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Sample records for essential rna-editing ligase

  1. Functional and structural insights revealed by molecular dynamics simulations of an essential RNA editing ligase in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Rommie E Amaro

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing ligase 1 (TbREL1 is required for the survival of both the insect and bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for the devastating tropical disease African sleeping sickness. The type of RNA editing that TbREL1 is involved in is unique to the trypanosomes, and no close human homolog is known to exist. In addition, the high-resolution crystal structure revealed several unique features of the active site, making this enzyme a promising target for structure-based drug design. In this work, two 20 ns atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations are employed to investigate the dynamics of TbREL1, both with and without the ATP substrate present. The flexibility of the active site, dynamics of conserved residues and crystallized water molecules, and the interactions between TbREL1 and the ATP substrate are investigated and discussed in the context of TbREL1's function. Differences in local and global motion upon ATP binding suggest that two peripheral loops, unique to the trypanosomes, may be involved in interdomain signaling events. Notably, a significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme's active site occurs during the apo simulations, opening an additional cavity adjacent to the ATP binding site that could be exploited in the development of effective inhibitors directed against this protozoan parasite. Finally, ensemble averaged electrostatics calculations over the MD simulations reveal a novel putative RNA binding site, a discovery that has previously eluded scientists. Ultimately, we use the insights gained through the MD simulations to make several predictions and recommendations, which we anticipate will help direct future experimental studies and structure-based drug discovery efforts against this vital enzyme.

  2. Multifunctional G-rich and RRM-containing domains of TbRGG2 perform separate yet essential functions in trypanosome RNA editing.

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    Foda, Bardees M; Downey, Kurtis M; Fisk, John C; Read, Laurie K

    2012-09-01

    Efficient editing of Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial RNAs involves the actions of multiple accessory factors. T. brucei RGG2 (TbRGG2) is an essential protein crucial for initiation and 3'-to-5' progression of editing. TbRGG2 comprises an N-terminal G-rich region containing GWG and RG repeats and a C-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM)-containing domain. Here, we perform in vitro and in vivo separation-of-function studies to interrogate the mechanism of TbRGG2 action in RNA editing. TbRGG2 preferentially binds preedited mRNA in vitro with high affinity attributable to its G-rich region. RNA-annealing and -melting activities are separable, carried out primarily by the G-rich and RRM domains, respectively. In vivo, the G-rich domain partially complements TbRGG2 knockdown, but the RRM domain is also required. Notably, TbRGG2's RNA-melting activity is dispensable for RNA editing in vivo. Interactions between TbRGG2 and MRB1 complex proteins are mediated by both G-rich and RRM-containing domains, depending on the binding partner. Overall, our results are consistent with a model in which the high-affinity RNA binding and RNA-annealing activities of the G-rich domain are essential for RNA editing in vivo. The RRM domain may have key functions involving interactions with the MRB1 complex and/or regulation of the activities of the G-rich domain.

  3. RNA editing machinery in plant organelles.

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    Yan, Junjie; Zhang, Qunxia; Yin, Ping

    2018-02-01

    RNA editing is a type of post-transcriptional modification that includes nucleotide insertion/deletion or conversion. Different categories of RNA editing have been widely observed in distinct RNAs from divergent organisms. In flowering plants, RNA editing usually alters cytidine to uridine in plastids and mitochondria, playing important roles in various plant developmental processes, including organelle biogenesis, adaptation to environmental changes, and signal transduction. Numerous studies have demonstrated that a number of factors are involved in plant RNA editing, such as pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, multiple organelle RNA editing factors (MORF, also known as RIP), organelle RNA recognition motif (ORRM) containing proteins, protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase 1 (PPO1) and organelle zinc finger 1 (OZ1). These factors play diverse roles in plant RNA editing due to their distinct characteristics. In this review, we discuss the functional roles of the individual editing factors and their associations in plant RNA editing.

  4. REDIdb: the RNA editing database.

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    Picardi, Ernesto; Regina, Teresa Maria Rosaria; Brennicke, Axel; Quagliariello, Carla

    2007-01-01

    The RNA Editing Database (REDIdb) is an interactive, web-based database created and designed with the aim to allocate RNA editing events such as substitutions, insertions and deletions occurring in a wide range of organisms. The database contains both fully and partially sequenced DNA molecules for which editing information is available either by experimental inspection (in vitro) or by computational detection (in silico). Each record of REDIdb is organized in a specific flat-file containing a description of the main characteristics of the entry, a feature table with the editing events and related details and a sequence zone with both the genomic sequence and the corresponding edited transcript. REDIdb is a relational database in which the browsing and identification of editing sites has been simplified by means of two facilities to either graphically display genomic or cDNA sequences or to show the corresponding alignment. In both cases, all editing sites are highlighted in colour and their relative positions are detailed by mousing over. New editing positions can be directly submitted to REDIdb after a user-specific registration to obtain authorized secure access. This first version of REDIdb database stores 9964 editing events and can be freely queried at http://biologia.unical.it/py_script/search.html.

  5. Site-specific photochemical RNA editing.

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    Fujimoto, Kenzo; Konishi-Hiratsuka, Kaoru; Sakamoto, Takashi; Yoshimura, Yoshinaga

    2010-10-28

    Photo-induced artificial RNA editing was demonstrated using photo-reactive oligonucleotides containing 3-cyanovinylcarbazole nucleoside. This non-enzymatic and sequence-specific methodology will make a major contribution to the elucidation of RNA functions including non-coding RNAs and to the development of drugs based on sequence-specific RNA editing.

  6. RNA editing in plants and its evolution.

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    Takenaka, Mizuki; Zehrmann, Anja; Verbitskiy, Daniil; Härtel, Barbara; Brennicke, Axel

    2013-01-01

    RNA editing alters the identity of nucleotides in RNA molecules such that the information for a protein in the mRNA differs from the prediction of the genomic DNA. In chloroplasts and mitochondria of flowering plants, RNA editing changes C nucleotides to U nucleotides; in ferns and mosses, it also changes U to C. The approximately 500 editing sites in mitochondria and 40 editing sites in plastids of flowering plants are individually addressed by specific proteins, genes for which are amplified in plant species with organellar RNA editing. These proteins contain repeat elements that bind to cognate RNA sequence motifs just 5' to the edited nucleotide. In flowering plants, the site-specific proteins interact selectively with individual members of a different, smaller family of proteins. These latter proteins may be connectors between the site-specific proteins and the as yet unknown deaminating enzymatic activity.

  7. Abundant RNA editing sites of chloroplast protein-coding genes in Ginkgo biloba and an evolutionary pattern analysis.

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    He, Peng; Huang, Sheng; Xiao, Guanghui; Zhang, Yuzhou; Yu, Jianing

    2016-12-01

    RNA editing is a posttranscriptional modification process that alters the RNA sequence so that it deviates from the genomic DNA sequence. RNA editing mainly occurs in chloroplasts and mitochondrial genomes, and the number of editing sites varies in terrestrial plants. Why and how RNA editing systems evolved remains a mystery. Ginkgo biloba is one of the oldest seed plants and has an important evolutionary position. Determining the patterns and distribution of RNA editing in the ancient plant provides insights into the evolutionary trend of RNA editing, and helping us to further understand their biological significance. In this paper, we investigated 82 protein-coding genes in the chloroplast genome of G. biloba and identified 255 editing sites, which is the highest number of RNA editing events reported in a gymnosperm. All of the editing sites were C-to-U conversions, which mainly occurred in the second codon position, biased towards to the U_A context, and caused an increase in hydrophobic amino acids. RNA editing could change the secondary structures of 82 proteins, and create or eliminate a transmembrane region in five proteins as determined in silico. Finally, the evolutionary tendencies of RNA editing in different gene groups were estimated using the nonsynonymous-synonymous substitution rate selection mode. The G. biloba chloroplast genome possesses the highest number of RNA editing events reported so far in a seed plant. Most of the RNA editing sites can restore amino acid conservation, increase hydrophobicity, and even influence protein structures. Similar purifying selections constitute the dominant evolutionary force at the editing sites of essential genes, such as the psa, some psb and pet groups, and a positive selection occurred in the editing sites of nonessential genes, such as most ndh and a few psb genes.

  8. A-to-I RNA editing: the "ADAR" side of human cancer.

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    Galeano, Federica; Tomaselli, Sara; Locatelli, Franco; Gallo, Angela

    2012-05-01

    Carcinogenesis is a complex, multi-stage process depending on both endogenous and exogenous factors. In the past years, DNA mutations provided important clues to the comprehension of the molecular pathways involved in numerous cancers. Recently, post-transcriptional modification events, such as RNA editing, are emerging as new players in several human diseases, including tumours. A-to-I RNA editing changes the nucleotide sequence of target RNAs, introducing A-to-I/G "mutations". Since ADAR enzymes catalyse this nucleotide conversion, their expression/activity is essential and finely regulated in normal cells. This review summarizes the available knowledge on A-to-I RNA editing in the cancer field, giving a new view on how ADARs may play a role in carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. ADAR RNA editing below the backbone.

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    Keegan, Liam; Khan, Anzer; Vukic, Dragana; O'Connell, Mary

    2017-09-01

    ADAR RNA editing enzymes ( a denosine d e a minases acting on R NA) that convert adenosine bases to inosines were first identified biochemically 30 years ago. Since then, studies on ADARs in genetic model organisms, and evolutionary comparisons between them, continue to reveal a surprising range of pleiotropic biological effects of ADARs. This review focuses on Drosophila melanogaster , which has a single Adar gene encoding a homolog of vertebrate ADAR2 that site-specifically edits hundreds of transcripts to change individual codons in ion channel subunits and membrane and cytoskeletal proteins. Drosophila ADAR is involved in the control of neuronal excitability and neurodegeneration and, intriguingly, in the control of neuronal plasticity and sleep. Drosophila ADAR also interacts strongly with RNA interference, a key antiviral defense mechanism in invertebrates. Recent crystal structures of human ADAR2 deaminase domain-RNA complexes help to interpret available information on Drosophila ADAR isoforms and on the evolution of ADARs from tRNA deaminase ADAT proteins. ADAR RNA editing is a paradigm for the now rapidly expanding range of RNA modifications in mRNAs and ncRNAs. Even with recent progress, much remains to be understood about these groundbreaking ADAR RNA modification systems. © 2017 Keegan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of differential RNA editing in epilepsy

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    Srivastava, Prashant Kumar; Bagnati, Marta; Delahaye-Duriez, Andree; Ko, Jeong-Hun; Rotival, Maxime; Langley, Sarah R.; Shkura, Kirill; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Danis, Bénédicte; van Eyll, Jonathan; Foerch, Patrik; Behmoaras, Jacques; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Petretto, Enrico; Johnson, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    The recoding of genetic information through RNA editing contributes to proteomic diversity, but the extent and significance of RNA editing in disease is poorly understood. In particular, few studies have investigated the relationship between RNA editing and disease at a genome-wide level. Here, we developed a framework for the genome-wide detection of RNA sites that are differentially edited in disease. Using RNA-sequencing data from 100 hippocampi from mice with epilepsy (pilocarpine–temporal lobe epilepsy model) and 100 healthy control hippocampi, we identified 256 RNA sites (overlapping with 87 genes) that were significantly differentially edited between epileptic cases and controls. The degree of differential RNA editing in epileptic mice correlated with frequency of seizures, and the set of genes differentially RNA-edited between case and control mice were enriched for functional terms highly relevant to epilepsy, including “neuron projection” and “seizures.” Genes with differential RNA editing were preferentially enriched for genes with a genetic association to epilepsy. Indeed, we found that they are significantly enriched for genes that harbor nonsynonymous de novo mutations in patients with epileptic encephalopathy and for common susceptibility variants associated with generalized epilepsy. These analyses reveal a functional convergence between genes that are differentially RNA-edited in acquired symptomatic epilepsy and those that contribute risk for genetic epilepsy. Taken together, our results suggest a potential role for RNA editing in the epileptic hippocampus in the occurrence and severity of epileptic seizures. PMID:28250018

  11. A Novel Computational Strategy to Identify A-to-I RNA Editing Sites by RNA-Seq Data: De Novo Detection in Human Spinal Cord Tissue

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    Picardi, Ernesto; Gallo, Angela; Galeano, Federica; Tomaselli, Sara; Pesole, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process occurring in a wide range of organisms. In human brain, the A-to-I RNA editing, in which individual adenosine (A) bases in pre-mRNA are modified to yield inosine (I), is the most frequent event. Modulating gene expression, RNA editing is essential for cellular homeostasis. Indeed, its deregulation has been linked to several neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. To date, many RNA editing sites have been identified by next generation sequencing technologies employing massive transcriptome sequencing together with whole genome or exome sequencing. While genome and transcriptome reads are not always available for single individuals, RNA-Seq data are widespread through public databases and represent a relevant source of yet unexplored RNA editing sites. In this context, we propose a simple computational strategy to identify genomic positions enriched in novel hypothetical RNA editing events by means of a new two-steps mapping procedure requiring only RNA-Seq data and no a priori knowledge of RNA editing characteristics and genomic reads. We assessed the suitability of our procedure by confirming A-to-I candidates using conventional Sanger sequencing and performing RNA-Seq as well as whole exome sequencing of human spinal cord tissue from a single individual. PMID:22957051

  12. REDIdb: an upgraded bioinformatics resource for organellar RNA editing sites.

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    Picardi, Ernesto; Regina, Teresa M R; Verbitskiy, Daniil; Brennicke, Axel; Quagliariello, Carla

    2011-03-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional molecular process whereby the information in a genetic message is modified from that in the corresponding DNA template by means of nucleotide substitutions, insertions and/or deletions. It occurs mostly in organelles by clade-specific diverse and unrelated biochemical mechanisms. RNA editing events have been annotated in primary databases as GenBank and at more sophisticated level in the specialized databases REDIdb, dbRES and EdRNA. At present, REDIdb is the only freely available database that focuses on the organellar RNA editing process and annotates each editing modification in its biological context. Here we present an updated and upgraded release of REDIdb with a web-interface refurbished with graphical and computational facilities that improve RNA editing investigations. Details of the REDIdb features and novelties are illustrated and compared to other RNA editing databases. REDIdb is freely queried at http://biologia.unical.it/py_script/REDIdb/. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of RNA editing in dynamic environments

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    Rocha, L. M. (Luis Mateus); Huang, C. F. (Chien-Feng)

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a computational methodology based on Genetic Algorithms with Genotype Editing (GAE) for investigating the role of RNA editing in dynamic environments. This model is constructed based on several genetic editing characteristics that are gleaned from the RNA editing system as observed in several organisms. We have previously expanded the traditional Genetic Algorithm (GA) with artificial editing mechanisms (Rocha, 1995, 1997), and studied the benefits of including straightforward Genotype Editing in GA for several machine learning problems (Huang and Rocha, 2003, 2004). We show that the incorporation of genotype editing provides a means for artificial agents with genetic descriptions to gain greater phenotypic plasticity. Artificial agents use genotype edition to their advantage by linking it to environmental context. The ability to link changes in the environment with editing parameters gives organisms an adaptive advantage as genotype expression can become contextually regulated. The study of this RNA editing model in changing environments has shed some light into the evolutionary implications of RNA editing. We expect that our methodology will both facilitate determining the evolutionary role of RNA editing in biology, and advance the current state of research in Evolutionary Computation and Artificial Life.

  14. RNA Editing and its Control in Hepatitis Delta Virus Replication

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    John L. Casey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The hepatitis delta virus genome is a small circular RNA, similar to viroids. Although HDV contains a gene, the protein produced (HDAg is encoded by less than half the genome and possesses no RNA polymerase activity. Because of this limited coding capacity, HDV relies heavily on host functions and on structural features of the viral RNA—very much like viroids. The virus’ use of host RNA editing activity to produce two functionally distinct forms of HDAg is a particularly good example of this reliance. This review covers the mechanisms and control of RNA editing in the HDV replication cycle.

  15. The E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of Trip12 is essential for mouse embryogenesis.

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    Masashi Kajiro

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is a post-translational protein modification that regulates many biological conditions. Trip12 is a HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates ARF and APP-BP1. However, the significance of Trip12 in vivo is largely unknown. Here we show that the ubiquitin ligase activity of Trip12 is indispensable for mouse embryogenesis. A homozygous mutation in Trip12 (Trip12(mt/mt that disrupts the ubiquitin ligase activity resulted in embryonic lethality in the middle stage of development. Trip12(mt/mt embryos exhibited growth arrest and increased expression of the negative cell cycle regulator p16. In contrast, Trip12(mt/mt ES cells were viable. They had decreased proliferation, but maintained both the undifferentiated state and the ability to differentiate. Trip12(mt/mt ES cells had increased levels of the BAF57 protein (a component of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex and altered gene expression patterns. These data suggest that Trip12 is involved in global gene expression and plays an important role in mouse development.

  16. Frequent chloroplast RNA editing in early-branching flowering plants: pilot studies on angiosperm-wide coexistence of editing sites and their nuclear specificity factors.

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    Hein, Anke; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker

    2016-01-25

    RNA editing by cytidine-to-uridine conversions is an essential step of RNA maturation in plant organelles. Some 30-50 sites of C-to-U RNA editing exist in chloroplasts of flowering plant models like Arabidopsis, rice or tobacco. We now predicted significantly more RNA editing in chloroplasts of early-branching angiosperm genera like Amborella, Calycanthus, Ceratophyllum, Chloranthus, Illicium, Liriodendron, Magnolia, Nuphar and Zingiber. Nuclear-encoded RNA-binding pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are key editing factors expected to coevolve with their cognate RNA editing sites in the organelles. With an extensive chloroplast transcriptome study we identified 138 sites of RNA editing in Amborella trichopoda, approximately the 3- to 4-fold of cp editing in Arabidopsis thaliana or Oryza sativa. Selected cDNA studies in the other early-branching flowering plant taxa furthermore reveal a high diversity of early angiosperm RNA editomes. Many of the now identified editing sites in Amborella have orthologues in ferns, lycophytes or hornworts. We investigated the evolution of CRR28 and RARE1, two known Arabidopsis RNA editing factors responsible for cp editing events ndhBeU467PL, ndhDeU878SL and accDeU794SL, respectively, all of which we now found conserved in Amborella. In a phylogenetically wide sampling of 65 angiosperm genomes we find evidence for only one single loss of CRR28 in chickpea but several independent losses of RARE1, perfectly congruent with the presence of their cognate editing sites in the respective cpDNAs. Chloroplast RNA editing is much more abundant in early-branching than in widely investigated model flowering plants. RNA editing specificity factors can be traced back for more than 120 million years of angiosperm evolution and show highly divergent patterns of evolutionary losses, matching the presence of their target editing events.

  17. The ubiquitin ligase HectH9 regulates transcriptional activation by Myc and is essential for tumor cell proliferation

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    Adhikary, Sovana; Marinoni, Federica; Hock, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The Myc oncoprotein forms a binary activating complex with its partner protein, Max, and a ternary repressive complex that, in addition to Max, contains the zinc finger protein Miz1. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase HectH9 ubiquitinates Myc in vivo and in vitro, forming a lysine 63-linked...... polyubiquitin chain. Miz1 inhibits this ubiquitination. HectH9-mediated ubiquitination of Myc is required for transactivation of multiple target genes, recruitment of the coactivator p300, and induction of cell proliferation by Myc. HectH9 is overexpressed in multiple human tumors and is essential...... for proliferation of a subset of tumor cells. Our results suggest that site-specific ubiquitination regulates the switch between an activating and a repressive state of the Myc protein, and they suggest a strategy to interfere with Myc function in vivo....

  18. Molecular Diversity through RNA Editing: A Balancing Act

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    Farajollahi, Sanaz; Maas, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deamination fuels the generation of RNA and protein diversity in eukaryotes, particularly in higher organisms. This includes the recoding of translated exons, widespread editing of retrotransposon-derived repeat elements and sequence modification of miRNA transcripts. Such changes can bring about specific amino acid substitutions, alternative splicing and changes in gene expression levels. Although the overall prevalence of A-to-I editing and its specific functional impact on many of the affected genes are not yet known, the importance of balancing RNA modification levels across time and space is becoming increasingly evident. In particular, transcriptome instabilities in form of too much or too little RNA editing activity, or misguided editing manifest in several human disease phenotypes which disrupt that balance. PMID:20395010

  19. Deficiency in RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 impairs regulated exocytosis.

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    Yang, Liu; Zhao, Liyun; Gan, Zhenji; He, Zixuan; Xu, Jingyue; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Xiaorui; Han, Weiping; Chen, Liangyi; Xu, Tao; Li, Wenjun; Liu, Yong

    2010-10-01

    Mammalian RNA editing catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) ADAR1 and ADAR2 plays pivotal roles in the brain through functional modifications of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels. We have demonstrated previously that RNA editing by ADAR2 is regulated metabolically in pancreatic β cells. To investigate the cellular functions of ADAR2 in professional secretory cells, we studied the effects of ADAR2 knockdown on regulated exocytosis. Selective knockdown of ADAR2 expression markedly impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the rat insulinoma INS-1 cells and primary pancreatic islets and significantly diminished KCl-stimulated secretion of exogenous human growth hormone or endogenous chromogranin B protein in the rat adrenal pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Notably, restored overexpression of catalytically active but not editing-deficient mutant ADAR2 could rescue the impairment in stimulated secretion from ADAR2 knockdown cells. Moreover, ADAR2 suppression significantly attenuated Ca(2+)-evoked membrane capacitance increases and appreciably reduced the number of membrane-docked insulin granules in INS-1 cells. Interestingly, the secretory defects resulting from ADAR2 deficiency were coupled to decreased expression of Munc18-1 and synaptotagmin-7, two key molecules in the regulation of vesicle exocytosis. Thus, these findings reveal an important aspect of ADAR2 actions in regulated exocytosis, implicating RNA editing in the control of cellular secretory machinery.

  20. An essential role of CBL and CBL-B ubiquitin ligases in mammary stem cell maintenance.

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    Mohapatra, Bhopal; Zutshi, Neha; An, Wei; Goetz, Benjamin; Arya, Priyanka; Bielecki, Timothy A; Mustaq, Insha; Storck, Matthew D; Meza, Jane L; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2017-03-15

    The ubiquitin ligases CBL and CBL-B are negative regulators of tyrosine kinase signaling with established roles in the immune system. However, their physiological roles in epithelial tissues are unknown. Here, we used MMTV-Cre-mediated Cbl gene deletion on a Cbl-b null background, as well as a tamoxifen-inducible mammary stem cell (MaSC)-specific Cbl and Cbl-b double knockout ( Cbl/Cbl-b DKO) using Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2, to demonstrate a mammary epithelial cell-autonomous requirement of CBL and CBL-B in the maintenance of MaSCs. Using a newly engineered tamoxifen-inducible Cbl and Cbl-b deletion model with a dual fluorescent reporter ( Cbl flox/flox ; Cbl-b flox/flox ; Rosa26-CreERT; mT/mG ), we show that Cbl/Cbl-b DKO in mammary organoids leads to hyperactivation of AKT-mTOR signaling with depletion of MaSCs. Chemical inhibition of AKT or mTOR rescued MaSCs from Cbl/Cbl-b DKO-induced depletion. Our studies reveal a novel, cell-autonomous requirement of CBL and CBL-B in epithelial stem cell maintenance during organ development and remodeling through modulation of mTOR signaling. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. ATP- and NAD+-dependent DNA ligases share an essential function in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii

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    Zhao, A.; Gray, F. C; MacNeill, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    DNA ligases join the ends of DNA molecules during replication, repair and recombination. ATP-dependent ligases are found predominantly in the eukarya and archaea whereas NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are found only in the eubacteria and in entomopoxviruses. Using the genetically tractable halophile....... volcanii also encodes an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase family member, LigN, the first such enzyme to be identified in the archaea, and present phylogenetic analysis indicating that the gene encoding this protein has been acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT) from eubacteria. As with LigA, we show that Lig...

  2. Altered A-to-I RNA editing in human embryogenesis.

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    Ronit Shtrichman

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional events play an important role in human development. The question arises as to whether Adenosine to Inosine RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase acting on RNA enzymes, differs in human embryogenesis and in adulthood. We tested the editing of various target genes in coding (FLNA, BLCAP, CYFIP2 and non-coding sequences at their Alu elements (BRCA1, CARD11, RBBP9, MDM4, FNACC, as well as the transcriptional levels of the ADAR1 enzymes. This analysis was performed on five fetal and adult human tissues: brain, heart, liver, kidney, and spleen, as well as on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, which represent the blastocyst stage in early human development. Our results show substantially greater editing activity for most adult tissue samples relative to fetal ones, in six of the eight genes tested. To test the effect of reduced A-to-I RNA editing activity in early human development we used human embryonic stem cells (hESCs as a model and tried to generate hESC clones that overexpress the ADAR1-p110 isoform. We were unable to achieve overexpression of ADAR1-p110 by either transfection or lentiviral infection, though we easily generated hESC clones that expressed the GFP transgene and overexpressed ADAR1-p110 in 293T cells and in primary human foreskin fibroblast (HFF cells. Moreover, in contrast to the expected overexpression of ADAR1-p110 protein following its introduction into hESCs, the expression levels of this protein decreased dramatically 24-48 hr post infection. Similar results were obtained when we tried to overexpress ADAR1-p110 in pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. This suggests that ADAR1 protein is substantially regulated in undifferentiated pluripotent hESCs. Overall, our data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing plays a critical role during early human development.

  3. Inherited variants affecting RNA editing may contribute to ovarian cancer susceptibility

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    Permuth, Jennifer B; Reid, Brett; Earp, Madalene

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing in mammals is a form of post-transcriptional modification in which adenosine is converted to inosine by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. Based on evidence of altered ADAR expression in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC), we hypothesized that single nucleo......, including rs1127313 (G/A), a SNP in the 3' untranslated region. In summary, germline variation involving RNA editing genes may influence EOC susceptibility, warranting further investigation of inherited and acquired alterations affecting RNA editing....

  4. Genes (including RNA editing information) - RMG | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

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    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us RMG Genes... (including RNA editing information) Data detail Data name Genes (including RNA edi... Site Policy | Contact Us Genes (including RNA editing information) - RMG | LSDB Archive ...

  5. Haploid genetic screens identify an essential role for PLP2 in the downregulation of novel plasma membrane targets by viral E3 ubiquitin ligases.

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    Richard T Timms

    Full Text Available The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gene products K3 and K5 are viral ubiquitin E3 ligases which downregulate MHC-I and additional cell surface immunoreceptors. To identify novel cellular genes required for K5 function we performed a forward genetic screen in near-haploid human KBM7 cells. The screen identified proteolipid protein 2 (PLP2, a MARVEL domain protein of unknown function, as essential for K5 activity. Genetic loss of PLP2 traps the viral ligase in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is unable to ubiquitinate and degrade its substrates. Subsequent analysis of the plasma membrane proteome of K5-expressing KBM7 cells in the presence and absence of PLP2 revealed a wide range of novel K5 targets, all of which required PLP2 for their K5-mediated downregulation. This work ascribes a critical function to PLP2 for viral ligase activity and underlines the power of non-lethal haploid genetic screens in human cells to identify the genes involved in pathogen manipulation of the host immune system.

  6. Abundant and selective RNA-editing events in the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum.

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    Zhu, Yingjie; Luo, Hongmei; Zhang, Xin; Song, Jingyuan; Sun, Chao; Ji, Aijia; Xu, Jiang; Chen, Shilin

    2014-04-01

    RNA editing is a widespread, post-transcriptional molecular phenomenon that diversifies hereditary information across various organisms. However, little is known about genome-scale RNA editing in fungi. In this study, we screened for fungal RNA editing sites at the genomic level in Ganoderma lucidum, a valuable medicinal fungus. On the basis of our pipeline that predicted the editing sites from genomic and transcriptomic data, a total of 8906 possible RNA-editing sites were identified within the G. lucidum genome, including the exon and intron sequences and the 5'-/3'-untranslated regions of 2991 genes and the intergenic regions. The major editing types included C-to-U, A-to-G, G-to-A, and U-to-C conversions. Four putative RNA-editing enzymes were identified, including three adenosine deaminases acting on transfer RNA and a deoxycytidylate deaminase. The genes containing RNA-editing sites were functionally classified by the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes enrichment and gene ontology analysis. The key functional groupings enriched for RNA-editing sites included laccase genes involved in lignin degradation, key enzymes involved in triterpenoid biosynthesis, and transcription factors. A total of 97 putative editing sites were randomly selected and validated by using PCR and Sanger sequencing. We presented an accurate and large-scale identification of RNA-editing events in G. lucidum, providing global and quantitative cataloging of RNA editing in the fungal genome. This study will shed light on the role of transcriptional plasticity in the growth and development of G. lucidum, as well as its adaptation to the environment and the regulation of valuable secondary metabolite pathways.

  7. Consistent levels of A-to-I RNA editing across individuals in coding sequences and non-conserved Alu repeats

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    Osenberg Sivan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I RNA-editing is an essential post-transcriptional mechanism that occurs in numerous sites in the human transcriptome, mainly within Alu repeats. It has been shown to have consistent levels of editing across individuals in a few targets in the human brain and altered in several human pathologies. However, the variability across human individuals of editing levels in other tissues has not been studied so far. Results Here, we analyzed 32 skin samples, looking at A-to-I editing level in three genes within coding sequences and in the Alu repeats of six different genes. We observed highly consistent editing levels across different individuals as well as across tissues, not only in coding targets but, surprisingly, also in the non evolutionary conserved Alu repeats. Conclusions Our findings suggest that A-to-I RNA-editing of Alu elements is a tightly regulated process and, as such, might have been recruited in the course of primate evolution for post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  8. The expression of apoB mRNA editing factors is not the sole determinant for the induction of editing in differentiating Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Chad A. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Rochester School of Medicine, 601 Elmwood Ave., Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Smith, Harold C., E-mail: harold.smith@rochester.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Rochester School of Medicine, 601 Elmwood Ave., Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA is edited at cytidine 6666 in the enterocytes lining the small intestine of all mammals; converting a CAA codon to a UAA stop codon. The conversion is {approx}80% efficient in this tissue and leads to the expression of the truncated protein, ApoB48, essential for secretion of dietary lipid as chylomicrons. Caco-2 cell raft cultures have been used as an in vitro model for the induction of editing activity during human small intestinal cell differentiation. This induction of apoB mRNA editing has been ascribed to the expression of APOBEC-1. In agreement our data demonstrated differentiation-dependent induction of expression of the editing enzyme APOBEC-1 and in addition we show alternative splicing of the essential auxiliary factor ACF. However, transfection of these editing factors in undifferentiated proliferating Caco-2 cells was not sufficient to induce robust apoB mRNA editing activity. Only differentiation of Caco-2 cells could induce more physiological like levels of apoB mRNA editing. The data suggested that additional regulatory mechanism(s) were induced by differentiation that controlled the functional activity of editing factors.

  9. Does RNA editing compensate for Alu invasion of the primate genome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanon, Erez Y; Eisenberg, Eli

    2015-02-01

    One of the distinctive features of the primate genome is the Alu element, a repetitive short interspersed element, over a million highly similar copies of which account for >10% of the genome. A direct consequence of this feature is that primates' transcriptome is highly enriched in long stable dsRNA structures, the preferred target of adenosine deaminases acting on RNAs (ADARs), which are the enzymes catalyzing A-to-I RNA editing. Indeed, A-to-I editing by ADARs is extremely abundant in primates: over a hundred million editing sites exist in their genomes. However, there are few essential editing sites conserved across mammals that have maintained their editing level despite the radical change in ADAR target landscape. Here, we review and discuss the cost of having an unusual amount of dsRNA and editing in the transcriptome, as well as the opportunities it presents, which might have contributed to the accelerated evolution of the primates. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Glycine receptors caught between genome and proteome - functional implications of RNA editing and splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Legendre

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Information processing in the brain requires a delicate balance between excitation and inhibition. Glycine receptors (GlyR are involved in inhibitory mechanisms mainly at a synaptic level, but potential novel roles for these receptors recently emerged due to the discovery of posttranscriptional processing. GLR transcripts are edited through enzymatic modification of a single nucleotide leading to amino acid substitution within the neurotransmitter binding domain. RNA editing produces gain-of-function receptors well suited for generation and maintenance of tonic inhibition of neuronal excitability. As neuronal activity deprivation in early stages of development or in epileptic tissue is detrimental to neurons and because RNA editing of GlyR is up-regulated in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with a severe course of disease a pathophysiological role of these receptors emerges. This review contains a state-of-the-art discussion of (pathophysiological implications of GlyR RNA editing.

  11. TbRGG2 facilitates kinetoplastid RNA editing initiation and progression past intrinsic pause sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Michelle L; Presnyak, Vladimir; Fisk, John C; Foda, Bardees M; Read, Laurie K

    2010-11-01

    TbRGG2 is an essential kinetoplastid RNA editing accessory factor that acts specifically on pan-edited RNAs. To understand the mechanism of TbRGG2 action, we undertook an in-depth analysis of edited RNA populations in TbRGG2 knockdown cells and an in vitro examination of the biochemical activities of the protein. We demonstrate that TbRGG2 down-regulation more severely impacts editing at the 5' ends of pan-edited RNAs than at their 3' ends. The initiation of editing is reduced to some extent in TbRGG2 knockdown cells. In addition, TbRGG2 plays a post-initiation role as editing becomes stalled in TbRGG2-depleted cells, resulting in an overall decrease in the 3' to 5' progression of editing. Detailed analyses of edited RNAs from wild-type and TbRGG2-depleted cells reveal that TbRGG2 facilitates progression of editing past intrinsic pause sites that often correspond to the 3' ends of cognate guide RNAs (gRNAs). In addition, noncanonically edited junction regions are either absent or significantly shortened in TbRGG2-depleted cells, consistent with impaired gRNA transitions. Sequence analysis further suggests that TbRGG2 facilitates complete utilization of certain gRNAs. In vitro RNA annealing and in vivo RNA unwinding assays demonstrate that TbRGG2 can modulate RNA-RNA interactions. Collectively, these data are consistent with a model in which TbRGG2 facilitates initiation and 3' to 5' progression of editing through its ability to affect gRNA utilization, both during the transition between specific gRNAs and during usage of certain gRNAs.

  12. Comprehensive analysis of RNA-Seq data reveals extensive RNA editing in a human transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Zhiyu; Cheng, Yanbing; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional event that recodes hereditary information. Here we describe a comprehensive profile of the RNA editome of a male Han Chinese individual based on analysis of ∼767 million sequencing reads from poly(A)(+), poly(A)(-) and small RNA samples. We developed...

  13. Unveiling Chloroplast RNA Editing Events Using Next Generation Small RNA Sequencing Data

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    Nureyev F. Rodrigues

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Organellar RNA editing involves the modification of nucleotide sequences to maintain conserved protein functions, mainly by reverting non-neutral codon mutations. The loss of plastid editing events, resulting from mutations in RNA editing factors or through stress interference, leads to developmental, physiological and photosynthetic alterations. Recently, next generation sequencing technology has generated the massive discovery of sRNA sequences and expanded the number of sRNA data. Here, we present a method to screen chloroplast RNA editing using public sRNA libraries from Arabidopsis, soybean and rice. We mapped the sRNAs against the nuclear, mitochondrial and plastid genomes to confirm predicted cytosine to uracil (C-to-U editing events and identify new editing sites in plastids. Among the predicted editing sites, 40.57, 34.78, and 25.31% were confirmed using sRNAs from Arabidopsis, soybean and rice, respectively. SNP analysis revealed 58.2, 43.9, and 37.5% new C-to-U changes in the respective species and identified known and new putative adenosine to inosine (A-to-I RNA editing in tRNAs. The present method and data reveal the potential of sRNA as a reliable source to identify new and confirm known editing sites.

  14. Integrity of the core mitochondrial RNA-binding complex 1/nis vital for trypanosome RNA editing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huang, Zhenqiu; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Křížová, A.; Kafková, L.; Read, L. K.; Lukeš, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 12 (2015), s. 2088-2102 ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21974S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 289007 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : RNA editing * mitochondrion * trypanosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.344, year: 2015

  15. The Genomic Landscape and Clinical Relevance of A-to-I RNA Editing in Human Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a widespread post-transcriptional mechanism, but its genomic landscape and clinical relevance in cancer have not been investigated systematically. We characterized the global A-to-I RNA editing profiles of 6,236 patient samples of 17 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas and revealed a striking diversity of altered RNA-editing patterns in tumors relative to normal tissues. We identified an appreciable number of clinically relevant editing events, many of which are in noncoding regions.

  16. RNA editing in Drosophila melanogaster: new targets and functionalconsequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2006-09-05

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine in primary mRNA transcripts. These re-coding events affect coding potential, splice-sites, and stability of mature mRNAs. ADAR is an essential gene and studies in mouse, C. elegans, and Drosophila suggest its primary function is to modify adult behavior by altering signaling components in the nervous system. By comparing the sequence of isogenic cDNAs to genomic DNA, we have identified and experimentally verified 27 new targets of Drosophila ADAR. Our analyses lead us to identify new classes of genes whose transcripts are targets of ADAR including components of the actin cytoskeleton, and genes involved in ion homeostasis and signal transduction. Our results indicate that editing in Drosophila increases the diversity of the proteome, and does so in a manner that has direct functional consequences on protein function.

  17. Condition-specific RNA editing in the coral symbiont Symbiodinium microadriaticum

    KAUST Repository

    Liew, Yi Jin

    2017-03-01

    RNA editing is a rare post-transcriptional event that provides cells with an additional level of gene expression regulation. It has been implicated in various processes including adaptation, viral defence and RNA interference; however, its potential role as a mechanism in acclimatization has just recently been recognised. Here, we show that RNA editing occurs in 1.6% of all nuclear-encoded genes of Symbiodinium microadriaticum, a dinoflagellate symbiont of reef-building corals. All base-substitution edit types were present, and statistically significant motifs were associated with three edit types. Strikingly, a subset of genes exhibited condition-specific editing patterns in response to different stressors that resulted in significant increases of non-synonymous changes. We posit that this previously unrecognised mechanism extends this organism’s capability to respond to stress beyond what is encoded by the genome. This in turn may provide further acclimatization capacity to these organisms, and by extension, their coral hosts.

  18. Elevated RNA Editing Activity Is a Major Contributor to Transcriptomic Diversity in Tumors

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    Nurit Paz-Yaacov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Genomic mutations in key genes are known to drive tumorigenesis and have been the focus of much attention in recent years. However, genetic content also may change farther downstream. RNA editing alters the mRNA sequence from its genomic blueprint in a dynamic and flexible way. A few isolated cases of editing alterations in cancer have been reported previously. Here, we provide a transcriptome-wide characterization of RNA editing across hundreds of cancer samples from multiple cancer tissues, and we show that A-to-I editing and the enzymes mediating this modification are significantly altered, usually elevated, in most cancer types. Increased editing activity is found to be associated with patient survival. As is the case with somatic mutations in DNA, most of these newly introduced RNA mutations are likely passengers, but a few may serve as drivers that may be novel candidates for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

  19. Genetic Determinants of RNA Editing Levels of ADAR Targets in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerbol Z. Kurmangaliyev

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing usually affects only a fraction of expressed transcripts and there is a vast amount of variation in editing levels of ADAR (adenosine deaminase, RNA-specific targets. Here we explore natural genetic variation affecting editing levels of particular sites in 81 natural strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The analysis of associations between editing levels and single-nucleotide polymorphisms allows us to map putative cis-regulatory regions affecting editing of 16 A-to-I editing sites (cis-RNA editing quantitative trait loci or cis-edQTLs, P < 10−8. The observed changes in editing levels are validated by independent molecular technique. All identified regulatory variants are located in close proximity of modulated editing sites. Moreover, colocalized editing sites are often regulated by same loci. Similar to expression and splicing QTL studies, the characterization of edQTLs will greatly expand our understanding of cis-regulatory evolution of gene expression.

  20. Alternative splicing and extensive RNA editing of human TPH2 transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Grohmann

    Full Text Available Brain serotonin (5-HT neurotransmission plays a key role in the regulation of mood and has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of 5-HT. Recently, we discovered a second TPH isoform (TPH2 in vertebrates, including man, which is predominantly expressed in brain, while the previously known TPH isoform (TPH1 is primarly a non-neuronal enzyme. Overwhelming evidence now points to TPH2 as a candidate gene for 5-HT-related psychiatric disorders. To assess the role of TPH2 gene variability in the etiology of psychiatric diseases we performed cDNA sequence analysis of TPH2 transcripts from human post mortem amygdala samples obtained from individuals with psychiatric disorders (drug abuse, schizophrenia, suicide and controls. Here we show that TPH2 exists in two alternatively spliced variants in the coding region, denoted TPH2a and TPH2b. Moreover, we found evidence that the pre-mRNAs of both splice variants are dynamically RNA-edited in a mutually exclusive manner. Kinetic studies with cell lines expressing recombinant TPH2 variants revealed a higher activity of the novel TPH2B protein compared with the previously known TPH2A, whereas RNA editing was shown to inhibit the enzymatic activity of both TPH2 splice variants. Therefore, our results strongly suggest a complex fine-tuning of central nervous system 5-HT biosynthesis by TPH2 alternative splicing and RNA editing. Finally, we present molecular and large-scale linkage data evidencing that deregulated alternative splicing and RNA editing is involved in the etiology of psychiatric diseases, such as suicidal behaviour.

  1. Dual core processing: MRB1 is an emerging kinetoplast RNA editing complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hashimi, Hassan; Zimmer, S.L.; Ammerman, M. L.; Read, L. K.; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2013), s. 91-99 ISSN 1471-4922 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : kinetoplastida * trypanosome * RNA editing * protein complexes * RECC * MRB1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.217, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1471492212001985

  2. Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1, a gene involved in X-linked intellectual disability, undergoes RNA editing and alternative splicing during human brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Barresi

    Full Text Available Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1 encodes for a Rho-GTPase-activating protein, important for dendritic morphogenesis and synaptic function. Mutations in this gene have been identified in patients with X-linked intellectual disability associated with cerebellar hypoplasia. ADAR enzymes are responsible for A-to-I RNA editing, an essential post-transcriptional RNA modification contributing to transcriptome and proteome diversification. Specifically, ADAR2 activity is essential for brain development and function. Herein, we show that the OPHN1 transcript undergoes post-transcriptional modifications such as A-to-I RNA editing and alternative splicing in human brain and other tissues. We found that OPHN1 editing is detectable already at the 18th week of gestation in human brain with a boost of editing at weeks 20 to 33, concomitantly with OPHN1 expression increase and the appearance of a novel OPHN1 splicing isoform. Our results demonstrate that multiple post-transcriptional events occur on OPHN1, a gene playing an important role in brain function and development.

  3. Paramyxovirus RNA synthesis, mRNA editing, and genome hexamer phase: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolakofsky, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The recent flurry of high resolution structures of Negative Strand RNA Virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerases has rekindled interest in the manner in which these polymerases, and in particular those of the nonsegmented viruses, recognize the RNA sequences that control mRNA synthesis and genome replication. In the light of these polymerase structures, we re-examine some unusual aspects of the Paramyxoviridae, namely bipartite replication promoters and mRNA editing, and the manner in which these properties are governed by genome hexamer phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. TMEM129 is a Derlin-1 associated ERAD E3 ligase essential for virus-induced degradation of MHC-I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Boomen, Dick J H; Timms, Richard T; Grice, Guinevere L

    2014-01-01

    The US11 gene product of human cytomegalovirus promotes viral immune evasion by hijacking the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. US11 initiates dislocation of newly translocated MHC I from the ER to the cytosol for proteasome-mediated degradation. Despite the critical......, and subsequent degradation of US11-associated MHC-I. US11 engages two degradation pathways: a Derlin-1/TMEM129-dependent pathway required for MHC-I degradation and a SEL1L/HRD1-dependent pathway required for "free" US11 degradation. Our data show that TMEM129 is a novel ERAD E3 ligase and the central component......-mediated MHC-I degradation and acts as a novel ER resident E3 ubiquitin ligase. TMEM129 contains an unusual cysteine-only RING with intrinsic E3 ligase activity and is recruited to US11 via Derlin-1. Together with its E2 conjugase Ube2J2, TMEM129 is responsible for the ubiquitination, dislocation...

  5. Genetic Determinants of RNA Editing Levels of ADAR Targets in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmangaliyev, Yerbol Z; Ali, Sammi; Nuzhdin, Sergey V

    2015-12-12

    RNA editing usually affects only a fraction of expressed transcripts and there is a vast amount of variation in editing levels of ADAR (adenosine deaminase, RNA-specific) targets. Here we explore natural genetic variation affecting editing levels of particular sites in 81 natural strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The analysis of associations between editing levels and single-nucleotide polymorphisms allows us to map putative cis-regulatory regions affecting editing of 16 A-to-I editing sites (cis-RNA editing quantitative trait loci or cis-edQTLs, P < 10(-8)). The observed changes in editing levels are validated by independent molecular technique. All identified regulatory variants are located in close proximity of modulated editing sites. Moreover, colocalized editing sites are often regulated by same loci. Similar to expression and splicing QTL studies, the characterization of edQTLs will greatly expand our understanding of cis-regulatory evolution of gene expression. Copyright © 2016 Kurmangaliyev et al.

  6. Mitochondrial Genome Evolution and a Novel RNA Editing System in Deep-Branching Heteroloboseids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiwon; Harding, Tommy; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Simpson, Alastair G B; Roger, Andrew J

    2017-05-01

    Discoba (Excavata) is an evolutionarily important group of eukaryotes that includes Jakobida, with the most bacterial-like mitochondrial genomes known, and Euglenozoa, many of which have extensively fragmented mitochondrial genomes. However, little is known about the mitochondrial genomes of Heterolobosea, the third main group of Discoba. Here, we studied two heteroloboseids-an undescribed amoeba "BB2" and Pharyngomonas kirbyi. Phylogenomic analysis revealed that they form a clade that is a sister group to all other Heterolobosea. We characterized the mitochondrial genomes of BB2 and P. kirbyi, which encoded 44 and 48 putative protein-coding genes respectively. Their gene contents were similar to that of Naegleria. In BB2, mitochondrially encoded RNAs were heavily edited, with ∼500 mononucleotide insertion events, mostly guanosines. These insertions always have the same identity as an adjacent nucleotide. Editing occurs in all ribosomal RNAs and protein-coding transcripts except one, and half of the transfer RNAs. Analysis of Illumina deep-sequencing data suggested that this RNA editing is very accurate and efficient, and most likely co-transcriptional. The dissimilarity of this editing process to other RNA editing phenomena in discobids, as well as its apparent absence in P. kirbyi, suggest that this remarkably extensive system of insertional editing evolved independently in the BB2 lineage, after its divergence from the P. kirbyi lineage. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Regulation of gene expression and RNA editing in Drosophila adapting to divergent microclimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablonovitch, Arielle L; Fu, Jeremy; Li, Kexin; Mahato, Simpla; Kang, Lin; Rashkovetsky, Eugenia; Korol, Abraham B; Tang, Hua; Michalak, Pawel; Zelhof, Andrew C; Nevo, Eviatar; Li, Jin Billy

    2017-11-17

    Determining the mechanisms by which a species adapts to its environment is a key endeavor in the study of evolution. In particular, relatively little is known about how transcriptional processes are fine-tuned to adjust to different environmental conditions. Here we study Drosophila melanogaster from 'Evolution Canyon' in Israel, which consists of two opposing slopes with divergent microclimates. We identify several hundred differentially expressed genes and dozens of differentially edited sites between flies from each slope, correlate these changes with genetic differences, and use CRISPR mutagenesis to validate that an intronic SNP in prominin regulates its editing levels. We also demonstrate that while temperature affects editing levels at more sites than genetic differences, genetically regulated sites tend to be less affected by temperature. This work shows the extent to which gene expression and RNA editing differ between flies from different microclimates, and provides insights into the regulation responsible for these differences.

  8. Regulation of Na+/K+ ATPase transport velocity by RNA editing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Colina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Because firing properties and metabolic rates vary widely, neurons require different transport rates from their Na(+/K(+ pumps in order to maintain ion homeostasis. In this study we show that Na(+/K(+ pump activity is tightly regulated by a novel process, RNA editing. Three codons within the squid Na(+/K(+ ATPase gene can be recoded at the RNA level, and the efficiency of conversion for each varies dramatically, and independently, between tissues. At one site, a highly conserved isoleucine in the seventh transmembrane span can be converted to a valine, a change that shifts the pump's intrinsic voltage dependence. Mechanistically, the removal of a single methyl group specifically targets the process of Na(+ release to the extracellular solution, causing a higher turnover rate at the resting membrane potential.

  9. Native mitochondrial RNA-binding complexes in kinetoplastid RNA editing differ in guide RNA composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madina, Bhaskara R; Kumar, Vikas; Metz, Richard; Mooers, Blaine H M; Bundschuh, Ralf; Cruz-Reyes, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial mRNAs in kinetoplastids require extensive U-insertion/deletion editing that progresses 3'-to-5' in small blocks, each directed by a guide RNA (gRNA), and exhibits substrate and developmental stage-specificity by unsolved mechanisms. Here, we address compositionally related factors, collectively known as the mitochondrial RNA-binding complex 1 (MRB1) or gRNA-binding complex (GRBC), that contain gRNA, have a dynamic protein composition, and transiently associate with several mitochondrial factors including RNA editing core complexes (RECC) and ribosomes. MRB1 controls editing by still unknown mechanisms. We performed the first next-generation sequencing study of native subcomplexes of MRB1, immunoselected via either RNA helicase 2 (REH2), that binds RNA and associates with unwinding activity, or MRB3010, that affects an early editing step. The particles contain either REH2 or MRB3010 but share the core GAP1 and other proteins detected by RNA photo-crosslinking. Analyses of the first editing blocks indicate an enrichment of several initiating gRNAs in the MRB3010-purified complex. Our data also indicate fast evolution of mRNA 3' ends and strain-specific alternative 3' editing within 3' UTR or C-terminal protein-coding sequence that could impact mitochondrial physiology. Moreover, we found robust specific copurification of edited and pre-edited mRNAs, suggesting that these particles may bind both mRNA and gRNA editing substrates. We propose that multiple subcomplexes of MRB1 with different RNA/protein composition serve as a scaffold for specific assembly of editing substrates and RECC, thereby forming the editing holoenzyme. The MRB3010-subcomplex may promote early editing through its preferential recruitment of initiating gRNAs. © 2014 Madina et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Reciprocal regulation of A-to-I RNA editing and the vertebrate nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Charles Penn

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The fine control of molecules mediating communication in the nervous system is key to adjusting neuronal responsiveness during development and in maintaining the stability of established networks in the face of altered sensory input. To prevent culmination of pathological recurrent network excitation or debilitating periods of quiescence, adaptive alterations occur in the signalling molecules and ion channels that control membrane excitability and synaptic transmission. However, rather than encoding (and thus ‘hardwiring’ modified gene copies, the nervous systems of metazoa have opted for expanding on post-transcriptional pre-mRNA splicing by altering key encoded amino acids using a conserved mechanism of A-to-I RNA editing: the enzymatic deamination of adenosine resulting in a change in the nucleotide to inosine. Inosine exhibits similar base-pairing properties to guanosine with respect to tRNA codon recognition, replication by polymerases and RNA secondary structure forming capacity. In addition to recoding within the open reading frame, adenosine deamination also occurs with high frequency throughout the non-coding transcriptome, where it affects multiple aspects of RNA metabolism and gene expression. We will describe here the recoding function of key RNA editing targets in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS and their potential to be regulated. We will then discuss how interactions of A-to-I editing with gene expression and alternative splicing could play a wider role in regulating the neuronal transcriptome. Finally, we will highlight the increasing complexity of this multifaceted control hub by summarising new findings from high-throughput studies.

  11. RED: A Java-MySQL Software for Identifying and Visualizing RNA Editing Sites Using Rule-Based and Statistical Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongmei; Li, Xing; Wu, Di; Pan, Qi; Ji, Yuefeng; Ren, Hong; Ding, Keyue

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing is one of the post- or co-transcriptional processes that can lead to amino acid substitutions in protein sequences, alternative pre-mRNA splicing, and changes in gene expression levels. Although several methods have been suggested to identify RNA editing sites, there remains challenges to be addressed in distinguishing true RNA editing sites from its counterparts on genome and technical artifacts. In addition, there lacks a software framework to identify and visualize potential RNA editing sites. Here, we presented a software - 'RED' (RNA Editing sites Detector) - for the identification of RNA editing sites by integrating multiple rule-based and statistical filters. The potential RNA editing sites can be visualized at the genome and the site levels by graphical user interface (GUI). To improve performance, we used MySQL database management system (DBMS) for high-throughput data storage and query. We demonstrated the validity and utility of RED by identifying the presence and absence of C→U RNA-editing sites experimentally validated, in comparison with REDItools, a command line tool to perform high-throughput investigation of RNA editing. In an analysis of a sample data-set with 28 experimentally validated C→U RNA editing sites, RED had sensitivity and specificity of 0.64 and 0.5. In comparison, REDItools had a better sensitivity (0.75) but similar specificity (0.5). RED is an easy-to-use, platform-independent Java-based software, and can be applied to RNA-seq data without or with DNA sequencing data. The package is freely available under the GPLv3 license at http://github.com/REDetector/RED or https://sourceforge.net/projects/redetector.

  12. C-to-U editing and site-directed RNA editing for the correction of genetic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Luyen Thi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2017-07-24

    Cytidine to uridine (C-to-U) editing is one type of substitutional RNA editing. It occurs in both mammals and plants. The molecular mechanism of C-to-U editing involves the hydrolytic deamination of a cytosine to a uracil base. C-to-U editing is mediated by RNA-specific cytidine deaminases and several complementation factors, which have not been completely identified. Here, we review recent findings related to the regulation and enzymatic basis of C-to-U RNA editing. More importantly, when C-to-U editing occurs in coding regions, it has the power to reprogram genetic information on the RNA level, therefore it has great potential for applications in transcript repair (diseases related to thymidine to cytidine (T>C) or adenosine to guanosine (A>G) point mutations). If it is possible to manipulate or mimic C-to-U editing, T>C or A>G genetic mutation-related diseases could be treated. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic site-directed RNA editing are two different approaches for mimicking C-to-U editing. For enzymatic site-directed RNA editing, C-to-U editing has not yet been successfully performed, and in theory, adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) editing involves the same strategy as C-to-U editing. Therefore, in this review, for applications in transcript repair, we will provide a detailed overview of enzymatic site-directed RNA editing, with a focus on A-to-I editing and non-enzymatic site-directed C-to-U editing.

  13. KREX2 is not essential for either procyclic or bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Carnes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei require RNA editing for maturation and translation. The edited RNAs primarily encode proteins of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These parasites undergo extensive changes in energy metabolism between the insect and bloodstream stages which are mirrored by alterations in RNA editing. Two U-specific exonucleases, KREX1 and KREX2, are both present in protein complexes (editosomes that catalyze RNA editing but the relative roles of each protein are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The requirement for KREX2 for RNA editing in vivo was assessed in both procyclic (insect and bloodstream form parasites by methods that use homologous recombination for gene elimination. These studies resulted in null mutant cells in which both alleles were eliminated. The viability of these cells demonstrates that KREX2 is not essential in either life cycle stage, despite certain defects in RNA editing in vivo. Furthermore, editosomes isolated from KREX2 null cells require KREX1 for in vitro U-specific exonuclease activity. CONCLUSIONS: KREX2 is a U-specific exonuclease that is dispensable for RNA editing in vivo in T. brucei BFs and PFs. This result suggests that the U deletion activity, which is required for RNA editing, is primarily mediated in vivo by KREX1 which is normally found associated with only one type of editosome. The retention of the KREX2 gene implies a non-essential role or a role that is essential in other life cycle stages or conditions.

  14. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated noncoding RNA editing in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Meng, Xiaodan; Pan, Jinchang; Jiang, Nan; Zhou, Chengwei; Wu, Zhenhua; Gong, Zhaohui

    2018-01-02

    Cancer is characterized by multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations, including a higher prevalence of mutations of oncogenes and/or tumor suppressors. Mounting evidences have shown that noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are involved in the epigenetic regulation of cancer genes and their associated pathways. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated nuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system, a revolutionary genome-editing technology, has shed light on ncRNA-based cancer therapy. Here, we briefly introduce the classifications and mechanisms of CRISPR/Cas9 system. Importantly, we mainly focused on the applications of CRISPR/Cas9 system as a molecular tool for ncRNA (microRNA, long noncoding RNA and circular RNA, etc.) editing in human cancers, and the novel techniques that are based on CRISPR/Cas9 system. Additionally, the off-target effects and the corresponding solutions as well as the challenges toward CRISPR/Cas9 were also evaluated and discussed. Long- and short-ncRNAs have been employed as targets in precision oncology, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated ncRNA editing may provide an excellent way to cure cancer.

  15. The assembly of F1FO-ATP synthase is disrupted upon interference of RNA editing in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hashimi, Hassan; Benkovičová, V.; Čermáková, P.; Lai, De Hua; Horváth, A.; Lukeš, Julius

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2010), s. 45-54 ISSN 0020-7519 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/06/1558; GA AV ČR IAA500960705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : RNA editing * ATP synthase * mitochondrion * Trypanosoma * respiratory complex * membrane potential Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.822, year: 2010

  16. Loss of matK RNA editing in seed plant chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Uwe G

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA editing in chloroplasts of angiosperms proceeds by C-to-U conversions at specific sites. Nuclear-encoded factors are required for the recognition of cis-elements located immediately upstream of editing sites. The ensemble of editing sites in a chloroplast genome differs widely between species, and editing sites are thought to evolve rapidly. However, large-scale analyses of the evolution of individual editing sites have not yet been undertaken. Results Here, we analyzed the evolution of two chloroplast editing sites, matK-2 and matK-3, for which DNA sequences from thousands of angiosperm species are available. Both sites are found in most major taxa, including deep-branching families such as the nymphaeaceae. However, 36 isolated taxa scattered across the entire tree lack a C at one of the two matK editing sites. Tests of several exemplary species from this in silico analysis of matK processing unexpectedly revealed that one of the two sites remain unedited in almost half of all species examined. A comparison of sequences between editors and non-editors showed that specific nucleotides co-evolve with the C at the matK editing sites, suggesting that these nucleotides are critical for editing-site recognition. Conclusion (i Both matK editing sites were present in the common ancestor of all angiosperms and have been independently lost multiple times during angiosperm evolution. (ii The editing activities corresponding to matK-2 and matK-3 are unstable. (iii A small number of third-codon positions in the vicinity of editing sites are selectively constrained independent of the presence of the editing site, most likely because of interacting RNA-binding proteins.

  17. Loss of matK RNA editing in seed plant chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillich, Michael; Le Sy, Vinh; Schulerowitz, Katrin; von Haeseler, Arndt; Maier, Uwe G; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background RNA editing in chloroplasts of angiosperms proceeds by C-to-U conversions at specific sites. Nuclear-encoded factors are required for the recognition of cis-elements located immediately upstream of editing sites. The ensemble of editing sites in a chloroplast genome differs widely between species, and editing sites are thought to evolve rapidly. However, large-scale analyses of the evolution of individual editing sites have not yet been undertaken. Results Here, we analyzed the evolution of two chloroplast editing sites, matK-2 and matK-3, for which DNA sequences from thousands of angiosperm species are available. Both sites are found in most major taxa, including deep-branching families such as the nymphaeaceae. However, 36 isolated taxa scattered across the entire tree lack a C at one of the two matK editing sites. Tests of several exemplary species from this in silico analysis of matK processing unexpectedly revealed that one of the two sites remain unedited in almost half of all species examined. A comparison of sequences between editors and non-editors showed that specific nucleotides co-evolve with the C at the matK editing sites, suggesting that these nucleotides are critical for editing-site recognition. Conclusion (i) Both matK editing sites were present in the common ancestor of all angiosperms and have been independently lost multiple times during angiosperm evolution. (ii) The editing activities corresponding to matK-2 and matK-3 are unstable. (iii) A small number of third-codon positions in the vicinity of editing sites are selectively constrained independent of the presence of the editing site, most likely because of interacting RNA-binding proteins. PMID:19678945

  18. RNA Editing Genes Associated with Extreme Old Age in Humans and with Lifespan in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puca, Annibale; Solovieff, Nadia; Kojima, Toshio; Wang, Meng C.; Melista, Efthymia; Meltzer, Micah; Fischer, Sylvia E. J.; Andersen, Stacy; Hartley, Stephen H.; Sedgewick, Amanda; Arai, Yasumichi; Bergman, Aviv; Barzilai, Nir; Terry, Dellara F.; Riva, Alberto; Anselmi, Chiara Viviani; Malovini, Alberto; Kitamoto, Aya; Sawabe, Motoji; Arai, Tomio; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Steinberg, Martin H.; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Atzmon, Gil; Ruvkun, Gary; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Perls, Thomas T.

