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Sample records for esophageal variceal hemorrhage

  1. Prevention of Esophageal Variceal Rebleeding

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    Gin-Ho Lo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate of rebleeding of esophageal varices remains high after cessation of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage. Many measures have been developed to prevent the occurrence of rebleeding. When considering their effectiveness in reduction of rebleeding, the associated complications cannot be neglected. Due to unavoidable high incidence of complications, shunt surgery and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy are now rarely used. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt was developed to replace shunt operation but is now reserved for rescue therapy. Nonselective beta-blockers alone or in combination with isosorbide mononitrate and endoscopic variceal ligation are currently the first choices in the prevention of variceal rebleeding. The combination of nonselective beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal ligation appear to enhance the efficacy. With the advent of newly developed measures, esophageal variceal rebleeding could be greatly reduced and the survival of cirrhotics with bleeding esophageal varices could thereby be prolonged.

  2. Esophageal variceal ligation for hemostasis of acute variceal bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Endoscopic variceal ligation is widely accepted as the optimum endoscopic treatment for esophageal variceal hemorrhage. In Morocco, there are no data regarding the efficacy of this technique. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of endoscopic variceal ligation in the management of ...

  3. Evaluation of portosystemic collaterals by MDCT-MPR imaging for management of hemorrhagic esophageal varices

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    Kodama, Hideaki [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Aikata, Hiroshi, E-mail: aikata@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Takaki, Shintaro; Azakami, Takahiro; Katamura, Yoshio; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Imamura, Michio; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Takahashi, Shoichi [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Toyota, Naoyuki; Ito, Katsuhide [Department of Radiology, Division of Medical Intelligence and Informatics, Programs for Applied Biomedicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Chayama, Kazuaki [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Objective: To study the correlation between changes in portosystemic collaterals, evaluated by multidetector-row computed tomography imaging using multiplanar reconstruction (MDCT-MPR), and prognosis in patients with hemorrhagic esophageal varices (EV) after endoscopic treatment. Methods: Forty-nine patients with primary hemostasis for variceal bleeding received radical endoscopic treatment: endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) or endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Patients were classified according to the rate of reduction in feeding vessel diameter on MDCT-MPR images, into the narrowing (n = 24) and no-change (n = 25) groups. We evaluated changes in portosystemic collaterals by MDCT-MPR before and after treatment, and determined rebleeding and survival rates. Results: The left gastric and paraesophageal (PEV) veins were recognized as portosystemic collaterals in 100 and 80%, respectively, of patients with EV on MDCT-MPR images. The rebleeding rates at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years after endoscopic treatment were 10, 15, 23, and 23%, respectively, for the narrowing group, and 17, 24, 35, and 67%, respectively, for the no-change group (P = 0.068). Among no-change group, the rebleeding rate in patients with large PEV was significantly lower than that with small PEV (P = 0.027). The rebleeding rate in patients with small PEV of the no-change group was significantly higher than that in the narrowing group (P = 0.018). There was no significant difference in rebleeding rates between the no-change group with a large PEV and narrowing group (P = 0.435). Conclusion: Changes in portosystemic collaterals evaluated by MDCT-MPR imaging correlate with rebleeding rate. Evaluation of portosystemic collaterals in this manner would provide useful information for the management of hemorrhagic EV.

  4. Evaluation of portosystemic collaterals by MDCT-MPR imaging for management of hemorrhagic esophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Hideaki; Aikata, Hiroshi; Takaki, Shintaro; Azakami, Takahiro; Katamura, Yoshio; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Imamura, Michio; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Takahashi, Shoichi; Toyota, Naoyuki; Ito, Katsuhide; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation between changes in portosystemic collaterals, evaluated by multidetector-row computed tomography imaging using multiplanar reconstruction (MDCT-MPR), and prognosis in patients with hemorrhagic esophageal varices (EV) after endoscopic treatment. Methods: Forty-nine patients with primary hemostasis for variceal bleeding received radical endoscopic treatment: endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) or endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Patients were classified according to the rate of reduction in feeding vessel diameter on MDCT-MPR images, into the narrowing (n = 24) and no-change (n = 25) groups. We evaluated changes in portosystemic collaterals by MDCT-MPR before and after treatment, and determined rebleeding and survival rates. Results: The left gastric and paraesophageal (PEV) veins were recognized as portosystemic collaterals in 100 and 80%, respectively, of patients with EV on MDCT-MPR images. The rebleeding rates at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years after endoscopic treatment were 10, 15, 23, and 23%, respectively, for the narrowing group, and 17, 24, 35, and 67%, respectively, for the no-change group (P = 0.068). Among no-change group, the rebleeding rate in patients with large PEV was significantly lower than that with small PEV (P = 0.027). The rebleeding rate in patients with small PEV of the no-change group was significantly higher than that in the narrowing group (P = 0.018). There was no significant difference in rebleeding rates between the no-change group with a large PEV and narrowing group (P = 0.435). Conclusion: Changes in portosystemic collaterals evaluated by MDCT-MPR imaging correlate with rebleeding rate. Evaluation of portosystemic collaterals in this manner would provide useful information for the management of hemorrhagic EV.

  5. A reproducible canine model of esophageal varices.

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    Jensen, D M; Machicado, G A; Tapia, J I; Kauffman, G; Franco, P; Beilin, D

    1983-03-01

    One of the most promising nonoperative techniques for control of variceal hemorrhage is sclerosis via the fiberoptic endoscope. Many questions remain, however, about sclerosing agents, guidelines for effective use, and limitations of endoscopic techniques. A reproducible large animal model of esophageal varices would facilitate the critical evaluation of techniques for variceal hemostasis or sclerosis. Our purpose was to develop a large animal model of esophageal varices. Studies in pigs and dogs are described which led to the development of a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices. For the final model, mongrel dogs had laparotomy, side-to-side portacaval shunt, inferior vena cava ligation, placement of an ameroid constrictor around the portal vein, and liver biopsy. The mean (+/- SE) pre- and postshunt portal pressure increased significantly from 12 +/- 0.4 to 23 +/- 1 cm saline. Weekly endoscopies were performed to grade the varix size. Two-thirds of animals developed medium or large sized esophageal varices after the first operation. Three to six weeks later, a second laparotomy with complete ligation of the portal vein and liver biopsy were performed in animals with varices (one-third of the animals). All dogs developed esophageal varices and abdominal wall collateral veins of variable size 3-6 wk after the first operation. After the second operation, the varices became larger. Shunting of blood through esophageal varices via splenic and gastric veins was demonstrated by angiography. Sequential liver biopsies were normal. There was no morbidity or mortality. Ascites, encephalopathy, or spontaneous variceal bleeding did not occur. We have documented the lack of size change and the persistence of medium to large esophageal varices and abdominal collateral veins in all animals followed for more than 6 mo. Variceal bleeding could be induced by venipuncture for testing endoscopic hemostatic and sclerosis methods. We suggest other potential uses of this

  6. Management of esophageal varices in children by endoscopic variceal ligation.

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    Price, M R; Sartorelli, K H; Karrer, F M; Narkewicz, M R; Sokol, R J; Lilly, J R

    1996-08-01

    Endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy (EVS) has been considered the mainstay of therapy for bleeding esophageal varices in adults. However, recent data have shown that endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is just as efficacious and has fewer complications than EVS. Although there are many reports concerning EVL in adults, only a few studies have been done in children. This report describes experience with EVL in 22 children with esophageal variceal hemorrhage. Eighty-seven EVL procedures were performed during a 9-year period in 22 children. The causes of portal hypertension were biliary atresia (10), portal vein thrombosis (8), chronic active hepatitis (1), cirrhosis secondary to cystic fibrosis (2), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (1). The age range at the onset of variceal bleeding was 8 months to 19 years. Twelve patients had EVS before EVL treatment was begun. Distal esophageal varices (one to four per session) were mechanically ligated using an elastic band ligature device attached to a flexible endoscope. The aim of therapy was obliteration of distal esophageal varices by EVL, every 2 to 4 weeks, until eradication. Subsequent EVL was dictated by the status of the varices. Outcome was assessed with respect to survival, rebleeding, status of varices, and complications. The patients underwent a mean of four sessions of EVL (range, one to eight). Four patients subsequently underwent liver transplantation. Of the 18 patients remaining (average follow-up period, 5.3 years), 12 had their varices eradicated (average of four EVL sessions), four are still in treatment, one has not been evaluated in the past 4 years, and one died of liver failure. Complications included bleeding between sessions (6 patients), cervical esophageal perforation (1 patient), and transient fever (2 patients). No child has experienced symptoms of esophageal stenosis or gastroesophageal reflux. Two patients died of liver disease, unrelated to bleeding from portal hypertension. EVL is effective in

  7. Pharmacologic influence on esophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunderquist, A.; Owman, T.

    1983-01-01

    Selective catherization of the left gastric vein was performed after percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP) in patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Following the hypothesis that drugs increasing the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure may obstruct the variceal blood flow throught the lower esophagus, the effect of different drugs (i.e., intravenous injection of vasopressin, pentagastrin, domperidone and somatostatin and subcutaneous injection of metacholine) on the variceal blood flow was examined. Vasopressin did not change the variceal blood flow; pentagastrine, with its known effect of increasing the LES pressure produced a total interruption of the flow in four of eight patients; domperiodone, also known to increase the LES pressure obstructed the variceal blood flow in the only patient examined with this drug; somatostatin has no reported action on the LES but blocked the flow in one of two patients; and metacholine, reported to increase the LES pressure did not produce any change in the flow in the three patients examined. LES pressure was recorded before and during vasopressin infusion in seven patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. No reaction on the pressure was found. The patient number in the study is small and the results are nonuniform but still they suggest that drugs increasing the LES tonus might be useful to control variceal blood flow. (orig.)

  8. Radionuclide transit in esophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, S.H.; Wang, S.J.; Wu, L.C.; Liu, R.S.; Tsai, Y.T.; Chiang, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    This study assessed esophageal motility in patients with esophageal varices by radionuclide transit studies. Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position above a low-energy all-purpose collimator of a gamma camera. The condensed image (CI) superimposed with a centroid curve was also produced in each case. Twenty-five normal subjects (N) and 32 patients (pts) with esophageal varices by endoscopy (large varices in Grades IV and V in 8 and small varices in Grade III or less in 24) were studied. TMTT, RTT, RF, and RI were all significantly increased in pts as compared to N. Especially, the transit time for the middle third (6.7 +- 2.6 sec vs 3.5 +- 0.9 sec in N, rho < 0.005) had the optimal sensitivy and specificity of 88% each at the cutoff value of 4.2 sec as determined by ROC analysis. In summary, radionuclide transit disorders occur in the majority of pts with esopageal varices. The middle RTT and CI are both optimal in sensitivity and specificity for detecting the abnormalities

  9. Asymptomatic Esophageal Varices Should Be Endoscopically Treated

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    Nib Soehendra

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic treatment has generally been accepted in the management of bleeding esophageal varices. Both the control of acute variceal bleeding and elective variceal eradication to prevent recurrent bleeding can be achieved via endoscopic methods. In contrast to acute and elective treatment, the role of endoscopic therapy in asymptomatic patients who have never had variceal bleeding remains controversial because of the rather disappointing results obtained from prophylactic sclerotherapy. Most published randomized controlled trials showed that prophylactic sclerotherapy had no effect on survival. In some studies, neither survival rate nor bleeding risk was improved. In this article, the author champions the view that asymptomatic esophageal varices should be endoscopically treated.

  10. The difference of variceal distribution in the portal hypertension on CT between hemorrhagic and nonhemorrhagic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwa Yeon; Yoo, Seung Min; Lim, Sang Joon; Lee, Jong Beum; Kim, Yang Soo; Choi, Young Hee; Choi, Yun Sun

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether there is any difference in variceal distribution between patients with and without a history of esophageal variceal bleeding. To compare the distribution of varices, abdominal CT scans of 24 patients with a history of esophageal variceal bleeding (hemorrhagic group) and 90 patients without a history of bleeding (non-hemorrhagic group) were retrospectively assessed. The most common varices in both the hemorrhagic (n=21, 87.5%) and nonhemorrhagic group (n=53, 58.9%) were coronary varices, with a statistically significant frequency (p<.01). Esophageal varices were also more common in the hemorrhagic than the nonhemorrhagic group (n=19, 79.2% vs n=36, 40.0% : P<.005). Splenorenal shunts were more common in the nonhemorrhagic (n=8, 8.9%) than in the hemorrhagic group (n=0, 0%)(P<.05). Other types of varice such as paraumbilical (n=10, 41.7% vs n=21, 23.3%), perisplenic (n=6, 25% vs n=15, 16.7%) and retroperitoneal-paravertebral (n=11, 45.8% vs n=24, 26.7%) were more common in the hemorrhagic group, but without a statistically significant frequency. The frequency of coronary and esophageal varices was significant in patients with a history of esophageal variceal bleeding. In patients without such a history, splenorenal shunts were seen

  11. [Clinical analysis of early esophageal varices bleeding after endoscopic varices ligation in advanced schistosomiasis patients].

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    Liu, Lie-Qnan; Zhang, Jun; Tian, Yue-Xiao; Hu, Heng; Wang, Gang

    2014-10-01

    To study the clinical characteristics of early esophageal varices bleeding after endoscopic varices ligation (EVL) in advanced schistosomiasis patients. The data of 206 advanced schistosomiasis patients who received VEL were collected and studied retrospectively. There were 17 cases of early esophageal varices bleeding after EVL including 1 died case, the early hemorrhage rate was 8.25%, and the mortality rate was 0.5%. The early bleeding occurred from the 4th to 12th day, and 76% occurred from the 7th to 9th day postoperatively. The direct cause of hemorrhagic was ligation ring falling off, and the inducements were the improper diet (10 cases, 58.8%) and increased abdominal pressure (6 cases, 35%). All the cases of early esophageal varices bleeding occurred in the patients whose liver function being Child-Pugh C. The incidence and mortality of EVL early postoperative hemorrhage are both low, and mostly occur from the 7th to 9th day postoperatively. We should pay attention to the diet and nursing, and the patients with Child-Pugh C liver function are the high risk group.

  12. Tratamento da recidiva hemorrágica por varizes do esôfago em doentes esquistossomóticos operados Treatment of recurrent hemorrhage esophageal varices in schistosomotic patients after surgery

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    José Cesar Assef

    2003-01-01

    ástrica esquerda ocluída e veia gástrica esquerda não-opacificada.OBJECTIVE: To standardize the treatment recurrent hemorrhage esophageal varices in schistosomotic patients after non decompressive surgery. METHODS: We treated 45 patients with schistosomotic portal hypertension who presented recurrent hemorrhage esophageal varices. Performance of abdominal ultra-sonography and arteriographic studies and two groups were defined: Group A: Nineteen patients (42,2% with absence of spleen, occluded splenic artery and patency of left gastric artery and vein, thus characterizing splenectomy at prior operation. Group B: Twenty six patients (57,8% with absence of spleen image, occluded splenic and left gastric artery and non-opacified left gastric vein, showing splenectomy and some type of gastroesophageal devascularization performed before. Patients of Group A were reoperated to carry out the gastroesophageal devascularization and patients of Group B were submitted to a sclerotherapy program. RESULTS: In Group A, one patient (5.3% presented recurrent hemorrhage on the late postoperative period. The esophageal varices decreased in number or diameter in 14 patients (73.7%, disappeared in three (15.8% and remained unchanged in two (10.5%, under final endoscopic evaluation. In Group B, six patients (23.1% presented recurrent bleeding. In four patients the acute hemorrhagic event were controlled. Two patients who underwent mesocaval shunt owing to unsuccess of these methods died postoperatively. Esophageal varices disappeared in 17 patients (65.4%, decreased in number or diameter in seven (26.9% and remained unchanged in two (7.7% after the last endoscopic evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The gastroesophageal devascularization is appropriated to splenectomized patients, with patency of left gastric artery and vein. 2 A long term of esophageal varices endoscopic sclerotherapy may be an option to splenectomized patients, with occluded left gastric artery and non-opacified left gastric ven.

  13. The use of a detachable mini-loop for the treatment of esophageal varices.

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    Sung, J J; Chung, S C

    1998-02-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation is facilitated by multiband ligating devices, but these have limitations including a fixed number of bands, occasional failure to firmly ligate a variceal column, and relatively high cost. We report the use of a mini-loop for treatment of esophageal varices. A detachable nylon ring (mini-loop), maximum diameter 11 mm, passed through the accessory channel of a standard endoscope is opened at the rim of a transparent ligation chamber attached to the instrument. By suction, a varix is brought into the chamber, the mini-loop is maneuvered over the varix, closed, and detached. Five ligation sessions (four to seven loops per session) were performed in four patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. There were variceal stigmata of bleeding, but no active hemorrhage. Application of all mini-loops was successful and did not induce uncontrolled bleeding. Endoscopy at 1 week disclosed superficial ulcers at ligation sites. Post procedure epigastric pain occurred in one patient. Detachable mini-loop ligation of esophageal varices is simple and safe, and a comparison study with a multi-band ligator device is warranted.

  14. [Present status of endoscopic therapy for esophageal varices--endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL)].

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    Suzuki, H; Chiba, M; Yamamoto, M; Hino, S

    1996-01-01

    Recently, EVL was developed to provide the endoscopist a safer method for the treatment of esophageal varices. The purpose of this report is to reveal our data and the present status. From 1989 to 1995, we performed EVL with EIS using Aethoxysklerol in a total of 214 patients who had bleeding and/or risky esophageal varices. Our technique of EVL is as follows; For prophylactic and elective patients, a spiral ligation method was employed and followed by EIS to obtain the complete eradication. When active bleeding was observed, direct ligation was performed onto the bleeding point and if the bleeding point was not found, spiral ligation method was done. Eradicating effect was observed in 97% of the entire patients and 29 active/spurting bleedings were well controlled by this technique. Complications were experienced in 12 cases (2 stenosis and 10 post EVL ulcedr bleeding), however, there were no patients who could not be managed by endoscopic treatment. Variceal recurrence after EVL/EIS were occurred in 36 of 214 patients (16.8%). Recurrent period was ranged from 1 month to 24 months and mean period was 10 months. We conclude that EVL/EIS is safe, easy and effective mean for the treatment of esophageal varices.

  15. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantos, Christos; Kalafateli, Maria

    2014-09-28

    Variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension with a six-week mortality rate of approximately 20%. Patients with medium- or large-sized varices can be treated for primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding using two strategies: non-selective beta-blockers (NSBBs) or endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Both treatments are equally effective. Patients with acute variceal bleeding are critically ill patients. The available data suggest that vasoactive drugs, combined with endoscopic therapy and antibiotics, are the best treatment strategy with EVL being the endoscopic procedure of choice. In cases of uncontrolled bleeding, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents are recommended. Approximately 60% of the patients experience rebleeding, with a mortality rate of 30%. Secondary prophylaxis should start on day six following the initial bleeding episode. The combination of NSBBs and EVL is the recommended management, whereas TIPS with PTFE-covered stents are the preferred option in patients who fail endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. Apart from injection sclerotherapy and EVL, other endoscopic procedures, including tissue adhesives, endoloops, endoscopic clipping and argon plasma coagulation, have been used in the management of esophageal varices. However, their efficacy and safety, compared to standard endoscopic treatment, remain to be further elucidated. There are safety issues accompanying endoscopic techniques with aspiration pneumonia occurring at a rate of approximately 2.5%. In conclusion, future research is needed to improve treatment strategies, including novel endoscopic techniques with better efficacy, lower cost, and fewer adverse events.

  16. [Percutaneous transsplenic varices embolization in treatment of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage of schistosomiasis cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Xue, Ji; Ying, Li; Shuai, Ju; Jin-Wei, Qiang

    2017-03-27

    To evaluate the application value of percutaneous transsplenic varices embolization (PTSVE) in the treatment of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage in patients with schistosomiasis cirrhosis. Sixteen schistosomiasis cirrhosis patients (12 males and 4 females) with portal hypertension complicated with esophageal and upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage were selected as the investigation subjects, all the patients had been treated by esophageal vein ligation and sclerotherapy, but with bleeding again post-operation. The patients were treated by PTSVE under the guidance of X-ray fluoroscopy. The success rate of PTSVE and the rate of complications were observed. In addition, the patients received PTSVE were reexamined with abdominal CT one month post-operation, and the degrees of varices were compared before and after PTSVE. Fourteen cases (87.50%) were successfully treated with PTSVE. Two cases (12.50%) failed, and one case had an abdominal bleeding 1 week post-operation. The abdominal CT showed the degrees of esophageal varices ( P bared main portal vein and even the branches.

  17. Low risk of bacteremia after endoscopic variceal therapy for esophageal varices: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Yi; Dwivedi, Alok; Elhanafi, Sherif; Ortiz, Arleen; Othman, Mohamed; Zuckerman, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy (EVS) are the main therapeutic procedures for the emergency treatment and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal varices in cirrhotics. Post-endoscopic bacteremia has been reported after EVS and EVL, but data on the frequency of bacteremia are conflicting. This study aims to provide incidences of bacteremia after EVS and EVL in different settings through meta-analysis. Methods: Only prospective or...

  18. Banding ligation versus beta-blockers as primary prophylaxis in esophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise L; Klingenberg, Sarah; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2007-01-01

    To compare banding ligation versus beta-blockers as primary prophylaxis in patients with esophageal varices and no previous bleeding.......To compare banding ligation versus beta-blockers as primary prophylaxis in patients with esophageal varices and no previous bleeding....

  19. Changes in Cardiac Varices and Their Clinical Significance after Eradication of Esophageal Varices by Band Ligation

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    Seung Woon Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Cardiac varices (CVs in patients with type 1 gastroesophageal varices (GOV1s usually disappear with treatment for esophageal varices (EVs by endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS. However, whether this applies to patients treated with endoscopic band ligation (EBL for EVs remains unclear. We evaluated the effect of EVs eradication by EBL on CVs. Methods. We included cirrhotic patients whose EVs had been eradicated using EBL and excluded those who had been treated using EIS, those who had received endoscopic therapy for CVs, and those who were combined with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results. A total of 123 patients were enrolled. The age was 59.7 ± 11.7 years, and 96 patients (78.0% were men. Thirty-eight patients (30.9% had EVs only, while 85 (69.1% had GOV1s. After EVs eradication, the CVs disappeared in 55 patients (64.7%. EVs recurred in 40 patients, with recurrence rates at 1, 2, and 3 years of 16.0%, 29.6%, and 35.6%, respectively, the recurrence being more frequent in patients who had undergone EBL for secondary prophylaxis and in those with persisting CVs after EVs eradication (P=0.003. Conclusions. CVs frequently disappeared when EVs were eradicated using EBL in patients with GOV1s. Persistence of CVs after EVs eradication by EBL was associated with EVs recurrence.

  20. The Role of Adjuvant Acid Suppression on the Outcomes of Bleeding Esophageal Varices after Endoscopic Variceal Ligation.

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    Cheng-Kun Wu

    Full Text Available The impact of adjuvant acid suppression via proton pump inhibitors or histamine-2 receptor antagonists after endoscopic variceal ligation remains uncertain. We therefore aimed to evaluate the effect of adjuvant acid suppression on the rebleeding and mortality rates in patients who received endoscopic variceal ligation and vasoconstrictor therapy for bleeding esophageal varices. Data from 1997 to 2011 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. A total of 1576 cirrhotic patients aged > 18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute esophageal variceal bleeding who received endoscopic variceal ligation therapy were screened. After strict exclusion, 637 patients were recruited. The exclusion criteria included patients with gastric variceal bleeding, failure in the control of bleeding, mortality within 12 hours, and history of hepatocellular carcinoma or gastric cancer. Patients were divided into two groups: the vasoconstrictors group (n = 126 and vasoconstrictors plus acid suppression group (n = 511. We observed that the rebleeding and mortality rates were not significantly different between 2 groups during hospitalization and the 15-year follow-up period after discharge. A Charlson score ≥3 (odds ratio: 2.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.55 ~3.79, P = 0.0001, presence of hepatitis C virus (odds ratio: 1.70, 95% confidence interval: 1.15 ~2.52, P = 0.0085, and cirrhosis (odds ratio: 1.69, 95% confidence interval: 1.08 ~2.66, P = 0.0229 were the independent risk factors of mortality after discharge. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggest that adjuvant acid suppression prescription to patients who received endoscopic variceal ligation and vasoconstrictor therapy for bleeding esophageal varices may not change the rebleeding and mortality outcomes compared to that for those who received endoscopic variceal ligation and vasoconstrictor agents without acid suppression.

  1. Plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration for the treatment of gastric variceal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Min Yung; Kim, Man Deuk; Shin, Won Seon; Shin, Min Woo; Kim, Gyoung Min; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun; Kim, Tae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical outcomes of plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) to treat gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. From May 2012 to June 2014, 19 patients (11 men and 8 women, median age; 61, with history of gastric variceal hemorrhage; 17, active bleeding; 2) who underwent PARTO using a vascular plug and a gelfoam pledget were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and laboratory data were examined to evaluate primary (technical and clinical success, complications) and secondary (worsening of esophageal varix [EV], change in liver function) end points. Median follow-up duration was 11 months, from 6.5 to 18 months. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare laboratory data before and after the procedure. Technical success (complete occlusion of the efferent shunt and complete filling of gastric varix [GV] with a gelfoam slurry) was achieved in 18 of 19 (94.7%) patients. The embolic materials could not reach the GV in 1 patient who had endoscopic glue injection before our procedure. The clinical success rate (no recurrence of gastric variceal bleeding) was the same because the technically failed patient showed recurrent bleeding later. Acute complications included fever (n = 2), fever and hypotension (n = 2; one diagnosed adrenal insufficiency), and transient microscopic hematuria (n = 3). Ten patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; all exhibited GV improvement, except 2 without endoscopic change. Five patients exhibited aggravated EV, and 2 of them had a bleeding event. Laboratory findings were significantly improved after PARTO. PARTO is technically feasible, safe, and effective for gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension

  2. Plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration for the treatment of gastric variceal hemorrhage

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    Chang, Min Yung; Kim, Man Deuk; Shin, Won Seon; Shin, Min Woo; Kim, Gyoung Min; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, National Health Insurance Serivce Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical outcomes of plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) to treat gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. From May 2012 to June 2014, 19 patients (11 men and 8 women, median age; 61, with history of gastric variceal hemorrhage; 17, active bleeding; 2) who underwent PARTO using a vascular plug and a gelfoam pledget were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and laboratory data were examined to evaluate primary (technical and clinical success, complications) and secondary (worsening of esophageal varix [EV], change in liver function) end points. Median follow-up duration was 11 months, from 6.5 to 18 months. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare laboratory data before and after the procedure. Technical success (complete occlusion of the efferent shunt and complete filling of gastric varix [GV] with a gelfoam slurry) was achieved in 18 of 19 (94.7%) patients. The embolic materials could not reach the GV in 1 patient who had endoscopic glue injection before our procedure. The clinical success rate (no recurrence of gastric variceal bleeding) was the same because the technically failed patient showed recurrent bleeding later. Acute complications included fever (n = 2), fever and hypotension (n = 2; one diagnosed adrenal insufficiency), and transient microscopic hematuria (n = 3). Ten patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; all exhibited GV improvement, except 2 without endoscopic change. Five patients exhibited aggravated EV, and 2 of them had a bleeding event. Laboratory findings were significantly improved after PARTO. PARTO is technically feasible, safe, and effective for gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension.

  3. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors. A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996–2000), T2 (2001–2005), and T3 (2006–2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate. Our results showed that more patients were expenses increased (P 1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were the independent factors for increased medical expenses. PMID:27428225

  4. Elevation of the AST to ALT ratio in association with the severity of esophageal varices in patients with HCV-related compensated liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yoshinori; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Hironori; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Ishii, Akio; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Yuri, Yukihisa; Iwata, Kazunari; Saito, Masaki; Imanishi, Hiroyasu; lijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    The development of esophageal varices depends on the progression of liver fibrosis. However, it has not yet been sufficiently clarified whether biomarkers of liver fibrosis can be used to predict the incidence of varices in cirrhotic patients with a well-maintained liver function (Child-Pugh class A). Three established markers of liver fibrosis, including AST-to-ALT ratios (AAR), FIB-4 and AST-to-platelet ratio indices (APRI), were analyzed in HCV-positive cirrhotic patients with Child-Pugh class A status, and the relationships between these markers and the risk of variceal bleeding were investigated. The values of AAR and FIB-4 in the patient with varices with a high risk of hemorrhage were significantly higher than those in the patients without high-risk varices, whereas the value of APRI was not found to be related to the risk of variceal bleeding. Of all the parameters examined, the values of AAR were the most significantly different between the two (with or without high-risk varices) groups. In addition, the values of AAR increased in line with variceal severity. The value of AAR is related to the severity and risk of variceal bleeding in patients with HCV-related compensated cirrhosis.

  5. Low risk of bacteremia after endoscopic variceal therapy for esophageal varices: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Dwivedi, Alok; Elhanafi, Sherif; Ortiz, Arleen; Othman, Mohamed; Zuckerman, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy (EVS) are the main therapeutic procedures for the emergency treatment and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal varices in cirrhotics. Post-endoscopic bacteremia has been reported after EVS and EVL, but data on the frequency of bacteremia are conflicting. This study aims to provide incidences of bacteremia after EVS and EVL in different settings through meta-analysis. Only prospective or randomized studies were included in this meta-analysis. Binomial distribution was used to compute variance for each study. Random effects models were used as the final model for estimating the effect size and 95 % confidence interval. Adjusted effects were obtained using meta-regression analysis. Nineteen prospective studies involving 1001 procedures in 587 patients were included in the meta-analysis on the risk of bacteremia after EVS or EVL in cirrhotics with esophageal varices. The frequency of bacteremia after endoscopic variceal therapy was 13 %. The frequency of bacteremia after EVS (17 %) was higher than after EVL (6 %) with no statistically significant difference (P = 0.106). The frequency of bacteremia after elective EVS (14 %) was significantly less than after emergency EVS (22 %) (P EVL (7.6 %) was not significantly different from after emergency EVL (3.2 %) (P = 0.850). The incidence of bacteremia is low in patients with cirrhosis and varices after esophageal variceal therapy. These results are consistent with our current guidelines that antibiotic prophylaxis before endoscopic variceal therapy is only necessary for bleeding patients.

  6. Treatment of Non variceal Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage by Transcatheter Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.; Ul Haq, T.; Salam, B.; Beg, M.; Sayani, R.; Azeemuddin, M.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the sensitivity of mesenteric angiography, technical success of hemostasis, clinical success rate, and complications of transcatheter embolization for the treatment of acute non variceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Material and Methods. A retrospective review of 200 consecutive patients who underwent mesenteric arteriography for acute non variceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage between February 2004 and February 2011 was done. Results. Of 200 angiographic studies, 114 correctly revealed the bleeding site with mesenteric angiography. 47 (41%) patients had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and 67 (59%) patients had lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Out of these 114, in 112 patients (98%) technical success was achieved with immediate cessation of bleeding. 81 patients could be followed for one month. Clinical success was achieved in 72 out of these 81 patients (89%). Seven patients rebled. 2 patients developed bowel ischemia. Four patients underwent surgery for bowel ischemia or rebleeding. Conclusion. The use of therapeutic transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is highly successful and relatively safe with 98% technical success and 2.4% post embolization ischemia in our series. In 89% of cases it was definitive without any further intervention.

  7. Monometric and scintiscanning evaluation of esophageal function after endoscopic sclerosis of esophageal varices. Controlled prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.L.A.

    1990-01-01

    Esophageal function was studied in twenty-one patients with esophageal varices of different etiology submitted to endoscopic sclerosis for the detection of possible alterations in the functional pattern of the organ after this treatment. The endoscopic injection sclerosis (EIS) was performed electively in 14 patients (Group I) and in the presence of bleeding in 07 (Group II). The sclerotizing agent used was a solution of equal parts of ethanolamine oleate (Ethamolin R ) and 50% glucose. The injections were preferentially performed by the perivascular technique at weekly intervals. Esophageal function was studied by manometry, and esophageal transit time by scintillography. Group I patients were evaluated before and two to three months and five to nine months after EIS, and Group II patients were only evaluated six to nine months after EIS. The manometry and scintillography procedures were performed in sequence on the same day. The scintillographic examinations were performed with the patient in the supine and sitting positions. (author)

  8. Less-invasive MR indices of clinically evident esophageal variceal bleeding in biliary atresia patients

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    Yuan Heng Mo

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Less-invasive indices, including the corrected splenic length platelet ratio and the splenic volume index-to-platelet count ratio, may be valuable predictors of esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with biliary atresia.

  9. Association of Endoscopic Esophageal Variceal Ligation with Duodenal Ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, Z. H.; Lin, A. F.; Tang, D. P.; Wei, J. J.; Pan, Y. F.; Liu, Z. J.; Xin, X. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of duodenal ulcer (DU), as well as other clinical characteristics occurring after endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) of the esophagus. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China, from April 2012 to April 2013. Methodology: A total of 47 patients with esophageal varices (EVr) who had also undergone EVL and gastroscopic follow-up within 3 months of the procedure was retrospectively analyzed. The status of Helicobacter pylori(Hp) infection, Child-Pugh classification, and the grades of portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) were collected. Sixty EVr patients without EVL treatment, but with clinical data available, served as the control group. Results: The frequency of DU in the EVL group (29.8%, 14/47) was higher than the control group (6.7%, 4/60) (p=0.02). Hp infection rate in EVL group was 19.15% (9/47), while in control group was 21.67% (13/60) (p=0.813). Hp positive rate (12.5%, 1/8) in patients exhibited new DUs after EVL was comparable to the patients without DU in the EVL group (12.1%, 4/33) (p=1.00). Patients with DU after EVL received 18.79 ± 8.48 of ligating bands, while in those who did not exhibit DUs received 13.85 ± 6.47 (z = -2.042, p = 0.041). Logistic regression analysis showed that the occurrence of DU was not associated with age, gender, Child-Pugh classification, or the grade of PHG (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Esophageal EVL is associated with a higher frequency of developing DU, which is related to a larger number of applied bands but is not correlated with Hp infection status or other variables. (author)

  10. Association of Endoscopic Esophageal Variceal Ligation with Duodenal Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ze-Hao; Lin, Ai-Fang; Tang, Du-Peng; Wei, Jing-Jing; Liu, Zheng-Ji; Xin, Xiao-Mei; Pan, Yu-Feng

    2016-04-01

    To determine the frequency of duodenal ulcer (DU), as well as other clinical characteristics occurring after endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) of the esophagus. Descriptive study. The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China, from April 2012 to April 2013. A total of 47 patients with esophageal varices (EVr) who had also undergone EVL and gastroscopic follow-up within 3 months of the procedure was retrospectively analyzed. The status of Helicobacter pylori(Hp) infection, Child-Pugh classification, and the grades of portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) were collected. Sixty EVr patients without EVL treatment, but with clinical data available, served as the control group. The frequency of DU in the EVL group (29.8%, 14/47) was higher than the control group (6.7%, 4/60) (p=0.02). Hp infection rate in EVLgroup was 19.15% (9/47), while in control group was 21.67% (13/60) (p=0.813). Hp positive rate (12.5%, 1/8) in patients exhibited new DUs after EVL was comparable to the patients without DU in the EVL group (12.1%, 4/33) (p=1.00). Patients with DU after EVL received 18.79 ±8.48 of ligating bands, while in those who did not exhibit DUs received 13.85 ±6.47 (z = -2.042, p = 0.041). Logistic regression analysis showed that the occurrence of DU was not associated with age, gender, Child-Pugh classification, or the grade of PHG (p > 0.05). Esophageal EVL is associated with a higher frequency of developing DU, which is related to a larger number of applied bands but is not correlated with Hp infection status or other variables.

  11. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Triantos, Christos; Kalafateli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension with a six-week mortality rate of approximately 20%. Patients with medium- or large-sized varices can be treated for primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding using two strategies: non-selective beta-blockers (NSBBs) or endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Both treatments are equally effective. Patients with acute variceal bleeding are critically ill patients. The available data suggest that vasoactive drugs, combined w...

  12. Endoscopic ligation of esophageal varices for prophylaxis of first bleeding in children and adolescents with portal hypertension: preliminary results of a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celińska-Cedro, Danuta; Teisseyre, Mikotaj; Woynarowski, Marek; Socha, Piotr; Socha, Jerzy; Ryzko, Józef

    2003-07-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is effective in controlling rebleeding from esophageal varices in children, but there is no data on the use of EVL to prevent initial bleeding. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of EVL in preventing the first hemorrhage from esophageal varices in children. Thirty-seven children with portal hypertension (22 liver cirrhosis, 15 portal vein thrombosis), aged 4 to 17 years (M = 9.5 +/- 4.4 years) were included in the study. The criteria for inclusion were (1) no previous variceal bleeding; (2) the presence of esophageal varices classified grade II or more, and (3) their enlargement by at least I grade after 6 months of observation without endoscopic treatment or appearance of endoscopic signs of high bleeding risk. A Multi-Band Ligator was used, and 2 to 6 bands were fixed under general anesthesia during one procedure depending on the number and size of varices. Follow-up examinations were performed every 3 months, repeating the procedure if necessary. In total, 75 procedures of EVL were performed, from one to 5 in each patient Four patients underwent liver transplantation before eradication of varices. Two others were excluded from the observation because of lack of compliance to the protocol. Of the remaining 31 patients, eradication of varices was achieved in 28 children (90.3%) after 2.0 EVL sessions performed at 3-month intervals. The average time of follow-up after cessation of treatment is 16 months. No bleeding from varices occurred in any child during or after treatment. There were no differences in results between children with liver cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis. Development of hypertensive gastropathy was observed in 2 children with one episode of bleeding. Recurrence of varices without bleeding occurred in 3 children after 12, 13, and 28 months from eradication. The study results confirmed that endoscopic variceal ligation is a safe and highly effective procedure in children

  13. Correlation Between Esophageal Varices and Lok Score as a Non-invasive Parameter in Liver Cirrhosis Patients

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    Iqbal Sungkar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding from gastro-esophageal varices is the most serious and life-threatening complication of cirrhosis. Endoscopic surveillance of esophageal varices in cirrhotic patients is expensive and uncomfortable for the patients. Therefore, there is a particular need for non-invasive predictors for esophageal varices. The aim of the present study was to evaluate association of esophageal varices and Lok Score as non-invasive parameter in liver cirrhosis patients. This is a cross-sectional study of patients admitted at the Adam Malik hospital Medan between September to December 2014 with a diagnosis of cirrhosis based on clinical, biochemical examination, ultrasound, and gastroscopy. Lok Score was calculated for all patients, tabulated and analyzed. Among 76 patients with esophageal varices, 55.3% was due to hepatitis B virus (HBV. The majority of patients were Child C with only 13,2% being Child Pugh class A. Majority of the population had F2 esophageal varices (42.1%, F1 (32.9%, and F3 (25%. There is significance difference between Lok Score and grading of esophageal varices, in which Lok Score is higher in large esophageal varices compared with small esophageal varises (0.92 ± 0.14 vs. 0.70 ± 0.29; p = 0.001. Lok Score with cut-off point of > 0.9141 was highly predictive in the diagnosis large esophageal varices with a sensitivity of 74.5%, specificity of 72%, positive predictive value of 84%, negative predictive value 58%, and accuracy was 73.7%. Lok Score was significantly associated with esophageal varices. Lok Score is a good non-invasive predictor of large esophageal varices in cirrhotic patients.

  14. Clinical effect of esophageal variceal ligation in treatment of esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis

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    ZHANG Dongxu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical effect of endoscopic esophageal variceal ligation (EVL in the treatment of esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB in patients with liver cirrhosis. MethodsA total of 84 liver cirrhosis patients with EVB who were admitted to The Third People′s Hospital of Shenzhen, Guangdong Medical University, from December 2010 to July 2013 were divided into ligation group (group A, treated with EVL combined with somatostatin and esomeprazole and control group (group B, treated with somatostatin and esomeprazole, with 42 patients in each group. The hemostasis rate, rebleeding rate, incidence rate of complications, and mortality rate were observed in both groups, as well as the variceal eradication rate after EVL and risk factors for early rebleeding. The t-test was used for comparison of normally distributed continuous data between two groups, and an analysis of variance was used for comparison between multiple groups; the Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of non-normally distributed continuous data between two groups, the Wilcoxon signed-rank sum test was used for comparison within each group, and the Kruskal-Wallis H test was used for comparison between multiple groups. The chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival rates, and the log-rank test was used to compare survival rates between groups. The logistic regression method was used to investigate the influencing factors for dichotomous data. ResultsThere was a significant difference in the hemostasis rate between groups A and B (97.62% vs 80.95%, P=0.029. Compared with group B, group A had significantly lower rebleeding rates in 1-2 years (15.38% vs 38.89%, χ2=5.323, P=0.021 and 2-3 years (15.38% vs 48.48%, χ2=10.448, P=0.001. A total of 14 patients (33.33% in group A and 7 patients (16.67% in group B experienced adverse events, and 4 patients in

  15. Rebleeding rates following TIPS for variceal hemorrhage in the Viatorr era: TIPS alone versus TIPS with variceal embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaba, Ron C; Bui, James T; Cotler, Scott J; Kallwitz, Eric R; Mengin, Olga T; Martinez, Brandon K; Berkes, Jaime L; Carrillo, Tami C; Knuttinen, M Grace; Owens, Charles A

    2010-08-06

    To compare rebleeding rates following treatment of variceal hemorrhage with TIPS alone versus TIPS with variceal embolization in the covered stent-graft era. In this retrospective study, 52 patients (M:F 29:23, median age 52 years) with hepatic cirrhosis and variceal hemorrhage underwent TIPS insertion between 2003 and 2008. Median Child-Pugh and MELD scores were 8.5 and 13.5. Generally, 10-mm diameter TIPS were created using covered stent-grafts (Viatorr; W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ). A total of 37 patients underwent TIPS alone, while 15 patients underwent TIPS with variceal embolization. The rates of rebleeding and survival were compared. All TIPS were technically successful. Median portosystemic pressure gradient reductions were 13 versus 11 mmHg in the embolization and non-embolization groups. There were no statistically significant differences in Child-Pugh and MELD score, or portosystemic pressure gradients between each group. A trend toward increased rebleeding was present in the non-embolization group, where 8/37 (21.6%) patients rebled while 1/15 (6.7%) patients in the TIPS with embolization group rebled (P = 0.159) during median follow-up periods of 199 and 252 days (P = 0.374). Rebleeding approached statistical significance among patients with acute hemorrhage, where 8/32 (25%) versus 0/14 (0%) rebled in the non-embolization and embolization groups (P = 0.055). A trend toward increased bleeding-related mortality was seen in the non-embolization group (P = 0.120). TIPS alone showed a high incidence of rebleeding in this series, whereas TIPS with variceal embolization resulted in reduced recurrent hemorrhage. The efficacy of embolization during TIPS performed for variceal hemorrhage versus TIPS alone should be further compared with larger prospective randomized trials.

  16. Motion – Prophylactic Banding of Esophageal Varices Is Useful: Arguments for the Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory V Stiegmann

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Variceal hemorrhage is a frequent complication of cirrhosis and is associated with a high mortality rate, especially in patients with decompensated liver disease. Endoscopy is useful in identifying factors that predict a high likelihood of bleeding, including large varices and red colour signs. Endoscopic rubber band ligation has superseded sclerotherapy in the prevention of both recurrent hemorrhage and the first episode of bleeding, because it causes fewer complications and requires fewer sessions to eradicate varices. It has been proven to be more effective than nontreatment in the primary prophylaxis against variceal hemorrhage. There is extensive literature that has found that band ligation is more effective than beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists at preventing the first variceal hemorrhage. There is ongoing debate about the relative merits of these two approaches, but the available evidence supports the conclusion that band ligation is the treatment of choice in the primary prevention of variceal bleeding. Trials of combined medical and endoscopic therapy are eagerly awaited, and the author suspects that it may prove to be more effective than either modality alone.