    2009-01-01

    Background The strong familiality of living to extreme ages suggests that human longevity is genetically regulated. The majority of genes found thus far to be associated with longevity primarily function in lipoprotein metabolism and insulin/IGF-1 signaling. There are likely many more genetic modifiers of human longevity that remain to be discovered. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we first show that 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the RNA editing genes ADARB1 and ADARB2 are associated with extreme old age in a U.S. based study of centenarians, the New England Centenarian Study. We describe replications of these findings in three independently conducted centenarian studies with different genetic backgrounds (Italian, Ashkenazi Jewish and Japanese) that collectively support an association of ADARB1 and ADARB2 with longevity. Some SNPs in ADARB2 replicate consistently in the four populations and suggest a strong effect that is independent of the different genetic backgrounds and environments. To evaluate the functional association of these genes with lifespan, we demonstrate that inactivation of their orthologues adr-1 and adr-2 in C. elegans reduces median survival by 50%. We further demonstrate that inactivation of the argonaute gene, rde-1, a critical regulator of RNA interference, completely restores lifespan to normal levels in the context of adr-1 and adr-2 loss of function. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that RNA editors may be an important regulator of aging in humans and that, when evaluated in C. elegans, this pathway may interact with the RNA interference machinery to regulate lifespan. PMID:20011587

  19. A disrupted RNA editing balance mediated by ADARs (Adenosine DeAminases that act on RNA) in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tim Hon Man; Lin, Chi Ho; Qi, Lihua; Fei, Jing; Li, Yan; Yong, Kol Jia; Liu, Ming; Song, Yangyang; Chow, Raymond Kwok Kei; Ng, Vanessa Hui En; Yuan, Yun-Fei; Tenen, Daniel G; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Leilei

    2014-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a heterogeneous tumour displaying a complex variety of genetic and epigenetic changes. In human cancers, aberrant post-transcriptional modifications, such as alternative splicing and RNA editing, may lead to tumour specific transcriptome diversity. By utilising large scale transcriptome sequencing of three paired HCC clinical specimens and their adjacent non-tumour (NT) tissue counterparts at depth, we discovered an average of 20 007 inferred A to I (adenosine to inosine) RNA editing events in transcripts. The roles of the double stranded RNA specific ADAR (Adenosine DeAminase that act on RNA) family members (ADARs) and the altered gene specific editing patterns were investigated in clinical specimens, cell models and mice. HCC displays a severely disrupted A to I RNA editing balance. ADAR1 and ADAR2 manipulate the A to I imbalance of HCC via their differential expression in HCC compared with NT liver tissues. Patients with ADAR1 overexpression and ADAR2 downregulation in tumours demonstrated an increased risk of liver cirrhosis and postoperative recurrence and had poor prognoses. Due to the differentially expressed ADAR1 and ADAR2 in tumours, the altered gene specific editing activities, which was reflected by the hyper-editing of FLNB (filamin B, β) and the hypo-editing of COPA (coatomer protein complex, subunit α), are closely associated with HCC pathogenesis. In vitro and in vivo functional assays prove that ADAR1 functions as an oncogene while ADAR2 has tumour suppressive ability in HCC. These findings highlight the fact that the differentially expressed ADARs in tumours, which are responsible for an A to I editing imbalance, has great prognostic value and diagnostic potential for HCC.

  20. Determinants for association and gRNA-directed endonuclease cleavage by purified RNA editing complexes from Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Alfredo; Panigrahi, Aswini; Cifuentes-Rojas, Catherine; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Stuart, Kenneth; Cruz-Reyes, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    U-insertion/deletion RNA editing in the single mitochondrion of ancient kinetoplastids is a unique mRNA maturation process needed for translation. Multi-subunit editing complexes recognize many pre-mRNA sites and modify them via cycles of three catalytic steps: guide-RNA (gRNA) mediated cleavage, insertion or deletion of uridylates at the 3’ terminus of the upstream cleaved piece, and ligation of the two mRNA pieces. While catalytic and many structural protein subunits of these complexes have...

  1. DEAH-RHA helicase•Znf cofactor systems in kinetoplastid RNA editing and evolutionarily distant RNA processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Reyes, Jorge; Mooers, Blaine H.M.; Abu-Adas, Zakaria; Kumar, Vikas; Gulati, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    Multi-zinc finger proteins are an emerging class of cofactors in DEAH-RHA RNA helicases across highly divergent eukaryotic lineages. DEAH-RHA helicase•zinc finger cofactor partnerships predate the split of kinetoplastid protozoa, which include several human pathogens, from other eukaryotic lineages 100–400 Ma. Despite a long evolutionary history, the prototypical DEAH-RHA domains remain highly conserved. This short review focuses on a recently identified DEAH-RHA helicase•zinc finger cofactor system in kinetoplastid RNA editing, and its potential functional parallels with analogous systems in embryogenesis control in nematodes and antivirus protection in humans. PMID:27540585

  2. EdiPy: a resource to simulate the evolution of plant mitochondrial genes under the RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Ernesto; Quagliariello, Carla

    2006-02-01

    EdiPy is an online resource appropriately designed to simulate the evolution of plant mitochondrial genes in a biologically realistic fashion. EdiPy takes into account the presence of sites subjected to RNA editing and provides multiple artificial alignments corresponding to both genomic and cDNA sequences. Each artificial data set can successively be submitted to main and widespread evolutionary and phylogenetic software packages such as PAUP, Phyml, PAML and Phylip. As an online bioinformatic resource, EdiPy is available at the following web page: http://biologia.unical.it/py_script/index.html.

  3. Changing blue fluorescent protein to green fluorescent protein using chemical RNA editing as a novel strategy in genetic restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Luyen T; Nguyen, Thanh T K; Alam, Shafiul; Sakamoto, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenzo; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    Using the transition from cytosine of BFP (blue fluorescent protein) gene to uridine of GFP (green fluorescent protein) gene at position 199 as a model, we successfully controlled photochemical RNA editing to effect site-directed deamination of cytidine (C) to uridine (U). Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing 5'-carboxyvinyl-2'-deoxyuridine ((CV) U) were used for reversible photoligation, and single-stranded 100-nt BFP DNA and in vitro-transcribed full-length BFP mRNA were the targets. Photo-cross-linking with the responsive ODNs was performed using UV (366 nm) irradiation, which was followed by heat treatment, and the cross-linked nucleotide was cleaved through photosplitting (UV, 312 nm). The products were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and fluorescence measurements. Western blotting and fluorescence-analysis results revealed that in vitro-translated proteins were synthesized from mRNAs after site-directed RNA editing. We detected substantial amounts of the target-base-substituted fragment using RFLP and observed highly reproducible spectra of the transition-GFP signal using fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated protein stability. ODNc restored approximately 10% of the C-to-U transition. Thus, we successfully used non-enzymatic site-directed deamination for genetic restoration in vitro. In the near future, in vivo studies that include cultured cells and model animals will be conducted to treat genetic disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Is plant mitochondrial RNA editing a source of phylogenetic incongruence? An answer from in silico and in vivo data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quagliariello Carla

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In plant mitochondria, the post-transcriptional RNA editing process converts C to U at a number of specific sites of the mRNA sequence and usually restores phylogenetically conserved codons and the encoded amino acid residues. Sites undergoing RNA editing evolve at a higher rate than sites not modified by the process. As a result, editing sites strongly affect the evolution of plant mitochondrial genomes, representing an important source of sequence variability and potentially informative characters. To date no clear and convincing evidence has established whether or not editing sites really affect the topology of reconstructed phylogenetic trees. For this reason, we investigated here the effect of RNA editing on the tree building process of twenty different plant mitochondrial gene sequences and by means of computer simulations. Results Based on our simulation study we suggest that the editing ‘noise’ in tree topology inference is mainly manifested at the cDNA level. In particular, editing sites tend to confuse tree topologies when artificial genomic and cDNA sequences are generated shorter than 500 bp and with an editing percentage higher than 5.0%. Similar results have been also obtained with genuine plant mitochondrial genes. In this latter instance, indeed, the topology incongruence increases when the editing percentage goes up from about 3.0 to 14.0%. However, when the average gene length is higher than 1,000 bp (rps3, matR and atp1 no differences in the comparison between inferred genomic and cDNA topologies could be detected. Conclusions Our findings by the here reported in silico and in vivo computer simulation system seem to strongly suggest that editing sites contribute in the generation of misleading phylogenetic trees if the analyzed mitochondrial gene sequence is highly edited (higher than 3.0% and reduced in length (shorter than 500 bp. In the current lack of direct experimental evidence the results

  5. RING E3 ligases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Seok Keun; Ryu, Moon Young; Kim, Jong Hum

    2017-01-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a variety of abiotic stresses, such as drought, heat, cold, flood, and salinity. To survive under such unfavorable conditions, plants have evolutionarily developed their own resistant-mechanisms. For several decades, many studies have clarified specific stress...... response pathways of plants through various molecular and genetic studies. In particular, it was recently discovered that ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), a regulatory mechanism for protein turn over, is greatly involved in the stress responsive pathways. In the UPS, many E3 ligases play key roles...

  6. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching Between Two DNA Bound States†

    OpenAIRE

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases DNA nick-joining and intermolecular DNA ligation. Yet, the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small angle x-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD)...

  7. Auto-Regulatory RNA Editing Fine-Tunes mRNA Re-Coding and Complex Behaviour in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, Yiannis A.; Jepson, James E.C; Sahin, Asli; Sugden, Arthur U.; Dorsky, Jacquelyn S.; Alpert, Lauren; Lawrence, Charles; Reenan, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Auto-regulatory feedback loops are a common molecular strategy used to optimize protein function. In Drosophila many mRNAs involved in neuro-transmission are re-coded at the RNA level by the RNA editing enzyme dADAR, leading to the incorporation of amino acids that are not directly encoded by the genome. dADAR also re-codes its own transcript, but the consequences of this auto-regulation in vivo are unclear. Here we show that hard-wiring or abolishing endogenous dADAR auto-regulation dramatically remodels the landscape of re-coding events in a site-specific manner. These molecular phenotypes correlate with altered localization of dADAR within the nuclear compartment. Furthermore, auto-editing exhibits sexually dimorphic patterns of spatial regulation and can be modified by abiotic environmental factors. Finally, we demonstrate that modifying dAdar auto-editing affects adaptive complex behaviors. Our results reveal the in vivo relevance of auto-regulatory control over post-transcriptional mRNA re-coding events in fine-tuning brain function and organismal behavior. PMID:22531175

  8. Modulation of microRNA editing, expression and processing by ADAR2 deaminase in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaselli, Sara; Galeano, Federica; Alon, Shahar; Raho, Susanna; Galardi, Silvia; Polito, Vinicia Assunta; Presutti, Carlo; Vincenti, Sara; Eisenberg, Eli; Locatelli, Franco; Gallo, Angela

    2015-01-13

    ADAR enzymes convert adenosines to inosines within double-stranded RNAs, including microRNA (miRNA) precursors, with important consequences on miRNA retargeting and expression. ADAR2 activity is impaired in glioblastoma and its rescue has anti-tumoral effects. However, how ADAR2 activity may impact the miRNome and the progression of glioblastoma is not known. By integrating deep-sequencing and array approaches with bioinformatics analyses and molecular studies, we show that ADAR2 is essential to edit a small number of mature miRNAs and to significantly modulate the expression of about 90 miRNAs in glioblastoma cells. Specifically, the rescue of ADAR2 activity in cancer cells recovers the edited miRNA population lost in glioblastoma cell lines and tissues, and rebalances expression of onco-miRNAs and tumor suppressor miRNAs to the levels observed in normal human brain. We report that the major effect of ADAR2 is to reduce the expression of a large number of miRNAs, most of which act as onco-miRNAs. ADAR2 can edit miR-222/221 and miR-21 precursors and decrease the expression of the corresponding mature onco-miRNAs in vivo and in vitro, with important effects on cell proliferation and migration. Our findings disclose an additional layer of complexity in miRNome regulation and provide information to better understand the impact of ADAR2 editing enzyme in glioblastoma. We propose that ADAR2 is a key factor for maintaining edited-miRNA population and balancing the expression of several essential miRNAs involved in cancer.

  9. MRB3010 is a core component of the MRB1 complex that facilitates an early step of the kinetoplastid RNA editing process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ammerman, M. L.; Hashimi, Hassan; Novotná, Lucie; Číčová, Zdeňka; Mcevoy, S. M.; Lukeš, Julius; Read, L. K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2011), 865-877 ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA MŠk 2B06129; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : RNA editing * trypanosome * MRB1 complex * mitochondria * kinetoplast Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.095, year: 2011

  10. Comprehensive analysis of human small RNA sequencing data provides insights into expression profiles and miRNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jing; Wu, Yuliang; Zhang, Xiantong; Liao, Yifang; Sibanda, Vusumuzi Leroy; Liu, Wei; Guo, An-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key regulatory roles in various biological processes and diseases. A comprehensive analysis of large scale small RNA sequencing data (smRNA-seq) will be very helpful to explore tissue or disease specific miRNA markers and uncover miRNA variants. Here, we systematically analyzed 410 human smRNA-seq datasets, which samples are from 24 tissue/disease/cell lines. We tested the mapping strategies and found that it was necessary to make multiple-round mappings with different mismatch parameters. miRNA expression profiles revealed that on average ∼70% of known miRNAs were expressed at low level or not expressed (RPM 100). About 30% known miRNAs were not expressed in all of our used samples. The miRNA expression profiles were compiled into an online database (HMED, http://bioinfo.life.hust.edu.cn/smallRNA/). Dozens of tissue/disease specific miRNAs, disease/control dysregulated miRNAs and miRNAs with arm switching events were discovered. Further, we identified some highly confident editing sites including 24 A-to-I sites and 23 C-to-U sites. About half of them were widespread miRNA editing sites in different tissues. We characterized that the 2 types of editing sites have different features with regard to location, editing level and frequency. Our analyses for expression profiles, specific miRNA markers, arm switching, and editing sites, may provide valuable information for further studies of miRNA function and biomarker finding.

  11. A population study of the minicircles in Trypanosoma cruzi: predicting guide RNAs in the absence of empirical RNA editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westenberger Scott J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structurally complex network of minicircles and maxicircles comprising the mitochondrial DNA of kinetoplastids mirrors the complexity of the RNA editing process that is required for faithful expression of encrypted maxicircle genes. Although a few of the guide RNAs that direct this editing process have been discovered on maxicircles, guide RNAs are mostly found on the minicircles. The nuclear and maxicircle genomes have been sequenced and assembled for Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, however the complement of 1.4-kb minicircles, carrying four guide RNA genes per molecule in this parasite, has been less thoroughly characterised. Results Fifty-four CL Brener and 53 Esmeraldo strain minicircle sequence reads were extracted from T. cruzi whole genome shotgun sequencing data. With these sequences and all published T. cruzi minicircle sequences, 108 unique guide RNAs from all known T. cruzi minicircle sequences and two guide RNAs from the CL Brener maxicircle were predicted using a local alignment algorithm and mapped onto predicted or experimentally determined sequences of edited maxicircle open reading frames. For half of the sequences no statistically significant guide RNA could be assigned. Likely positions of these unidentified gRNAs in T. cruzi minicircle sequences are estimated using a simple Hidden Markov Model. With the local alignment predictions as a standard, the HMM had an ~85% chance of correctly identifying at least 20 nucleotides of guide RNA from a given minicircle sequence. Inter-minicircle recombination was documented. Variable regions contain species-specific areas of distinct nucleotide preference. Two maxicircle guide RNA genes were found. Conclusion The identification of new minicircle sequences and the further characterization of all published minicircles are presented, including the first observation of recombination between minicircles. Extrapolation suggests a level of 4

  12. Improved design of hammerhead ribozyme for selective digestion of target RNA through recognition of site-specific adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Masatora; Kurihara, Kei; Yamaguchi, Shota; Oyama, Yui; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2014-03-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is an endogenous regulatory mechanism involved in various biological processes. Site-specific, editing-state-dependent degradation of target RNA may be a powerful tool both for analyzing the mechanism of RNA editing and for regulating biological processes. Previously, we designed an artificial hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) for selective, site-specific RNA cleavage dependent on the A-to-I RNA editing state. In the present work, we developed an improved strategy for constructing a trans-acting HHR that specifically cleaves target editing sites in the adenosine but not the inosine state. Specificity for unedited sites was achieved by utilizing a sequence encoding the intrinsic cleavage specificity of a natural HHR. We used in vitro selection methods in an HHR library to select for an extended HHR containing a tertiary stabilization motif that facilitates HHR folding into an active conformation. By using this method, we successfully constructed highly active HHRs with unedited-specific cleavage. Moreover, using HHR cleavage followed by direct sequencing, we demonstrated that this ribozyme could cleave serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) mRNA extracted from mouse brain, depending on the site-specific editing state. This unedited-specific cleavage also enabled us to analyze the effect of editing state at the E and C sites on editing at other sites by using direct sequencing for the simultaneous quantification of the editing ratio at multiple sites. Our approach has the potential to elucidate the mechanism underlying the interdependencies of different editing states in substrate RNA with multiple editing sites.

  13. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom (Scripps); (Maryland-MED); (WU-MED); (LBNL)

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  14. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramachandran, Annie M; Dohmen, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Covalent posttranslational modification with SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) modulates functions of a wide range of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Sumoylation affects the activity, interaction properties, subcellular localization and the stability of its substrate proteins. The recent discovery of a novel class of ubiquitin ligases (E3), termed ULS (E3-S) or STUbL, that recognize sumoylated proteins, links SUMO modification to the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Here we review recent insights into the properties and function of these ligases and their roles in regulating sumoylated proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System. Guest Editors: Thomas Sommer and Dieter H. Wolf. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptional Slippage and RNA Editing Increase the Diversity of Transcripts in Chloroplasts: Insight from Deep Sequencing of Vigna radiata Genome and Transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ping Lin

    Full Text Available We performed deep sequencing of the nuclear and organellar genomes of three mungbean genotypes: Vigna radiata ssp. sublobata TC1966, V. radiata var. radiata NM92 and the recombinant inbred line RIL59 derived from a cross between TC1966 and NM92. Moreover, we performed deep sequencing of the RIL59 transcriptome to investigate transcript variability. The mungbean chloroplast genome has a quadripartite structure including a pair of inverted repeats separated by two single copy regions. A total of 213 simple sequence repeats were identified in the chloroplast genomes of NM92 and RIL59; 78 single nucleotide variants and nine indels were discovered in comparing the chloroplast genomes of TC1966 and NM92. Analysis of the mungbean chloroplast transcriptome revealed mRNAs that were affected by transcriptional slippage and RNA editing. Transcriptional slippage frequency was positively correlated with the length of simple sequence repeats of the mungbean chloroplast genome (R2=0.9911. In total, 41 C-to-U editing sites were found in 23 chloroplast genes and in one intergenic spacer. No editing site that swapped U to C was found. A combination of bioinformatics and experimental methods revealed that the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase-transcribed genes psbF and ndhA are affected by transcriptional slippage in mungbean and in main lineages of land plants, including three dicots (Glycine max, Brassica rapa, and Nicotiana tabacum, two monocots (Oryza sativa and Zea mays, two gymnosperms (Pinus taeda and Ginkgo biloba and one moss (Physcomitrella patens. Transcript analysis of the rps2 gene showed that transcriptional slippage could affect transcripts at single sequence repeat regions with poly-A runs. It showed that transcriptional slippage together with incomplete RNA editing may cause sequence diversity of transcripts in chloroplasts of land plants.

  16. RNA interference analyses suggest a transcript-specific regulatory role for mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 in RNA editing and other RNA processing in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáková, Eva; Van Den Burg, J.; Zíková, Alena; Ernst, N. L.; Stuart, K.; Benne, R.; Lukeš, Julius

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 280, č. 4 (2005), s. 2429-2438 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6022903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * RNA editing * interference RNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.854, year: 2005

  17. ATPase-dependent control of the Mms21 SUMO ligase during DNA repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelino Bermúdez-López

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Modification of proteins by SUMO is essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. During DNA replication, the Mms21-branch of the SUMO pathway counteracts recombination intermediates at damaged replication forks, thus facilitating sister chromatid disjunction. The Mms21 SUMO ligase docks to the arm region of the Smc5 protein in the Smc5/6 complex; together, they cooperate during recombinational DNA repair. Yet how the activity of the SUMO ligase is controlled remains unknown. Here we show that the SUMO ligase and the chromosome disjunction functions of Mms21 depend on its docking to an intact and active Smc5/6 complex, indicating that the Smc5/6-Mms21 complex operates as a large SUMO ligase in vivo. In spite of the physical distance separating the E3 and the nucleotide-binding domains in Smc5/6, Mms21-dependent sumoylation requires binding of ATP to Smc5, a step that is part of the ligase mechanism that assists Ubc9 function. The communication is enabled by the presence of a conserved disruption in the coiled coil domain of Smc5, pointing to potential conformational changes for SUMO ligase activation. In accordance, scanning force microscopy of the Smc5-Mms21 heterodimer shows that the molecule is physically remodeled in an ATP-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that the ATP-binding activity of the Smc5/6 complex is coordinated with its SUMO ligase, through the coiled coil domain of Smc5 and the physical remodeling of the molecule, to promote sumoylation and chromosome disjunction during DNA repair.

  18. A chloroplastic RNA ligase activity analogous to the bacterial and archaeal 2´-5' RNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Serrano, Diego; Marqués, Jorge; Nohales, María-Ángeles; Flores, Ricardo; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Bacteria and archaea contain a 2'-5' RNA ligase that seals in vitro 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiester and 5'-hydroxyl RNA termini, generating a 2',5'-phosphodiester bond. In our search for an RNA ligase able to circularize the monomeric linear replication intermediates of viroids belonging to the family Avsunviroidae, which replicate in the chloroplast, we have identified in spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) chloroplasts a new RNA ligase activity whose properties resemble those of the bacterial and archaeal 2'-5' RNA ligase. The spinach chloroplastic RNA ligase recognizes the 5'-hydroxyl and 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiester termini of Avocado sunblotch viroid and Eggplant latent viroid RNAs produced by hammerhead-mediated self-cleavage, yielding circular products linked through an atypical, most likely 2',5'-phosphodiester, bond. The enzyme neither requires divalent cations as cofactors, nor NTPs as substrate. The reaction apparently reaches equilibrium at a low ratio between the final circular product and the linear initial substrate. Even if its involvement in viroid replication seems unlikely, the identification of a 2'-5' RNA ligase activity in higher plant chloroplasts, with properties very similar to an analogous enzyme widely distributed in bacterial and archaeal proteomes, is intriguing and suggests an important biological role so far unknown.

  19. Evolution of Plant HECT Ubiquitin Ligases

    OpenAIRE

    Mar?n, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    HECT ubiquitin ligases are key components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is present in all eukaryotes. In this study, the patterns of emergence of HECT genes in plants are described. Phylogenetic and structural data indicate that viridiplantae have six main HECT subfamilies, which arose before the split that separated green algae from the rest of plants. It is estimated that the common ancestor of all plants contained seven HECT genes. Contrary to what happened in animals, the numb...

  20. Novel E3 ubiquitin ligases that regulate histone protein levels in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available Core histone proteins are essential for packaging the genomic DNA into chromatin in all eukaryotes. Since multiple genes encode these histone proteins, there is potential for generating more histones than what is required for chromatin assembly. The positively charged histones have a very high affinity for negatively charged molecules such as DNA, and any excess of histone proteins results in deleterious effects on genomic stability and cell viability. Hence, histone levels are known to be tightly regulated via transcriptional, posttranscriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. We have previously elucidated the posttranslational regulation of histone protein levels by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway involving the E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubc4/5 and the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-Terminus domain containing E3 ligase Tom1 in the budding yeast. Here we report the identification of four additional E3 ligases containing the RING (Really Interesting New Gene finger domains that are involved in the ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation of excess histones in yeast. These E3 ligases are Pep5, Snt2 as well as two previously uncharacterized Open Reading Frames (ORFs YKR017C and YDR266C that we have named Hel1 and Hel2 (for Histone E3 Ligases respectively. Mutants lacking these E3 ligases are sensitive to histone overexpression as they fail to degrade excess histones and accumulate high levels of endogenous histones on histone chaperones. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that these E3 ligases interact with the major E2 enzyme Ubc4 that is involved in the degradation related ubiquitylation of histones. Using mutagenesis we further demonstrate that the RING domains of Hel1, Hel2 and Snt2 are required for histone regulation. Lastly, mutants corresponding to Hel1, Hel2 and Pep5 are sensitive to replication inhibitors. Overall, our results highlight the importance of posttranslational histone regulatory mechanisms that employ multiple E3

  1. Polynucleotide 3′-terminal Phosphate Modifications by RNA and DNA Ligases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; McReynolds, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA and DNA ligases catalyze the formation of a phosphodiester bond between the 5′-phosphate and 3′-hydroxyl ends of nucleic acids. In this work, we describe the ability of the thermophilic RNA ligase MthRnl from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum to recognize and modify the 3′-terminal phosphate of RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). This ligase can use an RNA 3′p substrate to generate an RNA 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate or convert DNA3′p to ssDNA3′pp5′A. An RNA ligase from the Thermus scotoductus bacteriophage TS2126 and a predicted T4 Rnl1-like protein from Thermovibrio ammonificans, TVa, were also able to adenylate ssDNA 3′p. These modifications of RNA and DNA 3′-phosphates are similar to the activities of RtcA, an RNA 3′-phosphate cyclase. The initial step involves adenylation of the enzyme by ATP, which is then transferred to either RNA 3′p or DNA 3′p to generate the adenylated intermediate. For RNA 3′pp5′A, the third step involves attack of the adjacent 2′ hydroxyl to generate the RNA 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate. These steps are analogous to those in classical 5′ phosphate ligation. MthRnl and TS2126 RNA ligases were not able to modify a 3′p in nicked double-stranded DNA. However, T4 DNA ligase and RtcA can use 3′-phosphorylated nicks in double-stranded DNA to produce a 3′-adenylated product. These 3′-terminal phosphate-adenylated intermediates are substrates for deadenylation by yeast 5′Deadenylase. Our findings that classic ligases can duplicate the adenylation and phosphate cyclization activity of RtcA suggests that they have an essential role in metabolism of nucleic acids with 3′-terminal phosphates. PMID:25324547

  2. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  3. Neuromuscular regulation in zebrafish by a large AAA+ ATPase/ubiquitin ligase, mysterin/RNF213

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Yuri; Morito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Satoru; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Kawakami, Koichi; Takashima, Seiji; Hirata, Hiromi; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Mysterin (also known as RNF213) is a huge intracellular protein with two AAA+ ATPase modules and a RING finger ubiquitin ligase domain. Mysterin was originally isolated as a significant risk factor for the cryptogenic cerebrovascular disorder moyamoya disease, and was found to be involved in physiological angiogenesis in zebrafish. However, the function and the physiological significance of mysterin in other than blood vessels remain largely unknown, although mysterin is ubiquitously expressed in animal tissues. In this study, we performed antisense-mediated suppression of a mysterin orthologue in zebrafish larvae and revealed that mysterin-deficient larvae showed significant reduction in fast myofibrils and immature projection of primary motoneurons, leading to severe motor deficits. Fast muscle-specific restoration of mysterin expression cancelled these phenotypes, and interestingly both AAA+ ATPase and ubiquitin ligase activities of mysterin were indispensable for proper fast muscle formation, demonstrating an essential role of mysterin and its enzymatic activities in the neuromuscular regulation in zebrafish. PMID:26530008

  4. KF-1 Ubiquitin Ligase: An Anxiety Suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto-Gotoh, Tamotsu; Iwabe, Naoyuki; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2009-05-01

    Anxiety is an instinct that may have developed to promote adaptive survival by evading unnecessary danger. However, excessive anxiety is disruptive and can be a basic disorder of other psychiatric diseases such as depression. The KF-1, a ubiquitin ligase located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), may prevent excessive anxiety; kf-1(-/-) mice exhibit selectively elevated anxiety-like behavior against light or heights. It is surmised that KF-1 degrades some target proteins, responsible for promoting anxiety, through the ER-associated degradation pathway, similar to Parkin in Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, another ER-ubiquitin ligase, prevents the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons by degrading the target proteins responsible for PD. Molecular phylogenetic studies have revealed that the prototype of kf-1 appeared in the very early phase of animal evolution but was lost, unlike parkin, in the lineage leading up to Drosophila. Therefore, kf-1(-/-) mice may be a powerful tool for elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in emotional regulation, and for screening novel anxiolytic/antidepressant compounds.

  5. Estimation of structure and stability of MurE ligase from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Rohit; Haque, Md Anzarul; Yadav, Prakarsh; Gupta, Deepali; Ethayathulla, Abdul S; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Kaur, Punit

    2018-04-01

    MurE ligase catalyzes the assembly of peptide moiety, an essential component of bacterial cell wall. We have explored the conformational stability and unfolding equilibrium behaviour of the protein MurE ligase by determining the conformational free energy, entropy and enthalpy parameters under stress conditions. MurE from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi was cloned, expressed and purified. Conformational changes associated with increasing concentration of GdmCl- and urea-induced denaturation of MurE were monitored using Circular Dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopies. The secondary structural content of protein estimated by CD experiment is in close agreement with the predicted MurE ligase structure by homology modeling. Denaturant-induced transition curve was analyzed for thermodynamic parameters. Average values for MurE ligase of ΔG D 0  = 3.13 kcal mol -1 , m = 1.52 kcal mol -1  M -1 and C m (=ΔG D 0 /m) = 2.05 M were calculated in the presence of GdmCl whereas in the case of urea these were ΔG D 0  = 3.04 kcal mol -1 , m = 1.20 kcal mol -1  M -1 and C m (=ΔG D 0 /m) = 2.53 M. The observed superposition of normalized transition curve of two independent optical properties suggested that GdmCl- and urea-induced denaturation follow a two-state process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A plant DNA ligase is an important determinant of seed longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Masnavi, Ghzaleh; Bhardwaj, Rajni M; Jiang, Qing; Bray, Clifford M; West, Christopher E

    2010-09-01

    DNA repair is important for maintaining genome integrity. In plants, DNA damage accumulated in the embryo of seeds is repaired early in imbibition, and is important for germination performance and seed longevity. An essential step in most repair pathways is the DNA ligase-mediated rejoining of single- and double-strand breaks. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligase enzymes, each having distinct roles in cellular metabolism. Here, we report the characterization of DNA LIGASE VI, which is only found in plant species. The primary structure of this ligase shows a unique N-terminal region that contains a β-CASP motif, which is found in a number of repair proteins, including the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor Artemis. Phenotypic analysis revealed a delay in the germination of atlig6 mutants compared with wild-type lines, and this delay becomes markedly exacerbated in the presence of the genotoxin menadione. Arabidopsis atlig6 and atlig6 atlig4 mutants display significant hypersensitivity to controlled seed ageing, resulting in delayed germination and reduced seed viability relative to wild-type lines. In addition, atlig6 and atlig6 atlig4 mutants display increased sensitivity to low-temperature stress, resulting in delayed germination and reduced seedling vigour upon transfer to standard growth conditions. Seeds display a rapid transcriptional DNA DSB response, which is activated in the earliest stages of water imbibition, providing evidence for the accumulation of cytotoxic DSBs in the quiescent seed. These results implicate AtLIG6 and AtLIG4 as major determinants of Arabidopsis seed quality and longevity. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. KF-1 ubiquitin ligase: anxiety suppressor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto-Gotoh, Tamotsu; Iwabe, Naoyuki; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2011-06-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most popular psychiatric disease in any human societies irrespective of nation, culture, religion, economics or politics. Anxiety expression mediated by the amygdala may be suppressed by signals transmitted from the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. KF-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-based E3-ubiquitin (Ub) ligase with a RING-H2 finger motif at the C-terminus. The kf-1 gene expression is up-regulated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in rats after anti-depressant treatments. The kf-1 null mice show no apparent abnormalities, but exhibit selectively pronounced anxiety-like behaviors or increased timidity-like responses. The kf-1 orthologous genes had been generated after the Poriferan emergence, and are found widely in all animals except insects, arachnids and threadworms such as Drosophila, Ixodes and Caenorhabditis, respectively. This suggests that the kf-1 gene may be relevant to some biological functions characteristic to animals. Based on these observations, the Anxiety Suppressor Model has been proposed, which assumes that KF-1 Ub ligase may suppress the amygdala-mediated anxiety by degrading some anxiety promoting protein(s), such as a neurotransmitter receptor, through the ER-associated degradation pathway in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. According to this model, the emotional sensitivity to environmental stresses may be regulated by the cellular protein level of KF-1 relative to that of the putative anxiety promoter. The kf-1 null mice should be useful in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of the anxiety regulation and for screening novel anxiolytic compounds, which may block the putative anxiety promoter.

  8. E3 Ubiquitin Ligases Neurobiological Mechanisms: Development to Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Upadhyay

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells regularly synthesize new proteins to replace old or damaged proteins. Deposition of various aberrant proteins in specific brain regions leads to neurodegeneration and aging. The cellular protein quality control system develop various defense mechanisms against the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated proteins. The mechanisms underlying the selective recognition of specific crucial protein or misfolded proteins are majorly governed by quality control E3 ubiquitin ligases mediated through ubiquitin-proteasome system. Few known E3 ubiquitin ligases have shown prominent neurodevelopmental functions, but their interactions with different developmental proteins play critical roles in neurodevelopmental disorders. Several questions are yet to be understood properly. How E3 ubiquitin ligases determine the specificity and regulate degradation of a particular substrate involved in neuronal proliferation and differentiation is certainly the one, which needs detailed investigations. Another important question is how neurodevelopmental E3 ubiquitin ligases specifically differentiate between their versatile range of substrates and timing of their functional modulations during different phases of development. The premise of this article is to understand how few E3 ubiquitin ligases sense major molecular events, which are crucial for human brain development from its early embryonic stages to throughout adolescence period. A better understanding of these few E3 ubiquitin ligases and their interactions with other potential proteins will provide invaluable insight into disease mechanisms to approach toward therapeutic interventions.

  9. Comparative analysis of the end-joining activity of several DNA ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Bauer

    Full Text Available DNA ligases catalyze the repair of phosphate backbone breaks in DNA, acting with highest activity on breaks in one strand of duplex DNA. Some DNA ligases have also been observed to ligate two DNA fragments with short complementary overhangs or blunt-ended termini. In this study, several wild-type DNA ligases (phage T3, T4, and T7 DNA ligases, Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV1 DNA ligase, human DNA ligase 3, and Escherichia coli DNA ligase were tested for their ability to ligate DNA fragments with several difficult to ligate end structures (blunt-ended termini, 3'- and 5'- single base overhangs, and 5'-two base overhangs. This analysis revealed that T4 DNA ligase, the most common enzyme utilized for in vitro ligation, had its greatest activity on blunt- and 2-base overhangs, and poorest on 5'-single base overhangs. Other ligases had different substrate specificity: T3 DNA ligase ligated only blunt ends well; PBCV1 DNA ligase joined 3'-single base overhangs and 2-base overhangs effectively with little blunt or 5'- single base overhang activity; and human ligase 3 had highest activity on blunt ends and 5'-single base overhangs. There is no correlation of activity among ligases on blunt DNA ends with their activity on single base overhangs. In addition, DNA binding domains (Sso7d, hLig3 zinc finger, and T4 DNA ligase N-terminal domain were fused to PBCV1 DNA ligase to explore whether modified binding to DNA would lead to greater activity on these difficult to ligate substrates. These engineered ligases showed both an increased binding affinity for DNA and increased activity, but did not alter the relative substrate preferences of PBCV1 DNA ligase, indicating active site structure plays a role in determining substrate preference.

  10. Crystal structure of the substrate-recognition domain of the Shigella E3 ligase IpaH9.8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kenji; Kim, Minsoo; Sasakawa, Chihiro; Mizushima, Tsunehiro

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diseases caused by bacteria have significant impacts on global public health. During infection, pathogenic bacteria deliver a variety of virulence factors, called effectors, into host cells. The Shigella effector IpaH9.8 functions as an ubiquitin ligase, ubiquitinating the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO)/IKK-γ to inhibit host inflammatory responses. IpaH9.8 contains leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) involved in substrate recognition and an E3 ligase domain. To elucidate the structural basis of the function of IpaH9.8, the crystal structure of the LRR domain of Shigella IpaH9.8 was determined and this structure was compared with the known structures of other IpaH family members. This model provides insights into the structural features involved in substrate specificity.

  11. Interplays between Sumoylation, SUMO-Targeted Ubiquitin Ligases, and the Ubiquitin-Adaptor Protein Ufd1 in Fission Yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Julie Bonne

    their conformation or interactions with other macromolecules. Though, whereas the downstream consequence of ubiquitin conjugation is often protein degradation, the functional outcomes of sumoylation are less unifiable. A class of ubiquitin E3 ligases able to target sumoylated proteins for degradation by the 26S...... proteasome mediates direct cross-talk between the two modification systems. By contributing to the dynamic turnover of SUMO conjugated species these SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) fulfills essential roles in both yeast and man. However, the specific sumoylated proteins affected by STUbL activity...... and the specific molecular interactions and sequence of events linking sumoylation, ubiquitylation and substrate degradation, has been largely uncovered. Using the fission yeast model organism I here present evidence for a role of the Ufd1 (ubiquitinfusion degradation 1) protein, and by extension of the Cdc48-Ufd1...

  12. Regulation of lipid droplet turnover by ubiquitin ligases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotin Daniela

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mutation of the protein spartin is a cause of one form of spastic paraplegia. Spartin interacts with ubiquitin ligases of the Nedd4 family, and a recent report in BMC Biology now shows that it acts as an adaptor to recruit and activate the ubiquitin ligase AIP4 onto lipid droplets, leading to the ubiquitination and degradation of droplet-associated proteins. A deficiency of spartin apparently causes lipid droplets to accumulate. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/72/

  13. Differential dependence on DNA ligase of type II restriction enzymes: a practical way toward ligase-free DNA automaton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Li, Jing; Zhao, Jian; He, Lin; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2007-02-16

    DNA computing study is a new paradigm in computer science and biological computing fields. As one of DNA computing approaches, DNA automaton is composed of the hardware, input DNA molecule and state transition molecules. By now restriction enzymes are key hardware for DNA computing automaton. It has been found that DNA computing efficiency may be independent on DNA ligases when type IIS restriction enzymes like FokI are used as hardware. In this study, we compared FokI with four other distinct enzymes HgaI, BsmFI, BbsI, and BseMII, and found their differential independence on T4 DNA ligase when performing automaton reactions. Since DNA automaton is a potential powerful tool to tackle gene relationship in genomic network scale, the feasible ligase-free DNA automaton may set an initial base to develop functional DNA automata for various DNA technology development and implications in genetics study in the near future.

  14. Biochemical characterisation of LigN, an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase from the halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii that displays maximal in vitro activity at high salt concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacNeill Stuart A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA ligases are required for DNA strand joining in all forms of cellular life. NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are found primarily in eubacteria but also in some eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage and archaea. Among the archaeal NAD+-dependent DNA ligases is the LigN enzyme of the halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, the gene for which was apparently acquired by Hfx.volcanii through lateral gene transfer (LGT from a halophilic eubacterium. Genetic studies show that the LGT-acquired LigN enzyme shares an essential function with the native Hfx.volcanii ATP-dependent DNA ligase protein LigA. Results To characterise the enzymatic properties of the LigN protein, wild-type and three mutant forms of the LigN protein were separately expressed in recombinant form in E.coli and purified to apparent homogeneity by immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. Non-isotopic DNA ligase activity assays using λ DNA restriction fragments with 12 bp cos cohesive ends were used to show that LigN activity was dependent on addition of divalent cations and salt. No activity was detected in the absence of KCl, whereas maximum activity could be detected at 3.2 M KCl, close to the intracellular KCl concentration of Hfx.volcanii cells. Conclusion LigN is unique amongst characterised DNA ligase enzymes in displaying maximal DNA strand joining activity at high (> 3 M salt levels. As such the LigN enzyme has potential both as a novel tool for biotechnology and as a model enzyme for studying the adaptation of proteins to high intracellular salt levels.

  15. Plasmid containing a DNA ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, D.; Griffin, K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    A ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae was cloned into the shuttle vector pDM2. Although the plasmid did not affect X-ray sensitivity, it caused an increase in UV sensitivity of the wild-type but not excision-defective H. influenzae and a decrease in UV sensitivity of the rec-1 mutant. 14 references, 2 figures

  16. Salvaging recombinants from low-efficiency ligase reactions for more efficient subcloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H W; Lolis, E

    1995-04-01

    Certain types of ligase reactions can be problematic, such as those involving PCR products, blunt-ends and multiple DNA inserts. A simple PCR-based strategy was developed to overcome cloning difficulties with these inefficient ligase reactions. After an initial ligase reaction, primers complementary to the vector are utilized to amplify the DNA fragment from (the few) successful recombinants in the ligation mixture. This DNA fragment is processed for use in a more conventional and straightforward ligase reaction. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by applying it to a variety of difficult ligase reactions.

  17. Transcriptional profile analysis of E3 ligase and hormone-related genes expressed during wheat grain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capron Delphine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat grains are an important source of food, stock feed and raw materials for industry, but current production levels cannot meet world needs. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying wheat grain development will contribute valuable information to improving wheat cultivation. One of the most important mechanisms implicated in plant developmental processes is the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS. Among the different roles of the UPS, it is clear that it is essential to hormone signaling. In particular, E3 ubiquitin ligases of the UPS have been shown to play critical roles in hormone perception and signal transduction. Results A NimbleGen microarray containing 39,179 UniGenes was used to study the kinetics of gene expression during wheat grain development from the early stages of cell division to the mid-grain filling stage. By comparing 11 consecutive time-points, 9284 differentially expressed genes were identified and annotated during this study. A comparison of the temporal profiles of these genes revealed dynamic transcript accumulation profiles with major reprogramming events that occurred during the time intervals of 80-120 and 220-240°Cdays. The list of the genes expressed differentially during these transitions were identified and annotated. Emphasis was placed on E3 ligase and hormone-related genes. In total, 173 E3 ligase coding genes and 126 hormone-related genes were differentially expressed during the cell division and grain filling stages, with each family displaying a different expression profile. Conclusions The differential expression of genes involved in the UPS and plant hormone pathways suggests that phytohormones and UPS crosstalk might play a critical role in the wheat grain developmental process. Some E3 ligase and hormone-related genes seem to be up- or down-regulated during the early and late stages of the grain development.

  18. Statistical Physics Approaches to RNA Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2012-02-01

    The central dogma of molecular Biology states that DNA is transcribed base by base into RNA which is in turn translated into proteins. However, some organisms edit their RNA before translation by inserting, deleting, or substituting individual or short stretches of bases. In many instances the mechanisms by which an organism recognizes the positions at which to edit or by which it performs the actual editing are unknown. One model system that stands out by its very high rate of on average one out of 25 bases being edited are the Myxomycetes, a class of slime molds. In this talk we will show how the computational methods and concepts from statistical Physics can be used to analyze DNA and protein sequence data to predict editing sites in these slime molds and to guide experiments that identified previously unknown types of editing as well as the complete set of editing events in the slime mold Physarum polycephalum.

  19. Label-free electrochemical monitoring of DNA ligase activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacek, Jan; Cahová, Kateřina; Paleček, Emil; Bullard, D.R.; Lavesa-Curto, M.; Bowater, R.P.; Fojta, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 19 (2008), s. 7609-7613 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/07/1195; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA ligase activity * DNA damage electrochemistry Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.712, year: 2008

  20. The Penicillium chrysogenum aclA gene encodes a broad-substrate-specificity acyl-coenzyme A ligase involved in activation of adipic acid, a side-chain precursor for cephem antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, Martijn J.; Gombert, Andreas K.; Fekken, Susan; Bovenberg, Roel A. L.; Van den Berg, Marco A.; Kiel, Jan A. K. W.; Jekel, Peter A.; Janssen, Dick B.; Pronk, Jack T.; Van der Klei, Ida J.; Daran, Jean-Marc

    Activation of the cephalosporin side-chain precursor to the corresponding CoA-thioester is an essential step for its incorporation into the P-lactam backbone. To identify an acyl-CoA ligase involved in activation of adipate, we searched in the genome database of Penicillium chrysogenum for putative

  1. Sculpting ion channel functional expression with engineered ubiquitin ligases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Scott A; Morgenstern, Travis

    2017-01-01

    The functional repertoire of surface ion channels is sustained by dynamic processes of trafficking, sorting, and degradation. Dysregulation of these processes underlies diverse ion channelopathies including cardiac arrhythmias and cystic fibrosis. Ubiquitination powerfully regulates multiple steps in the channel lifecycle, yet basic mechanistic understanding is confounded by promiscuity among E3 ligase/substrate interactions and ubiquitin code complexity. Here we targeted the catalytic domain of E3 ligase, CHIP, to YFP-tagged KCNQ1 ± KCNE1 subunits with a GFP-nanobody to selectively manipulate this channel complex in heterologous cells and adult rat cardiomyocytes. Engineered CHIP enhanced KCNQ1 ubiquitination, eliminated KCNQ1 surface-density, and abolished reconstituted K+ currents without affecting protein expression. A chemo-genetic variation enabling chemical control of ubiquitination revealed KCNQ1 surface-density declined with a ~ 3.5 hr t1/2 by impaired forward trafficking. The results illustrate utility of engineered E3 ligases to elucidate mechanisms underlying ubiquitin regulation of membrane proteins, and to achieve effective post-translational functional knockdown of ion channels. PMID:29256394

  2. Structural insights into the nanomolar affinity of RING E3 ligase ZNRF1 for Ube2N and its functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Adaitya Prasad; Naskar, Pritam; Agarwal, Shubhangi; Banka, Prerana Agarwal; Poddar, Asim; Datta, Ajit B

    2018-04-06

    RING domains in Ubiquitin RING E3 ligases exclusively engage ubiquitin (Ub) loaded E2s to facilitate ubiquitination of their substrates. Despite such specificity, all RINGs characterized till-date bind unloaded E2s with dissociation constants ( K d s) in the micromolar to the sub-millimolar range. Here we show that the RING domain of E3 ligase ZNRF1, an essential E3 ligase implicated in diverse cellular pathways, binds Ube2N with a K d of ~50 nM. This high-affinity interaction is exclusive for Ube2N as ZNRF1 interacts with Ube2D2 with a K d of ~1 µM alike few other E3s. The crystal structure of ZNRF1 C-terminal domain in complex with Ube2N coupled with mutational analyses reveals the molecular basis of this unusual affinity. We further demonstrate that the ubiquitination efficiency of ZNRF1:E2 pairs correlates with their affinity. Intriguingly, as a consequence of its high E2 affinity, an excess of ZNRF1 inhibits Ube2N mediated ubiquitination at concentrations ≥500 nM instead of showing enhanced ubiquitination. This suggests a novel mode of activity regulation of E3 ligases and emphasizes the importance of E3:E2 ratio for the optimum activity. Based on our results we propose that overexpression based functional analyses on E3 ligases such as ZNRF1 must be approached with caution as enhanced cellular levels might result in aberrant modification activity. ©2018 The Author(s).

  3. PIASxα Ligase Enhances SUMO1 Modification of PTEN Protein as a SUMO E3 Ligase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weibin; Chen, Yifan; Wang, Shuya; Hu, Ningguang; Cao, Zhengyi; Wang, Wengong; Tong, Tanjun; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN plays a critical role in the regulation of multiple cellular processes that include survival, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis. PTEN is frequently mutated or deleted in various human cancer cells to promote tumorigenesis. PTEN is regulated by SUMOylation, but the SUMO E3 ligase involved in the SUMOylation of PTEN remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that PIASxα is a SUMO E3 ligase for PTEN. PIASxα physically interacted with PTEN both in vitro and in vivo. Their interaction depended on the integrity of phosphatase and C2 domains of PTEN and the region of PIASxα comprising residues 134–347. PIASxα enhanced PTEN protein stability by reducing PTEN ubiquitination, whereas the mutation of PTEN SUMO1 conjugation sites neutralized the effect of PIASxα on PTEN protein half-life. Functionally, PIASxα, as a potential tumor suppressor, negatively regulated the PI3K-Akt pathway through stabilizing PTEN protein. Overexpression of PIASxα led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, thus triggering cell proliferation inhibition and tumor suppression, whereas PIASxα knockdown or deficiency in catalytic activity abolished the inhibition. Together our studies suggest that PIASxα is a novel SUMO E3 ligase for PTEN, and it positively regulates PTEN protein level in tumor suppression. PMID:24344134

  4. PIASxα ligase enhances SUMO1 modification of PTEN protein as a SUMO E3 ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weibin; Chen, Yifan; Wang, Shuya; Hu, Ningguang; Cao, Zhengyi; Wang, Wengong; Tong, Tanjun; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2014-02-07

    The tumor suppressor PTEN plays a critical role in the regulation of multiple cellular processes that include survival, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis. PTEN is frequently mutated or deleted in various human cancer cells to promote tumorigenesis. PTEN is regulated by SUMOylation, but the SUMO E3 ligase involved in the SUMOylation of PTEN remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that PIASxα is a SUMO E3 ligase for PTEN. PIASxα physically interacted with PTEN both in vitro and in vivo. Their interaction depended on the integrity of phosphatase and C2 domains of PTEN and the region of PIASxα comprising residues 134-347. PIASxα enhanced PTEN protein stability by reducing PTEN ubiquitination, whereas the mutation of PTEN SUMO1 conjugation sites neutralized the effect of PIASxα on PTEN protein half-life. Functionally, PIASxα, as a potential tumor suppressor, negatively regulated the PI3K-Akt pathway through stabilizing PTEN protein. Overexpression of PIASxα led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, thus triggering cell proliferation inhibition and tumor suppression, whereas PIASxα knockdown or deficiency in catalytic activity abolished the inhibition. Together our studies suggest that PIASxα is a novel SUMO E3 ligase for PTEN, and it positively regulates PTEN protein level in tumor suppression.

  5. Successful Conversion of the Bacillus subtilis BirA Group II Biotin Protein Ligase into a Group I Ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Sarah K.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Group II biotin protein ligases (BPLs) are characterized by the presence of an N-terminal DNA binding domain that allows transcriptional regulation of biotin biosynthetic and transport genes whereas Group I BPLs lack this N-terminal domain. The Bacillus subtilis BPL, BirA, is classified as a Group II BPL based on sequence predictions of an N-terminal helix-turn-helix motif and mutational alteration of its regulatory properties. We report evidence that B. subtilis BirA is a Group II BPL that regulates transcription at three genomic sites: bioWAFDBI, yuiG and yhfUTS. Moreover, unlike the paradigm Group II BPL, E. coli BirA, the N-terminal DNA binding domain can be deleted from Bacillus subtilis BirA without adverse effects on its ligase function. This is the first example of successful conversion of a Group II BPL to a Group I BPL with retention of full ligase activity. PMID:24816803

  6. Enzymatic Characterization of a Mutant of Escherichia coli with an Altered DNA Ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrich, Paul; Lehman, I. R.

    1971-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive, radiation-sensitive mutant of Escherichia coli has been assayed for DNA ligase activity in vitro. The strain contains a markedly reduced amount of DNA-joining activity, which is thermolabile. The formation of the ligase-adenylate intermediate is also temperature-sensitive in vitro. Two temperature-resistant revertants of the mutant contain normal amounts of a thermostable ligase. The mutant is killed by growth at 42°C, a temperature at which it displays aberrant DNA synthesis. These results suggest that the ligase is necessary for normal DNA metabolism and viability in this strain. PMID:4995816

  7. Stealing the spotlight: CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase docks WD40-repeat proteins to destroy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hui

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent investigation of Cullin 4 (CUL4 has ushered this class of multiprotein ubiquitin E3 ligases to center stage as critical regulators of diverse processes including cell cycle regulation, developmental patterning, DNA replication, DNA damage and repair, and epigenetic control of gene expression. CUL4 associates with DNA Damage Binding protein 1 (DDB1 to assemble an ubiquitin E3 ligase that targets protein substrates for ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. CUL4 ligase activity is also regulated by the covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to CUL4, or neddylation, and the COP9 signalosome complex (CSN that removes this important modification. Recently, multiple WD40-repeat proteins (WDR were found to interact with DDB1 and serve as the substrate-recognition subunits of the CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase. As more than 150–300 WDR proteins exist in the human genome, these findings impact a wide array of biological processes through CUL4 ligase-mediated proteolysis. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the mechanism of CUL4 ubiquitin E3 ligase and discuss the architecture of CUL4-assembled E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes by comparison to CUL1-based E3s (SCF. Then, we will review several examples to highlight the critical roles of CUL4 ubiquitin ligase in genome stability, cell cycle regulation, and histone lysine methylation. Together, these studies provide insights into the mechanism of this novel ubiquitin ligase in the regulation of important biological processes.

  8. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA–RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; Cantor, Eric J.; Evans, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10−3 s−1 and KM DNA ligase produced only 5′-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a KM ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn2+, but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5′-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3′ side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA. PMID:24203707

  9. Activity-based in vitro selection of T4 DNA ligase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumio; Funabashi, Hisakage; Mie, Masayasu; Endo, Yaeta; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Aizawa, Masuo; Kobatake, Eiry

    2005-01-01

    Recent in vitro methodologies for selection and directed evolution of proteins have concentrated not only on proteins with affinity such as single-chain antibody but also on enzymes. We developed a display technology for selection of T4 DNA ligase on ribosome because an in vitro selection method for DNA ligase had never been developed. The 3' end of mRNA encoding the gene of active or inactive T4 DNA ligase-spacer peptide fusion protein was hybridized to dsDNA fragments with cohesive ends, the substrate of T4 DNA ligase. After in vitro translation of the mRNA-dsDNA complex in a rabbit reticulocyte system, a mRNA-dsDNA-ribosome-ligase complex was produced. T4 DNA ligase enzyme displayed on a ribosome, through addition of a spacer peptide, is able to react with dsDNA in the complex. The complex expressing active ligase was biotinylated by ligation with another biotinylated dsDNA probe and selected with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. We effectively selected active T4 DNA ligase from a small amount of protein. The gene of the active T4 DNA ligase was enriched 40 times from a mixture of active and inactive genes using this selection strategy. This ribosomal display strategy may have high potential to be useful for selection of other enzymes associated with DNA

  10. The SOCS2 ubiquitin ligase complex regulates growth hormone receptor levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Vesterlund

    Full Text Available Growth Hormone is essential for the regulation of growth and the homeostatic control of intermediary metabolism. GH actions are mediated by the Growth Hormone Receptor; a member of the cytokine receptor super family that signals chiefly through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway. Target tissue responsiveness to GH is under regulatory control to avoid excessive and off-target effects upon GHR activation. The suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (SOCS is a key regulator of GHR sensitivity. This is clearly shown in mice where the SOCS2 gene has been inactivated, which show 30-40% increase in body length, a phenotype that is dependent on endogenous GH secretion. SOCS2 is a GH-stimulated, STAT5b-regulated gene that acts in a negative feedback loop to downregulate GHR signalling. Since the biochemical basis for these actions is poorly understood, we studied the molecular function of SOCS2. We demonstrated that SOCS2 is part of a multimeric complex with intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutational analysis shows that the interaction with Elongin B/C controls SOCS2 protein turnover and affects its molecular activity. Increased GHR levels were observed in livers from SOCS2⁻/⁻ mice and in the absence of SOCS2 in in vitro experiments. We showed that SOCS2 regulates cellular GHR levels through direct ubiquitination and in a proteasomally dependent manner. We also confirmed the importance of the SOCS-box for the proper function of SOCS2. Finally, we identified two phosphotyrosine residues in the GHR to be responsible for the interaction with SOCS2, but only Y487 to account for the effects of SOCS2. The demonstration that SOCS2 is an ubiquitin ligase for the GHR unveils the molecular basis for its physiological actions.

  11. Essential thrombocythemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary thrombocythemia; Essential thrombocytosis ... the gums Prolonged bleeding from surgical procedures or tooth removal ... 68. Tefferi A. Polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ...

  12. The ligase chain reaction as a primary screening tool for the detection of culture positive tuberculosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, T M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The ligase chain reaction Mycobacterium tuberculosis assay uses ligase chain reaction technology to detect tuberculous DNA sequences in clinical specimens. A study was undertaken to determine its sensitivity and specificity as a primary screening tool for the detection of culture positive tuberculosis. METHODS: The study was conducted on 2420 clinical specimens (sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, pleural fluid, urine) submitted for primary screening for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to a regional medical microbiology laboratory. Specimens were tested in parallel with smear, ligase chain reaction, and culture. RESULTS: Thirty nine patients had specimens testing positive by the ligase chain reaction assay. Thirty two patients had newly diagnosed tuberculosis, one had a tuberculosis relapse, three had tuberculosis (on antituberculous therapy when tested), and three had healed tuberculosis. In the newly diagnosed group specimens were smear positive in 21 cases (66%), ligase chain reaction positive in 30 cases (94%), and culture positive in 32 cases (100%). Using a positive culture to diagnose active tuberculosis, the ligase chain reaction assay had a sensitivity of 93.9%, a specificity of 99.8%, a positive predictive value of 83.8%, and a negative predictive value of 99.9%. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the largest clinical trial to date to report the efficacy of the ligase chain reaction as a primary screening tool to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The authors conclude that ligase chain reaction is a useful primary screening test for tuberculosis, offering speed and discrimination in the early stages of diagnosis and complementing traditional smear and culture techniques.

  13. Novel inhibitor of DNA ligase IV with a promising cancer therapeutic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 39; Issue 3. Novel inhibitor of DNA ligase IV with a promising cancer therapeutic potential. Ashwin Kotnis Rita Mulherkar. Clipboards Volume 39 Issue 3 June 2014 pp 339-340 ... Keywords. Anti-cancer drug; DNA repair; ligase IV; non-homologous end-joining ...

  14. E3 ubiquitin ligases as drug targets and prognostic biomarkers in melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Bielskienė

    2015-01-01

    E3 ligases are of interest as drug targets for their ability to regulate proteins stability and functions. Compared to the general proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which blocks the entire protein degradation, drugs that target a particular E3 ligase are expected to have better selectivity with less associated toxicity. Components of different E3 ligases complexes (FBW7, MDM2, RBX1/ROC1, RBX2/ROC2, cullins and many others are known as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in melanomagenesis. These proteins participate in regulation of different cellular pathways and such important proteins in cancer development as p53 and Notch. In this review we summarized published data on the role of known E3 ligases in the development of melanoma and discuss the inhibitors of E3 ligases as a novel approach for the treatment of malignant melanomas.

  15. The Salmonella Effector Protein SopA Modulates Innate Immune Responses by Targeting TRIM E3 Ligase Family Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kamanova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium stimulates inflammatory responses in the intestinal epithelium, which are essential for its ability to replicate within the intestinal tract. Stimulation of these responses is strictly dependent on the activity of a type III secretion system encoded within its pathogenicity island 1, which through the delivery of effector proteins, triggers signaling pathways leading to inflammation. One of these effectors is SopA, a HECT-type E3 ligase, which is required for the efficient stimulation of inflammation in an animal model of Salmonella Typhimurium infection. We show here that SopA contributes to the stimulation of innate immune responses by targeting two host E3 ubiquitin ligases, TRIM56 and TRIM65. We also found that TRIM65 interacts with the innate immune receptor MDA5 enhancing its ability to stimulate interferon-β signaling. Therefore, by targeting TRIM56 and TRIM65, SopA can stimulate signaling through two innate immune receptors, RIG-I and MDA5. These findings describe a Salmonella mechanism to modulate inflammatory responses by directly targeting innate immune signaling mechanisms.