  17. [Frequency and mortality by rebleeding in cirrhotic patients treated for bleeding esophagic varices in two hospitals in Lima Peru during years 2009 to 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichilingue Reto, Catherina; Queirolo Rodriguez, Fiorella Sabrinna; Ruiz Llenque, José Jonathan; Bravo Paredes, Eduar; Guzmán Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos López, Roxana; Corzo Maldonado, Manuel Alejandro; Valdivia Roldán, Mario

    2013-01-01

    During the first 6 weeks after a variceal hemorrhage there is a 30-40% of probability of recurrence and those who rebleed 20- 30% die. Passed this period, the risk of rebleeding is of 60% and reaches a mortality of 60-70% in two years without treatment. Describe the frequency of rebleeding and mortality due to rebleeding in cirrhotic patients treated for variceal hemorrhage at Endoscopic Centers of Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru and Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza, Lima, Peru during the years 2009-2011. The study type is a transversal, periodic and retrospective one in which were included 176 cirrhotic patients older than 14 years who have bleed for esophageal varices and that have received endoscopic therapy. The instruments used were a data sheet with all the information obtained from the clinical chart of each patient, the CHILD score to assess severity of hepatic disease, endoscopic informs and phone calls. The frequency of rebleeding before 6 weeks was 32.20% (56 patients). Also, the frequency of rebleeding after that time was 22.56% (37 patients). There was a mortality rate of 5.70% (10 patients) and a mortality rate due to rebleeding of 13.33% (6 patients). Variceal hemorrhage is an important cause of mobimortality in peruvian people. The frequency of rebleeding and mortality due to rebleeding resulted slightly lower than in other countries.

  18. Correlation of thrombocytopenia with grading of esophageal varices in chronic liver disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, A.; Butt, N.; Bhutto, A.R.; Munir, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the severity of thrombocytopenia in different grades of esophageal varices. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, Medical Unit-III, Ward-7 from January to December 2008. Methodology: Subjects were eligible if they had a diagnosis of cirrhosis. Patient with advanced cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class C), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, hepatocellular carcinoma, portal vein thrombosis, parenteral drug addiction, current alcohol abuse and previous or current treatment with b-blockers, diuretics and other vasoactive drugs were excluded from the study. All patients under went upper gastrointestinal endoscopy after consent. On the basis of platelet count patients were divided into four groups. Group I with platelets greater or equal to 20000/mm/sup 3/, Group II with values of 21000- 50000/mm/sup 3/, Group III with count of 51000-99000/mm/sup 3/ and Group IV with count of 100000-150000/mm/sup 3/. Correlation of severity of thrombocytopenia with the grading of esophageal varices was assessed using Spearman's correlation with r-values of 0.01 considered significant. Results: One hundred and two patients with thrombocytopenia and esophageal varices were included in the study. There were 62 (60.8%) males and 40 (39.2%) females. The mean age of onset of the disease in these patients was 49.49 +- 14.3 years with range of 11-85 years. Major causes of cirrhosis were hepatitis C (n=79, 77.5%), hepatitis B (n=12, 11.8%), mixed hepatitis B and C infection (n=8, 7.8%) and Wilson's disease (n=3,2.9%). Seven patients had esophageal grade I, 24 had grade II, 35 had grade III, and 36 had grade IV. Gastric varices were detected in 2 patients. Portal hypertensive gastropathy were detected in 87 patients. There was an inverse correlation of platelet count with grading of esophageal varices (r=-0.321, p < 0.001). Conclusion: The severity of thrombocytopenia increased as the grading of

  19. Percutaneous transhepatic obliteration of stomal variceal hemorrhage from an ileal conduct: Case report and brief literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Hyun; Lee, Shin Jae; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun; Kim, Man Deuk [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Young [Institute of Gastroenterology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Variceal bleeding is an unusual complication of ileal conduits. We report a case in which recurrent stomal variceal hemorrhage from an ileal conduit for bladder cancer was successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic obliteration (PTO) using microcoils and N-butyl cyanoacrylate. Therefore, PTO can be one treatment option to prevent recurrent stomal variceal bleeding from ileal conduits.

  20. Splenomegaly and its Relation to Esophageal Varices in Patient with liver Cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasheid, S.A.; Hafez, E.N.; Al Kady, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis has been associated with portal hypertension as a common complication with subsequent development of esophageal varices (EV).Bleeding due to rupture of esophageal varices (EV) is one of main cause of death in liver cirrhosis, that endoscopy screening is recommended. The aim of work was to determin the of the degree esophageal varices endoscopically in in 60 cirrhotic patients,(32 in Child-Pugh's class A, 16 in Child-Pugh's class B, and 12 in Child-Pugh's class C) who were examined clinically, laboratory , ultrasonography to and comparing them with the determines of the spleen ultrasonography and some biochemical data . Correlation analysis was done to assess this study. Of 60 patients, 20 were admitted to hospital because of acute gastro-intestinal bleeding and 40 without history of gastro-intestinal bleeding. The range age of patients was 30-65 years (average 48.4 ± 8.6 years), 6 (10%) patients with EV grade I, 14(23.4%) patients with grade II and 10 (16.6%) patients with grade III. Twinty patients having esophageal varices of different degrees, had no splenomegaly. A negative correlation was found between spleen diameter and the degree of EV (p < 0.05). The percentage of patients with varices increased with the severty of Liver cirrhosis: 6(18.8) of 32 patients in Child-Pugh class A,14 (87.5%) of 16 in Child-Pugh class B, and 10(83.3%) of 12 in Child-Pugh class C had varices.The degree of EV significantly correlated with Child-Puph score. Patients with varices had lower platelet counts comparison to those without varices (237.259 ± 100.305, 298.424 ± 103.09 respectively; p<0.001), and lower serum albumin comparison to those without varices (1.8 ± 0.92, 2.8 ± 0.83 respectively; p<0.001). The platelet count to spleen diameter ratio (PC/SD) in patients with EV were significantly Rasheid et. al., J. Rad. Res. Appl. Sci., 266 Vol. 6, No. 1B (2013) different from patients without EV (945.84±778.59, 686.26± 546.39 respectively; p<0.001).

  1. PLATELET COUNT SQUARED/SPLEEN DIAMETER-ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE RATIO: NON-INVASIVE METHOD TO PREDICT ESOPHAGEAL VARICES

    OpenAIRE

    MATTOS, Ângelo Zambam de; DAROS, Larissa Faraco; MATTOS, Angelo Alves de

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND - Variceal bleeding has a high mortality among cirrhotics, and screening with endoscopy is indicated at the diagnosis of cirrhosis. Screening with endoscopy implies discomfort, risks and considerable costs. OBJECTIVE - To evaluate platelet count squared/spleen diameter-aspartate aminotransferase ratio (PS/SA), as a non-invasive predictor of esophageal varices in cirrhotics. METHODS - This cross-sectional study evaluated cirrhotics for PS/SA and presence of esophageal...

  2. Non-invasive predictors of esophageous varices in children and adolescents with chronic liver disease or extrahepatic portal venous obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Alcantara, Roberta V.; Yamada, Roberto M.; De Tommaso, Adriana M. A.; Bellomo-Brandão, Maria Angela; Hessel, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify non-invasive predictors of esophageal varices in children and adolescents with chronic liver disease or extrahepatic portal venous obstruction (EHPVO). METHODS: 53 patients younger than 20 years with chronic liver disease or EHPVO and no history of bleeding or prophylactic treatment of esophageal varices (EV) were assessed. They were divided into 2 groups: group I (35 with chronic liver disease) and group II (18 with EHPVO). Their blood count, international normalized r...

  3. Correlation of Major Scan Findings and Esophageal Varices in Liver Cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, J. S.; Bahk, Y. W.; Lim, J. L.

    1970-01-01

    In an endeavor to help understand some typical scan findings and portal hemodynamics in liver cirrhosis, several commonly occurring scan changes and esophageal varices as demonstrated by esophagram were correlated one another from quantitative and qualitative stand points. Clinical materials consisted of 34 patients with proven diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and esophageal varices. Liver scan was performed with colloidal 198-Au and the changes in the size and internal architecture of the Liver, splenic uptake and splenomegaly were graded and scored by repeated double-blind readings. The variceal changes on esophagrams were also graded according to the classification of Shanks and Kerley following modification. Of 34 patients, 91% showed definite reducing in liver volume(shrinkage) constituting the most frequent scan change. The splenic uptake and splenomegaly were noted in 73.5 and 79.4%, respectively. The present study revealed no positive correlation between the graded scan findings including shrinkage of the liver, splenic uptake or splenomegaly and severity of variceal changes of the esophagus. Exceptionally, however, apparently paradoxical correlation was noted between the severity of mottling and varices. Thus, in the majority(73.5%) of patients mottling were either absent or mild. This interesting observation is in favor of the view held by Christie et al. who consider the mottlings to be not faithful expression of actual scarring of the cirrhosis liver. This also would indicate that variceal changes are to be the results of intrahepatic arteriovenous shunting of blood with hypervolemic load to the portal system rather than simple hypertension secondary to fibrosis and shrinkage.

  4. Predictors of esophageal varices in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis: a retrospective study

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    Jiang Zen-cai

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All patients with liver cirrhosis are recommended to undergo an evaluation of esophageal varices (EV to assess their risk of bleeding. Predicting the presence of EV through non-invasive means may reduce a large number of unnecessary endoscopies. This study was designed to develop a predictive model for varices in patients with Hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis. Methods The retrospective analysis was performed in 146 patients with Hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis. The data were assessed by univariate analysis and a multivariate logistic regression analysis. In addition, the receiver operating characteristic curves were also applied to calculate and compare the accuracy of the model and other single parameters for the diagnosis of esophageal varices. Results We found the prevalence of EV in patients with Hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis to be 74.7%. In addition, platelet count, spleen width, portal vein diameter and platelet count/spleen width ratio were significantly associated with the presence of esophageal varices on univariate analysis. A multivariate analysis revealed that only the spleen width and portal vein diameter were independent risk factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of regression function (RF model, which was composed of the spleen width and portal vein diameter, was higher than that of the platelet count. With a cut-off value of 0.3631, the RF model had an excellent sensitivity of 87.2% and an acceptable specificity of 59.5% with an overall accuracy of 80.1%. Conclusion Our data suggest that portal vein diameter and spleen width rather than platelet count may predict the presence of varices in patients with Hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis, and that the RF model may help physicians to identify patients who would most likely benefit from screenings for EV.

  5. Evaluation of large esophageal varices in cirrhotic patients by transient elastography: a meta-analysis

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    Tao Li

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Transient elastography (TE has been shown to be a valuable tool for the prediction of large esophageal varices. However, the conclusions have not been always consistent throughout the different studies. Therefore, we performed a further meta-analysis in order to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of transient elastography for the prediction of large esophageal varices. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library without time restriction. The strategy we used was "(fibroscan OR transient elastography OR stiffness AND esophageal varices". Accuracy measures such as pooled sensitivity, specificity, among others, were calculated using Meta-DiSc statistical software. Results: Twenty studies (2,994 patients were included in our meta-analysis. The values of pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios and diagnostic odds ratio were as follows: 0.81 (95% CI, 0.79-0.84, 0.71 (95% CI, 0.69-0.73, 2.63 (95% CI, 2.15-3.23, 0.27 (95% CI, 0.22-0.34 and 10.30 (95% CI, 7.33-14.47. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.83. The Spearman correlation coefficient was 0.246 with a p-value of 0.296, indicating the absence of any significant threshold effects. In our subgroup analysis, the heterogeneity could be partially explained by the geographical origin of the study or etiology; or it could be partially explained blindingly, through the appropriate interval and cut-off value of the liver stiffness (LS. Conclusions: Transient elastography could be used as a valuable non-invasive screening tool for the prediction of large esophageal varices. However, since LS cut-off values vary throughout the different studies and significant heterogeneity also exists among them, we need more reasonable approaches or flow diagram in order to improve the operability of this technology.

  6. [Management of bleeding esophageal varices in public and private institutions in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas T, Ling; Ovalle A, Loreto; Morales O, Ximena; Agar F, Solange; Estay O, René; Soto H, Juan Ramón; Armas M, Rodolfo; Vergara A, María Teresa; Nazal S, Roberto

    2008-07-01

    The better treatment modalities for bleeding esophageal varices have improved the prognosis of cirrhosis. To inquire about diagnostic and treatment modalities for esophageal bleeding in Chile. An enquiry about diagnosis and treatment of esophageal bleeding was designed and electronically sent to public and private health institutions that could admit patients and were located in cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants. The enquiry was answered by 31 of 35 public and 17 of 19 private health institutions that were consulted. Emergency endoscopy was available in 6 of 27 public and in the 16 private institutions that had an emergency room. Rubber band was available in 16 public (52%) and in all private institutions. Cyanoacrylate injections were done in 10 public (32%) and 11 (65%) private institutions. No public institution installed transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, but 8 had occasional access to this technique. This procedure was done in 7 (41%) private institutions and all had access to it. Surgical treatment was feasible in 20 public (65%) and all private institutions. Primary prophylaxis was done in 18 public (58%) and 14 private (82%) institutions. Secondary prophylaxis was carried out in 26 public (84%) and 16 private (94%) institutions. Public health institutions have poor access to adequate diagnostic and treatment methods for esophageal bleeding. The primary and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal varices must be improved in both types of institutions.

  7. Predictive value of CT for first esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis: Value of para-umbilical vein patency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calame, Paul [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Besançon (France); Ronot, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.ronot@aphp.fr [Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris (France); INSERM U1149, centre de recherche biomédicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); Bouveresse, Sébastien [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Besançon (France); Cervoni, Jean-Paul [Department of Hepatology, University Hospitals of Besançon (France); Vilgrain, Valérie [Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris (France); INSERM U1149, centre de recherche biomédicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); Delabrousse, Éric [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Besançon (France)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Large PUV are more frequent in patients without variceal bleeding and in those low-risk esophageal varices. • The PUV diameter is smaller in patients who experience variceal bleeding. • The imaging score could help to identify cirrhotic patients at high-risk for EVH. • Cirrhotic patients with high imaging score should be referred for treatment. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate if the presence/size of a para-umbilical vein (PUV) on computed tomography (CT) are associated with a first esophageal variceal hemorrhage (EVH) in patients with cirrhosis and whether imaging features can help identify patients at increased risk of EVH. Materials and methods: From January 2010 to June 2012 patients with cirrhosis who underwent CT and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy within six months were included. The presence/size of PUV was noted. PUV >5 mm were considered large (LPUV). Association with a first EVH was searched for, and validated in a prospective cohort of 55 patients. Results: 172 patients (113 men, mean 60 ± 12 yo) were included. Forty-three patients (25%) experienced a first EVH. LPUV were more frequent in the group without EVH (27% vs. 7%, p = 0.005). At multivariate analysis, factors associated with a first EVH were spleen size > 135 mm (Odd Ratio [OR] = 1.32 [95% confident interval [CI] 1.16–1.51], p < 0.001), ascites (OR = 4.07 [95%CI-1.84–9.01], p = 0.001) and small/absent PUV (OR = 3.06 [95%CI-1.86–5.05], p < 0.001). An imaging score combining these factors was significantly associated with first EVH in the study and the validation cohorts (EVH in 0%, 19%, and 33% when score 0–1, 2–3, and 4–5, respectively). Conclusions: A simple imaging score combining the PUV and spleen size, and the presence of ascites could help to identify cirrhotic patients at high-risk for EVH.

  8. A case series on the use of circumferential radiofrequency ablation for early esophageal squamous neoplasias in patients with esophageal varices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Lun; Chang, I-Wei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Yang; Mo, Lein-Ray; Lin, Jaw-Town; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lee, Ching-Tai

    2017-02-01

    Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a rapidly evolving therapeutic modality for early esophageal squamous cell neoplasias (ESCNs). However, the feasibility of RFA for ESCNs in the setting of esophageal varices has not been reported. We retrospectively enrolled 8 consecutive patients with cirrhosis (Child-Pugh score ≤6) with early flat-type ESCNs (high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia/intramucosal cancer, and Lugol unstained lesion [USL] length ≥3 cm extending ≥1/2 the circumference) on or adjacent to esophageal varices, for which circumferential RFA was applied as the initial treatment. The primary endpoint was a complete response at 12 months, and the secondary endpoints were adverse events and procedure-related mortality. The mean USL length was 5.3 cm (range, 3-10 cm), and the average length of the treatment area was 7.5 cm (range, 5-12 cm), with an average procedure time of 31.9 min (range, 25-40 min). After circumferential RFA, 3 adverse events were recorded, including 2 intramucosal hematomas and 1 mucosal laceration, all of which spontaneously resolved without further management. No massive bleeding, perforation, stricture, or hepatic failure occurred after the procedure. Six of the 8 patients achieved a complete response after single circumferential RFA, but 2 had residual squamous neoplasias. After additional focal-type RFA treatment, all achieved a complete response at 12 months. No neoplastic progression or recurrence occurred during a median follow-up period of 21.6 months (range, 13-42 months). RFA was associated with good treatment results, no neoplastic progression, and an acceptable adverse event profile for the treatment of early ESCNs in patients with well-compensated cirrhosis and esophageal varices. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Combination therapy versus pharmacotherapy, endoscopic variceal ligation, or the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt alone in the secondary prevention of esophageal variceal bleeding: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu-Lu; Du, Shi-Ming; Fu, Yan; Gu, Hui-Yun; Wang, Lei; Jian, Zhi-Yuan; Shen, Xian-Feng; Luo, Jie; Zhang, Chao

    2017-08-22

    Patients with liver cirrhosis and variceal hemorrhage are at increased risk of rebleeding. We performed a meta-analysis toassess the clinical efficacy of combination therapy (pharmacotherapy and endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL)) compared with pharmacotherapy, EVL, or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) alone in the prevention of rebleeding and mortality. A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, up until November 2016, identified relevant randomized controlled trials. Data analysis was performed using Stata 12.0. Regarding overall mortality, combination therapy was as effective as EVL, pharmacotherapy, and TIPS (relative risk (RR) = 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.36-1.08, RR=1.05, 95% CI: 0.68-1.63, and RR=1.39, 95% CI: 0.92-2.09, respectively). Combination therapy was as effective as EVL and pharmacotherapy alone in reducing blood-related mortality (RR=0.43, 95% CI: 0.15-1.25, and RR=0.42, 95% CI: 0.17-1.06), whereas TIPS was more effective than combination therapy (RR=5.66, 95% CI: 1.02-31.40). This was also the case for rebleeding; combination therapy was more effective than EVL and pharmacotherapy alone (RR=0.57, 95% CI: 0.41-0.79, and RR=0.65, 95% CI: 0.48-0.88), whereas TIPS was more effective than combination therapy (RR=9.42, 95% CI: 2.99-29.65). Finally, regarding rebleeding from esophageal varices, combination therapy was as effective as EVL alone (RR=0.59, 95% CI: 0.33-1.06) and was more effective than pharmacotherapy alone (RR=0.58, 95% CI: 0.40-0.85), although was less effective than TIPS (RR=2.20, 95% CI: 1.22-3.99). TIPS was recommended as the first choice of therapy in the secondary prevention of esophageal variceal bleeding.

  10. Risk factors and survival of early bleeding after esophageal variceal ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min-Ta; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lee, His-Chang; Lin, Chih-Lin

    2007-09-01

    In cirrhotic patients, esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) is still unpredictable and continues despite initial adequate treatment that is associated with great mortality. Bacterial infections are frequently diagnosed in cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). The aims of this study were to analyze the clinical risk factors and survival of early bleeding after endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). A total of 96 cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices who received elective or emergent EVL procedure were analyzed. The variables for risk factors analysis included bacterial infection, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with or without portal vein thrombosis, etiology of cirrhosis, Child-Pugh status, and basic laboratory data. There were 19 patients with bleeding episode or rebleeding within 14 days after EVL. The remaining 77 patients were without bleeding event after EVL. Patients with Child C cirrhosis (odds ratio, 7.27; 95% CI, 2.20-24.07, P = 0.001) and bacterial infection (odds ratio, 130.29; 95% CI, 14.70-1154, P EVL. However, there was no significant difference in long-term survival between patients with and without early bleeding after EVL. Bacterial infection and end-stage liver cirrhosis (Child C) are the independent risk factors for early bleeding after EVL. We should closely monitor the symptoms/signs of infection and empirical antibiotics should be administered once infection is suspected or documented, especially in cirrhotic patients with poor liver reserve.

  11. Esophageal Stent for Refractory Variceal Bleeding: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Shao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Preliminary studies suggest that covered self-expandable metal stents may be helpful in controlling esophageal variceal bleeding. Aims. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of esophageal stent in refractory variceal bleeding in a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods. A comprehensive literature search was conducted on PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library covering the period from January 1970 to December 2015. Data were selected and abstracted from eligible studies and were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using I2 test. Results. Five studies involving 80 patients were included in the analysis. The age of patients ranged from 18 to 91 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 46.8 d (range, 30–60 d. The success rate of stent deployment was 96.7% (95% CI: 91.6%–99.5% and complete response to esophageal stenting was in 93.9% (95% CI: 82.2%–99.6%. The incidence of rebleeding was 13.2% (95% CI: 1.8%–32.8% and the overall mortality was 34.5% (95% CI: 24.8%–44.8%. Most of patients (87.4% died from hepatic or multiple organ failure, and only 12.6% of patients died from uncontrolled bleeding. There was no stent-related complication reported and the incidence of stent migration was 21.6% (95% CI: 4.7%–46.1%. Conclusion. Esophageal stent may be considered in patients with variceal bleeding refractory to conventional therapy.

  12. Identifying Emergency Department Patients at Low Risk for a Variceal Source of Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Lauren R; Money, Joel; Maharaj, Kaveesh; Robinson, Aaron; Lai, Tarissa; Driver, Brian E

    2017-11-01

    Assessing the likelihood of a variceal versus nonvariceal source of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) guides therapy, but can be difficult to determine on clinical grounds. The objective of this study was to determine if there are easily ascertainable clinical and laboratory findings that can identify a patient as low risk for a variceal source of hemorrhage. This was a retrospective cohort study of adult ED patients with UGIB between January 2008 and December 2014 who had upper endoscopy performed during hospitalization. Clinical and laboratory data were abstracted from the medical record. The source of the UGIB was defined as variceal or nonvariceal based on endoscopic reports. Binary recursive partitioning was utilized to create a clinical decision rule. The rule was internally validated and test characteristics were calculated with 1,000 bootstrap replications. A total of 719 patients were identified; mean age was 55 years and 61% were male. There were 71 (10%) patients with a variceal UGIB identified on endoscopy. Binary recursive partitioning yielded a two-step decision rule (platelet count > 200 × 10 9 /L and an international normalized ratio [INR] low risk for a variceal source of hemorrhage. For the bootstrapped samples, the rule performed with 97% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] = 91%-100%) and 49% specificity (95% CI = 44%-53%). Although this derivation study must be externally validated before widespread use, patients presenting to the ED with an acute UGIB with platelet count of >200 × 10 9 /L and an INR of low risk for a variceal source of their upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. [Risk factors for early rebleeding after esophageal variceal ligation in patients with liver cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J N; Wei, Z; Sun, Z Q

    2016-07-20

    Objective: To investigate the risk factors for early rebleeding after esophageal variceal ligation (EVL) through a multicenter retrospective study. Methods: A total of 3289 patients who were hospitalized and underwent EVL in 17 upper second-class hospitals or hospitals of higher classes from January 1999 to May 2015 were collected and screened according to the exclusion criteria. A total of 2531 patients were screened out, and a retrospective analysis was performed for their clinical data including age, sex, endoscopic findings, and results of laboratory examination (liver function, biochemical results, routine blood test, and coagulation function) to collect related data. According to the presence or absence of rebleeding within 1 month after EVL, the patients were divided into rebleeding group and non-rebleeding group. SPSS22.0 software was used for independent t-test and one-way analysis of variance, and P EVL, the rate of early rebleeding after EVL was 6.6%, and the mortality rate was 12.0%. The results showed that sex ( P = 0.014), number of veins with varices ( P = 0.203), prothrombin time ( P = 0.001), prothrombin activity ( P = 0.014), albumin ( P = 0), total bilirubin ( P = 0.011), aspartate aminotransferase ( P = 0.004), white blood cell count ( P = 0.342), hepatic encephalopathy ( P = 0.021), ascites ( P = 0.027), Child-Pugh class ( P = 0), Child-Pugh score ( P = 0), glue injection for gastric varices ( P = 0.521), gastric varices ( P = 0.32), shunt ( P = 0.174), number of ligation points ( P = 0.001), number of ligation times ( P = 0.024), number of times of hematemesis before treatment ( P = 0), number of times of tarry stool ( P = 0.008), and volume of blood in hematemesis before treatment ( P = 0) were risk factors for early rebleeding after EVL. The regression analysis showed that male sex, a Child-Pugh score of >7.2, and volume of blood in hematemesis before treatment were independent risk factors for early rebleeding after EVL, while an albumin

  14. [Clinical application of hepatic venous pressure gradient to predict early bleeding after esophageal variceal ligation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingju; Wu, Lichun; Wang, Guangchuan; Feng, Hua; Hu, Jinhua; Cui, Yi; Zhang, Chunqing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the predictive value of hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) for early bleeding after esophageal variceal ligation (EVL) by analyzing the differences in HVPG in patients with and without post-EVL bleeding. The medical records of patients who had been diagnosed with cirrhosis and esophageal varices and who had pre-EVL HVPG measurement data were surveyed. The study population included 105 patients from October 2010 to March 2014. Data of HVPG value, previous treatment history, endoscopic manifestation, and whether bleeding and serious complications occurred within 2 weeks after the ligation procedure were investigated as independent risk factors. included the chi-square test and Wilcoxon test, logistic regression modeling and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis using the SPSS software version 16. Only HVPG value was identified as an independent risk factor of early bleeding after EVL.According to the ROC analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) of HVPG for early bleeding after EVL was 0.866; when HVPG was more than or equal to 16 mmHg, AUC was 0.838. The sensitivity was 90.9% and the specificity was 76.4%. HVPG is an independent factor of early bleeding after EVL and when HVPG cut-off value of more than or equal to 16 mmHg is used the predictive ability has certain accuracy and high sensitivity and specificity.

  15. Fatal hemorrhage in irr[iated esophageal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kenji; Takai, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Ariga, Hisanori; Matsushita, Haruo; Wada, Hitoshi; Yamada, Shogo

    1998-01-01

    Between 1980 and 1994, 423 patients with esophageal cancer were given curative r[iation therapy. Of these patients, 31 died of massive hemorrhage and were used as the subjects of analysis in this study. The incidence of massive hemorrhage in all patients was 7% (31/423). In the 31 patients who died of massive hemorrhage, 27 h[ local tumors and two h[ no tumors at hemorrhage (two unknown cases). The mean time interval from the start of r[iation to hemorrhage was 9.2 months. In 9 autopsy cases the origin of hemorrhage was a tear of the aorta in 5 cases, necrotic local tumor in 3 cases and esophageal ulcer in 1 case. The positive risk factors for this complication seemed to be excess total dose, infection, metallic stent, and tracheoesophageal fistula. Chest pain or sentinel hemorrhage proceeding to massive hemorrhage was observed in about half of the patients. (orig.)

  16. Study on efficacy of endoscopic ligation therapy for esophageal varices and risk factors for postoperative rebleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GU Chuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo examine the efficacy of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL as a secondary prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients associated with esophageal varices, and to identify the risk factors for postoperative rebleeding. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of cirrhotic patients with esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB in the Peking University First Hospital from 2000 to 2012. Patients were divided into ligation and control (conservative treatment groups and their prognosis was followed up. According to the outcome, the ligation group was further divided into rebleeding and non-rebleeding groups for comparative analysis of clinical data. Continuous data were compared between groups using the independent samples t-test, and data were converted before t-test when necessary. Ranked data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test, and categorical data were compared between groups using the χ2 test. ResultsA total of 139 patients were enrolled, 119 assigned to the ligation group and 20 to the control group. At the end of the follow-up period (1 to 24 months, the rebleeding, early rebleeding, and mortality rates significantly differed between the ligation and control groups (P<005, i.e., 41.2%, 8.4% and 7.6% in the ligation group versus 70.0%, 200% and 400% in the control group, respectively. In the ligation group, comparative analysis showed that the history of hepatic encephalopathy, ascites, Child-Pugh score, and platelet count significantly differed between the rebleeding and non-rebleeding groups (P<0.05. ConclusionAs a secondary prophylaxis therapy, EVL can effectively improve the prognosis of cirrhosis associated with EVB. The deterioration of liver function may indicate a higher risk of rebleeding. Therefore, it is necessary to improve patients basic conditions during EVL therapy.

  17. Analysis of the treatment effect on recurrent bleeding and death in patients with cirrhosis and esophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, B L; Sørensen, T I

    1998-01-01

    Multiple recurrences of bleeding with high mortality in cirrhosis with esophageal varices have been inadequately analyzed in previous trials. We propose analysis by the multistage competing-risks model, specifying the effect on overall mortality as an effect on mortality during bleeding, rate...

  18. Comparison of computed tomography and endoscopy in the diagnosis and grading of esophageal varices; value of computed tomography for predict prognosis of chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gi Young; Park, Cheol Min; Lee, Jin Seong; Hyun, Chang Dong; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho; Kim, Hae Ryun

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of conventional CT of abdomen in the detection of esophageal varices, and to correlate CT grade of esophageal varices with prognosis and risk for bleeding. Both CT and endoscopy were performed in 100 patients. Endoscopy revealed that while 54 patients had varices, 46 did not. CT criteria of variceal grading were follows;(1) wallthickening of more than 5 mm or irregular wall contour(grade 1):(2) intraluminal protruding tubular structures with contrast enhancement(grade II);(3) confluent varices in the wall of esophagus or multiplied paraesophageal collaterals(gradeIII). CT were reviewed by three radiologists without reference to clinical and endoscopic data. Sensitivity and specificity of CT in the detection of esophageal varices were 80%, retrospectively. CT and endoscopic grades agreed with each other in 68% of patients, and there was high correlation between CT and endoscopy. (Gamma statistics, p=0.828). No history or endoscopic evidence of variceal bleeding was present on grade I, but there was a high incidence on grade II(35%) and on grade III(50%)(MH Chi-Square, Ridit scores=50.561, p=0.000). Abdominal CT is useful in the detection of esophageal varices, and can predict the risk factors of bleeding in patients with chronic liver diseases

  19. Regression of esophageal varices and splenomegaly in two patients with hepatitis-C-related liver cirrhosis after interferon and ribavirin combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Jae Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Some recent studies have found regression of liver cirrhosis after antiviral therapy in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV-related liver cirrhosis, but there have been no reports of complete regression of esophageal varices after interferon/peg-interferon and ribavirin combination therapy. We describe two cases of complete regression of esophageal varices and splenomegaly after interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis. Esophageal varices and splenomegaly regressed after 3 and 8 years of sustained virologic responses in cases 1 and 2, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that complications of liver cirrhosis, such as esophageal varices and splenomegaly, can regress after antiviral therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis.

  20. Endoscopic sclerotherapy compared with no specific treatment for the primary prevention of bleeding from esophageal varices. A randomized controlled multicentre trial [ISRCTN03215899].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. van Buuren (Henk); M.C. Rasch (Marijke); P.L. Batenburg (Piet); C.L. Bolwerk (Clemens); J.J. Nicolai (Jan); S.D.J. Werf, van der (Sjoerd); J. Scherpenisse (Joost); J. van Hattum (Jan); E.A. Rauws (Erik); S.W. Schalm (Solko); L.R. Arends (Lidia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Since esophageal variceal bleeding is associated with a high mortality rate, prevention of bleeding might be expected to result in improved survival. The first trials to evaluate prophylactic sclerotherapy found a marked beneficial effect of prophylactic

  1. Evaluation of the optimal condition for transabdominal US in diagnosis of esophageal varices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Sung Shin; Shin, Jung Hee; Baek, Seung Yon [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    To evaluate whether there is any difference in thickness of the distal esophageal wall in various examination conditions including at rest, during Valsalva maneuver and after drinking cold water and to search the optimal condition for transabdominal US examination in diagnosis for esophageal varix. Transabdominal ultrasonography was prospectively performed in forty one patients with esophageal varix confirmed by endoscopy and underlying liver. The thickness of the anterior distal esophageal wall was measured three times consecutively and calculated the mean thickness at rest, during Valsalva maneuver and following drinking cold water. At the same time, the normal control group consisted of forty four normal patients, and the mean thickness wa calculated in the same method to established the normal value. Data obtained by both measures were compared and analyzed ANOVA and Tuckey multiple comparison. The mean thickness of the distal esophageal wall in variceal group was 5.20 {+-} 1.82 mm at rest, 6.07 {+-} 2.01 mm during Valsalva maneuver, 4.07 {+-} 1.61 mm following drinking cold water. The mean thickness of the esophageal wall increased during Valsalva maneuver and decreased following drinking cold water when compared to the mean thickness at rest. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean thickness measured at rest, during Valsalva maneuver and following drinking clod water among each grade of esophageal varix, grade I (n=19), grade II (n=10), grade III (n=12) (p=0.00, p=0.01, and p=0.01, respectively) Meanwhile, the mean thickness of the normal control group was 2.74 {+-} 0.74 mm at rest, 3.46 {+-} 1.00 mm during Valsalva maneuver, and 2.29 {+-} 0.65 mm following drinking cold water (p=0.00). In order to accurately diagnose esophageal varix and to estimate grade using transabdominal ultrasonography, the maintenance of the same examining condition is essential, and the measurement done at rest appears to be the optimal condition for the

  2. A retrospective comparative study of histoacryl injection and banding ligation in the treatment of acute type 1 gastric variceal hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Gin-Ho; Lin, Chih-Wen; Perng, Daw-Shyong; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lee, Ching-Tai; Hsu, Chuan-Yuan; Wang, Huay-Min; Lin, Hui-Chen

    2013-10-01

    BACKGROUND. Esophageal varices extending along lesser curvature side of stomach is classified as GOV1. The optimal therapy for GOV1 bleeding is still undetermined. METHODS. One hundred and sixty-two patients diagnosed as acute hemorrhage from GOV1 were enrolled. At endoscopists' discretion, 118 patients received glue injection (Glue group) and 44 patients received ligation to arrest bleeding [endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) group]. This study aimed to compare hemostasis, rebleeding, complications and mortality within 42 days. RESULTS. Both groups were comparable in baseline data. In 109 patients (92%) in the Glue group and 36 patients (82%) in the EVL group (p = 0.07) 48-h hemostasis was achieved . Hemostasis of active bleeding was achieved in 49 of 55 patients (89%) in the Glue group and 24 of 28 patients (85%) in the EVL group (p = 0.70). Treatment failure was noted in 14% of the Glue group and 23% in the EVL group (p = 0.22). Eight patients in the Glue group and four patients in the EVL group rebled between 5 and 42 days (p = 0.73). A total of 48 and 19 adverse events occurred in the Glue and EVL groups, respectively (p = 0.85). Six patients in the Glue group and seven patients in the EVL group encountered posttreatment gastric ulcer bleeding (p = 0.04). Seventeen patients (14%) in the Glue group and 10 (23%) patients in the EVL group died within 42 days (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS. Banding ligation was similar to glue injection in achieving successful hemostasis of acute bleeding from GOV1. However, a higher incidence of posttreatment ulcer bleeding and mortality may be associated with banding ligation.

  3. Diagnostic performance of using effervescent powder for detection and grading of esophageal varices by multi-detector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cansu, Aysegul, E-mail: drcansu@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Karadeniz Technical University School of Medicine, Farabi Hospital, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Ahmetoglu, Ali; Kul, Sibel; Yukunc, Gokcen [Department of Radiology, Karadeniz Technical University School of Medicine, Farabi Hospital, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Fidan, Sami; Arslan, Mehmet [Department of Gastroenterology, Karadeniz Technical University School of Medicine, Farabi Hospital, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Topbas, Murat [Department of Public Health, Karadeniz Technical University School of Medicine, Farabi Hospital, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of using effervescent powder (EP) on the efficacy of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in detection and grading of esophageal varices in cirrhotic patients by considering endoscopy as the gold standard. Materials and methods: Ninety-two cirrhotic patients undergoing biphasic liver MDCT followed by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy within 4 weeks of MDCT were prospectively evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups before MDCT. The first group (n = 50) received effervescent powder (EP) before and during MDCT procedure and the second group did not receive (n = 42). The presence, size and grade of the esophageal varices were evaluated. MDCT findings were compared with endoscopic results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of MDCT with EP and without EP were calculated and compared. Correlations between the grades of the varices for each group based on MDCT imaging and endoscopic grading were also evaluated. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV of MDCT were 100%, 88%, 96%, 94%, and 100%, respectively, in the EP group, whereas they were 76%, 67%, 74%, 89%, and 43%, respectively, in the non-EP group. Correlations between the grades of the esophageal varices on MDCT and endoscopy were significant in both groups (r = 0.94, p < 0.001 for EP group and r = 0.70, p < 0.001 for non-EP group). Conclusion: During periodic CT scanning of cirrhotic patients, use of EP increases the success rate of MDCT for detection and grading of esophageal varices.

  4. Prospective study of bacteremia rate after elective band ligation and sclerotherapy with cyanoacrylate for esophageal varices in patients with advanced liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilha,Danielle Queiroz; Correia,Lucianna Motta; Monaghan,Marie; Lenz,Luciano; Santos,Marcus; Libera,Ermelindo Della

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT: Band ligation (BL) is the most appropriate endoscopic treatment for acute bleeding or prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. Sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (CY) can be an alternative for patients with advanced liver disease. Bacteremia is an infrequent complication after BL while the bacteremia rate following treatment with CY for esophageal varices remains unknown. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and compare the incidence of transient bacteremia between cirrhotic patients ...

  5. Esophageal Varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parasitic infection found in parts of Africa, South America, the Caribbean, the Middle East and Southeast Asia. ... risk of hepatitis. Sharing needles and having unprotected sex can increase your risk of hepatitis B and ...

  6. Clinical value of acoustic radiation force impulse in quantitative prediction of the degree of esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis

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    CHEN Min

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical value of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI in quantitative prediction of the degree of esophageal varices in patients with cirrhotic portal hypertension. Methods A total of 116 patients with liver cirrhosis who were admitted to 302 Hospital of PLA from October 2014 to February 2016 were enrolled. ARFI was used to measure real-time liver and spleen stiffness for all patients. With the degree of esophageal varices determined by gastroscopy as the gold standard for diagnosis, these patients were divided into non-varices group (EV0, 16 patients, mild varices group (EV1, 39 patients, moderate varices group (EV2, 26 patients, and severe varices group (EV3, 35 patients. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to analyze the clinical value of liver/spleen ARFI in predicting the degree of esophageal varices. An analysis of variance or the Kruskal-Wallis H test was used for comparison of continuous data between multiple groups, and the least significant difference Mann-Whitney U test was used for further comparison between any two groups; the chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups. The Spearman correlation analysis was used to investigate the correlation between the stiffness measured by ARFI and the degree of esophageal varices. Results The ARFI value of the spleen was 2.54±0.34 m/s for EV0 patients, 3.05±0.34 m/s for EV1 patients, 3.48±0.50 m/s for EV2 patients, and 3.69±0.33 m/s for EV3 patients (χ2=60.121,P<0.001. The ARFI value of the spleen was positively correlated with the grade of esophageal varices (r=0.713, P<0.001. The areas under the ROC curve for the ARFI value of the spleen in the diagnosis of ≥EV1, ≥EV2, or EV3 esophageal varices were 0.93, 0.88, and 0.83, respectively. There was no significant difference in the ARFI value of the liver between groups (P=0.085, and the ARFI value of the liver was not correlated with the degree of

  7. Controlled trial of ligation plus vasoconstrictor versus proton pump inhibitor in the control of acute esophageal variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Gin-Ho; Perng, Daw-Shyong; Chang, Chi-Yang; Tai, Chi-Ming; Wang, Huay-Min; Lin, Hui-Chen

    2013-04-01

    Endoscopic therapy combined with vasoconstrictor was generally recommended to treat acute variceal bleeding. However, up to 30% of patients may still encounter treatment failure. This trial was to evaluate the efficacy of combination with endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) infusion in patients with acute variceal bleeding. Cirrhotic patients presenting with acute esophageal variceal bleeding were rescued by emergency EVL. Soon after arresting of bleeding varices, eligible subjects were randomized to two groups. Vasoconstrictor group received either somatostatin or terlipressin infusion. PPI group received either omeprazole or pantoprazole. End points were initial hemostasis, very early rebleeding rate, and adverse events. Sixty patients were enrolled in vasoconstrictor group and 58 patients in PPI group. Both groups were comparable in baseline data. Initial hemostasis was achieved in 98% in vasoconstrictor group and 100% in PPI group (P = 1.0). Very early rebleeding within 48-120 h occurred in one patient (2%) in vasoconstrictor group and one patient (2%) in the PPI group (P = 1.0). Treatment failure was 4% in vasoconstrictor group and 2% in PPI group (P = 0.95). Adverse events occurred in 33 patients (55%) in vasoconstrictor group and three patients (6%) in PPI group (P EVL, adjuvant therapy with PPI infusion was similar to combination with vasoconstrictor infusion in terms of initial hemostasis, very early rebleeding rate, and associated with fewer adverse events. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Correlation study of spleen stiffness measured by FibroTouch with esophageal and gastric varices in patients with liver cirrhosis

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    WEI Yutong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo explore the correlation of spleen stiffness measured by FibroScan with esophageal and gastric varices in patients with liver cirrhosis. MethodsSpleen and liver stiffness was measured by FibroScan in 72 patients with liver cirrhosis who received gastroscopy in our hospital from December 2012 to December 2013. Categorical data were analyzed by χ2 test, and continuous data were analyzed by t test. Pearson's correlation analysis was used to investigate the correlation between the degree of esophageal varices and spleen stiffness. ResultsWith the increase in the Child-Pugh score in patients, the measurements of liver and spleen stiffness showed a rising trend. Correlation was found between the measurements of spleen and liver stiffness (r=0.367, P<0.05. The differences in measurements of spleen stiffness between patients with Child-Pugh classes A, B, and C were all significant (t=5.149, 7.231, and 6.119, respectively; P=0031, 0.025, and 0.037, respectively. The measurements of spleen and liver stiffness showed marked increases in patients with moderate and severe esophageal and gastric varices. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis showed that the area under the ROC curve, sensitivity, and specificity for spleen stiffness were significantly higher than those for liver stiffness and platelet count/spleen thickness. ConclusionThe spleen stiffness measurement by FibroScan shows a good correlation with the esophageal and gastric varices in patients with liver cirrhosis. FibroScan is safe and noninvasive, and especially useful for those who are not suitable for gastroscopy.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of primary bleeding from esophageal varices in cirrhotic patients from Yangzhou, China: an analysis of 80 cases

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU Honghua

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate the diagnosis and treatment of primary bleeding from esophageal varices (EVB) in cirrhotic patients from Yangzhou, China. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on 80 cirrhotic patients with primary BEV who were treated at the Department of Gastroenterology, Northern Jiangsu People's Hospital, Yangzhou, China, from January 2010 to December 2013. Categorical data were expressed as rate or constituent ratio and comparison of the rate was performed using χ2 test. R...

  10. Value of color Doppler ultrasound in diagnosis of portal hypertension liver cirrhosis merged with esophageal variceal bleeding

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    Hai-Rong Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the value of color Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of portal hypertension liver cirrhosis merged with esophageal variceal bleeding. Methods: The clinical materials of 30 patients with portal hypertension liver cirrhosis merged with esophageal varices who were admitted in our hospital from August, 2014 to August, 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. According to whether there was a history of hematemesis and melena or not before and 3 months after ultrasound examination, and whether was esophageal variceal bleeding or not confirming by the electronic gastroscopy, the patients were divided into the bleeding group (17 cases and non-bleeding group (13 cases. The color Doppler ultrasonic diagnosis apparatus was used to detect the inner diameter and blood flow rate of splenic vein, portal vein, and left gastric vein. The blood flow volume of splenic vein, portal vein, and left gastric vein was calculated. Results: The inner diameter and blood flow volume of splenic vein in the bleeding group were significantly higher than those in the non-bleeding group, but the blood flow rate was significantly lower than that in the non-bleeding group (P0.05. The inner diameter of left gastric vein in the bleeding group was significantly higher than that in the non-bleeding group, but the blood flow rate was significantly lower that that in the non-bleeding group (P0.05. Conclusions: Color Doppler ultrasound can detect the inner diameter of splenic vein, portal vein, and left gastric vein, and the related hemodynamic indicators, particularly, the inner diameter, blood flow rate, and blood flow volume of splenic vein are effective in predicting the risk of esophageal variceal bleeding.

  11. Spleen Stiffness Correlates with the Presence of Ascites but Not Esophageal Varices in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients

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    Kazuyo Mori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although spleen stiffness has recently been identified as potential surrogate marker for portal hypertension, the relationship between spleen stiffness and portal hypertension has not been fully elucidated. We attempted to determine the relationship between the liver or spleen stiffness and the presence of ascites or esophageal varices by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI imaging. A total of 33 chronic hepatitis C (CHC patients (median age 68; range 51–84 were enrolled. We evaluated the relationship between the liver or spleen stiffness and indicators of portal hypertension as well as clinical and biochemical parameters. Fourteen healthy volunteers were used for validating the accuracy of AFRI imaging. The liver and spleen stiffness increased significantly with progression of liver disease. A significant positive correlation was observed between the liver and spleen stiffness. However, spleen stiffness, but not liver stiffness, was significantly associated with the presence of ascites (, while there was no significant association between the spleen stiffness and spleen index/presence of esophageal varices in CHC patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve based on the spleen stiffness was 0.80. In conclusion, spleen stiffness significantly correlates with the presence of ascites but not esophageal varices in CHC patients.

  12. Alterações da motilidade esofagiana em pacientes cirróticos com varizes de esôfago não submetidos a tratamento endoscópico Esophageal motor disorders in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices non-submitted to endoscopic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Pollo Flores

    2005-12-01

    the development of esophageal varices, the possibility of a digestive hemorrhage and worsening of hepatic insufficiency. It is important to identify causal predictive or aggravating factors and if possible to prevent them. In the last years, it has been observed the association of esophageal motor disorders and gastro-esophageal reflux in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices. AIMS: To study the prevalence of the esophageal motility disorders and among them, the ineffective esophageal motility, in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and esophageal varices, without previous endoscopic therapeutic and the predictives factors. METHODS: Prospectively, it has been evaluate 74 patients suffering from liver cirrhosis and esophagic varices, without previous endoscopic treatment. All of them were submitted to a clinical protocol, esophageal manometry and 55 patients also held the ambulatory esophageal pHmetry. RESULTS: Esophageal motility disorders have been found in 44 patients (60%. The most prevalent was the ineffective esophageal motility, observed in 28%. The abnormal reflux disease was diagnosed through the pHmetry in 35% of the patients. There were no correlation between the manometrical abnormality in general and the ineffective esophageal motility in particular and the esophageal or gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, the abnormal reflux, the disease seriousness, the ascites presence and the gauge of the varices. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of cirrhotic patients with non-treated esophageal varices present esophageal motor disorders. No predictive factor was found. The clinical relevance of these findings need more researches in the scope to define the real meaning of theses abnormalities.

  13. TIPS for treatment of variceal hemorrhage: clinical outcomes in 128 patients at a single institution over a 12-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaba, Ron C; Omene, Benedictta O; Podczerwinski, Elizabeth S; Knuttinen, M Grace; Cotler, Scott J; Kallwitz, Eric R; Berkes, Jaime L; Walzer, Natasha M; Bui, James T; Owens, Charles A

    2012-02-01

    To assess clinical outcomes of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) treatment of variceal hemorrhage. A total of 128 patients (82 men and 46 women; mean age, 52 y) with liver cirrhosis and refractory variceal hemorrhage underwent TIPS creation from 1998 to 2010. Mean Child-Pugh and Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores were 9 and 18, respectively. From 1998 to 2004, 12-mm Wallstents (n = 58) were used, whereas from 2004 to 2010, 10-mm VIATORR covered stent-grafts (n = 70) were used. Technical success, hemodynamic success, complications, shunt dysfunction, recurrent bleeding, and overall survival were assessed. Technical and hemodynamic success rates were 100% and 94%, respectively. Mean portosystemic gradient reduction was 13 mm Hg. Complications at 30 days included encephalopathy (14%), renal failure (5.5%), infection (1.6%), and liver failure (0.8%). Shunt patency rates were 93%, 82%, and 60% at 30 days, 1 year, and 2 years, respectively. Dysfunction, or loss of TIPS primary patency, occurred more with Wallstent versus VIATORR TIPSs (29% vs 11%; P = .009). Recurrent bleeding incidences were 9%, 22%, and 29% at 30 days, 1 year, and 2 years, respectively, and were similar between Wallstent and VIATORR TIPSs (19% vs 19%; P = .924). Variceal embolization significantly reduced recurrent bleeding rates (5% vs 25%; P = .013). Overall survival rates were 80%, 69%, and 65% at 30 days, 1 year, and 2 years, respectively, and were similar between Wallstent and VIATORR TIPSs (35% vs 26% mortality rate; P = .312). Advanced MELD score was associated with increased mortality on multivariate analysis. Wallstent and VIATORR TIPSs effectively treat variceal hemorrhage, particularly when accompanied by variceal embolization. Although TIPS with a VIATORR device showed improved shunt patency, patient survival is similar to that with Wallstent TIPS. These results further validate TIPS creation for refractory variceal bleeding. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published

  14. Combination therapy versus pharmacotherapy, endoscopic variceal ligation, or the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt alone in the secondary prevention of esophageal variceal bleeding: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lu-Lu; Du, Shi-Ming; Fu, Yan; Gu, Hui-Yun; Wang, Lei; Jian, Zhi-Yuan; Shen, Xian-Feng; Luo, Jie; Zhang, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Patients with liver cirrhosis and variceal hemorrhage are at increased risk of rebleeding. We performed a meta-analysis toassess the clinical efficacy of combination therapy (pharmacotherapy and endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL)) compared with pharmacotherapy, EVL, or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) alone in the prevention of rebleeding and mortality. A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, up until November 2016, identified r...

  15. Transjugular Intrahepatic Porto-Systemic Stent-Shunt for Therapy of Bleeding Esophageal Varices Due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Primary Myelofibrosis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Phillip, Veit;Berger, Hermann;Straub, Melanie;Saugel, Bernd;Treiber, Matthias;Einwächter, Henrik;Schmid, Roland M.;Huber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary myelofibrosis belongs to the group of myeloproliferative syndromes. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver can lead to portal hypertension. Patient and Methods: We report a case of a patient with life-threatening, endoscopically not treatable bleeding from esophageal varices due to extramedullary hematopoiesis of the liver that was successfully treated with placement of a transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic stent-shunt (TIPS). Results: Therapy of variceal bleeding ...

  16. Can transient elastography, Fib-4, Forns Index, and Lok Score predict esophageal varices in HCV-related cirrhotic patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Eman M; Omran, Dalia A; El Beshlawey, Mohamad L; Abdo, Mahmoud; El Askary, Ahmad

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal varices are present in approximately 50% of patients with liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate liver stiffness measurement (LSM), Fib-4, Forns Index and Lok Score as noninvasive predictors of esophageal varices (EV). This prospective study included 65 patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis. All patients underwent routine laboratory tests, transient elastograhy (TE) and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. FIB-4, Forns Index and Lok Score were calculated. The diagnostic performances of these methods were assessed using sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and receiver operating characteristic curves. All predictors (LSM, FIB-4, Forns Index and Lok Score) demonstrated statistically significant correlation with the presence and the grade of EV. TE could diagnose EV at a cutoff value of 18.2kPa. Fib-4, Forns Index, and Lok Score could diagnose EV at cutoff values of 2.8, 6.61 and 0.63, respectively. For prediction of large varices (grade 2, 3), LSM showed the highest accuracy (80%) with a cutoff of 22.4kPa and AUROC of 0.801. Its sensitivity was 84%, specificity 72%, PPV 84% and NPV 72%. The diagnostic accuracies of FIB-4, Forns Index and Lok Score were 70%, 70% and76%, respectively, at cutoffs of 3.3, 6.9 and 0.7, respectively. For diagnosis of large esophageal varices, adding TE to each of the other diagnostic indices (serum fibrosis scores) increased their sensitivities with little decrease in their specificities. Moreover, this combination decreased the LR- in all tests. Noninvasive predictors can restrict endoscopic screening. This is very important as non invasiveness is now a major goal in hepatology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of collateral veins detected by endosonography in predicting the recurrence of esophageal varices after endoscopic treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalaite, Laura; Valantinas, Jonas; Stanaitis, Juozas

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopic therapy is the principal method of treatment for esophageal varices. The recurrence of varices is still common following endoscopic treatment. The aim was to identify predictive factors for variceal recurrence detected by endosonography. We performed a systematic review of studies published prior to June 2013. Studies analyzing gastroesophageal collateral veins as risk factors for variceal recurrence after endoscopic treatment were included. The primary outcome was to identify predictive factors for variceal recurrence investigated by endosonography. After a full-text review, 13 studies were included in our analysis. Analysis of risk factors was not possible for all studies included. Perforating veins and periesophageal collateral veins were related to a higher risk of variceal recurrence (OR = 3.93; 95 % CI 1.06-14.51; I (2) = 96 %; OR = 2.29; 95 % CI 1.58-3.33; I (2) = 55 %). Analysis of cardiac intramural veins and paragastric/cardiac collateral veins showed the same trend, but without reaching statistical significance because of the small group size and wide CI (OR = 3.72; 95 % CI 0.14-101.53; I (2) = 91 %; OR = 1.85; 95 % CI 0.84-4.07; I (2) = 0 %). Analysis of other collateral veins as risk factors for variceal recurrence and analysis of risk factors with regard to the endoscopic treatment method was not possible because of the limited number of cases and different methodologies. A positive association between variceal recurrence and type and grade of collateral veins, investigated by endosonography, was demonstrated. Endosonography is a promising tool for predicting recurrence of esophageal varices following endoscopic treatment. These findings should be interpreted with caution because of the heterogeneity of the studies.

  18. Clinical outcomes of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for the treatment of gastric variceal hemorrhage in Korean patients with liver cirrhosis: a retrospective multicenter study

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    Se Young Jang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsThis study evaluated the clinical outcomes of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO for the treatment of hemorrhage from gastric varices (GV in Korean patients with liver cirrhosis (LC.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed data from 183 LC patients who underwent BRTO for GV bleeding in 6 university-based hospitals between January 2001 and December 2010.ResultsOf the 183 enrolled patients, 49 patients had Child-Pugh (CP class A LC, 105 had CP class B, and 30 had CP class C at the time of BRTO. BRTO was successfully performed in 177 patients (96.7%. Procedure-related complications (e.g., pulmonary thromboembolism and renal infarction occurred in eight patients (4.4%. Among 151 patients who underwent follow-up examinations of GV, 79 patients (52.3% achieved eradication of GV, and 110 patients (72.8% exhibited marked shrinkage of the treated GV to grade 0 or I. Meanwhile, new-appearance or aggravation of esophageal varices (EV occurred in 54 out of 136 patients who underwent follow-up endoscopy (41.2%. During the 36.0±29.2 months (mean±SD of follow-up, 39 patients rebled (hemorrhage from GV in 7, EV in 18, nonvariceal origin in 4, and unknown in 10 patients. The estimated 3-year rebleeding-free rate was 74.8%, and multivariate analysis showed that CP class C was associated with rebleeding (odds ratio, 2.404; 95% confidence-interval, 1.013-5.704; P=0.047.ConclusionsBRTO can be performed safely and effectively for the treatment of GV bleeding. However, aggravation of EV or bleeding from EV is not uncommon after BRTO; thus, periodic endoscopy to follow-up of EV with or without prophylactic treatment might be necessary in LC patients undergoing BRTO.

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of primary bleeding from esophageal varices in cirrhotic patients from Yangzhou, China: an analysis of 80 cases

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    ZHOU Honghua

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the diagnosis and treatment of primary bleeding from esophageal varices (EVB in cirrhotic patients from Yangzhou, China. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on 80 cirrhotic patients with primary BEV who were treated at the Department of Gastroenterology, Northern Jiangsu People's Hospital, Yangzhou, China, from January 2010 to December 2013. Categorical data were expressed as rate or constituent ratio and comparison of the rate was performed using χ2 test. ResultsPrimary BEV caused by hepatitis B-related cirrhosis accounted for the largest proportion of patients under study. Clinical application of Sengstaken-Blakemore tubes saved the life of patients' to the maximum degree, which provided time for the following treatment. The basic treatment included hemostasis, blood transfusion, antacids, and fluid infusion, and the late treatment mainly included endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL, endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy (EVS, EVL+EVS, surgery, and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, among which EVL was most widely used. Changes in hematologic indicators during early bleeding were useful for guiding clinical treatment and evaluating the prognosis of patients. ConclusionCirrhosis-related primary BEV has complex causes in patients from Yangzhou, for whom the treatment still needs to be further improved to reach the individualized level. Timely and correct treatment has great implications for improving the clinical effect and reducing the mortality. Early physical examination plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  20. A Rare but Reversible Cause of Hematemesis: “Downhill” Esophageal Varices

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    Lam-Phuong Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available “Downhill” varices are a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding and are generally due to obstruction of the superior vena cava (SVC. Often these cases of “downhill” varices are missed diagnoses as portal hypertension but fail to improve with medical treatment to reduce portal pressure. We report a similar case where recurrent variceal bleeding was initially diagnosed as portal hypertension but later found to have SVC thrombosis presenting with recurrent hematemesis. A 39-year-old female with history of end-stage renal disease presented with recurrent hematemesis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD revealed multiple varices. Banding and sclerotherapy were performed. Extensive evaluation did not show overt portal hypertension or cirrhosis. Due to ongoing bleeding requiring resuscitation, she underwent internal jugular (IJ and SVC venogram in preparation for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS, which demonstrated complete IJ and SVC occlusion. She underwent balloon angioplasty with stent placement across SVC occlusion with complete resolution of her varices and resolved hematemesis. “Downhill” varices are extremely rare, though previously well described. Frequently, patients are misdiagnosed with underlying liver disease. High index of suspicion and investigation of alternative causes of varices is prudent in those without underlying liver diseases. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate intervention can significantly improve morbidity and mortality.

  1. Endoscopic sclerotherapy compared with no specific treatment for the primary prevention of bleeding from esophageal varices. A randomized controlled multicentre trial [ISRCTN03215899

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buuren, Henk R.; Rasch, Marijke C.; Batenburg, Piet L.; Bolwerk, Clemens J. M.; Nicolai, Jan J.; van der Werf, Sjoerd D. J.; Scherpenisse, Joost; Arends, Lidia R.; van Hattum, Jan; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Schalm, Solko W.

    2003-01-01

    Since esophageal variceal bleeding is associated with a high mortality rate, prevention of bleeding might be expected to result in improved survival. The first trials to evaluate prophylactic sclerotherapy found a marked beneficial effect of prophylactic treatment. These results, however, were not

  2. Analysis of noninvasive predictive indices of esophageal varices in patients with posthepatitic cirrhosis

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    LIU Wenna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical significance of noninvasive predictive indices of esophageal varices (EV in patients with posthepatitic cirrhosis. MethodsSixty-four patients with posthepatitic cirrhosis, who were hospitalized in the Affiliated Hospital of Yan′an University from February 2011 to January 2013, were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent gastroscopy to evaluate EV. The diameter of portal vein (PV, spleen length (SL, spleen thickness (ST, and degree of ascites were determined by abdominal ultrasound, and the spleen index (SI was calculated. Prothrombin time (PT, serum albumin (Alb, etc., were measured by laboratory testing. Liver function was assessed by Child-Pugh classification. The correlation between each index and EV or severe EV was analyzed based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. For normally distributed data, comparison of means between groups was made by one-way analysis of variance; for non-normally distributed data, comparison between groups was made by Kruskal-Wallis H test; correlation analysis was performed by Kendall′s rank correlation test. ResultsAmong the 64 patients, 48 (75% had various degrees of EV, including 14 mild cases, 12 moderate cases, and 22 severe cases. There were significant differences in SI, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD score, MELD-Na score between the patients with EV and those without EV (P<0.05. PV and SI showed significant differences between the mild cases and severe cases (P<0.05; SI showed significant differences between the mild cases and moderate cases and between the moderate cases and severe cases (P<0.05 for both. Alb showed significant difference only between the patients without EV and severe cases (P<0.01. No significant difference in PT was found between each two patient groups (P>0.05. As the severity of EV increases, PV, SI, MELD score, and MELD-Na score tended to increase, Alb showed a downward trend, and PT

  3. Platelet count/spleen diameter ratio: analysis of its capacity as a predictor of the existence of esophageal varices Índice contagem de plaquetas/diâmetro do baço: análise de sua capacidade como preditor da existência de varizes esofágicas

    OpenAIRE

    Ângelo Zambam de Mattos; Angelo Alves de Mattos; Fernanda Farias Vianna; Maiara Isabel Musskopf; Júlio Carlos Pereira-Lima; Antônio Carlos Maciel

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding associated to esophageal varices is the most dramatic complication of cirrhosis. It is recommended screening every cirrhotic for esophageal varices with endoscopy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the capacity of the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio in non-invasively predicting esophageal varices in a population of cirrhotics originated in an independent center from the one in which it was developed. METHODS: The study included patients from the ambulatory ...

  4. Transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic stent-shunt for therapy of bleeding esophageal varices due to extramedullary hematopoiesis in primary myelofibrosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillip, Veit; Berger, Hermann; Straub, Melanie; Saugel, Bernd; Treiber, Matthias; Einwächter, Henrik; Schmid, Roland M; Huber, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis belongs to the group of myeloproliferative syndromes. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver can lead to portal hypertension. We report a case of a patient with life-threatening, endoscopically not treatable bleeding from esophageal varices due to extramedullary hematopoiesis of the liver that was successfully treated with placement of a transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic stent-shunt (TIPS). Therapy of variceal bleeding by TIPS insertion was successful. During a 29-month follow-up, no hepatic failure, hepatic encephalopathy, or further variceal bleeding episode occurred. TIPS placement is a well-established procedure for the treatment of complications due to portal hypertension mainly due to liver cirrhosis. This report illustrates that TIPS placement can also be a promising treatment option in patients with primary myelofibrosis and portal hypertension due to extramedullary hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Use of Wireless Capsule Endoscopy for the Diagnosis and Grading of Esophageal Varices in Patients With Portal Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Thomas R; Afinogenova, Yuliya; Njei, Basile

    2017-02-01

    Esophageal variceal bleeding is a severe complication of portal hypertension with significant morbidity and mortality. Although traditional screening and grading of esophageal varices has been performed by endogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), wireless video capsule endoscopy provides a minimally invasive alternative that may improve screening and surveillance compliance. The aim of the study was to perform a systematic review and structured meta-analysis of all eligible studies to evaluate the efficacy of wireless capsule endoscopy for screening and diagnosis of esophageal varices among patients with portal hypertension. Searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library databases were performed through December 2015. Bivariate and hierarchical models were used to compute the pooled sensitivity and specificity, and to plot the summary receiver operating characteristics curve with summary point and corresponding 95% confidence region. Bias of included studies was assessed using the quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies-2. Seventeen studies from 2005 to 2015 were included in this meta-analysis (n=1328). The diagnostic accuracy of wireless capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of esophageal varices was 90% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88-0.93]. The diagnostic pooled sensitivity and specificity were 83% (95% CI, 0.76-0.89) and 85% (95% CI, 0.75-0.91), respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of wireless capsule endoscopy for the grading of medium to large varices was 92% (95% CI, 0.90-0.94). The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 72% (95% CI, 0.54-0.85) and 91% (95% CI, 0.86-0.94), respectively, for the grading of medium to large varices. The use of capsule demonstrated only mild adverse events. A sensitivity analysis limited to only high quality studies revealed similar results. Wireless esophageal capsule endoscopy is well tolerated and safe in patients with liver cirrhosis and suspicion of portal hypertension. The sensitivity of capsule

  6. A Rare Case of Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage Secondary to Infiltrative B-Cell Lymphoma

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    Adrienne Lenhart

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Portal hypertension commonly arises in the setting of advanced liver cirrhosis and is the consequence of increased resistance within the portal vasculature. Less commonly, left-sided noncirrhotic portal hypertension can develop in a patient secondary to isolated obstruction of the splenic vein. We present a rare case of left-sided portal hypertension and isolated gastric varices in a patient with large B-cell lymphoma, who was treated with splenic artery embolization. The patient is a 73-year-old male with no previous history of liver disease, who presented with coffee ground emesis and melena. On admission to hospital, he was found to have a hemoglobin level of 3.4 g/l. Emergent esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed isolated bleeding gastric varices (IGV1 by Sarin classification in the fundus and cardia with subsequent argon plasma coagulation injection. He was transferred to our tertiary center where work-up revealed normal liver function tests, and abdominal ultrasound showed patent hepatic/portal vasculature without cirrhosis. MRI demonstrated a large heterogeneously enhancing mass in the pancreatic tail, with invasion into the spleen and associated splenic vein thrombosis. Surgery consultation was obtained, but urgent splenectomy was not recommended. The patient instead underwent splenic artery embolization to prevent future bleeding from his known gastric varices. Pathology from a CT-guided biopsy was consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PET imaging showed uptake in the splenic hilum/pancreatic tail region with no additional metastatic involvement. He was evaluated by the Hematology Department to initiate R-CHOP chemotherapy. During his outpatient follow-up, he reported no further episodes of melena or hematemesis. To the best of our knowledge, there have only been two published case reports of large B-cell lymphoma causing upper gastrointestinal bleeding from isolated gastric varices. These cases were treated with splenectomy or

  7. Effect of endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate in treatment of acute esophageal and gastric variceal bleeding in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Xiaoxing

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the effect and safety of endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate in the treatment of esophageal and gastric variceal bleeding (EGVB in children. MethodsThe clinical data of 35 children with acute EGVB who were treated with endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate in Children′s Hospital of Baoji Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital from August 2010 to August 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. The emergency response rate, rebleeding rate, and incidence of complications after the treatment were analyzed statistically. ResultsThirty-five patients received 46 times of endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate in total. The response rate to the initial injection was 95.6% (44/46. The volume of cyanoacrylate injected was 0.2-0.6 ml, with a mean volume of 0.4±0.2 ml. The emergency hemostasis rate was 93.4% (43/46, the rebleeding rate was 11.4% (4/35, and the cycle for 4 patients with the recurrence of bleeding to be cured was 1.2-23.0 months (mean 121±10.9 months. One patient experienced abdominal pain, and no patients experienced ectopic embolism. Two patients died after injection. ConclusionFrequent, small-volume endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate is an effective and convenient therapeutic method for EGVB in children, has few complications, and holds promise for clinical application.

  8. Practical Approach to Endoscopic Management for Bleeding Gastric Varices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Young Suk [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Bleeding from gastric varices is generally more severe than bleeding from esophageal varices, although it occurs less frequently. Recently, new endoscopic treatment options and interventional radiological procedures have broadened the therapeutic armamentarium for gastric varices. This review provides an overview of the classification and pathophysiology of gastric varices, an introduction to current endoscopic and interventional radiological management options for gastric varices, and details of a practical approach to endoscopic variceal obturation using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate.

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis after endoscopic therapy prevents rebleeding in acute variceal hemorrhage: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh; Liu, Tsu-Te; Kuo, Benjamin Ing-Tieu; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2004-03-01

    Bacterial infection may adversely affect the hemostasis of patients with gastroesophageal variceal bleeding (GEVB). Antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent bacterial infection in such patients, but its role in preventing rebleeding is unclear. Over a 25-month period, patients with acute GEVB but without evidence of bacterial infection were randomized to receive prophylactic antibiotics (ofloxacin 200 mg i.v. q12h for 2 days followed by oral ofloxacin 200 mg q12h for 5 days) or receive antibiotics only when infection became evident (on-demand group). Endoscopic therapy for the GEVB was performed immediately after infection work-up and randomization. Fifty-nine patients in the prophylactic group and 61 patients in the on-demand group were analyzed. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics of the gastroesophageal varices, time to endoscopic treatment, and period of follow-up were not different between the two groups. Antibiotic prophylaxis decreased infections (2/59 vs. 16/61; P actuarial probability of rebleeding was higher in patients without prophylactic antibiotics (P =.0029). The difference of rebleeding was mostly due to early rebleeding within 7 days (4/12 vs. 21/27, P =.0221). The relative hazard of rebleeding within 7 days was 5.078 (95% CI: 1.854-13.908, P <.0001). The multivariate Cox regression indicated bacterial infection (relative hazard: 3.85, 95% CI: 1.85-13.90) and association with hepatocellular carcinoma (relative hazard: 2.46, 95% CI: 1.30-4.63) as independent factors predictive of rebleeding. Blood transfusion for rebleeding was also reduced in the prophylactic group (1.40 +/- 0.89 vs. 2.81 +/- 2.29 units, P <.05). There was no difference in survival between the two groups. In conclusion, antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent infection and rebleeding as well as decrease the amount of blood transfused for patients with acute GEVB following endoscopic treatment.

  10. Three-day versus five-day somatostatin infusion combination with endoscopic variceal ligation in the prevention of early rebleeding following acute variceal hemorrhage: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitapanarux, Taned; Ritdamrongthum, Phuripong; Leerapun, Apinya; Pisespongsa, Pises; Thongsawat, Satawat

    2015-12-01

    Combined pharmacological and endoscopic therapy is recommended for initial treatment of acute variceal bleeding (AVB). The optimal duration of therapy with a vasoactive agent is not well established. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of 3-day and 5-day somatostatin treatment in the prevention of early rebleeding after endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). In a double-blind, prospective trial, cirrhotic patients with AVB who underwent EVL were randomly assigned to receive a continuous infusion of somatostatin for either 3 days or 5 days. A total of 95 patients were enrolled; 50 patients in the 3-day group and 45 patients in the 5-day group after initial hemostasis by combination therapy with somatostatin and EVL. Both groups were comparable in terms of baseline data. Very early and early rebleeding within 5 days and 42 days occurred in one and three patient (2%, 6%) in the 3-day group and three and two patients (6.67%, 4.45%) in the 5-day group (P = 0.342, 0.735), respectively. Overall, eight patients died (three from variceal rebleeding and five from causes other than variceal bleed); four (8%) in the 3-day group and four (8.89%) in the 5-day group (P = 0.876). Multivariate analysis revealed that none of the factors was a predictor of rebleeding. No serious side-effects and complications were observed. A 3-day course of somatostatin is as effective as a 5-day course for the control of variceal bleeding and prevention of early rebleeding when used as combination therapy with EVL. © 2015 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  11. Endoscopic variceal ligation combined with argon plasma coagulation versus ligation alone for the secondary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Tingting; Gao, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is often recommended as an effective method for the treatment of esophageal varices, despite the important tendency of variceal recurrence. Recent studies indicate that combining EVL with argon plasma coagulation (APC) may be a more effective therapy than ligation alone. To investigate these findings, we carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the safety and efficacy of EVL combined with APC versus ligation alone for the secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal hemorrhage. All studies were searched through PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Science Direct. The outcome measures were relative risk (RR) or risk difference with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dichotomous data and standardized mean difference for continuous data. Heterogeneity was calculated using the χ and the I-tests. Two investigators independently identified four randomized-controlled trials included in the research. The variceal recurrence rate was significantly lower in the combined therapy group (RR=0.19, 95% CI: 0.09-0.41, P=0.000). The bleeding recurrence and mortalities in the two groups showed no significant differences (RR=0.29, 95% CI: 0.08-1.04, P=0.058; risk difference=-0.02, 95% CI: -0.08-0.04, P=0.576, respectively). Although the pyrexia incidence rate was significantly higher in the combined group (RR=3.42, 95% CI: 1.56-7.48, P=0.002), there was intertrial heterogeneity (I=52.5%, P=0.097). EVL combined with APC is superior to ligation alone for endoscopic variceal recurrence without severe adverse events in secondary prophylaxis against esophageal variceal bleeding. More high-quality studies are needed to strengthen this conclusion.

  12. Treatment of massive esophageal variceal bleeding by Sengstaken-Blackmore tube compression and intensive endoscopic detachable mini- loop ligation: a retrospective study in 83 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dingguo; Shi, Ruiyue; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Ru; Xu, Zhenglei; Wang, Lisheng

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of improved sengstaken-blackmore tube combined with intensive endoscopic detachable mini-loop ligation for the treatment of massive esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB). Eighty-three patients diagnosed with massive EVB and admitted from January 2005 to July 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. Upon admission, all patients received 12 h balloon tamponade with sengstaken-blackmore tube in addition to conventional therapy (blood volume resuscitation, prophylactic antibiotics and somatostatin). Within 24 h after admission, all patients further received endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) with intensive endoscopic detachable nylon ring (mini-loop). No severe complications were observed after the patients received the 12 h consistent compression with sengstaken-blackmore tube. Eighty-two patients (98.8%) showed effective hemostasis, among which seventy-eight showed complete hemostasis. After receiving the subsequent EVL therapy with intensive endoscopic detachable mini-loop in 24 h after admission, patients did not show active bleeding in 24 h after EVL. Rehaemorrhagia appeared only in one patient within the 7 days of observation period, which was controlled by a second EVL. Each patient was ligated with 10 to 15 loops. EVB can be effectively treated with improved sengstaken-blackmore tube followed by EVL therapy with intensive endoscopic detachable mini-loop.

  13. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amount of bleeding, the only symptom may be dark or black streaks in the stools. If larger amounts of bleeding occur, symptoms ... exam which may show: Bloody or black stool (in a rectal exam) Low ... the use of a camera on a flexible tube to examine the esophagus ...

  14. Prediction of Mortality after Emergent Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement: Use of APACHE II, Child-Pugh and MELD Scores in Asian Patients with Refractory Variceal Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen Sheng; Wu, Reng Hong; Lin, Ching Yih; Chen, Jyh Jou; Sheu, Ming Juen; Koay, Lok Beng; Lee, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if existing methods of grading liver function that have been developed in non-Asian patients with cirrhosis can be used to predict mortality in Asian patients treated for refractory variceal hemorrhage by the use of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. Data for 107 consecutive patients who underwent an emergency TIPS procedure were retrospectively analyzed. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II), Child-Pugh and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores were calculated. Survival analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of the various models to predict 30-day, 60-day and 360-day mortality. The ability of stratified APACHE II, Child-Pugh, and MELD scores to predict survival was assessed by the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. No patient died during the TIPS procedure, but 82 patients died during the follow-up period. Thirty patients died within 30 days after the TIPS procedure; 37 patients died within 60 days and 53 patients died within 360 days. Univariate analysis indicated that hepatorenal syndrome, use of inotropic agents and mechanical ventilation were associated with elevated 30-day mortality (p 11 or an MELD score > 20 predicted increased risk of death at 30, 60 and 360 days (p 11 or an MELD score > 20 are predictive of mortality in Asian patients with refractory variceal hemorrhage treated with the TIPS procedure. An APACHE II score is not predictive of early mortality in this patient population

  15. Stratifying risk in the prevention of recurrent variceal hemorrhage: Results of an individual patient meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albillos, Agustín; Zamora, Javier; Martínez, Javier; Arroyo, David; Ahmad, Irfan; De-la-Peña, Joaquin; Garcia-Pagán, Juan-Carlos; Lo, Gin-Ho; Sarin, Shiv; Sharma, Barjesh; Abraldes, Juan G; Bosch, Jaime; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2017-10-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation plus beta-blockers (EVL+BB) is currently recommended for variceal rebleeding prophylaxis, a recommendation that extends to all patients with cirrhosis with previous variceal bleeding irrespective of prognostic stage. Individualizing patient care is relevant, and in published studies on variceal rebleeding prophylaxis, there is a lack of information regarding response to therapy by prognostic stage. This study aimed at comparing EVL plus BB with monotherapy (EVL or BB) on all-source rebleeding and mortality in patients with cirrhosis and previous variceal bleeding stratified by cirrhosis severity (Child A versus B/C) by means of individual time-to-event patient data meta-analysis from randomized controlled trials. The study used individual data on 389 patients from three trials comparing EVL plus BB versus BB and 416 patients from four trials comparing EVL plus BB versus EVL. Compared with BB alone, EVL plus BB reduced overall rebleeding in Child A (incidence rate ratio 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.89; P = 0.025) but not in Child B/C, without differences in mortality. The effect of EVL on rebleeding was different according to Child (P for interaction EVL, EVL plus BB reduced rebleeding in both Child A and B/C, with a significant reduction in mortality in Child B/C (incidence rate ratio 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.85; P = 0.013). Outcomes of therapies to prevent variceal rebleeding differ depending on cirrhosis severity: in patients with preserved liver function (Child A), combination therapy is recommended because it is more effective in preventing rebleeding, without modifying survival, while in patients with advanced liver failure (Child B/C), EVL alone carries an increased risk of rebleeding and death compared with combination therapy, underlining that BB is the key element of combination therapy. (Hepatology 2017;66:1219-1231). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  16. Perfil evolutivo das varizes esofágicas pós esplenectomia associada à ligadura da veia gástrica esquerda e escleroterapia na hipertensão portal esquistossomótica Evolutional profile of the esophageal varices after splenectomy associated with ligation of the left gastric vein and sclerotherapy in schistosomal portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista-Neto

    2013-03-01

    hemorrhage and underwent to splenectomy + ligation of the left gastric vein and sclerotherapy. The variables were: evolutional profile of esophageal varices before and after surgery and re-bleeding rate. RESULTS: The sample included 30 patients, 15 patients for each gender. The age ranged from 19 to 74 years (median = 43 years. There was a reduction in the degree, caliber and red spots in all patients (p< 0.05. The eradication of varices with sclerotherapy was achieved in 86.7% and with surgery alone in 15.4%. The mean follow-up was 28 months, ranging from two to 76 months. Were carried from one to seven sessions of sclerotherapy and the average was three per patient to eradicate varices. Four (13.3% did not complete the follow-up. The re-bleeding rate was 16.7%. CONCLUSION: There was a reduction of the degree, caliber and red spots of esophageal varices in all patients.

  17. Prediction of Mortality after Emergent Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement: Use of APACHE II, Child-Pugh and MELD Scores in Asian Patients with Refractory Variceal Hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeng, Wen Sheng; Wu, Reng Hong; Lin, Ching Yih; Chen, Jyh Jou; Sheu, Ming Juen; Koay, Lok Beng; Lee, Chuan [Chi-Mei Foundation Medical Center, Tainan (China)

    2009-10-15

    This study was designed to determine if existing methods of grading liver function that have been developed in non-Asian patients with cirrhosis can be used to predict mortality in Asian patients treated for refractory variceal hemorrhage by the use of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. Data for 107 consecutive patients who underwent an emergency TIPS procedure were retrospectively analyzed. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II), Child-Pugh and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores were calculated. Survival analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of the various models to predict 30-day, 60-day and 360-day mortality. The ability of stratified APACHE II, Child-Pugh, and MELD scores to predict survival was assessed by the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. No patient died during the TIPS procedure, but 82 patients died during the follow-up period. Thirty patients died within 30 days after the TIPS procedure; 37 patients died within 60 days and 53 patients died within 360 days. Univariate analysis indicated that hepatorenal syndrome, use of inotropic agents and mechanical ventilation were associated with elevated 30-day mortality (p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that a Child-Pugh score > 11 or an MELD score > 20 predicted increased risk of death at 30, 60 and 360 days (p < 0.05). APACHE II scores could only predict mortality at 360 days (p < 0.05). A Child-Pugh score > 11 or an MELD score > 20 are predictive of mortality in Asian patients with refractory variceal hemorrhage treated with the TIPS procedure. An APACHE II score is not predictive of early mortality in this patient population.

  18. Gastric varices: Classification, endoscopic and ultrasonographic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Ahmad Wani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric varices (GV are responsible for 10-30% of all variceal hemorrhage. However, they tend to bleed more severely with higher mortality. Around 35-90% rebleed after spontaneous hemostasis. Approximately 50% of patients with cirrhosis of liver harbor gastroesophageal varices. In this review, new treatment modalities in the form of endoscopic treatment options and interventional radiological procedures have been discussed besides discussion on classification and pathophysiology of GV.

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices without endoscopic treatment Prevalência do refluxo gastroesofágico em pacientes cirróticos com varizes de esôfago sem tratamento endoscópico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Bihari Schechter

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Portal hypertension in patients with liver cirrhosis causes manifestations such as esophageal varices, ascites and edema. Some studies have been conducted about the role of esophageal varices in the development of esophageal motor disorders and abnormal gastroesophageal reflux in these patients. Ascites could be a factor promoting gastroesophageal reflux and it has been questioned whether reflux would favor the rupture of varices. However there are a few studies using ambulatory esophageal pH recording in the evaluation of these patients. AIMS: Evaluate gastroesophageal reflux by pH recording in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices and possible predictors. METHODS: Fifty one patients (28 men, 23 women, mean age of 54 years with liver cirrhosis, diagnosed by clinical, laboratorial, image and histological findings were prospectively evaluated. All patients had esophageal varices confirmed by endoscopy and were submitted to a questionnaire about typical gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms (heartburn and or acid regurgitation. pH recording was performed with the probe placed 5 cm above the superior lower esophageal sphincter limit, as determined by manometry. Abnormal reflux (% total time with pH 4.5% was related to the size of varices, congestive gastropathy, ascites, severity of cirrhosis and typical gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms. RESULTS: The caliber of the varices was considered to be small in 30 patients (59%, medium in 17 (33% and large in 4 (8%, 21 (41% congestive gastropathy. Ascites was observed in 17 (33%, 32 patients (63% were classified as Child-Pugh A, 17 (33% Child-Pugh B and 2 (4% Child-Pugh C. Twenty seven patients (53% presented with typical gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms. Abnormal reflux at pH recording was found in 19 patients (37%. One of them presented with erosive esophagitis at endoscopy. There was no relation between ascites, variceal size, congestive gastropathy and Child

  20. Gamna-Gandy bodies of the spleen detected with susceptibility weighted imaging: maybe a new potential non-invasive marker of esophageal varices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuquan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Portal hypertension (PH is a clinical sequelae of liver cirrhosis, and bleeding from esophageal varices (EV is a serious complication of PH with significant morbidity and mortality. The aims of this study were to assess the ability of 2D multislice breath-hold susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI to detect Gamna-Gandy bodies (GGBs in the spleens of patients with PH and to evaluate the potential role of GGB number as a non-invasive marker of PH and EV. MATERIALS AND METHODS: T1-, T2- and T2(*-weighted imaging and SWI were performed on 135 patients with PH and on 37 control individuals. Platelet counts were collected from all PH patients. Two radiologists analyzed all magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data, and measured the portal vein diameter, splenic index (SI, and platelet count/spleen diameter ratio. The numbers of patients with GGBs in the spleen were determined, and the numbers of GGB were counted in the four MRI sequences in GGB-positive patients. The portal vein diameter, SI, platelet count, and platelet count/spleen diameter ratio of control individuals were compared with those of GGB-negative and GGB-positive patients on SWI images. The correlations among GGB numbers, the portal vein diameter, the SI, the platelet count, and the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio were analyzed. RESULTS: The GGB detection rate and the detected GGB number by using SWI were significantly greater than those by using T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted images. The number of GGBs in the SWI images correlated positively with the portal vein diameter and SI and correlated negatively with the platelet count and platelet count/spleen diameter ratio. CONCLUSION: SWI provided more accurate information of GGBs in patients with PH. The number of GGB may be a non-invasive predictor of improving the selection for endoscopic screening of PH patients at risk of EV.

  1. Tratamento endoscópico das varizes esofágicas utilizando alças pré-atadas confeccionadas com fio de poliamida Endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices, using pretied loop made with polyamide thread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Susumu Corrêa Koyama

    2006-12-01

    em 47 (81,03% doentes. Em 37 (63,79% as ligaduras resultaram em pseudopólipos. Não foram identificados complicações sistêmicas ou óbitos. A ecoendoscopia mostrou trombose nos pseudopólipos formados. No período de seguimento que variou de 4 a 32 meses, observou-se recidiva das varizes em 9 (15,51% pacientes, tratados com êxito por nova ligadura com fio de poliamida em 5 pacientes e esclerose endoscópica em 4. O custo médio de cada ligadura foi estimado em R$ 3,60 CONCLUSÕES: O tratamento endoscópico, utilizando ligadura com fio de poliamida, revelou ser método seguro, eficaz, de simples realização e de baixo custo, no tratamento das varizes esofágicas. Esse método demonstrou também um novo aspecto que é a obliteração das varizes esofágicas, pelos pseudopólipos, sem necrose.BACKGROUD: The elastic band ligation is the method of choice for treatment of esophageal varices. The action mechanism is a mechanical varices compression with thromboses. Based on this concept we developed a ligature method using pretied loop made with polyamide thread for the treatment of esophageal varices. OBJECTIVE: The present study describes and evaluates the feasibility of the treatment of esophageal varices by the ligature method using pretied loop made with polyamide thread and analyzes the local changes of the ligations and the results, concerning safety, efficiency and complications of this procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between March, 1998 and May, 2000, 58 patients with esophageal varices were treated with pretied loop, made with polyamide thread (26 patients with schistosomiasis, 11 with alcoholic cirrhosis, 9 with hepatitis C, 5 with hepatitis B, 4 of unknown etiology, 2 with hepatitis B and C, and one with Budd-Chiari syndrome/ 42 men and 16 women/ average age of 47,67 ± 13,12 years, range 16-74. A plastic tube was attached to the endoscope tip featured as an accessory working channel, allowing the pretied loop made with polyamide thread to be conducted to

  2. Ectopic Varices in Colonic Stoma: MDCT Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Woong; Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min; Kim, Jin Yong [Guro Hospital of Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    We describe the 2D reformatted and 3D volume rendered images by MDCT in a patient with an episode of acute bleeding from the colonic stoma. This case indicates that the 2D reformatted and 3D volume rendered images are useful to detect this rare complication of portal hypertension, and they help to tailor adequate treatment for the patients with bleeding from stomal varices. Ectopic varices are an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage, but they account for up to 5% of all variceal bleedings (1). Bleeding from stomal varices has been reported in up to 20% of the patients suffering with chronic liver failure with permanent stoma (2). However, the diagnosis of stomal varices is difficult because bleeding from stoma may also be associated with lower gastrointestinal bleeding. To the best of our knowledge, the 2D reformatted and 3D volume rendered images by MDCT for visualization of ectopic stomal varices have not been previously reported in the medical literature.

  3. Antibiotic Prophylaxis Using Third Generation Cephalosporins Can Reduce the Risk of Early Rebleeding in the First Acute Gastroesophageal Variceal Hemorrhage: A Prospective Randomized Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Wan-Sik; Joo, Young-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun; Kim, Sei-Jong; Kim, Young-Dae

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial infection may be a critical trigger for variceal bleeding. Antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent rebleeding in patients with acute gastroesophageal variceal bleeding (GEVB). The aim of the study was to compare prophylactic third generation cephalosporins with on-demand antibiotics for the prevention of gastroesophageal variceal rebleeding. In a prospective trial, patients with the first acute GEVB were randomly assigned to receive prophylactic antibiotics (intravenous cefotaxime 2 g q ...