  16. Human cytomegalovirus IE1 downregulates Hes1 in neural progenitor cells as a potential E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Juan Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is the leading cause of neurological disabilities in children worldwide, but the mechanisms underlying these disorders are far from well-defined. HCMV infection has been shown to dysregulate the Notch signaling pathway in human neural progenitor cells (NPCs. As an important downstream effector of Notch signaling, the transcriptional regulator Hairy and Enhancer of Split 1 (Hes1 is essential for governing NPC fate and fetal brain development. In the present study, we report that HCMV infection downregulates Hes1 protein levels in infected NPCs. The HCMV 72-kDa immediate-early 1 protein (IE1 is involved in Hes1 degradation by assembling a ubiquitination complex and promoting Hes1 ubiquitination as a potential E3 ubiquitin ligase, followed by proteasomal degradation of Hes1. Sp100A, an important component of PML nuclear bodies, is identified to be another target of IE1-mediated ubiquitination. A C-terminal acidic region in IE1, spanning amino acids 451 to 475, is required for IE1/Hes1 physical interaction and IE1-mediated Hes1 ubiquitination, but is dispensable for IE1/Sp100A interaction and ubiquitination. Our study suggests a novel mechanism linking downregulation of Hes1 protein to neurodevelopmental disorders caused by HCMV infection. Our findings also complement the current knowledge of herpesviruses by identifying IE1 as the first potential HCMV-encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase.

  17. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of Xoo0352, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase A, from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan, Thanh Thi Ngoc; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Kim, Hyesoon; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Lee, Byoung-Moo; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2008-01-01

    Xoo0352, which encodes d-alanine-d-alanine ligase A (DdlA), from X. oryzae pv. oryzae was cloned, purified and crystallized. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of DdlA crystals was performed. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight (BB), which is one of the most devastating diseases of rice in most rice-growing countries. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase A (DdlA), coded by the Xoo0352 gene, was expressed, purified and crystallized. DdlA is an enzyme that is involved in d-alanine metabolism and the biosynthesis of an essential bacterial peptidoglycan precursor, in which it catalyzes the formation of d-alanyl-d-alanine from two d-alanines, and is thus an attractive antibacterial drug target against Xoo. The DdlA crystals diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution and belonged to the primitive tetragonal space group P4 3 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 83.0, c = 97.6 Å. There is one molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding V M of 1.88 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 34.6%. The initial structure was determined by molecular replacement using d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Staphylococcus aureus as a template model

  18. KNIME essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Bakos, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    KNIME Essentials is a practical guide aimed at getting the results you want, as quickly as possible.""Knime Essentials"" is written for data analysts looking to quickly get up to speed using the market leader in data processing tools, KNIME. No knowledge of KNIME is required, but we will assume that you have some background in data processing.

  19. A Comprehensive Atlas of E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Mutations in Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene J. George

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is a posttranslational modification that plays an integral part in mediating diverse cellular functions. The process of protein ubiquitination requires an enzymatic cascade that consists of a ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1, ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (E2 and an E3 ubiquitin ligase (E3. There are an estimated 600–700 E3 ligase genes representing ~5% of the human genome. Not surprisingly, mutations in E3 ligase genes have been observed in multiple neurological conditions. We constructed a comprehensive atlas of disrupted E3 ligase genes in common (CND and rare neurological diseases (RND. Of the predicted and known human E3 ligase genes, we found ~13% were mutated in a neurological disorder with 83 total genes representing 70 different types of neurological diseases. Of the E3 ligase genes identified, 51 were associated with an RND. Here, we provide an updated list of neurological disorders associated with E3 ligase gene disruption. We further highlight research in these neurological disorders and discuss the advanced technologies used to support these findings.

  20. The ubiquitin ligase SCFFBXW7α promotes GATA3 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nan; Cao, Cheng; Tang, Yiman; Bi, Liyuan; Jiang, Yong; Zhou, Yongsheng; Song, Xin; Liu, Ling; Ge, Wenshu

    2018-03-01

    GATA3 is a key transcription factor in cell fate determination and its dysregulation has been implicated in various types of malignancies. However, how the abundance and function of GATA3 are regulated remains unclear. Here, we report that GATA3 is physically associated with FBXW7α, and FBXW7α destabilizes GATA3 through assembly of a SKP1-CUL1-F-box E3 ligase complex. Importantly, we showed that FBXW7α promotes GATA3 ubiquitination and degradation in a GSK3 dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrated that FBXW7α inhibits breast cancer cells survival through destabilizing GATA3, and the expression level of FBXW7α is negatively correlated with that of GATA3 in breast cancer samples. This study indicated that FBXW7α is a critical negative regulator of GATA3 and revealed a pathway for the maintenance of GATA3 abundance in breast cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Protein homeostasis and aging: role of ubiquitin protein ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2012-04-01

    Protein homeostasis is fundamental in normal cellular function and cell survival. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a central role in maintaining the protein homeostasis network through selective elimination of misfolded and damaged proteins. Impaired function of UPS is implicated in normal aging process and also in several age-related neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by increased accumulation oxidatively modified proteins and protein aggregates. Growing literature also indicate the potential role of various ubiquitin protein ligases in the regulation of aging process by enhancing the degradation of either central lifespan regulators or abnormally folded and damaged proteins. This review mainly focuses on our current understanding of the importance of UPS function in the regulation of normal aging process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Topology essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Topology includes an overview of elementary set theory, relations and functions, ordinals and cardinals, topological spaces, continuous functions, metric spaces and normed spaces, co

  3. Astronomy essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Brass, Charles O

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Astronomy includes the historical perspective of astronomy, sky basics and the celestial coordinate systems, a model and the origin of the solar system, the sun, the planets, Kepler'

  4. Papel de E3 ligases na plasticidade muscular esquelética.

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Luchini Baptista

    2012-01-01

    Neste estudo analisamos o envolvimento de E3 ligases sob três aspectos da plasticidade muscular esquelética: a perda de massa decorrente do desuso, a manutenção de fibras tipo I e II e a regeneração do tecido muscular. O primeiro objetivo foi determinar se leucina atenuaria a perda de massa provocada pela atrofia. Nossos dados mostraram que este aminoácido evitou a perda de massa, sobretudo através da inibição da expressão de E3 ligases. A seguir, analisamos se a ausência de duas E3 ligases, ...

  5. Functional characterisation of Burkholderia pseudomallei biotin protein ligase: A toolkit for anti-melioidosis drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Thomas E H; Sorenson, Alanna E; Schaeffer, Patrick M

    2017-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causative agent of melioidosis. The bacterium is responsible for 20% of community-acquired sepsis cases and 40% of sepsis-related mortalities in northeast Thailand, and is intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides, macrolides, rifamycins, cephalosporins, and nonureidopenicillins. There is no vaccine and its diagnosis is problematic. Biotin protein ligase (BirA) which is essential for fatty acid synthesis has been proposed as a drug target in bacteria. Very few bacterial BirA have been characterized, and a better understanding of these enzymes is necessary to further assess their value as drug targets. BirA within the Burkholderia genus have not yet been investigated. We present for the first time the cloning, expression, purification and functional characterisation of the putative Bp BirA and orthologous B. thailandensis (Bt) biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) substrate. A GFP-tagged Bp BirA was produced and applied for the development of a high-throughput (HT) assay based on our differential scanning fluorimetry of GFP-tagged proteins (DSF-GTP) principle as well as an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Our biochemical data in combination with the new HT DSF-GTP and biotinylation activity assay could facilitate future drug screening efforts against this drug-resistant organism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Ubiquitin Ligase ATL31 Functions in Leaf Senescence in Response to the Balance Between Atmospheric CO2 and Nitrogen Availability in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Aoyama, Shoki; Huarancca Reyes, Thais; Guglielminetti, Lorenzo; Lu, Yu; Morita, Yoshie; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2014-01-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are essential elements for metabolism, and their availability, called the C/N balance, must be tightly coordinated for optimal growth in plants. Previously, we have identified the ubiquitin ligase CNI1/ATL31 as a novel C/N regulator by screening plants grown on C/N stress medium containing excess sugar and limited N. To elucidate further the effect of C/N balance on plant growth and to determine the physiological function of ATL31, we performed C/N response analysi...

  7. Prokaryotic BirA ligase biotinylates K4, K9, K18 and K23 in histone H3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobza, Keyna; Sarath, Gautam; Zempleni, Janos

    2008-04-30

    BirA ligase is a prokaryotic ortholog of holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) that can biotinylate proteins. This study tested the hypothesis that BirA ligase catalyzes the biotinylation of eukaryotic histones. If so, this would mean that recombinant BirA ligase is a useful surrogate for HCS in studies of histone biotinylation. The biological activity of recombinant BirA ligase was confirmed by enzymatic biotinylation of p67. In particular, it was found that BirA ligase biotinylated both calf thymus histone H1 and human bulk histone extracts. Incubation of recombinant BirA ligase with H3-based synthetic peptides showed that lysines 4, 9, 18, and 23 in histone H3 are the targets for the biotinylation by BirA ligase. Modification of the peptides (e.g., serine phosphorylation) affected the subsequent biotinylation by BirA ligase, suggesting crosstalk between modifications. In conclusion, this study suggests that prokaryotic BirA ligase is a promiscuous enzyme and biotinylates eukaryotic histones. Moreover the biotinylation of histones by BirA ligase is consistent with the proposed role of human HCS in chromatin.

  8. Structure of the HHARI catalytic domain shows glimpses of a HECT E3 ligase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald E Spratt

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-signaling pathway utilizes E1 activating, E2 conjugating, and E3 ligase enzymes to sequentially transfer the small modifier protein ubiquitin to a substrate protein. During the last step of this cascade different types of E3 ligases either act as scaffolds to recruit an E2 enzyme and substrate (RING, or form an ubiquitin-thioester intermediate prior to transferring ubiquitin to a substrate (HECT. The RING-inBetweenRING-RING (RBR proteins constitute a unique group of E3 ubiquitin ligases that includes the Human Homologue of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI. These E3 ligases are proposed to use a hybrid RING/HECT mechanism whereby the enzyme uses facets of both the RING and HECT enzymes to transfer ubiquitin to a substrate. We now present the solution structure of the HHARI RING2 domain, the key portion of this E3 ligase required for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism. The structure shows the domain possesses two Zn²⁺-binding sites and a single exposed cysteine used for ubiquitin catalysis. A structural comparison of the RING2 domain with the HECT E3 ligase NEDD4 reveals a near mirror image of the cysteine and histidine residues in the catalytic site. Further, a tandem pair of aromatic residues exists near the C-terminus of the HHARI RING2 domain that is conserved in other RBR E3 ligases. One of these aromatic residues is remotely located from the catalytic site that is reminiscent of the location found in HECT E3 enzymes where it is used for ubiquitin catalysis. These observations provide an initial structural rationale for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism for ubiquitination used by the RBR E3 ligases.

  9. KREPA6 is an RNA-binding protein essential for editosome integrity and survival of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, Salvador Zipagan; Schnaufer, Achim; Ernst, Nancy Lewis; Proff, Rosemary; Deng, Junpeng; Hol, Wim; Stuart, Kenneth

    2008-02-01

    Most mitochondrial mRNAs in kinetoplastid protozoa require post-transcriptional RNA editing that inserts and deletes uridylates, a process that is catalyzed by multiprotein editosomes. KREPA6 is the smallest of six editosome proteins that have predicted oligonucleotide-binding (OB) folds. Inactivation of KREPA6 expression results in disruption and ultimate loss of approximately 20S editosomes and inhibition of procyclic form cell growth. Gel shift studies show that recombinant KREPA6 binds RNA, but not DNA, with a preference for oligo-(U) whether on the 3' end of gRNA or as a (UU)(12) homopolymer. Thus, KREPA6 is essential for the structural integrity and presence of approximately 20S editosomes and for cell viability. It functions in RNA binding perhaps primarily through the gRNA 3' oligo(U) tail. The significance of these findings to key steps in editing is discussed.

  10. Essential Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of botulinum toxin as a treatment for a variety of involuntary movement disorders, including essential tremor of the hand. Get information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Tremor Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition ...

  11. Highcharts essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Shahid, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    If you are a web developer with a basic knowledge of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript and want to quickly get started with this web charting technology, this is the book for you. This book will also serve as an essential guide to those who have probably used a similar library and are now looking at migrating to Highcharts.

  12. Swift essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Blewitt, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Whether you are a seasoned Objective-C developer or new to the Xcode platform, Swift Essentials will provide you with all you need to know to get started with the language. Prior experience with iOS development is not necessary, but will be helpful to get the most out of the book.

  13. A conserved regulatory mechanism in bifunctional biotin protein ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingheng; Beckett, Dorothy

    2017-08-01

    Class II bifunctional biotin protein ligases (BirA), which catalyze post-translational biotinylation and repress transcription initiation, are broadly distributed in eubacteria and archaea. However, it is unclear if these proteins all share the same molecular mechanism of transcription regulation. In Escherichia coli the corepressor biotinoyl-5'-AMP (bio-5'-AMP), which is also the intermediate in biotin transfer, promotes operator binding and resulting transcription repression by enhancing BirA dimerization. Like E. coli BirA (EcBirA), Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis BirA (Sa and BsBirA) repress transcription in vivo in a biotin-dependent manner. In this work, sedimentation equilibrium measurements were performed to investigate the molecular basis of this biotin-responsive transcription regulation. The results reveal that, as observed for EcBirA, Sa, and BsBirA dimerization reactions are significantly enhanced by bio-5'-AMP binding. Thus, the molecular mechanism of the Biotin Regulatory System is conserved in the biotin repressors from these three organisms. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  14. Ubiquitin-protein ligases in muscle wasting: multiple parallel pathways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecker, Stewart H.; Goldberg, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Studies in a wide variety of animal models of muscle wasting have led to the concept that increased protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is responsible for the loss of muscle mass seen as muscle atrophy. The complexity of the ubiquitination apparatus has hampered our understanding of how this pathway is activated in atrophying muscles and which ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in muscle are responsible. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent experiments have shown that two newly identified ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s), atrogin-1/MAFbx and MURF-1, are critical in the development of muscle atrophy. Other in-vitro studies also implicated E2(14k) and E3alpha, of the N-end rule pathway, as playing an important role in the process. SUMMARY: It seems likely that multiple pathways of ubiquitin conjugation are activated in parallel in atrophying muscle, perhaps to target for degradation specific classes of muscle proteins. The emerging challenge will be to define the protein targets for, as well as inhibitors of, these E3s.

  15. UHRF2, another E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Fangmin; Yang, Yan; Qian, Guanhua [Department of Cell Biology and Medical Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Duan, Changzhu, E-mail: duanchzhu@cqmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics of Ministry of Education, Faculty of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Cell Biology and Medical Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 associates with p53 in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 interacts with p53 through its SRA/YDG domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 ubiquitinates p53 in vivo and in vitro. -- Abstract: UHRF2, ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 2, is a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is involved in cell cycle and epigenetic regulation. UHRF2 interacts with multiple cell cycle proteins, including cyclins (A2, B1, D1, and E1), CDK2, and pRb; moreover, UHRF2 could ubiquitinate cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Also, UHRF2 has been shown to be implicated in epigenetic regulation by associating with DNMTs, G9a, HDAC1, H3K9me2/3 and hemi-methylated DNA. We found that UHRF2 associates with tumor suppressor protein p53, and p53 is ubiquitinated by UHRF2 in vivo and in vitro. Given that both UHRF2 and p53 are involved in cell cycle regulation, this study may suggest a novel signaling pathway on cell proliferation.

  16. DNA ligase III is involved in a DNA-PK independent pathway of NHEJ in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Perrault, A.R.; Qin, W.; Wang, H.; Iliakis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Double strand breaks (DSB) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and other cytotoxic agents in the genome of higher eukaryotes are thought to be repaired either by homologous recombination repair (HRR), or non-homologous endjoining (NHEJ). We previously reported the operation of two components of NHEJ in vivo: a DNA-PK dependent component that operates with fast kinetics (D-NHEJ), and a DNA-PK independent component that acts as a backup (basic or B-NHEJ) and operates with kinetics an order of magnitude slower. To gain further insight into the mechanisms of B-NHEJ, we investigated DNA endjoining in extracts 180BR, a human cell line deficient in DNA ligase IV, using an in vitro plasmid-based DNA endjoining assay. An anti DNA ligase III antibody inhibited almost completely DNA endjoining activity in these extracts. On the other hand, an anti DNA ligase I antibody had no measurable effect in DNA endjoining activity. Immunodepletion of DNA ligase III from 180BR cell extracts abolished the DNA endjoining activity, which could be restored by addition of purified human DNA ligase IIIb. Full-length DNA ligase III bound to double stranded DNA and stimulated DNA endjoining in both intermolecular and intramolecular ligation. Furthermore, fractionation of HeLa cell extracts demonstrated the presence of an activity stimulating the function of DNA ligase III. Based on these observations we propose that DNA ligase III is the ligase operating in B-NHEJ

  17. Structure and Function of the First Full-Length Murein Peptide Ligase (Mpl) Cell Wall Recycling Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debanu; Hervé, Mireille; Feuerhelm, Julie; Farr, Carol L.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Elsliger, Marc-André; Knuth, Mark W.; Klock, Heath E.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Wilson, Ian A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cell walls contain peptidoglycan, an essential polymer made by enzymes in the Mur pathway. These proteins are specific to bacteria, which make them targets for drug discovery. MurC, MurD, MurE and MurF catalyze the synthesis of the peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine by the sequential addition of amino acids onto UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UDP-MurNAc). MurC-F enzymes have been extensively studied by biochemistry and X-ray crystallography. In Gram-negative bacteria, ∼30–60% of the bacterial cell wall is recycled during each generation. Part of this recycling process involves the murein peptide ligase (Mpl), which attaches the breakdown product, the tripeptide L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelate, to UDP-MurNAc. We present the crystal structure at 1.65 Å resolution of a full-length Mpl from the permafrost bacterium Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4 (PaMpl). Although the Mpl structure has similarities to Mur enzymes, it has unique sequence and structure features that are likely related to its role in cell wall recycling, a function that differentiates it from the MurC-F enzymes. We have analyzed the sequence-structure relationships that are unique to Mpl proteins and compared them to MurC-F ligases. We have also characterized the biochemical properties of this enzyme (optimal temperature, pH and magnesium binding profiles and kinetic parameters). Although the structure does not contain any bound substrates, we have identified ∼30 residues that are likely to be important for recognition of the tripeptide and UDP-MurNAc substrates, as well as features that are unique to Psychrobacter Mpl proteins. These results provide the basis for future mutational studies for more extensive function characterization of the Mpl sequence-structure relationships. PMID:21445265

  18. Predicting the Function of 4-Coumarate:CoA Ligase (LJ4CL1 in Lonicera japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yuan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 4-Coumarate:CoA ligases (4CLs are a group of essential enzymes involved in the pathway of phenylpropanoid-derived compound metabolisms; however it is still difficult to identify orthologs and paralogs of these important enzymes just based on sequence similarity of the conserved domains. Using sequence data of 20 plant species from the public databases and sequences from Lonicera japonica, we define 1252 adenosine monophosphate (AMP-dependent synthetase/ligase sequences and classify them into three phylogenetic clades. 4CLs are in one of the four subgroups, according to their partitioning, with known proteins characterized in A. thaliana and Oryza sativa. We also defined 184 non-redundant sequences that encode proteins containing the GEICIRG motif and the taxonomic distribution of these GEICIRG-containing proteins suggests unique catalytic activities in plants. We further analyzed their transcription levels in L. japonica and L. japonica. var. chinensis flowers and chose the highest expressed genes representing the subgroups for structure and binding site predictions. Coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS analysis of the L. japonica flowers, the structural study on putative substrate binding amino acid residues, ferulate, and 4-coumaric acid of the conserved binding-site of LJ4CL1 leads to a conclusion that this highly expressed protein group in the flowers may process 4-coumarate that represents 90% of the known phenylpropanoid-derived compounds. The activity of purified crude LJ4CL1 protein was analyzed using 4-coumarate as template and high activity indicating that 4-coumarate is one of the substrates of LJ4CL1.

  19. Complete steady-state rate equation for DNA ligase and its use for measuring product kinetic parameters of NAD⁺-dependent DNA ligase from Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B

    2014-05-09

    DNA ligase seals the nicks in the phosphodiester backbone between Okazaki fragments during DNA replication. DNA ligase has an unusual Bi Ter Ping Pong kinetic mechanism. Its substrates in eubacteria are NAD+ and nicked DNA (nDNA). Its products are nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), and sealed DNA. Investigation of the kinetic mechanism and measurement of the kinetic constants of DNA ligase using steady-state kinetics would benefit from the availability of the complete steady-state rate equation, including terms for product concentrations and product-related kinetic constants, which has not previously been published. The rate equations for two possible Bi Ter kinetic mechanisms for DNA ligase, including products, are reported. The mechanisms differ according to whether the last two products, AMP and sealed DNA, are released in an ordered or rapid-equilibrium random (RER) manner. Steady-state kinetic studies of product inhibition by NMN and AMP were performed with Haemophilus influenzae NAD+-dependent DNA ligase. The complete rate equation enabled measurement of dissociation constants for NAD+, NMN, and AMP and eliminated one of 3 possible product release mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic product inhibition experiments and complete steady-state kinetic rate equations were used to measure dissociation constants of NAD+, NMN, and AMP and eliminate the possibility that AMP is the second product released in an ordered mechanism. Determining by steady-state kinetics whether the release of sealed DNA and AMP products goes by an ordered (AMP last off) or RER mechanism was shown to require a product inhibition study using sealed DNA.

  20. Essential SQLAlchemy

    CERN Document Server

    Copeland, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Essential SQLAlchemy introduces a high-level open-source code library that makes it easier for Python programmers to access relational databases such as Oracle, DB2, MySQL, PostgreSQL, and SQLite. SQLAlchemy has become increasingly popular since its release, but it still lacks good offline documentation. This practical book fills the gap, and because a developer wrote it, you get an objective look at SQLAlchemy's tools rather than an advocate's description of all the "cool" features. SQLAlchemy includes both a database server-independent SQL expression language and an object-relational mappe

  1. Linux Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Roderick W

    2012-01-01

    A unique, full-color introduction to Linux fundamentals Serving as a low-cost, secure alternative to expensive operating systems, Linux is a UNIX-based, open source operating system. Full-color and concise, this beginner's guide takes a learning-by-doing approach to understanding the essentials of Linux. Each chapter begins by clearly identifying what you will learn in the chapter, followed by a straightforward discussion of concepts that leads you right into hands-on tutorials. Chapters conclude with additional exercises and review questions, allowing you to reinforce and measure your underst

  2. Prezi essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Domi

    2014-01-01

    If you want to learn Prezi, and specifically design within Prezi, this is the book for you. Perhaps you already know a bit about Prezi but have never used it, or perhaps you have used Prezi before but want to learn how to incorporate your own custom design elements. In either case, this book will get you up and running quickly. It would be helpful to have a bit of familiarity with basic design concepts and the use of Prezi, but prior experience is not essential.

  3. The E3 ligase AtCHIP positively regulates Clp proteolytic subunit homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jia; Qiu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Lin; Hu, Wenjun; Hu, Rongbin; Chen, Jian; Sun, Li; Li, Li; Zhang, Hong; Lv, Zhiqiang; Shen, Guoxin

    2015-09-01

    The caseinolytic peptidase (Clp) core proteins are essential for plant growth and development, especially for chloroplast function. Antisense or overexpression of ClpP4, which is one of the Clp core subunits, causes chlorotic phenotypes in Arabidopsis. An E3 ligase gene, AtCHIP, has previously been found to ubiquitylate ClpP4 in vitro. ClpP4 antisense and overexpressing plants that also overexpressed AtCHIP were constructed to explore the effect of AtCHIP on ClpP4. Overexpression of AtCHIP was found to rescue the chlorotic phenotypes of both ClpP4 antisense and overexpressing plants. The unbalanced levels of Clp core proteins in ClpP4 antisense and overexpressing plants with overexpression of AtCHIP were similar to wild-type levels, suggesting that AtCHIP regulates Clp core proteins. The results also show that AtCHIP can interact with ClpP3 and ClpP5 in yeast and ubiquitylate ClpP3 and ClpP5 in vitro. This suggests that AtCHIP is directly related to ClpP3 and ClpP5. Given these results, the inference is that through selective degradation of Clp subunits, AtCHIP could positively regulate homeostasis of Clp proteolytic subunits and maximize the production of functional chloroplasts. Similar results were obtained from transgenic tobacco plants, suggesting that regulation of the Clp protease by AtCHIP is conserved. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. 4-coumarate: CoA ligase partitions metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Shubhra; Kumar, Ritesh; Chanotiya, Chandan S; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan M; Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Shasany, Ajit K

    2013-08-01

    Biosynthesis of eugenol shares its initial steps with that of lignin, involving conversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to their corresponding coenzyme A (CoA) esters by 4-coumarate:CoA ligases (4CLs). In this investigation, a 4CL (OS4CL) was identified from glandular trichome-rich tissue of Ocimum sanctum with high sequence similarity to an isoform (OB4CL_ctg4) from Ocimum basilicum. The levels of OS4CL and OB4CL_ctg4-like transcripts were highest in O. sanctum trichome, followed by leaf, stem and root. The eugenol content in leaf essential oil was positively correlated with the expression of OS4CL in the leaf at different developmental stages. Recombinant OS4CL showed the highest activity with p-coumaric acid, followed by ferulic, caffeic and trans-cinnamic acids. Transient RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of OS4CL in O. sanctum leaves caused a reduction in leaf eugenol content and trichome transcript level, with a considerable increase in endogenous p-coumaric, ferulic, trans-cinnamic and caffeic acids. A significant reduction in the expression levels was observed for OB4CL_ctg4-related transcripts in suppressed trichome compared with transcripts similar to the other four isoforms (OB4CL_ctg1, 2, 3 and 5). Sinapic acid and lignin content were also unaffected in RNAi suppressed leaf samples. Transient expression of OS4CL-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts was associated with the cytosol. These results indicate metabolite channeling of intermediates towards eugenol by a specific 4CL and is the first report demonstrating the involvement of 4CL in creation of virtual compartments through substrate utilization and committing metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis at an early stage of the pathway.

  5. Overview of the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) E3 ligase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Johannes; Bakke, Oddmund; Morth, J Preben

    2017-09-25

    E3 ligases are critical checkpoints for protein ubiquitination, a signal that often results in protein sorting and degradation but has also been linked to regulation of transcription and DNA repair. In line with their key role in cellular trafficking and cell-cycle control, malfunction of E3 ligases is often linked to human disease. Thus, they have emerged as prime drug targets. However, the molecular basis of action of membrane-bound E3 ligases is still unknown. Here, we review the current knowledge on the membrane-embedded MARCH E3 ligases (MARCH-1-6,7,8,11) with a focus on how the transmembrane regions can contribute via GxxxG-motifs to the selection and recognition of other membrane proteins as substrates for ubiquitination. Further understanding of the molecular parameters that govern target protein recognition of MARCH E3 ligases will contribute to development of strategies for therapeutic regulation of MARCH-induced ubiquitination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mcl-1 Ubiquitination: Unique Regulation of an Essential Survival Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mojsa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family that is essential for the survival of multiple cell lineages and that is highly amplified in human cancer. Under physiological conditions, Mcl-1 expression is tightly regulated at multiple levels, involving transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes. Ubiquitination of Mcl-1, that targets it for proteasomal degradation, allows for rapid elimination of the protein and triggering of cell death, in response to various cellular events. In the last decade, a number of studies have elucidated different pathways controlling Mcl-1 ubiquitination and degradation. Four different E3 ubiquitin-ligases (e.g., Mule, SCFβ-TrCP, SCFFbw7 and Trim17 and one deubiquitinase (e.g., USP9X, that respectively mediate and oppose Mcl-1 ubiquitination, have been formerly identified. The interaction between Mule and Mcl-1 can be modulated by other Bcl-2 family proteins, while recognition of Mcl-1 by the other E3 ubiquitin-ligases and deubiquitinase is influenced by phosphorylation of specific residues in Mcl-1. The protein kinases and E3 ubiquitin-ligases that are involved in the regulation of Mcl-1 stability vary depending on the cellular context, highlighting the complexity and pivotal role of Mcl-1 regulation. In this review, we attempt to recapitulate progress in understanding Mcl-1 regulation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  7. Essential astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2013-01-01

    Essential Astrophysics is a book to learn or teach from, as well as a fundamental reference volume for anyone interested in astronomy and astrophysics. It presents astrophysics from basic principles without requiring any previous study of astronomy or astrophysics. It serves as a comprehensive introductory text, which takes the student through the field of astrophysics in lecture-sized chapters of basic physical principles applied to the cosmos. This one-semester overview will be enjoyed by undergraduate students with an interest in the physical sciences, such as astronomy, chemistry, engineering or physics, as well as by any curious student interested in learning about our celestial science. The mathematics required for understanding the text is on the level of simple algebra, for that is all that is needed to describe the fundamental principles. The text is of sufficient breadth and depth to prepare the interested student for more advanced specialized courses in the future. Astronomical examples are provide...

  8. Butelase 1 is an Asx-specific ligase enabling peptide macrocyclization and synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Giang K T; Wang, Shujing; Qiu, Yibo; Hemu, Xinya; Lian, Yilong; Tam, James P

    2014-09-01

    Proteases are ubiquitous in nature, whereas naturally occurring peptide ligases, enzymes catalyzing the reverse reactions of proteases, are rare occurrences. Here we describe the discovery of butelase 1, to our knowledge the first asparagine/aspartate (Asx) peptide ligase to be reported. This highly efficient enzyme was isolated from Clitoria ternatea, a cyclic peptide-producing medicinal plant. Butelase 1 shares 71% sequence identity and the same catalytic triad with legumain proteases but does not hydrolyze the protease substrate of legumain. Instead, butelase 1 cyclizes various peptides of plant and animal origin with yields greater than 95%. With Kcat values of up to 17 s(-1) and catalytic efficiencies as high as 542,000 M(-1) s(-1), butelase 1 is the fastest peptide ligase known. Notably, butelase 1 also displays broad specificity for the N-terminal amino acids of the peptide substrate, thus providing a new tool for C terminus-specific intermolecular peptide ligations.

  9. The BRCA1 Ubiquitin ligase function sets a new trend for remodelling in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densham, Ruth M; Morris, Joanna R

    2017-03-04

    The protein product of the breast and ovarian cancer gene, BRCA1, is part of an obligate heterodimer with BARD1. Together these RING bearing proteins act as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Several functions have been attributed to BRCA1 that contribute to genome integrity but which of these, if any, require this enzymatic function was unclear. Here we review recent studies clarifying the role of BRCA1 E3 ubiquitin ligase in DNA repair. Perhaps the most surprising finding is the narrow range of BRCA1 functions this activity relates to. Remarkably ligase activity promotes chromatin remodelling and 53BP1 positioning through the remodeller SMARCAD1, but the activity is dispensable for the cellular survival in response to cisplatin or replication stressing agents. Implications for therapy response and tumor susceptibility are discussed.

  10. A new non-catalytic role for ubiquitin ligase RNF8 in unfolding higher-order chromatin structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Acs, Klara; Ackermann, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168 orchestrate DNA damage signalling through the ubiquitylation of histone H2A and the recruitment of downstream repair factors. Here, we demonstrate that RNF8, but not RNF168 or the canonical H2A ubiquitin ligase RNF2, mediates extensive chromatin decondensatio...

  11. Domain structure of a NHEJ DNA repair ligase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Robert S; Tonkin, Louise M; Green, Andrew J; Doherty, Aidan J

    2005-08-19

    A prokaryotic non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) system for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), composed of a Ku homodimer (Mt-Ku) and a multidomain multifunctional ATP-dependent DNA ligase (Mt-Lig), has been described recently in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mt-Lig exhibits polymerase and nuclease activity in addition to DNA ligation activity. These functions were ascribed to putative polymerase, nuclease and ligase domains that together constitute a monomeric protein. Here, the separate polymerase, nuclease and ligase domains of Mt-Lig were cloned individually, over-expressed and the soluble proteins purified to homogeneity. The polymerase domain demonstrated DNA-dependent RNA primase activity, catalysing the synthesis of unprimed oligoribonucleotides on single-stranded DNA templates. The polymerase domain can also extend DNA in a template-dependent manner. This activity was eliminated when the catalytic aspartate residues were replaced with alanine. The ligase domain catalysed the sealing of nicked double-stranded DNA designed to mimic a DSB, consistent with the role of Mt-Lig in NHEJ. Deletion of the active-site lysine residue prevented the formation of an adenylated ligase complex and consequently thwarted ligation. The nuclease domain did not function independently as a 3'-5' exonuclease. DNA-binding assays revealed that both the polymerase and ligase domains bind DNA in vitro, the latter with considerably higher affinity. Mt-Ku directly stimulated the polymerase and nuclease activities of Mt-Lig. The polymerase domain bound Mt-Ku in vitro, suggesting it may recruit Mt-Lig to Ku-bound DNA in vivo. Consistent with these data, Mt-Ku stimulated the primer extension activity of the polymerase domain, suggestive of a functional interaction relevant to NHEJ-mediated DSB repair processes.

  12. Identification of a specific inhibitor for DNA ligase I in human cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, S W; Becker, F F; Chan, J Y

    1992-01-01

    A protein inhibitor for human DNA ligase I has recently been identified. It was copurified with a fraction of the enzymes from HeLa cells through several steps of chromatography. The inhibitor was first identified by the absence of ligation activity of the associated enzyme, while it retained the ability to form the ligase-[32P]AMP adducts. The inhibitor was eluted as a single peak at approximately 0.25-0.30 M NaCl from a Mono S column. It inhibited the ligation of both double-stranded and si...

  13. The E3 Ligase CHIP: Insights into Its Structure and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indranil Paul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The carboxy-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein (CHIP is a cochaperone E3 ligase containing three tandem repeats of tetratricopeptide (TPR motifs and a C-terminal U-box domain separated by a charged coiled-coil region. CHIP is known to function as a central quality control E3 ligase and regulates several proteins involved in a myriad of physiological and pathological processes. Recent studies have highlighted varied regulatory mechanisms operating on the activity of CHIP which is crucial for cellular homeostasis. In this review article, we give a concise account of our current knowledge on the biochemistry and regulation of CHIP.

  14. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Boomsma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Since the accumulation of such proteins is potentially harmful for the cell, their prompt removal is important. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases mediate substrate ubiquitination by bringing together the substrate with an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which transfers ubiquitin to the substrate. For misfolded proteins, substrate recognition is generally delegated to molecular chaperones that subsequently interact with specific E3 ligases. An important exception is San1, a yeast E3 ligase. San1 harbors extensive regions of intrinsic disorder, which provide both conformational flexibility and sites for direct recognition of misfolded targets of vastly different conformations. So far, no mammalian ortholog of San1 is known, nor is it clear whether other E3 ligases utilize disordered regions for substrate recognition. Here, we conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology of their ordered regions, and did not capture the unique disorder patterns that encode the functional mechanism of San1. However, by searching specifically for key features of the San1 sequence, such as long regions of intrinsic disorder embedded with short stretches predicted to be suitable for substrate interaction, we identified several E3 ligases with these characteristics. Our initial analysis revealed that another remarkable trait of San1 is shared with several candidate E3 ligases: long stretches of complete lysine suppression, which in San1 limits auto-ubiquitination. We encode these characteristic features into a San1 similarity-score, and present a set of proteins that are plausible candidates as San1 counterparts in humans. In conclusion, our work

  15. The E3 Ligase CHIP: Insights into Its Structure and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Indranil; Ghosh, Mrinal K.

    2014-01-01

    The carboxy-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein (CHIP) is a cochaperone E3 ligase containing three tandem repeats of tetratricopeptide (TPR) motifs and a C-terminal U-box domain separated by a charged coiled-coil region. CHIP is known to function as a central quality control E3 ligase and regulates several proteins involved in a myriad of physiological and pathological processes. Recent studies have highlighted varied regulatory mechanisms operating on the activity of CHIP which is crucial for cellular homeostasis. In this review article, we give a concise account of our current knowledge on the biochemistry and regulation of CHIP. PMID:24868554

  16. MPSR1 is a cytoplasmic PQC E3 ligase for eliminating emergent misfolded proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hum; Cho, Seok Keun; Oh, Tae Rin; Ryu, Moon Young; Yang, Seong Wook

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitin E3 ligases are crucial for eliminating misfolded proteins before they form cytotoxic aggregates that threaten cell fitness and survival. However, it remains unclear how emerging misfolded proteins in the cytoplasm can be selectively recognized and eliminated by E3 ligases in plants. We found that Misfolded Protein Sensing RING E3 ligase 1 (MPSR1) is an indispensable E3 ligase required for plant survival after protein-damaging stress. Under no stress, MPSR1 is prone to rapid degradation by the 26S proteasome, concealing its protein quality control (PQC) E3 ligase activity. Upon proteotoxic stress, MPSR1 directly senses incipient misfolded proteins and tethers ubiquitins for subsequent degradation. Furthermore, MPSR1 sustains the structural integrity of the proteasome complex at the initial stage of proteotoxic stress. Here, we suggest that the MPSR1 pathway is a constitutive mechanism for proteostasis under protein-damaging stress, as a front-line surveillance system in the cytoplasm. PMID:29087340

  17. Characterization of ubiquitin ligase SlATL31 and proteomic analysis of 14-3-3 targets in tomato fruit tissue (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yu; Yasuda, Shigetaka; Li, Xingwen; Fukao, Yoichiro; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Matsukura, Chiaki; Ezura, Hiroshi; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2016-06-30

    The 14-3-3 proteins participate in many aspects of plant physiology by interacting with phosphorylated proteins and thereby regulating target protein functions. In Arabidopsis plant, the ubiquitin ligase ATL31 controls 14-3-3 stability via both direct interaction and ubiquitination, and this consequently regulates post-germinative growth in response to carbon and nitrogen nutrient availability. Since 14-3-3 proteins regulate the activities of many key enzymes related to nutrient metabolism, one would anticipate that they should play an essential role not only in vegetative but also in reproductive tissue. Because fruit yield largely depends on carbon and nitrogen availability and their utilization, the function of 14-3-3 proteins was analyzed in tomato fruit tissue. Here, we isolated and characterized an ubiquitin ligase SlATL31 (Solyc03g112340) from tomato and demonstrated that SlATL31 has ubiquitin ligase activity as well as interaction with tomato 14-3-3 proteins, suggesting the possibility that the SlATL31 functions as an ubiquitin ligase for 14-3-3 similarly to its Arabidopsis ortholog. Furthermore, we performed proteomic analysis of 14-3-3 interacting proteins and identified 106 proteins as putative 14-3-3 targets including key enzymes for carbon metabolism and photosynthesis. This 14-3-3 interactome result and available transcriptome profile suggest a considerable yet complex role of 14-3-3 proteins in tomato fruit tissue. Considerable cumulative evidence exists which implies that 14-3-3 proteins are involved in the regulation of plant primary metabolism. Here we provide the first report of 14-3-3 interactome analysis and identify putative 14-3-3 targets in tomato fruit tissue, which may be highly important given the documented metabolic shifts, which occur during fruit development and ripening. These data open future research avenues by which to understand the regulation of the role of post-translational regulation in tomato fruit development. Copyright

  18. Exercise induced upregulation of glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit gene expression in Thoroughbred horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Woong Park

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study was performed to reveal the molecular structure and expression patterns of horse glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM genes whose products form glutamate cysteine ligase, which were identified as differentially expressed genes in the previous study. Methods We performed bioinformatics analyses, and gene expression assay with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR for horse GCLC and GCLM genes in muscle and blood leukocytes of Thoroughbred horses Results Expression of GCLC showed the same pattern in both blood and muscle tissues after exercise. Expression of GCLC increased in the muscle and blood of Thoroughbreds, suggesting a tissue-specific regulatory mechanism for the expression of GCLC. In addition, expression of the GCLM gene increased after exercise in both the blood and muscle of Thoroughbreds. Conclusion We established the expression patterns of GCLC and GCLM in the skeletal muscle and blood of Thoroughbred horses in response to exercise. Further study is now warranted to uncover the functional importance of these genes in exercise and recovery in racehorses.

  19. The Host E3-Ubiquitin Ligase TRIM6 Ubiquitinates the Ebola Virus VP35 Protein and Promotes Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharaj, Preeti; Atkins, Colm; Luthra, Priya; Giraldo, Maria Isabel; Dawes, Brian E; Miorin, Lisa; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Krogan, Nevan J; Basler, Christopher F; Freiberg, Alexander N; Rajsbaum, Ricardo

    2017-09-15

    Ebola virus (EBOV), a member of the Filoviridae family, is a highly pathogenic virus that causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and is responsible for epidemics throughout sub-Saharan, central, and West Africa. The EBOV genome encodes VP35, an important viral protein involved in virus replication by acting as an essential cofactor of the viral polymerase as well as a potent antagonist of the host antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) system. By using mass spectrometry analysis and coimmunoprecipitation assays, we show here that VP35 is ubiquitinated on lysine 309 (K309), a residue located on its IFN antagonist domain. We also found that VP35 interacts with TRIM6, a member of the E3-ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif (TRIM) family. We recently reported that TRIM6 promotes the synthesis of unanchored K48-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are not covalently attached to any protein, to induce efficient antiviral IFN-I-mediated responses. Consistent with this notion, VP35 also associated noncovalently with polyubiquitin chains and inhibited TRIM6-mediated IFN-I induction. Intriguingly, we also found that TRIM6 enhances EBOV polymerase activity in a minigenome assay and TRIM6 knockout cells have reduced replication of infectious EBOV, suggesting that VP35 hijacks TRIM6 to promote EBOV replication through ubiquitination. Our work provides evidence that TRIM6 is an important host cellular factor that promotes EBOV replication, and future studies will focus on whether TRIM6 could be targeted for therapeutic intervention against EBOV infection. IMPORTANCE EBOV belongs to a family of highly pathogenic viruses that cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and other mammals with high mortality rates (40 to 90%). Because of its high pathogenicity and lack of licensed antivirals and vaccines, EBOV is listed as a tier 1 select-agent risk group 4 pathogen. An important mechanism for the severity of EBOV infection is its suppression of innate immune responses. The EBOV VP35

  20. Nonperiodic activity of the human anaphase-promoting complex-Cdh1 ubiquitin ligase results in continuous DNA synthesis uncoupled from mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, C; Kramer, E R; Peters, J M

    2000-01-01

    Ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated destruction of rate-limiting proteins is required for timely progression through the main cell cycle transitions. The anaphase-promoting complex (APC), periodically activated by the Cdh1 subunit, represents one of the major cellular ubiquitin ligases which, in Saccha......Ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated destruction of rate-limiting proteins is required for timely progression through the main cell cycle transitions. The anaphase-promoting complex (APC), periodically activated by the Cdh1 subunit, represents one of the major cellular ubiquitin ligases which......, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila spp., triggers exit from mitosis and during G(1) prevents unscheduled DNA replication. In this study we investigated the importance of periodic oscillation of the APC-Cdh1 activity for the cell cycle progression in human cells. We show that conditional interference...... transition and lowered the rate of DNA synthesis during S phase, some of the activities essential for DNA replication became markedly amplified, mainly due to a progressive increase of E2F-dependent cyclin E transcription and a rapid turnover of the p27(Kip1) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Consequently...

  1. A cost-effective method for Illumina small RNA-Seq library preparation using T4 RNA ligase 1 adenylated adapters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yun-Ru

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sequencing is a powerful tool for novel small RNA discovery. Illumina small RNA sequencing library preparation requires a pre-adenylated 3’ end adapter containing a 5’,5’-adenyl pyrophosphoryl moiety. In the absence of ATP, this adapter can be ligated to the 3’ hydroxyl group of small RNA, while RNA self-ligation and concatenation are repressed. Pre-adenylated adapters are one of the most essential and costly components required for library preparation, and few are commercially available. Results We demonstrate that DNA oligo with 5’ phosphate and 3’ amine groups can be enzymatically adenylated by T4 RNA ligase 1 to generate customized pre-adenylated adapters. We have constructed and sequenced a small RNA library for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum using the T4 RNA ligase 1 adenylated adapter. Conclusion We provide an efficient and low-cost method for small RNA sequencing library preparation, which takes two days to complete and costs around $20 per library. This protocol has been tested in several plant species for small RNA sequencing including sweet potato, pepper, watermelon, and cowpea, and could be readily applied to any RNA samples.

  2. Post-transcriptional regulation of lipoprotein receptors by the E3-ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Zelcer, Noam

    2012-06-01

    The hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway is essential for clearing circulating LDL and is an important therapeutic target for treating cardiovascular disease. Abundance of the LDLR is subject to both transcriptional and nontranscriptional control. Here, we highlight a new post-transcriptional mechanism for controlling LDLR function via ubiquitination of the receptor by the E3-ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDLR (IDOL). IDOL is a recently identified transcriptional target of the liver X receptors. Acting as an E3-ubiquitin ligase IDOL promotes ubiquitination of the LDLR, thereby marking it for lysosomal degradation. The determinants required for degradation of the LDLR by IDOL have been largely identified. IDOL also targets two related lipoprotein receptors, the very low-density lipoprotein receptor and apolipoprotein E receptor 2. Despite several similarities, the IDOL, and PCSK9 pathways for controlling LDLR abundance seem independent of each other. Genome-wide association studies have recently identified IDOL as a locus influencing variability in circulating levels of LDL, thereby highlighting the possible role of IDOL in human lipoprotein metabolism. Transcriptional induction of IDOL by liver X receptor defines a new post-transcriptional pathway for controlling LDLR abundance and LDL uptake independent of sterol regulatory element binding proteins. Targeting IDOL activity may offer a novel therapeutic approach complementary to statins for treating cardiovascular disease.

  3. The effects of microgravity on ligase activity in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, A; Ohnishi, K; Takahashi, S; Masukawa, M; Sekikawa, K; Amano, T; Nakano, T; Nagaoka, S; Ohnishi, T

    2000-06-01

    In recent years, contradictory data have been reported about the effects of microgravity on radiation-induced biological responses in space experiments. The aim of the present study was to clarify whether enzymatic repair of DNA double-strand breaks is affected by microgravity using an in vitro enzymatic reaction system. The DNA repair activity of T4 DNA ligase (EC 6.5.1.1) was measured in vitro for a DNA substrate damaged by restriction enzyme digestion during a US Space Shuttle mission (Discovery; STS-91). After the flight, the amount of ligated DNA molecules was measured using an electrophoresis method. Ligated products (closed circular DNA, open circular DNA and multimeric ligated products) were produced by T4 DNA ligase treatment of linear DNA containing double-strand breaks, and they increased with increasing T4 DNA ligase concentration (0-3 units per microg of plasmid DNA). Almost no difference in T4 DNA ligase activity was detected between the space experiments and the control ground experiments. No significant effect of microgravity on ligation of damaged DNA was found during space flight. Therefore, other mechanisms must account for the synergism between radiation and microgravity, if it exists.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Li, Lan-Fen [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Tang, De-Wei [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liu, Xiang-Yu [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, Xiaojun, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liang, Yu-He, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn; Su, Xiao-Dong [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China)

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-01-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni 2+ -chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3 1 21 or P3 2 21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit

  6. Membrane-localized ubiquitin ligase ATL15 functions in sugar-responsive growth regulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Shoki; Terada, Saki; Sanagi, Miho; Hasegawa, Yoko; Lu, Yu; Morita, Yoshie; Chiba, Yukako; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2017-09-09

    Ubiquitin ligases play important roles in regulating various cellular processes by modulating the protein function of specific ubiquitination targets. The Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) family is a group of plant-specific RING-type ubiquitin ligases that localize to membranes via their N-terminal transmembrane-like domains. To date, 91 ATL isoforms have been identified in the Arabidopsis genome, with several ATLs reported to be involved in regulating plant responses to environmental stresses. However, the functions of most ATLs remain unknown. This study, involving transcriptome database analysis, identifies ATL15 as a sugar responsive ATL gene in Arabidopsis. ATL15 expression was rapidly down-regulated in the presence of sugar. The ATL15 protein showed ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and localized to plasma membrane and endomembrane compartments. Further genetic analyses demonstrated that the atl15 knockout mutants are insensitive to high glucose concentrations, whereas ATL15 overexpression depresses plant growth. In addition, endogenous glucose and starch amounts were reciprocally affected in the atl15 knockout mutants and the ATL15 overexpressors. These results suggest that ATL15 protein plays a significant role as a membrane-localized ubiquitin ligase that regulates sugar-responsive plant growth in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Schizophrenia and oxidative stress: glutamate cysteine ligase modifier as a susceptibility gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosic, Mirjana; Ott, Jurg; Barral, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress could be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, a major psychiatric disorder. Glutathione (GSH), a redox regulator, is decreased in patients' cerebrospinal fluid and prefrontal cortex. The gene of the key GSH-synthesizing enzyme, glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM...

  8. Peroxisomal lignoceroyl-CoA ligase deficiency in childhood adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenomyeloneuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazo, O.; Contreras, M.; Hashmi, M.; Stanley, W.; Irazu, C.; Singh, I. (Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston (USA))

    1988-10-01

    The authors previously reported that in childhood adrenoleukodystrophy (C-ALD) and adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), the peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation system for very long chain fatty acids is defective. To further define the defect in these two forms of X chromosome-linked ALD, they examined the oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid (n-tetracosanoic acid, C24:0) and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceroyl-CoA (substrates for the first and second steps of {beta}-oxidation, respectively). The oxidation rates of lignoceric acid in C-ALD and AMN were 43% and 36% of control values, respectively, whereas the oxidation rate of lignoceroyl-CoA was 109% (C-ALD) and 106% (AMN) of control values, respectively. These results suggest that lignoceroyl-CoA ligase activity may be impaired in C-ALD and AMN. To identify the specific enzymatic deficiency and its subcellular localization in C-ALD and AMN, they established a modified procedure for the subcellular fractionation of cultured skin fibroblasts. Determination of acyl-CoA ligase activities provided direct evidence that lignoceroyl-CoA ligase is deficient in peroxisomes while it is normal in mitochondria and microsomes. These data clearly demonstrate that the pathognomonic accumulation of very long chain fatty acids in C-ALD and AMN is due to a deficiency of peroxisomal very long chain (lignoceric acid) acyl-CoA ligase.

  9. The Role of Ubiquitin E3 Ligase SCF-SKP2 in Prostate Cancer Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Hui

    2007-01-01

    .... Loss of tumor suppressors p53 and Pten is also associated with prostate cancers. We found that p27 is regulated by both SCF-SKP2 and a novel ubiquitin E3 ligase containing CUL4-DDB1-WD40-repeat proteins...

  10. Novel inhibitor of DNA ligase IV with a promising cancer therapeutic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 39; Issue 3. Novel inhibitor of DNA ligase IV with a promising cancer therapeutic potential. Ashwin Kotnis Rita Mulherkar. Clipboards Volume 39 Issue 3 June 2014 pp 339-340. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Single-stranded DNA library preparation from highly degraded DNA using T4 DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Gerber, Tobias; Glocke, Isabelle; Korlevic, Petra; Lippik, Laurin; Nagel, Sarah; Riehl, Lara Maria; Schmidt, Anna; Meyer, Matthias

    2017-06-02

    DNA library preparation for high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA usually involves ligation of adapters to double-stranded DNA fragments. However, for highly degraded DNA, especially ancient DNA, library preparation has been found to be more efficient if each of the two DNA strands are converted into library molecules separately. We present a new method for single-stranded library preparation, ssDNA2.0, which is based on single-stranded DNA ligation with T4 DNA ligase utilizing a splinter oligonucleotide with a stretch of random bases hybridized to a 3΄ biotinylated donor oligonucleotide. A thorough evaluation of this ligation scheme shows that single-stranded DNA can be ligated to adapter oligonucleotides in higher concentration than with CircLigase (an RNA ligase that was previously chosen for end-to-end ligation in single-stranded library preparation) and that biases in ligation can be minimized when choosing splinters with 7 or 8 random nucleotides. We show that ssDNA2.0 tolerates higher quantities of input DNA than CircLigase-based library preparation, is less costly and better compatible with automation. We also provide an in-depth comparison of library preparation methods on degraded DNA from various sources. Most strikingly, we find that single-stranded library preparation increases library yields from tissues stored in formalin for many years by several orders of magnitude. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Inhibitors of ubiquitin E3 ligase as potential new antimalarial drug leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ubiquitin/proteasome pathway is the principal system for degradation of proteins in eukaryotes. Ubiquitin is a highly conserved polypeptide that covalently attaches to target proteins through the combined action ofubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1), conjugating enzyme (E2) and a protein ligase (E...

  13. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke

    2016-01-01

    ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling in human cells by facilitating the generation of RPA-bound single-stranded DNA regions upon replication stress in a manner that critically requires its E3 ligase activity and is potentiated by the PIP box. Consequently, loss of TRAIP function leads to enhanced...

  14. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Nielsen, Sofie Vincents; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2016-01-01

    conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology...

  15. In vitro selection of optimal DNA substrates for T4 RNA ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 RNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligated about 10 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly, the majority of the selected sequences approximated a well-defined consensus sequence.

  16. The substrate binding domains of human SIAH E3 ubiquitin ligases are now crystal clear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zhongduo; Hou, Feng; Harding, Rachel; Huang, Xinyi; Dong, Aiping; Walker, John R.; Tong, Yufeng

    2017-01-01

    Seven in absentia homologs (SIAHs) comprise a family of highly conserved E3 ubiquitin ligases that play an important role in regulating signalling pathways in tumorigenesis, including the DNA damage repair and hypoxia response pathways. SIAH1 and SIAH2 have been found to function as a tumour repressor and a proto-oncogene, respectively, despite the high sequence identity of their substrate binding domains (SBDs). Ubiquitin-specific protease USP19 is a deubiquitinase that forms a complex with SIAHs and counteracts the ligase function. Much effort has been made to find selective inhibitors of the SIAHs E3 ligases. Menadione was reported to inhibit SIAH2 specifically. We used X-ray crystallography, peptide array, bioinformatic analysis, and biophysical techniques to characterize the structure and interaction of SIAHs with deubiquitinases and literature reported compounds. We solved the crystal structures of SIAH1 in complex with a USP19 peptide and of the apo form SIAH2. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the SIAH/USP19 complex is conserved in evolution. We demonstrated that menadione destabilizes both SIAH1 and SIAH2 non-specifically through covalent modification. The SBDs of SIAH E3 ligases are structurally similar with a subtle stability difference. USP19 is the only deubiquitinase that directly binds to SIAHs through the substrate binding pocket. Menadione is not a specific inhibitor for SIAH2. The crystallographic models provide structural insights into the substrate binding of the SIAH family E3 ubiquitin ligases that are critically involved in regulating cancer-related pathways. Our results suggest caution should be taken when using menadione as a specific SIAH2 inhibitor.

  17. Novel compound heterozygous DNA ligase IV mutations in an adolescent with a slowly-progressing radiosensitive-severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Shinobu; Higuchi, Kohei; Tamaki, Masaharu; Inoue, Chizuko; Awazawa, Ryoko; Mitsuki, Noriko; Nakazawa, Yuka; Mishima, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kenzo; Kondo, Osamu; Imai, Kohsuke; Morio, Tomohiro; Ohara, Osamu; Ogi, Tomoo; Furukawa, Fukumi; Inoue, Masami; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kanazawa, Nobuo

    2015-10-01

    We herein describe a case of a 17-year-old boy with intractable common warts, short stature, microcephaly and slowly-progressing pancytopenia. Simultaneous quantification of T-cell receptor recombination excision circles (TREC) and immunoglobulin κ-deleting recombination excision circles (KREC) suggested very poor generation of both T-cells and B-cells. By whole exome sequencing, novel compound heterozygous mutations were identified in the patient's DNA ligase IV (LIG4) gene. The diagnosis of LIG4 syndrome was confirmed by delayed DNA double-strand break repair kinetics in γ-irradiated fibroblasts from the patient and their restoration by an introduction of wild-type LIG4. Although the patient received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from his haploidentical mother, he unfortunately expired due to an insufficiently reconstructed immune system. An earlier definitive diagnosis using TREC/KREC quantification and whole exome sequencing would thereby allow earlier intervention, which would be essential for improving long-term survival in similar cases with slowly-progressing LIG4 syndrome masked in adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation of mitosis-meiosis transition by the ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP in male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tadashi; Zhang, Teng; Kushi, Ryo; Nakano, Seiji; Endo, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Makiko; Yanagihara, Noriko; Zarkower, David; Nakayama, Keiko

    2017-11-15

    The mitosis-meiosis transition is essential for spermatogenesis. Specific and timely downregulation of the transcription factor DMRT1, and consequent induction of Stra8 expression, is required for this process in mammals, but the molecular mechanism has remained unclear. Here, we show that β-TrCP, the substrate recognition component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, targets DMRT1 for degradation and thereby controls the mitosis-meiosis transition in mouse male germ cells. Conditional inactivation of β-TrCP2 in male germ cells of β-TrCP1 knockout mice resulted in sterility due to a lack of mature sperm. The β-TrCP-deficient male germ cells did not enter meiosis, but instead underwent apoptosis. The induction of Stra8 expression was also attenuated in association with the accumulation of DMRT1 at the Stra8 promoter in β-TrCP-deficient testes. DMRT1 contains a consensus β-TrCP degron sequence that was found to bind β-TrCP. Overexpression of β-TrCP induced the ubiquitylation and degradation of DMRT1. Heterozygous deletion of Dmrt1 in β-TrCP-deficient spermatogonia increased meiotic cells with a concomitant reduction of apoptosis. Collectively, our data indicate that β-TrCP regulates the transition from mitosis to meiosis in male germ cells by targeting DMRT1 for degradation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. An E3 ubiquitin ligase prevents ectopic localization of the centromeric histone H3 variant via the centromere targeting domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjitkar, Prerana; Press, Maximilian O; Yi, Xianhua; Baker, Richard; MacCoss, Michael J; Biggins, Sue

    2010-11-12

    Proper centromere function is critical to maintain genomic stability and to prevent aneuploidy, a hallmark of tumors and birth defects. A conserved feature of all eukaryotic centromeres is an essential histone H3 variant called CENP-A that requires a centromere targeting domain (CATD) for its localization. Although proteolysis prevents CENP-A from mislocalizing to euchromatin, regulatory factors have not been identified. Here, we identify an E3 ubiquitin ligase called Psh1 that leads to the degradation of Cse4, the budding yeast CENP-A homolog. Cse4 overexpression is toxic to psh1Δ cells and results in euchromatic localization. Strikingly, the Cse4 CATD is a key regulator of its stability and helps Psh1 discriminate Cse4 from histone H3. Taken together, we propose that the CATD has a previously unknown role in maintaining the exclusive localization of Cse4 by preventing its mislocalization to euchromatin via Psh1-mediated degradation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of a SUMO Ligase that is Essential for DNA Damage-Induced NF-Kappa B Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    from pcDNA3.1(+) 2×HA–NEMO template. pcDNA3 2×HA–NEMO K277A and K309A mutants were generated through subcloning of pcDNA3 6×Myc–NEMO K277A and K309A...cloning are available on request. All constructs were verified by DNA sequencing. Xenopus pET28a–PIASy was subcloned into the pcDNA3–Myc3 vector...overexpression of Ubc9 or SUMO-1 inhibited NF-kB transcriptional activity induced by TNFa, IL-1 and okadaic acid as measured by an NF-kB- dependent HIV -LTR

  1. Architecture of the trypanosome RNA editing accessory complex, MRB1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ammerman, M. L.; Downey, K. M.; Hashimi, Hassan; Fisk, J. C.; Tomasello, D. L.; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Kafková, L.; King, T.; Lukeš, Julius; Read, L. K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 12 (2012), s. 5637-5650 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : BINDING COMPLEX * PROTEIN * BRUCEI * TANDEM * TRANSCRIPTOME * MITOCHONDRIA * INTERACTS * TBRGG2 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.278, year: 2012 http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/content/40/12/5637.full

  2. Guide totheNomenclatureofKinetoplastidRNA Editing: AProposal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simpson, L.; Aphasizhev, R.; Lukeš, Julius; Cruz-Reyes, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 161, č. 1 (2010), s. 2-6 ISSN 1434-4610 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : TRYPANOSOMA-BRUCEI MITOCHONDRIA * BINDING COMPLEX * EDITOSOME INTEGRITY * MESSENGER-RNA * U-DELETION * LEISHMANIA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.329, year: 2010

  3. A screen for E3 ubiquitination ligases that genetically interact with the adaptor protein Cindr during Drosophila eye patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketosugbo, Kwami F; Bushnell, Henry L; Johnson, Ruth I

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a crucial post-translational modification that can target proteins for degradation. The E3 ubiquitin ligases are responsible for recognizing substrate proteins for ubiquitination, hence providing specificity to the process of protein degradation. Here, we describe a genetic modifier screen that identified E3 ligases that modified the rough-eye phenotype generated by expression of cindrRNAi transgenes during Drosophila eye development. In total, we identified 36 E3 ligases, as well as 4 Cullins, that modified the mild cindrRNA mis-patterning phenotype. This indicates possible roles for these E3s/Cullins in processes that require Cindr function, including cytoskeletal regulation, cell adhesion, cell signaling and cell survival. Three E3 ligases identified in our screen had previously been linked to regulating JNK signaling.