  4. Emergency endoscopic variceal ligation following variceal rupture in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and portal vein tumor thrombosis: a retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Kawai, Toshihiro; Yashima, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takafumi; Sato, Takahisa; Kanda, Miho; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Sato, Shinpei; Obi, Shuntaro

    2016-01-01

    Background The outcomes of treatment of ruptured varices in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) are unclear. We therefore evaluated the long- (rebleeding and death) and short-term (immediate death within 24?h of variceal bleeding diagnosis) outcomes of patients with PVTT who underwent emergency variceal band ligation. Methods Data on 62 patients with PVTT and endoscopically proven esophageal or gastric variceal bleeding from 2007 to 2012 were stu...

  5. Esophageal stricture - benign

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... esophagus. These may include household cleaners, lye, disc batteries, or battery acid. Treatment of esophageal varices . ... keep you from getting enough fluids and nutrients. Solid food, especially meat, can get stuck above the ...

  6. Thrombosis of orbital varices; Trombosis de varices orbitarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi Oyhenart, J.; Tenyi, A.; Boschi Pau, J. [Hospital Italiano, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2002-07-01

    Orbital varices are venous malformations produced by an abnormal dilatation of one or more orbital veins, probably associated with congenital weakness of the vascular wall. They are rare lesions, usually occurring in young patients, that produce intermittent proptosis related to the increase in the systemic venous pressure. The presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis is associated with rapid development of proptosis, pain and decreased ocular motility. We report the cases of two adult patients with orbital varices complicated by thrombosis in whom the diagnosis was based on computed tomography. The ultrasound and magnetic resonance findings are also discussed. (Author) 16 refs.

  7. Value of Adjusted Blood Requirement Index in determining failure to control bleed in patients with variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Shahab; Khalid, Abdullah B; Awan, Safia; Shah, Hasnain A; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2015-03-01

    Variceal bleeding is a serious complication in patients with cirrhosis. Among the criteria that were proposed in Baveno conferences, the Adjusted Blood Requirement Index (ABRI) has not been validated prospectively in clinical practice. We therefore aim to evaluate the measurement of ABRI as a marker of failure to control bleeding and to evaluate the consistency of ABRI in relation to other criteria of failure to control variceal bleeding. All patients with variceal bleeding who presented to Aga Khan University Hospital from January 2010 to December 2012 who were administered transfusion of packed red blood cells were included after obtaining informed consent. All patients were managed as per the standard protocol with intravenous terlipressin along with band ligation and injection of cyanoacrylate in cases of esophageal and fundal varices, respectively. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were measured every 6 h for 48 h and then every 12 h until 5 days of index bleed in each patient. Packed cells were transfused if hemoglobin decreased below 8 g/dl. The number of blood units transfused, change in hemoglobin values, and ABRI were calculated after each unit of blood transfusion till 120 h. In patients in whom bleed could not be controlled, an ABRI value of 0.75 or more was compared with other Baveno IV-based parameters that define failure to control variceal bleeding. During the study period, 137 eligible patients with variceal bleed were admitted. The mean age of the patients was 52±12 years. The majority of patients (50.4%) were in Child-Pugh class B, followed by 38% in Child-Pugh class C. According to the Baveno IV criteria, overall failure to control acute variceal bleeding occurred in 52 (37.9%) patients. Excluding ABRI, failure to control bleeding was found in 22/137 (16%) patients, whereas ABRI-based criteria showed that in 34/137 (24.8%) patients, bleeding could not be controlled. There were only four (2.9%) patients with variceal bleeding in whom ABRI and

  8. Effect of large fundal varices on changes in gastric mucosal hemodynamics after endoscopic variceal ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayama, C; Iwao, T; Oho, K; Toyonaga, A; Tanikawa, K

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUNDS AND STUDY AIMS: Effect of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) on gastric mucosal hemodynamics would differ in patients with and without large fundal varices. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. Twenty-seven patients with cirrhosis and large sized esophageal varices were prospectively studied. There were eight patients with large fundal varices and 19 patients without large fundal varices. Before EVL, gastric mucosal hemodynamics were endoscopically assessed by laser-Doppler velocimetry and reflectance spectrophotometry in the antrum and the corpus. In the reflectance spectrophotometric measurements, gastric mucosal hemoglobin content (IHb) and gastric mucosal oxygen saturation (ISO2) were determined. The severity of portal-hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) was also recorded at the antrum and the corpus. For data analysis, PHG was scored (absent, 0; mild, 1; severe, 2; bleeding, 3). These measurements were repeated after initial (three days after initial session) and repeated (seven days after last session) EVL. At the antrum, neither PHG score nor gastric mucosal hemodynamic parameters were modified after initial and repeated EVL in patients with and without large fundal varices. In addition, no significant differences of the integrated changes in PHG score and gastric mucosal hemodynamic parameters were observed in the two groups. At the corpus, PHG score significantly increased after initial and repeated EVL in patients without large fundal varices. In these patients, laser-Doppler signal and ISO2 significantly decreased and IHb significantly increased after initial and repeated EVL. In contrast, PHG score, laser-Doppler signal, and ISO2 did not change significantly in patients with large fundal varices, although IHb transiently increased after initial EVL. Furthermore, the integrated changes in PHG score and gastric mucosal hemodynamic parameters were significantly lower in patients with large fundal varices than in those without. The

  9. Clinicopathological Features and Treatment of Ectopic Varices with Portal Hypertension

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    Takahiro Sato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding from ectopic varices, which is rare in patients with portal hypertension, is generally massive and life-threatening. Forty-three patients were hospitalized in our ward for gastrointestinal bleeding from ectopic varices. The frequency of ectopic varices was 43/1218 (3.5% among portal hypertensive patients in our ward. The locations of the ectopic varices were rectal in thirty-two, duodenal in three, intestinal in two, vesical in three, stomal in one, and colonic in two patients. Endoscopic or interventional radiologic treatment was performed successfully for ectopic varices. Hemorrhage from ectopic varices should be kept in mind in patients with portal hypertension presenting with lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  10. Antibiotic prophylaxis using third generation cephalosporins can reduce the risk of early rebleeding in the first acute gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Wan-Sik; Joo, Young-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun; Kim, Sei-Jong; Kim, Young-Dae

    2006-10-01

    Bacterial infection may be a critical trigger for variceal bleeding. Antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent rebleeding in patients with acute gastroesophageal variceal bleeding (GEVB). The aim of the study was to compare prophylactic third generation cephalosporins with on-demand antibiotics for the prevention of gastroesophageal variceal rebleeding. In a prospective trial, patients with the first acute GEVB were randomly assigned to receive prophylactic antibiotics (intravenous cefotaxime 2 g q 8 hr for 7 days, prophylactic antibiotics group) or to receive the same antibiotics only when infection became evident (on-demand group). Sixty-two patients in the prophylactic group and 58 patients in the on-demand group were included for analysis. Antibiotic prophylaxis decreased infection (3.2% vs. 15.5%, p=0.026). The actuarial rebleeding rate in the prophylactic group was significantly lower than that in the on-demand group (33.9% vs. 62.1%, p=0.004). The difference of rebleeding rate was mostly due to early rebleeding within 6 weeks (4.8% vs. 20.7%, p=0.012). On multivariate analysis, antibiotic prophylaxis (relative hazard: 0.248, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.067-0.919, p=0.037) and bacterial infection (relative hazard: 3.901, 95% CI: 1.053-14.448, p=0.042) were two independent determinants of early rebleeding. In conclusion, antibiotic prophylaxis using third generation cephalosporins can prevent bacterial infection and early rebleeding in patients with the first acute GEVB.

  11. A New Sampling Method for Spleen Stiffness Measurement Based on Quantitative Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography for Noninvasive Assessment of Esophageal Varices in Newly Diagnosed HCV-Related Cirrhosis

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    Leonardo Rizzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In our study, we evaluated the feasibility of a new sampling method for splenic stiffness (SS measurement by Quantitative Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography (Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification (VTTQ.We measured SS in 54 patients with HCV-related cirrhosis of whom 28 with esophageal varices (EV, 27 with Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC F1–F3, and 63 healthy controls. VTTQ-SS was significantly higher among cirrhotic patients with EV (3.37 m/s in comparison with controls (2.19 m/s, P<0.001, CHC patients (2.37 m/s, P<0.001, and cirrhotic patients without EV (2.7 m/s, P<0.001. Moreover, VTTQ-SS was significantly higher among cirrhotic patients without EV in comparison with both controls (P<0.001 and CHC patients (P<0.01. The optimal VTTQ-SS cut-off value for predicting EV was 3.1 m/s (AUROC = 0.96, sensitivity 96.4%, specificity 88.5%, positive predictive value 90%, negative predictive value 96%, positive likelihood ratio 8.36, and negative likelihood ratio 0.04. In conclusion, VTTQ-SS is a promising noninvasive and reliable diagnostic tool to screen cirrhotic patients for EV and reduce the need for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. By using our cut-off value of 3.1 m/s, we would avoid endoscopy in around 45% of cirrhotic subjects, with significant time and cost savings.

  12. Splanchnic vein thrombosis and variceal rebleeding in patients with cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitrano, Lucio; Guardascione, Maria A; Scaglione, Mariano; Menchise, Antonella; Martino, Rossana; Manguso, Francesco; Lanza, Alfonso G; Lampasi, Filippo

    2012-12-01

    Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) affects the short-term prognosis of acute variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients. This study evaluated whether SVT also affects the rebleeding rate of patients included in a program of secondary prophylaxis after variceal bleeding. A total of 387 patients with variceal bleeding were included from January 2001 to December 2010. Band ligation was carried out every 3-4 weeks. Follow-up included endoscopy at 1, 3, and every 6 months, Echo-Doppler, and biochemical examination every 6 months. From 2005, patients with SVT received anticoagulation with enoxaparin 200 UI/kg/day for at least 6 months. The therapy was started after variceal eradication. SVT was diagnosed in 41 patients at variceal bleeding, in eight before and in 18 patients during the follow-up. Variceal eradication was achieved in 89.2 and 86.6% in no-SVT and SVT patients. Rebleeding occurred in 9.5 and 11.9% of no-SVT and SVT patients at 12 months. Varices relapsed more frequently in SVT than in no-SVT patients (25.4 vs. 14.67%, P=0.03). The rates of variceal rebleeding and relapse were similar in patients who received or did not receive anticoagulation, but mortality was significantly lower in patients who received anticoagulation. SVT favors the relapse of esophageal varices, but rebleeding can be effectively prevented by standard scheduled band ligations. Anticoagulation does not prevent variceal relapse. The improvement in the survival of patients treated with anticoagulation needs to be confirmed in future studies.

  13. Ruptured duodenal varices successfully treated by mini-loop ligation: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghidirim, Gh; Mishin, I; Dolghii, A; Zastavnitsky, Gh

    2009-01-01

    Bleeding from duodenal varices is a rare, but often fatal manifestation of portal hypertension and these ectopic varices are more common in extrahepatic portal venous obstruction. There are over 160 cases of duodenal varices reported in the English literature. A 47-year-old female presented with massive hematemesis and prolonged shock. Initial endoscopy revealed non-bleeding small esophageal varices and large varices in the first portion of the duodenum with spurting bleeding. Endoscopic hemostasis was obtained with 5 detachable nylon loops. Portal hypertension was caused by liver cirrhosis and postthrombotic portal cavernoma. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of successful mini-loop ligation of bleeding duodenal varices reported in the literature.

  14. Esophageal variceal ligation in the secondary prevention of variceal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Long-term outcome of patients after band ligation have been poorly defined. Therefore, we conducted a long-term follow-up study to delineate the outcome of ligation in patients with portal hypertension in the Hassan II university hospital, Fes, Morocco. Methods: Over 118 months patients treated by endoscopic ...

  15. Efficacy of absolute alcohol injection compared with band ligation in the eradication of esophageal varices Eficácia da injeção de álcool absoluto comparada com ligadura elástica na erradicação de varizes de esôfago

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    Angelo Paulo Ferrari

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endoscopic sclerotherapy is an absolute indication for treating esophageal varices. Re-bleeding is common during the treatment period, before all varices become eradicated. AIM: To compare two techniques of endoscopic esophageal varices eradication: sclerotherapy with absolute alcohol and banding ligation. PATIENTS AND METHOD: Forty-six patients with liver cirrhosis and esophageal varices were prospectively randomized into two treatment groups: endoscopic sclerotherapy with absolute alcohol and banding ligation. Patients were included if they had large varices with signs of high bleeding risk. Informed writing consent was obtained from every patient and the Ethics Committee of Federal University of São Paulo, SP, Brazil, approved the study. After eradication, all patients were followed up to 1 year to look for re-bleeding episodes and variceal recurrence. RESULTS: Both groups were similar except that male gender was more common in the sclerotherapy group. There was no statistical difference regarding variceal eradication (78.3% in sclerotherapy group vs 73.9% in the ligation group, recurrence (26.7% vs 42.9%, respectively and death related to any cause (21.7% vs 13.9%. In the sclerotherapy group more sessions were need to obtain complete variceal eradication. In this group we did observe a high re-bleeding rate (34.8% and more ulcers associated with retrosternal pain right after the procedure. There was no difference regarding overall morbidity and mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Banding ligation requires fewer sessions than sclerotherapy with absolute alcohol to eradicate esophageal varices. Both methods are equally efficient regarding variceal eradication and recurrence during a short follow-up period.RACIONAL: Escleroterapia endoscópica tem indicação absoluta no tratamento das varizes de esôfago. Ressangramento é comum durante o período de tratamento, antes que as varizes sejam erradicadas. OBJETIVO: Comparar duas técnicas de

  16. Factors that Determine the Development and Progression of Gastroesophageal Varices in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Robert J.; Sanyal, Arun J.; Ghany, Marc G.; Lee, William M.; Reid, Andrea E.; Naishadham, Deepa; Everson, Gregory T.; Kahn, Jeffrey A.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Szabo, Gyongyi; Morgan, Timothy R.; Everhart, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims We aimed to identify the incidence and predictors of de novo gastroesophageal variceal formation and progression in a large cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and advanced fibrosis. Methods All participants in the HALT-C Trial were offered an endoscopy before treatment and again after 4 years. Patients with varices at baseline also had a endoscopy at 2 years. Baseline laboratory and clinical parameters were analyzed as predictors of de novo variceal formation and variceal progression. Results De novo varices developed in 157 of the 598 (26.2%) patients. Most of the new varices were small (76.4%) and only 1% of patients developed variceal hemorrhage. The likelihood of developing varices was associated with subject race (Hispanic > Caucasian > African American, p= 0.0005), lower baseline levels of albumin (P=0.051), and higher levels of hyaluronic acid (P< 0.001) with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve=0.70. Among 210 patients with existing gastroesophageal varices, 74 (35.2%) had variceal progression or bleeding during follow-up. Patients with a higher baseline ratios of serum aspartate /alanine aminotransferase (P=0.028) and lower platelet counts (P=0.0002) were at greatest risk of variceal progression (AUROC = 0.72). Prolonged, low-dose peginterferon α2a therapy and β-blockers did not influence the risk of developing new or enlarging varices. Conclusion Development of varices in patients with CHC is associated with patient race/ethnicity and laboratory markers of disease severity. Prolonged low dose peginterferon α2a therapy and β-blockers do not reduce the risk of variceal development nor progression. PMID:20211180

  17. Esophageal Stricture Post Endoscopic Injection Sclerotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only two patients had esophageal varices secondary to viral hepatitis B liver cirrhosis. Their presentation was commonly with difficulty in swallowing and few cases presented with food impaction. The majority of patients were treated with wire guided endoscopic Savary Gilliard dilation. Conclusion: Esophageal stricture ...

  18. Side effects of endoscopic variceal ligation by using Indonesian Endoscopic Ligator versus Endoscopic Variceal Sclerotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simadibrata, Marcellus; Syam, Ari F; Fauzi, Achmad; Abdullah, Murdani; Rani, Abdul A

    2011-01-01

    to investigate the side effects and survival of endoscopic variceal ligation by using Indonesian Endoscopic Ligator versus Endoscopic Variceal Sclerotherapy. we studied the medical records and endoscopy reports of patients who underwent endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) or endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) from January 2003 until December 2006. EST was done using ethoxysclerol injection; and ligation was done using a home-made Indonesian endoscopic ligating device. Patient characteristics, side effects of EVL and EST, as well as survival and length of stay were collected. Data of side effects was analyzed by chi-square test. there were no statistically significant differences of patients characteristics among both groups. The side effects in EVL group (29.2%) were less frequent than the EST group (60.9%) (p = 0.009). The death side effect in the EVL group (1.0%) was less frequent than in the EST group (21.7%) (pEVL and EST were 91.7% and 16.7%, respectively (pEVL had fewer side effects than EST in the treatment of esophageal varices bleeding. Death in the EVL group was lower than in the EST group.

  19. Management of acute gastric varices bleeding

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    Chen-Jung Chang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal varices bleeding is a major complication in patients with cirrhosis. Gastric varices (GVs occur in approximately 20% of patients with portal hypertension. However, GV bleeding develops in only 25% of patients with GV and requires more transfusion and has higher mortality than esophageal variceal (EV bleeding. The best strategy for managing acute GV bleeding is similar to that of acute EV bleeding, which involves airway protection, hemodynamic stabilization, and intensive care. Blood transfusion should be cautiously administered in order to avoid rebleeding. Vasoactive agents such as terlipressin or somatostatin should be used when GV bleeding is suspected. Routine use of prophylactic antibiotics reduces bacterial infection and lowers rebleeding rates. By administering endoscopic cyanoacrylate injection, the initial hemostasis rate achieved is at least 90% in most cases; the average mortality rate of GV bleeding is approximately 10–30% and the rebleeding rate is between 22% and 37%. Although endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate is superior to sclerotherapy and band ligation, and has remained the treatment of choice for treating acute GV bleeding, the outcome of this treatment is still unsatisfactory. New treatment options, such as thrombin injection, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, or balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration, have shown promising results for acute GV bleeding. However, randomized controlled trials are needed to compare the efficacy of these therapies with cyanoacrylate.

  20. Emergency endoscopic variceal ligation following variceal rupture in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and portal vein tumor thrombosis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Toshihiro; Yashima, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takafumi; Sato, Takahisa; Kanda, Miho; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Sato, Shinpei; Obi, Shuntaro

    2016-02-24

    The outcomes of treatment of ruptured varices in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) are unclear. We therefore evaluated the long- (rebleeding and death) and short-term (immediate death within 24 h of variceal bleeding diagnosis) outcomes of patients with PVTT who underwent emergency variceal band ligation. Data on 62 patients with PVTT and endoscopically proven esophageal or gastric variceal bleeding from 2007 to 2012 were studied. In most cases, the varices were treated using endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL). We assessed the patients' rebleeding-free and overall survival using the Kaplan-Meier method, and a Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyze effect of independent factors on rebleeding-free and overall survival times. Most patients had decompensated cirrhosis and were classified as Child-Pugh class B (56%) or C (36%). A total of 35 patients (56%) had PVTT in the main portal trunk. Among all patients, 58 (94%) and 4 (6%) had esophageal and gastric variceal bleeding, respectively. Bleeding was managed using EVL in all, but one patient (98%) who was treated with a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube. A total of 24 patients (39.3%) experienced rebleeding, and these patients had a median overall survival time of 36 days. A PVTT in the main portal trunk was predictive of rebleeding (hazard ratio 3.706, p = .0223), and α-fetoprotein-L3 levels EVL achieved hemostasis in 92 of the 95 bleeding events, whereas seven immediate deaths occurred due to variceal bleeding (7/92, 7.6%). All three bleeding events treated with modalities other than EVL resulted in immediate deaths. EVL is a safe and effective treatment of variceal ruptures in patients with HCC and PVTT. After successful hemostasis, alleviation of the underlying liver function impairment and tumor control are equally important for a good prognosis.

  1. Spectrum of esophageal abnormality seen on thoracic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu; Jeon, Yong Sun; Jeong, Seok [Inha university Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jin [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    A variety of diseases involve the esophagus including esophagitis, benign or malignant tumors, varices, and esophageal perforation. We reviewed the thoracic CT of these various esophageal diseases, and classified them by similar CT findings. The CT findings were circumferential wall thickening, nodular wall thickening, abnormal luminal dilatation, fistula formation, and mass or mass like lesion. Although CT alone has limited diagnostic ability in esophageal disease, it may have an important role in diagnosing submucosal dissection, fistula, perforation, and intramural abscess.

  2. Prevention and management of gastroesophageal varices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeon Seok

    2018-03-01

    Bleeding from gastroesophageal varices is a serious complication in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Although there has been significance improvement in the prognosis of variceal bleeding with advancement in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for its management, mortality rate still remains high. Therefore, appropriate prevention and rapid, effective management of bleeding from gastroesophageal varices is very important. Recently, various studies about management of gastoesophageal varices, including prevention of development and aggravation of varices, prevention of first variceal bleeding, management of acute variceal bleeding, and prevention of variceal rebleeding, have been published. The present article reviews published articles and practice guidelines to present the most optimal management of patients with gastroesophageal varices.

  3. Successful Treatment of Bleeding Gastric Varices with Splenectomy in a Patient with Splenic, Portal, and Mesenteric Thromboses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior Menasherian-Yaccobe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old female with a history of multiple splanchnic and portal thromboses treated with warfarin underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy for cancer screening, and a polypoid mass was biopsied. One week later, she was admitted with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Her therapeutic coagulopathy was reversed with fresh frozen plasma, and she was transfused with packed red blood cells. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated an erosion of a gastric varix without evidence of recent bleeding. Conservative measures failed, and she continued to bleed during her stay. She was not considered a candidate for a shunt procedure; therefore, a splenectomy was performed. Postoperative esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated near complete resolution of gastric varices. One year after discharge on warfarin, there has been no recurrence of hemorrhage. Gastric varices often arise from either portal hypertension or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment of gastric variceal hemorrhage can be challenging. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is often effective for emergency control in varices secondary to portal hypertension. Splenectomy is the treatment for varices that arise from splenic vein thrombosis. However, treatment of gastric variceal hemorrhage in the context of multiple splanchnic and portal vein thromboses is more complicated. We report splenectomy as a successful treatment of gastric varices in a patient with multiple extrahepatic thromboses.

  4. The clinical results of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration in treatment of gastric varices compared with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Jeon, Ung Bae; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Jo, Mong; Heo, Jeong [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To compare the clinical results of BRTO in the gastric varices with those of TIPS. From January 2004 to March 2006, eight patients who had been followed up for more than 1 month after BRTO were enrolled in this study. This study compared the clinical efficacy of BRTO with than of TIPS in 13 patients who had undergone TIPS from January 2000 to March 2006. The change in laboratory parameters before and after each procedure and the incidence of rebleeding, encephalopathy, asictes and varices were analyzed after each procedure. In the BRTO group, the level of albumin increased, and the levels of ammonia and the Child-Pugh score decreased. The TIPS group showed no improvement in the liver function. In the BRTO group, the gastric varices were eradicated in 7 patients. Gastric variceal rebleeding and encephalopathy did not occur. However, the esophageal varices worsened in 6 patients. In the TIPS group, rebleeding (n = 4), encephalopathy (n = 7) and a worsening of the gastric (n = 5) or esophageal varices (n = 2) occurred. BRTO improves the metabolic activity of the liver and has a lower incidence of encephalopathy. Hence, BRTO is a good alternative to TIPS in the gastric varices accompanied by a gastrorenal shunt although a treatment for a worsening of the esophageal varices may be needed after BRTO.

  5. Testicular Cancer Presenting as Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

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    Carlos Eduardo Salazar-Mejía

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Testicular cancer is the most common solid malignancy affecting males between the ages of 15 and 35. The symptomatology caused by this tumor varies according to the site of metastasis. We present the case of a 26-year-old male who arrived to the emergency department with hematemesis. He had no previous medical history. On arrival, we noted enlargement of the left scrotal sac. There was also a mass in the left scrotum which provoked displacement of the penis and right testis. The serum alpha-fetoprotein level was 17,090 ng/mL, lactate dehydrogenase was 1480 U/L, and human chorionic gonadotropin was 287.4 IU/mL. Upper endoscopy revealed a type 1 isolated gastric varix, treated with cyanoacrylate. A CT scan showed extrinsic compression of the portal vein by lymphadenopathy along with splenic vein partial thrombosis, which caused left-sided portal hypertension. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was started with etoposide and cisplatin, and seven days later the patient underwent left radical orchiectomy. A postoperative biopsy revealed a pure testicular teratoma. Noncirrhotic left portal hypertension with bleeding from an isolated gastric varix secondary to metastasic testicular cancer has not been described before. Clinicians must consider the possibility of malignancy in the differential diagnosis of a young man presenting with unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding.

  6. Efficacy of endoscopic histoacryl injection in treatment of gastric variceal bleeding caused by regional portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Shanhong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the efficacy of endoscopic histoacryl injection in the treatment of gastric variceal bleeding caused by regional portal hypertension. Methods The endoscopic features and efficacy of endoscopic histoacryl injection were examined and compared in two groups of patients admitted to our hospital from June 2012 to December 2012. One of the groups included 6 patients with gastric variceal bleeding caused by regional portal hypertension and the other group included 6 patients with gastric variceal bleeding caused by hepatitis B cirrhosis-related portal hypertension. Between-group comparison of categorical data was made by Fisher′s test. Results In patients with regional portal hypertension, five of them had severe isolated gastric varices (IGV and one had severe IGV with mild esophageal varices. All six patients with hepatitis B cirrhosis-related portal hypertension had severe IGV and the endoscopic features were similar to those of patients with regional portal hypertension. Significant differences were observed between the group with regional portal hypertension and the group with hepatitis B cirrhosis related portal hypertension in short-term response rate (1/6 vs 6/6, P=0.015 and long-term response rate (0/6 vs 5/6, P=0.015. Conclusion The gastric varices caused by regional portal hypertension has a fast progression rate and a high bleeding risk. The efficacy of endoscopic histoacryl injection in patients with this type of gastric varices is poor.

  7. [Endoscopic variceal ligation combined with partial splenic embolization: preliminary clinical results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F; Liu, X; Nie, W

    1998-01-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation combined with partial splenic embolization (EVL-PSE) was performed in a group of 13 patients with esophageal variceal bleeding and hypersplenism due to portal hypertension from January 1997 to March 1998. PSE was performed one to two weeks before or one week after initial EVL, and a range of 30% to 60% of the splenic parenchyma was embolized. Repeated EVL was performed at two week intervals until the varices were eradicated. Active bleeding in the nine patients was successfully controlled and all the varices of the 13 patients were eradicated after EVL-PSE. Eradication of the varices required two to five(mean 3.1) EVL sessions, follow-up ranging from 2 to 16 months(mean 6.9 months). In all but one case, no rebleeding occurred. All patients after PSE showed a good response on peripheral blood cell count and reduction of splenomegaly. No major complication or death related to the combination therapy was observed. Preliminary results in this study show that this combination therapy may result in more rapid eradication of the varices and reduce rebleeding after endoscopic variceal ligation. However, more data and studies may be necessary for further evaluation.

  8. Efficacy and safety of terlipressin in cirrhotic patients with variceal bleeding or hepatorenal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Aleksander; Borup, Tine; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Terlipressin is an analog of the natural hormone arginine-vasopressin. It is used in the treatment of patients with cirrhosis and bleeding esophageal varices (BEV) and in patients with hepatorenal syndrome (HRS): two of the most dramatic and feared complications of cirrhosis. Terlipressin exerts...

  9. Surgical management of bleeding esopageal varices: the Tikur Anbessa hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, Endale; Jhonson, Orval

    2005-10-01

    Surgery is one of the modalities of treatment of portal hypertension with bleeding esophageal varices. Between 1992 and 2003, a total of 33 patients with esophageal varices secondary to hepatic or pre-hepatic causes of portal hypertension underwent proto-azygeal disconnection surgery at Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa University. Twenty-five, (69. 7%) were men and 8 (24.3%) were women. Their age ranged between 13 and 54 years with a mean age of 24.3 years. Eighty two percent of the patients had hematemesis and melena. Thirty-two, (97%) patients had splenomegaly and of these; 27 (84%) had splenomegaqly with hyperslenism. Twenty-one, (63.6%) and 12 (36.6%) patients had child's A and B functional class, respectively. None of the patients was in class C. The condition of the liver as assessed macroscopically at surgery showed portal fibrosis in 22 (66.7%), cirrhosis in 3 (9.1%) and normal liver in 8 (24.2%) patients. There was no significant correlation between variceal bleeding episode and type of liver pathology. Four patients (12%) died after surgery and re-bleeding occurred in one (3%) patients. Porto-azygeal disconnection surgery can be done safely in patients with esophageal varices and good liver function in order to prevent further bleeding episode.

  10. New placement of TIPS during pregnancy for recurring esophageal variceal bleeding: Estimation of fetal radiation exposure; TIPS-Neuanlage in der Schwangerschaft bei rezidivierender Oesophagusvarizenblutung - Abschaetzung der fetalen Strahlenexposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildberger, J.E.; Vorwerk, D.; Stargardt, A.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Winograd, R.; Busch, N. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Medizinische Klinik 3

    1998-10-01

    Recurrent variceal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis led to treatment with a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in a pregnant woman at 20 weeks` gestation. Fetal radiation exposure was estimated to be less than 10 mSv. The use of a graduated catheter allowed measurement of field size and reliable determination of the patient`s entrance dose. Radiation exposure of an approximated fetal dosage of 5.2 mSv did not justify abortion for medical reasons. Therefore, TIPS procedure is not generally contraindicated during pregnancy itself. TIPS placement may be a therapeutic option related to the severity of the underlying maternal disease, after radiation exposure of the fetus has been estimated. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei rezidivierender Oesophagusvarizenblutung auf dem Boden einer Leberzirrhose wurde bei bestehender Schwangerschaft der 20. Woche ein transjugulaerer portosystemischer Stent-Shunt (TIPS) neu angelegt. Praeinterventionell wurde die zu erwartende Strahlenexposition fuer den Feten kleiner 10 mSv abgeschaetzt. Der Einsatz eines Messkatheters waehrend des Eingriffs ermoeglichte die genaue Bestimmung der Feldgroesse und somit eine verlaessliche Berechnung der Einfallsdosis. Die applizierte Strahlendosis lag mit 5,2 mSv unter der praeinterventionellen Abschaetzung. Eine Strahlenexposition in diesem Dosisbereich stellt keine Indikation fuer einen medizinisch induzierten Schwangerschaftsabbruch dar. Eine intakte Graviditaet ist keine absolute Kontraindikation zur TIPS-Neuanlage. Diese muss unter Beruecksichtigung der Schwere des muetterlichen Krankheitsbildes und unter Vorausabschaetzung der zu erwartenden Strahlenexposition fuer den Feten als moegliche Therapieoption geprueft werden. (orig.)

  11. Outcome of the Pediatric Patients with Portal Cavernoma: The Retrospective Study for 10 Years Focusing on Recurrent Variceal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Portal cavernoma (PC is the most critical condition with risk or variceal hemorrhage in pediatric patients. We retrospectively investigated the patients with PC focusing on the predictors for recurrent variceal bleeding. Methods. Between July 2003 and June 2013, we retrospectively enrolled all consecutive patients admitted to our department with a diagnosis of PC without abdominal malignancy or liver cirrhosis. The primary endpoint of this observational study was recurrent variceal bleeding. Independent predictors of recurrent variceal bleeding were identified using the logistic regression model. Results. A total of 157 patients were enrolled in the study. During the follow-up period, 24 patients exhibited onset of recurrent variceal bleeding. Acute variceal bleeding was subjected to conservative symptomatic treatment and emergency endoscopic sclerotherapy. Surgical procedure selection was based on the severity of vascular dilation and collateral circulation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the presence of ascites, collateral circulation, and portal venous pressure were independent prognostic factors of recurrent variceal bleeding for patients with portal cavernoma. Conclusions. The presence of ascites, collateral circulation, and portal venous pressure evaluation are important and could predict the postsurgical recurrent variceal bleeding in patients with portal cavernoma.

  12. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage – some epidemiological characteristics of patients in the period 1994–2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skok

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a frequent medical problem and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this prospective, cohort study, which was carried out at our institution, was to establish the causes of hemorrhage from the digestive tract and mortality during a 10-year period.Patients and methods: The study includes patients with emergency endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract and other diagnostic procedures of the digestive tract due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2003.Results: 6416 patients were investigated: 2452 women (38.2 % and 3964 men (61.8 %. The average age of our patients was 59.3 years (a 1–106 year span, SD ± 17.2. In 2142 patients (33.4 %, endoscopic investigation of the upper digestive tube revealed signs of acute or traces of previous hemorrhage. Different methods of endoscopic hemostasis were carried out in 1486 cases (23.2 %. Sequelae of ulcer disease were the cause of hemorrhage in 36.4 % of investigated patients. Frequent causes of hemorrhage were also inflammatory, hemorrhagically-erosive changes of the gastric and duodenal mucosa (16.6 %, esophageal reflux disease (11.2 %, ruptured esophageal varices (10.7 %. Less frequent causes of hemorrhage from the upper digestive tract were different tumors (3.8 %, Mallory-Weiss tear (2.9 %, polyps (1.4 % and Dieulafoy lesion (1.3 %. In 13.7 % of patients the cause of hemorrhage was in the large bowel and in 0.4 % in the small intestine. More than half of our patients (53.4 % were aged over 60, 11.4 % older than 80 years. The total mortality of our patients was 9.9 %, the majority of them (8.5 %, were older than 60 years, with concommitant diseases and complications during treatment.Conclusions: In the observed period, sequelae of ulcer disease were the most significant cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemorrhages are frequent in elderly patients who usually have significant medical conditions

  13. Endovascular obliteration of bleeding duodenal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, Carlos Armando; Sugimoto, Koji; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Izaki, Kenta; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Kawasaki, Ryota; Taniguchi, Takanori; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe-shi, Hyogo-ken (Japan); Kuwata, Yoichiro [Nishi-Kobe Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kobe-shi, Hyogo-ken (Japan); Hirota, Shozo [Hyogo Medical College, Department of Radiology, Nishinomiya-shi, Hyogo-ken (Japan)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe our experience with endovascular obliteration of duodenal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Balloon-occluded transvenous retrograde and percutaneous transhepatic anterograde embolizations were performed for duodenal varices in five patients with liver cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and decreased liver function. All patients had undergone previous endoscopic treatments that failed to stop bleeding and were poor surgical candidates. Temporary balloon occlusion catheters were used to achieve accumulation of an ethanolamine oleate-iopamidol mixture inside the varices. Elimination of the varices was successful in all patients. Retrograde transvenous obliteration via efferent veins to the inferior vena cava was enough to achieve adequate sclerosant accumulation in three patients. A combined anterograde-retrograde embolization was used in one patient with balloon occlusion of afferent and efferent veins. Transhepatic embolization through the afferent vein was performed in one patient under balloon occlusion of both efferent and afferent veins. There was complete variceal thrombosis and no bleeding was observed at follow-up. No major complications were recorded. Endovascular obliteration of duodenal varices is a feasible and safe alternative procedure for managing patients with portal hypertension and hemorrhage from this source. (orig.)

  14. Controlling Oesophageal Variceal Bleeding by Reloading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A special reloading kit (produced by McGown; USA) was used to reload previously used and sterilized Opti-vu caps from Saeed six shooter variceal band ligators (North Carolina, USA). Subjects with oesophageal varices underwent banding of the varices down the lower 5cm of the oesophagus using this technique.

  15. Variceal recurrence, rebleeding and survival after injection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study tested the validity of the hypothesis that eradication of oesophageal varices by repeated injection sclerotherapy would reduce recurrent variceal bleeding and death from bleeding oesophageal varices in a high risk cohort of patients with portal hypertension and cirrhosis. Patients and Methods: 306 alcoholic ...

  16. Ascending colonic variceal bleeding: utility of phase-contrast MR portography in diagnosis and follow-up after treatment with TIPS and variceal embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, P.; Motamedi, J.P.; Oddo, F.; Padovani, B.; Demuth, N.; Caroli-Bosc, F.X.

    2000-01-01

    The authors describe the discovery of ascending colonic variceal veins via celiomesenteric diagnostic angiography following a bout of melena in a 44-year-old woman. Magnetic resonance imaging, including phase-contrast MR venography, allowed visualization of the portal and systemic veins immediately after the initial angiograms. The hemorrhagic episode did not resolve until after transjugular intrahepatic shunt insertion and selective variceal embolization through the shunt. At 1 week-, 3 months-, and 6 months post treatment, follow-up MR venography no longer revealed the presence of colonic varices. Colonoscopy at 6 months was normal and the patient did not have any further episodes of bleeding until a liver transplantation was performed after 9 months. (orig.)

  17. Management of variceal and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Suzane

    2014-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage remains the most common medical emergency managed by gastroenterologists. Causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with liver cirrhosis can be grouped into two categories: the first includes lesions that arise by virtue of portal hypertension, namely gastroesophageal varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy; and the second includes lesions seen in the general population (peptic ulcer, erosive gastritis, reflux esophagitis, Mallory–Weiss syndrome, tumors, etc.). Emergency upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the standard procedure recommended for both diagnosis and treatment of UGIB. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is band ligation of varices. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the same time as endoscopy. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy is less frequent, usually chronic and treatment options include β-blocker therapy, injection therapy and interventional radiology. The standard of care of UGIB in patients with cirrhosis includes careful resuscitation, preferably in an intensive care setting, medical and endoscopic therapy, early consideration for placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and, sometimes, surgical therapy or hepatic transplant. PMID:25177367

  18. Percutaneous Transportal Sclerotherapy with N-Butyl-2-Cyanoacrylate for Gastric Varices: Technique and Clinical Efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    This study was deigned to evaluate the technique and clinical efficacy of the use of percutaneous transportal sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for patients with gastric varices. Seven patients were treated by transportal sclerotherapy with the use of NBCA. For transportal sclerotherapy, portal vein catheterization was performed with a 6-Fr sheath by the transhepatic approach. A 5-Fr catheter was introduced into the afferent gastric vein and a microcatheter was advanced through the 5-Fr catheter into the varices. NBCA was injected through the microcatheter in the varices by use of the continuous single-column injection technique. After the procedure, postcontrast computed tomography (CT) was performed on the next day and then every six months. Gastroendoscopy was performed at one week, three months, and then every six months after the procedure. The technical success rate of the procedure was 88%. In six patients, gastric varices were successfully obliterated with 1-8 mL (mean, 5.4 mL) of a NBCA-Lipiodol mixture injected via a microcatheter. No complications related to the procedure were encountered. As seen on the follow-up endoscopy and CT imaging performed after six months, the presence of gastric varcies was not seen in any of the patients after treatment with the NBCA-Lipiodol mixture and the use of microcoils. Recurrence of gastric varices was not observed during the followup period. Worsening of esophageal varices occurred in four patients after transportal sclerotherapy. The serum albumin level increased, the ammonia level decreased and the prothrombin time increased at six months after the procedure (p < 0.05). Percutaneous transportal sclerotherapy with NBCA is useful to obliterate gastric varices if it is not possible to perform balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration.

  19. Non-invasive parameters as predictors of high risk of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Andrea Peñaloza-Posada

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: The presence of large esophageal varices is the most important predictive risk factor for the occurrence of VB, independently of the class of Child-Pugh. Additionally, the portal vein diameter ≥ 13 mm is a non-invasive parameter related to high risk of VB. Therefore, these factors could be used as predictors of high risk of VB when the measure of HPVG is not available.

  20. [Esophageal moniliasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Degollado, J; Martínez Aguilar, A; Peniche Bojórquez, J

    1978-01-01

    Esophageal moniliasis is found rarely. It has been described mainly in chronically ill patients, who receive antibiotics and corticoesteroids. Early diagnosis and treatment betters their prognosis. Nine patients, 5 males and 4 females were studies in Hospital General del Centro Medico Nacional in Mexico City. Their agesranged from 26 to 77 years, with a mean of 49 years. All patients were chronically ill and 7 of them were treated in the intensive care unit. Three had disphagia, 3 retrosternal pain, and 2 gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Eight patients had high W.B.C., 3 irregular filling defects on X ray studies, and on endoscopy, all showed a pseudomembranous white yellowish exudate, underneath it the mucosa was inflamed, irregular and bled scantily. In 5 out of 9 patients biopsy and a smear confirmed the diagnosis. Eight patients treated with nystatin were cured. This disorder must be suspected in patients with disphagia and retrosternal pain; esophagoscopy is the prefered procedure to establish this diagnosis.

  1. Ectopic intestinal varies as a rare cause of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Sarwar, S.; Alam, A.; Butt, A.K.; Shafqat, F.; Ahmed, I.; Alvi, A.; Niazi, A.

    2003-01-01

    Ectopic intestinal varices are rarely responsible for lower gastrointestinal (Gl) hemorrhage. A case of 55 years old male with recurrent melena is being presented, who was found to have scattered varices on small as well as large intestine. Selective review of literature regarding presentation, diagnosis and management of these cases is also part of presentation.(author)

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound coil placement of gastric varices: Emerging modality for recurrent bleeding gastric varices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Harwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric varices are the probable source of bleeding in 10-36% of patients, with acute variceal bleeding and carry high mortality and rebleeding rates. Till date, cyanoacrylate glue injection is considered as the standard of care but has high complication rate. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS guided coil placement is a new emerging technique of management of gastric varices. In this case report, we detail the EUS guided coil placement for management of gastric varices after failed glue injections.

  3. Clinical features and outcomes of gastric variceal bleeding: retrospective Korean multicenter data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Young Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsWhile gastric variceal bleeding (GVB is not as prevalent as esophageal variceal bleeding, it is reportedly more serious, with high failure rates of the initial hemostasis (>30%, and has a worse prognosis than esophageal variceal bleeding. However, there is limited information regarding hemostasis and the prognosis for GVB. The aim of this study was to determine retrospectively the clinical outcomes of GVB in a multicenter study in Korea.MethodsThe data of 1,308 episodes of GVB (males:females=1062:246, age=55.0±11.0 years, mean±SD were collected from 24 referral hospital centers in South Korea between March 2003 and December 2008. The rates of initial hemostasis failure, rebleeding, and mortality within 5 days and 6 weeks of the index bleed were evaluated.ResultsThe initial hemostasis failed in 6.1% of the patients, and this was associated with the Child-Pugh score [odds ratio (OR=1.619; P<0.001] and the treatment modality: endoscopic variceal ligation, endoscopic variceal obturation, and balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration vs. endoscopic sclerotherapy, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and balloon tamponade (OR=0.221, P<0.001. Rebleeding developed in 11.5% of the patients, and was significantly associated with Child-Pugh score (OR=1.159, P<0.001 and treatment modality (OR=0.619, P=0.026. The GVB-associated mortality was 10.3%; mortality in these cases was associated with Child-Pugh score (OR=1.795, P<0.001 and the treatment modality for the initial hemostasis (OR=0.467, P=0.001.ConclusionsThe clinical outcome for GVB was better for the present cohort than in previous reports. Initial hemostasis failure, rebleeding, and mortality due to GVB were universally associated with the severity of liver cirrhosis.

  4. Emergency endoscopic variceal ligation in cirrhotic patients with blood clots in the stomach but no active bleeding or stigmata increases the risk of rebleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jin Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of emergency variceal ligation for the prevention of rebleeding in cirrhotic patients who are found on initial endoscopy to have blood clots in the stomach but no actively bleeding esophageal and gastric varices or stigmata. Methods This study included 28 cirrhotic patients who underwent emergency prophylactic EVL and 41 who underwent an elective intervention between January 2009 and June 2014. Clinical outcomes were analyzed, including the rebleeding, 6-week mortality, and rebleeding-free survival rates. Results The rebleeding rate was higher in the emergency than in the elective group (28.6% vs. 7.3%, P=0.041. Multivariate analysis showed that emergency prophylactic EVL (odds ratio [OR] = 7.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.634.8, P=0.012 and Child-Pugh score C (OR=10.6, 95% CI=1.4-80.8, P=0.022 were associated with rebleeding. In the emergency group, the gastric varices were associated with rebleeding (OR=12.0, 95% CI=1.7-83.5, P=0.012. Conclusions Emergency EVL may be associated with variceal rebleeding when blood clots are present in the stomach without active esophageal and gastric variceal bleeding or stigmata. Elective intervention should be considered as a safer strategy for preventing variceal rebleeding in this situation.

  5. Covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt versus endoscopic therapy + β-blocker for prevention of variceal rebleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holster, I Lisanne; Tjwa, Eric T T L; Moelker, Adriaan; Wils, Alexandra; Hansen, Bettina E; Vermeijden, J Reinoud; Scholten, Pieter; van Hoek, Bart; Nicolai, Jan J; Kuipers, Ernst J; Pattynama, Peter M T; van Buuren, Henk R

    2016-02-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, as well as a high rebleeding risk. Limited data are available on the role of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with covered stents in patients receiving standard endoscopic, vasoactive, and antibiotic treatment. In this multicenter randomized trial, long-term endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) or glue injection + β-blocker treatment was compared with TIPS placement in 72 patients with a first or second episode of gastric and/or esophageal variceal bleeding, after hemodynamic stabilization upon endoscopic, vasoactive, and antibiotic treatment. Randomization was stratified according to Child-Pugh score. Kaplan-Meier (event-free) survival estimates were used for the endpoints rebleeding, death, treatment failure, and hepatic encephalopathy. During a median follow-up of 23 months, 10 (29%) of 35 patients in the endoscopy + β-blocker group, as compared to 0 of 37 (0%) patients in the TIPS group, developed variceal rebleeding (P = 0.001). Mortality (TIPS 32% vs. endoscopy 26%; P = 0.418) and treatment failure (TIPS 38% vs. endoscopy 34%; P = 0.685) did not differ between groups. Early hepatic encephalopathy (within 1 year) was significantly more frequent in the TIPS group (35% vs. 14%; P = 0.035), but during long-term follow-up this difference diminished (38% vs. 23%; P = 0.121). In unselected patients with cirrhosis, who underwent successful endoscopic hemostasis for variceal bleeding, covered TIPS was superior to EVL + β-blocker for reduction of variceal rebleeding, but did not improve survival. TIPS was associated with higher rates of early hepatic encephalopathy. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. An observational study on oesophageal variceal endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bleeding oesophageal varices still remain a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality in Kenya and is the leading cause of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage as seen at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. We report on our experiences in the management of oesophageal varices using injection sclerotherapy.

  7. An observational study on oesophageal variceal endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    SUMMARY. Bleeding oesophageal varices still remain a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality in Kenya and is the leading cause of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage as seen at. Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. We report on our experiences in the management of oesophageal varices using injection ...

  8. Bleeding stomal varices in portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Tran-Harding, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 50-year-old man with a history of liver cirrhosis and colon cancer post end colostomy presenting to the emergency department with stomal bleeding and passage of clots into the colostomy bag. The patient was treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS and concomitant embolization of the stomal varices via the TIPS shunt using N-butyl cyanoacrylate mixed with ethiodol. Although stomal variceal bleeding is uncommon, this entity can have up to 40% mortality upon initial presentation, given the challenges in diagnosis and management. Currently, there are no established standard treatments for stomal variceal bleeding. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, there are no cases in the current literature in which treatment of this entity is performed with a combination of TIPS shunt placement and N-butyl cyanoacrylate variceal embolization. Keywords: Stomal varices, TIPS, Cirrhosis, Colon cancer, Embolization, NBCA

  9. Esclerose de varizes do esôfago em pacientes esquistossomóticos Variceal sclerosis in schistosomotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Cordeiro

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the therapeutic possibilities of injection sclerosis in schistosomotic portal hypertension, a 5-year prospective study was conducted in northeast Brazil, where this parasitosis is endemic. Fifty patients undergoing endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal hemorrage from rupture of esophageal varices from July through December 1981 were chosen for the study. The 32 consenting patients were submitted to injection sclerotherapy paravariceally, using ethanolamine oleate; the 18 refusing to participate were assigned to the control group. The incidence of rebleeding was 28.1% in the former and 44.5% in the latter, a difference wich was not statistically significant (Fisher's test, p = 0.017. Since sclerotherapymarkedly improved the long-term survival rate of the patients, this procedure is advocated for the treatment of esophageal varices in cases of portal hypertension due to schistosomiasis.

  10. Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Patients & Families » About Stroke » Intracerebral Hemorrhage Intracerebral Hemorrhage What is a Stroke? Ischemic Stroke Intracerebral Hemorrhage Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Pediatric Stroke Warning Signs Stroke Statistics ...

  11. Esophageal atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000961.htm Esophageal atresia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Esophageal atresia is a disorder of the digestive system in ...

  12. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  13. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Mediastinal Tumors Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Pleural Diseases Mesothelioma Esophageal Cancer Overview The esophagus (ĕ-sof´ah-gus) is the hollow, muscular tube that moves food and liquid from the mouth ...

  14. Comparison of Endoscopic Variceal Ligation and Endoscopic Variceal Obliteration in Patients with GOV1 Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Hyoung Ju; Jun, Chung Hwan; Lee, Du Hyeon; Cho, Eun Ae; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, HyunSoo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, rebleeding rates, survival, and complications of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) with those of endoscopic variceal obliteration (EVO) in patients with acute type 1 gastroesophageal variceal (GOV1) bleeding. Data were collected retrospectively at a single center. A total of 84 patients were selected (20 patients underwent EVL; 64 patients underwent EVO) from February 2004 to September 2011. Their clinical characteristics, laboratory results...

  15. Successful Management of Neobladder Variceal Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwal, Dinesh; Chatterjee, Kshitij, E-mail: kchatterjee@uams.edu [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, Residency Program: Slot 634 (United States); Osborne, Scott [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Kakkera, Krishna; Deas, Steven [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, Residency Program: Slot 634 (United States); Li, Ruizong [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Erbland, Marcia [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, Residency Program: Slot 634 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Hematuria from a neobladder can occur due to a variety of pathologies including tumors, stones, and fistulas. Variceal bleeding in a neobladder is a very rare condition with only one case reported in literature. We present a case of a patient with cirrhosis and portal hypertension and an ileocolic orthotopic neobladder presenting with hematuria. Computed tomographic angiography showed dilated varices around the neobladder which were successfully embolized. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report case of variceal bleeding in a neobladder successfully managed with the combination of TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) procedure and embolization.

  16. A randomized trial of endoscopic variceal ligation versus cyanoacrylate injection for treatment of bleeding junctional varices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amin, H; Abdel Baky, L; Sayed, Z; Abdel Mohsen, E; Eid, K; Fouad, Y; El Khayat, H

    2010-01-01

    There is scarcity of data concerning the management of bleeding junctional gastroesophageal varices. Our aim was to compare the efficacy and safety of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) with cyanoacrylate injection for the treatment of bleeding junctional varices. One hundred fifty patients with bleeding junctional varices were included in the study. Patients were subjected after randomization to either EVL of junctional varices (group 1:75 patients) or cyanoacrylate injection (group 11:75 patients). Endoscopic sessions were continued till obliteration of the varices. Clinical as well as biochemical parameters and severity of liver disease were assessed in all patients. Control of active variceal bleeding was achieved in 61 patients (81%) in group I and in 68 patients (91%) in group II with no significant difference (p = 0.07). Re-bleeding was seen in 12 patients (16%) in group I and 5 patients in group II (6%). Junctional varix obliteration was achieved after one session in 33% of patients in group I and 52% of patients in group II, however after 2 sessions it was achieved in 67% in group I and 93 % in group II. After 3 sessions variceal obliteration was achieved in 99% in group 1. Fever, chest pain and dysphagia were observed more frequently in group II than in group I. Long term complications including spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatic encephalopathy and hepatorenal syndrome were also observed more frequently group II than in group I. EVL may be a good alternative to cyanoacrylate injection in treatment of bleeding junctional varices.

  17. Herpetic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium

  18. Esophageal Atresia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke Neess; Markøw, Simone; Kruse-Andersen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is one of the most frequent congenital alimentary tract anomalies with a considerable morbidity throughout childhood. This study evaluates the gastroesophageal problems in 5-15year old children with EA and aims to identify factors predisposing to esophagitis in EA....

  19. Oesophageal variceal band ligation using a Saeed Six-Shooter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Oesophageal varices are common sequelae of cirrhosis, which when they bleed can be difficult to control. Oesophageal variceal band ligation, being the best modality for controlling variceal bleeding has not been common practice in West Africa, a region recognized to have a high prevalence of liver diseases.

  20. To evaluate the results of endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVBL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-04-04

    Apr 4, 2004 ... Villanueva, C. Ortiz, J. Minana, J. et al. Somatostatin treatment and risk stratification by continuous portal pressure monitoring during acute variceal bleeding. Gastroenterology. 2001; 121:ll0-117. 5. Nevens, F. and Rutgeerts, P. Variceal band ligation in the management of bleeding oesophageal varices: an ...

  1. Somatostatin analogues for acute bleeding oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Hrobjartsson, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatostatin and its derivatives are sometimes used for emergency treatment of bleeding oesophageal varices in patients with cirrhosis of the liver. OBJECTIVES: To study whether somatostatin or its analogues improve survival or reduce the need for blood transfusions in patients...... with bleeding oesophageal varices. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed and The Cochrane Library were searched (November 2007). Reference lists of publications, contacts with authors. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised trials comparing somatostatin or analogues with placebo or no treatment in patients suspected of acute...... or recent bleeding from oesophageal varices. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The outcome measures extracted were: mortality, blood transfusions, use of balloon tamponade, initial haemostasis and rebleeding. Intention-to-treat analyses including all randomised patients were conducted if possible; a random...

  2. Vascular plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration for the management of gastric varices: Comparative effectiveness between gelatin sponge embolization and permanent sclerosant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Jo, Jeong Hyun; Park, Jae Hyung; Park, Byeong Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Dong A University Hospital, Dong A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Gyoo Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Gospel Hospital, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    To evaluate the short-term outcome of plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) using vascular plugs and gelatin sponges in comparison with balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) for the management of gastric varices. From January 2005 to October 2014, 171 patients were referred for management of gastric varices, of which, 52 patients with hemodynamically stable gastric varices (48 recent bleeding; 4 primary prophylaxes) were evaluated. Of these, 38 received BRTO (men/women 23/15; mean age 61.3; Child-Pugh classes A/B/C = 11/25/2) and 14 underwent PARTO (men/women 11/3; mean age 63.4; Child-Pugh classes A/B/C = 9/4/1). The technical success rate, complications, variceal changes, liver function, and exacerbation of ascites/pleural effusion were compared between the 2 groups within 3 months after the procedure. The technical success rates were 92.1% in the BRTO and 100% in the PARTO group. Procedure-related early complications occurred in the BRTO group alone (8%, n = 3). Among patients with technical success, follow-up CT at 1 month was available for 98% (n = 48/49). Complete thrombosis of gastric varices was achieved in 97.1% in the BRTO and 100% in the PARTO group. Worsening of esophageal varices was observed in 24% of the BRTO group alone (n = 8). The albumin level increased significantly in both groups and aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase level improved significantly in the PARTO group (p < 0.05). Exacerbation of ascites/pleural effusion was observed in both groups (35.2% vs. 21.4%, both p > 0.05). PARTO appears to be equivalent to BRTO for short-term management of gastric varices.

  3. Esophageal Spasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptom Checker Esophageal spasms Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  4. RESEARCH Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RESEARCH. 884 November 2012, Vol. 102, No. 11 SAMJ. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices in children with intrahepatic and extrahepatic portal venous ... Progress has been made in developing newer endoscopic techniques ... a sclerosant, usually 0.5 - 0.75 ml per injection, at multiple (up to.

  5. RESEARCH Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Portal hypertension due to intrahepatic disease or extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) is an important cause of upper gastro- intestinal bleeding in children. About 50% of children with EHPVO present with bleeding from oesophageal varices.1-3 Improvements in the management of children with intrahepatic ...

  6. Measurement of variceal pressure with a computerized endoscopic manometry: validation and effect of propranolol therapy in cirrhotic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Run Kong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Recently, we invented a computerized endoscopic balloon manometry (CEBM to measure variceal pressure (VP in cirrhotic patient. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and feasibility of this method, and whether this technique provided further information to pharmacological therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: VP measurements were performed in 83 cirrhotic patients and compared with HVPG as well as endoscopic bleeding risk parameters. Furthermore, VP was assessed before and during propranolol therapy in 30 patients without previous bleeding. RESULTS: VP measurements were successful in 96% (83/86 of all patients. Of the 83 patients, the VP correlated closely with the HVPG (P<0.001. The presence of red colour signs and the size of varices were strongly associated with VP. Patients with previous bleeding had higher VP than those who had not yet experienced bleeding. In univariate analysis, the level of VP, the size of varices, and red color signs predicted a higher risk of bleeding. The multiple logistic regression model revealed that VP was the major risk factor for bleeding. In 30 patients receiving propranolol, VP significantly decreased from 21.1 ± 3.5 mmHg before therapy to 18.1 ± 3.3 mmHg after 3 months and to 16.3 ± 4.0 mmHg after 6 months. Comparing the mean decrease in VP with that in hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG, the decrease in VP was more obvious than HVPG response to propranolol. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that CEBM is safe and practical to assess VP in cirrhotic patient. It has the potential to be used as a clinical method to assess the risk of variceal bleeding and the effects of pharmacological therapy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Effect of vasoactive drugs on esophageal variceal hemodynamics in patients with portal hypertension. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry -TRC-08000252.

  7. Outcome of band ligation in oesophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, A.; Bhutto, A.R.; Bhatti, K.I.; Mahmood, K.; Lal, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find out the outcome og band ligation of oesophageal varices in decompensated chronic liver disease patients. Methods: The quasi experimental study was conducted at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, and Civil Hospital, Karachi, unit from September 2007 to August 2011. Subjects were eligible if they had a diagnosis of cirrhosis based on history, physical examination, biochemical parameters and liver biopsy in some cases. Patients with advanced cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class C), antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus, hepatocellular carcinoma, portal vein thrombosis evident on ultrasonography, parenteral drug addiction, current alcohol abuse, previous or current treatment with β-blockers were excluded from the study. All patients were asked about alcohol intake and tested to determine the cause of liver cirrhosis. Tests for other causes of cirrhosis were carried out only if there was a suggestive clue. All patients under-went upper gastrointestinal endoscopy after consent. SPSS 15 was used for statistical analysis. Results: The age of the 173 patients who met the inclusion criteria ranged from 15 to 85 years, with a mean of 48.39+-13.38 years. There were 112 (64.7%) males. High-grade varices were seen in 130 (75.1%) patients, while low-grade varices were observed in 43 (24.9%) on first endoscopy. At initial endoscopy, 111 (64.2%) patients had portal hypertensive gastropathy. The patients were followed up for a mean period of 5.20+-2.67 months. Variceal obliteration was achieved in 138 (79.8%), while 33 (19.1%) cases developed re-bleeding. Mean number of endoscopy sessions for these patients were 2.28+-.918 with a maximum of 4. Conclusion: Band ligation eradicated oesophageal varices with less complications and a lower re-bleeding rate, but at the same time eradication was associated with more frequent development of portal hypertensive gastropathy. (author)

  8. Esophageal Capsule Endoscopy for Screening Esophageal Varices among Japanese Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruya Ishiguro

    2012-01-01

    Methods. We examined 29 patients with cirrhosis (20 males and 9 females; mean age 60 years; Child-Pugh classification A/B/C; 14/14/1 using ECE followed by esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD. High-risk EV were defined as F2 and/or RC2 and above. Results. The sensitivity and specificity of ECE for the diagnosis of high-risk EV were 92% and 80%, respectively. Conclusions. The findings showed that ECE is a highly sensitive method of diagnosing high-risk EV that requires endoscopic or pharmacological therapy. Thus, ECE might be a useful method for the screening and followup of EV in patients with cirrhosis.

  9. Similar rebleeding rate in 3-day and 7-day intravenous ceftriaxone prophylaxis for patients with acute variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzong-Hsi; Huang, Chung-Tsui; Lin, Chien-Chu; Chung, Chen-Shuan; Lin, Cheng-Kuan; Tsai, Kuang-Chau

    2016-07-01

    Although prophylactic antibiotics have been recommended for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the duration of its use remains an inconclusive issue. We designed this study to investigate the duration of antibiotic prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding. We enrolled those patients suffering from acute esophageal variceal bleeding and receiving band ligation. They were randomly allocated to two groups to receive prophylactic antibiotics; Group I: receiving intravenous ceftriaxone 500 mg every 12 hours for 3 days, and Group II: same regimen for 7 days. We used rebleeding rate within 14 days as the primary end point and also evaluated the survival rate within 28 days and the amount of transfusion during admission. There were 38 patients in Group I and 33 patients in Group II that completed the study course for analysis. Overall, there was no significant difference in the baseline characteristics between these two groups. There were three patients both in Group I and Group II who developed rebleeding within 14 days (8% vs. 9%, p > 0.99). There was also no difference between Group I and Group II in transfusion amount (2.71 ± 2.84 units vs. 3.18 ± 4.07, p = 0.839) and survival rate in 28 days (100 vs. 97%, p = 0.465). Our small scale study demonstrated that there was no difference in the rebleeding rate between 3-day and 7-day ceftriaxone prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding. There was also no difference in 28 day survival rate between these two groups. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Trashepatic left gastric vein embolization in the treatment of recurrent hemorrhaging in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to non-derivative surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fernandes Saad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Non-derivative surgical techniques are the treatment of choice for the control of upper digestive tract hemorrhages after schistosomotic portal hypertension. However, recurrent hemorrhaging due to gastroesophagic varices is frequent. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of treatment based on embolization of the left gastric vein to control the reoccurrence of hemorrhages caused by gastroesophagic varices in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to non-derivative surgery. METHODS: Rates of reoccurrence of hemorrhages and the qualitative and quantitative reduction of gastroesophagic varices in patients undergoing transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein between December 1999 and January 2009 were studied based on medical charts and follow-up reports. RESULTS: Seven patients with a mean age of 39.3 years underwent percutaneous transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein. The mean time between azigoportal disconnections employed in combination with splenectomy and the percutaneous approach was 8.4 ± 7.3 years, and the number of episodes of digestive hemorrhaging ranged from 1 to 7 years. No episodes of reoccurrence of hemorrhaging were found during a follow-up period which ranged from 6 months to 7 years. Endoscopic postembolization studies revealed reductions in gastroesophagic varices in all patients compared to preembolization endoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Percutaneous transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to surgery resulted in a decrease in gastroesophagic varices and was shown to be effective in controlling hemorrhage reoccurrence.

  11. Splinter hemorrhages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingernail hemorrhage ... Splinter hemorrhages look like thin, red to reddish-brown lines of blood under the nails. They run in the direction of nail growth. They are named splinter hemorrhages because they look like a splinter under the ...

  12. [Digestive tract hemorrhages of cirrhotic patients. Relation between hepatic insufficiency and the hemorrhagic lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, D; Deporte, A; Darragon, T; Bismuth, H

    1975-12-06

    The cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was studied in 85 cirrhotic patients by emergency endoscopy. In every patient, one or several lesions were observed and the site of bleeding was ascertained in 59. The two main causes were oesophago-gastric varices (46 p.cent) and acute mucosal lesions(42 p.cent). The source of bleeding appeared to be related to the degree of liver function impairment. In patients with no or moderate liver function impariment, bleeding usually originated from varices or from drug-associated mucosal erosions. Patients with severe impairment of liver function most often bled from spontaneous acute oeso-gastro-duodenal ulcerations. These ulcerations resembled what has been described in "stress" hemorrhage. Because of the relationship between liver function and the cause of hemorrhage, mortality was lower in variceal bleeders (29 p.cent) than in patients with spontaneous ulcerations (83 p.cent). In patients with severely impaired liver function, portacaval shunt was rarely indicated since hemorrhage was generally due to acute mucosal ulcerations.

  13. Profilaxis preprimaria de la hemorragia por varices Pre-primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. González-Alonso

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La formación de colaterales portosistémicas, en especial en la unión esofagogástrica, es una de las consecuencias más graves de la hipertensión portal. El aumento de la presión portal es la fuerza más importante que dirige la formación de varices esofagogástricas, siendo necesario para que esto ocurra que la presión portal (estimada por el gradiente de presión venosa hepática alcance un valor mínimo de 10 mmHg. Posteriormente, la hiperemia esplácnica también contribuye al desarrollo de las varices. Las colaterales portosistémicas se forman por repermeabilización de vasos preexistentes, remodelado vascular y angiogénesis. El objetivo de la profilaxis preprimaria es evitar o retrasar la formación de varices esofagogástricas. En modelos experimentales de hipertensión portal, la administración precoz de vasoconstrictores esplácnicos como los beta-bloqueantes, de inhibidores de la síntesis de óxido nítrico o de sustancias anti-angiogénicas, inhibe la formación de colaterales portosistémicas. Sin embargo, los ensayos clínicos con beta-bloqueantes realizados en pacientes con cirrosis sin varices con objeto de retrasar su formación no han alcanzado los resultados esperados.Portosystemic collateral formation, particularly at the gastroesophageal junction, is a most serious consequence of portal hypertension. Increased portal pressure is the most significant force underlying gastroesophageal variceal formation, to which end portal pressure (estimated from the hepatic venous pressure gradient must reach at least 10 mmHg. Subsequently, splanchnic hyperemia also contributes to variceal development. Portoystemic collaterals result from repermeabilization of pre-extant vessels, vascular remodeling, and angiogenesis. The goal of pre-primary prophylaxis is preventing or delaying the formation of gastroesophageal varices. In experimental models of portal hypertension, early administration of splanchnic vasoconstrictors such as beta

  14. Esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, O.; Ganem, G.; Denis, F.; Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Pradier, O.; Martin, P.; Mirabel, X.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancers are highly malignant tumours with often a poor prognosis, except for minimal lesions treated with surgery. Radiation therapy, or combined radiation and chemotherapy is the most used therapeutic modality, alone or before oesophagectomy. The delineation of target volumes is now more accurate owing the possibility to use routinely the new imaging techniques (mainly PET). The aim of this work is to precise the radio-anatomical particularities, the pattern of spread of esophageal cancer and the principles of 3D conformal radiotherapy illustrated with a clinical case. (authors)

  15. Esophageal leiomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filartiga Lacroix, A.; Wattiez Gonzalez, C.; Gimenez Villarejo, A.; Lemir Marchese, P.

    1997-01-01

    Esophageal leiomyosarcoma is an infrequent non-epithelial malignant tumor very difficult to diagnose preoperatively.The diagnosis is based on barium swallow,endoscopy and biopsy.CT scan can be helpful for staging. The mitotic index is the main difference between leiomyosarcoma.Standard treatment is extensive esophagectomy will adjuvant radiotherapy.This report ia a case of esophageal leiomyosarcoma diagnosed and treated in our service.First Department of Surgery of the de Clinic Hospital in Asuncion,Paraguay; with a review of the literature

  16. Perivesical varices and portal hypertension: imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallorquin Jimenez, F.; Medina Benitez, A.; Lopez Machado, E.; Pardo Moreno, M.D.; Garrido Moreno, C.; Pastor Rull, J.

    1995-01-01

    Nine patients with portal hypertension syndrome and Perivesical varices are studied retrospectively by means of imaging techniques including ultrasound, duplex Doppler, color Doppler, CT and angiography. All the patients presented portal thrombosis and thickening of the bladder wall. These collaterals either represent a shunting of hepato pedal flow or correspond to blood stasis associated with said syndrome. Ultrasound, whether involving duplex Doppler or color Doppler techniques, is highly useful to detect the presence of Perivesical varices which appear as tubular or rounded hypo echogenic areas in the bladder wall. Given the association of this entity with bladder wall thickening, it should be taken into account in any clinical situation involving said change, especially in patients with portal hypertension; moreover knowledge of its presence is of great importance when the possibility of creating shunts by means of interventional or surgical vascular procedures or other types of abdominal procedures are being considered because of the risk of bleeding. (Author)

  17. Esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas in esophageal cancer (EC) has changed, and focus directed towards tumors of the distal esophagus and the esophagogastric junction. The genetic events leading to EC are not fully clarified, but important risk factors have been...

  18. [Related factors to re-bleeding and mortality in cirrhotic patients with acute variceal bleeding at Hipolito Unanue Hospital, Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Pérez, Víctor Felipe; Raymundo Cajo, Roxana Magali; Gutiérrez de Aranguren, Constantino Fernando

    2013-01-01

    To determine related factors to 5 days re-bleeding and 6 week-mortality of an episode of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients. Observational, descriptive, co relational, retrospective study. In this study were included the cirrhotic patients who entered to Hipolito Unanue Hospital, Lima, Peru, between January 2006 and February 2012 with suspicion of variceal bleeding. Were excluded patients who bled from nonvariceal origin, or that did not have the data in clinical history to calculate the Child Pugh score, the Model for terminal diseases of the liver (MELD), or the endoscopic report detailing the bleeding source and the presence of esophageal and/or gastric varices. We include 63 patients, 35 (55.6%) were men. The median of age was of 64 years. 26 of them (41.3%) were Child Pugh C, where as the median of MELD score was 9. The multivariate analysis found that the Child Pugh score was related to 6 weeks-mortality (p=0,003), where as the presence of active bleeding during endoscopy (p=0.012) and the value of creatinine (p=0.012) were related to 5 days re-bleeding. The Child Pugh score was related to 6 weeks-mortality in cirrhotic patients with variceal bleeding. Active bleeding during endoscopy and the value of creatinine were related to 5 days re-bleeding.

  19. To evaluate the results of endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVBL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-04-04

    Apr 4, 2004 ... (emergency treatment), and to prevent re-bleeding. (secondary prophylaxis). The modalities used for the ... interventional radiology(8,11) and laser therapy(12). Endoscopic therapy, in places where the .... pressure and variceal size which in turn will diminish the problems of variceal bleeding altogether.

  20. Endoscopic variceal band ligation: a local experience | Jani | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the results of endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVBL) in the local set-up. Design: Retrospective analysis of data of all patients who had EVBL. Setting: Patients having EVBL at the office endoscopy suite. The Nairobi Hospital, the Aga Khan Hospital and M.P Shah Hospital. Methods: The varices were ...

  1. Portographic Evaluation for Recurrent Esophagogastric Varices Following Devascularization Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, J.-S.; Huang, C.-J.; Wang, J.-Y.; Huang, T.-J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate, by transhepatic portography, the changes in portosystemic collaterals and recurrent esophagogastric varices after devascularization surgery. Methods: Thirty-five patients, who had undergone devascularization surgery 2 - 8 years previously, underwent follow-up portography and the collaterals and drainage routes were compared with preoperative portography results. Results: Newly formed collaterals were present in 30 of 35 patients and the origins and drainage routes differed from preoperative ones. Most common were new collaterals arising from the junction of the portal and superior mesenteric veins; the next most frequent arose from a main portal branch, the portal trunk, or the superior mesenteric vein. New collaterals with recurrent varices were seen in 20 patients and without varices in 10; 5 patients had no collaterals or varices.Conclusion: Since the development of new collaterals is common in portal hypertensive patients following devascularization surgery, regular follow-up for recurrent varices is necessary

  2. Esophageal Mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Boatright

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare invasive fungal infection with high mortality. It usually affects patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or hematological malignancies. Gastroenterologists need to be aware of this rare infection because endoscopy can facilitate early diagnosis and prompt appropriate therapy. Here we describe a case of invasive esophageal mucormycosis that developed in a 63-year-old man with diabetes, acute promyelocytic leukemia, and prolonged leukopenia after chemotherapy. Upper endoscopy showed distal circumferential esophageal wall thickening with devitalization. The mucosa did not bleed after endoscopic biopsy. Histopathology confirmed mucormycosis. He was treated with various antifungal agents including echinocandins, fluconazole, and liposomal amphotericin B. Despite aggressive antifungal therapy and supportive care, the patient died 24 days later.

  3. Equal efficacy of endoscopic variceal ligation and propranolol in preventing variceal bleeding in patients with noncirrhotic portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Shiv Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Jha, Sanjeev Kumar; Agrawal, Amit; Mishra, Smruti Ranjan; Sharma, Barjesh Chander; Kumar, Ashish

    2010-10-01

    Variceal bleeding increases morbidity and mortality among patients with noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH). Blockers of β-adrenergic receptor signaling and endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) have been used to prevent recurrence of bleeding, based on data from cirrhotic patients. We compared the efficacy and safety of the β-blocker propranolol with that of EVL in preventing the recurrence of variceal bleeding in patients with NCPH. Consecutive patients with NCPH with a history of variceal bleeding in the past 6 weeks were assigned randomly to groups treated every 3 weeks with EVL (n = 51) or propranolol (until they had a resting heart rate of 55 beats per minute or to a maximum of 320 mg/day; n = 50). Primary end points were recurrence of variceal bleeding or death. Secondary end points were complications of EVL in patients given EVL, variceal eradication after EVL, variceal recurrence after EVL, or a decrease in variceal grade in patients given propranolol. After a median follow-up period of 23 months, rates of recurrence of bleeding were similar between the groups (EVL, 23.5%; propranolol, 18%; P = .625). The actuarial probability of remaining free of bleeding recurrence was similar between the groups. No deaths occurred in either group. Of the patients given propranolol, 47% had a decrease in the grade of varices and none experienced bleeding. Adverse events were minor and comparable between groups (EVL, 12%; propranolol, 18%; P = .635). EVL was not more effective than the β-blocker propranolol for the secondary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding in patients with NCPH. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Subconjunctival hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001616.htm Subconjunctival hemorrhage To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Subconjunctival hemorrhage is a bright red patch appearing in the ...

  5. The spectrum of benign esophageal lesions: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Kyung Mi; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Soon Jin; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Tae Sung; Han, Dae Hee; Shim, Young Mog [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-01

    Benign esophageal lesions occur in various diseases. Barium studies are useful for the evaluation of mucosal surface lesions but provide little information about the extramucosal extent of disease. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, on the other hand, permit the assessment of wall thickness, mediastinal involvement, adjacent lymphadenopathy, and distant spread. In diseases such as fibrovascular polyps, duplication cysts, scleroderma, trauma, caustic esophagitis, hiatal hernia, esophageal diverticulum, achalasia, and paraesophageal varices, the findings of imaging studies are specific, obviating the need for further invasive diagnostic work-up. The advent of helical computed tomography and its volume data set allows the acquisition of multiplanar images, and magnetic resonance imaging is useful both for this and for tissue characterization. Thus, multiplanar cross-sectional imaging further extends the role of imaging modalities to the evaluation of benign esophageal lesions. Through an awareness of the multiplanar cross-sectional appearances of various benign esophageal lesions, the radiologist can play an important role in the detection, diagnosis, further diagnostic planning, and treatment of the diseases in which they occur.

  6. Evaluation of percutaneous transhepatic gastroesophageal varices embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Hongxiang; Chen Gensheng; Sun Huiling; Zeng Yun; Yan Zhiping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application of percutaneous transheaptic gastroesophgeal varices embolization (PTVE) for treatment and prevention of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhotic portal hypertension. Methods: 48 patients with cirrhotic portal hypertension and gastroesophageal varices were treated with PTVE for the prevention and control of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Results: The technical success of PTVE was 97.9% and the rate of hemostasis was 100%. During the procedure, steel coil displacement occurred in 1 case, vagus nerve reflection with blood pressure degression and heart rate decline in 4 cases. After the procedure, 1 patients developed refractory ascites and 1 patients died of abdominal bleeding. 2 cases died of hepatic failure and 2 cases occurred rehaemorrhagia in fore 6 mon. after one year follow-up; 3 cases losed follow-up and 5 cases occurred rehaemorrhagia in the late 6 mon. Conclusion: PTVE is mini-invasive and efficient in treating acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhotic portal hypertension. Increase of technical success and decreases of morbidity can be achieved on the condition of' proper maneuver. (authors)

  7. Comparison of Endoscopic Variceal Ligation and Nadolol Plus Isosorbide-5-mononitrate in the Prevention of First Variceal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huay-Min Wang

    2006-10-01

    Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that endoscopic variceal ligation is similar to the combination of nadolol plus ISMN with regard to effectiveness and safety in the prevention of first variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis.

  8. Embolization with NBCA for the treatment of esophago-fundal varices: its complications and nursing care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lingyun; Li Xiaohui; Qiu Xuanying; Lai Lisha; Zhong Qiuying; Zhu Kangshun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the nursing care for patients with portal hypertension after receiving NBCA embolization treatment of esophago-fundal varices. Methods: The clinical data and nursing care effect in 28 patients with portal hypertension after NBCA embolization treatment of esophago-fundal varices were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Successful embolization was achieved in 27 patients, and the bleeding was stopped. Failure of embolization occurred in one patient. Slight pulmonary embolism was found in 4 cases, of which 2 had mild cough. Pain in different degree was seen in 24 cases, and vomiting with mild abdominal pain in 20 cases. Neither puncture site bleeding nor intraperitoneal hemorrhage occurred. Conclusion: In order to increase the success rate and to reduce the occurrence of complications, it is very important for nurses to take the following obligations seriously: to give the patient pertinent psychological nursing care before the procedure, to take a close observation on the patient's condition during and after the surgery and to deal with the complications promptly. (authors)

  9. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... Four different dengue viruses are known to cause dengue hemorrhagic fever. Dengue hemorrhagic fever occurs when a person is bitten by ...

  10. Ileal Varices Treated with Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro; Yamazaki, Katsu; Toyota, Jouji; Karino, Yoshiyasu; Ohmura, Takumi; Akaike, Jun

    2009-04-01

    A 55-year-old man with hepatitis B virus antigen-positive liver cirrhosis was admitted to our hospital with anal bleeding. Colonoscopy revealed blood retention in the entire colon, but no bleeding lesion was found. Computed tomography images showed that vessels in the ileum were connected to the right testicular vein, and we suspected ileal varices to be the most probable cause of bleeding. We immediately performed double balloon enteroscopy, but failed to find any site of bleeding owing to the difficulty of fiberscope insertion with sever adhesion. Using a balloon catheter during retrograde transvenous venography, we found ileal varices communicating with the right testicular vein (efferent vein) with the superior mesenteric vein branch as the afferent vein of these varices. We performed balloon occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration by way of the efferent vein of the varices and have detected no further bleeding in this patient one year after treatment.

  11. Preretinal hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Felippe

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of Valsalva hemorrhagic retinopathy treated with Nd:YAGlaser indescribed. The patient presented decreased visual acuityafter coughing, and a preretinal hemorrhage was diagnosed in theposterior pole; puncturing the posterior hyaloid face was performedwith Nd:Yag laser. Rapid hemorrhage absorption was observedafter the therapy proposed and visual acuity was recovered. Nd:Yaglaser proved to be safe and efficient in the management of preretinalhemorrhage.

  12. Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngu, Jing H.; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Chin, YK

    2017-01-01

    Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study.......Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study....

  13. The Significance of Variceal Haemorrhage in Ghana: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archampong, T N A; Tachi, K; Agyei, A A; Nkrumah, K N

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the burden of bleeding oesophageal varices at the main tertiary referral centre in Accra. Retrospective design to describe the endoscopic spectrum and review mortality data following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. Endoscopic data was reviewed in the Endoscopy Unit between 2007 and 2010. Mortality data was collated from the Department of Medicine between 2010 and 2013. The study questionnaire compiled clinical and demographic characteristics, endoscopic diagnoses, length of hospital admission and treatment regimens. Aetiology and time-trend analysis of mortality rates following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding; variceal bleeding treatment modalities. On review of the endoscopic diagnoses, gastro-oesophageal varices were identified in 21.9% of cases followed by gastritis 21.7%, duodenal ulcer, 17.0%, and gastric ulcer, 13.2%. Gastro-oesophageal varices were the predominant cause of death from acute upper gastro-intestinal haemorrhage from 46% in 2010 to 76% in 2013. Outcomes following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding were dismal with some 38% of fatalities occurring within the first 24 hours. Injection sclerotherapy was the dominant endoscopic modality for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding in comparison with band ligation, mainly as a result of cost and availability. At the tertiary centre in Accra, variceal bleeding is an increasingly common cause of acute upper gastro-intestinal haemorrhage in comparison with previous reviews in Ghana. Its significantly high in-hospital mortality reflects inadequate facilities to deal with this medical emergency. A strategic approach to care with endoscopic services equipped with all the necessary therapeutic interventions will be vital in improving the outcomes of variceal bleeding in Ghana.

  14. Comparison of Endoscopic Variceal Ligation and Endoscopic Variceal Obliteration in Patients with GOV1 Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyoung Ju; Jun, Chung Hwan; Lee, Du Hyeon; Cho, Eun Ae; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Hyunsoo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, rebleeding rates, survival, and complications of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) with those of endoscopic variceal obliteration (EVO) in patients with acute type 1 gastroesophageal variceal (GOV1) bleeding. Data were collected retrospectively at a single center. A total of 84 patients were selected (20 patients underwent EVL; 64 patients underwent EVO) from February 2004 to September 2011. Their clinical characteristics, laboratory results, vital signs, Child-Pugh score, Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and overall mortality were evaluated. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. The success rate in initial control of active bleeding was not significantly different between the EVL and EVO groups (18/20 EVL, or 90.0%, compared with 62/64 EVO, or 96.9%; p=0.239). The early rebleeding rate was also not significantly different between the groups (3/18 EVL, or 16.7% compared with 17/62 EVO, or 27.4%; p=0.422). The late rebleeding rate of the EVL group was lower than that of the EVO group (3/18 EVL, or 16.7%, compared with 26/59 EVO, or 44.1%; p=0.042). The time-to-rebleeding was 594 days for the EVL group and 326 days for the EVO group (p=0.054). In the multivariate analysis, portal vein thrombosis (PVT) was a significant risk factor for early rebleeding. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and previous history of bleeding were significant risk factors for very late rebleeding. In conclusion, EVL is better than EVO in reducing late rebleeding in acute GOV1 bleeding. HCC, PVT, and previous bleeding history were significant risk factors for rebleeding.

  15. [Therapeutic efficacy of endoscopic variceal ligation to treat gastric varices: a study of 63 consecutive cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xian-jue; Chen, Wei-qing

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) for treating various types of gastric varices (GV) by reviewing patient cases in order to identify the influencing factors of EVL-related recurrence and rebleeding. The medical records of 101 GV cases treated by EVL in our department between January 2008 and October 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The cases were grouped according to GV type: type 1 (GOV1, n = 63), type 2 (GOV2, n = 18), GOV1 coexisting with GOV2 (n = 11), isolated GOV1 (IGV1, n = 9), and GOV2 (IGV2, n = 0). Data from follow-up examinations (range: 1.5 - 48.0 months, average: 14.9 +/- 9.1 months) were extracted for analysis and included early (less than 72 h after EVL) and late (72 h to 6 weeks after EVL) rebleeding and recurrence. In addition, data from computed tomography (CT) or CT angiography (CTA), performed in 32 of the patients, were extracted to determine the influence of supplying veins, gastrorenal or splenorenal shunts, and portal vein and/or splenic vein diameters on GV recurrence. Data analysis was carried out by ANOVA, Chi-square, Fisher's exact or rank-sum tests, as appropriate. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate the time of first recurrent bleeding, and the log-rank test was used to compare between-group differences. GOV2 and IGV1 varices were more severe than the varices of GOV1 (GOV2 and GOV1: u = -2.960; IGV1 and GOV1: u = -2.871; both P less than 0.05). GOV1 had a significantly lower recurrence rate than all other GV types (x2 = 7.054, P less than 0.05). The CT and CTA data indicated that all GV were supplied by left gastric veins, while 83.3% of IGV1 had blood supplementation by left gastric veins and short gastric or posterior gastric veins, and 100% of IGV1 had gastrorenal or splenorenal shunts. Approximately one-half of the total GV cases (56.3%, 18/32) had gastrorenal or splenorenal shunts, and this parameter was correlated with portal vein diameter (t = -2.766, P less than 0.05). The

  16. Meta-analysis: banding ligation and medical interventions for the prevention of rebleeding from oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Maja; Krag, A; Rohde, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In patients with oesophageal varices, the combination of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and medical therapy is recommended as standard of care for prevention of rebleeding. The results of previous meta-analyses on this topic are equivocal.......In patients with oesophageal varices, the combination of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and medical therapy is recommended as standard of care for prevention of rebleeding. The results of previous meta-analyses on this topic are equivocal....

  17. Color doppler findings of gastric varices compared with findings on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Takahiro; Yamazaki, Katsu; Toyota, Jouji; Karino, Yoshiyasu; Ohmura, Takumi; Suga, Toshihiro [Sapporo Kosei General Hospital (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hemodynamics of gastric varices. We evaluated the detection rates of gastric varices, inflowing vessels to gastric varices, and outflowing vessels from gastric varices in 24 patients with gastric varices, using color Doppler sonography, and compared these findings with computed tomography findings. Eighteen patients had F2-type varices and 6 had F3-type, classified according to the Japanese Research Society for Portal Hypertension. Fourteen patients had fundal varices, and 10 had cardiac and fundal varices. The detection rates of collateral veins using color Doppler sonography were as follows: gastric varices were detected in all 24 patients (100%); inflowing vessels, in 21 of the 24 patients (87.5%); and outflowing vessels, in 18 of the 24 patients (75.0%). The detection rates of collateral veins, using computed tomography, were: gastric varices were detected in all 24 patients (100%); inflowing vessels, in all 24 patients (100%); and outflowing vessles, in 21 of the 24 patients (87.5%). The color Doppler findings agreed perfectly with the computed tomography findings in 13 of the 24 patients (54.2%). Although color Doppler sonography is a useful, noninvasive modality for evaluating the hemodynamics of gastric varices, it falls short in visualizing the detailed hemodynamics of the inflowing and outflowing vessels of gastric varices in half of the patients when compared with computed tomography. (author)

  18. [Update on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the main studies in the field of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding reported in the last American Congress of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) in 2013. Some of these studies have provided new knowledge and expertise in areas of uncertainty. In this context and among other findings, it has been reported that the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prior to endoscopy or the early performance of endoscopy-within 6 hours of admission in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) (or colonoscopy within 24 hours in patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding)-does not improve the prognosis of the event. It has also been reported that oral administration of a PPI after endoscopic hemostasis may produce a similar outcome to that of intravenously administered PPI in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). In the field of endoscopic therapy, the use of radiofrequency ablation for antral vascular ectasia is of interest. Regarding UGIB and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), new data confirm the risk of cardiovascular events by stopping treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) after an episode of UGIB, the increased risk of UGIB when associating gastrotoxic drugs, and the need to identify both the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks of each NSAID and coxib when prescribing these agents. Finally, there is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors are involved in individual susceptibility to gastrointestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Cerebrovascular disease/Stroke http: / / n. neurology. org/ / cgi/ collection/ all_ cerebrovascular_ disease_ stro ke Arteriovenous malformation http: / / n. neurology. org/ / cgi/ collection/ arteriovenous_ malformation Subarachnoid hemorrhage http: / / n. neurology. ...

  20. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common injury leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage is motor vehicle crashes. Risks include: Aneurysm in other blood vessels ... goals of treatment are to: Save your life Repair the cause of bleeding Relieve symptoms Prevent complications ...