  4. Arabidopsis DNA ligase IV is induced by gamma-irradiation and interacts with an Arabidopsis homologue of the double strand break repair protein XRCC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C E; Waterworth, W M; Jiang, Q; Bray, C M

    2000-10-01

    Rejoining of single- and double-strand breaks (DSBs) introduced in DNA during replication, recombination, and DNA damage is catalysed by DNA ligase enzymes. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligase enzymes, each having distinct roles in cellular metabolism. Double-strand breaks in DNA, which can occur spontaneously in the cell or be induced experimentally by gamma-irradiation, represent one of the most serious threats to genomic integrity. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) rather than homologous recombination is the major pathway for repair of DSBs in organisms with complex genomes, including humans and plants. DNA ligase IV in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans catalyses the final step in the NHEJ pathway of DSB repair. In this study we identify an Arabidopsis thaliana homologue (AtLIG4) of human and S. cerevisiae DNA ligase IV which is shown to encode an ATP-dependent DNA ligase with a theoretical molecular mass of 138 kDa and 48% similarity in amino-acid sequence to the human DNA ligase IV. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated a strong interaction between A. thaliana DNA ligase IV and the A. thaliana homologue of the human DNA ligase IV-binding protein XRCC4. This interaction is shown to be mediated via the tandem BRCA C-terminal domains of A. thaliana DNA ligase IV protein. Expression of AtLIG4 is induced by gamma-irradiation but not by UVB irradiation, consistent with an in vivo role for the A. thaliana DNA ligase IV in DSB repair.

  5. DNA ligase 1 deficient plants display severe growth defects and delayed repair of both DNA single and double strand breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray Clifford M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA ligase enzymes catalyse the joining of adjacent polynucleotides and as such play important roles in DNA replication and repair pathways. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligases with distinct roles in DNA metabolism, with clear differences in the functions of DNA ligase orthologues between animals, yeast and plants. DNA ligase 1, present in all eukaryotes, plays critical roles in both DNA repair and replication and is indispensable for cell viability. Results Knockout mutants of atlig1 are lethal. Therefore, RNAi lines with reduced levels of AtLIG1 were generated to allow the roles and importance of Arabidopsis DNA ligase 1 in DNA metabolism to be elucidated. Viable plants were fertile but displayed a severely stunted and stressed growth phenotype. Cell size was reduced in the silenced lines, whilst flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of cells in S-phase in atlig1-RNAi lines relative to wild type plants. Comet assay analysis of isolated nuclei showed atlig1-RNAi lines displayed slower repair of single strand breaks (SSBs and also double strand breaks (DSBs, implicating AtLIG1 in repair of both these lesions. Conclusion Reduced levels of Arabidopsis DNA ligase 1 in the silenced lines are sufficient to support plant development but result in retarded growth and reduced cell size, which may reflect roles for AtLIG1 in both replication and repair. The finding that DNA ligase 1 plays an important role in DSB repair in addition to its known function in SSB repair, demonstrates the existence of a previously uncharacterised novel pathway, independent of the conserved NHEJ. These results indicate that DNA ligase 1 functions in both DNA replication and in repair of both ss and dsDNA strand breaks in higher plants.

  6. Mutation screening of the glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) gene in patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butticaz, Christophe; Werge, Thomas; Beckmann, Jacques S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental evidences show that glutathione and its rate-limiting synthesizing enzyme, the glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), are involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Furthermore, genetic association has been previously reported between two single nucleotide polymorphisms lying...... in noncoding regions of glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) gene, which specifies for the modifier subunit of GCL and schizophrenia. OBJECTIVE: We wanted to investigate the presence of GCLM true functional mutations, likely in linkage disequilibrium with the previously identified single nucleotide...... relationship of any of these DNA variants with schizophrenia. CONCLUSION: It is unlikely that functional mutations in the GCLM gene could play a major role in genetic predisposition to schizophrenia and further studies will be required to assess its etiological function in the disease....

  7. Structure and catalytic activation of the TRIM23 RING E3 ubiquitin ligase: DAWIDZIAK et al.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawidziak, Daria M. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville Virginia; Sanchez, Jacint G. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville Virginia; Wagner, Jonathan M. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville Virginia; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville Virginia; Pornillos, Owen [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville Virginia

    2017-07-24

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins comprise a large family of RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligases that regulate important biological processes. An emerging general model is that TRIMs form elongated antiparallel coiled-coil dimers that prevent interaction of the two attendant RING domains. The RING domains themselves bind E2 conjugating enzymes as dimers, implying that an active TRIM ligase requires higher-order oligomerization of the basal coiled-coil dimers. Here, we report crystal structures of the TRIM23 RING domain in isolation and in complex with an E2–ubiquitin conjugate. Our results indicate that TRIM23 enzymatic activity requires RING dimerization, consistent with the general model of TRIM activation.

  8. How a disordered ubiquitin ligase maintains order in nuclear protein homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Joel C; Gardner, Richard G

    2011-01-01

    Cells use protein quality control (PQC) systems to protect themselves from potentially harmful misfolded proteins. Many misfolded proteins are repaired by molecular chaperones, but irreparably damaged proteins must be destroyed. Eukaryotes predominantly destroy these abnormally folded proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, which requires compartment-specific ubiquitin ligase complexes that mark substrates with ubiquitin for proteasome degradation. In the yeast nucleus, misfolded proteins are targeted for degradation by the ubiquitin ligase San1, which binds misfolded nuclear proteins directly and does not appear to require chaperones for substrate binding. San1 is also remarkably adaptable, as it is capable of ubiquitinating a structurally diverse assortment of abnormally folded substrates. We attribute this adaptability to San1's high degree of structural disorder, which provides flexibility and allows San1 to conform to differently shaped substrates. Here we review our recent work characterizing San1's distinctive mode of substrate recognition and the associated implications for PQC in the nucleus.

  9. Identification of HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase family genes involved in stem cell regulation and regeneration in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Jordana M; Nisperos, Sean V; Weeks, Joi; Ghulam, Mahjoobah; Marín, Ignacio; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2015-08-15

    E3 ubiquitin ligases constitute a large family of enzymes that modify specific proteins by covalently attaching ubiquitin polypeptides. This post-translational modification can serve to regulate protein function or longevity. In spite of their importance in cell physiology, the biological roles of most ubiquitin ligases remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the function of the HECT domain family of E3 ubiquitin ligases in stem cell biology and tissue regeneration in planarians. Using bioinformatic searches, we identified 17 HECT E3 genes that are expressed in the Schmidtea mediterranea genome. Whole-mount in situ hybridization experiments showed that HECT genes were expressed in diverse tissues and most were expressed in the stem cell population (neoblasts) or in their progeny. To investigate the function of all HECT E3 ligases, we inhibited their expression using RNA interference (RNAi) and determined that orthologs of huwe1, wwp1, and trip12 had roles in tissue regeneration. We show that huwe1 RNAi knockdown led to a significant expansion of the neoblast population and death by lysis. Further, our experiments showed that wwp1 was necessary for both neoblast and intestinal tissue homeostasis as well as uncovered an unexpected role of trip12 in posterior tissue specification. Taken together, our data provide insights into the roles of HECT E3 ligases in tissue regeneration and demonstrate that planarians will be a useful model to evaluate the functions of E3 ubiquitin ligases in stem cell regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Classification, expression pattern, and E3 ligase activity assay of rice U-box-containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li-Rong; Park, Chan Ho; Venu, R C; Gough, Julian; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2008-09-01

    Ubiquitin ligases play a central role in determining the specificity of the ubiquitination system by selecting a myriad of appropriate candidate proteins for modification. The U-box is a recently identified, ubiquitin ligase activity-related protein domain that shows greater presence in plants than in other organisms. In this study, we identified 77 putative U-box proteins from the rice genome using a battery of whole genome analysis algorithms. Most of the U-box protein genes are expressed, as supported by the identification of their corresponding expressed sequence tags (ESTs), full-length cDNAs, or massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) tags. Using the same algorithms, we identified 61 U-box proteins from the Arabidopsis genome. The rice and Arabidopsis U-box proteins were classified into nine major classes based on their domain compositions. Comparison between rice and Arabidopsis U-box proteins indicates that the majority of rice and Arabidopsis U-box proteins have the same domain organizations. The inferred phylogeny established the homology between rice and Arabidopsis U-box/ARM proteins. Cell death assay using the rice protoplast system suggests that one rice U-box gene, OsPUB51, might act as a negative regulator of cell death signaling. In addition, the selected U-box proteins were found to be functional E3 ubiquitin ligases. The identification and analysis of rice U-box proteins hereby at the genomic level will help functionally characterize this class of E3 ubiquitin ligase in the future.

  11. Siah1/2 Ubiquitin Ligases in ER Stress Signaling in Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    resistance to vemurafenib, a major obstacle in clinical management of melanoma today. Our search led to identify RNF125, which we found to regulate...is the most significant in melanoma. Among these splice variants we identified Siah1L to be expressed in a way that is best linked to the resistant ... changes that are regulated by ubiquitin ligases was initiated with a focus on Siah1/2, which led to a distinct understanding of these ligases’ impact

  12. Proteolytic regulation of metabolic enzymes by E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes: lessons from yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms use diverse mechanisms to control metabolic rates in response to changes in the internal and/or external environment. Fine metabolic control is a highly responsive, energy-saving process that is mediated by allosteric inhibition/activation and/or reversible modification of preexisting metabolic enzymes. In contrast, coarse metabolic control is a relatively long-term and expensive process that involves modulating the level of metabolic enzymes. Coarse metabolic control can be achieved through the degradation of metabolic enzymes by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), in which substrates are specifically ubiquitinated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Here, we review select multi-protein E3 ligase complexes that directly regulate metabolic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The first part of the review focuses on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated Hrd1 and Doa10 E3 ligase complexes. In addition to their primary roles in the ER-associated degradation pathway that eliminates misfolded proteins, recent quantitative proteomic analyses identified native substrates of Hrd1 and Doa10 in the sterol synthesis pathway. The second part focuses on the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) complex, an abundant prototypical multi-protein E3 ligase complex. While the best-known roles of the SCF complex are in the regulation of the cell cycle and transcription, accumulating evidence indicates that the SCF complex also modulates carbon metabolism pathways. The increasing number of metabolic enzymes whose stability is directly regulated by the UPS underscores the importance of the proteolytic regulation of metabolic processes for the acclimation of cells to environmental changes.

  13. How a disordered ubiquitin ligase maintains order in nuclear protein homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, Joel C; Gardner, Richard G

    2011-01-01

    Cells use protein quality control (PQC) systems to protect themselves from potentially harmful misfolded proteins. Many misfolded proteins are repaired by molecular chaperones, but irreparably damaged proteins must be destroyed. Eukaryotes predominantly destroy these abnormally folded proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, which requires compartment-specific ubiquitin ligase complexes that mark substrates with ubiquitin for proteasome degradation. In the yeast nucleus, misfolded p...

  14. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl-b Regulates Pten via Nedd4 in T Cells Independently of Its Ubiquitin Ligase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Guo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b plays a crucial role in T cell activation and tolerance induction. However, the molecular mechanism by which Cbl-b inhibits T cell activation remains unclear. Here, we report that Cbl-b does not inhibit PI3K but rather suppresses TCR/CD28-induced inactivation of Pten. The elevated Akt activity in Cbl-b−/− T cells is therefore due to heightened Pten inactivation. Suppression of Pten inactivation in T cells by Cbl-b is achieved by impeding the association of Pten with Nedd4, which targets Pten K13 for K63-linked polyubiquitination. Consistent with this finding, introducing Nedd4 deficiency into Cbl-b−/− mice abrogates hyper-T cell responses caused by the loss of Cbl-b. Hence, our data demonstrate that Cbl-b inhibits T cell activation by suppressing Pten inactivation independently of its ubiquitin ligase activity.

  15. Solution structure and DNA binding of the zinc-finger domain from DNA ligase IIIalpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W; Yang, Ji-Chun; Neuhaus, David

    2004-08-13

    DNA ligase IIIalpha carries out the final ligation step in the base excision repair (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR) mechanisms of DNA repair. The enzyme recognises single-strand nicks and other damage features in double-stranded DNA, both through the catalytic domain and an N-terminal domain containing a single zinc finger. The latter is homologous to other zinc fingers that recognise damaged DNA, two in the N terminus of poly(adenosine-ribose)polymerase and three in the N terminus of the Arabidopsis thaliana nick-sensing DNA 3'-phosphoesterase. Here, we present the solution structure of the zinc-finger domain of human DNA ligase IIIalpha, the first structure of a finger from this group. It is related to that of the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1, but has an additional N-terminal beta-strand and C-terminal alpha-helix. Chemical shift mapping using a DNA ligand containing a single-stranded break showed that the DNA-binding surface of the DNA-ligase IIIalpha zinc finger is substantially different from that of GATA-1, consistent with the fact that the two proteins recognise very different features in the DNA. Likely implications for DNA binding are discussed.

  16. HSV-1 ICP0: An E3 Ubiquitin Ligase That Counteracts Host Intrinsic and Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Perusina Lanfranca

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0, is required for efficient lytic viral replication and regulates the switch between the lytic and latent states of HSV-1. As an E3 ubiquitin ligase, ICP0 directs the proteasomal degradation of several cellular targets, allowing the virus to counteract different cellular intrinsic and innate immune responses. In this review, we will focus on how ICP0’s E3 ubiquitin ligase activity inactivates the host intrinsic defenses, such as nuclear domain 10 (ND10, SUMO, and the DNA damage response to HSV-1 infection. In addition, we will examine ICP0’s capacity to impair the activation of interferon (innate regulatory mediators that include IFI16 (IFN γ-inducible protein 16, MyD88 (myeloid differentiation factor 88, and Mal (MyD88 adaptor-like protein. We will also consider how ICP0 allows HSV-1 to evade activation of the NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B inflammatory signaling pathway. Finally, ICP0’s paradoxical relationship with USP7 (ubiquitin specific protease 7 and its roles in intrinsic and innate immune responses to HSV-1 infection will be discussed.

  17. BRCA1 Is a Histone-H2A-Specific Ubiquitin Ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Kalb

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The RING domain proteins BRCA1 and BARD1 comprise a heterodimeric ubiquitin (E3 ligase that is required for the accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates at sites of DNA damage and for silencing at DNA satellite repeat regions. Despite its links to chromatin, the substrate and underlying function of the BRCA1/BARD1 ubiquitin ligase remain unclear. Here, we show that BRCA1/BARD1 specifically ubiquitylates histone H2A in its C-terminal tail on lysines 127 and 129 in vitro and in vivo. The specificity for K127-129 is acquired only when H2A is within a nucleosomal context. Moreover, site-specific targeting of the BRCA1/BARD1 RING domains to chromatin is sufficient for H2Aub foci formation in vivo. Our data establish BRCA1/BARD1 as a histone-H2A-specific E3 ligase, helping to explain its localization and activities on chromatin in cells.

  18. Normal DNA ligase activity in a γ-ray-sensitive Chinese hamster mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamato, T.D.; Hu, J.

    1987-01-01

    A Chinese hamster cell mutant (XR-1) was previously described that is extremely deficient in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks produced by γ-irradiation during the sensitive G 1 -early-S period and somewhat deficient in repair of γ-ray-induced single-strand DNA breaks. To determine whether a deficiency in DNA ligase activity might underlie the biochemical defect, protein extracts from mutant and parental cells were examined for their ability to ligate single- and double-strand breaks in DNA. The kinetics of ligation of single 5'-phosphate-3'-hydroxyl breaks in double-stranded DNA were the same in protein extracts from both cells. After separation of protein extracts by gel-filtration chromatography, the percentage of activity in the large and small molecular forms of DNA ligase was also similar in the two cells. Finally, protein extracts prepared from exponentially growing or G 1 -synchronized mutant and parental cells were equal in their ability to ligate blunt-end DNA substrates. These data suggest that a deficiency in DNA ligase is not the cause of the repair defect in the XR-1 mutant cell. (Auth.)

  19. Auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 Enhances Its Substrate Ubiquitin Ligase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaweera, Ruchira S.; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    The RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2 is the master regulator of the tumor suppressor p53. It targets p53 for proteasomal degradation, restraining the potent activity of p53 and enabling cell survival and proliferation. Like most E3 ligases, Mdm2 can also ubiquitinate itself. How Mdm2 auto-ubiquitination may influence its substrate ubiquitin ligase activity is undefined. Here we show that auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 is an activating event. Mdm2 that has been conjugated to polyubiquitin chains, but not to single ubiquitins, exhibits substantially enhanced activity to polyubiquitinate p53. Mechanistically, auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 facilitates the recruitment of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. This occurs through noncovalent interactions between the ubiquitin chains on Mdm2 and the ubiquitin binding domain on E2s. Mutations that diminish the noncovalent interactions render auto-ubiquitination unable to stimulate Mdm2 substrate E3 activity. These results suggest a model in which polyubiquitin chains on an E3 increase the local concentration of E2 enzymes and permit the processivity of substrate ubiquitination. They also support the notion that autocatalysis may be a prevalent mode for turning on the activity of latent enzymes. PMID:23671280

  20. Ubiquitin ligase ATL31 functions in leaf senescence in response to the balance between atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen availability in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Shoki; Huarancca Reyes, Thais; Guglielminetti, Lorenzo; Lu, Yu; Morita, Yoshie; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2014-02-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are essential elements for metabolism, and their availability, called the C/N balance, must be tightly coordinated for optimal growth in plants. Previously, we have identified the ubiquitin ligase CNI1/ATL31 as a novel C/N regulator by screening plants grown on C/N stress medium containing excess sugar and limited N. To elucidate further the effect of C/N balance on plant growth and to determine the physiological function of ATL31, we performed C/N response analysis using an atmospheric CO2 manipulation system. Under conditions of elevated CO2 and sufficient N, plant biomass and total sugar and starch dramatically increased. In contrast, elevated CO2 with limited N did not increase plant biomass but promoted leaf chlorosis, with anthocyanin accumulation and increased senescence-associated gene expression. Similar results were obtained with plants grown in medium containing excess sugar and limited N, suggesting that disruption of the C/N balance affects senescence progression. In ATL31-overexpressing plants, promotion of senescence under disrupted CO2/N conditions was repressed, whereas in the loss-of-function mutant it was enhanced. The ATL31 gene was transcriptionally up-regulated under N deficiency and in senescent leaves, and ATL31 expression was highly correlated with WRKY53 expression, a key regulator of senescence. Furthermore, transient protoplast analysis implicated the direct activation of ATL31 expression by WRKY53, which was in accordance with the results of WRKY53 overexpression experiments. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of C/N balance in leaf senescence and the involvement of ubiquitin ligase ATL31 in the process of senescence in Arabidopsis.

  1. Cbl-family ubiquitin ligases and their recruitment of CIN85 are largely dispensable for epidermal growth factor receptor endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Gulzar; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Schulte, Nancy A.; Nadeau, Scott; Luan, Haitao; Zutshi, Neha; Tom, Eric; Ortega-Cava, Cesar; Tu, Chun; Sanada, Masashi; Ogawa, Seishi; Toews, Myron L.; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Casitas B-Lineage Lymphoma (Cbl) family (Cbl, Cbl-b and Cbl-c) of ubiquitin ligases serve as negative regulators of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). An essential role of Cbl-family protein-dependent ubiquitination for efficient ligand-induced lysosomal targeting and degradation is now well-accepted. However, a more proximal role of Cbl and Cbl-b as adapters for CIN85-endophilin recruitment to mediate ligand-induced initial internalization of RTKs is supported by some studies but refuted by others. Overexpression and/or incomplete depletion of Cbl proteins in these studies is likely to have contributed to this dichotomy. To address the role of endogenous Cbl and Cbl-b in the internalization step of RTK endocytic traffic, we established Cbl/Cbl-b double-knockout (DKO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and demonstrated that these cells lack the expression of both Cbl-family members as well as endophilin A, while they express CIN85. We show that ligand-induced ubiquitination of EGFR, as a prototype RTK, was abolished in DKO MEFs, and EGFR degradation was delayed. These traits were reversed by ectopic human Cbl expression. EGFR endocytosis, assessed using the internalization of 125I-labeled or fluorescent EGF, or of EGFR itself, was largely retained in Cbl/Cbl-b DKO compared to wild type MEFs. EGFR internalization was also largely intact in Cbl/Cbl-b depleted MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cell line. Inducible shRNA-mediated knockdown of CIN85 in wild type or Cbl/Cbl-b DKO MEFs had no impact on EGFR internalization. Our findings, establish that, at physiological expression levels, Cbl, Cbl-b and CIN85 are largely dispensable for EGFR internalization. Our results support the model that Cbl-CIN85-endophilin complex is not required for efficient internalization of EGFR, a prototype RTK. PMID:25449262

  2. Upregulation of capacity for glutathione synthesis in response to amino acid deprivation: regulation of glutamate-cysteine ligase subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikalidis, Angelos K.; Mazor, Kevin M.; Lee, Jeong-In; Roman, Heather B.; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.; Stipanuk, Martha H.

    2014-01-01

    Using HepG2/C3A cells and MEFs, we investigated whether induction of GSH synthesis in response to sulfur amino acid deficiency is mediated by the decrease in cysteine levels or whether it requires a decrease in GSH levels per se. Both the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) and modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNA levels were upregulated in response to a lack of cysteine or other essential amino acids, independent of GSH levels. This upregulation did not occur in MEFs lacking GCN2 (general control non-derepressible 2, also known as eIF2α kinase 4) or in cells expressing mutant eIF2α lacking the eIF2α kinase Ser51 phosphorylation site, indicating that expression of both GCLC and GCLM was mediated by the GCN2/ATF4 stress response pathway. Only the increase in GCLM mRNA level, however, was accompanied by a parallel increase in protein expression, suggesting that the enhanced capacity for GSH synthesis depended largely on increased association of GCLC with its regulatory subunit. Upregulation of both GCLC and GLCM mRNA levels in response to cysteine deprivation was dependent on new protein synthesis, which is consistent with expression of GCLC and GCLM being mediated by proteins whose synthesis depends on activation of the GCN2/ATF4 pathway. Our data suggest that the regulation of GCLC expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of transcriptional regulators, whereas the regulation of GCLM expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of mRNA stabilizing or destabilizing proteins. Upregulation of GCLM levels in response to low cysteine levels may serve to protect the cell in the face of a future stress requiring GSH as an antioxidant or conjugating/detoxifying agent. PMID:24557597

  3. YbdK is a carboxylate-amine ligase with a gamma-glutamyl:Cysteine ligase activity: crystal structure and enzymatic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Christopher; Doseeva, Victoria; Pullalarevu, Sadhana; Krajewski, Wojciech; Howard, Andrew; Herzberg, Osnat

    2004-08-01

    The Escherichia coli open reading frame YbdK encodes a member of a large bacterial protein family of unknown biological function. The sequences within this family are remotely related to the sequence of gamma-glutamate-cysteine ligase (gamma-GCS), an enzyme in the glutathione biosynthetic pathway. A gene encoding gamma-GCS in E. coli is already known. The 2.15 A resolution crystal structure of YbdK reveals an overall fold similar to that of glutamine synthetase (GS), a nitrogen metabolism enzyme that ligates glutamate and ammonia to yield glutamine. GS and gamma-GCS perform related chemical reactions and require ATP and Mg2+ for their activity. The Mg2+-dependent binding of ATP to YbdK was confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy employing 2'(or 3')-O-(trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5'-triphosphate, and yielding a dissociation constant of 3 +/- 0.5 microM. The structure of YbdK contains a crevice that corresponds to the binding sites of ATP, Mg2+ and glutamate in GS. Many of the GS residues that coordinate the metal ions and interact with glutamic acid and the phosphoryl and ribosyl groups of ATP are also present in YbdK. GS amino acids that have been associated with ammonia binding have no obvious counterparts in YbdK, consistent with a substrate specificity that is different from that of GS. Ligase activity between glutamic acid and each of the twenty amino acid residues was tested on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) by following the hydrolysis of ATP to ADP. Catalysis was observed only with cysteine. A pyruvate kinase/lactic acid dehydrogenase coupled assay was used to rule out GS activity and to determine that YbdK exhibits gamma-GCS activity. The catalytic rate was found to be approximately 500-fold slower than that reported for authentic gamma-GCS. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Binding interactions between yeast tRNA ligase and a precursor transfer ribonucleic acid containing two photoreactive uridine analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, N.K.; Hanna, M.M.; Abelson, J.

    1988-01-01

    Yeast tRNA ligase, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is one of the protein components that is involved in the splicing reaction of intron-containing yeast precursor tRNAs. It is an unusual protein because it has three distinct catalytic activities. It functions as a polynucleotide kinase, as a cyclic phosphodiesterase, and as an RNA ligase. We have studied the binding interactions between ligase and precursor tRNAs containing two photoreactive uridine analogues, 4-thiouridine and 5-bromouridine. When irradiated with long ultraviolet light, RNA containing these analogues can form specific covalent bonds with associated proteins. In this paper, we show that 4-thiouridine triphosphate and 5-bromouridine triphosphate were readily incorporated into a precursor tRNA(Phe) that was synthesized, in vitro, with bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. The analogue-containing precursor tRNAs were authentic substrates for the two splicing enzymes that were tested (endonuclease and ligase), and they formed specific covalent bonds with ligase when they were irradiated with long-wavelength ultraviolet light. We have determined the position of three major cross-links and one minor cross-link on precursor tRNA(Phe) that were located within the intron and near the 3' splice site. On the basis of these data, we present a model for the in vivo splicing reaction of yeast precursor tRNAs

  5. A Family of Salmonella Virulence Factors Functions as a Distinct Class of Autoregulated E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quezada, C.; Hicks, S; Galan, J; Stebbins, C

    2009-01-01

    Processes as diverse as receptor binding and signaling, cytoskeletal dynamics, and programmed cell death are manipulated by mimics of host proteins encoded by pathogenic bacteria. We show here that the Salmonella virulence factor SspH2 belongs to a growing class of bacterial effector proteins that harness and subvert the eukaryotic ubiquitination pathway. This virulence protein possesses ubiquitination activity that depends on a conserved cysteine residue. A crystal structure of SspH2 reveals a canonical leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain that interacts with a unique E{sub 3} ligase [which we have termed NEL for Novel E{sub 3} Ligase] C-terminal fold unrelated to previously observed HECT or RING-finger E{sub 3} ligases. Moreover, the LRR domain sequesters the catalytic cysteine residue contained in the NEL domain, and we suggest a mechanism for activation of the ligase requiring a substantial conformational change to release the catalytic domain for function. We also show that the N-terminal domain targets SspH2 to the apical plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells and propose a model whereby binding of the LRR to proteins at the target site releases the ligase domain for site-specific function.

  6. The ubiquitin ligase ASB4 promotes trophoblast differentiation through the degradation of ID2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W H Davin Townley-Tilson

    Full Text Available Vascularization of the placenta is a critical developmental process that ensures fetal viability. Although the vascular health of the placenta affects both maternal and fetal well being, relatively little is known about the early stages of placental vascular development. The ubiquitin ligase Ankyrin repeat, SOCS box-containing 4 (ASB4 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation to vascular lineages and is highly expressed early in placental development. The transcriptional regulator Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2 negatively regulates vascular differentiation during development and is a target of many ubiquitin ligases. Due to their overlapping spatiotemporal expression pattern in the placenta and contrasting effects on vascular differentiation, we investigated whether ASB4 regulates ID2 through its ligase activity in the placenta and whether this activity mediates vascular differentiation. In mouse placentas, ASB4 expression is restricted to a subset of cells that express both stem cell and endothelial markers. Placentas that lack Asb4 display immature vascular patterning and retain expression of placental progenitor markers, including ID2 expression. Using JAR placental cells, we determined that ASB4 ubiquitinates and represses ID2 expression in a proteasome-dependent fashion. Expression of ASB4 in JAR cells and primary isolated trophoblast stem cells promotes the expression of differentiation markers. In functional endothelial co-culture assays, JAR cells ectopically expressing ASB4 increased endothelial cell turnover and stabilized endothelial tube formation, both of which are hallmarks of vascular differentiation within the placenta. Co-transfection of a degradation-resistant Id2 mutant with Asb4 inhibits both differentiation and functional responses. Lastly, deletion of Asb4 in mice induces a pathology that phenocopies human pre-eclampsia, including hypertension and proteinuria in late-stage pregnant females. These results indicate that

  7. UV-B induction of the E3 ligase ARIADNE12 depends on CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lisi; Lang-Mladek, Christina; Richter, Julia; Nigam, Neha; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2015-08-01

    The UV-B inducible ARIADNE12 (ARI12) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is a member of the RING-between-RING (RBR) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases for which a novel ubiquitination mechanism was identified in mammalian homologs. This RING-HECT hybrid mechanism needs a conserved cysteine which is replaced by serine in ARI12 and might affect the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. We have shown that under photomorphogenic UV-B, ARI12 is a downstream target of the classical ultraviolet B (UV-B) UV Resistance Locus 8 (UVR8) pathway. However, under high fluence rate of UV-B ARI12 was induced independently of UVR8 and the UV-A/blue light and red/far-red photoreceptors. A key component of several light signaling pathways is Constitutively Photomorphogenic 1 (COP1). Upon UV-B COP1 is trapped in the nucleus through interaction with UVR8 permitting the activation of genes that regulate the biosynthesis of UV-B protective metabolites and growth adaptations. To clarify the role of COP1 in the regulation of ARI12 mRNA expression and ARI12 protein stability, localization and interaction with COP1 was assessed with and without UV-B. We found that COP1 controls ARI12 in white light, low and high fluence rate of UV-B. Furthermore we show that ARI12 is indeed an E3 ubiquitin ligase which is mono-ubiquitinated, a prerequisite for the RING-HECT hybrid mechanism. Finally, genetic analyses with transgenes expressing a genomic pmARI12:ARI12-GFP construct confirm the epistatic interaction between COP1 and ARI12 in growth responses to high fluence rate UV-B. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  8. Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase is required for protein trafficking in Saccharomyces cerevisiae COPI mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jarmoszewicz

    Full Text Available Retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER depends on the formation of vesicles coated with the multiprotein complex COPI. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae ubiquitinated derivatives of several COPI subunits have been identified. The importance of this modification of COPI proteins is unknown. With the exception of the Sec27 protein (β'COP neither the ubiquitin ligase responsible for ubiquitination of COPI subunits nor the importance of this modification are known. Here we find that the ubiquitin ligase mutation, rsp5-1, has a negative effect that is additive with ret1-1 and sec28Δ mutations, in genes encoding α- and ε-COP, respectively. The double ret1-1 rsp5-1 mutant is also more severely defective in the Golgi-to-ER trafficking compared to the single ret1-1, secreting more of the ER chaperone Kar2p, localizing Rer1p mostly to the vacuole, and increasing sensitivity to neomycin. Overexpression of ubiquitin in ret1-1 rsp5-1 mutant suppresses vacuolar accumulation of Rer1p. We found that the effect of rsp5 mutation on the Golgi-to-ER trafficking is similar to that of sla1Δ mutation in a gene encoding actin cytoskeleton proteins, an Rsp5p substrate. Additionally, Rsp5 and Sla1 proteins were found by co-immunoprecipitation in a complex containing COPI subunits. Together, our results show that Rsp5 ligase plays a role in regulating retrograde Golgi-to-ER trafficking.

  9. IFT20 modulates ciliary PDGFRα signaling by regulating the stability of Cbl E3 ubiquitin ligases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Fabian Marc; Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Vilhelm, Martin Juel

    2018-01-01

    ciliogenesis, and ciliary localization of the receptor is required for its appropriate ligand-mediated activation by PDGF-AA. However, the mechanisms regulating sorting of PDGFRα and feedback inhibition of PDGFRα signaling at the cilium are unknown. Here, we provide evidence that intraflagellar transport...... protein 20 (IFT20) interacts with E3 ubiquitin ligases c-Cbl and Cbl-b and is required for Cbl-mediated ubiquitination and internalization of PDGFRα for feedback inhibition of receptor signaling. In wild-type cells treated with PDGF-AA, c-Cbl becomes enriched in the cilium, and the receptor...

  10. A viral E3 ligase targets RNF8 and RNF168 to control histone ubiquitination and DNA damage responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Caroline E; Chaurushiya, Mira S; Boutell, Chris; Landry, Sebastien; Suh, Junghae; Panier, Stephanie; Everett, Roger D; Stewart, Grant S; Durocher, Daniel; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2010-01-01

    The ICP0 protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and transactivator required for the efficient switch between latent and lytic infection. As DNA damaging treatments are known to reactivate latent virus, we wished to explore whether ICP0 modulates the cellular response to DNA damage. We report that ICP0 prevents accumulation of repair factors at cellular damage sites, acting between recruitment of the mediator proteins Mdc1 and 53BP1. We identify RNF8 and RNF168, cellular histone ubiquitin ligases responsible for anchoring repair factors at sites of damage, as new targets for ICP0-mediated degradation. By targeting these ligases, ICP0 expression results in loss of ubiquitinated forms of H2A, mobilization of DNA repair proteins and enhanced viral fitness. Our study raises the possibility that the ICP0-mediated control of histone ubiquitination may link DNA repair, relief of transcriptional repression, and activation of latent viral genomes. PMID:20075863

  11. Distinct functional domains contribute to degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) by the E3 ubiquitin ligase inducible Degrader of the LDLR (IDOL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Scheer, Lilith; Santos, Ana; Reits, Eric; Bleijlevens, Boris; Zelcer, Noam

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified the liver X receptor-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDL receptor (IDOL) as a modulator of lipoprotein metabolism. Acting as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, IDOL triggers ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR).

  12. DNA ligase C1 mediates the LigD-independent nonhomologous end-joining pathway of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Hitesh; Gupta, Richa; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described bacterial DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that has been best characterized for mycobacteria. NHEJ can religate transformed linear plasmids, repair ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells, and seal I-SceI-induced chromosomal DSBs. The core components of the mycobacterial NHEJ machinery are the DNA end binding protein Ku and the polyfunctional DNA ligase LigD. LigD has three autonomous enzymatic modules: ATP-dependent DNA ligase (LIG), DNA/RNA polymerase (POL), and 3' phosphoesterase (PE). Although genetic ablation of ku or ligD abolishes NHEJ and sensitizes nonreplicating cells to ionizing radiation, selective ablation of the ligase activity of LigD in vivo only mildly impairs NHEJ of linearized plasmids, indicating that an additional DNA ligase can support NHEJ. Additionally, the in vivo role of the POL and PE domains in NHEJ is unclear. Here we define a LigD ligase-independent NHEJ pathway in Mycobacterium smegmatis that requires the ATP-dependent DNA ligase LigC1 and the POL domain of LigD. Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigC can also support this backup NHEJ pathway. We also demonstrate that, although dispensable for efficient plasmid NHEJ, the activities of the POL and PE domains are required for repair of IR-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells. These findings define the genetic requirements for a LigD-independent NHEJ pathway in mycobacteria and demonstrate that all enzymatic functions of the LigD protein participate in NHEJ in vivo. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Functional Characterization of the Apple RING E3 Ligase MdMIEL1 in Transgenic Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping AN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available E3 ubiquitin ligases are involved in various physiological processes, and they play pivotal roles in growth and development. In this study, we identified a previously unknown gene in the apple fruit (Malus × domestica and named it MdMIEL1. The MdMIEL1 gene encoded a protein that contained a zinc-finger domain at its N-terminus and a RING-finger motif at its C-terminus. To investigate MdMIEL1 functions, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing the MdMIEL1 gene under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Interestingly, ectopic expression of MdMIEL1 in Arabidopsis produced multiple phenotypes, including early germination, early flowering and a lateral root number increase relative to wild-type plants. Further analysis indicated that MdMIEL1 regulated lateral root initiation by increasing auxin accumulation in the roots. In a word, these results suggest that, MdMIEL1 as a novel RING-finger ubiquitin ligase influences plant growth and development, and highlight that MdMIEL1 regulates lateral root growth.

  14. Regulation of PTEN degradation and NEDD4-1 E3 ligase activity by Numb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chen; Li, Zhiguo; Ahmad, Nihal; Liu, Xiaoqi

    2017-05-19

    The critical tumor suppressor PTEN is regulated by numerous post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, acetylation and ubiquitination. Ubiquitination of PTEN was reported to control both PTEN stability and nuclear localization. Notably, the HECT E3-ligase NEDD4-1 was identified as the ubiquitin ligase for PTEN, mediating its degradation and down-stream events. However, the mechanisms how NEDD4-1 is regulated by up-stream signaling pathways or interaction with other proteins in promoting PTEN degradation remain largely unclear. In the present study, we identified that the adaptor protein Numb, which is demonstrated to be a novel binding partner of NEDD4-1, plays important roles in controlling PTEN ubiquitination through regulating NEDD4-1 activity and the association between PTEN and NEDD4-1. Furthermore, we provided data to show that Numb regulates cell proliferation and glucose metabolism in a PTEN-dependent manner. Overall, our study revealed a novel regulation of the well-documented NEDD4-1/PTEN pathway and its oncogenic behavior.

  15. Differential recruitment of E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes regulates RET isoform internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, Brandy D; Crupi, Mathieu J F; Peng, Susan; Bone, Leslie N; Rekab, Aisha N; Lian, Eric Y; Wagner, Simona M; Antonescu, Costin N; Mulligan, Lois M

    2017-10-01

    The RET receptor tyrosine kinase is implicated in normal development and cancer. RET is expressed as two isoforms, RET9 and RET51, with unique C-terminal tail sequences that recruit distinct protein complexes to mediate signals. Upon activation, RET isoforms are internalized with distinct kinetics, suggesting differences in regulation. Here, we demonstrate that RET9 and RET51 differ in their abilities to recruit E3 ubiquitin ligases to their unique C-termini. RET51, but not RET9, interacts with, and is ubiquitylated by CBL, which is recruited through interactions with the GRB2 adaptor protein. RET51 internalization was not affected by CBL knockout but was delayed in GRB2-depleted cells. In contrast, RET9 ubiquitylation requires phosphorylation-dependent changes in accessibility of key RET9 C-terminal binding motifs that facilitate interactions with multiple adaptor proteins, including GRB10 and SHANK2, to recruit the NEDD4 ubiquitin ligase. We showed that NEDD4-mediated ubiquitylation is required for RET9 localization to clathrin-coated pits and subsequent internalization. Our data establish differences in the mechanisms of RET9 and RET51 ubiquitylation and internalization that may influence the strength and duration of RET isoform signals and cellular outputs.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first authors of the paper. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Aurora Kinase A Promotes AR Degradation via the E3 Ligase CHIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sukumar; Brautigan, David L; Larner, James M

    2017-08-01

    Reducing the levels of the androgen receptor (AR) is one of the most viable approaches to combat castration-resistant prostate cancer. Previously, we observed that proteasomal-dependent degradation of AR in response to 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) depends primarily on the E3 ligase C-terminus of HSP70-interacting protein (STUB1/CHIP). Here, 2-ME stimulation activates CHIP by phosphorylation via Aurora kinase A (AURKA). Aurora A kinase inhibitors and RNAi knockdown of Aurora A transcript selectively blocked CHIP phosphorylation and AR degradation. Aurora A kinase is activated by 2-ME in the S-phase as well as during mitosis, and phosphorylates CHIP at S273. Prostate cancer cells expressing an S273A mutant of CHIP have attenuated AR degradation upon 2-ME treatment compared with cells expressing wild-type CHIP, supporting the idea that CHIP phosphorylation by Aurora A activates its E3 ligase activity for the AR. These results reveal a novel 2-ME→Aurora A→CHIP→AR pathway that promotes AR degradation via the proteasome that may offer novel therapeutic opportunities for prostate cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 15(8); 1063-72. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. The E3 Ligase CHIP Mediates p21 Degradation to Maintain Radioresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kuntal; Sarkar, Sukumar; Du, Kangping; Brautigan, David L; Abbas, Tarek; Larner, James M

    2017-06-01

    Lung cancer resists radiotherapy, making it one of the deadliest forms of cancer. Here, we show that human lung cancer cell lines can be rendered sensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) by RNAi knockdown of C-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP/STUB1), a U-box-type E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets a number of stress-induced proteins. Mechanistically, ubiquitin-dependent degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, p21 protein, is reduced by CHIP knockdown, leading to enhanced senescence of cells in response to exposure to IR. Cellular senescence and sensitivity to IR is prevented by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of the p21 gene ( CDKN1A) in CHIP knockdown cells. Conversely, overexpression of CHIP potentiates p21 degradation and promotes greater radioresistance of lung cancer cells. In vitro and cell-based assays demonstrate that p21 is a novel and direct ubiquitylation substrate of CHIP that also requires the CHIP-associated chaperone HSP70. These data reveal that the inhibition of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP promotes radiosensitivity, thus suggesting a novel strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. Implications: The CHIP-HSP70-p21 ubiquitylation/degradation axis identified here could be exploited to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 15(6); 651-9. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Ubiquitin ligase Kf-1 is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Misa; Takahashi, Kou; Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2008-10-03

    Kf-1 was first identified as a gene showing enhanced expression in the cerebral cortex of a sporadic Alzheimer's disease patient. To date, however, the functional properties of Kf-1 protein remain unknown. In this study, immunohistochemical analysis showed that Kf-1 immunoreactivity was detected in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex neurons. Interestingly, it was colocalized with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker. To investigate the specific function of Kf-1 protein, we generated Myc tagged wild type Kf-1 (Myc-Kf-1WT) and RING finger domain deletion mutant of Kf-1 (Myc-Kf-1DeltaR), and then transfected in HEK293 cells. Myc-Kf-1WT displayed a reticular pattern typical of ER localization, with large perinuclear aggregates and colocalized with ER marker, calnexin. Myc-Kf-1WT facilitated ubiquitination of endogenous proteins, whereas Myc-Kf-1DeltaR did not show ubiquitin ligase activity. In addition, we found that Kf-1 interacted with components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway, including Derlin-1 and VCP. Taken together, these properties suggest that Kf-1 is an ER ubiquitin ligase involved in the ERAD pathway.

  19. Adenylylation of small RNA sequencing adapters using the TS2126 RNA ligase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Lodoe; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many high-throughput small RNA next-generation sequencing protocols use 5' preadenylylated DNA oligonucleotide adapters during cDNA library preparation. Preadenylylation of the DNA adapter's 5' end frees from ATP-dependence the ligation of the adapter to RNA collections, thereby avoiding ATP-dependent side reactions. However, preadenylylation of the DNA adapters can be costly and difficult. The currently available method for chemical adenylylation of DNA adapters is inefficient and uses techniques not typically practiced in laboratories profiling cellular RNA expression. An alternative enzymatic method using a commercial RNA ligase was recently introduced, but this enzyme works best as a stoichiometric adenylylating reagent rather than a catalyst and can therefore prove costly when several variant adapters are needed or during scale-up or high-throughput adenylylation procedures. Here, we describe a simple, scalable, and highly efficient method for the 5' adenylylation of DNA oligonucleotides using the thermostable RNA ligase 1 from bacteriophage TS2126. Adapters with 3' blocking groups are adenylylated at >95% yield at catalytic enzyme-to-adapter ratios and need not be gel purified before ligation to RNA acceptors. Experimental conditions are also reported that enable DNA adapters with free 3' ends to be 5' adenylylated at >90% efficiency. © 2015 Lama and Ryan; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Ubiquitination and regulation of AURKA identifies a hypoxia-independent E3 ligase activity of VHL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanov, E; Chen, G; Chowdhury, P; Weldon, J; Ding, Z; Jonasch, E; Sen, S; Walker, C L; Dere, R

    2017-06-15

    The hypoxia-regulated tumor-suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an E3 ligase that recognizes its substrates as part of an oxygen-dependent prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) reaction, with hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα) being its most notable substrate. Here we report that VHL has an equally important function distinct from its hypoxia-regulated activity. We find that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is a novel, hypoxia-independent target for VHL ubiquitination. In contrast to its hypoxia-regulated activity, VHL mono-, rather than poly-ubiquitinates AURKA, in a PHD-independent reaction targeting AURKA for degradation in quiescent cells, where degradation of AURKA is required to maintain the primary cilium. Tumor-associated variants of VHL differentiate between these two functions, as a pathogenic VHL mutant that retains intrinsic ability to ubiquitinate HIFα is unable to ubiquitinate AURKA. Together, these data identify VHL as an E3 ligase with important cellular functions under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

  1. An Arabidopsis SUMO E3 Ligase, SIZ1, Negatively Regulates Photomorphogenesis by Promoting COP1 Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Xiao-Li

    2016-04-29

    COP1 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1), a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is a central negative regulator of photomorphogenesis. However, how COP1 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications remains largely unknown. Here we show that SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification enhances COP1 activity. Loss-of-function siz1 mutant seedlings exhibit a weak constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype. SIZ1 physically interacts with COP1 and mediates the sumoylation of COP1. A K193R substitution in COP1 blocks its SUMO modification and reduces COP1 activity in vitro and in planta. Consistently, COP1 activity is reduced in siz1 and the level of HY5, a COP1 target protein, is increased in siz1. Sumoylated COP1 may exhibits higher transubiquitination activity than does non-sumoylated COP1, but SIZ1-mediated SUMO modification does not affect COP1 dimerization, COP1-HY5 interaction, and nuclear accumulation of COP1. Interestingly, prolonged light exposure reduces the sumoylation level of COP1, and COP1 mediates the ubiquitination and degradation of SIZ1. These regulatory mechanisms may maintain the homeostasis of COP1 activity, ensuing proper photomorphogenic development in changing light environment. Our genetic and biochemical studies identify a function for SIZ1 in photomorphogenesis and reveal a novel SUMO-regulated ubiquitin ligase, COP1, in plants.

  2. Blocking an N-terminal acetylation–dependent protein interaction inhibits an E3 ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Daniel C.; Hammill, Jared T.; Min, Jaeki; Rhee, David Y.; Connelly, Michele; Sviderskiy, Vladislav O.; Bhasin, Deepak; Chen, Yizhe; Ong, Su-Sien; Chai, Sergio C.; Goktug, Asli N.; Huang, Guochang; Monda, Julie K.; Low, Jonathan; Kim, Ho Shin; Paulo, Joao A.; Cannon, Joe R.; Shelat, Anang A.; Chen, Taosheng; Kelsall, Ian R.; Alpi, Arno F.; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Wang, Xusheng; Peng, Junmin; Singh , Bhuvanesh; Harper, J. Wade; Schulman, Brenda A.; Guy, R. Kip (MSKCC); (Dundee); (SJCH); (Harvard-Med); (MXPL)

    2017-06-05

    N-terminal acetylation is an abundant modification influencing protein functions. Because ~80% of mammalian cytosolic proteins are N-terminally acetylated, this modification is potentially an untapped target for chemical control of their functions. Structural studies have revealed that, like lysine acetylation, N-terminal acetylation converts a positively charged amine into a hydrophobic handle that mediates protein interactions; hence, this modification may be a druggable target. We report the development of chemical probes targeting the N-terminal acetylation–dependent interaction between an E2 conjugating enzyme (UBE2M or UBC12) and DCN1 (DCUN1D1), a subunit of a multiprotein E3 ligase for the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. The inhibitors are highly selective with respect to other protein acetyl-amide–binding sites, inhibit NEDD8 ligation in vitro and in cells, and suppress anchorage-independent growth of a cell line with DCN1 amplification. Overall, our data demonstrate that N-terminal acetyl-dependent protein interactions are druggable targets and provide insights into targeting multiprotein E2–E3 ligases.

  3. The Ubiquitin Ligase CBLC Maintains the Network Organization of the Golgi Apparatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Yin Lee

    Full Text Available The Golgi apparatus plays a pivotal role in the sorting and post-translational modifications of secreted and membrane proteins. In mammalian cells, the Golgi is organized in stacks of cisternae linked together to form a network with a ribbon shape. Regulation of Golgi ribbon formation is poorly understood. Here we find in an image-based RNAi screen that depletion of the ubiquitin-ligase CBLC induces Golgi fragmentation. Depletions of the close homologues CBL and CBLB do not induce any visible defects. In CBLC-depleted cells, Golgi stacks appear relatively unperturbed at both the light and electron microscopy levels, suggesting that CBLC controls mostly network organization. CBLC partially localizes on Golgi membranes and this localization is enhanced after activation of the SRC kinase. Inhibition of SRC reverts CBLC depletion effects, suggesting interplay between the two. CBLC's regulation of Golgi network requires its ubiquitin ligase activity. However, SRC levels are not significantly affected by CBLC, and CBLC knockdown does not phenocopy SRC activation, suggesting that CBLC's action at the Golgi is not direct downregulation of SRC. Altogether, our results demonstrate a role of CBLC in regulating Golgi ribbon by antagonizing the SRC tyrosine kinase.

  4. The MIEL1 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Negatively Regulates Cuticular Wax Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis Stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Gil; Kim, Juyoung; Suh, Mi Chung; Seo, Pil Joon

    2017-07-01

    Cuticular wax is an important hydrophobic layer that covers the plant aerial surface. Cuticular wax biosynthesis is shaped by multiple layers of regulation. In particular, a pair of R2R3-type MYB transcription factors, MYB96 and MYB30, are known to be the main participants in cuticular wax accumulation. Here, we report that the MYB30-INTERACTING E3 LIGASE 1 (MIEL1) E3 ubiquitin ligase controls the protein stability of the two MYB transcription factors and thereby wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. MIEL1-deficient miel1 mutants exhibit increased wax accumulation in stems, with up-regulation of wax biosynthetic genes targeted by MYB96 and MYB30. Genetic analysis reveals that wax accumulation of the miel1 mutant is compromised by myb96 or myb30 mutation, but MYB96 is mainly epistatic to MIEL1, playing a predominant role in cuticular wax deposition. These observations indicate that the MIEL1-MYB96 module is important for balanced cuticular wax biosynthesis in developing inflorescence stems. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. APC/Cdh E3 ubiquitin ligase in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vina, Jose; Fuchsberger, Tanja; Giraldo, Esther; Lloret, Ana

    2014-10-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex APC/C is a E3 ligase. It is regulates important functions in neural cells. Its inactivation and accumulation of its substrates has been related with neurodegenerative diseases. Glutaminase is an important target of APC/C-Cdh1 in primary neurons. It catalyzes the conversion of glutamine into glutamate. When cdh1 decreases due to incubation with Aβ, glutaminase concentration increases as does cyclin B1, a known target of the ubiquitin ligase that is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The same treatment causes a high increase of glutamate levels in the supernatant of neurons in culture, which subsequently leads to an increase of Ca(2) inside the cells. The increase of glutamate due to the Aβ treatment can be partially reversed by a glutaminase inhibitor. This result suggests that the APC/C-Cdh1 signaling way is involved in the glutamate increase after the treatment with Aβ. Moreover, high levels of glutamate have been observed to further decrease cdh1 levels what also leads to an accumulation of gls. These results lead us to propose that neurons might enter into a positive feedback loop of glutamate production due to a lack of APC/C-Cdh1 signaling. This signaling pathway reveals a new mechanism to cause excitotoxicity in neurons, which could be relevant in AD. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. SVIP regulates Z variant alpha-1 antitrypsin retro-translocation by inhibiting ubiquitin ligase gp78.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazli Khodayari

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD is an inherited disorder characterized by early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common disease-causing mutation is a single amino acid substitution (Glu/Lys at amino acid 342 of the mature protein, resulting in disruption of the 290-342 salt bridge (an electrophoretic abnormality defining the mutation [Z allele, or ZAAT], protein misfolding, polymerization, and accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and monocytes. The Z allele causes a toxic gain of function, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase gp78 promotes degradation and increased solubility of endogenous ZAAT. We hypothesized that the accumulation of ZAAT is influenced by modulation of gp78 E3 ligase and SVIP (small VCP-interacting protein interaction with p97/VCP in ZAAT-expressing hepatocytes. We showed that the SVIP inhibitory effect on ERAD due to overexpression causes the accumulation of ZAAT in a human Z hepatocyte-like cell line (AT01. Overexpression of gp78, as well as SVIP suppression, induces gp78-VCP/p97 interaction in AT01 cells. This interaction leads to retro-translocation of ZAAT and reduction of the SVIP inhibitory role in ERAD. In this context, overexpression of gp78 or SVIP suppression may eliminate the toxic gain of function associated with polymerization of ZAAT, thus providing a potential new therapeutic approach to the treatment of AATD.

  7. Zn-binding AZUL domain of human ubiquitin protein ligase Ube3A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemak, Alexander; Yee, Adelinda [University of Toronto, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Ontario Cancer Institute, Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada); Bezsonova, Irina, E-mail: bezsonova@uchc.edu [University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Molecular Microbial and Structural Biology (United States); Dhe-Paganon, Sirano, E-mail: sirano.dhepaganon@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H., E-mail: carrow@uhnresearch.ca [University of Toronto, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Ontario Cancer Institute, Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Ube3A (also referred to as E6AP for E6 Associated Protein) is a E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase implicated in the development of Angelman syndrome by controlling degradation of synaptic protein Arc and oncogenic papilloma virus infection by controlling degradation of p53. This article describe the solution NMR structure of the conserved N-terminal domain of human Ube3A (residues 24-87) that contains two residues (Cys44 and Arg62) found to be mutated in patients with Angelman syndrome. The structure of this domain adopts a novel Zn-binding fold we called AZUL (Amino-terminal Zn-finger of Ube3a Ligase). The AZUL domain has a helix-loop-helix architecture with a Zn ion coordinated by four Cys residues arranged in Cys-X{sub 4}-Cys-X{sub 4}-Cys-X{sub 28}-Cys motif. Three of the Zn-bound residues are located in a 23-residue long and well structured loop that connects two {alpha}-helicies.

  8. Zn-binding AZUL domain of human ubiquitin protein ligase Ube3A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemak, Alexander; Yee, Adelinda; Bezsonova, Irina; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2011-01-01

    Ube3A (also referred to as E6AP for E6 Associated Protein) is a E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase implicated in the development of Angelman syndrome by controlling degradation of synaptic protein Arc and oncogenic papilloma virus infection by controlling degradation of p53. This article describe the solution NMR structure of the conserved N-terminal domain of human Ube3A (residues 24-87) that contains two residues (Cys44 and Arg62) found to be mutated in patients with Angelman syndrome. The structure of this domain adopts a novel Zn-binding fold we called AZUL (Amino-terminal Zn-finger of Ube3a Ligase). The AZUL domain has a helix-loop-helix architecture with a Zn ion coordinated by four Cys residues arranged in Cys-X 4 -Cys-X 4 -Cys-X 28 -Cys motif. Three of the Zn-bound residues are located in a 23-residue long and well structured loop that connects two α-helicies.

  9. Ubiquitin ligase ITCH recruitment suppresses the aggregation and cellular toxicity of cytoplasmic misfolded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhangani, Deepak; Upadhyay, Arun; Amanullah, Ayeman; Joshi, Vibhuti; Mishra, Amit

    2014-05-28

    The protein quality control (QC) system protects cells against cellular toxicity induced by misfolded proteins and maintains overall cellular fitness. Inefficient clearance of or failure to degrade damaged proteins causes several diseases, especially age-linked neurodegenerative disorders. Attenuation of misfolded protein degradation under severe stress conditions leads to the rapid over-accumulation of toxic proteinaceous aggregates in the cytoplasmic compartment. However, the precise cytoplasmic quality control degradation mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Nedd4-like E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH specifically interacts with mutant bona fide misfolded proteins and colocalizes with their perinuclear aggregates. In a cell culture model, we demonstrate ITCH recruitment by cytoplasmic inclusions containing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin or ataxin-3 proteins. Transient overexpression of ITCH dramatically induced the degradation of thermally denatured misfolded luciferase protein. Partial depletion of ITCH increased the rate of aggregate formation and cell death generated by expanded polyglutamine proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of ITCH alleviates the cytotoxic potential of expanded polyglutamine proteins and reduces aggregation. These observations indicate that ITCH is involved in the cytosolic quality control pathway and may help to explain how abnormal proteins are targeted by QC ubiquitin-protein ligases.

  10. Dsc E3 ligase localization to the Golgi requires the ATPase Cdc48 and cofactor Ufd1 for activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Risa; Ribbens, Diedre; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Stewart, Emerson V; Ho, Jason; Espenshade, Peter J

    2017-09-29

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe regulate lipid homeostasis and the hypoxic response under conditions of low sterol or oxygen availability. SREBPs are cleaved in the Golgi through the combined action of the Dsc E3 ligase complex, the rhomboid protease Rbd2, and the essential ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA + ) ATPase Cdc48. The soluble SREBP N-terminal transcription factor domain is then released into the cytosol to enter the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Previously, we reported that Cdc48 binding to Rbd2 is required for Rbd2-mediated SREBP cleavage. Here, using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry experiments, we identified Cdc48-binding proteins in S. pombe , generating a list of many previously unknown potential Cdc48-binding partners. We show that the established Cdc48 cofactor Ufd1 is required for SREBP cleavage but does not interact with the Cdc48-Rbd2 complex. Cdc48-Ufd1 is instead required at a step prior to Rbd2 function, during Golgi localization of the Dsc E3 ligase complex. Together, these findings demonstrate that two distinct Cdc48 complexes, Cdc48-Ufd1 and Cdc48-Rbd2, are required for SREBP activation and low-oxygen adaptation in S. pombe . © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The Penicillium chrysogenum aclA gene encodes a broad-substrate-specificity acyl-coenzyme A ligase involved in activation of adipic acid, a side-chain precursor for cephem antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetsier, Martijn J; Gombert, Andreas K; Fekken, Susan; Bovenberg, Roel A L; van den Berg, Marco A; Kiel, Jan A K W; Jekel, Peter A; Janssen, Dick B; Pronk, Jack T; van der Klei, Ida J; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the cephalosporin side-chain precursor to the corresponding CoA-thioester is an essential step for its incorporation into the beta-lactam backbone. To identify an acyl-CoA ligase involved in activation of adipate, we searched in the genome database of Penicillium chrysogenum for putative structural genes encoding acyl-CoA ligases. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis was used to identify the one presenting the highest expression level when cells were grown in the presence of adipate. Deletion of the gene renamed aclA, led to a 32% decreased specific rate of adipate consumption and a threefold reduction of adipoyl-6-aminopenicillanic acid levels, but did not affect penicillin V production. After overexpression in Escherichia coli, the purified protein was shown to have a broad substrate range including adipate. Finally, protein-fusion with cyan-fluorescent protein showed co-localization with microbody-borne acyl-transferase. Identification and functional characterization of aclA may aid in developing future metabolic engineering strategies for improving the production of different cephalosporins.

  12. Human gene essentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartha, István; di Iulio, Julia; Venter, J Craig; Telenti, Amalio

    2018-01-01

    A gene can be defined as essential when loss of its function compromises viability of the individual (for example, embryonic lethality) or results in profound loss of fitness. At the population level, identification of essential genes is accomplished by observing intolerance to loss-of-function variants. Several computational methods are available to score gene essentiality, and recent progress has been made in defining essentiality in the non-coding genome. Haploinsufficiency is emerging as a critical aspect of gene essentiality: approximately 3,000 human genes cannot tolerate loss of one of the two alleles. Genes identified as essential in human cell lines or knockout mice may be distinct from those in living humans. Reconciling these discrepancies in how we evaluate gene essentiality has applications in clinical genetics and may offer insights for drug development.

  13. The Role of the Cullin-5 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase in the Regulation of Insulin Receptor Substrate-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Zhiwen Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. SOCS proteins are known to negatively regulate insulin signaling by inhibiting insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1. IRS1 has been reported to be a substrate for ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. Given that SOCS proteins can function as substrate receptor subunits of Cullin-5 E3 ubiquitin ligases, we examined whether Cullin-5 dependent ubiquitination is involved in the regulation of basal IRS1 protein stability and signal-induced IRS1 degradation. Findings. Our results indicate that basal IRS1 stability varies between cell types. However, the Cullin-5 E3 ligase does not play a major role in mediating IRS1 ubiquitination under basal conditions. Protein kinase C activation triggered pronounced IRS1 destabilization. However, this effect was also independent of the function of Cullin-5 E3 ubiquitin ligases. Conclusions. In conclusion, SOCS proteins do not exert a negative regulatory effect on IRS1 by functioning as substrate receptors for Cullin-5-based E3 ubiquitin ligases both under basal conditions and when IRS1 degradation is induced by protein kinase C activation.