  1. Interesting case of spontaneously resolved dysphagia in a young female due to complicated esophageal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval Choksi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis can affect any organ of the body. Gastrointestinal tubercular involvement is fairly common. Esophageal tuberculosis though is uncommon. Esophageal tuberculosis accounts for only 0.3% of gastrointestinal tuberculosis. It presents with dysphagia, retrosternal pain, cough or constitutional symptoms. Complications like hemorrhage from the ulcer and development of fistulas like esophagomediastinal fistula is extremely uncommon. We report a case of a 27 years old female who presented with retrosternal pain, dysphagia and hematemesis. The patient had esophageal ulcer secondary to erosion of the esophagus by the subcarinal lymph nodes. Imaging was suggestive of esophagomediastinal fistula. Esophageal ulcer biopsy showed chronic tubercular infection. Culture from the esophageal biopsy confirmed the presence of tubercular bacilli. Patient responded to anti-tubercular therapy. Spontaneous dysphagia resolution prior to starting therapy was likely due to the rupture of the lymph node into the esophagus, which was compressing it initially. Esophageal tuberculosis presenting with hematemesis and fistula is extremely uncommon.

  2. Black and White Esophagus: Rare Presentations of Severe Esophageal Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel B; Bowers, Steven; Thomas, Mathew

    2017-01-01

    Benign esophageal strictures are typically the result of long-standing gastroesophageal reflux, and are usually treated with serial dilations and acid-suppressive therapy. Other causes of benign esophageal strictures include external beam radiation, caustic ingestions, prior surgery, and external compression from mediastinal fibrosis. We report 2 rare causes of ischemic esophageal structuring occurring after operations unrelated to the esophagus. The first is a patient who developed esophageal injury following radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation. The direct thermal injury resulted in a "white esophagus" with a full-thickness, long-segmental stricture. The second patient presented with a "black esophagus" also known as acute necrotizing esophagitis. This occurred after an orthotopic liver transplant, which was complicated by multiple organ dysfunction secondary to hemorrhagic shock. In this report, we present 2 rare causes of esophageal stricturing that occurred after procedures not necessarily related to the esophagus itself. Early recognition and active management of these esophageal injuries may lead to better outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a life-threatening condition, the outcome of which can be improved by intensive care. Intracranial hemorrhage may be spontaneous, precipitated by an underlying vascular malformation, induced by trauma, or related to therapeutic anticoagulation. The goals of critical care are to assess the proximate cause, minimize the risks of hemorrhage expansion through blood pressure control and correction of coagulopathy, and obliterate vascular lesions with a high risk of acute rebleeding. Simple bedside scales and interpretation of computed tomography scans assess the severity of neurological injury. Myocardial stunning and pulmonary edema related to neurological injury should be anticipated, and can usually be managed. Fever (often not from infection) is common and can be effectively treated, although therapeutic cooling has not been shown to improve outcomes after intracranial hemorrhage. Most functional and cognitive recovery takes place weeks to months after discharge; expected levels of functional independence (no disability, disability but independence with a device, dependence) may guide conversations with patient representatives. Goals of care impact mortality, with do-not-resuscitate status increasing the predicted mortality for any level of severity of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Future directions include refining the use of bedside neuromonitoring (electroencephalogram, invasive monitors), novel approaches to reduce intracranial hemorrhage expansion, minimizing vasospasm, and refining the assessment of quality of life to guide rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:22167847

  4. Endoscopic variceal ligation-induced ulcer bleeding: What are the risk factors and treatment strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunae; Jun, Chung Hwan; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2017-06-01

    This study was aimed to determine the risk factors of endoscopic variceal ligation-(EVL) induced ulcer bleeding.The prevalence of EVL-induced ulcer bleeding is reported to be 3.6%. However, there are only limited reports of this serious complication, and the risk factors and the treatment methods are not well established.A total of 430 patients who had undergone EVL in Chonnam National University Hospital from January 2014 to October 2016 were studied. EVL was performed for prophylaxis or acute hemorrhage. The patients were classified into 2 groups: a bleeding group (n = 33) and a non-bleeding group (n = 397). The patients who had endoscopically confirmed EVL-induced ulcer bleeding were included in the bleeding group.EVL-induced ulcer bleeding occurred in 7.7% (n = 33) of the patients. In a multivariate analysis, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score >10 (odds ratio [OR]: 3.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10-10.64), concomitant GV F3 (OR: 14.1, 95% CI: 2.84-71.43), and detachment of o-ring bands on follow-up endoscopy (OR: 8.06, 95% CI: 2.55-25.64) were independent predictive factors of EVL-induced ulcer bleeding. Various endoscopic modalities were attempted for hemostasis (EVL in 8 cases [24.2%], endoscopic variceal obturation [EVO] with cyanoacrylate in 6 cases [18.2%], argon plasma coagulation [APC] in 1 case (3%), Sengstaken-Blakemore (SB) tube in 3 cases [9.1%]), and proton pump inhibitor therapy only in 15 cases (45.5%).MELD score >10, concomitant GV F3, and detachment of o-ring bands on follow-up endoscopy are risk factors for EVL-induced ulcer bleeding.

  5. EFFICACY OF THROMBIN FIBRIN GLUE AND SCLE ROSANT IN THE MANAGEMENT OF BLEEDI NG GASTRIC VARICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric varices are noted in up to 20 % of patents with portal hypertension , and are more common in those with non - cirrhotic etiology 1 . They bleed at lower portal pressures , bleed more severely and are associated with higher rates of rebleed , encephalopathy and mortality 1,2,3 . Variceal obliteration using tissue adhesives such as N - butyl cyanoacrylate leading to plugging and thrombosis of the gastric varices is currently the first line management option for obliteration of the gastric varices 3 . Although various options have been proposed , gold standard for management of gastric variceal bleeds is yet to be defined. We theorized that injection of the gastric varices using thrombin based glue followed by injection of a sclerosant shall be effective in optimum sclerotherapy and eradication of gastric varices. MATERIAL AND METHODS : All patients presenting with gastric variceal bleed were offered sclerotherapy with Thrombin fibrin based glue and sclerosant (TFG/S . During the study period 18 patients were enrolled in the TGF/S group. 21 patients underwent variceal plugging with n - butyl cyanoacrylate (NBC . There was no significant difference in age/ sex , duration of bleed or time interval between onset of bleed and endotherapy. RESULTS: Patients undergoing endotherapy with TGF/S had less episodes of bleed , and greater eradication of varices. CONCLUSION: The results with thrombin / fibrin glue and sclerotherapy are highly encouraging. Well - designed trials need to be performed KEYWORDS:Gastric varices; Thrombin Sclerotherapy

  6. Familial and idiopathic colonic varices: an unusual cause of lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iredale, J P; Ridings, P; McGinn, F P; Arthur, M J

    1992-09-01

    A patient is described presenting with an acute lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage as a result of extensive colonic varices. Further investigation revealed that there were no oesophageal varices or splenomegaly. Liver biopsy showed grade II fatty change only, with no other specific or significant pathological features. Transhepatic portography showed a raised portal pressure (20 mm/Hg) but the portal system was patent throughout. There was an abnormal leash of vessels in the caecum thought to represent a variceal plexus. This patient was diagnosed as having idiopathic colonic varices. This case is discussed together with nine other reports of idiopathic colonic varices from the published literature. Four of these reports describe idiopathic colonic varices in more than one member of the same family. Possible modes of inheritance, aetiology of variceal change, natural history, and prognosis are discussed.

  7. EVALUATION OF PRIMARY PROPHYLAXIS WITH PROPRANOLOL AND ELASTIC BAND LIGATION IN VARICEAL BLEEDING IN CIRRHOTIC CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Rocha PIMENTA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background The efficacy of nonselective β-blocker and endoscopic procedures, such as endoscopic variceal ligation, as primary prophylaxis of variceal hemorrhage in cirrhotic adults was demonstrated by numerous controlled trials, but in pediatric population, few are the number of studies. Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the primary prophylaxis with β-blocker in cirrhotic children and adolescents with portal hypertension. Methods This is a cohort study encompassing 26 cirrhotic patients. β-blocker prophylaxis was performed with propranolol. When contraindicated the use of β-blocker, or if side effects presents, the patients were referred to endoscopic therapy with band ligation. Patients were evaluated by endoscopy, and those who had varicose veins of medium and large caliber or reddish spots, regardless of the caliber of varices, received primary prophylaxis. Results Of the 26 patients evaluated, 9 (34.6% had contraindications to the use of propranolol and were referred for endoscopic prophylaxis. Six (35.3% of the 17 patients who received β-blocker (propranolol, had bled after a median follow-up time of 1.9 years. β-blockage dosage varied from 1 mg/kg/day to 3.1 mg/kg/day and seven (41.2% patients had the propranolol suspended due to fail of the β-blockage or adverse effects, such as drowsiness, bronchospasm and hypotension. Patients who received endoscopic prophylaxis (elastic bandage had no bleeding during the follow-up period. Conclusion All of the patients that had upper gastroinstestinal bleeding in this study were under propranolol prophylaxis. The use of propranolol showed a high number of contraindications and side effects, requiring referral to endoscopic prophylaxis. The endoscopic prophylaxis was effective in reducing episodes of bleeding.

  8. Esophageal lichen planus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Janine Pichler; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. PMID:26131872

  9. Esophageal lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis.

  10. A Modified APACHE II Score for Predicting Mortality of Variceal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Modified APACHE II score is effective in predicting outcome of patients with variceal bleeding. Score of L 15 points and long ICU stay are associated with high mortality. Keywords: liver cirrhosis, periportal fibrosis, portal hypertension, schistosomiasis udan Journal of Medical Sciences Vol. 2 (2) 2007: pp. 105- ...

  11. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices in children with intrahepatic and extrahepatic portal venous obstruction: Benefit of injection tract embolisation. ... In a previous study at our institution, sclerotherapy was associated with a high re-bleeding rate and oesophageal ulceration. Embolisation of the injection ...

  12. The significance of variceal haemorrhage in Ghana: A retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study describes the burden of bleeding oesophageal varices at the main tertiary referral centre in Accra. Design: Retrospective design to describe the endoscopic spectrum and review mortality data following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. Endoscopic data was ...

  13. Disease: H01686 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available omplicated with severe hemorrhage due to ruptured esophageal varices, or massive splenomegaly. It is mainly ...iddle-aged women are more prone to IPH in Japan. IPH usually suggests a benign prognosis, but sometimes is c

  14. Esophageal trachealization: A feature of eosinophilic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlHussaini, Abdulrahman A; Semaan, Toufic; ElHag, Imad A

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an inflammatory condition characterized by intense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. EE is frequently misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Here, we present a child with EE and a characteristic endoscopic finding, r inged esophagus . An 11-year-old Saudi boy presented with dysphagia for 1 year. He had experienced an intermittent sensation of solid food sticking in his chest, which was relieved by drinking liquids. A barium swallow excluded anatomical causes of dysphagia, but revealed multiple-ringed esophagus. Endoscopy showed a furrowing and trachealizing appearance of the entire esophagus. Hisologically, extensive eosinophilic infiltration was a feature in biopsies obtained from the esophagus. The child responded well to a 2-month course of inhaled fluticasone. Symptoms recurred 3 months after discontinuation of therapy, which necessitated resumption of inhaled fluticasone. The endoscopic appearance of multiple esophageal rings should raise suspicion of EE and be confirmed by esophageal biopsies. (author)

  15. Supracardiac type total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) with oesophageal varices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Ae; Lee, Hyoung Doo; Ban, Ji Eun; Jo, Min Jung [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea); Sung, Si Chan; Chang, Yun Hee [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea); Choo, Ki Seok [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    Oesophageal varices due to total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) is very rare. Additionally, the infradiaphragmatic type is the most common type of oesophageal varices due to TAPVC. Paraoesophageal varices due to stenosis of the vertical vein of supracardiac TAPVC has not previously been reported. We describe paraoesophageal varices developed as a result of a connection between the left lower pulmonary vein and the umbilicovitelline venous system because of stenosis of the proximal vertical vein in supracardiac type TAPVC in a 3-day-old female newborn who presented with general cyanosis, tachypnoea and dyspnoea. (orig.)

  16. Portal hypertension and variceal bleeding: Clinical and pharmacological aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Lise

    2010-01-01

    Blødende esophagus varicer er en af den mest frygtede komplikationer til cirrose og portal hypertension pga. den høje mortalitet. Et klassisk studie fra 1981 opgjorde 6-ugers mortaliteten til 42%, hvoraf 75% døde indenfor den første uge. Gennem de sidste 2-3 årtier er der introduceret en række nye...... variceblødningsepisode, er en 6-ugers dødelighed på 17% stadig høj. Forebyggelse af blødning eller reblødning af varicer med den non-selektive betablokker propranolol er en effektiv behandling hvis portaltrykket falder med >20% eller til

  17. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M., E-mail: waly.pr@duke.edu [Duke University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Niemeyer, Matthew M. [Washington University Medical Center, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Dasika, Narasimham L., E-mail: narasimh@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  18. Transcatheter Embolotherapy with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate for Ectopic Varices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyo-Cheol, E-mail: angiointervention@gmail.com; Jae, Hwan Jun, E-mail: jaemdphd@gmail.com; Jung, Hyun-Seok; Hur, Saebeom; Lee, Myungsu; Chung, Jin Wook [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo address technical feasibility and clinical outcome of transcatheter embolotherapy with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for bleeding ectopic varices.MethodsThe institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. From January 2004 to June 2013, a total of 12 consecutive patients received transcatheter embolotherapy using NBCA for bleeding ectopic varices in our institute. Clinical and radiologic features of the endovascular procedures were comprehensively reviewed.ResultsPreprocedural computed tomography images revealed ectopic varices in the jejunum (n = 7), stoma (n = 2), rectum (n = 2), and duodenum (n = 1). The 12 procedures consisted of solitary embolotherapy (n = 8) and embolotherapy with portal decompression (main portal vein stenting in 3, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in 1). With regard to vascular access, percutaneous transhepatic access (n = 7), transsplenic access (n = 4), and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt tract (n = 1) were used. There was no failure in either the embolotherapy or the vascular accesses (technical success rate, 100 %). Two patients died within 1 month from the procedure from preexisting fatal medical conditions. Only one patient, with a large varix that had been partially embolized by using coils and NBCA, underwent rebleeding 5.5 months after the procedure. The patient was retreated with NBCA and did not undergo any bleeding afterward for a follow-up period of 2.5 months. The remaining nine patients did not experience rebleeding during the follow-up periods (range 1.5–33.2 months).ConclusionTranscatheter embolotherapy using NBCA can be a useful option for bleeding ectopic varices.

  19. Endocrine carcinoma of the pancreatic tail exhibiting gastric variceal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yuan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonfunctional endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas is uncommon. Without excess hormone secretion, it is clinically silent until the enlarging or metastatic tumor causes compressive symptoms. Epigastric pain, dyspepsia, jaundice, and abdominal mass are the usual symptoms, whereas upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is rare. Here, we describe the case of a 24-year-old man with the chief complaint of hematemesis. Upper GI panendoscopy revealed isolated gastric varices at the fundus and upper body. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a tumor mass at the pancreatic tail causing a splenic vein obstruction, engorged vessels near the fundus of the stomach, and splenomegaly. After distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, the bleeding did not recur. The final pathologic diagnosis was endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. Gastric variceal bleeding is a possible manifestation of nonfunctional endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas if the splenic vein is affected by a tumor. In non-cirrhotic patients with isolated gastric variceal bleeding, the differential diagnosis should include pancreatic disorders.

  20. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat esophageal cancer. A plastic ...

  1. Esophageal intramural pseudoverticulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.R.; Sanders, M.M.; Turner, M.A.; Liu, C.I.

    1981-01-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIP) is a rare condition of unknown etiology. It is characterized by multiple, small, flaskshaped outpouchings in the esophageal wall. Involvement may be segmental or diffuse. Since this entity was first reported in 1960, there have been 43 cases described in the English literature. These cases are reviewed and six additional cases are reported with emphasis on clinical and radiographic parameters of this entity. (orig.) [de

  2. [Esophageal motility disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, C; Wuttge-Hannig, A; Rummeny, E

    2007-02-01

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas'disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective.

  3. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported.

  4. Predictors of mortality in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage who underwent endoscopy and confirmed to have variceal hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Gado

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Patients with acute VH and hemodynamic instability at admission, Child class C, blood in UGI tract at the index endoscopy, rebleeding within five days of endoscopy and in-hospital complications are at an increased risk of mortality after the acute VH episode. Rebleeding within five days of endoscopy and in-hospital complications are the most significant independent predictors of mortality.

  5. Spontaneous Esophageal Injury: Esophageal Intramural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hui Chiu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute chest pain can indicate a life-threatening condition and it is important for physicians to diagnose and treat it as a matter of urgency. We report 1 rare case of esophageal intramural hematoma (IMH that presented with chest pain at the emergency department and which was initially clinically suspected to be due to aortic dissection. The case was diagnosed preoperatively by multidetector computed tomography. Esophageal IMH may represent an intermediate stage between Mallory-Weiss tear (mucosal and Boerhaave's syndrome (transmural. Multidetector computed tomography is a useful noninvasive imaging modality for accurate diagnosis of these spontaneous intramural and transmural ruptures of the esophagus, and aids in the differential diagnosis of aortic and other mediastinal diseases with acute chest pain.

  6. Prognostic variables in patients with cirrhosis and oesophageal varices without prior bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, E

    1994-01-01

    As identification of patients at risk of bleeding or death is essential for prophylaxis, we determined the prognostic influence of various patient characteristics on the risk of bleeding and death. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis and oesophageal varices without previous bleeding were included...... a significant relation with an increased risk of bleeding or death: high plasma volume (p varices (p

  7. Balloon-occluded percutaneous transheptic obliteration of isolated vesical varices causing gross hematuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Min Seok; Kim, Chul Sung [Department of Urology, College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Gross hematuria secondary to vesical varices is an unusual presentation. We report such a case recurrent gross hematuria in a male patient who had a history of bladder substitution with ileal segments that had been treated by balloon-occluded percutaneous transhepatic obliteration of vesical varices.

  8. Endoscopic Sclerotherapy for Bleeding Oesophageal Varices: Experience in Gezira State, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moawia Elbalal Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Bleeding due to oesophageal varices is the most common cause of upper gastrointestinal tract haemorrhage in Gezira State, Central Sudan. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EST is a valuable therapeutic modality for the management of variceal bleeding. Other options for treatment such as variceal band ligation are either expensive or unavailable. Objectives A retrospective study to evaluate the outcome of (EST in the management of bleeding oesophageal varices due to portal hypertension in Gezira State, the centre of a developing country, Sudan. Methods A total of 1073 patients, during 2001-2010, were carefully selected particularly those with bleeding oesophageal varices consequent to portal hypertension. EST was performed using a standard technique and ethanolamine oleate (5% was utilized as sclerosing agent. Results There were 777 males (72.4% and 296 females (27.6% in a ratio of 2.6. The causes of portal hypertension were found to be schistosomal periportal fibrosis (PPF in 1001 (93.3% patients, liver cirrhosis in 60 (5.5% mixed PPF and cirrhosis in seven (0.7% and portal vein thrombosis in five (0.5% patients. Full obliteration of varices required a mean of four sessions with a range of 2-6. In the present study 350 (32.6% patients have been followed up until complete sclerosis of varices. Conclusion This study provides evidence that endoscopic injection sclerotherapy is an important component in the management of bleeding oesophageal varices caused by hypertension. It is a safe and effective procedure.

  9. Esophageal Replacement for Long-Gap Esophageal Atresia in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The management of esophageal atresia in a resourcelimited environment is plagued with challenges that often lead to poor outcome. The diagnosis and management of babies with long-gap esophageal atresia adds a new dimension to these challenges. We report the success of esophageal replacement surgery for a ...

  10. Prostacyclin Increases Portal Venous Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    decline in CO. If PCI 2 were administered for an unrelated disease when cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and esophageal varices were present, flow into...the portal system would increase and possibly initiate variceal hemorrhage. The portal venous effects of PGI should be 2realized when considering this

  11. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Study in the Esophageal Motility Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook

    1993-01-01

    Esophageal motility was evaluated from the analysis of 10 consecutive swallows using liquid bolus containing 0.5 mCi of 99m Tc tin colloid. We have reviewed our experience of esophageal transit study in the 20 normal volunteers and 55 patients with dysphagia that was not related to mechanical obstruction. The purpose of this study is to measure the esophageal transit in normal subjects and in patients with various esophageal motility disorders. The overall sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide esophageal transit study in detecting esophageal motor abnormality were compared with manometric results as a gold standard, which were 80% and 100% respectively. Radionuclide transit study is a safe, rapid, noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  12. Association of left renal vein variations and pelvic varices in abdominal MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Zafer [Baskent University, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Baskent Universitesi Adana Hastanesi, Adana (Turkey); Ulusan, Serife; Oguzkurt, Levent [Baskent University, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey)

    2007-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether left renal vein (LRV) variation is associated with pelvic varices and left ovarian vein (LOV) reflux. Routine abdominal multidetector-row computed tomography scans of 324 women without symptoms of pelvic congestion syndrome were analyzed. Presence and type of LRV variants (circumaortic [CLRV] or retroaortic [RLRV]) were recorded. Diameters of the LRV, ovarian veins (OVs), and parauterine veins were measured and a specific LRV diameter ratio was calculated for each patient. Presence and severity of pelvic varices and LOV reflux were noted. Pelvic varices were detected in 59 (18%) of the total of 324 women, in 7 (37%) of the 19 women with RLRVs, in 7 (29%) of the 24 women with CLRVs, and in 45 (16%) of the 281 women with normal LRVs. The frequency of pelvic varices in the women with LRV variation was significantly higher than that in the group with normal LRV anatomy (33 vs. 16%; p=0.009). The frequency of pelvic varices in the women with RLRVs was also significantly higher than that in the group with normal LRV anatomy (p=0.02). LRV diameter ratio was correlated with presence of pelvic varices and presence of LOV reflux (p=0.0001 for both). This study revealed an association between pelvic varices and LRV variations in a population of predominantly multiparous women. (orig.)

  13. Treatment of symptomatic pelvic varices by ovarian vein embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capasso, Patrizio; Simons, Christine; Trotteur, Genevieve; Dondelinger, Robert F.; Henroteaux, Denis; Gaspard, Ulysse

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. Pelvic congestion syndrome is a common cause of chronic pelvic pain in women and its association with venous congestion has been described in the literature. We evaluated the potential benefits of lumboovarian vein embolization in the treatment of lower abdominal pain in patients presenting with pelvic varicosities. Methods. Nineteen patients were treated. There were 13 unilateral embolizations, 6 initial bilateral treatments and 5 treated recurrences (a total of 30 procedures). All embolizations were performed with either enbucrilate and/or macrocoils, and there was an average clinical and Doppler duplex follow-up of 15.4 months. Results. The initial technical success rate was 96.7%. There were no immediate or long-term complications. Variable symptomatic relief was observed in 73.7% of cases with complete responses in 57.9%. All 8 patients who had partial or no pain relief complained of dyspareunia. The direct relationship between varices and chronic pelvic pain was difficult to ascertain in a significant number of clinical failures. Conclusion. Transcatheter embolization of lumboovarian varices is a safe technique offering symptomatic relief of pelvic pain in the majority of cases. The presence of dyspareunia seemed to be a poor prognostic factor, indicating that other causes of pelvic pain may coexist with pelvic varicosities

  14. Greek results of the “ENERGIB” European study on non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodoridis, George; Akriviadis, Evangelos; Evgenidis, Nikolaos; Kapetanakis, Anargyros; Karamanolis, Demetrios; Kountouras, Jannis; Mantzaris, Gerassimos; Potamianos, Spyros; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Tzathas, Charalambos

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-variceal upper gastro-intestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is a common and challenging emergency situation. We aimed to describe the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with NVUGIB in Greece. Methods ENERGIB (NCT00797641) was an epidemiological survey conducted in 7 European countries including Greece. It included adult patients with overt NVUGIB from 10 tertiary hospitals across Greece. Data for each patient were collected on admission and up to 30 days thereafter. Results 201 patients were enrolled. A previous history of NVUGIB was reported by 14% of patients, while 61% had ≥ 1 co-morbidities. At presentation, 59% were on therapy that could harm the gastrointestinal mucosa, 14% on anticoagulant(s) and 42% had sign(s) of hemodynamic instability. 54% of patients showed stigmata of recent hemorrhage. Therapeutic endoscopy was performed in 25% and blood product(s) transfusions were required in 86% of cases. Proton pump inhibitors were administered before and after endoscopy in 70% and 95% of patients, respectively. Uncontrolled bleeding or rebleeding was observed in 11% being more common in elderly, hospitalized patients and patients with ≥1 co-morbidities. Second-look endoscopy was performed in 20%, angiographic intervention in 1.5% and surgical intervention in 4% of patients. Only 5/201 (2.5%) patients died during hospitalization and none died during the 30-day post-hospitalization period. Conclusions The majority of patients with NVUGIB in tertiary Greek hospitals are elderly, with co-morbidities, hemodynamic instability and required transfusion(s), while one fourth undergoes therapeutic endoscopic interventions. However, NVUGIB is associated with moderate degrees of continued bleeding/re-bleeding, low surgical rates and, most importantly, low mortality. PMID:24714268

  15. Distal esophageal spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Distal esophageal spasm (DES) is a rare esophageal motility disorder associated with dysphagia and chest pain. In 2011, the diagnosis of DES was refined based on the occurrence of premature (rather than rapid) contractions by high-resolution manometry. New therapeutic options have also been recently proposed. Thus, a review on DES incorporating publications since 2012 is timely because of these revisions in definition and management. DES remains a heterogeneous clinical disorder. Its pathophysiology is still debated and DES might be related to achalasia. Alternatively, it might be secondary to medications, especially opiates. Endoscopic ultrasound might be informative diagnostically by demonstrating muscularis propria hypertrophy and thickening. Botulinum toxin injection in the esophageal body has been shown superior to placebo to relieve symptoms associated with DES. Finally, per oral endoscopic myotomy is a promising therapeutic approach, but may be less effective in DES than in achalasia. The diagnosis of DES should lead to a systematic search for medication that might promote the occurrence of esophageal dysmotility. Endoscopic treatment of DES (botulinum toxin injection or per oral endoscopic myotomy) should be further evaluated in controlled studies using current diagnostic criteria by high-resolution manometry.

  16. Recombinant factor VIIa for variceal bleeding in patients with advanced cirrhosis: A randomized, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Jaime; Thabut, Dominique; Albillos, Agustín

    2008-01-01

    A beneficial effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in Child-Pugh class B and C patients with cirrhosis who have variceal bleeding has been suggested. This randomized controlled trial assessed the efficacy and safety of rFVIIa in patients with advanced cirrhosis and active variceal...... events, were comparable between groups. CONCLUSION: Treatment with rFVIIa had no significant effect on the primary composite endpoint compared with placebo. Therefore, decision on the use of this hemostatic agent in acute variceal bleeding should be carefully considered, because results of this study do...

  17. Esophageal bypass after failed chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matono, Satoru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Mori, Naoki; Nagano, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiromasa; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal stenosis and/or fistula often occur after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for unresectable esophageal cancer. In such patients, an esophageal stent can help achieve oral intake. However an esophageal stent cannot be inserted where there is complete stenosis or where the tumor is located. In such cases, esophageal bypass surgery may be necessary. Here, we investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients who underwent esophageal bypass surgery in our institution. We reviewed 10 cases of esophageal bypass surgery (gastric tube in 8 cases, colon in 2 cases) after CRT for unresectable esophageal cancer, between 2001 and 2009. There were 5 of stenosis-only cases, 4 fistula-only cases, and 1 case of stenosis and fistula. There were postoperative complications in 5 cases (50%), and all these were treated conservatively and healed. The median survival from surgery to peroral intake was 20 days (range 9-90 days), and the median survival after starting peroral intake was 130 days (range 48-293 days). Esophageal bypass surgery can achieve good performance status and improve peroral intake. (author)

  18. Esophageal Ulcer as a Cause of Death: A Population-Based Study. Mortality of Esophageal Ulcer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Tuomo K; Sihvo, Eero I T; Räsänen, Jari V; Hynninen, Marja; Salo, Jarmo A

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at defining the mortality and the nature of fatal complications that arise out of esophageal ulcer for one clearly defined geographical area. In this national, population-based study, the occurrence of fatal esophageal ulcer or ulcer requiring hospital treatment between January 1987 and December 2000 was assessed by the use of Finland's administrative databases. Medical records provided etiology of fatal ulcer and agonal symptoms. Due to an esophageal ulcer, 2,242 patients received treatment in Finnish hospitals, at an annual frequency of 3.2/100,000. Ulcer with hemorrhage (53.5%), perforation (38.4%), or aspiration pneumonia (2.3%) was the cause of death in 86 patients for an annual mortality of 0.12/100,000. Based on the number of ulcers treated, 3.8% cases ended fatally. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) seemed to be the etiologic factor for ulcer in 68 (79.0%) patients. The most common agonal symptoms were hematemesis (41.8%), abdominal pain (25.6%), melaena (22.1%), and dyspnea (17.4%). Twenty (23.3%) patients were found dead at home. The rarity of the disease, related disorders, and the diversity of symptoms make the complicated esophageal ulcer a diagnostic challenge. Effective monitored treatment for severe GERD may be an important step to prevent fatal outcome.

  19. Worldwide esophageal cancer collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, T W; Rusch, V W; Apperson-Hansen, C; Allen, M S; Chen, L-Q; Hunter, J G; Kesler, K A; Law, S; Lerut, T E M R; Reed, C E; Salo, J A; Scott, W J; Swisher, S G; Watson, T J; Blackstone, E H

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report assemblage of a large multi-institutional international database of esophageal cancer patients, patient and tumor characteristics, and survival of patients undergoing esophagectomy alone and its correlates. Forty-eight institutions were approached and agreed to participate in a worldwide esophageal cancer collaboration (WECC), and 13 (Asia, 2; Europe, 2; North America, 9) submitted data as of July 1, 2007. These were used to construct a de-identified database of 7884 esophageal cancer patients who underwent esophagectomy. Four thousand six hundred and twenty-seven esophagectomy patients had no induction or adjuvant therapy. Mean age was 62 +/- 11 years, 77% were men, and 33% were Asian. Mean tumor length was 3.3 +/- 2.5 cm, and esophageal location was upper in 4.1%, middle in 27%, and lower in 69%. Histopathologic cell type was adenocarcinoma in 60% and squamous cell in 40%. Histologic grade was G1 in 32%, G2 in 33%, G3 in 35%, and G4 in 0.18%. pT classification was pTis in 7.3%, pT1 in 23%, pT2 in 16%, pT3 in 51%, and pT4 in 3.3%. pN classification was pN0 in 56% and pN1 in 44%. The number of lymph nodes positive for cancer was 1 in 12%, 2 in 8%, 3 in 5%, and >3 in 18%. Resection was R0 in 87%, R1 in 11%, and R2 in 3%. Overall survival was 78, 42, and 31% at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Unlike single-institution studies, in this worldwide collaboration, survival progressively decreases and is distinctively stratified by all variables except region of the world. A worldwide esophageal cancer database has been assembled that overcomes problems of rarity of this cancer. It reveals that survival progressively (monotonically) decreased and was distinctively stratified by all variables except region of the world. Thus, it forms the basis for data-driven esophageal cancer staging. More centers are needed and encouraged to join WECC.

  20. Banding ligation or beta-blockers for primary prevention of variceal bleeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre Cotoras Viedma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La hemorragia digestiva alta variceal es una de las complicaciones más serias de la cirrosis hepática. Los betabloqueadores no selectivos y la ligadura endoscópica se consideran efectivos como estrategia de prevención primaria de hemorragia variceal, pero no hay consenso sobre cuál de las dos constituye la mejor opción. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en 30 bases de datos, identificamos siete revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen 21 estudios aleatorizados. Realizamos un metanálisis y tablas de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Concluimos que la ligadura variceal probablemente disminuye el riesgo de sangrado digestivo variceal y se asocia a menos efectos adversos al ser comparada con betabloqueadores no selectivos, aunque probablemente no existen diferencias en términos de mortalidad.

  1. Endosonography of gastroesophageal varices: evaluation and follow-up of 76 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, T. L.; Kimmings, N.; Rauws, E.; Jansen, P.; Tytgat, G.

    1995-01-01

    Endosonography was performed in 76 patients who had endoscopically detected gastroesophageal varices or questionable submucosal lesions, or who were being evaluated for pancreatic carcinoma or pancreatitis. The result were compared with surgery or autopsy results. The patients were divided

  2. CT in pontine hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Yasuo; Kinoshita, Masao; Ikeda, Ken; Sasaki, Atsushi.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical and CT findings in 10 patients with primary pontine hemorrhage were reviewed. All patients were hypertensive. Pontine hemorrhage can be divided into 3 groups from the viewpoint of location of hematomas. These are the tegmentobasilar type, tegmental type and basilar type. The tegmentobasilar type produces characteristic clinical features for pontine hemorrhage and poor prognosis, otherwise, another two types produce atypical clinical features for pontine hemorrhage and good prognosis. (author)

  3. Familial and idiopathic colonic varices: an unusual cause of lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Iredale, J P; Ridings, P; McGinn, F P; Arthur, M J

    1992-01-01

    A patient is described presenting with an acute lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage as a result of extensive colonic varices. Further investigation revealed that there were no oesophageal varices or splenomegaly. Liver biopsy showed grade II fatty change only, with no other specific or significant pathological features. Transhepatic portography showed a raised portal pressure (20 mm/Hg) but the portal system was patent throughout. There was an abnormal leash of vessels in the caecum thought to...

  4. The application of transabdominal 3D ultrasound for the diagnosis of gastric varices: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Hitoshi, E-mail: maru-cib@umin.ac.jp; Kamezaki, Hidehiro, E-mail: ugn29814@yahoo.co.jp; Kondo, Takayuki, E-mail: takakondonaika@yahoo.co.jp; Sekimoto, Tadashi, E-mail: tad_sekimoto@yahoo.co.jp; Shimada, Taro, E-mail: bobtaro51@yahoo.co.jp; Takahashi, Masanori, E-mail: machat1215@yahoo.co.jp; Yokosuka, Osamu, E-mail: yokosukao@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2013-09-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using transabdominal three-dimensional (3D) colour Doppler ultrasound as a non-invasive tool to demonstrate and quantify gastric varices. Subjects and methods: A phantom study compared the 3D water flow volume data in a hose with the actual volume inside the hose at three different flow velocities. The prospective clinical study examined the reliability and reproducibility of 3D volume data for gastric varices (mild 28, moderate 26, large 8) in 62 patients. The 3D images were acquired using the colour Doppler with both convex and micro-convex probes. Results: The phantom study showed a 12.4–17.6% difference between the 3D data and the actual volume with no difference between the two types of probes or three velocities. The detectability of gastric varices was identical between the two probes (54/62, 87.1%). However, the scanning efficiency was significantly greater for the micro-convex probe (66.9 ± 14.1%) than the convex probe (57.3 ± 14%, p = 0.012). Body mass index was the only factor that had a significant relationship with the detectability of varices. The mean volume (mL) of the 3D signal was 0.82 ± 0.74 for mild varices, 5.48 ± 3.84 for moderate varices, and 10.63 ± 6.67 for large varices with significant differences between different grades. The intra-/inter-rater reliability was excellent. Conclusion: The method of 3D colour Doppler ultrasound is reliable and reproducible in the quantitative assessment of vascular volume and is applicable for grading gastric varices. This study may offer a practical usefulness for 3D ultrasonography as an alternative to endoscopy.

  5. Banding ligation versus no intervention for primary prevention in adults with oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yong, Charles Wei Kit; Vadera, Sonam; Morgan, Marsha Y.

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of banding ligation versus no intervention in adults with cirrhosis and gastro-oesophageal varices that have not bled.......This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of banding ligation versus no intervention in adults with cirrhosis and gastro-oesophageal varices that have not bled....

  6. Octreotide in the Control of Post-Sclerotherapy Bleeding from Oesophageal Varices, Ulcers and Oesophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer A. Jenkins

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding from oesophageal varices, oesophageal ulcers or oesophagitis is occasionally massive and difficult to control. Octreotide, a synthetic analogue of somatostin lowers portal pressure and collateral blood flow including that through varices, increases lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, and inhibits the gastric secretion of acid as well as pepsin. Our current experience suggests it is effective in controlling acute variceal haemorrhage. Therefore we have examined the efficacy of octreotide in the control of postsclerotherapy bleeding from oesophageal varices, oesophageal ulcers and oesophagitis. During the study period 77 patients experienced a significant gastrointestinal bleed (blood pressure 100 beats per min or the need to transfuse 2 or more units of blood to restore the haemoglobin level following injection sclerotherapy of oesophageal varices. The source of bleeding was varices in 42 patients, oesophageal ulcers in 31 and oesophagitis in 4. All patients received a continuous intravenous infusion of octreotide (50 μg/h for between 40–140h. If bleeding was not controlled in the first 12h after commencing octreotide hourly bolus doses (50 μg for 24h were superimposed on the continuous infusion. Haemorrhage was successfully controlled by an infusion of octreotide in 38 of the 42 patients with bleeding from varices, in 30 of 31 patients with oesophageal ulceration, and all patients with oesophagitis. In the 1 patient with persistent bleeding from oesophageal ulceration and in 2 of the 4 with continued haemorrhage from varices, haemostasis was achieved by hourly boluses of 50 μg octreotide for 24h in addition to the continuous infusion. No major complications were associated with octreotide administration. The results of this study clearly indicate that octreotide is a safe and effective treatment for the control of severe haemorrhage after technically successful injection sclerotherapy.

  7. Embolotherapy for Gastric Variceal Bleeding from Pseudoaneurysm of Short Gastric Artery: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Han; Kim, Young Dae; Kim, Dong Hyun [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The complications of pancreatitis, such as pseudocyst or abscesses, are well known to radiologists. Yet formation of a pseudoaneurysm of the short gastric artery is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis. It is also very rare for a psuedoaneurysm of the short gastric artery to cause splenic vein occlusion and the final result is gastric varices. We report here on a case that showed the dramatic effect of embolotherapy for a pseudoaneurysm of the short gastric artery that caused gastric variceal bleeding

  8. Immunopathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Hans-Uwe; Straumann, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus associated with dysphagia in adults and refractory reflux syndromes in children. Immunological and genetic approaches have been used to better understand the pathophysiology of the underlying inflammation. Evidence has accumulated that EoE represents a T-helper (Th) 2-type inflammatory disease, in which allergens play a role in triggering the disease. The majority of the patients suffer from concurrent allergic rhinitis, asthma, and eczema, and have a history of atopy. The chronic inflammatory response in EoE is associated with tissue damage and remodeling, both of which lead to esophageal dysfunction and bolus impaction. The new insights into the pathophysiology have resulted in the development of the first pharmacological therapies of EoE. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Severe duodenal hemorrhage induced by Lugol's solution administered for thyroid crisis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Mutsuko; Furumoto, Youhei; Watanabe, Naoko; Horiuchi, Takao; Murayama, Minekazu; Kitamura, Mari; Kaneko, Shingo; Inoshita, Seiji; Maruyama, Yasuki; Suenaga, Matsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi; Fujiki, Kazuhiko; Yakushiji, Fumiatsu

    2010-01-01

    Lugol's solution is an iodinated agent used for treating thyroid crisis. It is primarily used in diagnostic tests for esophageal diseases. However, Lugol's solution can cause local mucosal injury and hemorrhage. We report, for the first time, a case of 34-year-old man who exhibited severe duodenal hemorrhage induced by Lugol's solution that was used to treat thyroid crisis. The quantity of Lugol's solution used for treating thyroid crisis is much higher than that used for mucosal disease investigation. Clinical practitioners should be aware of gastrointestinal hemorrhage when using Lugol's solution for the treatment of thyroid crisis.

  10. Therapeutic and Diagnostic Tactics for Bleedings from Esophagogastric Varices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Nazyrov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to elaborate therapeutic and diagnostic tactics for bleedings from esophagogastric varices (EGV in an intensive care unit (ICU. Subjects and methods: The experience in treating 102 patients with profuse bleeding from EGV, admitted to the ICU, Acad. V. Vakhidov Republican Specialized Center of Surgery, in 2000—2008, was summarized. Results. The findings show that just less than 40% of the patients with hepatic cirrhosis are admitted for the clinical manifestations of active bleeding from EGV, the latter being profuse in 17.6%. These indicate that the noticeable admission preponderance of patients with first-degree blood loss and the low proportion of those with critical third-degree blood loss are noteworthy. Retrospective analysis demonstrated that hemostasis was achieved in 97 (95.1% patients, by applying solely conservative measures using a Blakemore tube (in both variants of its use. After removal of the Blakemore tube, stable hemostasis retained in 88.9% of the patients with bleedings from the veins of the middle third of the esophagus, in 71.8% of cases of those from its lower third and only in 24.1% of the patients with those from the cardiac stomach. Conclusion. According to the results of the study, we propose the therapeutic and diagnostic tactics for patients with profuse bleedings from EGV, which involve the use of a Blakemore tube and a complex of conservative measures with traditional hemostatic therapy, the administration of portal pressure-reducing agents to prevent or treat hepatic failure. Key words: bleeding, esophagogastric varices, hepatic failure, intensive therapy.

  11. Gallbladder varices in extrahepatic portal venous obstruction: demonstration by intravenous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: We performed a prospective study to determine frequency of presence of gallbladder varices (GBV) by intravenous CT portography (CTP) in patients with extrahepatic portal venous obstruction (EHPVO). 90 patients (age range: 2-55 years) with EHPVO (initially diagnosed on abdominal sonography) underwent CTP using a subsecond helical CT scanner. Axial overlapping sections of 2mm were obtained with collimation 3mm and table speed 4.5mm/sec (pitch 1.5). Presence and patterns of GBV were studied. CTP demonstrated GBV in 54 (60%) of 90 patients.GBV were said to be present when one or more of the following findings were seen: diffuse wall enhancement (26/90), pinpoint areas of enhancement in GB wall (33/90), obvious large collaterals in GB wall (8/90) and pericholecystic collaterals (49/90). Presence of GBV did not correlate with the site and extent of EHPVO. Contiguous intrahepatic collaterals extending from GB bed to intrahepatic portal vein branches were seen in 41 of 54 (76%) of patients with GBV, suggesting the role of GBV serving as bridging portoportal collaterals. Hepatic perfusion defects were seen in 5/54 patients with GBV and were not seen in remaining 36/90 patients of EHPVO. GB calculi were seen in only 4/54 cases with GBV (as determined on sonography) suggesting no increase in risk for cholelithiasis. GBV commonly develop as bridging collaterals in patients with EHPVO. CTP is very useful in detecting these varices and planning biliary surgery, given the frequency of iatrogenic surgical bleeding in these patients. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    an emerging worldwide food allergic disorder associated with polysensitization to multiple food allergens, resulting in greatly restricted diets and...and methylation), and DNA methylation.77 Importantly, because these genomic al- terations can be influenced by external stimuli, such as diet and drugs...2007;133: 1342-63. 3. Liacouras CA, Furuta GT, Hirano I, Atkins D, Attwood S, Bonis PA, et al. Eosin- ophilic esophagitis: updated consensus

  13. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Megan E.; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms—visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  14. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshitani, Takashi; Kuwata, Yoichiro; Kano, Kyoko

    1988-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma were treated by high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using specially designed balloon application at Hyogo medical Center for Adults. 32 patients were treated from January 1982 through July 1986. According to the stage of UICC (1978), 10 patients were classified into stage I, 7 into II, 13 into III and 2 into IV. Acturial 5 year survival rate was 17.9 % in all 32 patients and that of 23 patients who received radical radiotherapy was 24 %. Local CR rate was 66 %. However, since 9 (53 %) of 17 CR patients were relapsed, local control rate for 2 years was 25 %. Mild adverse effects were experienced in 9 (47 %) of 19 CR patients. Our balloon applicator was easily fixed, could have an adequate space from esophageal mucosa and clarify the tumor site by filling with 20 % gastrografin. It is concluded that high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation with our balloon applicator is an effective boost therapy and decline a lethal adverse effect in radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. (author)

  15. esophageal cancer: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Maddah Safaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Dysphagia is a common initial presentation in locally advanced esophageal cancer and negatively impacts patient quality of life and treatment compliance. To induce fast relief of dysphagia in patients with potentially operable esophageal cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy was applied prior to definitive radiochemotherapy. Material and methods : In this single arm phase II clinical trial between 2013 to 2014 twenty patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (17 squamous cell and 3 adenocarcinoma were treated with upfront 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy, followed by 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. Results : Tumor response, as measured by endoscopy and/or computed tomography scan, revealed complete remission in 16 and partial response in 4 patients (overall response rate 100%. Improvement of dysphagia was induced by brachytherapy within a few days and maintained up to the end of treatment in 80% of patients. No differences in either response rate or dysphagia resolution were found between squamous cell and adenocarcinoma histology. The grade 2 and 3 acute pancytopenia or bicytopenia reported in 4 patients, while sub-acute adverse effects with painful ulceration was seen in five patients, occurring after a median of 2 months. A perforation developed in one patient during the procedure of brachytherapy that resolved successfully with immediate surgery. Conclusions : Brachytherapy before EBRT was a safe and effective procedure to induce rapid and durable relief from dysphagia, especially when combined with EBRT.

  16. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome.

  17. Doxycycline induced Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Karakus Yilmaz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis is a hazardous condition such as acid reflux of esophageal mucosa, infection, systemic diseases, radiation, drugs and trauma. Drug- induced esophagial injury (DIEI is a disease with the use of variety of drugs that caused serious damage and ulcer in the mucosa of the esophagus. The most commonly implicated drugs are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, chloride and especially antibiotics. Thirty-six year-old female patient presented to the emergency department with odynophagia during swallowing and complaining of retrosternal pain. One week before 100 mg doxycycline (2x1 PO for therapeutic abortion were prescribed. It was learned that in the third day of the initiation of medication, the patient\\'s symptoms began and stopped using drug by the fourth day due to advers effect of drugs, but her symptoms didn’t regressed although she didn’t use them. Endoscopy appointment was taken, proton pump inhibitor and antiacid treatment was given, than patient was discharged from the emergency department. In the endoscopy, 20 mm segment esophageal ulcer was seen approximately in the 30.th cm of the esophagius. DIEI is a relatively common, although under-recognized, so this case was presented for remainding DIEI to emergency medicine personals and reweiving its diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

  18. Atrio-Esophageal Fistula: A Case Series and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuring, Craig A; Mountjoy, Luke J; Priaulx, Ashley B; Schneider, Robert J; Smith, Hayden L; Wall, Geoffrey C; Kadaria, Dipen; Sodhi, Amik

    2017-08-01

    BACKGROUND Percutaneous catheter radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and cryoablation of the left atrium and pulmonary vein ostia have become successful therapeutic modalities in the management of atrial fibrillation. Atrio-esophageal fistula is a rare complication. Awareness of complication risk is imperative because without prompt diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention, the outcome is often fatal. We present 3 cases of atrio-esophageal fistula following percutaneous catheter radiofrequency ablation (RFA). CASE REPORT Case 1: A 72-year old white male presented 27 days after percutaneous RFA for atrial fibrillation with fever, altered mental status, and melena. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a 1-cm defect in the mid-esophagus. Upon thoracotomy, severe hemorrhage ensued from a concomitant injury to the left atrium. Multiple attempts to repair the left atrial perforation were unsuccessful and the patient died. Case 2: A 71-year old white male presented 29 days after percutaneous RFA for atrial fibrillation with fever and tonic-clonic seizure. Recognition of possible atrio-esophageal fistula was considered and confirmed on thoracotomy. Surgical fixation of the left atria and esophagus were performed. The patient survived and was discharged to a skilled care facility. Case 3: A 75-year old white male presented 24 days after percutaneous RFA for atrial fibrillation with chest pain. An echocardiogram revealed a large pericardial effusion and pericardiocentesis was performed. Despite aggressive measures, the patient died. The autopsy demonstrated a communicating esophageal fistula with the right pulmonary vein. CONCLUSIONS Clinicians tending to patients who have recently undergone atrial ablation need to be aware of atrio-esophageal fistula as a rare but highly fatal complication.

  19. Meta-analysis: isosorbide-mononitrate alone or with either beta-blockers or endoscopic therapy for the management of oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Langholz, Ebbe; Krag, Aleksander Ahm

    2010-01-01

    The evidence concerning the use of isosorbide-mononitrate (IsMn) for oesophageal varices is equivocal.......The evidence concerning the use of isosorbide-mononitrate (IsMn) for oesophageal varices is equivocal....

  20. Endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal varices in young infants with cyanoacrylate glue: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, Christine; Robles-Medranda, Carlos; Dumortier, Jérôme; Le Gall, Catherine; Ponchon, Thierry; Lachaux, Alain

    2009-05-01

    In children, endoscopic sclerotherapy and variceal ligation (EVL) are the most used techniques for the treatment of gastroesophageal variceal bleeding (VB). However, these techniques achieve poor results in cases of gastric variceal bleeding, and EVL is not applicable in young infants. Our purpose was to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of cyanoacrylate glue injection for the treatment of gastroesophageal varices in young infants. Single-center prospective study. From 2001 to 2005, 8 young infants (data and the results were registered and analyzed at 1, 6, and 12 months after treatment. The mean age and weight were 1.3 +/- 0.42 years (range 0.8 to 1.9 years) and 8.5 +/- 1.6 kg (range 5.5 to 10 kg). Glue injection was successfully performed in all infants. The mean volume injected was 1.15 +/- 0.62 mL (range 0.5 to 2 mL). Immediate control of bleeding was achieved in all cases. Ulcer bleeding as a complication was observed in 1 case. Varices relapse with bleeding was observed in 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients after a mean of 12.5 +/- 10.6 weeks (range 5 to 20 weeks). Patients with variceal rebleeding were retreated. Varices eradication was achieved in all cases after a mean of 1.4 +/- 0.52 sessions (range 1 to 2 sessions). Open prospective series with a relatively small number of patients. In young infants, the use of cyanoacrylate glue is safe and effective for the treatment of gastroesophageal VB.

  1. Right ovarian vein drainage variant: Is there a relationship with pelvic varices?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Zafer [Baskent Universitesi, Adana Hastanesi, Radyoloji Boeluemue, Serin Evler 39, Sok. No. 6 Yueregir, Adana (Turkey)]. E-mail: koczafer@gmail.com; Ulusan, Serife [Baskent Universitesi, Adana Hastanesi, Radyoloji Boeluemue, Serin Evler 39, Sok. No. 6 Yueregir, Adana (Turkey); Oguzkurt, Levent [Baskent Universitesi, Adana Hastanesi, Radyoloji Boeluemue, Serin Evler 39, Sok. No. 6 Yueregir, Adana (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    Objective: To correlate right ovarian vein (ROV) variations that drain into the right renal vein (RRV) with the presence of pelvic varices. Materials and methods: Routine abdominal multidetector-row computed tomography scans of 324 women were analyzed for the presence and type of ROV variations in this retrospective study. The subjects were divided into 2 groups: those with ROV variations and those without such variations. The diameters of the subjects' ROV, left ovarian vein (LOV), and parauterine veins were measured. Pelvic varices and the presence and degree of ovarian vein reflux were noted and compared between the 2 groups. The {chi}{sup 2}-test and the Pearson correlation test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Thirty-two (9.9%) of 324 women studied exhibited ROV variant that drained into the right renal vein, and the remaining subjects (90.1%) exhibited a normal pattern of ROV drainage that flowed directly into the inferior vena cava. Pelvic varices were identified in 59 (18%) of the subjects. Reflux was not observed in any patient without pelvic varices. Fifty-seven of 59 women exhibited ovarian vein reflux. In 56 of those 57 individuals, reflux occurred only in the LOV, and in 1 subject, reflux was noted predominantly in the ROV. No significant relationship between the presence of an ROV that drained into the right renal vein and pelvic varices was noted. Conclusion: Although right-sided pelvic varices associated with right ovarian vein drainage variations are rare, anatomic variations of the right ovarian vein are not. This study did not find an association between the presence of right ovarian vein and pelvic varices.

  2. Right ovarian vein drainage variant: Is there a relationship with pelvic varices?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Zafer; Ulusan, Serife; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To correlate right ovarian vein (ROV) variations that drain into the right renal vein (RRV) with the presence of pelvic varices. Materials and methods: Routine abdominal multidetector-row computed tomography scans of 324 women were analyzed for the presence and type of ROV variations in this retrospective study. The subjects were divided into 2 groups: those with ROV variations and those without such variations. The diameters of the subjects' ROV, left ovarian vein (LOV), and parauterine veins were measured. Pelvic varices and the presence and degree of ovarian vein reflux were noted and compared between the 2 groups. The χ 2 -test and the Pearson correlation test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Thirty-two (9.9%) of 324 women studied exhibited ROV variant that drained into the right renal vein, and the remaining subjects (90.1%) exhibited a normal pattern of ROV drainage that flowed directly into the inferior vena cava. Pelvic varices were identified in 59 (18%) of the subjects. Reflux was not observed in any patient without pelvic varices. Fifty-seven of 59 women exhibited ovarian vein reflux. In 56 of those 57 individuals, reflux occurred only in the LOV, and in 1 subject, reflux was noted predominantly in the ROV. No significant relationship between the presence of an ROV that drained into the right renal vein and pelvic varices was noted. Conclusion: Although right-sided pelvic varices associated with right ovarian vein drainage variations are rare, anatomic variations of the right ovarian vein are not. This study did not find an association between the presence of right ovarian vein and pelvic varices

  3. Imaging of Esophageal Tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K. [PGIMER, Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Gastroenterology; Lal, A.; Gulati, M.; Suri, S. [PGIMER, Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Radiodiagnosis

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the various radiological abnormalities in patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis. Material and Methods: The case records of 23 patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis were evaluated retrospectively for various radiological abnormalities. Twenty-two patients had secondary involvement of esophagus in the form of direct extension of mediastinal and pulmonary tuberculosis or spinal tuberculosis. Only 1 patient had primary involvement of the esophagus with no evidence of disease elsewhere. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic and CT-guided biopsy/aspiration cytology in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Diagnosis was made on the basis of surgical biopsy of lymph node and autopsy in 1 patient each. In the remaining 8 patients the diagnosis was based on radiological and endoscopic findings and the response to antituberculous treatment. Results: Chest radiography (CXR) was abnormal in 65% patients. While the findings were non-conclusive for esophageal tuberculosis, characteristic lesions of tuberculosis in lungs or spine were suggestive of tuberculous etiology. In 15 patients, CT of the chest confirmed the corresponding CXR findings and also showed additional findings of mediastinal lymphadenopathy when CXR was normal. Fourteen patients showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy on CT of the chest. In all these patients, more than one group of lymph nodes was involved. The characteristic hypodense center of lymph nodes suggestive of tuberculosis was seen in 12 patients. Radiological abnormalities seen in barium swallow examination were extrinsic compression, traction diverticula, strictures, sinus/fistulous tracts, kinking and pseudotumor mass of esophagus in decreasing order of frequency. The middle third of the esophagus was found to be the most frequent site of involvement.

  4. Imaging of Esophageal Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.; Lal, A.; Gulati, M.; Suri, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the various radiological abnormalities in patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis. Material and Methods: The case records of 23 patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis were evaluated retrospectively for various radiological abnormalities. Twenty-two patients had secondary involvement of esophagus in the form of direct extension of mediastinal and pulmonary tuberculosis or spinal tuberculosis. Only 1 patient had primary involvement of the esophagus with no evidence of disease elsewhere. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic and CT-guided biopsy/aspiration cytology in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Diagnosis was made on the basis of surgical biopsy of lymph node and autopsy in 1 patient each. In the remaining 8 patients the diagnosis was based on radiological and endoscopic findings and the response to antituberculous treatment. Results: Chest radiography (CXR) was abnormal in 65% patients. While the findings were non-conclusive for esophageal tuberculosis, characteristic lesions of tuberculosis in lungs or spine were suggestive of tuberculous etiology. In 15 patients, CT of the chest confirmed the corresponding CXR findings and also showed additional findings of mediastinal lymphadenopathy when CXR was normal. Fourteen patients showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy on CT of the chest. In all these patients, more than one group of lymph nodes was involved. The characteristic hypodense center of lymph nodes suggestive of tuberculosis was seen in 12 patients. Radiological abnormalities seen in barium swallow examination were extrinsic compression, traction diverticula, strictures, sinus/fistulous tracts, kinking and pseudotumor mass of esophagus in decreasing order of frequency. The middle third of the esophagus was found to be the most frequent site of involvement

  5. Esophageal scintigraphy: Applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, M.K.; Byrne, P.J.; Keeling, P.; Hennessy, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia, scleroderma, esophageal carcinoma, Barrett esophagus, and reflux esophagitis. We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery. (orig.)

  6. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M.D., Lori C.; Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research ...

  7. Is cerebral hemorrhage approaching?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Yukiko; Yoneyama, Takumi; Hamasuna, Ryouichi; Fujime, Kenichi; Goya, Tomokazu [Junwakai Memorial Hospital, Miyazaki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    In Junwakai Memorial Hospital, from May, 2000 to April, 2001, 1042 patients underwent MRI examination to detect intracerebral microbleed (MB). This series included 481 hypertensive cases and 109 intra-cerebral and cerebellar hemorrhage patients. MB was identified by MRI GRASS image that detects hemosiderin with high sensitivity. The occurrence of MB is high in men and increased with the age. The hypertensive patients showed increased frequency of MB in proportion to the duration of hypertension. Almost all of the symptomatic cerebral and cerebellar hemorrhage cases showed multiple MBs except for massive hemorrhagic lesions. Therefore, MB can be an antecedant feature of the inpending symptomatic intracerebral and cerebellar hemorrhages. (author)

  8. Evaluation of Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Pediatric Intracerebral hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinman, Jonathan T; Beslow, Lauren A; Engelmann, Kyle; Smith, Sabrina E; Licht, Daniel J; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies of pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage have investigated isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We investigated whether detailed assessment of intraventricular hemorrhage enhanced outcome prediction after intracerebral hemorrhage. We prospectively enrolled 46 children, full-term to 17 years, median age 2.7 years with spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhage and/or intraventricular hemorrhage. Outcome was assessed with the King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury. Twenty-si...

  9. Therapeutic effects of percutaneous transhepatic variceal embolization combined with partial splenic embolization for portal hypertention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Yingxue; Yan Zhiping; Cheng Yongde; Qiao Delin; Zhou Bing; Chen Shiwei; Li Yong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficiency of percutaneous transhepatic variceal embolization (PTVE) combined with patial splenic embolization (PES)for portal hypertension. Methods: 30 patients with critical portal hypertension were divided randomly into two groups, 15 patients of A group underwent PSE PTVE combined with PSE and 15 of B group underwent PES only. The changes of collateral circulation of the two groups were compared via color Doppler ultrasonography pre-and postoperatively. Results: The hypersplenism was well controlled in both groups after PTVE and PSE. The varices of A group were embolized completely, the flow rate and velocity of portal blood stream were significantly reduced (P<0.05). In addition, the flow rate and velocity together with inner diameter of the azygous vein decreased (P<0.01), but no change shown on portal vein diameter, only with decrease of blood flow and velocity postoperatively were shown in the two groups (P<0.05). During 13-16 months follow-up, gastroesophageal variceal bleeding appeared in 2 patients and formation of portal thrombi in 1 patients of B group. There was no gastroesophageal variceal bleeding in A group but 2 patients appeared portal hypertensive gastroenteropathy (PHG)under endoscopic confirmations. Conclusion: PTVE combined PSE is very efficient for gastroesophageal variceal bleeding and hypersplenism due to portal hypertension, especially for patients with poor hepatic function, possessing simple, economic, less invasive properties and deserving to be recommended. (authors)

  10. Is computerised tomography better than fibreoptic gastroscopy for early detection of gastric varices?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Suvak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Video endoscopic diagnosis of gastric varices is particularly limited, owing to the deep submucosal or subserosal location of the varices and the normal appearance of the overlying mucosa. Aim: We present and emphasise the value of computerised tomography (CT examination in the early detection of gastric varices (GVs. Material and methods : In this retrospective study, a total of 216 consecutive patients with cirrhosis were evaluated at the Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Training and Research Hospital between September 2008 and March 2011. Results : One hundred and thirty patients with cirrhosis were enrolled in the study. The mean age of the male (88 cases patients was 59.45 ±2.42 years, and the mean age of the female (42 cases patients was 56.29 ±1.14 years. Computerised tomography identified oesophageal varices (EVs in 103/130 patients, and endoscopy identified EVs in 103/130 patients. Computerised tomography identified GVs in 86/130 patients, and endoscopy identified GVs in 26/130 patients. After endoscopic elastic band ligation (EBL, CT identified GVs in 22/26 patients, and endoscopy identified GVs in 7/26 patients. Conclusions : Gastric varices lie in the submucosa, deeper than EVs, and distinguishing GVs from gastric rugae may be difficult with video endoscopy. This study demonstrated that CT is a sensitive method for early detection of GVs and has been used previously in the evaluation of GVs.

  11. Recurrent Bacteremia, a Complication of Cyanoacrylate Injection for Variceal Bleeding: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Galperine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first description of recurrent bacteremia in two patients after cyanoacrylate injection for gastric varices bleeding treated with antibiotics alone. Adapted and prolonged antibiotic treatment allowed a complete resolution of the infection with no relapse after more than 6 months. According to recent data, prophylactic antibiotics should be further investigated for patients with bleeding varices undergoing cyanoacrylate injection.

  12. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation and Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: SMALL • LARGE Cerebral Cavernous Angioma and Hemorrhage By Jack Hoch; Reviewed by Dr. Issam Awad ... for years, the mechanism by which these lesions hemorrhage remains poorly understood. Hemorrhage Types Since cavernous angiomas ...

  13. Effect of recombinant Factor VIIa on outcome of acute variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; D'Amico, Gennaro; Rusch, Ea

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Two randomized controlled studies have evaluated the effect of recombinant Factor VIIa (rFVIIa) on variceal bleeding in cirrhosis without showing significant benefit. The aim of the present study was to perform a meta-analysis of the two trials on individual patient data...... vasoactive drug infusion and Child-Pugh score >8. RESULTS: 497 patients were eligible for the meta-analysis; 308 (62%) had active variceal bleeding at endoscopy (oozing or spurting) and 283 of these had a Child-Pugh score >8. Analysis on the composite endpoint in all patients with bleeding from oesophageal...... varices did not show any beneficial treatment effect. However, failure rate for the primary composite end-point was significantly lower in treated patients with active bleeding at endoscopy (17%) compared to placebo (26%, p=0.049). This difference was highly significant in patients with Child-Pugh score...

  14. A case of torsion of the wandering spleen presenting as hypersplenism and gastric fundal varices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irak, Kader; Esen, Irfan; Keskın, Murat; Emınler, Ahmet Tarık; Ayyildiz, Talat; Kaya, Ekrem; Kiyici, Murat; Gürel, Selim; Nak, Selim Giray; Gülten, Macit; Dolar, Enver

    2011-02-01

    Wandering spleen is the displacement of the spleen from its normal location due to the loss or weakening of ligaments that hold the spleen in the left upper quadrant. The possibility of torsion of the spleen is high due to the long and mobile nature of the vascular pedicle. Generally, cases are asymptomatic. Under conditions of delayed diagnosis, symptoms of splenomegaly, left portal hypertension, gastric fundal varices, and hypersplenism may present as a result of development of vascular congestion associated with chronic torsion. There are only a few cases in the literature reporting the association of wandering spleen and fundal varices. We report herein the case of a 55-year-old female who admitted to our clinic with complaints of fatigue and epigastric pain. She was determined to have gastric fundal varices and hypersplenism secondary to the development of left portal hypertension due to chronic splenic torsion.

  15. Hemorrhagic prepatellar bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donahue, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Turkel, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Mnaymneh, W. [Dept. of Orthopedics, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Ghandur-Mnaymneh, L. [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Simple prepatellar bursitis is easily diagnosed both clinically and by MRI. MRI shows the typical T1 and T2 lengthening of fluid within the bursa. However, because of complex MRI appearance of hemorrhage, chronic hemorrhagic bursitis and the size of the prepatellar mass the clinical and MRI appearance can be very different. (orig.)

  16. Mortality after hemorrhagic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Pérez, Antonio; Gaist, David; Wallander, Mari-Ann

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate short-term case fatality and long-term mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using data from The Health Improvement Network database. METHODS: Thirty-day case fatality was stratified by age, sex, and calendar year after ICH...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Esophageal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat esophageal cancer. A plastic ...

  18. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat esophageal cancer. A plastic ...

  19. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Understanding the sensory irregularities of esophageal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gregersen, Hans; Khan, Sheeba; Lelic, Dina; Lottrup, Christian; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms relating to esophageal sensory abnormalities can be encountered in the clinical environment. Such sensory abnormalities may be present in demonstrable disease, such as erosive esophagitis, and in the ostensibly normal esophagus, such as non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain. In this review, the authors discuss esophageal sensation and the esophageal pain system. In addition, the authors provide a primer concerning the techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of esophageal sensory function. Such technological advances, whilst not readily available in the clinic may facilitate the stratification and individualization of therapy in disorders of esophageal sensation in the future.

  1. Protruded superficial esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Akiyoshi; Satoh, Yuichi; Sugiyama, Akinori

    1986-01-01

    Until the end of 1985, 113 cases of superficial esophageal carcinoma had been operated on. Classified by histology, almost all cases are squamous cell carcinoma and some cases are pseudocarcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and so on. X-ray of the latter shows all cases except one are protruded type. Regarding the relation between X-ray findings and histology, semipeduncular tumorous type, generally speaking, belongs to pseudosarcoma. As to lymph node metastasis, there is no difference among superficial elevated, tumorous elevated and semi-peduncular tumorous types. Lymph node metastasis is less freqently seen in the cases with smooth surface. With regard to prognosis, there is no difference between early carcinoma without lymph node metastasis and superficial carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. Only two-year and more than 7-year survival rates of the one with smooth surface are superior to those of the one with irregular surface. (author)

  2. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography for esophageal motility disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-resolution manometer (HRM of the esophagus has become the main diagnostic test in the evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The first step of the Chicago classification described abnormal esophagogastric junction deglutitive relaxation. The latest classification system, proposed by Pandolfino et al, includes contraction patterns and peristalsis integrity based on integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4. It can be discriminating the achalasia from non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders. The aim of this study was to assessment of clinical findings in non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders based on the most recent Chicago classification. Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 963 patients that had been referred to manometry department of Gastrointestinal and Liver Research Center, Firozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April, 2012 to April, 2015. They had upper GI disorder (Dysphasia, non-cardiac chest pain, regurgitation, heartburn, vomiting and asthma and weight loss. Data were collected from clinical examinations as well as patient questionnaires. Manometry, water-perfused, was done for all patients. Manometry criteria of the patients who had integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4 ≤ 15 mmHg were studied. Results: Our finding showed that the non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders (58% was more common than the achalasia (18.2%. Heartburn (68.5%, regurgitation (65.4% and non-cardiac chest pain (60.6% were the most common clinical symptoms. Although, vomiting (91.7% and weight loss (63% were the most common symptoms in referring patients but did not discriminate this disorders from each other’s. Borderline motor function (67.2% was the most common, absent peristalsis (97% and the hyper

  3. Ektopiske varicer i den distale ileum som årsag til gastrointestinal blødning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Tine Juhl; Beier-Holgersen, Randi; Bruun, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Varices of the terminal ileum are not a common complication to portal hypertension but we describe a case where a 60-year-old male patient had massive, recurrent intestinal bleeding due to collateral blood supply from umbilical veins to varicose veins of the terminal ileum.......Varices of the terminal ileum are not a common complication to portal hypertension but we describe a case where a 60-year-old male patient had massive, recurrent intestinal bleeding due to collateral blood supply from umbilical veins to varicose veins of the terminal ileum....

  4. Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Complicated by Intercostal Artery Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Ahsan; Ahmed, Sara; Riaz, Mehmood

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhagic manifestations are fairly common in Dengue hemorrhagic fever and are associated with increased mortality. During last few decades there have been increasing reports of Dengue infection with unusual manifestations. Here we present a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by spontaneous rupture of an intercostal artery leading to a large hematoma which was treated successfully with angio-embolization. To the authors' knowledge this is a first case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by spontaneous intercostal artery hemorrhage.

  5. [Acute hemorrhagic viral conjunctivitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haicl, P; Vanista, J; Danes, L

    1992-10-01

    Two cases of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis are described, in which the enterovirus Coxsackie 24 was found by serological examination to be the etiological agent. The virus was important from Nigeria. The patients suffered by the acute hemorrhagic keratoconjuntivitis with transient iritic irritation without the systemic symptoms. Since now this disease with serological verification was not diagnosed in our country. The question of the viral hemorrhagic conjunctivitis and their treatment is discussed. The necessity of virological investigation in inflammations of the anterior segment is stressed.

  6. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doctor Near You Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Patient Health ... pH probe: A small wire with an acid sensor is placed through the nose down to the ...

  7. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Adolescent Patients Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Basics Overview Eosinophilic esophagitis also known as ( ... children may have vomiting and abdominal pain, and adolescents may complain of the feeling of food getting ...

  8. Liver stiffness and platelet count for identifying patients with compensated liver disease at low risk of variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marot, Astrid; Trépo, Eric; Doerig, Christopher; Schoepfer, Alain; Moreno, Christophe; Deltenre, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    The 2015 Baveno VI guidelines recommend against performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in patients with compensated cirrhosis who have a liver stiffness 150 000/mm³ because of a low prevalence of varices at risk of bleeding in this population. The aim was to synthesize the available evidence on the usefulness of the combined use of liver stiffness and platelet count to identify patients without oesophageal varices. Meta-analysis of trials evaluating the usefulness of a given cut-off for liver stiffness and platelet count to rule out the presence of oesophageal varices. Fifteen studies were included. All studies excepting five used the Baveno VI criteria. Compared to patients with either high liver stiffness or low platelet count, those with low liver stiffness and normal platelet count had a lower risk of varices at risk of bleeding (OR=0.22, 95% CI=0.13-0.39, Pliver stiffness and normal platelet count, the pooled estimate rates for varices at risk of bleeding was 0.040 (95% CI=0.027-0.059) with low heterogeneity between studies (I 2 =3%). Patients with low liver stiffness and normal platelet count have a lower risk of varices than those with either high liver stiffness or low platelet count. Varices at risk of bleeding are found in no more than 4% of patients when liver stiffness is <20 kPa and platelet count is normal. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Evaluation of Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Pediatric Intracerebral hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Jonathan T; Beslow, Lauren A; Engelmann, Kyle; Smith, Sabrina E; Licht, Daniel J; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage have investigated isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We investigated whether detailed assessment of intraventricular hemorrhage enhanced outcome prediction after intracerebral hemorrhage. We prospectively enrolled 46 children, full-term to 17 years, median age 2.7 years with spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhage and/or intraventricular hemorrhage. Outcome was assessed with the King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury. Twenty-six (57%) had intraparenchymal hemorrhage, 10 (22%) had pure intraventricular hemorrhage, and 10 (22%) had both. There were 2 deaths, both with intraparenchymal hemorrhage + intraventricular hemorrhage volume ≥4% of total brain volume. Presence of intraventricular hemorrhage was not associated with poor outcome, but hydrocephalus showed a trend (p=0.09) toward poor outcome. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, combined intraparenchymal hemorrhage + intraventricular hemorrhage volume also showed a trend toward better outcome prediction than intraparenchymal hemorrhage volume alone. Although not an independent outcome predictor, future studies should assess intraventricular hemorrhage qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:22068828

  10. Covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt versus endoscopic therapy + beta-blocker for prevention of variceal rebleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holster, I.L.; Tjwa, E.T.; Moelker, A.; Wils, A.; Hansen, B.E.; Vermeijden, J.R.; Scholten, P.; Hoek, B. van; Nicolai, J.J.; Kuipers, E.J.; Pattynama, P.M.; Buuren, H.R. van

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, as well as a high rebleeding risk. Limited data are available on the role of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with covered stents in patients receiving standard

  11. Diagnosis of a complication of endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy by combined use of radiology and endoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulke, H.; Auer, I.O.; Burghardt, W.; Braun, H.

    1982-01-01

    A case is reported of an intramural oesophageal fistula developing after fiberoptic injection sclerotherapy for oesophageal varices in a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver. Only the combined use of endoscopic application of radiographic contrast medium and detailed radiological investigation allowed the definite diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  12. Endoscopic therapy and beta-blockers for secondary prevention in adults with cirrhosis and oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Morgan, Marsha Y.

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of endoscopic therapy and beta-blockers used as a combination therapy versus monotherapy with either endoscopic therapy or beta-blockers for secondary prevention ...... in people with cirrhosis and oesophageal varices....

  13. Banding ligation versus beta-blockers for primary prevention in oesophageal varices in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Krag, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Non-selective beta-blockers are used as a first-line treatment for primary prevention in patients with medium- to high-risk oesophageal varices. The effect of non-selective beta-blockers on mortality is debated and many patients experience adverse events. Trials on banding ligation versus non...

  14. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. (Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  15. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F.

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis

  16. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device made...

  17. Histopathologic profile of esophageal atresia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose Few reports are available in the literature on the histology of the congenital atretic esophagus in humans. Histologic abnormalities including congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) may contribute toward the abnormal esophageal motility after successful repair of esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal ...

  18. Management of congenital esophageal stenosis associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim The aim of this work was to study the incidence, management of congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) associated with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), and its impact on esophageal stricture (ES) after primary repair. Patients and methods From January 2006 to December 2014, ...

  19. Balloon occlusion retrograde transvenous obliteration of gastric varices in two-cirrhotic patients with portal vein thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borhei, Peyman; Kim, Seung Kwon; Zukerman, Darryl A [Interventional Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis (United States)

    2014-02-15

    This report describes two non-cirrhotic patients with portal vein thrombosis who underwent successful balloon occlusion retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) of gastric varices with a satisfactory response and no complications. One patient was a 35-year-old female with a history of Crohn's disease, status post-total abdominal colectomy, and portal vein and mesenteric vein thrombosis. The other patient was a 51-year-old female with necrotizing pancreatitis, portal vein thrombosis, and gastric varices. The BRTO procedure was a useful treatment for gastric varices in non-cirrhotic patients with portal vein thrombosis in the presence of a gastrorenal shunt.

  20. Long-term effects of oral propranolol on splanchnic and systemic haemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis and oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Sørensen, T I

    1991-01-01

    Splanchnic and systemic haemodynamics were measured in 24 patients with cirrhosis and oesophageal varices and no previous bleeding. The patients were randomized either to long-term treatment with propranolol (14 patients) or no active treatment (controls, 10 patients). Catheterization was performed...... 1 year of treatment with propranolol, whereas a decrease in azygos blood flow was observed only in the propranolol group. The beneficial effect of propranolol on the risk of bleeding from oesophageal varices may, therefore, mostly be due to a selective decrease in collateral blood flow and thereby...... variceal blood flow....

  1. The Ultrasound Diagnosis of Round Ligament Varices That Mimicked Inguinal Hernias During Pregnancy:A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyung Jo; Shin, Hyun Woong; Kim, Seong Hun [Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang Hee; Byun, Kyung Hwan [CHA Gumi Medical Center, CHA University, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    Round ligament varices during pregnancy are an important part of the differential diagnosis of inguinal hernia as they may cause symptoms and clinical features that are similar to those of inguinal hernia. When this condition is correctly diagnosed, an unnecessary operation may be prevented. The diagnosis of round ligament varices should be considered for pregnant women who present with a palpable mass in the groin. We describe here a case of round ligament varices that presented during pregnancy and this was readily diagnosed with Doppler sonography

  2. Balloon occlusion retrograde transvenous obliteration of gastric varices in two-cirrhotic patients with portal vein thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borhei, Peyman; Kim, Seung Kwon; Zukerman, Darryl A

    2014-01-01

    This report describes two non-cirrhotic patients with portal vein thrombosis who underwent successful balloon occlusion retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) of gastric varices with a satisfactory response and no complications. One patient was a 35-year-old female with a history of Crohn's disease, status post-total abdominal colectomy, and portal vein and mesenteric vein thrombosis. The other patient was a 51-year-old female with necrotizing pancreatitis, portal vein thrombosis, and gastric varices. The BRTO procedure was a useful treatment for gastric varices in non-cirrhotic patients with portal vein thrombosis in the presence of a gastrorenal shunt.

  3. Recurrent Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Linnea Boegeskov; Goertz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a disease with high mortality and a substantial risk of recurrence. However, the recurrence risk is poorly documented and the knowledge of potential predictors for recurrence among co-morbidities and medicine with antithrombotic effect is limited....... OBJECTIVES: 1) To estimate the short- and long-term cumulative risks of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). 2) To investigate associations between typical comorbid diseases, surgical treatment, use of medicine with antithrombotic effects, including antithrombotic treatment (ATT), selective serotonin...

  4. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Avi Lemberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE is an emerging disease characterised by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf, lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with TGF-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE.

  5. Eosinophilic esophagitis: rapidly emerging disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straumann, Alex

    2012-02-03

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE), first described in the early 1990's, has rapidly evolved as distinctive chronic inflammatory esophageal disease. The diagnosis is based clinically by the presence of symptoms related to an esophageal dysfunction and histologically by an eosinophil-predominant inflammation once other conditions leading to esophageal eosinophilia are excluded. This striking male-prevalent disease has an increasing incidence and prevalence in the westernised countries. Currently, EoE represents the main cause of dysphagia and bolus impaction in adult patients. Despite the fact that EoE often occurs in atopic patients, the value of allergic testing is still under discussion. Topical corticosteroids lead to a rapid improvement of active EoE clinically and histologically; they are therefore regarded as first-line drug therapy. Elimination diets have similar efficacy as topical corticosteroids, but their long-term use is limited by practical issues. Esophageal dilation of EoE-induced strictures can also be effective in improving symptoms, but this therapy has no effect on the underlying inflammation. Neither the diagnostic nor the long-term therapeutic strategies are yet fully defined.

  6. Hemorrhagic brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Motoichiro; Takekawa, S.D.; Suzuki, Kenzo

    1986-01-01

    Tumor hemorrhage on computed tomography (CT) was found in 14 patients with brain metastases (7 % of two hundred patients with brain metastases), from April 1979 to July 1983. Primary foci of these lesions were the lung (6 patients), breast (2), kidney (2), uterus (2), colon (1) and adrenal gland (1). ''Stroke'' syndrome was the initial presenting symptom in 3 patients; neurological focal sign or symptoms of increased intracranial pressure in the remaining patients. CT demonstrated peritumoral hemorrhage in all patients with solid mass, intratumoral hemorrhage in a few patients and also cerebral or ventricular hemorrhage, which was fatal complication, in 2 patients (colon and breast cancers). A cystic mass with fluid-blood level was noted in a patient with breast cancer. Several predisposing factors including chemotherapy, thrombocytopenia, radiotherapy or combination of these were recognized in 8 patients. Of these, chemotherapy was the most causative factor of tumor hemorrhage. Brain irradiation for hemorrhagic brain metastases was effective for prolongation of mean survival time of these patients as follows; 10 months in irradiated group, whereas 1.5 months in non-irradiated group. (author)

  7. Esophageal cancer in yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samawi, A.S.A.; Aulaqi, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    To document the age and gender distribution, histopathologic type as well as grading characteristics of Esophageal Cancer (EC) in Yemen. Study Design: A case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Yemen, from January 2005 to December 2011. Methodology: Three hundred twenty five cases of EC were included for review. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and the cases were categorized into Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC). Results: Out of the 325 EC cases, 163 (50%) were SCC (females 67%, males 33%) and 158 (49%) were ADC (females 30%, males 70%). The rest of the cases were 2 adenosquamous carcinoma and 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The mean age, for SCC was 60 years while the mean age for ADC was 65 years. The peak incidence for SCC was found in the age groups of fifth and sixth decades for females and in fifth and seventh decades for males. The maximum number of patients with ADC was seen in sixth and seventh decades for both gender. Well-differentiated histological grading accounted for 247 (77%) for both genders and types. The moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated accounted, for 17% and 6% respectively. Conclusion: The EC in Yemen had a predominance of SCC in female patients and predominance of ADC in male patients which was usually of a well-differentiated grade. (author)

  8. Esophageal cancer in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samawi, Abdullah S; Aulaqi, Saleh M

    2014-03-01

    To document the age and gender distribution, histopathologic type as well as grading characteristics of Esophageal Cancer (EC) in Yemen. A case series. Department of Pathology, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Yemen, from January 2005 to December 2011. Three hundred twenty five cases of EC were included for review. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and the cases were categorized into Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC). Out of the 325 EC cases, 163 (50%) were SCC (females 67%, males 33%) and 158 (49%) were ADC (females 30%, males 70%). The rest of the cases were 2 adenosquamous carcinoma and 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The mean age, for SCC was 60 years while the mean age for ADC was 65 years. The peak incidence for SCC was found in the age groups of fifth and sixth decades for females and in fifth and seventh decades for males. The maximum number of patients with ADC was seen in sixth and seventh decades for both gender. Well-differentiated histological grading accounted for 247 (77%) for both genders and types. The moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated accounted, for 17% and 6% respectively. The EC in Yemen had a predominance of SCC in female patients and predominance of ADC in male patients which was usually of a well-differentiated grade.

  9. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for gastric variceal bleeding patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Seong, Chang Kyu; Kim, Yong Joo; Park, Noh Hyuk [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae Beom [Dong-A University Medical Center, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Soo [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) in the treatment of gastric variceal bleeding. Between September 2001 and March 2002, ten patients with gastric variceal bleeding and gastrorenal shunt, underwent BRTO. Three of the ten also had hepatic encephalopathy. To evaluated the gastrorenal shunt and exclude portal vein thrombosis, all patients underwent pre-procedural CT scanning. An occlusion balloon catheter was inserted from the right internal jugular vein and on ballooning was wedged into the left adrenal vein. A sclerosing agent (5% ethanolamine oleate-lipiodol mixture) was injected until the varices were completely filled. In four patients, the collateral veins seen at balloon-occluded adrenal venography were embolized with coils prior to sclerotherapy. Post-procedural follow-up CT (n=3) or endoscopy (n=8) was performed 1-4 weeks later, and both before and after the procedure, hepatic function was also monitored. Treatment was successful in nine cases: the failure involed rupture of the occlusion balloon during inflation, and a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. The cessation of bleeding was confirmed endoscopically or clinically; in three patients, follow-up CT showed complete obliteration of the varices. Hepatic function improved in eight patients, but three weeks after the procedure, one expired due to progressive infiltrative hepatoma. The clinical symptoms of the three patients with hepatic encephalopathy showed remarkable improvement. Although more extensive studies and long-term follow up are needed to overcome the limitations of our study, we believe that BRTO is a technically feasible and clinically effective treatment for gastric varices and hepatic encephalopathy.

  10. Usefulness of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the Management of Bleeding Ectopic Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, V.; Joly, L.; Perreault, P.; Bouchard, L.; Lafortune, M.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in the control of bleeding from ectopic varices. Methods. From 1995 to 2004, 24 cirrhotic patients, bleeding from ectopic varices, mean age 54.5 years (range 15-76 years), were treated by TIPS. The etiology of cirrhosis was alcoholic in 13 patients and nonalcoholic in 11 patients. The location of the varices was duodenal (n = 5), stomal (n = 8), ileocolic (n = 6), anorectal (n = 3), umbilical (n = 1), and peritoneal (n 1). Results. TIPS controlled the bleeding in all patients and induced a decrease in the portacaval gradient from 19.7 ± 5.4 to 6.4 ± 3.1 mmHg. Postoperative complications included self-limited intra-abdominal bleeding (n = 2), self-limited hemobilia (n = 1), acute thrombosis of the shunt (n = 1), and bile leak treated by a covered stent (n = 1). Median follow-up was 592 days (range 28-2482 days). Rebleeding occurred in 6 patients. In 2 cases rebleeding was observed despite a post-TIPS portacaval gradient lower than 12 mmHg and was controlled by variceal embolization; 1 patient underwent surgical portacaval shunt and never rebled; in 3 patients rebleeding was related to TIPS stenosis and treated with shunt dilatation with addition of a new stent. The cumulative rate of rebleeding was 23% and 31% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 80% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion. The present series demonstrates that bleeding from ectopic varices, a challenging clinical problem, can be managed safely by TIPS placement with low rebleeding and good survival rates

  11. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-04-15

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used.

  12. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De

    1990-01-01

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux after esophageal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Osamu; Yokoi, Hideki; Maebeya, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    By means of esophageal transit scintigram using 99m Tc-DTPA, 15 patients (13 esophageal carcinomas and 2 cardia carcinomas) were studied, in whom esophagogastric anastomosis was done according to the posterior invagination anastomosis technique we had devised. In all 8 patients with anastomosis at cervical region, gastroesophageal reflux was not seen on both scintigrams before and after meals, and the average pressure gradient of high pressure zone at anastomosis was 39.8 cmH 2 O. In 2 of 7 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, the scintigram before meals showed severe reflux. and the endoscopic findings showed diffuse and moderate erosion in the esophageal mucosa. The average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 6.5 cmH 2 O. In these 2 patients, the new fornix with a sharp angle of His was not formed. In the remaining 5 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, reflux was not seen on the scintigram before meals. However, in 2 of them, the scintigram after meal and endoscopic examination revealed mild reflux and mild esophagitis respectively. Furthermore in one patient very mild reflux was observed only on the scintigram after meals but the endoscopic findings showed the normal esophageal mucosa. In these 5 patients, the average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 17.0 cmH 2 O, which was significantly higher (p<0.01) than that in 2 patients with severe reflux and was significantly lower (p<0.01) than the mean value of high pressure zone in 8 patients with cervical anastomosis. In conclusion, it is presumed that the formation of a large fornix enough to store food and a sharp angle of His are important factors in maintaining an anti-reflux mechanism. The esophageal transit scintigram was proved to be an excellent technique in detecting and evaluating quantitatively gastroesophageal reflux. (author)

  14. Imaging of Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Ryan; Garg, Ankur

    2016-10-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management. Given that hemorrhagic stroke constitutes a heterogeneous collection of diagnoses, the subsequent neuroimaging pathway necessary to better evaluate and care for these patients is variable based on the etiology.With an increasing incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation associated with the aging population and the introduction of three new direct factor Xa inhibitors and one direct thrombin inhibitor to complement vitamin K antagonists, oral anticoagulant use continues to increase. Patients on oral anticoagulants have a sevenfold to tenfold increased risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Furthermore, patients who have an ICH associated with oral anticoagulant use have a higher mortality rate than those with primary ICH. Despite the reduced incidence of hypertension-related ICH over the past decade, it is expected that the incidence of ICH will continue to increase. Neuroimaging studies are integral to the identification of hemorrhagic stroke, determination of the underlying etiology, prevention of hematoma expansion, treatment of acute complications, and treatment of the underlying etiology, if indicated. Neuroimaging is essential for prognostication and thus directly impacts patient care.

  15. Esophageal Replacement for Long-Gap Esophageal Atresia in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    humility to know when to consider a replacement procedure (3). To replace the esophagus of a baby is a major decision in many pediatric surgical units world over. Fortunately, the need for this procedure has decreased in the recent years due to the increase in the variety of techniques of lengthening the upper esophageal ...