  14. Increased expression of pyruvate carboxylase and biotin protein ligase increases lysine production in a biotin prototrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhihao; Moslehi-Jenabian, Soloomeh; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    pimeloyl-Acyl Carrier Protein [ACP]) formation. Pyruvate carboxylase (pycA), a biotin-dependent enzyme needed for lysine biosynthesis and biotin ligase (birA), which is responsible for attaching biotin to pyruvate carboxylase, were overexpressed by replacing the native promoters with the strong superoxide...

  15. Sorghum Brown midrib 2 (Bmr2) gene encodes the major 4-coumarate Coenzyme A ligase involved in lignin synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful modification of plant cell wall composition without compromising plant integrity is dependent on being able to modify the expression of specific genes, but can be very challenging when the target genes are members of multigene families. 4-Coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) catalyzes the formatio...

  16. RavN is a member of a previously unrecognized group of Legionella pneumophila E3 ubiquitin ligases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Han; Evans, Timothy R.; Doms, Alexandra G.; Beauchene, Nicole A.; Hierro, Aitor

    2018-01-01

    The eukaryotic ubiquitylation machinery catalyzes the covalent attachment of the small protein modifier ubiquitin to cellular target proteins in order to alter their fate. Microbial pathogens exploit this post-translational modification process by encoding molecular mimics of E3 ubiquitin ligases, eukaryotic enzymes that catalyze the final step in the ubiquitylation cascade. Here, we show that the Legionella pneumophila effector protein RavN belongs to a growing class of bacterial proteins that mimic host cell E3 ligases to exploit the ubiquitylation pathway. The E3 ligase activity of RavN was located within its N-terminal region and was dependent upon interaction with a defined subset of E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. The crystal structure of the N-terminal region of RavN revealed a U-box-like motif that was only remotely similar to other U-box domains, indicating that RavN is an E3 ligase relic that has undergone significant evolutionary alteration. Substitution of residues within the predicted E2 binding interface rendered RavN inactive, indicating that, despite significant structural changes, the mode of E2 recognition has remained conserved. Using hidden Markov model-based secondary structure analyses, we identified and experimentally validated four additional L. pneumophila effectors that were not previously recognized to possess E3 ligase activity, including Lpg2452/SdcB, a new paralog of SidC. Our study provides strong evidence that L. pneumophila is dedicating a considerable fraction of its effector arsenal to the manipulation of the host ubiquitylation pathway. PMID:29415051

  17. Electric circuits essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Electric Circuits I includes units, notation, resistive circuits, experimental laws, transient circuits, network theorems, techniques of circuit analysis, sinusoidal analysis, polyph

  18. Business statistics I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Louise

    2014-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Business Statistics I includes descriptive statistics, introduction to probability, probability distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, interval estimation, and hypothesis t

  19. Heat transfer II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    1988-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Heat Transfer II reviews correlations for forced convection, free convection, heat exchangers, radiation heat transfer, and boiling and condensation.

  20. Statistics I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Statistics I covers include frequency distributions, numerical methods of describing data, measures of variability, parameters of distributions, probability theory, and distributions.

  1. Calculus III essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Calculus III includes vector analysis, real valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integrations, vector fields, and infinite series.

  2. Computer science I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Raus, Randall

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Computer Science I includes fundamental computer concepts, number representations, Boolean algebra, switching circuits, and computer architecture.

  3. Calculus I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Calculus I covers functions, limits, basic derivatives, and integrals.

  4. Modern algebra essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Lutfiyya, Lutfi A

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Modern Algebra includes set theory, operations, relations, basic properties of the integers, group theory, and ring theory.

  5. Pre-calculus essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Woodward, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Pre-Calculus reviews sets, numbers, operations and properties, coordinate geometry, fundamental algebraic topics, solving equations and inequalities, functions, trigonometry, exponents

  6. Differential equations I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Differential Equations I covers first- and second-order equations, series solutions, higher-order linear equations, and the Laplace transform.

  7. Algebra & trigonometry II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Algebra & Trigonometry II includes logarithms, sequences and series, permutations, combinations and probability, vectors, matrices, determinants and systems of equations, mathematica

  8. Transport phenomena II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Transport Phenomena II covers forced convention, temperature distribution, free convection, diffusitivity and the mechanism of mass transfer, convective mass transfer, concentration

  9. Numerical analysis II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of; Staff of Research Education Association

    1989-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Numerical Analysis II covers simultaneous linear systems and matrix methods, differential equations, Fourier transformations, partial differential equations, and Monte Carlo methods.

  10. Binding of Nickel to Testicular Glutamate–Ammonia Ligase Inhibits Its Enzymatic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, YINGBIAO; OU, YOUNG; CHENG, MIN; RUAN, YIBING; VAN DER HOORN, FRANS A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Exposure to nickel has been shown to cause damage to the testis in several animal models. It is not known if the testis expresses protein(s) that can bind nickel. To test this, we used a nickel-binding assay to isolate testicular nickel-binding proteins. We identified glutamate–ammonia ligase (GLUL) as a prominent nickel-binding protein by mass spectrometry. Protein analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that GLUL is expressed in the testis, predominantly in interstitial cells. We determined that GLUL has a higher affinity for nickel than for its regular co-factor manganese. We produced an enzymatically active, recombinant GLUL protein. Upon binding, nickel interferes with the manganese-catalyzed enzymatic activity of recombinant GLUL protein. We also determined that GLUL activity in testes of animals exposed to nickel sulfate is reduced. Our results identify testicular GLUL as the first testicular protein shown to be affected by nickel exposure. PMID:21254280

  11. Generation and Development of RNA Ligase Ribozymes with Modular Architecture Through “Design and Selection”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Fujita

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In vitro selection with long random RNA libraries has been used as a powerful method to generate novel functional RNAs, although it often requires laborious structural analysis of isolated RNA molecules. Rational RNA design is an attractive alternative to avoid this laborious step, but rational design of catalytic modules is still a challenging task. A hybrid strategy of in vitro selection and rational design has been proposed. With this strategy termed “design and selection,” new ribozymes can be generated through installation of catalytic modules onto RNA scaffolds with defined 3D structures. This approach, the concept of which was inspired by the modular architecture of naturally occurring ribozymes, allows prediction of the overall architectures of the resulting ribozymes, and the structural modularity of the resulting ribozymes allows modification of their structures and functions. In this review, we summarize the design, generation, properties, and engineering of four classes of ligase ribozyme generated by design and selection.

  12. [Mechanism of reaction catalyzed by RNA-ligase from bacteriophage T4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrebel'nyĭ, S N; Zernov, Iu P

    1987-01-01

    The dissociation constants of the complexes of RNA-ligase with acceptors, donors and the adenylylated donor A(5')ppAp have been determined on the basis of the inhibition of ATP-pyrophosphate exchange reaction. The dissociation constants of the complexes of the enzyme with "poor" acceptors (oligouridilates) have been shown to be slightly different from those with "good" acceptors (oligoadenylates). The dependence of the reaction velocity of the formation of ligation products on the concentration of acceptors (pA)4, (pU)4 and the adenylylated donor A(5)ppAp has been studied. On the basis of the data obtained the conclusion about the random addition mechanism has been drawn. The reaction takes place in the steady-state conditions in the case of (pA)4 and in the equilibrium conditions--in the case of (pU)4.

  13. Ube2w and ataxin-3 coordinately regulate the ubiquitin ligase CHIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, K. Matthew; Zavodszky, Eszter; Todi, Sokol V.; Patury, Srikanth; Xu, Ping; Rodríguez-Lebrón, Edgardo; Fischer, Svetlana; Konen, John; Djarmati, Ana; Peng, Junmin; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Paulson, Henry L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which ubiquitin ligases are regulated remain poorly understood. Here we describe a series of molecular events that coordinately regulate CHIP, a neuroprotective E3 implicated in protein quality control. Through their opposing activities, the initiator E2, Ube2w, and the specialized deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), ataxin-3, participate in initiating, regulating and terminating the CHIP ubiquitination cycle. Monoubiquitination of CHIP by Ube2w stabilizes the interaction between CHIP and ataxin-3, which through its DUB activity limits the length of chains attached to CHIP substrates. Upon completion of substrate ubiquitination ataxin-3 deubiquitinates CHIP, effectively terminating the reaction. Our results suggest that functional pairing of E3s with ataxin-3 or similar DUBs represents an important point of regulation in ubiquitin-dependent protein quality control. In addition, the results shed light on disease pathogenesis in SCA3, a neurodegenerative disorder caused by polyglutamine expansion in ataxin-3. PMID:21855799

  14. TRIM E3 ligases interfere with early and late stages of the retroviral life cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep D Uchil

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of the TRIpartite interaction Motif (TRIM family of E3 ligases have been shown to exhibit antiviral activities. Here we report a near comprehensive screen for antiretroviral activities of 55 TRIM proteins (36 human, 19 mouse. We identified approximately 20 TRIM proteins that, when transiently expressed in HEK293 cells, affect the entry or release of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV, murine leukemia virus (MLV, or avian leukosis virus (ALV. While TRIM11 and 31 inhibited HIV entry, TRIM11 enhanced N-MLV entry by interfering with Ref1 restriction. Strikingly, many TRIM proteins affected late stages of the viral life cycle. Gene silencing of endogenously expressed TRIM 25, 31, and 62 inhibited viral release indicating that they play an important role at late stages of the viral life cycle. In contrast, downregulation of TRIM11 and 15 enhanced virus release suggesting that these proteins contribute to the endogenous restriction of retroviruses in cells.

  15. Ret Finger Protein: An E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Juxtaposed to the XY Body in Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Gillot

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During prophase I of male meiosis, the sex chromosomes form a compact structure called XY body that associates with the nuclear membrane of pachytene spermatocytes. Ret Finger Protein is a transcriptional repressor, able to interact with both nuclear matrix-associated proteins and double-stranded DNA. We report the precise and unique localization of Ret Finger Protein in pachytene spermatocytes, in which Ret Finger Protein takes place of lamin B1, between the XY body and the inner nuclear membrane. This localization of Ret Finger Protein does not seem to be associated with O-glycosylation or sumoylation. In addition, we demonstrate that Ret Finger Protein contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. These observations lead to an attractive hypothesis in which Ret Finger Protein would be involved in the positioning and the attachment of XY body to the nuclear lamina of pachytene spermatocytes.

  16. TRB3 links the E3 ubiquitin ligase COP1 to lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ling; Heredia, Jose E; Altarejos, Judith Y; Screaton, Robert; Goebel, Naomi; Niessen, Sherry; Macleod, Ian X; Liew, Chong Wee; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Bain, James; Newgard, Christopher; Nelson, Michael; Evans, Ronald M; Yates, John; Montminy, Marc

    2006-06-23

    During fasting, increased concentrations of circulating catecholamines promote the mobilization of lipid stores from adipose tissue in part by phosphorylating and inactivating acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), the rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid synthesis. Here, we describe a parallel pathway, in which the pseudokinase Tribbles 3 (TRB3), whose abundance is increased during fasting, stimulates lipolysis by triggering the degradation of ACC in adipose tissue. TRB3 promoted ACC ubiquitination through an association with the E3 ubiquitin ligase constitutive photomorphogenic protein 1 (COP1). Indeed, adipocytes deficient in TRB3 accumulated larger amounts of ACC protein than did wild-type cells. Because transgenic mice expressing TRB3 in adipose tissue are protected from diet-induced obesity due to enhanced fatty acid oxidation, these results demonstrate how phosphorylation and ubiquitination pathways converge on a key regulator of lipid metabolism to maintain energy homeostasis.

  17. RNF111/Arkadia is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sara L; Hansen, Rebecca K; Wagner, Sebastian A

    2013-01-01

    Protein modifications by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) play key roles in cellular signaling pathways. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) directly couple these modifications by selectively recognizing SUMOylated target proteins through SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs...... nonproteolytic, K63-linked ubiquitylation of SUMOylated target proteins. We demonstrate that RNF111 promoted ubiquitylation of SUMOylated XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum C) protein, a central DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER) extensively regulated by ultraviolet (UV......)-induced SUMOylation and ubiquitylation. Moreover, we show that RNF111 facilitated NER by regulating the recruitment of XPC to UV-damaged DNA. Our findings establish RNF111 as a new STUbL that directly links nonproteolytic ubiquitylation and SUMOylation in the DNA damage response....

  18. Highly precise and developmentally programmed genome assembly in Paramecium requires ligase IV-dependent end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusta, Aurélie; Matsuda, Atsushi; Marmignon, Antoine; Ku, Michael; Silve, Aude; Meyer, Eric; Forney, James D; Malinsky, Sophie; Bétermier, Mireille

    2011-04-01

    During the sexual cycle of the ciliate Paramecium, assembly of the somatic genome includes the precise excision of tens of thousands of short, non-coding germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences or IESs), each one flanked by two TA dinucleotides. It has been reported previously that these genome rearrangements are initiated by the introduction of developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which depend on the domesticated transposase PiggyMac. These DSBs all exhibit a characteristic geometry, with 4-base 5' overhangs centered on the conserved TA, and may readily align and undergo ligation with minimal processing. However, the molecular steps and actors involved in the final and precise assembly of somatic genes have remained unknown. We demonstrate here that Ligase IV and Xrcc4p, core components of the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ), are required both for the repair of IES excision sites and for the circularization of excised IESs. The transcription of LIG4 and XRCC4 is induced early during the sexual cycle and a Lig4p-GFP fusion protein accumulates in the developing somatic nucleus by the time IES excision takes place. RNAi-mediated silencing of either gene results in the persistence of free broken DNA ends, apparently protected against extensive resection. At the nucleotide level, controlled removal of the 5'-terminal nucleotide occurs normally in LIG4-silenced cells, while nucleotide addition to the 3' ends of the breaks is blocked, together with the final joining step, indicative of a coupling between NHEJ polymerase and ligase activities. Taken together, our data indicate that IES excision is a "cut-and-close" mechanism, which involves the introduction of initiating double-strand cleavages at both ends of each IES, followed by DSB repair via highly precise end joining. This work broadens our current view on how the cellular NHEJ pathway has cooperated with domesticated transposases for the emergence of new mechanisms

  19. Highly precise and developmentally programmed genome assembly in Paramecium requires ligase IV-dependent end joining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Kapusta

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available During the sexual cycle of the ciliate Paramecium, assembly of the somatic genome includes the precise excision of tens of thousands of short, non-coding germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences or IESs, each one flanked by two TA dinucleotides. It has been reported previously that these genome rearrangements are initiated by the introduction of developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, which depend on the domesticated transposase PiggyMac. These DSBs all exhibit a characteristic geometry, with 4-base 5' overhangs centered on the conserved TA, and may readily align and undergo ligation with minimal processing. However, the molecular steps and actors involved in the final and precise assembly of somatic genes have remained unknown. We demonstrate here that Ligase IV and Xrcc4p, core components of the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ, are required both for the repair of IES excision sites and for the circularization of excised IESs. The transcription of LIG4 and XRCC4 is induced early during the sexual cycle and a Lig4p-GFP fusion protein accumulates in the developing somatic nucleus by the time IES excision takes place. RNAi-mediated silencing of either gene results in the persistence of free broken DNA ends, apparently protected against extensive resection. At the nucleotide level, controlled removal of the 5'-terminal nucleotide occurs normally in LIG4-silenced cells, while nucleotide addition to the 3' ends of the breaks is blocked, together with the final joining step, indicative of a coupling between NHEJ polymerase and ligase activities. Taken together, our data indicate that IES excision is a "cut-and-close" mechanism, which involves the introduction of initiating double-strand cleavages at both ends of each IES, followed by DSB repair via highly precise end joining. This work broadens our current view on how the cellular NHEJ pathway has cooperated with domesticated transposases for the emergence of new

  20. HTLV-1 Tax Functions as a Ubiquitin E3 Ligase for Direct IKK Activation via Synthesis of Mixed-Linkage Polyubiquitin Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Long, Wenying; Peng, Chao; Hu, Lin; Zhang, Qiong; Wu, Ailing; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Duan, Xiaotao; Wong, Catherine C L; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Xia, Zongping

    2016-04-01

    The HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax plays a key role in CD4+ T cell transformation by promoting cell proliferation and survival, mainly through permanent activation of the NK-κB pathway and induction of many NF-κB target genes. Elucidating the underlying molecular mechanism is therefore critical in understanding HTLV-1-mediated transformation. Current studies have suggested multiple but controversial mechanisms regarding Tax-induced IKK activation mainly due to blending of primary Tax-induced IKK activation events and secondary IKK activation events induced by cytokines secreted by the primary Tax-induced IKK-NF-κB activation events. We reconstituted Tax-stimulated IKK activation in a cell-free system to dissect the essential cellular components for primary IKK activation by Tax and studied the underlying biochemical mechanism. We found that Tax is a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, which, together with UbcH2, UhcH5c, or UbcH7, catalyzes the assembly of free mixed-linkage polyubiquitin chains. These free mixed-linkage polyubiquitin chains are then responsible for direct IKK activation by binding to the NEMO subunit of IKK. Our studies revealed the biochemical function of Tax in the process of IKK activation, which utilizes the minimal cellular ubiquitination components for NF-κB activation.

  1. Poxvirus targeting of E3 ligase β-TrCP by molecular mimicry: a mechanism to inhibit NF-κB activation and promote immune evasion and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S Mansur

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor NF-κB is essential for immune responses against pathogens and its activation requires the phosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of IκBα. Here we describe an inhibitor of NF-κB from vaccinia virus that has a closely related counterpart in variola virus, the cause of smallpox, and mechanistic similarity with the HIV protein Vpu. Protein A49 blocks NF-κB activation by molecular mimicry and contains a motif conserved in IκBα which, in IκBα, is phosphorylated by IKKβ causing ubiquitination and degradation. Like IκBα, A49 binds the E3 ligase β-TrCP, thereby preventing ubiquitination and degradation of IκBα. Consequently, A49 stabilised phosphorylated IκBα (p-IκBα and its interaction with p65, so preventing p65 nuclear translocation. Serine-to-alanine mutagenesis within the IκBα-like motif of A49 abolished β-TrCP binding, stabilisation of p-IκBα and inhibition of NF-κB activation. Remarkably, despite encoding nine other inhibitors of NF-κB, a VACV lacking A49 showed reduced virulence in vivo.

  2. Poxvirus targeting of E3 ligase β-TrCP by molecular mimicry: a mechanism to inhibit NF-κB activation and promote immune evasion and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Daniel S; Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Unterholzner, Leonie; Sumner, Rebecca P; Ferguson, Brian J; Ren, Hongwei; Strnadova, Pavla; Bowie, Andrew G; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2013-02-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB is essential for immune responses against pathogens and its activation requires the phosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of IκBα. Here we describe an inhibitor of NF-κB from vaccinia virus that has a closely related counterpart in variola virus, the cause of smallpox, and mechanistic similarity with the HIV protein Vpu. Protein A49 blocks NF-κB activation by molecular mimicry and contains a motif conserved in IκBα which, in IκBα, is phosphorylated by IKKβ causing ubiquitination and degradation. Like IκBα, A49 binds the E3 ligase β-TrCP, thereby preventing ubiquitination and degradation of IκBα. Consequently, A49 stabilised phosphorylated IκBα (p-IκBα) and its interaction with p65, so preventing p65 nuclear translocation. Serine-to-alanine mutagenesis within the IκBα-like motif of A49 abolished β-TrCP binding, stabilisation of p-IκBα and inhibition of NF-κB activation. Remarkably, despite encoding nine other inhibitors of NF-κB, a VACV lacking A49 showed reduced virulence in vivo.

  3. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were...... predicted to be essential. The vast majority of essential genes were categorized in relatively few domains of cell metabolism, with about half involved in information processing, one-fifth involved in the synthesis of cell envelope and the determination of cell shape and division, and one-tenth related...... to cell energetics. Only 4% of essential genes encode unknown functions. Most essential genes are present throughout a wide range of Bacteria, and almost 70% can also be found in Archaea and Eucarya. However, essential genes related to cell envelope, shape, division, and respiration tend to be lost from...

  4. C programming language essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, Ernest C

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. C Programming Language discusses fundamental notions, data types and objects, expressions, statements, declarations, function and program structure, the preprocessor, and the standar

  5. Electronics I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Electronics I covers fundamentals of semiconductor devices, junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, power supplies, multitransistor circuits, small signals, low-frequency anal

  6. Electronics II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Electronics II covers operational amplifiers, feedback and frequency compensation of OP amps, multivibrators, logic gates and families, Boolean algebra, registers, counters, arithmet

  7. Boolean algebra essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Alan D

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Boolean Algebra includes set theory, sentential calculus, fundamental ideas of Boolean algebras, lattices, rings and Boolean algebras, the structure of a Boolean algebra, and Boolean

  8. Group theory I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Group Theory I includes sets and mapping, groupoids and semi-groups, groups, isomorphisms and homomorphisms, cyclic groups, the Sylow theorems, and finite p-groups.

  9. Computer science II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Raus, Randall

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Computer Science II includes organization of a computer, memory and input/output, coding, data structures, and program development. Also included is an overview of the most commonly

  10. Set theory essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Set Theory includes elementary logic, sets, relations, functions, denumerable and non-denumerable sets, cardinal numbers, Cantor's theorem, axiom of choice, and order relations.

  11. Complex variables I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Complex Variables I includes functions of a complex variable, elementary complex functions, integrals of complex functions in the complex plane, sequences and series, and poles and r

  12. Transport phenomena I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Transport Phenomena I includes viscosity, flow of Newtonian fluids, velocity distribution in laminar flow, velocity distributions with more than one independent variable, thermal con

  13. Algebra & trigonometry I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Algebra & Trigonometry I includes sets and set operations, number systems and fundamental algebraic laws and operations, exponents and radicals, polynomials and rational expressions, eq

  14. Geometry I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Geometry I includes methods of proof, points, lines, planes, angles, congruent angles and line segments, triangles, parallelism, quadrilaterals, geometric inequalities, and geometric

  15. Complex variables II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Complex Variables II includes elementary mappings and Mobius transformation, mappings by general functions, conformal mappings and harmonic functions, applying complex functions to a

  16. Data structures II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Smolarski, Dennis C

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Data Structures II includes sets, trees, advanced sorting, elementary graph theory, hashing, memory management and garbage collection, and appendices on recursion vs. iteration, alge

  17. Data structures I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Smolarski, Dennis C

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Data Structures I includes scalar variables, arrays and records, elementary sorting, searching, linked lists, queues, and appendices of binary notation and subprogram parameter passi

  18. Thermodynamics I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Thermodynamics I includes review of properties and states of a pure substance, work and heat, energy and the first law of thermodynamics, entropy and the second law of thermodynamics

  19. Physics I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Physics I includes vectors and scalars, one-dimensional motion, plane motion, dynamics of a particle, work and energy, conservation of energy, dynamics of systems of particles, rotation

  20. Thermodynamics II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Thermodynamics II includes review of thermodynamic relations, power and refrigeration cycles, mixtures and solutions, chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, and flow through nozzl

  1. Physical chemistry II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    1992-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Physical Chemistry II includes reaction mechanisms, theoretical approaches to chemical kinetics, gravitational work, electrical and magnetic work, surface work, kinetic theory, collisional and transport properties of gases, statistical mechanics, matter and waves, quantum mechanics, and rotations and vibrations of atoms and molecules.

  2. Laplace transforms essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Shafii-Mousavi, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Laplace Transforms includes the Laplace transform, the inverse Laplace transform, special functions and properties, applications to ordinary linear differential equations, Fourier tr

  3. Statistics II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Statistics II discusses sampling theory, statistical inference, independent and dependent variables, correlation theory, experimental design, count data, chi-square test, and time se

  4. Biochemical characterisation of LigN, an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase from the halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii that displays maximal in vitro activity at high salt concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poidevin, L.; MacNeill, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    Background DNA ligases are required for DNA strand joining in all forms of cellular life. NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are found primarily in eubacteria but also in some eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage and archaea. Among the archaeal NAD+-dependent DNA ligases is the LigN enzyme of the halophilic...... assays using ¿ DNA restriction fragments with 12 bp cos cohesive ends were used to show that LigN activity was dependent on addition of divalent cations and salt. No activity was detected in the absence of KCl, whereas maximum activity could be detected at 3.2 M KCl, close to the intracellular KCl...... concentration of Hfx.volcanii cells. Conclusion LigN is unique amongst characterised DNA ligase enzymes in displaying maximal DNA strand joining activity at high (> 3 M) salt levels. As such the LigN enzyme has potential both as a novel tool for biotechnology and as a model enzyme for studying the adaptation...

  5. Roitt's essential immunology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delves, Peter J; Roitt, Ivan M

    2011-01-01

    ... of the immune system, the hallmark easy-reading style of Roitt's Essential Immunology clearly explains the key principles needed by medical and health sciences students, from the basis of immunity to clinical applications...

  6. Treatment of Essential Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... essential tremor. Neurologists from the American Academy of Neurology are doctors who identify and treat diseases of ... an educational service of the American Academy of Neurology. It is based on an assessment of current ...

  7. Marketingmanagement : De essentie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotler, P.J.; Keller, K.; Robben, H.S.J.

    2007-01-01

    'Marketingmanagement, de essentie' biedt een volledige introductie in modern marketingmanagement. De nieuwste concepten en onderzoeksresultaten komen aan bod. Zo wordt veel aandacht besteed aan holistische marketing en is de impact van technologische ontwikkelingen op hedendaagse marketing in deze

  8. Marketing management : De essentie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotler, P.J.; Keller, K.; Robben, H.S.J.

    2010-01-01

    'Marketingmanagement, de essentie' biedt een volledige introductie in modern marketingmanagement. De nieuwste concepten en onderzoeksresultaten komen aan bod. Zo wordt veel aandacht besteed aan holistische marketing en is de impact van technologische ontwikkelingen op hedendaagse marketing in deze

  9. Essential software architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Gorton, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Job titles like ""Technical Architect"" and ""Chief Architect"" nowadays abound in software industry, yet many people suspect that ""architecture"" is one of the most overused and least understood terms in professional software development. Gorton's book tries to resolve this dilemma. It concisely describes the essential elements of knowledge and key skills required to be a software architect. The explanations encompass the essentials of architecture thinking, practices, and supporting technologies. They range from a general understanding of structure and quality attributes through technical i

  10. The Trim39 ubiquitin ligase inhibits APC/CCdh1-mediated degradation of the Bax activator MOAP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Nai-Jia; Zhang, Liguo; Tang, Wanli; Chen, Chen; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Kornbluth, Sally

    2012-04-30

    Proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, such as Bax, promote release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, leading to caspase activation and cell death. It was previously reported that modulator of apoptosis protein 1 (MOAP-1), an enhancer of Bax activation induced by DNA damage, is stabilized by Trim39, a protein of unknown function. In this paper, we show that MOAP-1 is a novel substrate of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C(Cdh1)) ubiquitin ligase. The influence of Trim39 on MOAP-1 levels stems from the ability of Trim39 (a RING domain E3 ligase) to directly inhibit APC/C(Cdh1)-mediated protein ubiquitylation. Accordingly, small interfering ribonucleic acid-mediated knockdown of Cdh1 stabilized MOAP-1, thereby enhancing etoposide-induced Bax activation and apoptosis. These data identify Trim39 as a novel APC/C regulator and provide an unexpected link between the APC/C and apoptotic regulation via MOAP-1.

  11. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial...... slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I...... by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional...

  12. The glomuvenous malformation protein Glomulin binds Rbx1 and regulates cullin RING ligase-mediated turnover of Fbw7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Adriana E; Arai, Takehiro; Duda, David M; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Olszewski, Jennifer L; Fujiwara, Yuko; Bahamon, Brittany N; Signoretti, Sabina; Schulman, Brenda A; DeCaprio, James A

    2012-04-13

    Fbw7, a substrate receptor for Cul1-RING-ligase (CRL1), facilitates the ubiquitination and degradation of several proteins, including Cyclin E and c-Myc. In spite of much effort, the mechanisms underlying Fbw7 regulation are mostly unknown. Here, we show that Glomulin (Glmn), a protein found mutated in the vascular disorder glomuvenous malformation (GVM), binds directly to the RING domain of Rbx1 and inhibits its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Loss of Glmn in a variety of cells, tissues, and GVM lesions results in decreased levels of Fbw7 and increased levels of Cyclin E and c-Myc. The increased turnover of Fbw7 is dependent on CRL and proteasome activity, indicating that Glmn modulates the E3 activity of CRL1(Fbw7). These data reveal an unexpected functional connection between Glmn and Rbx1 and demonstrate that defective regulation of Fbw7 levels contributes to GVM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Smurf2 E3 ubiquitin ligase modulates proliferation and invasiveness of breast cancer cells in a CNKSR2 dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    David, Diana; Jagadeeshan, Sankar; Hariharan, Ramkumar; Nair, Asha Sivakumari; Pillai, Radhakrishna Madhavan

    2014-01-01

    Background Smurf2 is a member of the HECT family of E3 ubiquitin ligases that play important roles in determining the competence of cells to respond to TGF- β/BMP signaling pathway. However, besides TGF-β/BMP pathway, Smurf2 regulates a repertoire of other signaling pathways ranging from planar cell polarity during embryonic development to cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and senescence. Expression of Smurf2 is found to be dysregulated in many cancers including breast cancer. Th...

  14. Fbxw5 suppresses nuclear c-Myb activity via DDB1-Cul4-Rbx1 ligase-mediated sumoylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanei-Ishii, Chie; Nomura, Teruaki; Egoh, Ayako [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, RIKEN Tsukuba Institute, 3-1-1 Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0074 (Japan); Ishii, Shunsuke, E-mail: sishii@rtc.riken.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, RIKEN Tsukuba Institute, 3-1-1 Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0074 (Japan)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fbxw5 enhances sumoylation of c-Myb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DDB1-Cul4A-Rbx1 complex mediates c-Myb sumoylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Fbxw5-DDB1-Cul4A-Rdx1 complex is a dual SUMO/ubiquitin ligase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fbxw5 suppresses the c-Myb trans-activating capacity. -- Abstract: The c-myb proto-oncogene product (c-Myb) is degraded in response to Wnt-1 signaling. In this process, Fbxw7{alpha}, the F-box protein of the SCF complex, binds to c-Myb via its C-terminal WD40 domain, and induces the ubiquitination of c-Myb. Here, we report that Fbxw5, another F-box protein, enhances sumoylation of nuclear c-Myb. Fbxw5 enhanced c-Myb sumoylation via the DDB1-Cul4A-Rbx1 complex. Since the Fbxw5-DDB1-Cul4A-Rbx1 complex was shown to act as a ubiquitin ligase for tumor suppressor TSC2, our results suggest that this complex can function as a dual SUMO/ubiquitin ligase. Fbxw5, which is localized to both nucleus and cytosol, enhanced sumoylation of nuclear c-Myb and induced the localization of c-Myb to nuclear dot-like domains. Co-expression of Fbxw5 suppressed the trans-activation of c-myc promoter by wild-type c-Myb, but not by v-Myb, which lacks the sumoylation sites. These results suggest that multiple E3 ligases suppress c-Myb activity through sumoylation or ubiquitination, and that v-Myb is no longer subject to these negative regulations.

  15. The San1 Ubiquitin Ligase Functions Preferentially with Ubiquitin-conjugating Enzyme Ubc1 during Protein Quality Control*

    OpenAIRE

    Ibarra, Rebeca; Sandoval, Daniella; Fredrickson, Eric K.; Gardner, Richard G.; Kleiger, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Protein quality control (PQC) is a critical process wherein misfolded or damaged proteins are cleared from the cell to maintain protein homeostasis. In eukaryotic cells, the removal of misfolded proteins is primarily accomplished by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In the ubiquitin-proteasome system, ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes and ubiquitin ligases append polyubiquitin chains onto misfolded protein substrates signaling for their degradation. The kinetics of protein ubiquitylation are param...

  16. Interactions between the quality control ubiquitin ligase CHIP and ubiquitin conjugating enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nix Jay C

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitin (E3 ligases interact with specific ubiquitin conjugating (E2 enzymes to ubiquitinate particular substrate proteins. As the combination of E2 and E3 dictates the type and biological consequence of ubiquitination, it is important to understand the basis of specificity in E2:E3 interactions. The E3 ligase CHIP interacts with Hsp70 and Hsp90 and ubiquitinates client proteins that are chaperoned by these heat shock proteins. CHIP interacts with two types of E2 enzymes, UbcH5 and Ubc13-Uev1a. It is unclear, however, why CHIP binds these E2 enzymes rather than others, and whether CHIP interacts preferentially with UbcH5 or Ubc13-Uev1a, which form different types of polyubiquitin chains. Results The 2.9 Å crystal structure of the CHIP U-box domain complexed with UbcH5a shows that CHIP binds to UbcH5 and Ubc13 through similar specificity determinants, including a key S-P-A motif on the E2 enzymes. The determinants make different relative contributions to the overall interactions between CHIP and the two E2 enzymes. CHIP undergoes auto-ubiquitination by UbcH5 but not by Ubc13-Uev1a. Instead, CHIP drives the formation of unanchored polyubiquitin by Ubc13-Uev1a. CHIP also interacts productively with the class III E2 enzyme Ube2e2, in which the UbcH5- and Ubc13-binding specificity determinants are highly conserved. Conclusion The CHIP:UbcH5a structure emphasizes the importance of specificity determinants located on the long loops and central helix of the CHIP U-box, and on the N-terminal helix and loops L4 and L7 of its cognate E2 enzymes. The S-P-A motif and other specificity determinants define the set of cognate E2 enzymes for CHIP, which likely includes several Class III E2 enzymes. CHIP's interactions with UbcH5, Ube2e2 and Ubc13-Uev1a are consistent with the notion that Ubc13-Uev1a may work sequentially with other E2 enzymes to carry out K63-linked polyubiquitination of CHIP substrates.

  17. Ligase-free subcloning: a versatile method to subclone polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products in a single day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuldiner, A R; Tanner, K; Scott, L A; Moore, C A; Roth, J

    1991-04-01

    Often, it is convenient to subclone polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products into a plasmid vector for subsequent replication in bacteria, but conventional subcloning methods often fail. We report a rapid and versatile method to subclone PCR products directionally into a specific site of virtually any plasmid vector. The procedure requires only four primers, does not require DNA ligase, and may be accomplished in a single day. Ligase-free subcloning is performed by incorporating into the PCR primers sequences at the 5' ends that result in PCR products whose 3' ends are complementary to the 3' ends of the recipient linearized plasmid. The PCR product and the linearized plasmid are spliced together in a second PCR reaction in which Taq polymerase extends the complementary overlapping 3' ends (ligation by overlap extension). Denaturation followed by heterologous reannealing and cyclization results in a cyclic recombinant plasmid with two nicks that may be used directly to transform competent Escherichia coli. In our hands, ligase-free subcloning is rapid, and offers many advantages over existing strategies.

  18. Soy Glycinin Contains a Functional Inhibitory Sequence against Muscle-Atrophy-Associated Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl-b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Unloading stress induces skeletal muscle atrophy. We have reported that Cbl-b ubiquitin ligase is a master regulator of unloading-associated muscle atrophy. The present study was designed to elucidate whether dietary soy glycinin protein prevents denervation-mediated muscle atrophy, based on the presence of inhibitory peptides against Cbl-b ubiquitin ligase in soy glycinin protein. Methods. Mice were fed either 20% casein diet, 20% soy protein isolate diet, 10% glycinin diet containing 10% casein, or 20% glycinin diet. One week later, the right sciatic nerve was cut. The wet weight, cross sectional area (CSA, IGF-1 signaling, and atrogene expression in hindlimb muscles were examined at 1, 3, 3.5, or 4 days after denervation. Results. 20% soy glycinin diet significantly prevented denervation-induced decreases in muscle wet weight and myofiber CSA. Furthermore, dietary soy protein inhibited denervation-induced ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 in tibialis anterior muscle. Dietary soy glycinin partially suppressed the denervation-mediated expression of atrogenes, such as MAFbx/atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, through the protection of IGF-1 signaling estimated by phosphorylation of Akt-1. Conclusions. Soy glycinin contains a functional inhibitory sequence against muscle-atrophy-associated ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b. Dietary soy glycinin protein significantly prevented muscle atrophy after denervation in mice.

  19. Toward the virtual screening of potential drugs in the homology modeled NAD+ dependent DNA ligase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijai; Somvanshi, Pallavi

    2010-02-01

    DNA ligase is an important enzyme and it plays vital role in the replication and repair; also catalyzes nick joining between adjacent bases of DNA. The NAD(+) dependent DNA ligase is selectively present in eubacteria and few viruses; but missing in humans. Homology modeling was used to generate 3-D structure of NAD(+) dependent DNA ligase (LigA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using the known template (PDB: 2OWO). Furthermore, the stereochemical quality and torsion angle of 3-D structure was validated. Numerous effective drugs were selected and the active amino acid residue in LigA was targeted and virtual screening through molecular docking was done. In this analysis, four drugs Chloroquine, Hydroxychloroquine, Putrienscine and Adriamycin were found more potent in inhibition of M. tuberculosis through the robust binding affinity between protein-drug interactions in comparison with the other studied drugs. A phylogenetic tree was constructed and it was observed that homology of LigA in M. tuberculosis resembled with other Mycobacterium species. The conserved active amino acids of LigA may be useful to target these drugs. These findings could be used as the starting point of a rational design of novel antibacterial drugs and its analogs.

  20. FERM-dependent E3 ligase recognition is a conserved mechanism for targeted degradation of lipoprotein receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkin, Anna C; Goult, Benjamin T; Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Hong, Cynthia; Schwabe, John W R; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-12-13

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDL receptor) regulates LDL receptor (LDLR)-dependent cholesterol uptake, but its mechanism of action, including the molecular basis for its stringent specificity, is poorly understood. Here we show that IDOL uses a singular strategy among E3 ligases for target recognition. The IDOL FERM domain binds directly to a recognition sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of lipoprotein receptors. This physical interaction is independent of IDOL's really interesting new gene (RING) domain E3 ligase activity and its capacity for autoubiquitination. Furthermore, IDOL controls its own stability through autoubiquitination of a unique FERM subdomain fold not present in other FERM proteins. Key residues defining the IDOL-LDLR interaction and IDOL autoubiquitination are functionally conserved in their insect homologs. Finally, we demonstrate that target recognition by IDOL involves a tripartite interaction between the FERM domain, membrane phospholipids, and the lipoprotein receptor tail. Our data identify the IDOL-LDLR interaction as an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for the regulation of lipid uptake and suggest that this interaction could potentially be exploited for the pharmacologic modulation of lipid metabolism.

  1. Python essential reference

    CERN Document Server

    Beazley, David M

    2009-01-01

    Python Essential Reference is the definitive reference guide to the Python programming language — the one authoritative handbook that reliably untangles and explains both the core Python language and the most essential parts of the Python library. Designed for the professional programmer, the book is concise, to the point, and highly accessible. It also includes detailed information on the Python library and many advanced subjects that is not available in either the official Python documentation or any other single reference source. Thoroughly updated to reflect the significant new programming language features and library modules that have been introduced in Python 2.6 and Python 3, the fourth edition of Python Essential Reference is the definitive guide for programmers who need to modernize existing Python code or who are planning an eventual migration to Python 3. Programmers starting a new Python project will find detailed coverage of contemporary Python programming idioms.

  2. Essential travel medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This 1st edition of Essential Travel Medicine provides an excellent concise introduction to the specialty of Travel Medicine. This core text will enable health care practitioners particularly those new to the clinical practice of Travel Medicine, to gain a fundamental understanding of the diverse and complex issues which can potentially affect the health of the many millions of people who undertake international travel. Jane N Zuckerman is joined by Gary W Brunette from CDC and Peter A Leggat from Australia as Editors. Leading international specialists in their fields have contributed authoritative chapters reflecting current knowledge to facilitate best clinical practice in the different aspects of travel medicine. The aim of Essential Travel Medicine is to provide a comprehensive guide to Travel Medicine as well as a fundamental knowledge base to support international undergraduate and postgraduate specialty training programmes in the discipline of Travel Medicine. The 1st edition of Essential Travel ...

  3. The SCF ubiquitin ligase Slimb controls Nerfin-1 turnover in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaohui; Wang, Feng; Li, Yuanpei; Zhai, Chaojun; Wang, Guiping; Zhang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yang; Yi, Tao; Sun, Dan; Wu, Shian

    2018-01-01

    The C2H2 type zinc-finger transcription factor Nerfin-1 expresses dominantly in Drosophila nervous system and plays an important role in early axon guidance decisions and preventing neurons dedifferentiation. Recently, increasing reports indicated that INSM1 (homologue to nerfin-1 in mammals) is a useful marker for prognosis of neuroendocrine tumors. The dynamic expression of Nerfin-1 is regulated post-transcriptionally by multiple microRNAs; however, its post-translational regulation is still unclear. Here we showed that the protein turnover of Nerfin-1 is regulated by Slimb, the substrate adaptor of SCF Slimb ubiquitin ligase complex. Mechanistically, Slimb associates with Nerfin-1 and promotes it ubiquitination and degradation in Drosophila S2R + cells. Furthermore, we determined that the C-terminal half of Nerfin-1 (Nerfin-1 CT ) is required for its binding to Slimb. Genetic epistasis assays showed that Slimb misexpression antagonizes, while knock-down enhances the activity of Nerfin-1 CT in Drosophila eyes. Our data revealed a new link to understand the underlying mechanism for Nerfin-1 turnover in post-translational level, and provided useful insights in animal development and disease treatment by manipulating the activity of Slimb and Nerfin-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcriptional repressor NIR interacts with the p53-inhibiting ubiquitin ligase MDM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyne, Kristina; Förster, Juliane; Schüle, Roland; Roemer, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    NIR (novel INHAT repressor) can bind to p53 at promoters and inhibit p53-mediated gene transactivation by blocking histone acetylation carried out by p300/CBP. Like NIR, the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 can also bind and inhibit p53 at promoters. Here, we present data indicating that NIR, which shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, not only binds to p53 but also directly to MDM2, in part via the central acidic and zinc finger domain of MDM2 that is also contacted by several other nucleolus-based MDM2/p53-regulating proteins. Like some of these, NIR was able to inhibit the ubiquitination of MDM2 and stabilize MDM2; however, unlike these nucleolus-based MDM2 regulators, NIR did not inhibit MDM2 to activate p53. Rather, NIR cooperated with MDM2 to repress p53-induced transactivation. This cooperative repression may at least in part involve p300/CBP. We show that NIR can block the acetylation of p53 and MDM2. Non-acetylated p53 has been documented previously to more readily associate with inhibitory MDM2. NIR may thus help to sustain the inhibitory p53:MDM2 complex, and we present evidence suggesting that all three proteins can indeed form a ternary complex. In sum, our findings suggest that NIR can support MDM2 to suppress p53 as a transcriptional activator.

  5. Ubiquitin chain specificities of E6AP E3 ligase and its HECT domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Fuminori; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Takaki, Kento; Konno, Hiroki

    2018-02-05

    Ubiquitination of target proteins is accomplished by isopeptide bond formation between the carboxy group of the C-terminal glycine (Gly) residue of ubiquitin (Ub) and the ɛ-amino group of lysine (Lys) on the target proteins. The formation of an isopeptide bond between Ubs that gives rise to a poly-Ub chain on the target proteins and the types of poly-Ub chains formed depend on which of the seven Lys residues or N-terminal methionine (Met) residue on Ub is used for chain elongation. To understand the linkage specificity mechanism of Ub chains on E3, the previous study established an assay to monitor the formation of a free diubiquitin chain (Ub 2 chain synthesis assay) by HECT type E3 ligase. In this study, we investigated Ub 2 chain specificity using E6AP HECT domain. We here demonstrate the importance of the N-terminal domain of full length E6AP for Ub 2 chain specificity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The evolutionarily conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase AtCHIP contributes to plant immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin eLi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants possess a sophisticated immune system to recognize and respond to microbial threats in their environment. The level of immune signaling must be tightly regulated so that immune responses can be quickly activated in the presence of pathogens, while avoiding autoimmunity. HSP90s, along with their diverse array of co-chaperones, forms chaperone complexes that have been shown to play both positive and negative roles in regulating the accumulation of immune receptors and regulators. In this study, we examined the role of AtCHIP, an evolutionarily conserved E3 ligase that was known to interact with chaperones including HSP90s in multicellular organisms including fruit fly, C. elegans, plants and human. Atchip knockout mutants display enhanced disease susceptibility to a virulent oomycete pathogen, and overexpression of AtCHIP causes enhanced disease resistance at low temperature. Although CHIP was reported to target HSP90 for ubiquitination and degradation, accumulation of HSP90.3 was not affected in Atchip plants. In addition, protein accumulation of nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat domain immune receptor (NLR SNC1 is not altered in Atchip mutant. Thus, while AtCHIP plays a role in immunity, it does not seem to regulate the turnover of HSP90 or SNC1. Further investigation is needed in order to determine the exact mechanism behind AtCHIP’s role in regulating plant immune responses.

  7. Cloning and Functional Characterization of Two 4-Coumarate: CoA Ligase Genes from Selaginella moellendorffii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Yan Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Selaginella is an extant lycopodiophyte genus, which is representative of an ancient lineage of tracheophytes. The important evolutionary status makes it a valuable resource for the study of metabolic evolution in vascular plants. 4-coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL is the pivotal enzyme that controls the flow of carbon through the phenylpropanoid metabolic pathway into the specific lignin, flavonoid, and wall-bound phenolics biosynthesis pathways. Although 4CLs have been extensively characterized in other vascular plants, little is known of their functions in Selaginella. Here, we isolated two 4CL genes (Sm4CL1 and Sm4CL2 from Selaginella moellendorffii. Based on the enzymatic activities of the recombinant proteins, both of these genes encoded bona fide 4CLs. The 4CL isoforms in S. moellendorffii have different activities: Sm4CL2 was more active than Sm4CL1. The enzymatic properties and gene expression patterns indicated that the 4CL genes have been conserved in the evolution of vascular plants.

  8. Clinical and molecular characterization of 6 children with glutamate-cysteine ligase deficiency causing hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almusafri, Fatima; Elamin, Hiba E; Khalaf, Tamam E; Ali, Alaa; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; El-Hattab, Ayman W

    2017-06-01

    Glutathione (gamma-glutamylcysteinylglycine) has diverse functions including free radicals scavenging and modulating many critical cellular processes. Glutathione is synthesized by the consecutive action of the enzymes glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) and glutathione synthetase. GCL is composed of a catalytic subunit encoded by the GCLC gene and a regulatory subunit encoded by the GCLM gene. GCL deficiency due to homozygous mutations in GCLC has been reported in 6 individuals from 4 independent families. All presented with hemolytic anemia and 4 had additional neurological manifestations including cognitive impairment, neuropathy, ataxia, and myopathy. In this report, we present additional 6 children from 2 independent consanguineous families with GCL deficiency. All the children presented with neonatal hemolytic anemia. Beyond the neonatal period, they did not have jaundice or hemolysis, but continued to have mild anemia. They all had normal development and neurological examination. The affected children from the first family had the homozygous mutation c.1772G>A (p.S591N) and the second family had the homozygous mutation c.514T>A (p.S172T) in GCLC. GCL deficiency can have a mild non-neurological phenotype or a more severe phenotype with neurological manifestations. GCL deficiency can be an underdiagnosed cause of hemolytic anemia, thus awareness may aid in early diagnosis, appropriate genetic counseling, and management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiple functions of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shaohua; Wang, Tianxiao; Ge, Wei

    2017-09-03

    The carboxyl terminal of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays a pivotal role in the protein quality control system by shifting the balance of the folding-refolding machinery toward the degradative pathway. However, the precise mechanisms by which nonnative proteins are selected for degradation by CHIP either directly or indirectly via chaperone Hsp70 or Hsp90 are still not clear. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive model of the mechanism by which CHIP degrades its substrate in a chaperone-dependent or direct manner. In addition, through tight regulation of the protein level of its substrates, CHIP plays important roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, including cancers, neurological disorders, cardiac diseases, bone metabolism, immunity, and so on. Nonetheless, the precise mechanisms underlying the regulation of the immune system by CHIP are still poorly understood despite accumulating developments in our understanding of the regulatory roles of CHIP in both innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review, we also aim to provide a view of CHIP-mediated regulation of immune responses and the signaling pathways involved in the model described. Finally, we discuss the roles of CHIP in immune-related diseases.

  10. Pirh2 E3 ubiquitin ligase monoubiquitinates DNA polymerase eta to suppress translesion DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong-Sam; Hakem, Anne; Hakem, Razqallah; Chen, Xinbin

    2011-10-01

    Polymerase eta (PolH) is necessary for translesion DNA synthesis, and PolH deficiency predisposes xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) patients to cancer. Due to the critical role of PolH in translesion DNA synthesis, the activity of PolH is tightly controlled and subjected to multiple regulations, especially posttranslational modifications. Here, we show that PolH-dependent lesion bypass and intracellular translocation are regulated by Pirh2 E3 ubiquitin ligase through monoubiquitination. Specifically, we show that Pirh2, a target of the p53 tumor suppressor, monoubiquitinates PolH at one of multiple lysine residues. We also show that monoubiquitination of PolH inhibits the ability of PolH to interact with PCNA and to bypass UV-induced lesions, leading to decreased viability of UV-damaged cells. Moreover, we show that monoubiquitination of PolH alters the ability of PolH to translocate to replication foci for translesion DNA synthesis of UV-induced DNA lesions. Considering that Pirh2 is known to be overexpressed in various cancers, we postulate that in addition to mutation of PolH in XPV patients, inactivation of PolH by Pirh2 via monoubiquitination is one of the mechanisms by which PolH function is controlled, which might be responsible for the development and progression of some spontaneous tumors wherein PolH is not found to be mutated.

  11. Pirh2 E3 ubiquitin ligase targets DNA polymerase eta for 20S proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong-Sam; Liu, Gang; Chen, Xinbin

    2010-02-01

    DNA polymerase eta (PolH), a Y family translesion polymerase, is required for repairing UV-induced DNA damage, and loss of PolH is responsible for early onset of malignant skin cancers in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV), an autosomal recessive disorder. Here, we show that PolH, a target of the p53 tumor suppressor, is a short-half-life protein. We found that PolH is degraded by proteasome, which is enhanced upon UV irradiation. We also found that PolH interacts with Pirh2 E3 ligase, another target of the p53 tumor suppressor, via the polymerase-associated domain in PolH and the RING finger domain in Pirh2. In addition, we show that overexpression of Pirh2 decreases PolH protein stability, whereas knockdown of Pirh2 increases it. Interestingly, we found that PolH is recruited by Pirh2 and degraded by 20S proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner. Finally, we observed that Pirh2 knockdown leads to accumulation of PolH and, subsequently, enhances the survival of UV-irradiated cells. We postulate that UV irradiation promotes cancer formation in part by destabilizing PolH via Pirh2-mediated 20S proteasomal degradation.

  12. Pirh2 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Targets DNA Polymerase Eta for 20S Proteasomal Degradation ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong-Sam; Liu, Gang; Chen, Xinbin

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymerase eta (PolH), a Y family translesion polymerase, is required for repairing UV-induced DNA damage, and loss of PolH is responsible for early onset of malignant skin cancers in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV), an autosomal recessive disorder. Here, we show that PolH, a target of the p53 tumor suppressor, is a short-half-life protein. We found that PolH is degraded by proteasome, which is enhanced upon UV irradiation. We also found that PolH interacts with Pirh2 E3 ligase, another target of the p53 tumor suppressor, via the polymerase-associated domain in PolH and the RING finger domain in Pirh2. In addition, we show that overexpression of Pirh2 decreases PolH protein stability, whereas knockdown of Pirh2 increases it. Interestingly, we found that PolH is recruited by Pirh2 and degraded by 20S proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner. Finally, we observed that Pirh2 knockdown leads to accumulation of PolH and, subsequently, enhances the survival of UV-irradiated cells. We postulate that UV irradiation promotes cancer formation in part by destabilizing PolH via Pirh2-mediated 20S proteasomal degradation. PMID:20008555

  13. The ubiquitin ligase RNF5 regulates antiviral responses by mediating degradation of the adaptor protein MITA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bo; Zhang, Lu; Lei, Caoqi; Li, Ying; Mao, Ai-Ping; Yang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Lian; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2009-03-20

    Viral infection activates transcription factors NF-kappaB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and elicit innate antiviral response. MITA (also known as STING) has recently been identified as an adaptor that links virus-sensing receptors to IRF3 activation. Here, we showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF5 interacted with MITA in a viral-infection-dependent manner. Overexpression of RNF5 inhibited virus-triggered IRF3 activation, IFNB1 expression, and cellular antiviral response, whereas knockdown of RNF5 had opposite effects. RNF5 targeted MITA at Lys150 for ubiquitination and degradation after viral infection. Both MITA and RNF5 were located at the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and viral infection caused their redistribution to the ER and mitochondria, respectively. We further found that virus-induced ubiquitination and degradation of MITA by RNF5 occurred at the mitochondria. These findings suggest that RNF5 negatively regulates virus-triggered signaling by targeting MITA for ubiquitination and degradation at the mitochondria.

  14. Ubiquitination of HLA-DO by MARCH family E3 ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Martin; Trowsdale, John; Kelly, Adrian P

    2013-05-01

    HLA-DO (DO) is a nonclassical MHC class II (MHCII) molecule that negatively regulates the ability of HLA-DM to catalyse the removal of invariant chain-derived CLIP peptides from classical MHCII molecules. Here, we show that DO is posttranslationally modified by ubiquitination. The location of the modified lysine residue is shared with all classical MHCII beta chains, suggesting a conserved function. Three membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH1, 8 and 9) family E3 ligases that polyubiquitinate MHCII induce similar profiles of polyubiquitination on DOβ. All three MARCH proteins also influenced trafficking of DO indirectly by a mechanism that required the DOβ encoded di-leucine and tyrosine-based endocytosis motifs. This may be the result of MARCH-induced ubiquitination of components of the endocytic machinery. MARCH9 was by far the most efficient at inducing intracellular redistribution of DO but did not target molecules for lysosomal degradation. The specificity of MARCH9 for HLA-DQ and HLA-DO suggests a need for common regulation of these two MHC-encoded molecules. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. News from the PUB: plant U-box type E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Marco

    2018-01-23

    Plant U-box type E3 ubiquitin ligases (PUBs) are well known for their functions in a variety of stress responses, including immune responses and the adaptation to abiotic stresses. First linked to pollen self-incompatibility, their repertoire of roles has grown to encompass also the regulation of developmental processes. Notably, new studies provide clues to their mode of action, underline the existence of conserved PUB-kinase modules, and suggest new links to G-protein signalling, placing PUBs at the crossroads of major signalling hubs. The frequent association with membranes, by interacting and/or targeting membrane proteins, as well as through a recently reported direct interaction with phospholipids, indicates a general function in the control of vesicle transport and their cargoes. This review aims to give an overview of the most significant advances in the field, while also trying to identify common themes of PUB function. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Mutation in SUMO E3 ligase, SIZ1, disrupts the mature female gametophyte in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Yu

    2012-01-09

    Female gametophyte is the multicellular haploid structure that can produce embryo and endosperm after fertilization, which has become an attractive model system for investigating molecular mechanisms in nuclei migration, cell specification, cell-to-cell communication and many other processes. Previous reports found that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase, SIZ1, participated in many processes depending on particular target substrates and suppression of salicylic acid (SA) accumulation. Here, we report that SIZ1 mediates the reproductive process. SIZ1 showed enhanced expression in female organs, but was not detected in the anther or pollen. A defect in the siz1-2 maternal source resulted in reduced seed-set regardless of high SA concentration within the plant. Moreover, aniline blue staining and scanning electron microscopy revealed that funicular and micropylar pollen tube guidance was arrested in siz1-2 plants. Some of the embryo sacs of ovules in siz1-2 were also disrupted quickly after stage FG7. There was no significant affects of the siz1-2 mutation on expression of genes involved in female gametophyte development- or pollen tube guidance in ovaries. Together, our results suggest that SIZ1 sustains the stability and normal function of the mature female gametophyte which is necessary for pollen tube guidance. © 2012 Ling et al.

  17. Structural basis for phosphodependent substrate selection and orientation by the SCFCdc4 ubiquitin ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlicky, Steve; Tang, Xiaojing; Willems, Andrew; Tyers, Mike; Sicheri, Frank

    2010-12-01

    Cell cycle progression depends on precise elimination of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors by the ubiquitin system. Elimination of the CDK inhibitor Sic1 by the SCF{sup Cdc4} ubiquitin ligase at the onset of S phase requires phosphorylation of Sic1 on at least six of its nine Cdc4-phosphodegron (CPD) sites. A 2.7 {angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of a Skp1-Cdc4 complex bound to a high-affinity CPD phosphopeptide from human cyclin E reveals a core CPD motif, Leu-Leu-pThr-Pro, bound to an eight-bladed WD40 propeller domain in Cdc4. The low affinity of each CPD motif in Sic1 reflects structural discordance with one or more elements of the Cdc4 binding site. Reengineering of Cdc4 to reduce selection against Sic1 sequences allows ubiquitination of lower phosphorylated forms of Sic1. These features account for the observed phosphorylation threshold in Sic1 recognition and suggest an equilibrium binding mode between a single receptor site in Cdc4 and multiple low-affinity CPD sites in Sic1.

  18. Functional identification of glutamate cysteine ligase and glutathione synthetase in the marine yeast Rhodosporidium diobovatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Min; Wang, Fengjuan; Tian, Liuying; Tang, Hui; Zhang, Liping

    2018-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) fulfills a variety of metabolic functions, participates in oxidative stress response, and defends against toxic actions of heavy metals and xenobiotics. In this study, GSH was detected in Rhodosporidium diobovatum by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Then, two novel enzymes from R. diobovatum were characterized that convert glutamate, cysteine, and glycine into GSH. Based on reverse transcription PCR, we obtained the glutathione synthetase gene ( GSH2), 1866 bp, coding for a 56.6-kDa protein, and the glutamate cysteine ligase gene ( GSH1), 2469 bp, coding for a 90.5-kDa protein. The role of GSH1 and GSH2 for the biosynthesis of GSH in the marine yeast R. diobovatum was determined by deletions using the CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease system and enzymatic activity. These results also showed that GSH1 and GSH2 were involved in the production of GSH and are thus being potentially useful to engineer GSH pathways. Alternatively, pET- GSH constructed using vitro recombination could be used to detect the function of genes related to GSH biosynthesis. Finally, the fermentation parameters determined in the present study provide a reference for industrial GSH production in R. diobovatum.

  19. TRIM32 ubiquitin E3 ligase, one enzyme for several pathologies: From muscular dystrophy to tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Elisa; Meroni, Germana

    2016-10-01

    TRIM32 is a member of the TRIpartite Motif family characterised by the presence of an N-terminal three-domain-module that includes a RING domain, which confers E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, one or two B-box domains and a Coiled-Coil region that mediates oligomerisation. Several TRIM32 substrates were identified including muscular proteins and proteins involved in cell cycle regulation and cell motility. As ubiquitination is a versatile post-translational modification that can affect target turnover, sub-cellular localisation or activity, it is likely that diverse substrates may be differentially affected by TRIM32-mediated ubiquitination, reflecting its multi-faceted roles in muscle physiology, cancer and immunity. With particular relevance for muscle physiology, mutations in TRIM32 are associated with autosomal recessive Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2H, a muscle-wasting disease with variable clinical spectrum ranging from almost asymptomatic to wheelchair-bound patients. In this review, we will focus on the ability of TRIM32 to mark specific substrates for proteasomal degradation discussing how the TRIM32-proteasome axis may (i) be important for muscle homeostasis and for the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy; and (ii) define either an oncogenic or tumour suppressive role for TRIM32 in the context of different types of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modulation of immune cell functions by the E3 ligase CBL-b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eLutz-Nicoladoni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of immunological tolerance is a critical hallmark of the immune system. Several signaling checkpoints necessary to balance activating and inhibitory input to immune cells have been described so far, among which the E3 ligase Cbl-b appears to be a central player. Cbl-b is expressed in all leukocyte subsets and regulates several signaling pathways in T cells, NK cells, B cells and different types of myeloid cells. In most cases Cbl-b negatively regulates activation signals through antigen or pattern recognition receptors and co-stimulatory molecules. In line with this function, cblb-deficient immune cells display lower activation thresholds and cblb knockout mice spontaneously develop autoimmunity and are highly susceptible to experimental autoimmunity. Interestingly, genetic association studies link cblb-polymorphisms with autoimmunity also in humans. Vice versa, the increased activation potential of cblb-deficient cells renders them more potent to fight against malignancies or infections. Accordingly, several reports have shown that cblb knockout mice reject tumors, which mainly depends on cytotoxic T and NK cells. Thus targeting Cbl-b may be an interesting strategy to enhance anti-cancer immunity. In this review we summarize the findings on the molecular function of Cbl-b in different cell types and illustrate the potential of Cbl-b as target for immunomodulatory therapies.

  1. Physics Essentials For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Holzner, Steven

    2010-01-01

    For students who just need to know the vital concepts of physics, whether as a refresher, for exam prep, or as a reference, Physics Essentials For Dummies is a must-have guide. Free of ramp-up and ancillary material, Physics Essentials For Dummies contains content focused on key topics only. It provides discrete explanations of critical concepts taught in an introductory physics course, from force and motion to momentum and kinetics. This guide is also a perfect reference for parents who need to review critical physics concepts as they help high school students with homework assignments, as we

  2. Essentials of Computational Electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Essentials of Computational Electromagnetics provides an in-depth introduction of the three main full-wave numerical methods in computational electromagnetics (CEM); namely, the method of moment (MoM), the finite element method (FEM), and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Numerous monographs can be found addressing one of the above three methods. However, few give a broad general overview of essentials embodied in these methods, or were published too early to include recent advances. Furthermore, many existing monographs only present the final numerical results without specifyin

  3. Essential Palatal Myoclonus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuwan Raj Pandey

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Palatal myoclonus is a rare condition presenting with clicking sound in ear or muscle tremor in pharynx. There are two varieties: essential and symptomatic. Various treatment options exists ranging from watchful observation to botulinum toxin injection. We have not found any reported case of palatal myoclonus from our country. Here we present a case of essential palatal myoclonus managed with clonazepam. Case report: A young female presented in Ear Nose and Throat clinic with complain of auditory click and spontaneous rhythmic movement of throat muscles for eight months. On examination, there was involuntary, rhythmic contraction of bilateral soft-palate, uvula, and base of tongue. Neurological, eye, and peripheral examination were normal. A diagnosis of essential palatal myoclonus was made. It was managed successfully with clonazepam; patient was still on low dose clonazepam at the time of making this report. Conclusion: Essential palatal myoclonus can be clinically diagnosed and managed even in settings where MRI is not available or affordable.

  4. Essential trichomegaly: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Dutra Rossetto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports two cases of symptomatic essential trichomegaly. Trichomegaly may develop in various diseases, including anorexia nervosa, hypothyroidism, pregnancy, pretibial myxedema, systemic lupus erythematosus, vernal keratoconjunctivitis, and uveitis. The exact incidence trichomegaly is unknown, and the condition remains sporadically reported. Two cases of symptomatic trichomegaly without any associated systemic disorder are presented in this paper.

  5. The 2003 essential. AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    This document presents the essential activities of the Areva Group, a world nuclear industry leader. This group proposes technological solutions to produce the nuclear energy and to transport the electric power. It develops connection systems for the telecommunication, the computers and the automotive industry. Key data on the program management, the sustainable development activities and the different divisions are provided. (A.L.B.)

  6. The Atypical Occurrence of Two Biotin Protein Ligases in Francisella novicida Is Due to Distinct Roles in Virulence and Biotin Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Youjun; Chin, Chui-Yoke; Chakravartty, Vandana; Gao, Rongsui; Crispell, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The physiological function of biotin requires biotin protein ligase activity in order to attach the coenzyme to its cognate proteins, which are enzymes involved in central metabolism. The model intracellular pathogen Francisella novicida is unusual in that it encodes two putative biotin protein ligases rather than the usual single enzyme. F. novicida BirA has a ligase domain as well as an N-terminal DNA-binding regulatory domain, similar to the prototypical BirA protein in E. coli. However, the second ligase, which we name BplA, lacks the N-terminal DNA binding motif. It has been unclear why a bacterium would encode these two disparate biotin protein ligases, since F. novicida contains only a single biotinylated protein. In vivo complementation and enzyme assays demonstrated that BirA and BplA are both functional biotin protein ligases, but BplA is a much more efficient enzyme. BirA, but not BplA, regulated transcription of the biotin synthetic operon. Expression of bplA (but not birA) increased significantly during F. novicida infection of macrophages. BplA (but not BirA) was required for bacterial replication within macrophages as well as in mice. These data demonstrate that F. novicida has evolved two distinct enzymes with specific roles; BplA possesses the major ligase activity, whereas BirA acts to regulate and thereby likely prevent wasteful synthesis of biotin. During infection BplA seems primarily employed to maximize the efficiency of biotin utilization without limiting the expression of biotin biosynthetic genes, representing a novel adaptation strategy that may also be used by other intracellular pathogens. PMID:26060274

  7. The E3 ubiquitin-ligase SEVEN IN ABSENTIA like 7 mono-ubiquitinates glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 isoform in vitro and is required for its nuclear localization in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Diego A; Araya, Alejandro; Busi, Maria V; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2016-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases are associated to various processes such as cell cycle control and diverse developmental pathways. Arabidopsis thaliana SEVEN IN ABSENTIA like 7, which has ubiquitin ligase activity, is located in the nucleus and cytosol and is expressed at several stages in almost all plant tissues suggesting an important role in plant functions. However, the mechanism underlying the regulation of this protein is unknown. Since we found that the SEVEN IN ABSENTIA like 7 gene expression is altered in plants with impaired mitochondria, and in plants deficient in the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1, we decided to study the possible interactions between both proteins as potential partners in plant signaling functions. We found that SEVEN IN ABSENTIA like 7 is able to interact in vitro with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and that the Lys231 residue of the last is essential for this function. Following the interaction, a concomitant increase in the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase catalytic activity was observed. However, when SEVEN IN ABSENTIA like 7 was supplemented with E1 and E2 proteins to form a complete E1-E2-E3 modifier complex, we observed the mono-ubiquitination of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 at the Lys76 residue and a dramatic decrease of its catalytic activity. Moreover, we found that localization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 in the nucleus is dependent on the expression SEVEN IN ABSENTIA like 7. These observations suggest that the association of both proteins might result in different biological consequences in plants either through affecting the glycolytic flux or via cytoplasm-nucleus relocation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Treatment of essential thrombocythemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Larrán, Alberto; Cervantes, Francisco; Besses, Carlos

    2013-09-21

    Essential thrombocythemia is a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by sustained thrombocytosis, bone marrow megakaryocytic hyperplasia and an increased risk of thrombosis and hemorrhage. The goal of treatment is to prevent the development of vascular complications without increasing the risk of transformation. Patients aged>60 years or a history of thrombosis have a high risk of thrombosis while those with a platelet count>1,500 x 10(9)/l have a higher risk of hemorrhage. Patients with low-risk essential thrombocythemia can be managed appropriately with low-dose of acetylsalicylic acid or even observation only, while patients with a high-risk disease are candidates to receive cytoreductive treatment, hydroxyurea being the first choice therapy. Anagrelide is the most suitable option for patients with resistance or intolerance to hydroxyurea. All patients must be submitted to a rigorous control of cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Trombocitemia Essencial Essential thrombocythaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea B. Leite

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Essential thrombocythaemia is a chronic myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the proliferation of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, leading to a persistent increase in circulating platelets. Apart from this increase (>600 x 10(9/L this disease also exhibits accentuated hyperplasia of the megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, splenomegaly and clinically both thrombotic and haemorrhagic episodes. The etiology of this illness is largely unknown and the clinical manifestations are mostly asymptomatic, thus the diagnostic is often accidentally made. Here the case report of a 71-year-old male patient is discussed, who was admitted into hospital due to occlusion of the femoral artery requiring re-vascularisation. The physical exam showed that the patient suffered several other symptoms related to essential thrombocythaemia. In conclusion, this is a grave, potentially fatal disease which needs further study to determine the etiology. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for a good prognosis.

  10. Essentials of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsberg, Matt

    1993-01-01

    Since its publication, Essentials of Artificial Intelligence has beenadopted at numerous universities and colleges offering introductory AIcourses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Based on the author'scourse at Stanford University, the book is an integrated, cohesiveintroduction to the field. The author has a fresh, entertaining writingstyle that combines clear presentations with humor and AI anecdotes. At thesame time, as an active AI researcher, he presents the materialauthoritatively and with insight that reflects a contemporary, first hand

  11. Rake task management essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Koleshko, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    A step-by-step and interactive approach explaining the Rake essentials along with code examples and advanced features. If you are a developer who is acquainted with the Ruby language and want to speed up writing the code concerned with files, then this book is for you. To start reading this book, basic Ruby knowledge is required; however, a huge amount of experience with the language is not necessary.

  12. IPv6 Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    IPv6 Essentials, Second Edition provides a succinct, in-depth tour of all the new features and functions in IPv6. It guides you through everything you need to know to get started, including how to configure IPv6 on hosts and routers and which applications currently support IPv6. Aimed at system and network administrators, engineers, network designers, and IT managers, this book will help you understand, plan for, design, and integrate IPv6 into your current IPv4 infrastructure

  13. Android application security essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, Pragati

    2013-01-01

    Android Application Security Essentials is packed with examples, screenshots, illustrations, and real world use cases to secure your apps the right way.If you are looking for guidance and detailed instructions on how to secure app data, then this book is for you. Developers, architects, managers, and technologists who wish to enhance their knowledge of Android security will find this book interesting. Some prior knowledge of development on the Android stack is desirable but not required.

  14. Moodle administration essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Henrick, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    If you are an experienced system administrator and know how to manage servers and set up web environments but now want to explore Moodle, this book is perfect for you. You'll get to grips with the basics and learn to manage Moodle quickly, focusing on essential tasks. Having prior knowledge of virtual learning environments would be beneficial, but is not mandatory to make the most of this book.

  15. Process Improvement Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Persse, James R

    2006-01-01

    Process Improvement Essentials combines the foundation needed to understand process improvement theory with the best practices to help individuals implement process improvement initiatives in their organization. The three leading programs: ISO 9001:2000, CMMI, and Six Sigma--amidst the buzz and hype--tend to get lumped together under a common label. This book delivers a combined guide to all three programs, compares their applicability, and then sets the foundation for further exploration.

  16. The ubiquitin ligase tripartite-motif-protein 32 is induced in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assereto, Stefania; Piccirillo, Rosanna; Baratto, Serena; Scudieri, Paolo; Fiorillo, Chiara; Massacesi, Manuela; Traverso, Monica; Galietta, Luis J; Bruno, Claudio; Minetti, Carlo; Zara, Federico; Gazzerro, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    Activation of the proteasome pathway is one of the secondary processes of cell damage, which ultimately lead to muscle degeneration and necrosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In mdx mice, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib up-regulates the membrane expression of members of the dystrophin complex and reduces the inflammatory reaction. However, chronic inhibition of the 26S proteasome may be toxic, as indicated by the systemic side-effects caused by this drug. Therefore, we sought to determine the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway that are specifically activated in human dystrophin-deficient muscles. The analysis of a cohort of patients with genetically determined DMD or Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) unveiled a selective up-regulation of the ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif-containing protein 32 (TRIM32). The induction of TRIM32 was due to a transcriptional effect and it correlated with disease severity in BMD patients. In contrast, atrogin1 and muscle RING-finger protein-1 (MuRF-1), which are strongly increased in distinct types of muscular atrophy, were not affected by the DMD dystrophic process. Knock-out models showed that TRIM32 is involved in ubiquitination of muscle cytoskeletal proteins as well as of protein inhibitor of activated STAT protein gamma (Piasγ) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene, two inhibitors of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. Accordingly, we showed that in DMD/BMD muscle tissue, TRIM32 induction was more pronounced in regenerating myofibers rather than in necrotic muscle cells, thus pointing out a role of this protein in the regulation of human myoblast cell fate. This finding highlights TRIM32 as a possible therapeutic target to favor skeletal muscle regeneration in DMD patients.

  17. Ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and MAFbx in human skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Palma, Luigi; Marinelli, Mario; Pavan, Matteo; Orazi, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Several pathological conditions can induce skeletal muscle atrophy and seem to share common enzyme pathways. In catabolic states where proteolysis is increased, two genes specific to muscle atrophy, MuRf1 and MAFbx, are upregulated. These encode ubiquitin ligases, which bind to and mediate ubiquitination of myofibrillar proteins for subsequent degradation during muscle atrophy. Fifteen patients undergoing leg amputation were divided into two groups. Group A included 12 elderly patients (mean age 79years) amputated for vascular disease (complicated by diabetes in four), chronic osteomyelitis or squamous cell carcinoma. Group B included three car accident victims (mean age 32years) amputated due to acute arterial insufficiency. Gastrocnemius muscle biopsies were collected for a histochemical and immunohistochemical (anti-MuRf1, anti-MAFbx) study. Group A specimens showed a decreased cross-sectional fiber area and length, adipose tissue replacement, and MuRf1 and MAFbx immunoreactivity. Muscle cells showed MuRf1 and MAFbx subsarcolemmal immunoreactivity and weak extracellular matrix immunoreactivity. Group B samples exhibited mild muscle structural changes; they did not stain with anti-MuRf1 or anti-MAFbx, and neither did sections showing muscle degeneration and adipose tissue replacement. Results of our preliminary study showed upregulation of MuRf1 and MAFbx in atrophied muscle and support their role as regulatory peptides in various conditions that lead to muscle atrophy. Data suggest that the study of cellular pathways can help identify promising targets for effective new treatments for skeletal muscle atrophy. The treatment of several orthopedic conditions is complicated by muscle atrophy; potential treatments could be directed to specific sites where these proteins are localized.

  18. Suppression of 4-coumarate-CoA ligase in the coniferous gymnosperm Pinus radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Armin; Donaldson, Lloyd; Kim, Hoon; Phillips, Lorelle; Flint, Heather; Steward, Diane; Torr, Kirk; Koch, Gerald; Schmitt, Uwe; Ralph, John

    2009-01-01

    Severe suppression of 4-coumarate-coenzyme A ligase (4CL) in the coniferous gymnosperm Pinus radiata substantially affected plant phenotype and resulted in dwarfed plants with a "bonsai tree-like" appearance. Microscopic analyses of stem sections from 2-year-old plants revealed substantial morphological changes in both wood and bark tissues. This included the formation of weakly lignified tracheids that displayed signs of collapse and the development of circumferential bands of axial parenchyma. Acetyl bromide-soluble lignin assays and proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies revealed lignin reductions of 36% to 50% in the most severely affected transgenic plants. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry studies indicated that lignin reductions were mainly due to depletion of guaiacyl but not p-hydroxyphenyl lignin. 4CL silencing also caused modifications in the lignin interunit linkage distribution, including elevated beta-aryl ether (beta-O-4 unit) and spirodienone (beta-1) levels, accompanied by lower phenylcoumaran (beta-5), resinol (beta-beta), and dibenzodioxocin (5-5/beta-O-4) levels. A sharp depletion in the level of saturated (dihydroconiferyl alcohol) end groups was also observed. Severe suppression of 4CL also affected carbohydrate metabolism. Most obvious was an up to approximately 2-fold increase in galactose content in wood from transgenic plants due to increased compression wood formation. The molecular, anatomical, and analytical data verified that the isolated 4CL clone is associated with lignin biosynthesis and illustrated that 4CL silencing leads to complex, often surprising, physiological and morphological changes in P. radiata.

  19. Inhibiting Skp2 E3 Ligase Suppresses Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Mikamo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a progressive disease with poor prognosis and no curative therapies. SCF-Skp2 E3 ligase is a target for cancer therapy, but there have been no reports about Skp2 as a target for IPF. Here we demonstrate that Skp2 is a promising therapeutic target for IPF. We examined whether disrupting Skp2 suppressed pulmonary fibrosis in a bleomycin (BLM-induced mouse model and found that pulmonary fibrosis was significantly suppressed in Skp2-deficient mice compared with controls. The pulmonary accumulation of fibrotic markers such as collagen type 1 and fibronectin in BLM-infused mice was decreased in Skp2-deficient mice. Moreover, the number of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells accompanied with pulmonary fibrosis was significantly diminished. Levels of the Skp2 target p27 were significantly decreased by BLM-administration in wild-type mice, but recovered in Skp2−/− mice. In vimentin-positive mesenchymal fibroblasts, the decrease of p27-positive cells and increase of Ki67-positive cells by BLM-administration was suppressed by Skp2-deficency. As these results suggested that inhibiting Skp2 might be effective for BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis, we next performed a treatment experiment using the Skp2 inhibitor SZL-P1-41. As expected, BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis was significantly inhibited by SZL-P1-41. Moreover, p27 levels were increased by the SZL-P1-41 treatment, suggesting p27 may be an important Skp2 target for BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Our study suggests that Skp2 is a potential molecular target for human pulmonary fibrosis including IPF.

  20. The Deubiquitylase USP2 Regulates the LDLR Pathway by Counteracting the E3-Ubiquitin Ligase IDOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jessica Kristine; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Avagliano Trezza, Rossella; Heride, Claire; Urbe, Sylvie; Distel, Ben; Zelcer, Noam

    2016-02-05

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) is a central determinant of circulating LDL-cholesterol and as such subject to tight regulation. Recent studies and genetic evidence implicate the inducible degrader of the LDLR (IDOL) as a regulator of LDLR abundance and of circulating levels of LDL-cholesterol in humans. Acting as an E3-ubiquitin ligase, IDOL promotes ubiquitylation and subsequent lysosomal degradation of the LDLR. Consequently, inhibition of IDOL-mediated degradation of the LDLR represents a potential strategy to increase hepatic LDL-cholesterol clearance. To establish whether deubiquitylases counteract IDOL-mediated ubiquitylation and degradation of the LDLR. Using a genetic screening approach, we identify the ubiquitin-specific protease 2 (USP2) as a post-transcriptional regulator of IDOL-mediated LDLR degradation. We demonstrate that both USP2 isoforms, USP2-69 and USP2-45, interact with IDOL and promote its deubiquitylation. IDOL deubiquitylation requires USP2 enzymatic activity and leads to a marked stabilization of IDOL protein. Paradoxically, this also markedly attenuates IDOL-mediated degradation of the LDLR and the ability of IDOL to limit LDL uptake into cells. Conversely, loss of USP2 reduces LDLR protein in an IDOL-dependent manner and limits LDL uptake. We identify a tri-partite complex encompassing IDOL, USP2, and LDLR and demonstrate that in this context USP2 promotes deubiquitylation of the LDLR and prevents its degradation. Our findings identify USP2 as a novel regulator of lipoprotein clearance owing to its ability to control ubiquitylation-dependent degradation of the LDLR by IDOL. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. M. tuberculosis Sliding β-Clamp Does Not Interact Directly with the NAD+ -Dependent DNA Ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Khanam, Taran; Chopra, Deepti; Singh, Nidhi; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2012-01-01

    The sliding β-clamp, an important component of the DNA replication and repair machinery, is drawing increasing attention as a therapeutic target. We report the crystal structure of the M. tuberculosis β-clamp (Mtbβ-clamp) to 3.0 Å resolution. The protein crystallized in the space group C2221 with cell-dimensions a = 72.7, b = 234.9 & c = 125.1 Å respectively. Mtbβ-clamp is a dimer, and exhibits head-to-tail association similar to other bacterial clamps. Each monomer folds into three domains with similar structures respectively and associates with its dimeric partner through 6 salt-bridges and about 21 polar interactions. Affinity experiments involving a blunt DNA duplex, primed-DNA and nicked DNA respectively show that Mtbβ-clamp binds specifically to primed DNA about 1.8 times stronger compared to the other two substrates and with an apparent Kd of 300 nM. In bacteria like E. coli, the β-clamp is known to interact with subunits of the clamp loader, NAD+ -dependent DNA ligase (LigA) and other partners. We tested the interactions of the Mtbβ-clamp with MtbLigA and the γ-clamp loader subunit through radioactive gel shift assays, size exclusion chromatography, yeast-two hybrid experiments and also functionally. Intriguingly while Mtbβ-clamp interacts in vitro with the γ-clamp loader, it does not interact with MtbLigA unlike in bacteria like E. coli where it does. Modeling studies involving earlier peptide complexes reveal that the peptide-binding site is largely conserved despite lower sequence identity between bacterial clamps. Overall the results suggest that other as-yet-unidentified factors may mediate interactions between the clamp, LigA and DNA in mycobacteria. PMID:22545130

  2. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Kurosawa

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  3. Staphylococcal β-Toxin Modulates Human Aortic Endothelial Cell and Platelet Function through Sphingomyelinase and Biofilm Ligase Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfa Herrera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes many infections, such as skin and soft tissue, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, and infective endocarditis (IE. IE is an endovascular infection of native and prosthetic valves and the lining of the heart; it is characterized by the formation of cauliflower-like “vegetations” composed of fibrin, platelets, other host factors, bacteria, and bacterial products. β-Toxin is an S. aureus virulence factor that contributes to the microorganism’s ability to cause IE. This cytolysin has two enzymatic activities: sphingomyelinase (SMase and biofilm ligase. Although both activities have functions in a rabbit model of IE, the mechanism(s by which β-toxin directly affects human cells and is involved in the infectious process has not been elucidated. Here, we compared the in vitro effects of purified recombinant wild-type β-toxin, SMase-deficient β-toxin (H289N, and biofilm ligase-deficient β-toxin (H162A and/or D163A on human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs and platelets. β-Toxin was cytotoxic to HAECs and inhibited the production of interleukin 8 (IL-8 from these cells by both SMase and biofilm ligase activities. β-Toxin altered HAEC surface expression of CD40 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1. HAECs treated with β-toxin displayed granular membrane morphology not seen in treatment with the SMase-deficient mutant. The altered morphology resulted in two possibly separable activities, cell rounding and redistribution of cell membranes into granules, which were not the result of endosome production from the Golgi apparatus or lysosomes. β-Toxin directly aggregated rabbit platelets via SMase activity.

  4. Human melanocortin 1 receptor-mediated ubiquitination of nonvisual arrestins. Role of Mahogunin Ring Finger 1 E3 ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrisqueta, Marta; Olivares, Concepción; Herraiz, Cecilia; Castejón-Griñán, María; Sirés-Campos, Julia; García-Borrón, José C; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia

    2018-01-01

    Signaling from the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a Gs protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) crucial for melanocyte proliferation and differentiation, is regulated by cytosolic β-arrestins (ARRBs). MC1R signaling is also negatively modulated by the E3-ubiquitin ligase Mahogunin Ring Finger-1 (MGRN1), whose mutation causes hyperpigmentation, congenital heart defects and neurodegeneration in mice. We showed previously that although MC1R interacts stably with human ARRB1 or ARRB2, only ARRB2 mediates receptor desensitization and internalization. We analyzed MC1R-dependent ARRB ubiquitination, and the possible role of MGRN1. ARRB1 expressed in heterologous cells or human melanoma cells migrated in SDS-PAGE as a 55kDa protein whereas ARRB2 migrated as two major bands of apparent molecular weight near 45 and 55kDa, with an intermediate mobility band occasionally detected. These forms were related by post-translational modification rather than by proteolysis. Presence of MC1R favored expression of the 45kDa protein, the form that interacted preferentially with MC1R. MC1R also mediated poly- or multimonoubiquitination of ARRB2. Ubiquitination was agonist-independent, but required a native MC1R conformation and/or normal receptor trafficking to the plasma membrane, as it was not observed for loss-of-function MC1R variants. In a heterologous expression system, MC1R-dependent ARRB ubiquitination was enhanced by overexpression of MGRN1 and was impaired by siRNA-mediated MGRN1 knockdown thus pointing to MGRN1 as the responsible E3-ligase. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated interaction of MGRN1 and ARRBs in the presence of MC1R, suggesting a scaffolding role for the GPCR that may determine the selectivity of E3-ubiquitin ligase engagement and the functional outcome of ARRB ubiquitination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Blue Light-Dependent Polyubiquitination and Degradation of Arabidopsis Cryptochrome2 Requires Multiple E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Qin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xu; Park, Joon; Yang, Zhenming; Du, Xinglin; Bian, Mingdi; Lin, Chentao

    2016-10-01

    Cryptochromes are blue light receptors regulated by light-dependent ubiquitination and degradation in both plant and animal lineages. The Arabidopsis genome encodes two cryptochromes, CRY1 and CRY2, of which CRY2 undergoes blue light-dependent ubiquitination and 26S proteasome-dependent degradation. The molecular mechanism regulating blue light-dependent proteolysis of CRY2 is still not fully understood. We found that the F-box proteins ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and Lov Kelch Protein2 (LKP2), which mediate blue light suppression of degradation of the CRY2 signaling partner CIB1, are not required for the blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation. We further showed that the previously reported function of the COP1-SPA1 protein complex in blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation is more likely to be attributable to its cullin 4 (CUL4)-based E3 ubiquitin ligase activity than its activity as the cryptochrome signaling partner. However, the blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation is only partially impaired in the cul4 mutant, the cop1-5 null mutant and the spa1234 quadruple mutant, suggesting a possible involvement of additional E3 ubiquitin ligases in the regulation of CRY2. Consistent with this hypothesis, we demonstrated that the blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation is significantly impaired in the temperature-sensitive cul1 mutant allele (axr6-3), especially under the non-permissive temperature. Based on these and other results presented, we propose that photoexcited CRY2 undergoes Lys48-linked polyubiquitination catalyzed by the CUL4- and CUL1-based E3 ubiquitin ligases. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. E6-AP/UBE3A Protein Acts as a Ubiquitin Ligase toward SOX9 Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takako; Kishino, Tetsuya; Stephen, Shelley; Eberspaecher, Heidi; Maki, Sayumi; Takigawa, Masaharu; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Yasuda, Hideyo

    2013-01-01

    SOX9 is a transcription factor that acts as a key regulator at various stages of cartilage differentiation. There is ample evidence that intracellular SOX9 protein levels are tightly regulated both by sumoylation and by degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Using a proteomics approach, here we report the identification of a SOX9-binding protein, E6-AP/UBE3A, that may act as a ubiquitin ligase toward Sox9. E6-AP bound SOX9 through the region consisting mostly of its high mobility group domain in vitro. In nuclear lysates, FLAG-tagged E6-AP coprecipitated with Sox9 and its high mobility group domain. This finding was estimated using nuclear lysates from a chondrocytic cell line that endogenously expresses E6-AP and SOX9. Accordingly, ectopically expressed E6-AP and SOX9 colocalized in the nucleus. We show that E6-AP ubiquitinates SOX9 in vitro and in vivo and that SOX9 levels are enhanced after addition of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Similar, siRNA knockdown of E6-AP and the E2 ligase Ubc9 increased cellular SOX9 amounts, supporting the notion that SOX9 may be ubiquitinated in hypertrophic chondrocytes by E6-AP and degraded by proteasomes. This is in accordance with the distribution of SOX9 levels, which are high in proliferating and prehypertrophic chondrocytes but low in hypertrophic chondrocytes, whereas E6-AP levels are high in hypertrophic chondrocytes and low in prehypertrophic chondrocytes. Furthermore, E6-AP-deficient mice showed SOX9 accumulation in chondrocytes and the brain. These findings support the concept that E6-AP regulates SOX9 levels in developing cartilage by acting as a ubiquitin ligase. PMID:24155239

  7. Trade-off and flexibility in the dynamic regulation of the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Ronny; Shah, Meera; Flockerzi, Dietrich; Wolf, Dieter A

    2017-11-01

    Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) catalyze the ubiquitylation of substrates many of which are degraded by the 26S proteasome. Their modular architecture enables recognition of numerous substrates via exchangeable substrate receptors that competitively bind to a cullin scaffold with high affinity. Due to the plasticity of these interactions there is ongoing uncertainty how cells maintain a flexible CRL repertoire in view of changing substrate loads. Based on a series of in vivo and in vitro studies, different groups proposed that the exchange of substrate receptors is mediated by a protein exchange factor named Cand1. Here, we have performed mathematical modeling to provide a quantitative underpinning of this hypothesis. First we show that the exchange activity of Cand1 necessarily leads to a trade-off between high ligase activity and fast receptor exchange. Supported by measurements we argue that this trade-off yields an optimal Cand1 concentration in cells where the time scale for substrate degradation becomes minimal. In a second step we show through simulations that (i) substrates bias the CRL repertoire leading to preferential assembly of ligases for which substrates are available and (ii) differences in binding affinities or substrate receptor abundances create a temporal hierarchy for the degradation of substrates. Finally, we compare the Cand1-mediated exchange cycle with an alternative architecture lacking Cand1 which indicates superiority of a system with exchange factor if substrate receptors bind substrates and the cullin scaffold in a random order. Together, our results provide general constraints for the operating regimes of molecular exchange systems and suggest that Cand1 endows the CRL network with the properties of an "on demand" system allowing cells to dynamically adjust their CRL repertoire to fluctuating substrate abundances.

  8. The Role of E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl Proteins in Interleukin-2-Induced Jurkat T-Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Fang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin- (IL- 2 is the major growth factor for T-cell activation and proliferation. IL-2 has multiple functions in the regulation of immunological processes. Although most studies focus on T-cell immunomodulation, T-cell activation by IL-2 is the foundation of priming the feedback loop. Here, we investigated the effect of MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways on IL-2-induced cell activation and the regulatory mechanisms of upstream ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b and c-Cbl. Morphological analysis of Jurkat T cells was performed by cytospin preparations with Wright-Giemsa stain. CD25 expression on Jurkat T cells was determined by flow cytometry. Changes in cell activation proteins such as p-ERK, ERK, p-Akt, Akt, and ubiquitin ligase Casitas B-cell Lymphoma (Cbl proteins were analyzed by western blot. Following IL-2-induced activation of Jurkat T cells, p-ERK expression was upregulated, while there was no change in p-Akt, ERK, or Akt expression. Thus, the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, but not PI3K/Akt, was involved in IL-2-induced T-cell activation. Either using PD98059 (a specific inhibitor for p-ERK or depletion of ERK with small interfering RNA (siRNA reduced the expression of CD25. This study also showed that ubiquitin ligase proteins Cbl-b and c-Cbl might be involved in IL-2-induced Jurkat T-cell activation by negatively regulating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway.

  9. Oxidation of the cysteine-rich regions of parkin perturbs its E3 ligase activity and contributes to protein aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yuliang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of aberrant proteins to form Lewy bodies (LBs is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD. Ubiquitination-mediated degradation of aberrant, misfolded proteins is critical for maintaining normal cell function. Emerging evidence suggests that oxidative/nitrosative stress compromises the precisely-regulated network of ubiquitination in PD, particularly affecting parkin E3 ligase activity, and contributes to the accumulation of toxic proteins and neuronal cell death. Results To gain insight into the mechanism whereby cell stress alters parkin-mediated ubiquitination and LB formation, we investigated the effect of oxidative stress. We found significant increases in oxidation (sulfonation and subsequent aggregation of parkin in SH-SY5Y cells exposed to the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenlypyridinium (MPP+, representing an in vitro cell-based PD model. Exposure of these cells to direct oxidation via pathological doses of H2O2 induced a vicious cycle of increased followed by decreased parkin E3 ligase activity, similar to that previously reported following S-nitrosylation of parkin. Pre-incubation with catalase attenuated H2O2 accumulation, parkin sulfonation, and parkin aggregation. Mass spectrometry (MS analysis revealed that H2O2 reacted with specific cysteine residues of parkin, resulting in sulfination/sulfonation in regions of the protein similar to those affected by parkin mutations in hereditary forms of PD. Immunohistochemistry or gel electrophoresis revealed an increase in aggregated parkin in rats and primates exposed to mitochondrial complex I inhibitors, as well as in postmortem human brain from patients with PD with LBs. Conclusion These findings show that oxidative stress alters parkin E3 ligase activity, leading to dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and potentially contributing to LB formation.

  10. Genetic bypass of essential RNA repair enzymes in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Patrick D; White, Laura K; York, Kerri; Hesselberth, Jay R

    2018-03-01

    RNA repair enzymes catalyze rejoining of an RNA molecule after cleavage of phosphodiester linkages. RNA repair in budding yeast is catalyzed by two separate enzymes that process tRNA exons during their splicing and HAC1 mRNA exons during activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The RNA ligase Trl1 joins 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl RNA fragments, creating a phosphodiester linkage with a 2'-phosphate at the junction. The 2'-phosphate is removed by the 2'-phosphotransferase Tpt1. We bypassed the essential functions of TRL1 and TPT1 in budding yeast by expressing "prespliced," intronless versions of the 10 normally intron-containing tRNAs, indicating this repair pathway does not have additional essential functions. Consistent with previous studies, expression of intronless tRNAs failed to rescue the growth of cells with deletions in components of the SEN complex, implying an additional essential role for the splicing endonuclease. The trl1 Δ and tpt1 Δ mutants accumulate tRNA and HAC1 splicing intermediates indicative of RNA repair defects and are hypersensitive to drugs that inhibit translation. Failure to induce the unfolded protein response in trl1 Δ cells grown with tunicamycin is lethal owing to their inability to ligate HAC1 after its cleavage by Ire1. In contrast, tpt1 Δ mutants grow in the presence of tunicamycin despite reduced accumulation of spliced HAC1 mRNA. We optimized a PCR-based method to detect RNA 2'-phosphate modifications and show they are present on ligated HAC1 mRNA. These RNA repair mutants enable new studies of the role of RNA repair in cellular physiology. © 2018 Cherry et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. Surface chemistry essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Birdi, K S

    2013-01-01

    Surface chemistry plays an important role in everyday life, as the basis for many phenomena as well as technological applications. Common examples range from soap bubbles, foam, and raindrops to cosmetics, paint, adhesives, and pharmaceuticals. Additional areas that rely on surface chemistry include modern nanotechnology, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. There is extensive literature on this subject, but most chemistry books only devote one or two chapters to it. Surface Chemistry Essentials fills a need for a reference that brings together the fundamental aspects of surface chemistry w

  12. Geometry essentials for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Just the critical concepts you need to score high in geometry This practical, friendly guide focuses on critical concepts taught in a typical geometry course, from the properties of triangles, parallelograms, circles, and cylinders, to the skills and strategies you need to write geometry proofs. Geometry Essentials For Dummies is perfect for cramming or doing homework, or as a reference for parents helping kids study for exams. Get down to the basics - get a handle on the basics of geometry, from lines, segments, and angles, to vertices, altitudes, and diagonals Conque

  13. The essential David Bohm

    CERN Document Server

    Nichol, Lee

    2002-01-01

    There are few scientists of the twentieth century whose life's work has created more excitement and controversy than that of physicist David Bohm (1917-1992). For the first time in a single volume, The Essential David Bohm offers a comprehensive overview of Bohm's original works from a non-technical perspective. Including three chapters of previously unpublished material, and a forward by the Dalai Lama, each reading has been selected to highlight some aspect of the implicate order process, and to provide an introduction to one of the most provocative thinkers of our time.

  14. Cisco networking essentials

    CERN Document Server

    McMillan, Troy

    2015-01-01

    Start a career in networking Cisco Networking Essentials, 2nd Edition provides the latest for those beginning a career in networking. This book provides the fundamentals of networking and leads you through the concepts, processes, and skills you need to master fundamental networking concepts. Thinking of taking the CCENT Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician ICND1 Exam 100-101? This book has you covered! With coverage of important topics and objectives, each chapter outlines main points and provides clear, engaging discussion that will give you a sound understanding of core topics and c

  15. Microsoft Windows networking essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Darril

    2011-01-01

    The core concepts and technologies of Windows networking Networking can be a complex topic, especially for those new to the field of IT. This focused, full-color book takes a unique approach to teaching Windows networking to beginners by stripping down a network to its bare basics, thereby making each topic clear and easy to understand. Focusing on the new Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) program, this book pares down to just the essentials, showing beginners how to gain a solid foundation for understanding networking concepts upon which more advanced topics and technologies can be built.

  16. Autodesk Maya 2014 essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Naas, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The premiere book on getting started with Maya 2014 Whether you're just beginning, or migrating from another 3D application, this step-by-step guide is what you need to get a good working knowledge of Autodesk Maya 2014. Beautifully illustrated with full-color examples and screenshots, Autodesk Maya 2014 Essentials explains the basics of Maya as well as modeling, texturing, animating, setting a scene, and creating visual effects. You'll absorb important concepts and techniques, and learn how to confidently use Maya tools the way professionals do. Each chapter includes fun and cha

  17. RabbitMQ essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Dossot, David

    2014-01-01

    This book is a quick and concise introduction to RabbitMQ. Follow the unique case study of Clever Coney Media as they progressively discover how to fully utilize RabbitMQ, containing clever examples and detailed explanations.Whether you are someone who develops enterprise messaging products professionally or a hobbyist who is already familiar with open source Message Queuing software and you are looking for a new challenge, then this is the book for you. Although you should be familiar with Java, Ruby, and Python to get the most out of the examples, RabbitMQ Essentials will give you the push y

  18. Cisco Networking Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    McMillan, Troy

    2011-01-01

    An engaging approach for anyone beginning a career in networking As the world leader of networking products and services, Cisco products are constantly growing in demand. Yet, few books are aimed at those who are beginning a career in IT--until now. Cisco Networking Essentials provides a solid foundation on the Cisco networking products and services with thorough coverage of fundamental networking concepts. Author Troy McMillan applies his years of classroom instruction to effectively present high-level topics in easy-to-understand terms for beginners. With this indispensable full-color resour

  19. French essentials for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Lawless, Laura K

    2011-01-01

    Just the core concepts you need to write and speak French correctly If you have some knowledge of French and want to polish your skills, French Essentials For Dummies focuses on just the core concepts you need to communicate effectively. From conjugating verbs to understanding tenses, this easy-to-follow guide lets you skip the suffering and score high at exam time. French 101 - get the lowdown on the basics, from expressing dates and times to identifying parts of speech Gender matters - see how a noun's gender determines the articles, adjectives, and pronouns y

  20. Samii's essentials in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramina, Ricardo; Pontifical Catholic Univ. of Parana, Curitiba; Pires Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Sao Paulo Univ.; Hospital Santa Paula, Sao Paulo; Tatagiba, Marcos

    2008-01-01

    'Samii's Essentials in Neurosurgery' contains selected papers written by internationally recognized contributors who were trained by Professor Madjid Samii in Hannover, Germany. The main topics deal with cutting-edge technology in neurosurgery, skull-base surgery, and specific peripheral nerve, spine, and vascular surgeries. The texts and a wealth of illustrations review and reinforce guidelines on the diagnosis and management of situations that readers are likely to encounter in everyday practice. This book will be of great interest to neurosurgeons, neurologists, ENT surgeons, neuroradiologists, and neurophysiotherapists. (orig.)

  1. MooTools essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Newton, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    Mootools is a light, modular JavaScript framework that makes adding Ajax, animations, and interactive elements to your site a breeze. But it's more than fancy effects and shortcuts; Mootools enhances the JavaScript language and makes writing clean, object oriented code almost pleasant. Unlocking the power of Mootools, and therefore JavaScript, isn't that hard, but knowing where to start can be. Mootools Essentials aims to help you accomplish that task with the following: * Illustrations of nearly every class and function in the library * Real world examples of how to use them * Written by Moot

  2. Twisted network programming essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Fettig, Abe

    2005-01-01

    Twisted Network Programming Essentials from O'Reilly is a task-oriented look at this new open source, Python-based technology. The book begins with recommendations for various plug-ins and add-ons to enhance the basic package as installed. It then details Twisted's collection simple network protocols, and helper utilities. The book also includes projects that let you try out the Twisted framework for yourself. For example, you'll find examples of using Twisted to build web services applications using the REST architecture, using XML-RPC, and using SOAP. Written for developers who want to s

  3. Essential dynamics and relativity

    CERN Document Server

    O'Donnell, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Essential Dynamics & Relativity provides students with an introduction to the core aspects of dynamics and special relativity. The author reiterates important ideas and terms throughout and covers concepts that are often missing from other textbooks at this level. He also places each topic within the wider constructs of the theory, without jumping from topic to topic to illustrate a point.The first section of the book focuses on dynamics, discussing the basic aspects of single particle motion and analyzing the motion of multi-particle systems. The book also explains the dynamical behavior of b

  4. Microsoft Windows Security Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Darril

    2011-01-01

    Windows security concepts and technologies for IT beginners IT security can be a complex topic, especially for those new to the field of IT. This full-color book, with a focus on the Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) program, offers a clear and easy-to-understand approach to Windows security risks and attacks for newcomers to the world of IT. By paring down to just the essentials, beginners gain a solid foundation of security concepts upon which more advanced topics and technologies can be built. This straightforward guide begins each chapter by laying out a list of topics to be discussed,

  5. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  6. Characterization of d-boroAla as a Novel Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Agent Targeting d-Ala-d-Ala Ligase

    OpenAIRE

    Putty, Sandeep; Rai, Aman; Jamindar, Darshan; Pagano, Paul; Quinn, Cheryl L.; Mima, Takehiko; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Gutheil, William G.

    2011-01-01

    d-boroAla was previously characterized as an inhibitor of bacterial alanine racemase and d-Ala-d-Ala ligase enzymes [Duncan, K., et al Biochemistry 1989, 28:3541–9]. In the present study, d-boroAla was identified and characterized as an antibacterial agent. d-boroAla has activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, with MICs down to 8 µg/mL. A structure-function study on the alkyl side chain (NH2-CHR-B(OR’)2) revealed that d-boroAla is the most effective agent in a series ...

  7. The Trim39 ubiquitin ligase inhibits APC/CCdh1-mediated degradation of the Bax activator MOAP-1

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Nai-Jia; Zhang, Liguo; Tang, Wanli; Chen, Chen; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Kornbluth, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, such as Bax, promote release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, leading to caspase activation and cell death. It was previously reported that modulator of apoptosis protein 1 (MOAP-1), an enhancer of Bax activation induced by DNA damage, is stabilized by Trim39, a protein of unknown function. In this paper, we show that MOAP-1 is a novel substrate of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/CCdh1) ubiquitin ligase. The influence of Trim39 on MOAP-1 levels stems f...

  8. NleG Type 3 effectors from enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli are U-Box E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available NleG homologues constitute the largest family of Type 3 effectors delivered by pathogenic E. coli, with fourteen members in the enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC O157:H7 strain alone. Identified recently as part of the non-LEE-encoded (Nle effector set, this family remained uncharacterised and shared no sequence homology to other proteins including those of known function. The C-terminal domain of NleG2-3 (residues 90 to 191 is the most conserved region in NleG proteins and was solved by NMR. Structural analysis of this structure revealed the presence of a RING finger/U-box motif. Functional assays demonstrated that NleG2-3 as well as NleG5-1, NleG6-2 and NleG9' family members exhibited a strong autoubiquitination activity in vitro; a characteristic usually expressed by eukaryotic ubiquitin E3 ligases. When screened for activity against a panel of 30 human E2 enzymes, the NleG2-3 and NleG5-1 homologues showed an identical profile with only UBE2E2, UBE2E3 and UBE2D2 enzymes supporting NleG activity. Fluorescence polarization analysis yielded a binding affinity constant of 56+/-2 microM for the UBE2D2/NleG5-1 interaction, a value comparable with previous studies on E2/E3 affinities. The UBE2D2 interaction interface on NleG2-3 defined by NMR chemical shift perturbation and mutagenesis was shown to be generally similar to that characterised for human RING finger ubiquitin ligases. The alanine substitutions of UBE2D2 residues Arg5 and Lys63, critical for activation of eukaryotic E3 ligases, also significantly decreased both NleG binding and autoubiquitination activity. These results demonstrate that bacteria-encoded NleG effectors are E3 ubiquitin ligases analogous to RING finger and U-box enzymes in eukaryotes.

  9. Calcium, essential for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Victoria, Emilio

    2016-07-12

    Calcium (Ca) is the most abundant mineral element in our body. It accounts for about 2% of body weight. The functions of calcium are: a) functions skeletal and b) regulatory functions. Bone consists of a protein matrix that mineralizes mainly with calcium (the most abundant), phosphate and magnesium, for it is essential an adequate dietary intake of Ca, phosphorus and vitamin D. The ionic Ca (Ca2+) is essential to maintain and / or perform different specialized functions of, virtually, all body cells cellular. Because of its important functions Ca2+ must be closely regulated, keeping plasma concentrations within narrow ranges. For this reason there is an accurate response against hypocalcemia or hypercalcemia in which the parathormone, calcitriol, calcitonin and vitamin K are involved. Ca intakes in the Spanish population are low in a significant percentage of the older adult’s population, especially in women. The main source of Ca in the diet is milk and milk derivatives. Green leafy vegetables, fruits and legumes can be important sources of Ca in a Mediterranean dietary pattern. The bioavailability of dietary Ca depends on physiological and dietary factors. Physiological include age, physiological status (gestation and lactation) Ca and vitamin D status and disease. Several studies relate Ca intake in the diet and various diseases, such as osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity.

  10. Ligase-deficient yeast cells exhibit defective DNA rejoining and enhanced gamma ray sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    Yeast cells deficient in DNA ligase were also deficient in their capacity to rejoin single-strand scissions in prelabeled nuclear DNA. After high-dose-rate gamma irradiation (10 and 25 krads), cdc9-9 mutant cells failed to rejoin single-strand scissions at the restrictive temperature of 37 0 C. In contrast, parental (CDC9) cells (incubated with mutant cells both during and after irradiation) exhibited rapid medium-independent DNA rejoining after 10 min of post-irradiation incubation and slower rates of rejoining after longer incubation. Parental cells were also more resistant than mutant cells to killing by gamma irradiation. Approximately 2.5 +- 0.07 and 5.7 +- 0.6 single-strand breaks per 10 8 daltons were detected in DNAs from either CDC9 or cdc9-9 cells converted to spheroplasts immediately after 10 and 25 krads of irradiation, respectively. At the permissive temperature of 23 0 C, the cdc9-9 cells contained 2 to 3 times the number of DNA single-strand breaks as parental cells after 10 min to 4 h of incubation after 10 krads of irradiation, and two- to eightfold more breaks after 10 min to 2.5 h of incubation after 25 krads of irradiation. Rejoining of single-strand scissions was faster in medium. After only 10 min in buffered growth medium after 10 krads of irradiation, the number of DNA single-strand breaks was reduced to 0.32 +- 0.3 (at 23 0 C) or 0.21 +- 0.05 (at 37 0 C) per 10 8 daltons in parental cells, but remained at 2.1 +- 0.06 (at 23 0 C) or 2.3 +- 0.07 (at 37 0 C) per 10 8 daltons in mutant cells. After 10 or 25 krads of irradiation plus 1 h of incubation in medium at 37 0 C, only DNA from CDC9 cells was rejoined to the size of DNA from unirradiated cells, whereas at 23 0 C, DNAs in both strains were completely rejoined

  11. Essential real analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Field, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a rigorous introduction to the techniques and results of real analysis, metric spaces and multivariate differentiation, suitable for undergraduate courses. Starting from the very foundations of analysis, it offers a complete first course in real analysis, including topics rarely found in such detail in an undergraduate textbook such as the construction of non-analytic smooth functions, applications of the Euler-Maclaurin formula to estimates, and fractal geometry.  Drawing on the author’s extensive teaching and research experience, the exposition is guided by carefully chosen examples and counter-examples, with the emphasis placed on the key ideas underlying the theory. Much of the content is informed by its applicability: Fourier analysis is developed to the point where it can be rigorously applied to partial differential equations or computation, and the theory of metric spaces includes applications to ordinary differential equations and fractals. Essential Real Analysis will appeal t...

  12. Essentials of nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Murti, Y V G S

    2014-01-01

    Current literature on Nonlinear Optics varies widely in terms of content, style, and coverage of specific topics, relative emphasis of areas and the depth of treatment. While most of these books are excellent resources for the researchers, there is a strong need for books appropriate for presenting the subject at the undergraduate or postgraduate levels in Universities. The need for such a book to serve as a textbook at the level of the bachelors and masters courses was felt by the authors while teaching courses on nonlinear optics to students of both science and engineering during the past two decades. This book has emerged from an attempt to address the requirement of presenting the subject at college level. A one-semester course covering the essentials can effectively be designed based on this.

  13. DSP Architecture Design Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Marković, Dejan

    2012-01-01

    In DSP Architecture Design Essentials, authors Dejan Marković and Robert W. Brodersen cover a key subject for the successful realization of DSP algorithms for communications, multimedia, and healthcare applications. The book addresses the need for DSP architecture design that maps advanced DSP algorithms to hardware in the most power- and area-efficient way. The key feature of this text is a design methodology based on a high-level design model that leads to hardware implementation with minimum power and area. The methodology includes algorithm-level considerations such as automated word-length reduction and intrinsic data properties that can be leveraged to reduce hardware complexity. From a high-level data-flow graph model, an architecture exploration methodology based on linear programming is used to create an array of architectural solutions tailored to the underlying hardware technology. The book is supplemented with online material: bibliography, design examples, CAD tutorials and custom software.

  14. TQM: the essential concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, D W

    1998-01-01

    This is an introduction to the major concepts in total quality management, a loose collection of management approaches that focus on continuous improvement of processes, guided by routine data collection and adjustment of the processes. Customer focus and involvement of all members of an organization are also characteristics commonly found in TQM. The seventy-five-year history of the movement is sketched from its beginning in statistical work on quality assurance through the many improvements and redefinitions added by American and Japanese thinkers. Essential concepts covered include: control cycles, focus on the process rather than the defects, the GEAR model, importance of the customer, upstream quality, just-in-time, kaizen, and service quality.

  15. Genetics of essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mein, Charles A; Caulfield, Mark J; Dobson, Richard J; Munroe, Patricia B

    2004-04-01

    Essential hypertension affects 1 billion people worldwide and its genetic basis is well established. For this review we surveyed the literature on the genetics of hypertension during the past 18 months and we now report the highlights. There has been publication of the two largest genome scans for blood pressure and new loci including significant linkage to chromosome 6q have been reported. The molecular basis of Gordon's syndrome has been partially unravelled with a dual function for WNK4 in ion transport regulation being discovered. There has also been progress in narrowing rodent quantitative trait loci using congenic approaches and several linkage peaks have now been demonstrated to have more than one loci. We also report some of the initial findings from pharmacogenetic studies.

  16. CBL family E3 ubiquitin ligases control JAK2 ubiquitination and stability in hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Kaosheng; Jiang, Jing; Donaghy, Ryan; Riling, Christopher R; Cheng, Ying; Chandra, Vemika; Rozenova, Krasimira; An, Wei; Mohapatra, Bhopal C; Goetz, Benjamin T; Pillai, Vinodh; Han, Xu; Todd, Emily A; Jeschke, Grace R; Langdon, Wallace Y; Kumar, Suresh; Hexner, Elizabeth O; Band, Hamid; Tong, Wei

    2017-05-15

    Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) is a central kinase in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), and its uncontrolled activation is a prominent oncogenic driver of hematopoietic neoplasms. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of JAK2 have remained elusive. Here we report that the Casitas B-cell lymphoma (CBL) family E3 ubiquitin ligases down-regulate JAK2 stability and signaling via the adaptor protein LNK/SH2B3. We demonstrated that depletion of CBL/CBL-B or LNK abrogated JAK2 ubiquitination, extended JAK2 half-life, and enhanced JAK2 signaling and cell growth in human cell lines as well as primary murine HSPCs. Built on these findings, we showed that JAK inhibitor (JAKi) significantly reduced aberrant HSPCs and mitigated leukemia development in a mouse model of aggressive myeloid leukemia driven by loss of Cbl and Cbl-b Importantly, primary human CBL mutated ( CBL mut ) leukemias exhibited increased JAK2 protein levels and signaling and were hypersensitive to JAKi. Loss-of-function mutations in CBL E3 ubiquitin ligases are found in a wide range of myeloid malignancies, which are diseases without effective treatment options. Hence, our studies reveal a novel signaling axis that regulates JAK2 in normal and malignant HSPCs and suggest new therapeutic strategies for treating CBL mut myeloid malignancies. © 2017 Lv et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Loss of Ubr2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, leads to chromosome fragility and impaired homologous recombinational repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Yan; Kwon, Yong Tae; An, Jee Young; Eller, Danny; Tsai, S.-C.; Diaz-Perez, Silvia; Troke, Joshua J.; Teitell, Michael A.; Marahrens, York

    2006-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway of protein degradation targets proteins with destabilizing N-terminal residues. Ubr2 is one of the E3 ubiquitin ligases of the mouse N-end rule pathway. We have previously shown that Ubr2 -/- male mice are infertile, owing to the arrest of spermatocytes between the leptotene/zygotene and pachytene of meiosis I, the failure of chromosome pairing, and subsequent apoptosis. Here, we report that mouse fibroblast cells derived from Ubr2 -/- embryos display genome instability. The frequency of chromosomal bridges and micronuclei were much higher in Ubr2 -/- fibroblasts than in +/+ controls. Metaphase chromosome spreads from Ubr2 -/- cells revealed a high incidence of spontaneous chromosomal gaps, indicating chromosomal fragility. These fragile sites were generally replicated late in S phase. Ubr2 -/- cells were hypersensitive to mitomycin C, a DNA cross-linking agent, but displayed normal sensitivity to gamma-irradiation. A reporter assay showed that Ubr2 -/- cells are significantly impaired in the homologous recombination repair of a double strand break. In contrast, Ubr2 -/- cells appeared normal in an assay for non-homologous end joining. Our results therefore unveil the role of the ubiquitin ligase Ubr2 in maintaining genome integrity and in homologous recombination repair

  18. A HECT Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase as a Novel Candidate Gene for Altered Quinine and Quinidine Responses in Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Cecilia P.; Cyrklaff, Marek; Mu, Jianbing; Ferdig, Michael T.; Stein, Wilfred D.; Lanzer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The emerging resistance to quinine jeopardizes the efficacy of a drug that has been used in the treatment of malaria for several centuries. To identify factors contributing to differential quinine responses in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, we have conducted comparative quantitative trait locus analyses on the susceptibility to quinine and also its stereoisomer quinidine, and on the initial and steady-state intracellular drug accumulation levels in the F1 progeny of a genetic cross. These data, together with genetic screens of field isolates and laboratory strains associated differential quinine and quinidine responses with mutated pfcrt, a segment on chromosome 13, and a novel candidate gene, termed MAL7P1.19 (encoding a HECT ubiquitin ligase). Despite a strong likelihood of association, episomal transfections demonstrated a role for the HECT ubiquitin-protein ligase in quinine and quinidine sensitivity in only a subset of genetic backgrounds, and here the changes in IC50 values were moderate (approximately 2-fold). These data show that quinine responsiveness is a complex genetic trait with multiple alleles playing a role and that more experiments are needed to unravel the role of the contributing factors. PMID:24830312

  19. Atomic Structure and Nonhomologous End-Joining Function of the Polymerase Component of Bacterial DNA Ligase D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu,H.; Nandakumar, J.; Aniukwu, J.; Wang, L.; Glickman, M.; Lima, C.; Shuman, S.

    2006-01-01

    DNA ligase D (LigD) is a large polyfunctional protein that participates in a recently discovered pathway of nonhomologous end-joining in bacteria. LigD consists of an ATP-dependent ligase domain fused to a polymerase domain (Pol) and a phosphoesterase module. The Pol activity is remarkable for its dependence on manganese, its ability to perform templated and nontemplated primer extension reactions, and its preference for adding ribonucleotides to blunt DNA ends. Here we report the 1.5- Angstroms crystal structure of the Pol domain of Pseudomonas LigD and its complexes with manganese and ATP-dATP substrates, which reveal a minimized polymerase with a two-metal mechanism and a fold similar to that of archaeal DNA primase. Mutational analysis highlights the functionally relevant atomic contacts in the active site. Although distinct nucleoside conformations and contacts for ATP versus dATP are observed in the cocrystals, the functional analysis suggests that the ATP-binding mode is the productive conformation for dNMP and rNMP incorporation. We find that a mutation of Mycobacterium LigD that uniquely ablates the polymerase activity results in increased fidelity of blunt-end double-strand break repair in vivo by virtue of eliminating nucleotide insertions at the recombination junctions. Thus, LigD Pol is a direct catalyst of mutagenic nonhomologous end-joining in vivo. Our studies underscore a previously uncharacterized role for the primase-like polymerase family in DNA repair.

  20. Establishing a toolkit for precursor-directed polyketide biosynthesis: exploring substrate promiscuities of acid-CoA ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Maybelle Kho; Chow, Jeng Yeong; Cheung, Vivian Wing Ngar; Lim, Yan Ping; Yew, Wen Shan

    2012-06-05

    Polyketides are chemically diverse and medicinally important biochemicals that are biosynthesized from acyl-CoA precursors by polyketide synthases. One of the limitations to combinatorial biosynthesis of polyketides has been the lack of a toolkit that describes the means of delivering novel acyl-CoA precursors necessary for polyketide biosynthesis. Using five acid-CoA ligases obtained from various plants and microorganisms, we biosynthesized an initial library of 79 acyl-CoA thioesters by screening each of the acid-CoA ligases against a library of 123 carboxylic acids. The library of acyl-CoA thioesters includes derivatives of cinnamyl-CoA, 3-phenylpropanoyl-CoA, benzoyl-CoA, phenylacetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA, saturated and unsaturated aliphatic CoA thioesters, and bicyclic aromatic CoA thioesters. In our search for the biosynthetic routes of novel acyl-CoA precursors, we discovered two previously unreported malonyl-CoA derivatives (3-thiophenemalonyl-CoA and phenylmalonyl-CoA) that cannot be produced by canonical malonyl-CoA synthetases. This report highlights the utility and importance of determining substrate promiscuities beyond conventional substrate pools and describes novel enzymatic routes for the establishment of precursor-directed combinatorial polyketide biosynthesis.

  1. A MARCH6 and IDOL E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Circuit Uncouples Cholesterol Synthesis from Lipoprotein Uptake in Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loregger, Anke; Cook, Emma Claire Laura; Nelson, Jessica Kristin; Moeton, Martina; Sharpe, Laura Jane; Engberg, Susanna; Karimova, Madina; Lambert, Gilles; Brown, Andrew John; Zelcer, Noam

    2016-01-15

    Cholesterol synthesis and lipoprotein uptake are tightly coordinated to ensure that the cellular level of cholesterol is adequately maintained. Hepatic dysregulation of these processes is associated with pathological conditions, most notably cardiovascular disease. Using a genetic approach, we have recently identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH6 as a regulator of cholesterol biosynthesis, owing to its ability to promote degradation of the rate-limiting enzymes 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) and squalene epoxidase (SQLE). Here, we present evidence for MARCH6 playing a multifaceted role in the control of cholesterol homeostasis in hepatocytes. We identify MARCH6 as an endogenous inhibitor of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) transcriptional program. Accordingly, loss of MARCH6 increases expression of SREBP-regulated genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and lipoprotein uptake. Unexpectedly, this is associated with a decrease in cellular lipoprotein uptake, induced by enhanced lysosomal degradation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). Finally, we provide evidence that induction of the E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL represents the molecular mechanism underlying this MARCH6-induced phenotype. Our study thus highlights a MARCH6-dependent mechanism to direct cellular cholesterol accretion that relies on uncoupling of cholesterol synthesis from lipoprotein uptake. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantuma, Nico P; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process.

  3. The San1 Ubiquitin Ligase Functions Preferentially with Ubiquitin-conjugating Enzyme Ubc1 during Protein Quality Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Rebeca; Sandoval, Daniella; Fredrickson, Eric K; Gardner, Richard G; Kleiger, Gary

    2016-09-02

    Protein quality control (PQC) is a critical process wherein misfolded or damaged proteins are cleared from the cell to maintain protein homeostasis. In eukaryotic cells, the removal of misfolded proteins is primarily accomplished by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In the ubiquitin-proteasome system, ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes and ubiquitin ligases append polyubiquitin chains onto misfolded protein substrates signaling for their degradation. The kinetics of protein ubiquitylation are paramount as a balance must be achieved between the rapid removal of misfolded proteins versus providing sufficient time for protein chaperones to attempt refolding. To uncover the molecular basis for how PQC substrate ubiquitylation rates are controlled, the reaction catalyzed by nuclear ubiquitin ligase San1 was reconstituted in vitro Our results demonstrate that San1 can function with two ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, Cdc34 and Ubc1. Although Cdc34 and Ubc1 are both sufficient for promoting San1 activity, San1 functions preferentially with Ubc1, including when both Ubc1 and Cdc34 are present. Notably, a homogeneous peptide that mimics a misfolded PQC substrate was developed and enabled quantification of the kinetics of San1-catalyzed ubiquitylation reactions. We discuss how these results may have broad implications for the regulation of PQC-mediated protein degradation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Sterol homeostasis requires regulated degradation of squalene monooxygenase by the ubiquitin ligase Doa10/Teb4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foresti, Ombretta; Ruggiano, Annamaria; Hannibal-Bach, Hans K

    2013-01-01

    Sterol homeostasis is essential for the function of cellular membranes and requires feedback inhibition of HMGR, a rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. As HMGR acts at the beginning of the pathway, its regulation affects the synthesis of sterols and of other essential mevalonate-derive...... to control sterol biosynthesis at different levels and thereby allowing independent regulation of multiple products of the mevalonate pathway. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00953.001....

  5. Genetics Home Reference: essential tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be aggravated by emotional stress, anxiety, fatigue, hunger, caffeine, cigarette smoking, or temperature extremes. Essential tremor ... 6. Review. Citation on PubMed Testa CM. Key issues in essential tremor genetics research: Where are we ...

  6. Protein Interaction Screening for the Ankyrin Repeats and Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) Box (ASB) Family Identify Asb11 as a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Resident Ubiquitin Ligase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Christina Aaen; Smedegaard, Stine; Sylvestersen, Kathrine Beck

    2014-01-01

    The Ankyrin and SOCS (Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling) box (ASB) family of proteins function as the substrate recognition subunit in a subset of Elongin-Cullin-SOCS (ECS) E3 ubiquitin ligases. Despite counting with 18 members in humans, the identity of the physiological targets of the Asb protei...

  7. The ubiquitin ligase Cullin5SOCS2 regulates NDR1/STK38 stability and NF-κB transactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Indranil; Batth, Tanveer S; Iglesias-Gato, Diego

    2017-01-01

    SOCS2 is a pleiotropic E3 ligase. Its deficiency is associated with gigantism and organismal lethality upon inflammatory challenge. However, mechanistic understanding of SOCS2 function is dismal due to our unawareness of its protein substrates. We performed a mass spectrometry based proteomic pro...

  8. Ubiquitin ligase Rad18Sc localizes to the XY body and to other chromosomal regions that are unpaired and transcriptionally silenced during male meiotic prophase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van der Laan (Roald); W.M. Baarends (Willy); E.J. Uringa; E. Wassenaar (Evelyne); J.W. Hoogerbrugge (Jos); E. Sleddens; H. Odijk (Hanny); H.P. Roest (Henk); P. de Boer (Peter); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn replicative damage bypass (RDB) in yeast, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme RAD6 interacts with the ubiquitin ligase RAD18. In the mouse, these enzymes are represented by two homologs of RAD6, HR6a and HR6b, and one homolog of RAD18, Rad18Sc. Expression of these genes and the encoded

  9. Genome mining reveals high incidence of putative lipopeptide biosynthesis NRPS/PKS clusters containing fatty acyl-AMP ligase genes inbiofilm-forming cyanobacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galica, Tomáš; Hrouzek, P.; Mareš, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 5 (2017), s. 985-998 ISSN 0022-3646 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09381S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cyanobacteria * fatty-acyl AMP ligase * genome mining * lipopeptides * microbial biofilm Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.608, year: 2016

  10. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase IDOL Induces the Degradation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Family Members VLDLR and ApoER2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, Cynthia; Duit, Sarah; Jalonen, Pilvi; Out, Ruud; Scheer, Lilith; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Boyadjian, Rima; Rodenburg, Kees C. W.; Foley, Edan; Korhonen, Laura; Lindholm, Dan; Nimpf, Johannes; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Tontonoz, Peter; Zelcer, Noam

    2010-01-01

    We have previously identified the E3-ubiquitin ligase Inducible Degrader of the LDLR (Idol)1 as a post-translational modulator of LDLR levels. Idol is a direct target for regulation by Liver X Receptors (LXRs) and its expression is responsive to cellular sterol status independent of the

  11. Furan-based benzene mono- and dicarboxylic acid derivatives as multiple inhibitors of the bacterial Mur ligases (MurC-MurF): experimental and computational characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdih, Andrej; Hrast, Martina; Pureber, Kaja; Barreteau, Hélène; Grdadolnik, Simona Golič; Kocjan, Darko; Gobec, Stanislav; Solmajer, Tom; Wolber, Gerhard

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial resistance to the available antibiotic agents underlines an urgent need for the discovery of novel antibacterial agents. Members of the bacterial Mur ligase family MurC-MurF involved in the intracellular stages of the bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis have recently emerged as a collection of attractive targets for novel antibacterial drug design. In this study, we have first extended the knowledge of the class of furan-based benzene-1,3-dicarboxylic acid derivatives by first showing a multiple MurC-MurF ligase inhibition for representatives of the extended series of this class. Steady-state kinetics studies on the MurD enzyme were performed for compound 1, suggesting a competitive inhibition with respect to ATP. To the best of our knowledge, compound 1 represents the first ATP-competitive MurD inhibitor reported to date with concurrent multiple inhibition of all four Mur ligases (MurC-MurF). Subsequent molecular dynamic (MD) simulations coupled with interaction energy calculations were performed for two alternative in silico models of compound 1 in the UMA/ d-Glu- and ATP-binding sites of MurD, identifying binding in the ATP-binding site as energetically more favorable in comparison to the UMA/ d-Glu-binding site, which was in agreement with steady-state kinetic data. In the final stage, based on the obtained MD data novel furan-based benzene monocarboxylic acid derivatives 8- 11, exhibiting multiple Mur ligase (MurC-MurF) inhibition with predominantly superior ligase inhibition over the original series, were discovered and for compound 10 it was shown to possess promising antibacterial activity against S. aureus. These compounds represent novel leads that could by further optimization pave the way to novel antibacterial agents.

  12. Lysine 271 but not lysine 210 of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuchi, Mikoto; Wanotayan, Rujira; Liu, Sicheng; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa, E-mail: yoshim@nr.titech.ac.jp

    2015-06-12

    XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV (LIG4) cooperate to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, it is not fully understood how these proteins are localized to the nucleus. Here we created XRCC4{sup K271R} mutant, as Lys271 lies within the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS), and XRCC4{sup K210R} mutant, as Lys210 was reported to undergo SUMOylation, implicated in the nuclear localization of XRCC4. Wild-type and mutated XRCC4 with EGFP tag were introduced into HeLa cell, in which endogenous XRCC4 had been knocked down using siRNA directed to 3′-untranslated region, and tested for the nuclear localization function by fluorescence microscopy. XRCC4{sup K271R} was defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4, whereas XRCC4{sup K210R} was competent for the nuclear localization with LIG4. To examine DSB repair function, wild-type and mutated XRCC4 were introduced into XRCC4-deficient M10. M10-XRCC4{sup K271R}, but not M10-XRCC4{sup K210R}, showed significantly reduced surviving fraction after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation as compared to M10-XRCC4{sup WT}. The number of γ-H2AX foci remaining 2 h after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation was significantly greater in M10-XRCC4{sup K271R} than in M10-XRCC4{sup WT}, whereas it was only marginally increased in M10-XRCC4{sup K210R} as compared to M10-XRCC4{sup WT}. The present results collectively indicated that Lys271, but not Lys210, of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and LIG4 and that the nuclear localizing ability is essential for DSB repair function of XRCC4. - Highlights: • XRCC4{sup K271R} is defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4. • XRCC4{sup K210R} is competent for the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4. • XRCC4{sup K271R} is deficient in DSB repair function. • XRCC4{sup K210R} is mostly normal in DSB repair function.

  13. Rapid single step subcloning procedure by combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingenspor Martin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subcloning of a DNA fragment from an entry vector into a destination vector is a routinely performed task in molecular biology labs. Results We here present a novel benchtop procedure to achieve rapid recombination into any destination vector of choice with the sole requirement of an endonuclease recognition site. The method relies on a specifically designed entry vector and the combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase. The formulation leads to accumulation of a single stable cloning product representing the desired insert carrying destination vector. Conclusion The described method provides a fast single step procedure for routine subcloning from an entry vector into a series of destination vectors with the same restriction enzyme recognition site.

  14. Rapid single step subcloning procedure by combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Tobias; Klingenspor, Martin

    2007-11-26

    The subcloning of a DNA fragment from an entry vector into a destination vector is a routinely performed task in molecular biology labs. We here present a novel benchtop procedure to achieve rapid recombination into any destination vector of choice with the sole requirement of an endonuclease recognition site. The method relies on a specifically designed entry vector and the combined action of type II and type IIs endonucleases with ligase. The formulation leads to accumulation of a single stable cloning product representing the desired insert carrying destination vector. The described method provides a fast single step procedure for routine subcloning from an entry vector into a series of destination vectors with the same restriction enzyme recognition site.

  15. K48-linked KLF4 ubiquitination by E3 ligase Mule controls T-cell proliferation and cell cycle progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Zhenyue; Sheng, Yi; Duncan, Gordon S.

    2017-01-01

    (EAE), show impaired generation of antigen-specific CD8 + T cells with reduced cytokine production, and fail to clear LCMV infections. Thus, Mule-mediated ubiquitination of the novel substrate KLF4 regulates T-cell proliferation, autoimmunity and antiviral immune responses in vivo.......T-cell proliferation is regulated by ubiquitination but the underlying molecular mechanism remains obscure. Here we report that Lys-48-linked ubiquitination of the transcription factor KLF4 mediated by the E3 ligase Mule promotes T-cell entry into S phase. Mule is elevated in T cells upon TCR...... engagement, and Mule deficiency in T cells blocks proliferation because KLF4 accumulates and drives upregulation of its transcriptional targets E2F2 and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27. T-cell-specific Mule knockout (TMKO) mice develop exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis...

  16. Skeletal muscle atrophy and the E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehr, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 were identified more than 10 years ago as two muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases that are increased transcriptionally in skeletal muscle under atrophy-inducing conditions, making them excellent markers of muscle atrophy. In the past 10 years much has been published about MuRF1 and MAFbx with respect to their mRNA expression patterns under atrophy-inducing conditions, their transcriptional regulation, and their putative substrates. However, much remains to be learned about the physiological role of both genes in the regulation of mass and other cellular functions in striated muscle. Although both MuRF1 and MAFbx are enriched in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle, this review will focus on the current understanding of MuRF1 and MAFbx in skeletal muscle, highlighting the critical questions that remain to be answered. PMID:25096180

  17. Hot Fusion: An Efficient Method to Clone Multiple DNA Fragments as Well as Inverted Repeats without Ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Changlin; Donovan, William P.; Shikapwashya-Hasser, Olga; Ye, Xudong; Cole, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular cloning is utilized in nearly every facet of biological and medical research. We have developed a method, termed Hot Fusion, to efficiently clone one or multiple DNA fragments into plasmid vectors without the use of ligase. The method is directional, produces seamless junctions and is not dependent on the availability of restriction sites for inserts. Fragments are assembled based on shared homology regions of 17–30 bp at the junctions, which greatly simplifies the construct design. Hot Fusion is carried out in a one-step, single tube reaction at 50°C for one hour followed by cooling to room temperature. In addition to its utility for multi-fragment assembly Hot Fusion provides a highly efficient method for cloning DNA fragments containing inverted repeats for applications such as RNAi. The overall cloning efficiency is in the order of 90–95%. PMID:25551825

  18. Pirh2: an E3 ligase with central roles in the regulation of cell cycle, DNA damage response, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaby, Marie-jo; Hakem, Razqallah; Hakem, Anne

    2013-09-01

    Ubiquitylation is currently recognized as a major posttranslational modification that regulates diverse cellular processes. Pirh2 is a ubiquitin E3 ligase that regulates the turnover and functionality of several proteins involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, cell cycle checkpoints, and cell death. Here we review the role of Pirh2 as a regulator of the DNA damage response through the ubiquitylation of p53, Chk2, p73, and PolH. By ubiquitylating these proteins, Pirh2 regulates cell cycle checkpoints and cell death in response to DNA double-strand breaks or the formation of bulky DNA lesions. We also discuss how Pirh2 affects cell proliferation and differentiation in unstressed conditions through ubiquitylation and degradation of c-Myc, p63, and p27(kip1). Finally, we link these different functions of Pirh2 to its role as a tumor suppressor in mice and as a prognosis marker in various human cancer subtypes.

  19. Phosphorylation by PINK1 releases the UBL domain and initializes the conformational opening of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Caulfield

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in PINK1 or PARKIN are the most common causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease. Both gene products, the Ser/Thr kinase PINK1 and the E3 Ubiquitin ligase Parkin, functionally cooperate in a mitochondrial quality control pathway. Upon stress, PINK1 activates Parkin and enables its translocation to and ubiquitination of damaged mitochondria to facilitate their clearance from the cell. Though PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of Ser65 is an important initial step, the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of Parkin's enzymatic functions remain unclear. Using molecular modeling, we generated a complete structural model of human Parkin at all atom resolution. At steady state, the Ub ligase is maintained inactive in a closed, auto-inhibited conformation that results from intra-molecular interactions. Evidently, Parkin has to undergo major structural rearrangements in order to unleash its catalytic activity. As a spark, we have modeled PINK1-dependent Ser65 phosphorylation in silico and provide the first molecular dynamics simulation of Parkin conformations along a sequential unfolding pathway that could release its intertwined domains and enable its catalytic activity. We combined free (unbiased molecular dynamics simulation, Monte Carlo algorithms, and minimal-biasing methods with cell-based high content imaging and biochemical assays. Phosphorylation of Ser65 results in widening of a newly defined cleft and dissociation of the regulatory N-terminal UBL domain. This motion propagates through further opening conformations that allow binding of an Ub-loaded E2 co-enzyme. Subsequent spatial reorientation of the catalytic centers of both enzymes might facilitate the transfer of the Ub moiety to charge Parkin. Our structure-function study provides the basis to elucidate regulatory mechanisms and activity of the neuroprotective Parkin. This may open up new avenues for the development of small molecule Parkin

  20. HDAC7 Ubiquitination by the E3 Ligase CBX4 Is Involved in Contextual Fear Conditioning Memory Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xu; Sui, Wen-Hai; Wang, Shuai; Xu, Xu-Feng; Yuan, Rong-Rong; Chen, Xiao-Rong; Ma, Hui-Xian; Zhu, Ying-Xiao; Sun, Jin-Kai; Yi, Fan; Chen, Zhe-Yu; Wang, Yue

    2017-04-05

    Histone acetylation, an epigenetic modification, plays an important role in long-term memory formation. Recently, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors were demonstrated to promote memory formation, which raises the intriguing possibility that they may be used to rescue memory deficits. However, additional research is necessary to clarify the roles of individual HDACs in memory. In this study, we demonstrated that HDAC7, within the dorsal hippocampus of C57BL6J mice, had a late and persistent decrease after contextual fear conditioning (CFC) training (4-24 h), which was involved in long-term CFC memory formation. We also showed that HDAC7 decreased via ubiquitin-dependent degradation. CBX4 was one of the HDAC7 E3 ligases involved in this process. Nur77, as one of the target genes of HDAC7, increased 6-24 h after CFC training and, accordingly, modulated the formation of CFC memory. Finally, HDAC7 was involved in the formation of other hippocampal-dependent memories, including the Morris water maze and object location test. The current findings facilitate an understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of HDAC7 in the regulation of hippocampal-dependent memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current findings demonstrated the effects of histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) on hippocampal-dependent memories. Moreover, we determined the mechanism of decreased HDAC7 in contextual fear conditioning (CFC) through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. We also verified that CBX4 was one of the HDAC7 E3 ligases. Finally, we demonstrated that Nur77, as one of the important targets for HDAC7, was involved in CFC memory formation. All of these proteins, including HDAC7, CBX4, and Nur77, could be potential therapeutic targets for preventing memory deficits in aging and neurological diseases. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/373848-16$15.00/0.

  1. Toponomics analysis of functional interactions of the ubiquitin ligase PAM (Protein Associated with Myc) during spinal nociceptive processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Sandra; Maeurer, Christian; Coste, Ovidiu; Becker, Wiebke; Schmidtko, Achim; Holland, Sabrina; Wittpoth, Claus; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2008-12-01

    Protein associated with Myc (PAM) is a giant E3 ubiquitin ligase of 510 kDa. Although the role of PAM during neuronal development is well established, very little is known about its function in the regulation of synaptic strength. Here we used multiepitope ligand cartography (MELC) to study protein network profiles associated with PAM during the modulation of synaptic strength. MELC is a novel imaging technology that utilizes biomathematical tools to describe protein networks after consecutive immunohistochemical visualization of up to 100 proteins on the same sample. As an in vivo model to modulate synaptic strength we used the formalin test, a common model for acute and inflammatory pain. MELC analysis was performed with 37 different antibodies or fluorescence tags on spinal cord slices and led to the identification of 1390 PAM-related motifs that distinguish untreated and formalin-treated spinal cords. The majority of these motifs related to ubiquitin-dependent processes and/or the actin cytoskeleton. We detected an intermittent colocalization of PAM and ubiquitin with TSC2, a known substrate of PAM, and the glutamate receptors mGluR5 and GLUR1. Importantly these complexes were detected exclusively in the presence of F-actin. A direct PAM/F-actin interaction was confirmed by colocalization and cosedimentation. The binding of PAM toward F-actin varied strongly between the PAM splice forms found in rat spinal cords. PAM did not ubiquitylate actin or alter actin polymerization and depolymerization. However, F-actin decreased the ubiquitin ligase activity of purified PAM. Because PAM activation is known to involve its translocation, the binding of PAM to F-actin may serve to control its subcellular localization as well as its activity. Taken together we show that defining protein network profiles by topological proteomics analysis is a useful tool to identify previously unknown protein/protein interactions that underlie synaptic processes.

  2. Essential medicines: An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rituparna Maiti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of defining essential medicines and establishing a list of them was aimed to improve the availability of affordable medicines for the world′s poor. Access to essential medicines is a major determinant of health outcomes. Several countries have made substantial progress towards increasing access to essential medicines, but access to essential medicines in developing countries like India is not adequate. In this review we have tried to present the Indian scenario in respect to availability and accessibility of essential medicines over last one decade. To enhance the credibility of Indian healthcare system, procurement and delivery systems of essential medicines have to be strengthened through government commitment, careful selection, adequate public sector financing, efficient distribution systems, control on taxes and duties, and inculcating a culture of rational use of medicines in current and future prescribers.

  3. Essential oils and anxiolytic aromatherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setzer, William N

    2009-09-01

    A number of essential oils are currently in use as aromatherapy agents to relieve anxiety, stress, and depression. Popular anxiolytic oils include lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), rose (Rosa damascena), orange (Citrus sinensis), bergamot (Citrus aurantium), lemon (Citrus limon), sandalwood (Santalum album), clary sage (Salvia sclarea), Roman chamomile (Anthemis nobilis), and rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium spp.). This review discusses the chemical constituents and CNS effects of these aromatherapeutic essential oils, as well as recent studies on additional essential oils with anxiolytic activities.

  4. Levels of Essential and Non-Essential Elements in Commercially ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enebi Jasper

    and quantify the essential and non-essential elements as well as to determine heavy metal accumulation in the herbs tissues of the commercial moringa herb teas as a consequence of environmental pollution. For this reason all elements laying between sodium. (Na) to uranium (U) were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence.

  5. Essentialism, hybridism and cultural critique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frello, Birgitta

    2007-01-01

    In my paper, I suggest that we sharpen our attention towards the complexities of the work of power in transgressions as well as in constructions of essentialist identities. Criticising essentialism is vital for fighting group-based exclusionism. However, criticising essentialism and celebrating h...

  6. Systematic analysis of essential genes reveals important regulators of G protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappell, Steven D; Baker, Rachael; Skowyra, Dorota; Dohlman, Henrik G

    2010-06-11

    The yeast pheromone pathway consists of a canonical heterotrimeric G protein and MAP kinase cascade. To identify additional signaling components, we systematically evaluated 870 essential genes using a library of repressible-promoter strains. Quantitative transcription-reporter and MAPK activity assays were used to identify strains that exhibit altered pheromone sensitivity. Of the 92 newly identified essential genes required for proper G protein signaling, those involved with protein degradation were most highly represented. Included in this group are members of the Skp, Cullin, F box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex. Further genetic and biochemical analysis reveals that SCF(Cdc4) acts together with the Cdc34 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme at the level of the G protein; promotes degradation of the G protein alpha subunit, Gpa1, in vivo; and catalyzes Gpa1 ubiquitination in vitro. These insights to the G protein signaling network reveal the essential genome as an untapped resource for identifying new components and regulators of signal transduction pathways. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The essential function of the Trypanosoma brucei Trl1 homolog in procyclic cells is maturation of the intron-containing tRNATyr

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lopes, R.R.S.; Silveira, G. de O.; Eitler, R.; Vidal, R.S.; Kessler, A.; Hinger, S.; Paris, Zdeněk; Alfonzo, J. D.; Polycarpo, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 8 (2016), s. 1190-1199 ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-21450Y Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma * tRNA * tRNA editing * splicing * intron Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.605, year: 2016

  8. Neuroimaging essentials in essential tremor: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Sarvi; Nederveen, Aart J; Booij, Jan; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Essential tremor is regarded to be a disease of the central nervous system. Neuroimaging is a rapidly growing field with potential benefits to both diagnostics and research. The exact role of imaging techniques with respect to essential tremor in research and clinical practice is not clear. A systematic review of the different imaging techniques in essential tremor is lacking in the literature. We performed a systematic literature search combining the terms essential tremor and familial tremor with the following keywords: imaging, mri, vbm, dwi, fmri, pet and spect, both in abbreviated form as well as in full form. We summarize and discuss the quality and the external validity of each study and place the results in the context of existing knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of essential tremor. A total of 48 neuroimaging studies met our search criteria, roughly divided into 19 structural and 29 functional and metabolic studies. The quality of the studies varied, especially concerning inclusion criteria. Functional imaging studies indicated cerebellar hyperactivity during rest and during tremor. The studies also pointed to the involvement of the thalamus, the inferior olive and the red nucleus. Structural studies showed less consistent results. Neuroimaging techniques in essential tremor give insight into the pathophysiology of essential tremor indicating the involvement of the cerebellum as the most consistent finding. GABAergic dysfunction might be a major premise in the pathophysiological hypotheses. Inconsistencies between studies can be partly explained by the inclusion of heterogeneous patient groups. Improvement of scientific research requires more stringent inclusion criteria and application of advanced analysis techniques. Also, the use of multimodal neuroimaging techniques is a promising development in movement disorders research. Currently, the role of imaging techniques in essential tremor in daily clinical practice is limited.

  9. Characterization equipment essential drawing plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILSON, G.W.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to list the Characterization equipment drawings that are classified as Essential Drawings. Essential Drawings: Are those drawings identified by the facility staff as necessary to directly support the safe operation of the facility or equipment (HNF 1997a). The Characterization equipment drawings identified in this report are deemed essential drawings as defined in HNF-PRO-242, Engineering Drawing Requirements (HNF 1997a). These drawings will be prepared, revised, and maintained per HNF-PRO-440, Engineering Document Change Control (HNF 1997b). All other Characterization equipment drawings not identified in this document will be considered Support drawings until the Characterization Equipment Drawing Evaluation Report is completed

  10. Differential Editosome Protein Function between Life Cycle Stages of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Suzanne M; Guo, Xuemin; Carnes, Jason; Stuart, Kenneth

    2015-10-09

    Uridine insertion and deletion RNA editing generates functional mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei. The mRNAs are differentially edited in bloodstream form (BF) and procyclic form (PF) life cycle stages, and this correlates with the differential utilization of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation between the stages. The mechanism that controls this differential editing is unknown. Editing is catalyzed by multiprotein ∼20S editosomes that contain endonuclease, 3'-terminal uridylyltransferase, exonuclease, and ligase activities. These editosomes also contain KREPB5 and KREPA3 proteins, which have no functional catalytic motifs, but they are essential for parasite viability, editing, and editosome integrity in BF cells. We show here that repression of KREPB5 or KREPA3 is also lethal in PF, but the effects on editosome structure differ from those in BF. In addition, we found that point mutations in KREPB5 or KREPA3 differentially affect cell growth, editosome integrity, and RNA editing between BF and PF stages. These results indicate that the functions of KREPB5 and KREPA3 editosome proteins are adjusted between the life cycle stages. This implies that these proteins are involved in the processes that control differential editing and that the 20S editosomes differ between the life cycle stages. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. An Ethnic-Specific Polymorphism in the Catalytic Subunit of Glutamate-Cysteine Ligase Impairs the Production of Glutathione Intermediates In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Truc M.; Willis, Alecia S.; Barr, Frederick E.; Cunningham, Gary R.; Canter, Jeffrey A.; Owens, Sarah E.; Apple, Rachel K.; Ayodo, George; Reich, David; Summar, Marshall L.

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays a crucial role in free radical scavenging, oxidative injury, and cellular homeostasis. Previously, we identified a non-synonymous polymorphism (P462S) in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC), the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis. This polymorphism is present only in individuals of African descent. Presently, we report that this ethnic-specific polymorphism (462S) encodes an enzyme with significantly decreased in vitro ac...

  12. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 D1 (Ube2D1) mediates lysine-independent ubiquitination of the E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Bandola-Simon, Joanna; Roche, Paul A

    2018-02-01

    March-I is a membrane-bound E3 ubiquitin ligase belonging to the membrane-associated RING-CH (March) family. March-I ubiquitinates and down-regulates expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and cluster of differentiation 86 (CD86) in antigen presenting cells. March-I expression is regulated both transcriptionally and post-translationally and it has been reported that the March-I is ubiquitinated and that this ubiquitination contributes to March-I turnover. However, the molecular mechanism regulating March-I ubiquitination and the importance of March-I's E3 ligase activity for March-I ubiquitination are not fully understood. Here we confirmed that although March-I is ubiquitinated, it is not ubiquitinated on a lysine residue as a lysine-less March-I variant was ubiquitinated similarly to wild-type March-I. We found that March-I E3 ligase activity is not required for its ubiquitination and does not regulate March-I protein expression, suggesting that March-I does not undergo autoubiquitination. Knocking down ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 D1 (Ube2D1) impaired March-I ubiquitination, increased March-I expression, and enhanced March-I-dependent downregulation of MHC class II proteins. Taken together, our results suggest that March-I undergoes lysine-independent ubiquitination by an as yet unidentified E3 ubiquitin ligase that together with Ube2D1 regulates March-I expression. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Genome mining reveals high incidence of putative lipopeptide biosynthesis NRPS/PKS clusters containing fatty acyl-AMP ligase genes inbiofilm-forming cyanobacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galica, Tomáš; Hrouzek, Pavel; Mareš, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 5 (2017), s. 985-998 ISSN 0022-3646 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09381S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/19.0392 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : cyanobacteria * fatty-acyl AMP ligase * genome mining Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.608, year: 2016

  14. The E3 Ligase APC/C-Cdh1 Is Required for Associative Fear Memory and Long-Term Potentiation in the Amygdala of Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Joseph E.; Malumbres, Marcos; Klann, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an E3 ligase regulated by Cdh1. Beyond its role in controlling cell cycle progression, APC/C-Cdh1 has been detected in neurons and plays a role in long-lasting synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. Herein, we further examined the role of Cdh1 in synaptic plasticity and memory by generating…

  15. Aromatherapy and Essential Oils (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Aromatherapy and Essential Oils (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go ... FDA) (see Question 6 ). Questions and Answers About Aromatherapy What is aromatherapy? Aromatherapy is the use of ...

  16. A putative RNA editing from U to C in a mouse mitochondrial transcript

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Jaime; Müller, Ilse; Arredondo, Jacob; Pinto, Rodrigo; Burzio, Luis O.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we isolated and characterized a new mouse mitochondrial RNA molecule containing the mitochondrial 16S RNA plus 121 nt joined to the 5′ end of the RNA. This fragment arises from the L strand of the same gene and we have named this transcript chimeric RNA. At position 121 of the RNA there is a C, which, according to the sequence of the mitochondrial 16S RNA gene, should be a U. We hypothesized that this RNA is synthesized having a U at position 121, which is later substituted to a C by a putative editing reaction. Based on the presence of sites for the restriction endonucleases RsaI and Fnu4HI around position 121, both forms of the RNA were detected in mouse tissues. To confirm the presence of the non-edited and putative edited RNA, a fragment containing the first 154 nt of the RNA was amplified by RT–PCR and cloned. The substitution of U for C was demonstrated by sequencing these clones. In vitro transcription experiments demonstrated that the substitution of U for C is not due to artifact of amplification or cloning. Moreover, in mitochondria from testis only the non-edited form was found. This, together with other experimental evidence, demonstrated that the base substitution was not due to polymorphism of the mitochondrial 16S RNA gene. This is the first demonstration of a substitution reaction from U to C in a mammalian mitochondrial transcript. PMID:11972325

  17. Activity-regulated RNA editing in select neuronal subfields in hippocampus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balík, Aleš; Penn, A.C.; Nemoda, Z.; Greger, I. H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 2 (2013), s. 1124-1134 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M200110971; Medical Research Council(GB) U105174197 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : hippocampus * RNA * adenosine Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 8.808, year: 2013

  18. Regulation of Gene Expression by DNA Methylation and RNA Editing in Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiye

    . In this thesis, I first introduce my study of DNA methylation in a model mollusk, the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), and provide insight into the evolution of invertebrate CpG methylation. Then, I present and discuss the regulatory role of DNA methylation in reproductive division of labor in naked mole rat...

  19. Trypanosome RNA editing: the complexity of getting U in and taking U out

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Read, L. K.; Lukeš, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2016), s. 33-51 ISSN 1757-7004 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21974S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 289007 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : messenger RNA * guide RNA * mitochondria Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.838, year: 2016

  20. Gene Loss and Error-Prone RNA Editing in the Mitochondrion of Perkinsela, an Endosymbiotic Kinetoplastid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    David, Vojtěch; Flegontov, P.; Gerasimov, E.; Tanifuji, G.; Hashimi, Hassan; Logacheva, M.D.; Maruyama, S.; Onodera, N. T.; Gray, M.W.; Archibald, J.M.; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 6 (2015), e01498-15 ISSN 2150-7511 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12104; GA ČR GAP305/12/2261 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304; European Commission(XE) 289007 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : kinetoplastid * protist * RNA-seq Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.975, year: 2015

  1. The E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 mediates cell migration signaling of EGFR in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Genbao; Wang, Ranran; Sun, Aiqin; Wei, Jing; Peng, Ke; Dai, Qian; Yang, Wannian; Lin, Qiong

    2018-02-19

    EGFR-dependent cell migration plays an important role in lung cancer progression. Our previous study observed that the HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 is significantly correlated with tumor metastasis and required for migration and invasion signaling of EGFR in gastric cancer cells. However, how NEDD4 promotes the EGFR-dependent lung cancer cell migration is unknown. This study is to elucidate the mechanism by which NEDD4 mediates the EGFR lung cancer migration signaling. Lentiviral vector-loaded NEDD4 shRNA was used to deplete endogenous NEDD4 in lung cancer cell lines. Effects of the NEDD4 knockdown on the EGFR-dependent or independent lung cancer cell migration were determined using the wound-healing and transwell assays. Association of NEDD4 with activated EGFR was assayed by co-immunoprecipitation. Co-expression of NEDD4 with EGFR or PTEN was determined by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining in 63 lung adenocarcinoma tissue samples. Effects of NEDD4 ectopic expression or knockdown on PTEN ubiquitination and down-regulation, AKT activation and lysosomal secretion were examined using the GST-Uba pulldown assay, immunoblotting, immunofluorescent staining and a human cathepsin B ELISA assay respectively. The specific cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074Me was used for assessing the role of cathepsin B in lung cancer cell migration. Knockdown of NEDD4 significantly reduced EGF-stimulated cell migration in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assay found that NEDD4 is associated with EGFR complex upon EGF stimulation, and IHC staining indicates that NEDD4 is co-expressed with EGFR in lung adenocarcinoma tumor tissues, suggesting that NEDD4 might mediate lung cancer cell migration by interaction with the EGFR signaling complex. Interestingly, NEDD4 promotes the EGF-induced cathepsin B secretion, possibly through lysosomal exocytosis, as overexpression of the ligase-dead mutant of NEDD4 impedes lysosomal secretion, and knockdown of NEDD4

  2. The SOCS2 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Regulates Growth Hormone Receptor Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterlund, Mattias; Zadjali, Fahad; Persson, Torbjörn

    2011-01-01

    Growth Hormone is essential for the regulation of growth and the homeostatic control of intermediary metabolism. GH actions are mediated by the Growth Hormone Receptor; a member of the cytokine receptor super family that signals chiefly through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway. Target tissue responsiveness......, a phenotype that is dependent on endogenous GH secretion. SOCS2 is a GH-stimulated, STAT5b-regulated gene that acts in a negative feedback loop to downregulate GHR signalling. Since the biochemical basis for these actions is poorly understood, we studied the molecular function of SOCS2. We demonstrated...... of SOCS2 in in vitro experiments. We showed that SOCS2 regulates cellular GHR levels through direct ubiquitination and in a proteasomally dependent manner. We also confirmed the importance of the SOCS-box for the proper function of SOCS2. Finally, we identified two phosphotyrosine residues in the GHR...

  3. The Human IL-22 Receptor Is Regulated through the Action of the Novel E3 Ligase Subunit FBXW12, Which Functions as an Epithelial Growth Suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Franz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin- (IL- 22 signaling is protective in animal models of pneumonia and bacteremia by Klebsiella pneumoniae and mediates tissue recovery from influenza and Staph aureus infection. We recently described processing of mouse lung epithelial IL-22 receptor (IL-22R by ubiquitination on the intracellular C-terminal. To identify cellular factors that regulate human IL-22R, we screened receptor abundance while overexpressing constituents of the ubiquitin system and identify that IL-22R can be shuttled for degradation by multiple previously uncharacterized F-box protein E3 ligase subunits. We observe that in human cells IL-22R is destabilized by FBXW12. FBXW12 causes depletion of endogenous and plasmid-derived IL-22R in lung epithelia, binds the E3 ligase constituent Skp-1, and facilitates ubiquitination of IL-22R in vitro. FBXW12 knockdown with shRNA increases IL-22R abundance and STAT3 phosphorylation in response to IL-22 cytokine treatment. FBXW12 shRNA increases human epithelial cell growth and cell cycle progression with enhanced constitutive activity of map kinases JNK and ERK. These findings indicate that the heretofore-undescribed protein FBXW12 functions as an E3 ligase constituent to ubiquitinate and degrade IL-22R and that therapeutic FBXW12 inhibition may enhance IL-22 signaling and bolster mucosal host defense and infection containment.

  4. DNA synthesis and degradation in UV-irradiated toluene treated cells of E. coli K12: the role of polynucleotide ligase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strike, P.

    1977-01-01

    Toluene treated cells have been used to study the processes of DNA synthesis and DNA degradation in ultra-violet irradiated Escherichia coli K12. Synthesis and degradation are both shown to occur extensively if polynucleotide ligase is inhibited, and to occur to a much lesser extent if ligase activity is optimal. Extensive UV-induced DNA synthesis in toluene-treated cells requires ATP for the initial incision step, and DNA polymerase I. Extensive degradation also depends on the early ATP-dependent incision step, and the subsequent degradation shows a partial requirement for ATP. Curtailment of degradation by ligase requires DNA polymerase activity, but is not dependent upon DNA polymerase I. Apparently this process can be carried out with equal facility by either DNA polymerase II or polymerase III. These observations suggest that extensive DNA polymerase I-dependent repair synthesis and extensive DNA degradation are facets of two divergent pathways of excision repair, both of which depend upon the early uvrABC determined ATP-dependent incision step. (orig.) [de

  5. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  6. PARAQUAT TOLERANCE3 Is an E3 Ligase That Switches off Activated Oxidative Response by Targeting Histone-Modifying PROTEIN METHYLTRANSFERASE4b.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Luo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is unavoidable for aerobic organisms. When abiotic and biotic stresses are encountered, oxidative damage could occur in cells. To avoid this damage, defense mechanisms must be timely and efficiently modulated. While the response to oxidative stress has been extensively studied in plants, little is known about how the activated response is switched off when oxidative stress is diminished. By studying Arabidopsis mutant paraquat tolerance3, we identified the genetic locus PARAQUAT TOLERANCE3 (PQT3 as a major negative regulator of oxidative stress tolerance. PQT3, encoding an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is rapidly down-regulated by oxidative stress. PQT3 has E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in ubiquitination assay. Subsequently, we identified PRMT4b as a PQT3-interacting protein. By histone methylation, PRMT4b upregulates the expression of APX1 and GPX1, encoding two key enzymes against oxidative stress. On the other hand, PRMT4b is recognized by PQT3 for targeted degradation via 26S proteasome. Therefore, we have identified PQT3 as an E3 ligase that acts as a negative regulator of activated response to oxidative stress and found that histone modification by PRMT4b at APX1 and GPX1 loci plays an important role in oxidative stress tolerance.

  7. PARAQUAT TOLERANCE3 Is an E3 Ligase That Switches off Activated Oxidative Response by Targeting Histone-Modifying PROTEIN METHYLTRANSFERASE4b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jin; Zhao, Tao-Lan; Wang, Peng-Fei; Zhao, Ping-Xia; Xie, Qi; Cao, Xiao-Feng; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is unavoidable for aerobic organisms. When abiotic and biotic stresses are encountered, oxidative damage could occur in cells. To avoid this damage, defense mechanisms must be timely and efficiently modulated. While the response to oxidative stress has been extensively studied in plants, little is known about how the activated response is switched off when oxidative stress is diminished. By studying Arabidopsis mutant paraquat tolerance3, we identified the genetic locus PARAQUAT TOLERANCE3 (PQT3) as a major negative regulator of oxidative stress tolerance. PQT3, encoding an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is rapidly down-regulated by oxidative stress. PQT3 has E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in ubiquitination assay. Subsequently, we identified PRMT4b as a PQT3-interacting protein. By histone methylation, PRMT4b upregulates the expression of APX1 and GPX1, encoding two key enzymes against oxidative stress. On the other hand, PRMT4b is recognized by PQT3 for targeted degradation via 26S proteasome. Therefore, we have identified PQT3 as an E3 ligase that acts as a negative regulator of activated response to oxidative stress and found that histone modification by PRMT4b at APX1 and GPX1 loci plays an important role in oxidative stress tolerance. PMID:27676073

  8. Structural and kinetic analysis of the unnatural fusion protein 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase::stilbene synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yechun; Yi, Hankuil; Wang, Melissa; Yu, Oliver; Jez, Joseph M. (WU); (Danforth)

    2012-10-24

    To increase the biochemical efficiency of biosynthetic systems, metabolic engineers have explored different approaches for organizing enzymes, including the generation of unnatural fusion proteins. Previous work aimed at improving the biosynthesis of resveratrol, a stilbene associated a range of health-promoting activities, in yeast used an unnatural engineered fusion protein of Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase (At4CL1) and Vitis vinifera (grape) stilbene synthase (VvSTS) to increase resveratrol levels 15-fold relative to yeast expressing the individual enzymes. Here we present the crystallographic and biochemical analysis of the 4CL::STS fusion protein. Determination of the X-ray crystal structure of 4CL::STS provides the first molecular view of an artificial didomain adenylation/ketosynthase fusion protein. Comparison of the steady-state kinetic properties of At4CL1, VvSTS, and 4CL::STS demonstrates that the fusion protein improves catalytic efficiency of either reaction less than 3-fold. Structural and kinetic analysis suggests that colocalization of the two enzyme active sites within 70 {angstrom} of each other provides the basis for enhanced in vivo synthesis of resveratrol.

  9. Overexpressed ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 in breast cancer promotes cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hongsheng [Department of Histology and Embryology, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Wu, Fenping [The 7th People’s Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Wang, Yan [The Second School of Clinical Medicine, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Yan, Chong [School of Pharmacy, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Su, Wenmei, E-mail: wenmeisutg@126.com [Oncology of Affiliated Hospital Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524000, Guangdong (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Cullin7 is overexpressed in human breast cancer samples. • Cullin7 stimulated proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cells. • Inhibition of p53 contributes to Cullin7-induced proliferation and invasion. - Abstract: Ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 has been identified as an oncogene in some malignant diseases such as choriocarcinoma and neuroblastoma. However, the role of Cullin7 in breast cancer carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we compared Cullin7 protein levels in breast cancer tissues with normal breast tissues and identified significantly higher expression of Cullin7 protein in breast cancer specimens. By overexpressing Cullin7 in breast cancer cells HCC1937, we found that Cullin7 could promote cell growth and invasion in vitro. In contrast, the cell growth and invasion was inhibited by silencing Cullin7 in breast cancer cell BT474. Moreover, we demonstrated that Cullin7 promoted breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53 expression. Thus, our study provided evidence that Cullin7 functions as a novel oncogene in breast cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer management.

  10. The Sumo-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 regulates the localization and function of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryrear, Kimberly A.; Guo, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The Really Interesting New Gene (RING) Finger Protein 4 (RNF4) represents a class of ubiquitin ligases that target Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)–modified proteins for ubiquitin modification. To date, the regulatory function of RNF4 appears to be ubiquitin-mediated degradation of sumoylated cellular proteins. In the present study, we show that the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax is a substrate for RNF4 both in vivo and in vitro. We mapped the RNF4-binding site to a region adjacent to the Tax ubiquitin/SUMO modification sites K280/K284. Interestingly, RNF4 modification of Tax protein results in relocalization of the oncoprotein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of RNF4, but not the RNF4 RING mutant, resulted in cytoplasmic enrichment of Tax. The RNF4-induced nucleus-to-cytoplasm relocalization was associated with increased NF-κB–mediated and decreased cAMP Response Element-Binding (CREB)–mediated Tax activity. Finally, depletion of RNF4 by RNAi prevented the DNA damage–induced nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of Tax. These results provide important new insight into STUbL-mediated pathways that regulate the subcellular localization and functional dynamics of viral oncogenes. PMID:22106342

  11. Toll-Like Receptor-2 Ligand Peptidoglycan Upregulates Expression and Ubiquitin Ligase Activity of CHIP through JNK Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Meng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptidoglycan (PGN is a component of cell wall in Gram-positive bacteria that stimulates inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. The carboxyl terminus of constitutive heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70-interacting protein (CHIP, also known as Stub1 is a U-box-type E3 ubiquitin ligase, which plays an important role in protein quality control and inflammation through ubquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. However, it is unclear whether TLR2 agonist PGN regulates the expression and activation of CHIP. Methods/Results: In this study, we showed that PGN significantly up-regulated the expression of CHIP in both mRNA and protein levels in RAW264.7 cells in a time-dependant manner, and the expression of CHIP induced by PGN was abolished in TLR2 knockout macrophages. No significant change in CHIP was observed after lipopolysaccharide (LPS, TLR4 agonist and cytosine-phosphorous-guanine oligonucleotide (CpG ODN, TLR9 agonist treatment. Moreover, PGN markedly induced the expression and activity of CHIP in macrophages, whereas this effect was attenuated by SP600125, a selective inhibitor of JNK. Conclusion: Our study for the first time demonstrates that TLR2 activation enhances the expression and activity of CHIP through JNK signaling pathway.

  12. The Arabidopsis E3 Ubiquitin Ligase HOS1 Negatively Regulates CONSTANS Abundance in the Photoperiodic Control of Flowering[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaro, Ana; Valverde, Federico; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana early in short days6 (esd6) mutant was isolated in a screen for mutations that accelerate flowering time. Among other developmental alterations, esd6 displays early flowering in both long- and short-day conditions. Fine mapping of the mutation showed that the esd6 phenotype is caused by a lesion in the HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 (HOS1) locus, which encodes a RING finger–containing E3 ubiquitin ligase. The esd6/hos1 mutation causes decreased FLOWERING LOCUS C expression and requires CONSTANS (CO) protein for its early flowering phenotype under long days. Moreover, CO and HOS1 physically interact in vitro and in planta, and HOS1 regulates CO abundance, particularly during the daylight period. Accordingly, hos1 causes a shift in the regular long-day pattern of expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) transcript, starting to rise 4 h after dawn in the mutant. In addition, HOS1 interacts synergistically with CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1, another regulator of CO protein stability, in the regulation of flowering time. Taken together, these results indicate that HOS1 is involved in the control of CO abundance, ensuring that CO activation of FT occurs only when the light period reaches a certain length and preventing precocious flowering in Arabidopsis. PMID:22408073

  13. Vaccinia virus protein A49 activates Wnt signalling by targetting the E3 ligase β-TrCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes multiple proteins inhibiting the NF-κB signalling pathway. One of these, A49, targets the E3 ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP, which is responsible for the ubiquitylation and consequential proteosomal degradation of IκBα and the release of the NF-κB heterodimer. β-TrCP is a pleiotropic enzyme ubiquitylating multiple cellular substrates, including the transcriptional activator β-catenin. Here we demonstrate that A49 can activate the Wnt signalling pathway, a critical pathway that is involved in cell cycle and cell differentiation, and is controlled by β-catenin. The data presented show that the expression of A49 ectopically or during VACV infection causes accumulation of β-catenin, and that A49 triggering of Wnt signalling is dependent on binding β-TrCP. This is consistent with A49 blocking the ability of β-TrCP to recognise β-catenin and IκBα, and possibly other cellular targets. Thus, A49 targetting of β-TrCP affects multiple cellular pathways, including the NF-κB and Wnt signalling cascades. PMID:29058646

  14. Superior thermotolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient bioethanol fermentation can be achieved by overexpression of RSP5 ubiquitin ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavarani, Hosein; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Chuenchit, Boonchird; Harashima, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process requires thermo-tolerant yeast to facilitate the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. In this paper, we describe a Htg+ strain that exhibits confluent growth at high temperature (41 °C) and resistance to heat shock, ethanol, osmotic, oxidative and DNA damage stresses. HTG6, one of the six genes responsible for the thermotolerant phenotype was identified to be the gene RSP5 encoding a ubiquitin ligase. The RSP5 allele of the Htg+ strain, designated RSP5-C, possessed five, one and two base changes in the promoter, open reading frame and terminator region, respectively. The base changes in the promoter region of the RSP5-C allele were found to be responsible for the thermotolerant phenotype by strongly increasing transcription of the RSP5 gene and consequently causing a rise in the ubiquitination of cell proteins. Overexpression of the RSP5-BY allele present in the htg6 host strain (Htg-) conferred thermotolerance at 41°C, to this strain as in the case of RSP5-C allele. We also discovered that an Htg+ strain overexpressing the RSP5-C allele exhibits a more robust Htg+ phenotype against higher temperature (43 °C). The data presented here also suggest that overexpression of RSP5 could be applied to raise the upper limit of thermotolerance in S. cerevisiae strain used for industrial bioethanol production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pirh2 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Monoubiquitinates DNA Polymerase Eta To Suppress Translesion DNA Synthesis ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong-Sam; Hakem, Anne; Hakem, Razqallah; Chen, Xinbin

    2011-01-01

    Polymerase eta (PolH) is necessary for translesion DNA synthesis, and PolH deficiency predisposes xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) patients to cancer. Due to the critical role of PolH in translesion DNA synthesis, the activity of PolH is tightly controlled and subjected to multiple regulations, especially posttranslational modifications. Here, we show that PolH-dependent lesion bypass and intracellular translocation are regulated by Pirh2 E3 ubiquitin ligase through monoubiquitination. Specifically, we show that Pirh2, a target of the p53 tumor suppressor, monoubiquitinates PolH at one of multiple lysine residues. We also show that monoubiquitination of PolH inhibits the ability of PolH to interact with PCNA and to bypass UV-induced lesions, leading to decreased viability of UV-damaged cells. Moreover, we show that monoubiquitination of PolH alters the ability of PolH to translocate to replication foci for translesion DNA synthesis of UV-induced DNA lesions. Considering that Pirh2 is known to be overexpressed in various cancers, we postulate that in addition to mutation of PolH in XPV patients, inactivation of PolH by Pirh2 via monoubiquitination is one of the mechanisms by which PolH function is controlled, which might be responsible for the development and progression of some spontaneous tumors wherein PolH is not found to be mutated. PMID:21791603

  16. An Atypical SCF-like Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Promotes Wallerian Degeneration through Regulation of Axonal Nmnat2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Yamagishi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Axon degeneration is a tightly regulated, self-destructive program that is a critical feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular mechanisms regulating this program remain poorly understood. Here, we identify S-phase kinase-associated protein 1A (Skp1a, a core component of a Skp/Cullin/F-box (SCF-type E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, as a critical regulator of axon degeneration after injury in mammalian neurons. Depletion of Skp1a prolongs survival of injured axons in vitro and in the optic nerve in vivo. We demonstrate that Skp1a regulates the protein level of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ synthesizing enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (Nmnat2 in axons. Loss of axonal Nmnat2 contributes to a local ATP deficit that triggers axon degeneration. Knockdown of Skp1a elevates basal levels of axonal Nmnat2, thereby delaying axon degeneration through prolonged maintenance of axonal ATP. Consistent with Skp1a functioning through regulation of Nmnat2, Skp1a knockdown fails to protect axons from Nmnat2 knockdown. These results illuminate the molecular mechanism underlying Skp1a-dependent axonal destruction.

  17. The Hectd1 Ubiquitin Ligase is Required for Development of the Head Mesenchyme and Neural Tube Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohn, Irene E.; Anderson, Kathryn V.; Niswander, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Closure of the cranial neural tube depends on normal development of the head mesenchyme. Homozygous-mutant embryos for the ENU-induced open mind (opm) mutation exhibit exencephaly associated with defects in head mesenchyme development and dorsal-lateral hinge point formation. The head mesenchyme in opm mutant embryos is denser than in wildtype embryos and displays an abnormal cellular organization. Since cells that originate from both the cephalic paraxial mesoderm and the neural crest populate the head mesenchyme, we explored the origin of the abnormal head mesenchyme. opm mutant embryos show apparently normal development of neural crest-derived structures. Furthermore, the abnormal head mesenchyme in opm mutant embryos is not derived from the neural crest, but instead expresses molecular markers of cephalic mesoderm. We also report the identification of the opm mutation in the ubiquitously expressed Hectd1 E3 ubiquitin ligase. Two different Hectd1 alleles cause incompletely penetrant neural tube defects in heterozygous animals, indicating that Hectd1 function is required at a critical threshold for neural tube closure. This low penetrance of neural tube defects in embryos heterozygous for Hectd1 mutations suggests that Hectd1 should be considered as candidate susceptibility gene in human neural tube defects. PMID:17442300

  18. Transcription and RNA processing during expression of genes preceding DNA ligase gene 30 in T4-related bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truncaite, Lidija; Zajanckauskaite, Aurelija; Arlauskas, Aivaras; Nivinskas, Rimas

    2006-01-20

    Early gene expression in bacteriophage T4 is controlled primarily by the unique early promoters, while T4-encoded RegB endoribonuclease promotes degradation of many early messages contributing to the rapid shift of gene expression from the early to middle stages. The regulatory region for the genes clustered upstream of DNA ligase gene 30 of T4 was known to carry two strong early promoters and two putative RegB sites. Here, we present the comparative analysis of the regulatory events in this region of 16 T4-type bacteriophages. The regulatory elements for control of this gene cluster, such as rho-independent terminator, at least one early promoter, the sequence for stem-loop structure, and the RegB cleavage sites have been found to be conserved in the phages studied. Also, we present experimental evidence that the initial cleavage by RegB of phages TuIa and RB69 enables degradation of early phage mRNAs by the major Escherichia coli endoribonuclease, RNase E.

  19. Tetrahydroisoquinolines affect the whole-cell phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by inhibiting the ATP-dependent MurE ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Juan D; Pesnot, Thomas; Barrera, Diana A; Davies, Heledd M; McMahon, Eleanor; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Mortazavi, Parisa N; Munshi, Tulika; Maitra, Arundhati; Lamming, Eleanor D; Angell, Richard; Gershater, Markus C; Redmond, Joanna M; Needham, Deborah; Ward, John M; Cuca, Luis E; Hailes, Helen C; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    (S)-Leucoxine, isolated from the Colombian Lauraceae tree Rhodostemonodaphne crenaticupula Madriñan, was found to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. A biomimetic approach for the chemical synthesis of a wide array of 1-substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines was undertaken with the aim of elucidating a common pharmacophore for these compounds with novel mode(s) of anti-TB action. Biomimetic Pictet-Spengler or Bischler-Napieralski synthetic routes were employed followed by an evaluation of the biological activity of the synthesized compounds. In this work, the synthesized tetrahydroisoquinolines were found to inhibit the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and affect its whole-cell phenotype as well as the activity of the ATP-dependent MurE ligase, a key enzyme involved in the early stage of cell wall peptidoglycan biosynthesis. As the correlation between the MIC and the half-inhibitory enzymatic concentration was not particularly strong, there is a credible possibility that these compounds have pleiotropic mechanism(s) of action in M. tuberculosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  20. Structures of SPOP-Substrate Complexes: Insights into Molecular Architectures of BTB-Cul3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Min; Calabrese, Matthew F.; Liu, Jiang; Waddell, M. Brett; Nourse, Amanda; Hammel, Michal; Miller, Darcie J.; Walden, Helen; Duda, David M.; Seyedin, Steven N.; Hoggard, Timothy; Harper, J. Wade; White, Kevin P.; Schulman, Brenda A.; (Harvard-Med); (UW); (UC); (LBNL); (SJCH)

    2009-11-17

    In the largest E3 ligase subfamily, Cul3 binds a BTB domain, and an associated protein-interaction domain such as MATH recruits substrates for ubiquitination. Here, we present biochemical and structural analyses of the MATH-BTB protein, SPOP. We define a SPOP-binding consensus (SBC) and determine structures revealing recognition of SBCs from the phosphatase Puc, the transcriptional regulator Ci, and the chromatin component MacroH2A. We identify a dimeric SPOP-Cul3 assembly involving a conserved helical structure C-terminal of BTB domains, which we call '3-box' due to its facilitating Cul3 binding and its resemblance to F-/SOCS-boxes in other cullin-based E3s. Structural flexibility between the substrate-binding MATH and Cul3-binding BTB/3-box domains potentially allows a SPOP dimer to engage multiple SBCs found within a single substrate, such as Puc. These studies provide a molecular understanding of how MATH-BTB proteins recruit substrates to Cul3 and how their dimerization and conformational variability may facilitate avid interactions with diverse substrates.

  1. Role of the ubiquitin ligase E6AP/UBE3A in controlling levels of the synaptic protein Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnle, Simone; Mothes, Benedikt; Matentzoglu, Konstantin; Scheffner, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of the ubiquitin ligase E6 associated protein (E6AP) encoded by the UBE3A gene has been associated with development of the Angelman syndrome. Recently, it was reported that in mice, loss of E6AP expression results in increased levels of the synaptic protein Arc and a concomitant impaired synaptic function, providing an explanation for some phenotypic features of Angelman syndrome patients. Accordingly, E6AP has been shown to negatively regulate activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) and it has been suggested that E6AP targets Arc for ubiquitination and degradation. In our study, we provide evidence that Arc is not a direct substrate for E6AP and binds only weakly to E6AP, if at all. Furthermore, we show that down-regulation of E6AP expression stimulates estradiol-induced transcription of the Arc gene. Thus, we propose that Arc protein levels are controlled by E6AP at the transcriptional rather than at the posttranslational level. PMID:23671107

  2. CRL2(LRR-1 E3-ligase regulates proliferation and progression through meiosis in the Caenorhabditis elegans germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Burger

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteolytic system controls the stability of proteins in space and time. In this study, using a temperature-sensitive mutant allele of the cul-2 gene, we show that CRL2(LRR-1 (CUL-2 RING E3 ubiquitin-ligase and the Leucine Rich Repeat 1 substrate recognition subunit acts at multiple levels to control germline development. CRL2(LRR-1 promotes germ cell proliferation by counteracting the DNA replication ATL-1 checkpoint pathway. CRL2(LRR-1 also participates in the mitotic proliferation/meiotic entry decision, presumably controlling the stability of meiotic promoting factors in the mitotic zone of the germline. Finally, CRL2(LRR-1 inhibits the first steps of meiotic prophase by targeting in mitotic germ cells degradation of the HORMA domain-containing protein HTP-3, required for loading synaptonemal complex components onto meiotic chromosomes. Given its widespread evolutionary conservation, CUL-2 may similarly regulate germline development in other organisms as well.

  3. Overexpressed ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 in breast cancer promotes cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hongsheng; Wu, Fenping; Wang, Yan; Yan, Chong; Su, Wenmei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cullin7 is overexpressed in human breast cancer samples. • Cullin7 stimulated proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cells. • Inhibition of p53 contributes to Cullin7-induced proliferation and invasion. - Abstract: Ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 has been identified as an oncogene in some malignant diseases such as choriocarcinoma and neuroblastoma. However, the role of Cullin7 in breast cancer carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we compared Cullin7 protein levels in breast cancer tissues with normal breast tissues and identified significantly higher expression of Cullin7 protein in breast cancer specimens. By overexpressing Cullin7 in breast cancer cells HCC1937, we found that Cullin7 could promote cell growth and invasion in vitro. In contrast, the cell growth and invasion was inhibited by silencing Cullin7 in breast cancer cell BT474. Moreover, we demonstrated that Cullin7 promoted breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53 expression. Thus, our study provided evidence that Cullin7 functions as a novel oncogene in breast cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer management

  4. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Idol controls brain LDL receptor expression, ApoE clearance, and Aβ amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinkuk; Gao, Jie; Kim, Jaekwang; Hong, Cynthia; Kim, Jungsu; Tontonoz, Peter

    2015-11-18

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is an important modifier of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, and its abundance has been linked to the clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain. The pathways that control the clearance of ApoE in the brain are incompletely understood. We report that Idol, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) for degradation, is a critical determinant of brain ApoE metabolism and Aβ plaque biogenesis. Previous work has shown that Idol contributes minimally to the regulation of hepatic LDLR expression in mice. By contrast, we demonstrate that Idol is a primary physiological regulator of LDLR protein in the brain, controlling the clearance of both ApoE-containing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles and Aβ. We studied the consequences of loss of Idol expression in a transgenic mouse model of Aβ amyloidosis. Idol deficiency increased brain LDLR, decreased ApoE, decreased soluble and insoluble Aβ, reduced amyloid plaque burden, and ameliorated neuroinflammation. These findings identify Idol as a gatekeeper of LDLR-dependent ApoE and Aβ clearance in the brain and a potential enzyme target for therapeutic intervention in AD. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. The E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL regulates synaptic ApoER2 levels and is important for plasticity and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Marosi, Mate; Choi, Jinkuk; Achiro, Jennifer M; Kim, Sangmok; Li, Sandy; Otis, Klara; Martin, Kelsey C; Portera-Cailliau, Carlos; Tontonoz, Peter

    2017-09-11

    Neuronal ApoE receptors are linked to learning and memory, but the pathways governing their abundance, and the mechanisms by which they affect the function of neural circuits are incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate that the E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL determines synaptic ApoER2 protein levels in response to neuronal activation and regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis and plasticity. IDOL-dependent changes in ApoER2 abundance modulate dendritic filopodia initiation and synapse maturation. Loss of IDOL in neurons results in constitutive overexpression of ApoER2 and is associated with impaired activity-dependent structural remodeling of spines and defective LTP in primary neuron cultures and hippocampal slices. IDOL-deficient mice show profound impairment in experience-dependent reorganization of synaptic circuits in the barrel cortex, as well as diminished spatial and associative learning. These results identify control of lipoprotein receptor abundance by IDOL as a post-transcriptional mechanism underlying the structural and functional plasticity of synapses and neural circuits.

  6. Transcriptional effects of E3 ligase atrogin-1/MAFbx on apoptosis, hypertrophy and inflammation in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yong; Li, Junjie; Wang, Hong-Xia; Guo, Shu-Bin; Yang, Hui; Zeng, Xiang-Jun; Fang, Quan; Tang, Chao-Shu; Du, Jie; Li, Hui-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Atrogin-1/MAFbx is an ubiquitin E3 ligase that regulates myocardial structure and function through the ubiquitin-dependent protein modification. However, little is known about the effect of atrogin-1 activation on the gene expression changes in cardiomyocytes. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were infected with adenovirus atrogin-1 (Ad-atrogin-1) or GFP control (Ad-GFP) for 24 hours. The gene expression profiles were compared with microarray analysis. 314 genes were identified as differentially expressed by overexpression of atrogin-1, of which 222 were up-regulated and 92 were down-regulated. Atrogin-1 overexpression significantly modulated the expression of genes in 30 main functional categories, most genes clustered around the regulation of cell death, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism and cardiomyoctye structure and function. Moreover, overexpression of atrogin-1 significantly inhibited cardiomyocyte survival, hypertrophy and inflammation under basal condition or in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, knockdown of atrogin-1 by siRNA had opposite effects. The mechanisms underlying these effects were associated with inhibition of MAPK (ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38) and NF-κB signaling pathways. In conclusion, the present microarray analysis reveals previously unappreciated atrogin-1 regulation of genes that could contribute to the effects of atrogin-1 on cardiomyocyte survival, hypertrophy and inflammation in response to endotoxin, and may provide novel insight into how atrogin-1 modulates the programming of cardiac muscle gene expression.

  7. Mass spectrometric and mutational analyses reveal Lys-6-linked polyubiquitin chains catalyzed by BRCA1-BARD1 ubiquitin ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Ooka, Seido; Sato, Ko; Arima, Kei; Okamoto, Joji; Klevit, Rachel E; Fukuda, Mamoru; Ohta, Tomohiko

    2004-02-06

    The breast and ovarian cancer suppressor BRCA1 acquires significant ubiquitin ligase activity when bound to BARD1 as a RING heterodimer. Although the activity may well be important for the role of BRCA1 as a tumor suppressor, the biochemical consequence of the activity is not yet known. Here we report that BRCA1-BARD1 catalyzes Lys-6-linked polyubiquitin chain formation. K6R mutation of ubiquitin dramatically reduces the polyubiquitin products mediated by BRCA1-BARD1 in vitro. BRCA1-BARD1 preferentially utilizes ubiquitin with a single Lys residue at Lys-6 or Lys-29 to mediate autoubiquitination of BRCA1 in vivo. Furthermore, mass spectrometry analysis identified the Lys-6-linked branched ubiquitin fragment from the polyubiquitin chain produced by BRCA1-BARD1 using wild type ubiquitin. The BRCA1-BARD1-mediated Lys-6-linked polyubiquitin chains are deubiquitinated by 26 S proteasome in vitro, whereas autoubiquitinated CUL1 through Lys-48-linked polyubiquitin chains is degraded. Proteasome inhibitors do not alter the steady state level of the autoubiquitinated BRCA1 in vivo. Hence, the results indicate that BRCA1-BARD1 mediates novel polyubiquitin chains that may be distinctly edited by 26 S proteasome from conventional Lys-48-linked polyubiquitin chains.

  8. The Steroidogenic Enzyme AKR1C3 Regulates Stability of the Ubiquitin Ligase Siah2 in Prostate Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lingling; Peng, Guihong; Hussain, Arif; Fazli, Ladan; Guns, Emma; Gleave, Martin; Qi, Jianfei

    2015-01-01

    Re-activation of androgen receptor (AR) activity is the main driver for development of castration-resistant prostate cancer. We previously reported that the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 enhanced AR transcriptional activity and prostate cancer cell growth. Among the genes we found to be regulated by Siah2 was AKR1C3, which encodes a key androgen biosynthetic enzyme implicated in castration-resistant prostate cancer development. Here, we found that Siah2 inhibition in CWR22Rv1 prostate cancer cells decreased AKR1C3 expression as well as intracellular androgen levels, concomitant with inhibition of cell growth in vitro and in orthotopic prostate tumors. Re-expression of either wild-type or catalytically inactive forms of AKR1C3 partially rescued AR activity and growth defects in Siah2 knockdown cells, suggesting a nonenzymatic role for AKR1C3 in these outcomes. Unexpectedly, AKR1C3 re-expression in Siah2 knockdown cells elevated Siah2 protein levels, whereas AKR1C3 knockdown had the opposite effect. We further found that AKR1C3 can bind Siah2 and inhibit its self-ubiquitination and degradation, thereby increasing Siah2 protein levels. We observed parallel expression of Siah2 and AKR1C3 in human prostate cancer tissues. Collectively, our findings identify a new role for AKR1C3 in regulating Siah2 stability and thus enhancing Siah2-dependent regulation of AR activity in prostate cancer cells. PMID:26160177

  9. CONCENTRATION LEVELS OF ESSENTIAL AND NON-ESSENTIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    non-essential elements (K, Mg, Ca, Na, Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Cr, Co, Ni, Cd, and Pb) in the export quality Ethiopian red and white wines (Axumite red wine, Gouder red wine, Awash Crystal white wine, and Kemila white wine), (ii) compare the levels of minerals among the four brands of wines, and (iii) compare the levels of ...

  10. Levels of essential and non-essential elements in commercially ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus of this study was to assess the quality of commercially packaged moringa tea brands available in the retail markets in Nigerian cities on the basis of the essential and nonessential elemental content in their tissues. Four different brands of moringa tea comprising two locally processed teas and two imported teas ...

  11. Theological Compatibilism and Essential Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Ciprotti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Alvin Plantinga defends Theological Compatibilism (TC and Essentialism about property possession (E. TC is the claim that human freedom to act otherwise and God's essential omniscience are compatible, while E is the claim that every individual entity whatsoever has a modal profile consisting in having both essential and accidental properties. I purport to show that, if E is assumed in the argument for TC, then the latter leads to a very puzzling upshot. I also intend to show that, even if TC is suitably fixed in order to avoid that upshot, TC is still unconvincing in that it merges into one the de re and the de dicto rendering of 'human freedom to act otherwise'; I end up by briefly sketching why the two renderings should instead be kept well apart.

  12. Essential Medicines in a High Income Country: Essential to Whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Mai; Moles, Rebekah J; Chaar, Betty; Chen, Timothy F

    2015-01-01

    To explore the perspectives of a diverse group of stakeholders engaged in medicines decision making around what constitutes an "essential" medicine, and how the Essential Medicines List (EML) concept functions in a high income country context. In-depth qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 Australian stakeholders, recognised as decision makers, leaders or advisors in the area of medicines reimbursement or supply chain management. Participants were recruited from government, pharmaceutical industry, pharmaceutical wholesale/distribution companies, medicines non-profit organisations, academic health disciplines, hospitals, and consumer groups. Perspectives on the definition and application of the EML concept in a high income country context were thematically analysed using grounded theory approach. Stakeholders found it challenging to describe the EML concept in the Australian context because many perceived it was generally used in resource scarce settings. Stakeholders were unable to distinguish whether nationally reimbursed medicines were essential medicines in Australia. Despite frequent generic drug shortages and high prices paid by consumers, many struggled to describe how the EML concept applied to Australia. Instead, broad inclusion of consumer needs, such as rare and high cost medicines, and consumer involvement in the decision making process, has led to expansive lists of nationally subsidised medicines. Therefore, improved communication and coordination is needed around shared interests between stakeholders regarding how medicines are prioritised and guaranteed in the supply chain. This study showed that decision-making in Australia around reimbursement of medicines has strayed from the fundamental utilitarian concept of essential medicines. Many stakeholders involved in medicine reimbursement decisions and management of the supply chain did not consider the EML concept in their approach. The wide range of views of what stakeholders

  13. Essential Medicines in a High Income Country: Essential to Whom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Duong

    Full Text Available To explore the perspectives of a diverse group of stakeholders engaged in medicines decision making around what constitutes an "essential" medicine, and how the Essential Medicines List (EML concept functions in a high income country context.In-depth qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 Australian stakeholders, recognised as decision makers, leaders or advisors in the area of medicines reimbursement or supply chain management. Participants were recruited from government, pharmaceutical industry, pharmaceutical wholesale/distribution companies, medicines non-profit organisations, academic health disciplines, hospitals, and consumer groups. Perspectives on the definition and application of the EML concept in a high income country context were thematically analysed using grounded theory approach.Stakeholders found it challenging to describe the EML concept in the Australian context because many perceived it was generally used in resource scarce settings. Stakeholders were unable to distinguish whether nationally reimbursed medicines were essential medicines in Australia. Despite frequent generic drug shortages and high prices paid by consumers, many struggled to describe how the EML concept applied to Australia. Instead, broad inclusion of consumer needs, such as rare and high cost medicines, and consumer involvement in the decision making process, has led to expansive lists of nationally subsidised medicines. Therefore, improved communication and coordination is needed around shared interests between stakeholders regarding how medicines are prioritised and guaranteed in the supply chain.This study showed that decision-making in Australia around reimbursement of medicines has strayed from the fundamental utilitarian concept of essential medicines. Many stakeholders involved in medicine reimbursement decisions and management of the supply chain did not consider the EML concept in their approach. The wide range of views of

  14. Analgesic Potential of Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ferreira Sarmento-Neto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pain is an unpleasant sensation associated with a wide range of injuries and diseases, and affects approximately 20% of adults in the world. The discovery of new and more effective drugs that can relieve pain is an important research goal in both the pharmaceutical industry and academia. This review describes studies involving antinociceptive activity of essential oils from 31 plant species. Botanical aspects of aromatic plants, mechanisms of action in pain models and chemical composition profiles of the essential oils are discussed. The data obtained in these studies demonstrate the analgesic potential of this group of natural products for therapeutic purposes.

  15. Tank farms essential drawing plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domnoske-Rauch, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to define criteria for selecting Essential Drawings, Support Drawings, and Controlled Print File (CPF) drawings and documents for facilities that are part of East and West Tank Farms. Also, the drawings and documents that meet the criteria are compiled separate listings. The Essential Drawing list and the Support Drawing list establish a priority for updating technical baseline drawings. The CPF drawings, denoted by an asterisk (*), defined the drawings and documents that Operations is required to maintain per the TWRS Administration Manual. The Routing Boards in Buildings 272-WA and 272-AW are not part of the CPF

  16. Establishment of a Wheat Cell-Free Synthesized Protein Array Containing 250 Human and Mouse E3 Ubiquitin Ligases to Identify Novel Interaction between E3 Ligases and Substrate Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Takahashi

    Full Text Available Ubiquitination is a key post-translational modification in the regulation of numerous biological processes in eukaryotes. The primary roles of ubiquitination are thought to be the triggering of protein degradation and the regulation of signal transduction. During protein ubiquitination, substrate specificity is mainly determined by E3 ubiquitin ligase (E3. Although more than 600 genes in the human genome encode E3, the E3s of many target proteins remain unidentified owing to E3 diversity and the instability of ubiquitinated proteins in cell. We demonstrate herein a novel biochemical analysis for the identification of E3s targeting specific proteins. Using wheat cell-free protein synthesis system, a protein array containing 227 human and 23 mouse recombinant E3s was synthesized. To establish the high-throughput binding assay using AlphaScreen technology, we selected MDM2 and p53 as the model combination of E3 and its target protein. The AlphaScreen assay specifically detected the binding of p53 and MDM2 in a crude translation mixture. Then, a comprehensive binding assay using the E3 protein array was performed. Eleven of the E3s showed high binding activity, including four previously reported E3s (e.g., MDM2, MDM4, and WWP1 targeting p53. This result demonstrated the reliability of the assay. Another interactors, RNF6 and DZIP3-which there have been no report to bind p53-were found to ubiquitinate p53 in vitro. Further analysis showed that RNF6 decreased the amount of p53 in H1299 cells in E3 activity-dependent manner. These results suggest the possibility that the RNF6 ubiquitinates and degrades p53 in cells. The novel in vitro screening system established herein is a powerful tool for finding novel E3s of a target protein.

  17. Essential oils in broiler nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Kyung-woo

    2002-01-01

    Dietary antibiotics at low, subtherapeutic levels have been shown to improve growth performance in farm animals. However, there is a trend to look for alternatives to dietary antibiotics, due to occurrence of antibiotic-resistance bacteria. The present thesis explored the essential oils as the

  18. Essentialism, hybridism and cultural critique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frello, Birgitta

    2007-01-01

    , culture or whatever. The purpose of focusing on concepts of transgression is usually to try to develop conceptual spaces within which it is possible to grasp and to study cultural identity without resorting to cultural essentialism. These attempts open up new possibilities but also new problems - e...

  19. Essential Ideas for Healthy Childhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exchange: The Early Childhood Leaders' Magazine Since 1978, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents essential ideas from various people on how to cultivate healthy childhood. Amelia Gambetti says that in terms of young children, the element of complexity offers to them the possibility to have an opportunity to learn how to think and to generate ideas. Diane Levin shares how a three-year-old kid taught her that children do…

  20. Essential French Vocabulary Teach Yourself

    CERN Document Server

    Saint-Thomas, Noel

    2010-01-01

    Essential French Vocabulary is the course for you if you need help with your study of French. This fully revised edition of our best-selling course now comes with free downloadable audio support containing hints on how to learn vocabulary effectively.

  1. Hyper-V Replica essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Krstevski, Vangel

    2013-01-01

    a in various deployment scenarios.Hyper-V Replica Essentials is for Windows Server administrators who want to improve their system availability and speed up disaster recovery. You will need experience in Hyper-V deployment because Hyper-V Replica is built in the Hyper-V platform.

  2. Intellectual Workers and Essential Freedoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edley, Christopher Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Journalists and college professors deserve certain privileges, including freedom of speech and academic freedom, but they must adapt their work to increasingly diverse populations. They must confront public mistrust, convince people that these freedoms are worthwhile, and protect essential public rights through what they study and teach and to…

  3. Essentials of supply chain management

    CERN Document Server

    Hugos, Michael H

    2011-01-01

    The latest thinking, strategies, developments, and technologies to stay current in supply chain management Presenting the core concepts and techniques of supply chain management in a clear, concise and easily readable style, the Third Edition of Essentials of Supply Chain Management outlines the most crucial tenets and concepts of supply chain management.

  4. Essential Medicines in National Constitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toebes, Brigit; Hogerzeil, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A constitutional guarantee of access to essential medicines has been identified as an important indicator of government commitment to the progressive realization of the right to the highest attainable standard of health. The objective of this study was to evaluate provisions on access to essential medicines in national constitutions, to identify comprehensive examples of constitutional text on medicines that can be used as a model for other countries, and to evaluate the evolution of constitutional medicines-related rights since 2008. Relevant articles were selected from an inventory of constitutional texts from WHO member states. References to states’ legal obligations under international human rights law were evaluated. Twenty-two constitutions worldwide now oblige governments to protect and/or to fulfill accessibility of, availability of, and/or quality of medicines. Since 2008, state responsibilities to fulfill access to essential medicines have expanded in five constitutions, been maintained in four constitutions, and have regressed in one constitution. Government commitments to essential medicines are an important foundation of health system equity and are included increasingly in state constitutions. PMID:27781006

  5. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol prevents skeletal muscle atrophy: role of p38 MAPKinase and E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Derbre

    Full Text Available Alterations in muscle play an important role in common diseases and conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated during hindlimb unloading due, at least in part, to the activation of xanthine oxidase (XO. The major aim of this study was to determine the mechanism by which XO activation causes unloading-induced muscle atrophy in rats, and its possible prevention by allopurinol, a well-known inhibitor of this enzyme. For this purpose we studied one of the main redox sensitive signalling cascades involved in skeletal muscle atrophy i.e. p38 MAPKinase, and the expression of two well known muscle specific E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in proteolysis, the Muscle atrophy F-Box (MAFbx; also known as atrogin-1 and Muscle RING (Really Interesting New Gene Finger-1 (MuRF-1. We found that hindlimb unloading induced a significant increase in XO activity and in the protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes CuZnSOD and Catalase in skeletal muscle. The most relevant new fact reported in this paper is that inhibition of XO with allopurinol, a drug widely used in clinical practice, prevents soleus muscle atrophy by ~20% after hindlimb unloading. This was associated with the inhibition of the p38 MAPK-MAFbx pathway. Our data suggest that XO was involved in the loss of muscle mass via the activation of the p38MAPK-MAFbx pathway in unloaded muscle atrophy. Thus, allopurinol may have clinical benefits to combat skeletal muscle atrophy in bedridden, astronauts, sarcopenic, and cachexic patients.

  6. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase CHIP and NBR1-Mediated Selective Autophagy Protect Additively against Proteotoxicity in Plant Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jingxia; Chi, Yingjin; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    Plant stress responses require both protective measures that reduce or restore stress-inflicted damage to cellular structures and mechanisms that efficiently remove damaged and toxic macromolecules, such as misfolded and damaged proteins. We have recently reported that NBR1, the first identified plant autophagy adaptor with a ubiquitin-association domain, plays a critical role in plant stress tolerance by targeting stress-induced, ubiquitinated protein aggregates for degradation by autophagy. Here we report a comprehensive genetic analysis of CHIP, a chaperone-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase from Arabidopsis thaliana implicated in mediating degradation of nonnative proteins by 26S proteasomes. We isolated two chip knockout mutants and discovered that they had the same phenotypes as the nbr1 mutants with compromised tolerance to heat, oxidative and salt stresses and increased accumulation of insoluble proteins under heat stress. To determine their functional interactions, we generated chip nbr1 double mutants and found them to be further compromised in stress tolerance and in clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates, indicating additive roles of CHIP and NBR1. Furthermore, stress-induced protein aggregates were still ubiquitinated in the chip mutants. Through proteomic profiling, we systemically identified heat-induced protein aggregates in the chip and nbr1 single and double mutants. These experiments revealed that highly aggregate-prone proteins such as Rubisco activase and catalases preferentially accumulated in the nbr1 mutant while a number of light-harvesting complex proteins accumulated at high levels in the chip mutant after a relatively short period of heat stress. With extended heat stress, aggregates for a large number of intracellular proteins accumulated in both chip and nbr1 mutants and, to a greater extent, in the chip nbr1 double mutant. Based on these results, we propose that CHIP and NBR1 mediate two distinct but complementary anti

  7. Deubiquitylase Inhibition Reveals Liver X Receptor-independent Transcriptional Regulation of the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase IDOL and Lipoprotein Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jessica Kristine; Cook, Emma Clare Laura; Loregger, Anke; Hoeksema, Marten Anne; Scheij, Saskia; Kovacevic, Igor; Hordijk, Peter Lodewijk; Ovaa, Huib; Zelcer, Noam

    2016-02-26

    Cholesterol metabolism is subject to complex transcriptional and nontranscriptional regulation. Herein, the role of ubiquitylation is emerging as an important post-translational modification that regulates cholesterol synthesis and uptake. Similar to other post-translational modifications, ubiquitylation is reversible in a process dependent on activity of deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs). Yet whether these play a role in cholesterol metabolism is largely unknown. As a first step to test this possibility, we used pharmacological inhibition of cellular DUB activity. Short term (2 h) inhibition of DUBs resulted in accumulation of high molecular weight ubiquitylated proteins. This was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in abundance of the LDLR and attenuated LDL uptake into hepatic cells. Importantly, this occurred in the absence of changes in the mRNA levels of the LDLR or other SREBP2-regulated genes, in line with this phenotype being a post-transcriptional event. Mechanistically, we identify transcriptional induction of the E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL in human and rodent cells as the underlying cause for ubiquitylation-dependent lysosomal degradation of the LDLR following DUB inhibition. In contrast to the established transcriptional regulation of IDOL by the sterol-responsive liver X receptor (LXR) transcription factors, induction of IDOL by DUB inhibition is LXR-independent and occurs in Lxrαβ(-/-) MEFs. Consistent with the role of DUBs in transcriptional regulation, we identified a 70-bp region in the proximal promoter of IDOL, distinct from that containing the LXR-responsive element, which mediates the response to DUB inhibition. In conclusion, we identify a sterol-independent mechanism to regulate IDOL expression and IDOL-mediated lipoprotein receptor degradation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Glucocorticoids Induce Bone and Muscle Atrophy by Tissue-Specific Mechanisms Upstream of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Amy Y; Richardson, Danielle; Cregor, Meloney; Davis, Hannah M; Au, Ernie D; McAndrews, Kevin; Zimmers, Teresa A; Organ, Jason M; Peacock, Munro; Plotkin, Lilian I; Bellido, Teresita

    2017-03-01

    Glucocorticoid excess, either endogenous with diseases of the adrenal gland, stress, or aging or when administered for immunosuppression, induces bone and muscle loss, leading to osteopenia and sarcopenia. Muscle weakness increases the propensity for falling, which, combined with the lower bone mass, increases the fracture risk. The mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced bone and muscle atrophy are not completely understood. We have demonstrated that the loss of bone and muscle mass, decreased bone formation, and reduced muscle strength, hallmarks of glucocorticoid excess, are accompanied by upregulation in both tissues in vivo of the atrophy-related genes atrogin1, MuRF1, and MUSA1. These are E3 ubiquitin ligases traditionally considered muscle-specific. Glucocorticoids also upregulated atrophy genes in cultured osteoblastic/osteocytic cells, in ex vivo bone organ cultures, and in muscle organ cultures and C2C12 myoblasts/myotubes. Furthermore, glucocorticoids markedly increased the expression of components of the Notch signaling pathway in muscle in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In contrast, glucocorticoids did not increase Notch signaling in bone or bone cells. Moreover, the increased expression of atrophy-related genes in muscle, but not in bone, and the decreased myotube diameter induced by glucocorticoids were prevented by inhibiting Notch signaling. Thus, glucocorticoids activate different mechanisms in bone and muscle that upregulate atrophy-related genes. However, the role of these genes in the effects of glucocorticoids in bone is unknown. Nevertheless, these findings advance our knowledge of the mechanism of action of glucocorticoids in the musculoskeletal system and provide the basis for novel therapies to prevent glucocorticoid-induced atrophy of bone and muscle. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  9. Deubiquitylase Inhibition Reveals Liver X Receptor-independent Transcriptional Regulation of the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase IDOL and Lipoprotein Uptake*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jessica Kristine; Cook, Emma Clare Laura; Loregger, Anke; Hoeksema, Marten Anne; Scheij, Saskia; Kovacevic, Igor; Hordijk, Peter Lodewijk; Ovaa, Huib; Zelcer, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is subject to complex transcriptional and nontranscriptional regulation. Herein, the role of ubiquitylation is emerging as an important post-translational modification that regulates cholesterol synthesis and uptake. Similar to other post-translational modifications, ubiquitylation is reversible in a process dependent on activity of deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs). Yet whether these play a role in cholesterol metabolism is largely unknown. As a first step to test this possibility, we used pharmacological inhibition of cellular DUB activity. Short term (2 h) inhibition of DUBs resulted in accumulation of high molecular weight ubiquitylated proteins. This was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in abundance of the LDLR and attenuated LDL uptake into hepatic cells. Importantly, this occurred in the absence of changes in the mRNA levels of the LDLR or other SREBP2-regulated genes, in line with this phenotype being a post-transcriptional event. Mechanistically, we identify transcriptional induction of the E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL in human and rodent cells as the underlying cause for ubiquitylation-dependent lysosomal degradation of the LDLR following DUB inhibition. In contrast to the established transcriptional regulation of IDOL by the sterol-responsive liver X receptor (LXR) transcription factors, induction of IDOL by DUB inhibition is LXR-independent and occurs in Lxrαβ−/− MEFs. Consistent with the role of DUBs in transcriptional regulation, we identified a 70-bp region in the proximal promoter of IDOL, distinct from that containing the LXR-responsive element, which mediates the response to DUB inhibition. In conclusion, we identify a sterol-independent mechanism to regulate IDOL expression and IDOL-mediated lipoprotein receptor degradation. PMID:26719329

  10. The Biological Properties and Potential Interacting Proteins of d-Alanyl-d-alanine Ligase A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufeng Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: d-alanine-d-alanine ligase (DdlA, an effective target for drug development to combat against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, which threatens human health globally, supplies a substrate of d-alanyl-d-alanine for peptidoglycan crosslinking by catalyzing the dimerization of two d-alanines. To obtain a better understanding of DdlA profiles and develop a colorimetric assay for high-throughput inhibitor screening, we focused on explicating and characterizing Tb-DdlA. (2 Methods and Results: Rv2981c (ddlA was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified Tb-DdlA was identified using (anti-polyhistidine antibody followed by DdlA activity confirmation by measuring the released orthophosphate via colorimetric assay and the yielded d-alanyl-d-alanine through high performance thin layer chromatography (HP-TLC. The kinetic assays on Tb-DdlA indicated that Tb-DdlA exhibited a higher affinity to ATP (KmATP: 50.327 ± 4.652 μmol/L than alanine (KmAla: 1.011 ± 0.094 mmol/L. A colorimetric assay for Tb-DdlA activity was developed for high-throughput screening of DdlA inhibitors in this study. In addition, we presented an analysis on Tb-DdlA interaction partners by pull-down assay and MS/MS. Eight putative interaction partners of Tb-DdlA were identified. (3 Conclusions: Our dataset provided a valuable resource for exploring Tb-DdlA biology, and developed an easy colorimetric assay for screening of Tb-DdlA inhibitors.

  11. The Steroidogenic Enzyme AKR1C3 Regulates Stability of the Ubiquitin Ligase Siah2 in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lingling; Peng, Guihong; Hussain, Arif; Fazli, Ladan; Guns, Emma; Gleave, Martin; Qi, Jianfei

    2015-08-21

    Re-activation of androgen receptor (AR) activity is the main driver for development of castration-resistant prostate cancer. We previously reported that the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 enhanced AR transcriptional activity and prostate cancer cell growth. Among the genes we found to be regulated by Siah2 was AKR1C3, which encodes a key androgen biosynthetic enzyme implicated in castration-resistant prostate cancer development. Here, we found that Siah2 inhibition in CWR22Rv1 prostate cancer cells decreased AKR1C3 expression as well as intracellular androgen levels, concomitant with inhibition of cell growth in vitro and in orthotopic prostate tumors. Re-expression of either wild-type or catalytically inactive forms of AKR1C3 partially rescued AR activity and growth defects in Siah2 knockdown cells, suggesting a nonenzymatic role for AKR1C3 in these outcomes. Unexpectedly, AKR1C3 re-expression in Siah2 knockdown cells elevated Siah2 protein levels, whereas AKR1C3 knockdown had the opposite effect. We further found that AKR1C3 can bind Siah2 and inhibit its self-ubiquitination and degradation, thereby increasing Siah2 protein levels. We observed parallel expression of Siah2 and AKR1C3 in human prostate cancer tissues. Collectively, our findings identify a new role for AKR1C3 in regulating Siah2 stability and thus enhancing Siah2-dependent regulation of AR activity in prostate cancer cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP and NBR1-mediated selective autophagy protect additively against proteotoxicity in plant stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Yan; Qi, Jingxia; Chi, Yingjin; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    Plant stress responses require both protective measures that reduce or restore stress-inflicted damage to cellular structures and mechanisms that efficiently remove damaged and toxic macromolecules, such as misfolded and damaged proteins. We have recently reported that NBR1, the first identified plant autophagy adaptor with a ubiquitin-association domain, plays a critical role in plant stress tolerance by targeting stress-induced, ubiquitinated protein aggregates for degradation by autophagy. Here we report a comprehensive genetic analysis of CHIP, a chaperone-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase from Arabidopsis thaliana implicated in mediating degradation of nonnative proteins by 26S proteasomes. We isolated two chip knockout mutants and discovered that they had the same phenotypes as the nbr1 mutants with compromised tolerance to heat, oxidative and salt stresses and increased accumulation of insoluble proteins under heat stress. To determine their functional interactions, we generated chip nbr1 double mutants and found them to be further compromised in stress tolerance and in clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates, indicating additive roles of CHIP and NBR1. Furthermore, stress-induced protein aggregates were still ubiquitinated in the chip mutants. Through proteomic profiling, we systemically identified heat-induced protein aggregates in the chip and nbr1 single and double mutants. These experiments revealed that highly aggregate-prone proteins such as Rubisco activase and catalases preferentially accumulated in the nbr1 mutant while a number of light-harvesting complex proteins accumulated at high levels in the chip mutant after a relatively short period of heat stress. With extended heat stress, aggregates for a large number of intracellular proteins accumulated in both chip and nbr1 mutants and, to a greater extent, in the chip nbr1 double mutant. Based on these results, we propose that CHIP and NBR1 mediate two distinct but complementary anti

  13. Detection and serotyping of dengue virus in serum samples by multiplex reverse transcriptase PCR-ligase detection reaction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S; Pingle, M R; Muñoz-Jordán, J; Rundell, M S; Rondini, S; Granger, K; Chang, G-J J; Kelly, E; Spier, E G; Larone, D; Spitzer, E; Barany, F; Golightly, L M

    2008-10-01

    The detection and successful typing of dengue virus (DENV) from patients with suspected dengue fever is important both for the diagnosis of the disease and for the implementation of epidemiologic control measures. A technique for the multiplex detection and typing of DENV serotypes 1 to 4 (DENV-1 to DENV-4) from clinical samples by PCR-ligase detection reaction (LDR) has been developed. A serotype-specific PCR amplifies the regions of genes C and E simultaneously. The two amplicons are targeted in a multiplex LDR, and the resultant fluorescently labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array. The assay was optimized using 38 DENV strains and was evaluated with 350 archived acute-phase serum samples. The sensitivity of the assay was 98.7%, and its specificity was 98.4%, relative to the results of real-time PCR. The detection threshold was 0.017 PFU for DENV-1, 0.004 PFU for DENV-2, 0.8 PFU for DENV-3, and 0.7 PFU for DENV-4. The assay is specific; it does not cross-react with the other flaviviruses tested (West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Kunjin virus, Murray Valley virus, Powassan virus, and yellow fever virus). All but 1 of 26 genotypic variants of DENV serotypes in a global DENV panel from different geographic regions were successfully identified. The PCR-LDR assay is a rapid, sensitive, specific, and high-throughput technique for the simultaneous detection of all four serotypes of DENV.

  14. Polymorphism in glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) is associated with sulfamethoxazole-induced hypersensitivity in HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danxin; Curtis, Amanda; Papp, Audrey C; Koletar, Susan L; Para, Michael F

    2012-07-23

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is a commonly used antibiotic for prevention of infectious diseases associated with HIV/AIDS and immune-compromised states. SMX-induced hypersensitivity is an idiosyncratic cutaneous drug reaction with genetic components. Here, we tested association of candidate genes involved in SMX bioactivation and antioxidant defense with SMX-induced hypersensitivity. Seventy seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 14 candidate genes were genotyped and assessed for association with SMX-induced hypersensitivity, in a cohort of 171 HIV/AIDS patients. SNP rs761142 T > G, in glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), was significantly associated with SMX-induced hypersensitivity, with an adjusted p value of 0.045. This result was replicated in a second cohort of 249 patients (p = 0.025). In the combined cohort, heterozygous and homozygous carriers of the minor G allele were at increased risk of developing hypersensitivity (GT vs TT, odds ratio = 2.2, 95% CL 1.4-3.7, p = 0.0014; GG vs TT, odds ratio = 3.3, 95% CL 1.6 - 6.8, p = 0.0010). Each minor allele copy increased risk of developing hypersensitivity 1.9 fold (95% CL 1.4 - 2.6, p = 0.00012). Moreover, in 91 human livers and 84 B-lymphocytes samples, SNP rs761142 homozygous G allele carriers expressed significantly less GCLC mRNA than homozygous TT carriers (p hypersensitivity in HIV/AIDS patients. Catalyzing a critical step in glutathione biosynthesis, GCLC may play a broad role in idiosyncratic drug reactions.

  15. Expression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ku and Ligase D in Escherichia coli results in RecA and RecB-independent DNA end-joining at regions of microhomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarchuk, Svitlana; Wright, Douglas; Castore, Reneau; Klepper, Emily; Weiss, Bernard; Doherty, Aidan J; Harrison, Lynn

    2007-10-01

    Unlike Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt) expresses a Ku-like protein and an ATP-dependent DNA ligase that can perform non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). We have expressed the Mt-Ku and Mt-Ligase D in E. coli using an arabinose-inducible promoter and expression vectors that integrate into specific sites in the E. coli chromosome. E. coli strains have been generated that express the Mt-Ku and Mt-Ligase D on a genetic background that is wild-type for repair, or deficient in either the RecA or RecB protein. Transformation of these strains with linearized plasmid DNA containing a 2bp overhang has demonstrated that expression of both the Mt-Ku and Mt-Ligase D is required for DNA end-joining and that loss of RecA does not prevent this double-strand break repair. Analysis of the re-joined plasmid has shown that repair is predominantly inaccurate and results in the deletion of sequences. Loss of RecB did not prevent the formation of large deletions, but did increase the amount of end-joining. Sequencing the junctions has revealed that the majority of the ligations occurred at regions of microhomology (1-4bps), eliminating one copy of the homologous sequence at the junction. The Mt-Ku and Mt-Ligase D can therefore function in E. coli to re-circularize linear plasmid.

  16. Essentials of radiation heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Essentials of Radiation Heat Transfer is a textbook presenting the essential, fundamental information required to gain an understanding of radiation heat transfer and equips the reader with enough knowledge to be able to tackle more challenging problems. All concepts are reinforced by carefully chosen and fully worked examples, and exercise problems are provided at the end of every chapter. In a significant departure from other books on this subject, this book completely dispenses with the network method to solve problems of radiation heat transfer in surfaces. It instead presents the powerful radiosity-irradiation method and shows how this technique can be used to solve problems of radiation in enclosures made of one to any number of surfaces. The network method is not easily scalable. Secondly, the book introduces atmospheric radiation, which is now being considered as a potentially important area, in which engineers can contribute to the technology of remote sensing and atmospheric sciences in general, b...

  17. Communication: essential strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Mary

    2013-06-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advance organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tool, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author discusses strategies for communication for change processes, whether large or small. Intentional planning and development of a communication strategy alongside, not as an afterthought, to change initiatives are essential.

  18. Essential themes in Personnel economics

    OpenAIRE

    Josheski, Dushko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper are presented essential themes in the subject of personnel economics. In the first part analysis has been conducted on the impact of peer pressure on workplace behaviour. Then again models for compensation structures within firms, and their influence on the utility of work by employees. In the final section of the paper the productivity spillover effect has been analyzed, and the causes of existence of spillovers and their impact on workers’ productivity

  19. Repelling mosquitoes with essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, L.

    2017-12-01

    Mosquitoes carry diseases than can lead to serious illness and death. According to the World Health Organization, mosquitoes infect over 300 million people a year with Malaria and Dengue Fever, two life threatening diseases vectored by mosquitoes. Although insecticides are the most effective way to control mosquitoes, they are not always environmentally friendly. Therefore, alternative tactics should be considered. In this study, we looked at the repellency of various essential oils on female Aedes aegypti through a series of laboratory assays.

  20. Essentials of natural gas microturbines

    CERN Document Server

    Boicea, Valentin A

    2013-01-01

    Addressing a field which, until now, has not been sufficiently investigated, Essentials of Natural Gas Microturbines thoroughly examines several natural gas microturbine technologies suitable not only for distributed generation but also for the automotive industry. An invaluable resource for power systems, electrical, and computer science engineers as well as operations researchers, microturbine operators, policy makers, and other industry professionals, the book: Explains the importance of natural gas microturbines and their use in distributed energy resource (DER) systemsDiscusses the histor

  1. Essentials of nuclear medicine imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Mettler, Fred A. Jr

    2012-01-01

    Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging, by Drs. Fred A Mettler and Milton J Guiberteau, provides the practical and comprehensive guidance you need to master key nuclear imaging techniques. From physics, instrumentation, quality control, and legal requirements to hot topics such as sodium fluoride, radiopharmaceuticals, and recommended pediatric administered doses and guidelines, this sixth edition covers the fundamentals and recent developments in the practice of nuclear medicine.

  2. Time-of-day- and light-dependent expression of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 4 (UBR4 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrod H Ling

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology are driven by the biological clock that operates endogenously but can also be entrained to the light-dark cycle of the environment. In mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, which is composed of individual cellular oscillators that are driven by a set of core clock genes interacting in transcriptional/translational feedback loops. Light signals can trigger molecular events in the SCN that ultimately impact on the phase of expression of core clock genes to reset the master pacemaker. While transcriptional regulation has received much attention in the field of circadian biology in the past, other mechanisms including targeted protein degradation likely contribute to the clock timing and entrainment process. In the present study, proteome-wide screens of the murine SCN led to the identification of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 4 (UBR4, a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase component of the N-end rule pathway, as a time-of-day-dependent and light-inducible protein. The spatial and temporal expression pattern of UBR4 in the SCN was subsequently characterized by immunofluorescence microscopy. UBR4 is expressed across the entire rostrocaudal extent of the SCN in a time-of-day-dependent fashion. UBR4 is localized exclusively to arginine vasopressin (AVP-expressing neurons of the SCN shell. Upon photic stimulation in the early subjective night, the number of UBR4-expressing cells within the SCN increases. This study is the first to identify a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase component, UBR4, in the murine SCN and to implicate the N-end rule degradation pathway as a potential player in regulating core clock mechanisms and photic entrainment.

  3. A lysine-to-arginine mutation on NEDD8 markedly reduces the activity of cullin RING E3 ligase through the impairment of neddylation cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Yiyan; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang, E-mail: gux2002@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-12

    Neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, which forms covalent conjugates on lysines of its substrates. This post-translational modification, neddylation, plays important roles in tumor cell proliferation and viability. Ubiquitin can form diverse polyubiquitin chains, on its seven lysines, which play important functions in various biological processes. However, the roles of lysines in NEDD8 have not been explored. Here, we generated nine NEDD8 point mutants, each with one lysine replaced by an arginine, to study the putative function of lysines in NEDD8. Our experiments discover that Lys27 in NEDD8 is a critical residue for protein neddylation. Replacement of this residue with arginine almost completely eliminates the conjugation of NEDD8 to its substrates. Furthermore, we find that the K27R mutant impairs NEDD8 conjugation to the E2 enzyme, which normally forms thioester bonds for further transferring NEDD8 to its ligases and substrates. Therefore, this mutation completely inhibits global protein neddylation, including neddylation of cullin family proteins, resulting in decreased activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases. This work sheds new light on the roles of NEDD8 lysines on neddylation cascades and provides a dominant negative mutant for the study of neddylation and its biological functions. - Highlights: • Lys27 in NEDD8 is critical for protein neddylation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant impairs the NEDD8 conjugation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant significantly reduces the activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases.

  4. Functional analysis of NopM, a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase (NEL domain effector of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Xin

    Full Text Available Type 3 effector proteins secreted via the bacterial type 3 secretion system (T3SS are not only virulence factors of pathogenic bacteria, but also influence symbiotic interactions between nitrogen-fixing nodule bacteria (rhizobia and leguminous host plants. In this study, we characterized NopM (nodulation outer protein M of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234, which shows sequence similarities with novel E3 ubiquitin ligase (NEL domain effectors from the human pathogens Shigella flexneri and Salomonella enterica. NopM expressed in Escherichia coli, but not the non-functional mutant protein NopM-C338A, showed E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro. In vivo, NopM, but not inactive NopM-C338A, promoted nodulation of the host plant Lablab purpureus by NGR234. When NopM was expressed in yeast, it inhibited mating pheromone signaling, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathway. When expressed in the plant Nicotiana benthamiana, NopM inhibited one part of the plant's defense response, as shown by a reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in response to the flagellin peptide flg22, whereas it stimulated another part, namely the induction of defense genes. In summary, our data indicate the potential for NopM as a functional NEL domain E3 ubiquitin ligase. Our findings that NopM dampened the flg22-induced ROS burst in N. benthamiana but promoted defense gene induction are consistent with the concept that pattern-triggered immunity is split in two separate signaling branches, one leading to ROS production and the other to defense gene induction.

  5. Downregulation of the proapoptotic protein MOAP-1 by the UBR5 ubiquitin ligase and its role in ovarian cancer resistance to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, K; Huang, N-J; Cocce, K; Zhang, L; Kornbluth, S

    2017-03-23

    Evasion of apoptosis allows many cancers to resist chemotherapy. Apoptosis is mediated by the serial activation of caspase family proteins. These proteases are often activated upon the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria, which is promoted by the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family protein, Bax. This function of Bax is enhanced by the MOAP-1 (modulator of apoptosis protein 1) protein in response to DNA damage. Previously, we reported that MOAP-1 is targeted for ubiquitylation and degradation by the APC/C Cdh1 ubiquitin ligase. In this study, we identify the HECT (homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus) family E3 ubiquitin ligase, UBR5, as a novel ubiquitin ligase for MOAP-1. We demonstrate that UBR5 interacts physically with MOAP-1, ubiquitylates MOAP-1 in vitro and inhibits MOAP-1 stability in cultured cells. In addition, we show that Dyrk2 kinase, a reported UBR5 interactor, cooperates with UBR5 in mediating MOAP-1 ubiquitylation. Importantly, we found that cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines exhibit lower levels of MOAP-1 accumulation than their sensitive counterparts upon cisplatin treatment, consistent with the previously reported role of MOAP-1 in modulating cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, UBR5 knockdown increased MOAP-1 expression, enhanced Bax activation and sensitized otherwise resistant cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, UBR5 expression was higher in ovarian cancers from cisplatin-resistant patients than from cisplatin-responsive patients. These results show that UBR5 downregulates proapoptotic MOAP-1 and suggest that UBR5 can confer cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. Thus UBR5 may be an attractive therapeutic target for ovarian cancer treatment.

  6. The Type II Hsp40 Sis1 cooperates with Hsp70 and the E3 ligase Ubr1 to promote degradation of terminally misfolded cytosolic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Summers

    Full Text Available Mechanisms for cooperation between the cytosolic Hsp70 system and the ubiquitin proteasome system during protein triage are not clear. Herein, we identify new mechanisms for selection of misfolded cytosolic proteins for degradation via defining functional interactions between specific cytosolic Hsp70/Hsp40 pairs and quality control ubiquitin ligases. These studies revolved around the use of S. cerevisiae to elucidate the degradation pathway of a terminally misfolded reporter protein, short-lived GFP (slGFP. The Type I Hsp40 Ydj1 acts with Hsp70 to suppress slGFP aggregation. In contrast, the Type II Hsp40 Sis1 is required for proteasomal degradation of slGFP. Sis1 and Hsp70 operate sequentially with the quality control E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1 to target slGFP for degradation. Compromise of Sis1 or Ubr1 function leads slGFP to accumulate in a Triton X-100-soluble state with slGFP degradation intermediates being concentrated into perinuclear and peripheral puncta. Interestingly, when Sis1 activity is low the slGFP that is concentrated into puncta can be liberated from puncta and subsequently degraded. Conversely, in the absence of Ubr1, slGFP and the puncta that contain slGFP are relatively stable. Ubr1 mediates proteasomal degradation of slGFP that is released from cytosolic protein handling centers. Pathways for proteasomal degradation of misfolded cytosolic proteins involve functional interplay between Type II Hsp40/Hsp70 chaperone pairs, PQC E3 ligases, and storage depots for misfolded proteins.

  7. Lentiviral Vpx accessory factor targets VprBP/DCAF1 substrate adaptor for cullin 4 E3 ubiquitin ligase to enable macrophage infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Srivastava

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Vpx is a small virion-associated adaptor protein encoded by viruses of the HIV-2/SIVsm lineage of primate lentiviruses that enables these viruses to transduce monocyte-derived cells. This probably reflects the ability of Vpx to overcome an as yet uncharacterized block to an early event in the virus life cycle in these cells, but the underlying mechanism has remained elusive. Using biochemical and proteomic approaches, we have found that Vpx protein of the pathogenic SIVmac 239 strain associates with a ternary protein complex comprising DDB1 and VprBP subunits of Cullin 4-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, and DDA1, which has been implicated in the regulation of E3 catalytic activity, and that Vpx participates in the Cullin 4 E3 complex comprising VprBP. We further demonstrate that the ability of SIVmac as well as HIV-2 Vpx to interact with VprBP and its associated Cullin 4 complex is required for efficient reverse transcription of SIVmac RNA genome in primary macrophages. Strikingly, macrophages in which VprBP levels are depleted by RNA interference resist SIVmac infection. Thus, our observations reveal that Vpx interacts with both catalytic and regulatory components of the ubiquitin proteasome system and demonstrate that these interactions are critical for Vpx ability to enable efficient SIVmac replication in primary macrophages. Furthermore, they identify VprBP/DCAF1 substrate receptor for Cullin 4 E3 ubiquitin ligase and its associated protein complex as immediate downstream effector of Vpx for this function. Together, our findings suggest a model in which Vpx usurps VprBP-associated Cullin 4 ubiquitin ligase to enable efficient reverse transcription and thereby overcome a block to lentivirus replication in monocyte-derived cells, and thus provide novel insights into the underlying molecular mechanism.

  8. The E3 ubiquitin-ligase Bmi1/Ring1A controls the proteasomal degradation of Top2alpha cleavage complex - a potentially new drug target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Alchanati

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The topoisomerases Top1, Top2alpha and Top2beta are important molecular targets for antitumor drugs, which specifically poison Top1 or Top2 isomers. While it was previously demonstrated that poisoned Top1 and Top2beta are subject to proteasomal degradation, this phenomena was not demonstrated for Top2alpha.We show here that Top2alpha is subject to drug induced proteasomal degradation as well, although at a lower rate than Top2beta. Using an siRNA screen we identified Bmi1 and Ring1A as subunits of an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in this process. We show that silencing of Bmi1 inhibits drug-induced Top2alpha degradation, increases the persistence of Top2alpha-DNA cleavage complex, and increases Top2 drug efficacy. The Bmi1/Ring1A ligase ubiquitinates Top2alpha in-vitro and cellular overexpression of Bmi1 increases drug induced Top2alpha ubiquitination. A small-molecular weight compound, identified in a screen for inhibitors of Bmi1/Ring1A ubiquitination activity, also prevents Top2alpha ubiquitination and drug-induced Top2alpha degradation. This ubiquitination inhibitor increases the efficacy of topoisomerase 2 poisons in a synergistic manner.The discovery that poisoned Top2alpha is undergoing proteasomal degradation combined with the involvement of Bmi1/Ring1A, allowed us to identify a small molecule that inhibits the degradation process. The Bmi1/Ring1A inhibitor sensitizes cells to Top2 drugs, suggesting that this type of drug combination will have a beneficial therapeutic outcome. As Bmi1 is also a known oncogene, elevated in numerous types of cancer, the identified Bmi1/Ring1A ubiquitin ligase inhibitors can also be potentially used to directly target the oncogenic properties of Bmi1.

  9. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP2 facilitates RUNX2 protein transactivation in a mono-ubiquitination manner during osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; He, Xinyu; Hua, Yue; Li, Qian; Wang, Jiyong; Gan, Xiaoqing

    2017-07-07

    Poly-ubiquitination-mediated RUNX2 degradation is an important cause of age- and inflammation-related bone loss. NEDD4 family E3 ubiquitin protein ligases are thought to be the major regulators of RUNX2 poly-ubiquitination. However, we observed a mono-ubiquitination of RUNX2 that was catalyzed by WWP2, a member of the NEDD4 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. WWP2 has been reported to catalyze the mono-ubiquitination of Goosecoid in chondrocytes, facilitating craniofacial skeleton development. In this study, we found that osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells promoted WWP2 expression and nuclear accumulation. Knockdown of Wwp2 in mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts led to significant deficiencies of osteogenesis, including decreased mineral deposition and down-regulation of osteogenic marker genes. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed the interaction of WWP2 with RUNX2 in vitro and in vivo Mono-ubiquitination by WWP2 leads to RUNX2 transactivation, as evidenced by the wild type of WWP2, but not its ubiquitin ligase-dead mutant, augmenting RUNX2-reponsive reporter activity. Moreover, deletion of WWP2-dependent mono-ubiquitination resulted in striking defects of RUNX2 osteoblastic activity. In addition, ectopic expression of the constitutively active type 1A bone morphogenetic protein receptor enhanced WWP2-dependent RUNX2 ubiquitination and transactivation, demonstrating a regulatory role of bone morphogenetic protein signaling in the WWP2-RUNX2 axis. Taken together, our results provide evidence that WWP2 serves as a positive regulator of osteogenesis by augmenting RUNX2 transactivation in a non-proteolytic mono-ubiquitination manner. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. SAG/ROC-SCFβ-TrCP E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Promotes Pro-Caspase-3 Degradation as a Mechanism of Apoptosis Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjia Tan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Skp1-cullin-F-box protein (SCF is a multicomponent E3 ubiquitin (Ub ligase that ubiquitinates a number of important biologic molecules such as p27, β-catenin, and lκB for proteasomal degradation, thus regulating cell proliferation and survival. One SCF component, SAG/ROC2/Rbx2/Hrt2, a RING finger protein, was first identified as a redox-inducible protein, which, when overexpressed, inhibited apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. We report here that sensitive to apoptosis gene (SAG, as well as its family member ROC1/Rbxi, bound to the proinactive form of caspase-3 (pro-caspase-3. Binding was likely mediated through F-box protein, β-transducin repeat-containing protein (β-TrCP, which binds to the first 38 amino acids of pro-caspase-3. Importantly, β-TrCP1 expression significantly shortened the protein half-life of pro-caspase-3, whereas expression of a dominant-negative β-TrCP1 mutant with the F-box domain deleted extended it. An in vitro ubiquitination assay showed that SAG/ROC-SCF -Trcp promoted ubiquitination of pro-caspase-3. Furthermore, endogenous levels of pro-caspase-3 were decreased by overexpression of SAG/ROC-SCFβ-TrCP E3 Ub ligases, but increased on siRNA silencing of SAG, regulator of cullin-1 (ROC1, or β-TrCPs, leading to increased apoptosis by etoposide and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand through increased activation of caspase-3. Thus, pro-caspase-3 appears to be a substrate of SAG/ROC-SCFβ-TrCP E3 Ub ligase, which protects cells from apoptosis through increased apoptosis threshold by reducing the basal level of pro-caspase-3.

  11. Murine Myocardial Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Critical Role of COPS8 in the Gene Expression of Cullin-RING Ligase Substrate Receptors and Redox and Vesicle Trafficking Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammara Abdullah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The COP9 signalosome (CSN consisting of 8 unique protein subunits (COPS1 through COPS8 serves as the cullin deneddylase, regulating the catalytic dynamics of cullin RING ligases (CRLs, the largest family of ubiquitin ligases Background: The COP9 signalosome (CSN consisting of 8 unique protein subunits (COPS1 through COPS8 serves as the cullin deneddylase, regulating the catalytic dynamics of cullin RING ligases (CRLs, the largest family of ubiquitin ligases. Supported primarily by the decrease of substrate receptor (SR proteins of CRLs in cells deficient of a CSN subunit, CSN-mediated cullin deneddylation is believed to prevent autoubiquitination and self-destruction of the SR in active CRLs. However, it is unclear whether the decrease in SRs is solely due to protein destabilization. Moreover, our prior studies have demonstrated that cardiac specific knockout of Cops8 (Cops8-CKO impairs autophagosome maturation and causes massive necrosis in cardiomyocytes but the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Given that Cops8 is nucleus-enriched and a prior report showed its binding to the promoter of several genes and association of its ablation with decreased mRNA levels of these genes, we sought to determine the dynamic changes of myocardial transcriptome in mice with perinatal Cops8-CKO and to explore their functional implications.Methods and Results: Myocardial transcriptomes of Cops8flox/flox, Cops8flox/+::Myh6-Cre, and Cops8flox/flox::Myh6-Cre littermate mice at postnatal 2 and 3 weeks were analyzed. The data were imported into an in-house analysis pipeline using Bioconductor for quantile normalization and statistical analysis. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs between groups at each time point or between time points within the group were revealed by t-test. Genes with p < 0.05 after Benjamini and Hochberg false discovery rate correction for multiple hypothesis testing were considered as significant DEGs. We found that (1

  12. The Banana Fruit SINA Ubiquitin Ligase MaSINA1 Regulates the Stability of MaICE1 to be Negatively Involved in Cold Stress Response

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong-Qi Fan; Jian-Ye Chen; Jian-Fei Kuang; Wang-Jin Lu; Wei Shan

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of ICE1 protein stability is important to ensure effective cold stress response, and is extensively studied in Arabidopsis. Currently, how ICE1 stability in fruits under cold stress is controlled remains largely unknown. Here, we reported the possible involvement of a SEVEN IN ABSENTIA (SINA) ubiquitin ligase MaSINA1 from banana fruit in affecting MaICE1 stability. MaSINA1 was identified based on a yeast two-hybrid screening using MaICE1 as bait. Further yeast two-hybrid, pull-...

  13. Cadmium delays non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair via inhibition of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation and downregulation of XRCC4 and Ligase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weiwei; Gu, Xueyan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Kong, Jinxin [Gansu Key Laboratory of Biomonitoring and Bioremediation for Environmental Pollution, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Ding, Nan [Gansu Key laboratory of Space Radiobiology, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei [Gansu Key Laboratory of Biomonitoring and Bioremediation for Environmental Pollution, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Jufang [Gansu Key laboratory of Space Radiobiology, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Huang, Dejun, E-mail: huangdj@lzu.edu.cn [Gansu Key Laboratory of Biomonitoring and Bioremediation for Environmental Pollution, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Cadmium (Cd) exposure delayed the repair of DNA damage induced by X-ray. • Cd exposure altered the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs on Thr-2609 and Ser-2056 sites. • Cd impaired the formation of XRCC4 and Ligase IV foci, and down-regulated their protein expression. • Zinc mitigated the effects of Cd on DDR by regulating pDNA-PKcs (Thr-2609), XRCC4 and Ligase IV. - Abstract: Although studies have shown that cadmium (Cd) interfered with DNA damage repair (DDR), whether Cd could affect non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair remains elusive. To further understand the effect of Cd on DDR, we used X-ray irradiation of Hela cells as an in vitro model system, along with γH2AX and 53BP1 as markers for DNA damage. Results showed that X-ray significantly increased γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in Hela cells (p < 0.01), all of which are characteristic of accrued DNA damage. The number of foci declined rapidly over time (1–8 h postirradiation), indicating an initiation of NHEJ process. However, the disappearance of γH2AX and 53BP1 foci was remarkably slowed by Cd pretreatment (p < 0.01), suggesting that Cd reduced the efficiency of NHEJ. To further elucidate the mechanisms of Cd toxicity, several markers of NHEJ pathway including Ku70, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and Ligase IV were examined. Our data showed that Cd altered the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, and reduced the expression of both XRCC4 and Ligase IV in irradiated cells. These observations are indicative of the impairment of NHEJ-dependent DNA repair pathways. In addition, zinc (Zn) mitigated the effects of Cd on NHEJ, suggesting that the Cd-induced NHEJ alteration may partly result from the displacement of Zn or from an interference with the normal function of Zn-containing proteins by Cd. Our findings provide a new insight into the toxicity of Cd on NHEJ repair and its underlying mechanisms in human cells.

  14. The Cish SH2 domain is essential for PLC-γ1 regulation in TCR stimulated CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guittard, Geoffrey; Dios-Esponera, Ana; Palmer, Douglas C; Akpan, Itoro; Barr, Valarie A; Manna, Asit; Restifo, Nicholas P; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2018-03-28

    Cish, participates within a multi-molecular E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which ubiquitinates target proteins. It has an inhibitory effect on T cell activation mediated by PLC-γ1 regulation, and it functions as a potent checkpoint in CD8 + T cell tumor immunotherapy. To study the structural and functional relationships between Cish and PLC-γ1 during CD8 + T cell activation, we tested mutants of the Cish-SH2 (R107K) and D/BC (L222Q, C226Q) domains. We confirmed that Cish-SH2-specific binding was essential for PLC-γ1 ubiquitination and degradation. This domain was essential for the Cish-mediated inhibition of Ca 2+ release upon TCR stimulation. No effect on inhibition of cytokine release was observed with SH2 or D/BC mutants, although the absence of Cish led to an increased release of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Using imaging we showed that Cish was expressed mostly in the cytoplasm and we did not see any Cish clustering at the plasma membrane upon stimulation. We conclude that the Cish-SH2 domain is essential for PLC-γ1 regulation in TCR-stimulated CD8 + T cells.

  15. Linear feedback controls the essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The design of control systems is at the very core of engineering. Feedback controls are ubiquitous, ranging from simple room thermostats to airplane engine control. Helping to make sense of this wide-ranging field, this book provides a new approach by keeping a tight focus on the essentials with a limited, yet consistent set of examples. Analysis and design methods are explained in terms of theory and practice. The book covers classical, linear feedback controls, and linear approximations are used when needed. In parallel, the book covers time-discrete (digital) control systems and juxtapos

  16. Axure RP 6 Prototyping Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Ezra

    2012-01-01

    Axure RP 6 Prototyping Essentials is a detailed, practical primer on the leading rapid prototyping tool. Short on jargon and high on concepts, real-life scenarios and step-by-step guidance through hands-on examples, this book will show you how to integrate Axure into your UX workflow. This book is written for UX practitioners, business analysts, product managers, and anyone else who is involved in UX projects. The book assumes that you have no or very little familiarity with Axure. It will help you if you are evaluating the tool for an upcoming project or are required to quickly get up to spee

  17. Microsoft Windows Operating System Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Carpenter, Tom

    2012-01-01

    A full-color guide to key Windows 7 administration concepts and topics Windows 7 is the leading desktop software, yet it can be a difficult concept to grasp, especially for those new to the field of IT. Microsoft Windows Operating System Essentials is an ideal resource for anyone new to computer administration and looking for a career in computers. Delving into areas such as fundamental Windows 7 administration concepts and various desktop OS topics, this full-color book addresses the skills necessary for individuals looking to break into a career in IT. Each chapter begins with a list of topi

  18. Cyber essentials a pocket guide

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Every year, thousands of computer systems in the UK are compromised. The majority fall victim to easily preventable cyber attacks, carried out with tools which are freely available on the Internet.   Cyber Essentials is the UK Government's reaction to the proliferation of these attacks. It requires that organisations put basic security measures in place, enabling them to reliably counter the most common tactics employed by cyber criminals. From 1 October 2014, all suppliers bidding for a range of government ICT contracts - in particu

  19. Essentials of Electromagnetics for Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolf, David A.

    2000-11-01

    Essentials of Electromagnetics for Engineering introduces the key physical and engineering principles of electromagnetics. Throughout the book, David de Wolf describes the intermediate steps in mathematical derivations that many other textbooks leave out. He covers in depth the concepts of fields and potentials and then progresses to magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, electrodynamics and wave propagation, waveguides, transmission lines, and antennas. At each stage, de Wolf stresses the physical principles underlying the mathematical results. He also includes homework exercises, a separate chapter on numerical methods in electromagnetics, and a broad range of worked examples to illustrate important concepts. Solutions manual available.

  20. Alteration of Nrf2 and Glutamate Cysteine Ligase expression contribute to lesions growth and fibrogenesis in ectopic endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellin, L; Santulli, P; Chouzenoux, S; Cerles, O; Nicco, C; Dousset, B; Pallardy, M; Kerdine-Römer, S; Just, P A; Chapron, C; Batteux, F

    2017-09-01

    The redox-sensitive nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF2) controls endogenous antioxidant enzymes' transcription and protects against oxidative damage which is triggered by inflammation and known to favor progression of endometriosis. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase (GCL), a target gene of NRF2, is the first enzyme in the synthesis cascade of glutathione, an important endogenous antioxidant. Sixty-one patients, with thorough surgical examination of the abdominopelvic cavity, were recruited for the study: 31 with histologically-proven endometriosis and 30 disease-free women taken as controls. Expressions of NRF2 and GCL were investigated by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in eutopic and ectopic endometria from endometriosis-affected women and in endometrium of disease-free women. Ex vivo stromal and epithelial cells were extracted and purified from endometrial and endometriotic biopsies to explore expression of NRF2 and GCL in both stromal and epithelial compartments by western blot. Finally, in order to strengthen the role of NRF2 in endometriosis pathogenesis, we evaluated the drop of NRF2 expression in a mouse model of endometriosis using NRF2 knockout (NRF2 -/- ) mice. The mRNA levels of NRF2 and GCL were significantly lower in ectopic endometria of endometriosis-affected women compared to eutopic endometria of disease-free women. The immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the decreased expression of both NRF2 and GCL in ectopic endometriotic tissues compared to eutopic endometria of endometriosis-affected and disease-free women. Immunoblotting revealed a significant decreased of NRF2 and GCL expression in epithelial and stroma cells from ectopic lesions of endometriosis-affected women compared to eutopic endometria from controls. Using a murine model of endometriosis, NRF2 -/- implants were more fibrotic compared to wild-type with an increased weight and volume. These findings indicate that expression of the transcription factor NRF2 and its