  16. Reflux esophagitis revisited: Prospective analysis of radiologic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    A prospective radiologic-endoscopic study of the esophagogastric region in 266 patients, including 206 normals and 60 with esophagitis, is reported. The endoscopic classification grading severity of esophagitis was grade 1-normal; grades 2. 3. and 4-mild, moderate, and severe esophagitis, respectively. Radiology detected 22% of patient with mild esophagitis, 83% with moderate esophagitis, and 95% with severe esophagitis. Although hiatal hernia was present in 40% of normals and 89% with esophagitis, absence of radiographic hiatal hernia excluded esophagitis with 95% accuracy. The implications of this study regarding the role of radiology in evaluating patient with suspected reflux esophagitis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Adherence to guidelines in bleeding oesophageal varices and effects on outcome: comparison between a specialized unit and a community hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Lise; Krag, Aleksander; Malchow-Møller, Axel

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Randomized controlled trials have shown beneficial effects of vasoactive drugs, endoscopic treatment and prophylactic antibiotics on the outcome of bleeding oesophageal varices (BOV). However, translating guidelines based on randomized controlled trials into clinical practice is diffi......OBJECTIVES: Randomized controlled trials have shown beneficial effects of vasoactive drugs, endoscopic treatment and prophylactic antibiotics on the outcome of bleeding oesophageal varices (BOV). However, translating guidelines based on randomized controlled trials into clinical practice...

  18. Prognostic indicators in alcoholic cirrhotic men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Nielsen, G

    1988-01-01

    The relationships between portal pressure, liver function and clinical variables on one hand and development of variceal hemorrhage and death on the other were investigated in 58 men with newly diagnosed alcoholic cirrhosis. Portal pressure was determined during hepatic vein catheterization...... as wedged minus free hepatic vein pressure, and median pressure was 14 mm Hg (range = 3 to 26 mm Hg). Fourteen of 31 patients (45%) had esophageal varices at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (the size being considered large in nine patients). During follow-up (median = 31 months; range = 2 to 51 months), 12...... patients (21%) developed variceal hemorrhage. Applying Cox's regression analysis, information about previous variceal bleeding (p = 0.0046), large varices at endoscopy (p = 0.012), hepatic vein pressure gradient (p = 0.0056) and indocyanine green clearance (p = 0.038) all contained significant prognostic...

  19. Brain Abscess after Esophageal Dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, S; Grand, M; Michelsen, J

    2007-01-01

    with malaise, progressive lethargy, fever, aphasia and hemiparesis. Six days before she had been treated with esophageal dilatation for a stricture caused by accidental ingestion of caustic soda. The brain abscess was treated with surgery and antibiotics. She recovered completely. This clinical case...

  20. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  1. [Esophageal histoplasmosis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, M A; Mendes, E F; Saad, L H; Rodrigues, P A; Gonçalves, I

    1996-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient with complaint of progressive disphagia. Stenoses of lower third of esophagus was revealed by radiological and endoscopic examinations. Fungi were showed in biopsy of lesion, with demonstration of Histoplasm capsulate by tissue culture. Endoscopic dilatation was performed because especific medical treatment failed but esophageal rupture was observed. Partial esophagectomy was performed with symptoms remission.

  2. Microcatheter embolization of hemorrhages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppaenen, Seppo K.; Leppaenen, Martti J.; Pimenoff, Georg; Seppaenen, Janne M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of embolotherapy using microcatheters in patients with hemorrhage from various locations. Methods. Among 29 patients there were 13 with severe epistaxis, 7 with gastrointestinal bleeding, 4 with hemorrhage in the kidney, 4 with bleeding in pelvic organs and 1 with bleeding in the shoulder region. In all cases, a Tracker-18 or Tracker-10 microcatheter was advanced coaxially through a 4.1 Fr guiding catheter in order to reach the bleeding site as distally as possible. Polyvinyl alcohol microparticles and/or platinum microcoils were used as embolic material. Results. The bleeding was stopped in 90% (26 of 29) of cases. In 66% of cases the treatment was curative, in 7% preoperative, and in 17% palliative. There were 3 clinical failures. Conclusion. Microcatheter embolization is an effective and safe means of managing different kinds of hemorrhage of various causes from a variety of sites

  3. Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007301.htm Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the newborn is bleeding into the ...

  4. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  5. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) versus laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) plus preoperative endoscopic varices ligation (EVL) in the treatment of recurrent variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Wu, Zhong; Wu, Junchao; Wang, Xin; Li, Yongbin; Wang, Mingjun; Yang, Zhengguo; Peng, Bing; Zhou, Zongguang

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare elective transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) and laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) plus preoperative endoscopic varices ligation (EVL) in their efficacy in preventing recurrent bleeding and improving the long-term liver function in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Between January 2009 and March 2012, we enrolled 83 patients (55 with TIPS, defined as the TIPS group, and 28 with LS plus preoperative EVL, defined as the LS group) with portal hypertension and a history of gastroesophageal variceal bleeding resulting from liver cirrhosis. The clinical characteristics, perioperative outcomes, and follow-up were recorded. No significant differences were observed between the two treatment groups with respect to the patients' characteristics and preoperative variables. Within 30 days after surgery, one patient in the TIPS group died of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, whereas no patient in the LS group died. Complications occurred in 14 patients in the TIPS group, which included rebleeding, encephalopathy, ascites, bleeding from a pseudoaneurysm of the thoracoabdominal aorta, and pulmonary infection, compared with 5 patients in the LS group, which included pulmonary effusion, pancreatic leakage, and portal vein thrombosis. During a mean follow-up of 13.6 months in the TIPS group and 12.3 months in the LS group, the actuarial survival was 85.5 % in the TIPS group versus 100 % in the LS group. The long-term complications included rebleeding and encephalopathy in the TIPS group. LS plus EVL was superior to TIPS in the prevention of gastroesophageal variceal rebleeding in cirrhotic patients. This treatment was associated with a low rate of portosystemic encephalopathy and improvements in the long-term liver function.

  6. The secondary prophylactic efficacy of beta-blocker after endoscopic gastric variceal obturation for first acute episode of gastric variceal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Han Choi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsThe most appropriate treatment for acute gastric variceal bleeding (GVB is currently endoscopic gastric variceal obturation (GVO using Histoacryl®. However, the secondary prophylactic efficacy of beta-blocker (BB after GVO for the first acute episode of GVB has not yet been established. The secondary prophylactic efficacy of BB after GVO for the first acute episode of GVB was evaluated in this study.MethodsNinety-three patients at Soonchunhyang University Hospital with acute GVB who received GVO using Histoacryl® were enrolled between June 2001 and March 2010. Among these, 42 patients underwent GVO alone (GVO group and 51 patients underwent GVO with adjuvant BB therapy (GVO+BB group. This study was intended for patients in whom a desired heart rate was reached. The rates of rebleeding-free survival and overall survival were calculated for the two study groups using Kaplan-Meyer analysis and Cox's proportional-hazards model.ResultsThe follow-up period after the initial eradication of gastric varices was 18.14±25.22 months (mean±SD. During the follow-up period, rebleeding occurred in 10 (23.8% and 21 (41.2% GVO and GVO+BB patients, respectively, and 39 patients died [23 (54.8% in the GVO group and 16 (31.4% in the GVO+BB group]. The mean rebleeding-free survival time did not differ significantly between the GVO and GVO+BB groups (65.40 and 37.40 months, respectively; P=0.774, whereas the mean overall survival time did differ (52.54 and 72.65 months, respectively; P=0.036.Conclusions Adjuvant BB therapy after GVO using Histoacryl® for the first acute episode of GVB could decrease the mortality rate relative to GVO alone. However, adjuvant BB therapy afforded no benefit for the secondary prevention of rebleeding in GV.

  7. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers. 2014.

  8. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-22

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  9. Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: clinical, therapeutic and evolution aspects. Comparison between a tertiary medical center and a municipal hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, Cornelia; Matei, Daniela; Tőrők-Vistai, Tünde; Lazar, Mircea; Pascu, Oliviu

    2013-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is one of the most common emergencies in gastroenterology practice. In recent years, the introduction of urgent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE) and of the treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in high doses has resulted in an improvement of the treatment outcome in patients with UGIB, but without a significant improvement in mortality rates. In our study we compared the epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic aspects in patients with non-variceal UGIB admitted over a period of one year in a tertiary center where urgent UGIE is a routine procedure and in a municipal hospital where UGIE with endoscopic hemostasis is not available. Patients admitted to the tertiary medical center had more clinical and endoscopic severity factors compared to those from the municipal hospital: they were older, with more frequent intake of NSAIDs, several comorbidities, some of them severe, and more severe posthemorrhagic anemia. The endoscopic examination revealed that active bleeding and stigmata of recent hemorrhage were more frequent in these patients. Urgent UGIE and, where necessary because of lesions, endoscopic hemostasis were performed in most of these patients. Patients admitted to the municipal hospital were treated more frequently with high-dose intravenous PPIs. Patients undergoing urgent UGIE and endoscopic therapy had a shorter duration of hospitalization. However, there were no differences regarding the need for surgery or mortality rates. The results of our study are consistent with the literature.

  10. Chicago classification criteria of esophageal motility disorders defined in high resolution esophageal pressure topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Fox, M.; Kahrilas, P. J.; Pandolfino, J. E.; Schwizer, W.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Conklin, Jeffrey L.; Cook, Ian J.; Gyawali, C. Prakash; Hebbard, Geoffrey; Holloway, Richard H.; Ke, Meiyun; Keller, Jutta; Mittal, Ravinder K.; Peters, Jeff; Richter, Joel; Roman, Sabine; Rommel, Nathalie; Sifrim, Daniel; Tutuian, Radu; Valdovinos, Miguel; Vela, Marcelo F.; Zerbib, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Background The Chicago Classification of esophageal motility was developed to facilitate the interpretation of clinical high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) studies, concurrent with the widespread adoption of this technology into clinical practice. The Chicago Classification has been

  11. Clinical Study of Time Optimizing of Endoscopic Photodynamic Therapy on Esophageal and/or Gastric Cardiac Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Stage I Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  12. Management of non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: position statement of the Catalan Society of Gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Iglesias, Pilar; Botargues, Josep-Maria; Feu Caballé, Faust; Villanueva Sánchez, Càndid; Calvet Calvo, Xavier; Brullet Benedi, Enric; Cánovas Moreno, Gabriel; Fort Martorell, Esther; Gallach Montero, Marta; Gené Tous, Emili; Hidalgo Rosas, José-Manuel; Lago Macía, Amelia; Nieto Rodríguez, Ana; Papo Berger, Michel; Planella de Rubinat, Montserrat; Saló Rich, Joan; Campo Fernández de Los Ríos, Rafel

    2017-05-01

    In recent years there have been advances in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that have helped reduce rebleeding and mortality. This document positioning of the Catalan Society of Digestologia is an update of evidence-based recommendations on management of gastrointestinal bleeding peptic ulcer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  13. Risk factors for band-induced ulcer bleeding after prophylactic and therapeutic endoscopic variceal band ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Marie; Vaughan, Rhys; Angus, Peter W; Gow, Paul J; Parker, Frank; Hey, Penelope; Efthymiou, Marios

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVBL) aims to eradicate high-risk oesophageal varices. There is a small risk of precipitating bleeding from EVBL-induced oesophageal ulceration, which is associated with significant mortality. We explore the risk factors and outcome of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding. Retrospective review of our endoscopy database between 2007 and 2012 identified upper endoscopies during which EVBL was performed. Patient demographics, biochemistry and endoscopic findings were recorded as were the complications of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding and death. A total of 749 episodes of EVBL were performed in 347 patients with a mean Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of 15.8. In all, 609 procedures were performed for prophylaxis and 140 for acute haemorrhage. There were 21 episodes (2.8% of procedures) of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding in 18 patients, five of whom subsequently died (28%). On multivariable analysis, acute variceal haemorrhage was the only significant predictor of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding [odds ratio (OR) 6.25 (2.57-15.14), Pulcer bleeding rate was 1.5%, with 22% mortality. In this group, higher MELD score and reflux oesophagitis were associated significantly with EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding [OR 25.53 (2.14-303.26), P=0.010 and OR 1.07 (1.01-1.13), P=0.019, respectively]. Our EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding rate was low, but associated with significant mortality. Highest rates were observed following EVBL for acute variceal haemorrhage, for which EVBL is unavoidable. The incidence was lower following prophylactic EVBL, with the MELD score being the predominant risk factor. Reflux oesophagitis requires further investigation as a potentially modifiable risk factor for EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding.

  14. Gastric Varices with Remarkable Collateral Veins in Valpronic Acid-Induced Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hattori

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid (VPA is a commonly prescribed and approved treatment for epilepsy, including Angelman syndrome, throughout the world. However, the long-term administration of drugs like VPA is associated with the possible development of gastric varices and splenic obstruction as a result of chronic pancreatitis. Such cases can be difficult to treat using endoscopy or interventional radiology because of hemodynamic abnormalities; therefore, surgical treatment is often necessary.

  15. Massive fetomaternal hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rune; Berkowicz, Adela; Lousen, Thea

    2008-01-01

    the maternal circulation by anti-D in clinical cases of massive fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH). CASE REPORT: A 33-year-old D- woman delivered a D+ female infant by emergency cesarean section for suspected fetal anemia. A massive FMH, initially estimated to be approximately 142 mL of RBCs, was found. In addition...

  16. Hemorrhage and vascular abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    While many brain lesions have a similar appearance on MRI and CT, this is not true of hemorrhage. On CT, acute hemorrhage becomes hyperdense within an hour as the clot forms. This lasts for several days and then fades to isodensity and eventually hypodensity. On MRI, hemorrhage less than 12 to 24 hours old may not be distinguishable from vasogenic edema. Its appearance subsequently is an evolving pattern of variable signal intensity which depends on the specific form of hemoglobin which is present, or whether the red cells are intact or lysed, on the operating field strength, on the type of signal (that is, spin echo or gradient echo), and on contrast (that is, T 1 - or T 2 -weighing). The appearance of hemorrhage also depends on the compartment of the brain involved---subarachnoid, subdural, or intraparenchymal. Finally, for parenchymal hematomas, different zones may be defined from the inner core to the outer rim which all vary in appearance depending on field strength and imaging technique

  17. Magnesium in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergh, W.M. (Walter Marcel) van den

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to determine the role of serum magnesium in the pathophysiology after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to assess the effect of magnesium treatment in reducing cerebral ischemia in experimental SAH and in improving clinical outcome in patients with

  18. Post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, Christian; Wallén, Mia; Aakesson, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage (PTH) is a relatively common and potentially life-threatening complication. The objective of this study was to examine the rate of PTH and identify risk factors. A retrospective cohort study was carried out including all tonsillectomies (430 patients) performed...

  19. Massive antenatal fetomaternal hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Koldkjaer, Ole; Berkowicz, Adela

    2005-01-01

    Massive fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) can lead to life-threatening anemia. Quantification based on flow cytometry with anti-hemoglobin F (HbF) is applicable in all cases but underestimation of large fetal bleeds has been reported. A large FMH from an ABO-compatible fetus allows an estimation...

  20. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melhado, Rachel E.; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction

  1. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melhado, Rachel E., E-mail: raye732001@yahoo.co.uk; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga [Academic Department of Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-28

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction.

  2. Should we add beta-blockers to band ligation for secondary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre Cotoras

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Los pacientes cirróticos que han tenido un episodio de hemorragia por várices gastroesofágicas tienen un alto riesgo de resangrado, a pesar del tratamiento con ligadura variceal endoscópica. La adición de betabloqueadores podría disminuir este riesgo, pero se asocia a efectos adversos. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en múltiples bases de datos, identificamos siete revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen tres estudios aleatorizados que responden la pregunta. Extrajimos los datos, realizamos un metanálisis y confeccionamos tablas de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Concluimos que la adición de betabloquedores a la ligadura variceal endoscópica como profilaxis secundaria de hemorragia variceal disminuye el riesgo de resangrado, sin embargo, parece no disminuir la mortalidad, aunque la certeza de la evidencia para esto es baja. Si bien se asociaría a efectos adversos frecuentes estos serían leves y en general no llevan a suspender la terapia.

  3. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved. PMID:27957030

  4. Combined treatment of esophageal cancer: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesas, A.; Bagajevas, A.

    2004-01-01

    While still relatively uncommon in many countries, esophageal cancer is fatal in the vast majority of cases. In the USA, estimated 13,100 of new cases were diagnosed in 2002. In Lithuania, 163 new cases were diagnosed in 2001. Evidence for an association between environment, diet and esophageal cancer comes from the profound differences in incidence observed in different parts of the world. While the overall outlook for patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer has improved in the last 30 years, most patients are still present with advanced disease and their survival remains poor. Commonly etiology and risk factors of esophageal cancer are: cigarettes and alcohol, diet and other genetics factors. Only in 50% of patients with esophageal cancer clinically localized disease is present. National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines state that patients with clinically localized disease may be treated with resection or chemotherapy plus radiation. The overall survival rates for either surgery alone or combined chemotherapy and radiation appear equivalent. Chemoradiation as primary management of localized esophageal cancer has been shown to be superior in radiation alone. A series of randomized trials have demonstrated that adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation does not offer a survival advantage to patients with esophageal cancer. The superiority of preoperative chemoradiation over surgery alone in esophageal cancer has been demonstrated in a prospective trials. Recently published phase I and II studies have demonstrated moderate response rates to taxanes in esophageal cancer. Taxanes and irinotecan in combinations with platinum compounds and fluoropyrimidines are being tested in regimes with radiation. (author)

  5. Enhanced recovery after esophageal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorwald, Peter; Bruna Esteban, Marcos; Ortega Lucea, Sonia; Ramírez Rodríguez, Jose Manuel

    2018-03-21

    ERAS is a multimodal perioperative care program which replaces traditional practices concerning analgesia, intravenous fluids, nutrition, mobilization as well as a number of other perioperative items, whose implementation is supported by evidence-based best practices. According to the RICA guidelines published in 2015, a review of the literature and the consensus established at a multidisciplinary meeting in 2015, we present a protocol that contains the basic procedures of an ERAS pathway for resective esophageal surgery. The measures involved in this ERAS pathway are structured into 3areas: preoperative, perioperative and postoperative. The consensus document integrates all the analyzed items in a unique time chart. ERAS programs in esophageal resection surgery can reduce postoperative morbidity, mortality, hospitalization and hospital costs. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Vitiligo associated with esophageal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asilian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is a disease that results in depigmented areas in the skin. It may develop at any age but the average age at onset is 20 years. Association of vitiligo and melanoma has been commonly reported, but malignancies other than melanoma have been rarely associated with vitiligo. We report a 73-year-old patient with new onset vitiligo who developed esophageal adenocarcinoma in the following years.

  7. Eosinophilic esophagitis: indications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straumann, Alex

    2014-01-01

    At present, it is still debated whether the focus of treatment in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) should be directed toward a symptomatic or histological response, or even toward a combination of both. This question cannot be answered as long as we have no solid data evaluating the long-term consequences of untreated symptoms and untreated inflammation. Nevertheless, today there are at least three established reasons to treat patients with clinically and histologically active EoE. First, dysphagia has a substantial negative impact on the patient's daily life. Despite the fact that patients often cope with this symptom and accept even marked restrictions in their nutritional habits, they usually experience a marked enhancement in quality of life under treatment. Second, untreated EoE harbors the risk of long-lasting food impactions. There is evidence that this unpleasant, unforeseeable and even risky incident can be prevented by efficient treatment of the eosinophilic inflammation. Third, it has been demonstrated in several clinical studies as well as in animal models that unbridled eosinophilic inflammation leads to a so-called remodeling of the esophagus with wall thickening, stiffness of the organ and stricture. Prevention of esophageal damage caused by tissue remodeling is therefore another reason to strongly advocate a consequential treatment. Finally, there is increasing evidence that untreated EoE might be a risk factor for acute infection of the esophagus with herpes simplex virus (HSV), leading to a severe ulcerative and extremely painful esophagitis. Prevention of HSV esophagitis might therefore be a fourth indication for treating EoE. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Current knowledge on esophageal atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Paulo Fernando Martins; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Pereira, Regina Maria

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is the most common congenital anomaly of the esophagus. The improvement of survival observed over the previous two decades is multifactorial and largely attributable to advances in neonatal intensive care, neonatal anesthesia, ventilatory and nutritional support, antibiotics, early surgical intervention, surgical materials and techniques. Indeed, mortality is currently limited to those cases with coexisting severe life-threatening anomalies. The diagnosis of EA is most commonly made during the first 24 h of life but may occur either antenatally or may be delayed. The primary surgical correction for EA and TEF is the best option in the absence of severe malformations. There is no ideal replacement for the esophagus and the optimal surgical treatment for patients with long-gap EA is still controversial. The primary complications during the postoperative period are leak and stenosis of the anastomosis, gastro-esophageal reflux, esophageal dysmotility, fistula recurrence, respiratory disorders and deformities of the thoracic wall. Data regarding long-term outcomes and follow-ups are limited for patients following EA/TEF repair. The determination of the risk factors for the complicated evolution following EA/TEF repair may positively impact long-term prognoses. Much remains to be studied regarding this condition. This manuscript provides a literature review of the current knowledge regarding EA. PMID:22851858

  9. Spontaneous circumferential esophageal dissection in a young man with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Jorge; Prim, José María G; Moldes, Milagros; Ledo, Ramiro

    2009-12-01

    Spontaneous esophageal dissection is a rare condition that may happen in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Conservative management is an important therapeutic option to be considered. We describe an unusual case of a young man with eosinophilic esophagitis who presented complaining of acute retrosternal pain, fever and vomiting. After a thorough evaluation including CT-scan and esophagogram, circumferential esophageal dissection and mediastinal abscess without visible perforation was observed. Abscess resolution and oral nutrition reintroduction was achieved with non-surgical management. Corticoid therapy was initiated for esophagitis treatment.

  10. A case of liver cirrhosis due to hepatits C virus infection complicating giant anorectal varices treated with balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Imai, Yukinori; Takaya, Hiroaki; Nakazawa, Manabu; Chikayama, Taku; Ando, Satsuki; Mizuno, Yoshie; Sugawara, Kayoko; Nakamura, Yuuka; Saitoh, Eiko; Hamaoka, Kazuhiro; Motoya, Daisuke; Fujimori, Kenji; Inao, Mie; Nakayama, Nobuaki; Nagoshi, Sumiko; Mochida, Satoshi

    2011-02-01

    A 73-year-old man with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus infection was admitted to our hospital because of massive bleeding from external varices. Colonoscopic examination revealed that giant anorectal varices had developed between the anus and rectal ampulla, and had ruptured at the perianal site. On three-dimensional computed tomography imaging, the feeding and drainage vessels of the varices were identified as the inferior mesenteric vein and right inferior hemorrhoidal vein, respectively. Endoscopic therapies were not employed for the bleeding varices, because the blood flow volume of the feeding vessel was extremely large. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) was therefore carried out through the drainage vessels. The variceal blood flow disappeared after B-RTO therapy, and the varices decreased in size with thrombus formation verified by colonoscopy. Bleeding from the external varices also ceased. B-RTO therapy may be an effective approach for giant anorectal varices presenting as a complication in liver cirrhosis patients in whom the main drainage vessels can be determined.

  11. Management of Gastric Varices Unsuccessfully Treated by Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration: Long-Term Follow-Up and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio Uchiyama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of percutaneous transhepatic obliteration (PTO alone and combined with balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO for gastroesophageal varices refractory to BRTO alone. Between July 1999 and December 2010, 13 patients with gastroesophageal varices refractory to BRTO were treated with PTO (n = 6 or a combination of PTO and BRTO (n = 7. We retrospectively investigated the rates of survival, recurrence, or worsening of the varices; hepatic function before and after the procedure; and complications. The procedure achieved complete obliteration or significant reduction of the varices in all 13 patients without major complications. During follow-up, the varices had recurred in 2 patients, of which one had hepatocellular carcinoma, and the other died suddenly from variceal rebleeding 7 years after PTO. The remaining 11 patients did not experience worsening of the varices and showed significant improvements in the serum ammonia levels and prothrombin time. The mean follow-up period was 90 months, and the cumulative survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 92.9%, 85.7%, and 85.7%, respectively. Both PTO and combined PTO and BRTO seem as safe and effective procedures for the treatment of gastroesophageal varices refractory to BRTO alone.

  12. Endoscopic mucosal resection for staging and treatment of early esophageal carcinoma: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Justin T; Walker, Jon P; Meara, Michael P; Hazey, Jeffrey W; Melvin, W Scott; Perry, Kyle A

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) has emerged for evaluation and treatment of esophageal nodules. We report our initial experience with EMR for T staging and management of early esophageal cancer. We reviewed patients undergoing EMR for esophageal adenocarcinoma between 2008 and 2013. The primary outcome measure was needed for esophagectomy. Secondary outcomes included complete eradication of adenocarcinoma, recurrence or persistence of cancer, nodal status for those undergoing esophagectomy, and complications of endoscopic treatment. During the study period, 24 patients underwent EMR demonstrating carcinoma, and a grossly margin negative endoscopic resection was achieved in all cases. Ten patients (42 %) had evidence of submucosal invasion and were referred for esophagectomy. Patients with margin negative EMR (n = 10, 42 %) or positive radial margins (n = 4, 16 %) underwent endoscopic surveillance and treatment with radiofrequency ablation or repeat EMR as needed. Thirteen patients (93 %) with intramucosal cancer (IMC) have been successfully managed with ongoing endoscopic surveillance and treatment with a median follow-up of 15.5 months. One patient underwent esophagectomy due to recurrent IMC in the setting of long-segment multifocal high-grade dysplasia. There were no esophageal perforations, one patient developed a self-limited gastrointestinal hemorrhage following EMR, and one had an esophageal stricture following endoscopic management. IMC can be successfully managed endoscopically and thus esophagectomy is avoided in a significant proportion of patients. Endoscopic management may be utilized in the setting of complete resection or radial margin involvement without evidence of submucosal invasion. Close endoscopic follow-up is of paramount importance even in those with negative margins, because recurrent disease may occur following EMR in these patients.

  13. Candidial esophagitis - A marker for HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kumar

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of AIDS manifested as candidial esophagitis. In addition , he had genital herpes, frequent diarrhoea, loss of weight and generalized lymphadenopathy. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopy. The patient died in 3 months due to unremitting diarrhoea. This importance of candidial esophagitis in a person at risk for developing AIDS is highlighted.

  14. Iatrogenic esophageal perforation in a newborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Mi; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Park, Won Soon; Choi, Jung Hwan [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Esophagus and pharyngeal structures of newborn are very week and so vulnerable. When a parallel longitudinal tubular structure around (especially behind) the esophagus is seen, traumatic esophageal perforation must be differentiated. We report a case of esophageal perforation in a premature twin baby by nasogastric tube insertion.

  15. Prevalence of reflux esophagitis among patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed Gado

    2013-10-25

    Oct 25, 2013 ... 2.1. Definitions. Gastro-esophageal RS are defined as heartburn with or with- out acid regurgitation.11 RE is defined as mucosal breaks in the lower esophagus, as seen by endoscopy.12 Severity of esophagitis was defined based on endoscopic findings accord- ing to the Savary-Miller grading system.13 ...

  16. esophageal carcinoma complicating achalasia, 25 years post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mine

    Achalasia was made, with marked retention and esophageal dilation seen on Barium Swallow examination (fig. ... 2.) showed moderate dilation of the esophagus with trickling of barium into the stomach and some esophageal ... patients, an incidence almost seven times that in the general population. In Nigeria, Pindiga 10.

  17. PET-CT manifestation of Candida esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Yong Whee; O, Joo Hyun

    2007-01-01

    Candida esophagitis (moniliasis) is the most common infection of the gullet and has generally been attributed to as a complication of immune suppressed state. However, as the current case. Holt found the disease to occur in 3 of his 13 patients without predisposing condition. Predisposing factors other than immune deficient conditions include aplastic anemia, alcoholism and Parkinson's disease and age, diabetes mellitus, and disruption of mucosal integrity. Growing prevalence of Candida esophagitis in recent years is accounted for by an increase in the number of patients with organ transplantation, malignancy and AIDS as well as populrization of endoscopy. Microorganisms that reached the esophagus in oral secretions are rarely cultured from the esophageal surface. Of many species C. albicans is the most common offender although C. tropicalis has also been isolated with high prevalence, particularly in the patients with cancer and disseminated candidiasis. Clinically, the patients with Candida esophagitis seek medical care for esophageal or retrosternal pain, dysphagia or distress. Candida esophagitis may be the extension from oropharyngeal infection but in the majority the esophagus is the sole site of infection. The middle and lower thirds of the esophagus are more typically affected than the upper third. Diagnosis can be indicated by double contrast esophagography or endoscopy and confirmed by potassium hydroxide (KOH) stain or biopsy. It is to be noted that the more presence of Candida in smear or cultured specimen cannot indict Candida as definitive offender. Differential diagnosis includes herpes simplex infection, cytomegalovirus infection, reflux esophagitis or radiation esophagitis

  18. PET-CT manifestation of Candida esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee [Sung-Ae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); O, Joo Hyun [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic University Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Candida esophagitis (moniliasis) is the most common infection of the gullet and has generally been attributed to as a complication of immune suppressed state. However, as the current case. Holt found the disease to occur in 3 of his 13 patients without predisposing condition. Predisposing factors other than immune deficient conditions include aplastic anemia, alcoholism and Parkinson's disease and age, diabetes mellitus, and disruption of mucosal integrity. Growing prevalence of Candida esophagitis in recent years is accounted for by an increase in the number of patients with organ transplantation, malignancy and AIDS as well as populrization of endoscopy. Microorganisms that reached the esophagus in oral secretions are rarely cultured from the esophageal surface. Of many species C. albicans is the most common offender although C. tropicalis has also been isolated with high prevalence, particularly in the patients with cancer and disseminated candidiasis. Clinically, the patients with Candida esophagitis seek medical care for esophageal or retrosternal pain, dysphagia or distress. Candida esophagitis may be the extension from oropharyngeal infection but in the majority the esophagus is the sole site of infection. The middle and lower thirds of the esophagus are more typically affected than the upper third. Diagnosis can be indicated by double contrast esophagography or endoscopy and confirmed by potassium hydroxide (KOH) stain or biopsy. It is to be noted that the more presence of Candida in smear or cultured specimen cannot indict Candida as definitive offender. Differential diagnosis includes herpes simplex infection, cytomegalovirus infection, reflux esophagitis or radiation esophagitis.

  19. Histopathologic profile of esophageal atresia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    esophageal motility after successful repair of esophageal atresia (EA) and ... tissue were observed in only three LP specimens. Gastric- ... type of muscle fibers was identified. Muscles were examined for fibrosis and/or abnormally seated glands, ducts, or cartilage. Sections were also examined for the. Original article 1.

  20. Palliation of Dysphagia from Esophageal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.Y.V. Homs (Marjolein)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe prognosis of esophageal cancer is poor with a 5-year survival of 10-15%. In addition, over 50% of patients with esophageal cancer already have an inoperable disease at presentation. The majority of these patients require palliative treatment to relieve progressive dysphagia. Metal

  1. esophageal carcinoma complicating achalasia, 25 years post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mine

    moderate dilation of the esophagus with trickling of barium into the stomach and some esophageal retention Flexible esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy was carried out which showed cobble stone appearance of lower esophageal mucosa plus food debris. Biopsy taken during this procedure revealed chronic oesophagitis.

  2. Balloon-Occluded Antegrade Transvenous Sclerotherapy to Treat Rectal Varices: A Direct Puncture Approach to the Superior Rectal Vein Through the Greater Sciatic Foramen Under CT Fluoroscopy Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Yasuyuki, E-mail: onoyasy@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Kariya, Shuji, E-mail: kariyas@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Nakatani, Miyuki, E-mail: nakatanm@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Yoshida, Rie, E-mail: yagir@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Kono, Yumiko, E-mail: kohnoy@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Kan, Naoki, E-mail: kanna@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Ueno, Yutaka, E-mail: uenoyut@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Komemushi, Atsushi, E-mail: komemush@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru, E-mail: tanigano@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Rectal varices occur in 44.5 % of patients with ectopic varices caused by portal hypertension, and 48.6 % of these patients are untreated and followed by observation. However, bleeding occurs in 38 % and shock leading to death in 5 % of such patients. Two patients, an 80-year-old woman undergoing treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A) and a 63-year-old man with class C hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A), in whom balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous sclerotherapy was performed to treat rectal varices are reported. A catheter was inserted by directly puncturing the rectal vein percutaneously through the greater sciatic foramen under computed tomographic fluoroscopy guidance. In both cases, the rectal varices were successfully treated without any significant complications, with no bleeding from rectal varices after embolization.

  3. MR of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.; Dion, J.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging was performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR images as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of MR of the basal cisterns results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR studies in many cases

  4. Various phases of intracerebral hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kino, Masao; Anno, Izumi; Yano, Yuhiko; Anno, Yasuro.

    1980-01-01

    Cases of intracerebral hemorrhage except typical putamen thalamic hemorrhage were reported. It is not difficult to diagnose typical attacks of cerebral apoplexy in patients older than 40 years with hypertension by CT. When the condition of the onset is not typical, cerebral infarction must be considered. Though conservative treatment is performed for severe cerebral hemorrhage and cerbral infarction, there is no specific medicine curing these diseases completely. On the contrary, the risk that the administration of fibrinolysis activators and STA-MCA anastomosis may induce cerebral hemorrhage is stressed. Not a few patients with cerebral apoplexy accompanied by small hemorrhagic focuses have been found, especially since CT was used widely. However, treatment for this disease has many inconsistencies. From above-mentioned facts, we recognize excellent roles of CT in an application of surgery for cerebral hemorrhage of early stage, and we, general radiologists, are under an obligation to advise most adequate theraphy for each patient. (Tsunoda, M.)

  5. Non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Mikkelsen, Ronni; Sørensen, Leif

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Repeat imaging in patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (NASAH) remains controversial. We aim to report our experience with NASAH with different hemorrhage patterns, and to investigate the need for further diagnostic workup to determine the underlying cause of hemorrhage. M...... adequate with absence of hematoma and vasospasm. In contrast, a follow-up DSA should be mandatory for confirming or excluding vascular pathology in case of nPMSAH in order to prevent rebleeding....

  6. Upper gastrointestinal fiberoptic endoscopy in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolla, J C; Diehl, A S; Bemvenuti, G A; Loguercio, S V; Magalhães, D S; Silveira, T R

    1983-11-01

    Upper gastrointestinal fiberendoscopy in pediatric patients is done safely and under local anesthesia in most instances. This study of 47 children confirmed the value of fiberendoscopy in establishing the etiology of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and the presence of esophageal varices. It also contributed significantly to the management of patients with disphagia, pyrosis, epigastric pain, and ingestion of foreign bodies. No significant morbidity was caused.

  7. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  8. Esophageal lung resection and prosthesis placement in a preterm neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Parida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a successful outcome in a preterm baby with an esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula, who initially underwent a primary esophageal repair; but a persistent nonexpanding lung on the side of surgery led to further investigations. A further diagnosis of an esophageal lung resulted in pneumonectomy and prophylactic placement of an intra-thoracic prosthesis to prevent post-pneumonectomy syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prophylactic placement of an intra-thoracic prosthesis in a neonate with the condition of esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula and associated esophageal lung.

  9. Risk factors of early rebleeding after endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal varices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Yan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo explore risk factors of early rebleeding after endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal varices by retrospectively analyzing cases and outcomes from the China-Japan Friendship Hospital. MethodsThree hundred cases of esophagus and/or gastric varices that had received endoscopic therapy between November 1995 and December 2010 were enrolled in the study. The cases were divided into two groups according to presence or absence of early rebleeding, defined as rebleeding within 24 h to six weeks of the operative procedure. Associations with variables of the endoscopic procedure, as well as laboratory and imaging findings, were analyzed by forward stepwise logistic regression analysis to identify independent risk factors of early rebleeding. ResultsPatients experiencing early rebleeding after endoscopic therapy were more likely to be male (P=004, ascites-positive (P=0032, to have a larger portal vein diameter (P=0046, and higher levels of serum creatinine (P=0049 and serum sodium (P=0033 Two significant candidate variables were identified: ascites-positivity (odds ratio (OR=3505, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1169, 10512, P=0025 and higher serum creatinine (OR=1016, 95% CI: 1002, 1031, P=0028. ConclusionEarly rebleeding after endoscopic therapy of gastroesophageal varices is mainly affected by the presence of ascites and higher serum creatinine. Patients with these risk factors should be paid careful attention before and after the endoscopic procedure.

  10. Radiation therapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Masashi; Matayoshi, Yoshinobu; Masaki, Norie

    1992-01-01

    From 1977 through 1989, 149 patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with external irradiation (EI) with or without high-dose rate intraluminal irradiation (HDRII) using remote afterloading system. Concerning complete response group EI alone showed higher local control rate than EI + HDRII, especially in ulcerative type. Another problem is the EI field. Fourteen of 22 patients who were salvaged by surgery due to local recurrence after EI showed marginal or out-field metastasis of the lymph node. These preliminary results suggest that HDRII is not effective for the local control of the ulcerative lesion as a boost therapy, EI should be given for the entire regional lymph nodes. (author)

  11. Perimesencephalic hemorrhage: a nonaneurysmal and benign form of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gijn, J.; van Dongen, K. J.; Vermeulen, M.; Hijdra, A.

    1985-01-01

    We studied 28 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and normal angiograms. On early CT (within 5 days) in 13 cases, blood was seen mainly or only in the cisterns around the midbrain. This pattern of hemorrhage was found in only 1 of 92 patients with a ruptured aneurysm. None of the unexplained

  12. Systemic and microcirculatory responses to progressive hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubin, Arnaldo; Pozo, Mario Omar; Ferrara, Gonzalo; Murias, Gastón; Martins, Enrique; Canullán, Carlos; Canales, Héctor Saul; Kanoore Edul, Vanina Siham; Estenssoro, Elisa; Ince, Can

    2009-01-01

    To compare systemic hemodynamics with microcirculatory changes at different vascular beds during progressive hemorrhage. University-based research laboratory. Twelve anesthetized, mechanically ventilated sheep. Sheep were randomly assigned to HEMORRHAGE or CONTROL group. In the HEMORRHAGE group (n =

  13. Subconjunctival Hemorrhage (Broken Blood Vessel in Eye)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subconjunctival hemorrhage (broken blood vessel in eye) Overview A subconjunctival hemorrhage (sub-kun-JUNK-tih-vul HEM-uh-ruj) ... may not even realize you have a subconjunctival hemorrhage until you look in the mirror and notice ...

  14. Epidemiologic differences in esophageal cancer between Asian and Western populations

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Bing Shen; Guang-Fu Jin; Han-Ze Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a common cancer worldwide and has a poor prognosis. The incidence of esophageal squamous cell cancer has been decreasing, whereas the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing rapidly, particularly in Western men. Squamous cell cancer continues to be the major type of esophageal cancer in Asia, and the main risk factors include tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, hot beverage drinking, and poor nutrition. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma predomina...

  15. Thoracoscopic Surgery in a Patient with Multiple Esophageal Carcinomas after Surgery for Esophageal Achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Tomoya; Aoki, Tatsuya; Haba, Yusuke; Hirano, Katsuhisa; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Kaji, Masahide; Shimizu, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    We present a case in which we used a thoracoscopic approach for resection of multiple esophageal carcinomas diagnosed 33 years after surgery for esophageal achalasia. A 68-year-old Japanese man had been diagnosed with esophageal achalasia and underwent surgical treatment 33 years earlier. He was examined at our hospital for annual routine checkup in which upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a “0-IIb+IIa” lesion in the middle esophagus. Iodine staining revealed multiple irregularly shaped iodine-unstained areas, the diagnosis of which was esophageal carcinoma. Thoracoscopic subtotal esophagectomy was performed. Esophageal carcinoma may occur many years after surgery for esophageal achalasia, even if the passage symptoms have improved. So, long-term periodic follow-up is necessary for detection of carcinoma at an earlier stage. PMID:28951795

  16. A case of metachronous development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the patient with esophageal carcinosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ra Ri; Jung, Woon Tae; Oh, Hye Won; Kim, Hee Jin; Ha, Chang Yoon; Kim, Hong Jun; Kim, Tae Hyo; Ko, Gyung Hyuck

    2014-12-01

    Esophageal carcinosarcoma is a rare malignant esophageal neoplasm consisting of both carcinomatous and sarcomatous elements, with an incidence of 0.5%. There have been only a few case reports of carcinosarcoma and squamous cell carcinoma coexisting in the esophagus. However, all of these are cases of synchronous or metachronous development of carcinosarcoma after chemoradiotherapy in patients of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. A 53-year-old man underwent esophagogas-troduodenoscopy because of chest pain for several months. Endoscopic examination revealed a huge pedunculated esophageal polypoid mass. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed and histopathologic examination confirmed spindle cell carcinoma (carcinosarcoma). He refused additional esophagectomy. After 21 months, third follow-up endoscopy showed poorly-demarcated flat, faint discolored lesions at different location from the previous ESD site and endoscopic biopsies confirmed squamous cell carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of metachronous development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with esophageal carcinosarcoma.

  17. Circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schievink, W. I.; Karemaker, J. M.; Hageman, L. M.; van der Werf, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were investigated in a group of 500 consecutive patients admitted to a neurosurgical center. Subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred during stressful events in 42.8% of the patients, during nonstrenuous activities in 34.4%, and during rest or

  18. Anosmia After Perimesencephalic Nonaneurysmal Hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greebe, Paut; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Algra, Ale

    Background and Purpose-Anosmia frequently occurs after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage not only after clipping, but also after endovascular coiling. Thus, at least in part, anosmia is caused by the hemorrhage itself and not only by surgical treatment. However, it is unknown whether anosmia is

  19. Computed Tomography of Interacerebral Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Lee, Kwan Seh; Park, Soo Soung

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate and reliable method for the diagnosis of intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage. The precise anatomic extent of the nematoma, associated cerebral edema, ventricular deformity and displacement, and hydrocephalus are all readily assessed. Aside from head trauma, the principal cause of intracerebral hematoma is hypertensive vascular disease. Although hematomas from various causes may present similar CT appearances frequently the correct etiology may be suggested by consideration of patient's age, clinical history, and the location of the hematoma. The analytical study was performed in 180 cases of intracerebral hemorrhages by CT from October 1981 to January 1983. The results were as follows; 1. The most prevalent age group was 6th decade (37.2%). Male was prevalent to female at the ration of 1.6 to 1. 2. The most common symptom and sign was mental disturbance (48.7%), motor weakness (23%), headache (10.6%), nausea and vomiting (9.8%). 3. The causes of hemorrhage were hypertension (53.9%), head trauma (30.6%), aneurysm (6.1%) and A-V malformation (7.2%). 4. The frequent locations of hemorrhage were basal ganglia and thalamus (40.4%), lobes (35%), ventricles (21.8%). 5. The distribution of hemorrhage was intracerebral hemorrhage (65.6%), intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage (30.3%), intraventricular hemorrhage (4.4%).

  20. The potential of photodynamic therapy to treat esophageal candidiasis coexisting with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haixia; Mao, Yongping; Gu, Ying; Zhu, Jianguo; Wang, Ying; Zeng, Jing; Huang, Naiyan; Liu, Qingsen; Yang, Yunsheng

    2014-01-05

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used in recent years to deal with fungal infections because of the prevalence of fungi resistance to drugs. However, PDT for gastrointestinal fungal infection has not been reported. This study was conducted to assess the potential of PDT to deal with esophageal candidiasis. Two male patients with histological evidence of esophageal candidiasis coexisting with esophageal cancer were included in this retrospective study. Both patients were treated with PDT. This treatment was repeated at least 1month after the initial PDT if the patient still had residual cancer or esophageal candidiasis. Short-term efficacy was evaluated on the basis of endoscopy and histology findings. Further follow-up data were obtained from endoscopy results or telephone conversation. The esophageal candidiasis located 21-24cm and 25-28cm from the incisors of case 1 reached complete remission after one and two PDT sessions, respectively. The esophageal cancer coexisting with esophageal candidiasis located 21-24cm from the incisors reached complete remission after two PDT sessions. No recurrence was found at a 14-month follow-up. The esophageal cancer located 30-35cm from the incisors reached partial response after three PDT sessions. Both of the esophageal candidiasis and the coexisting esophageal cancer at 23-26cm from the incisors of case 2 reached complete remission and the esophageal cancer at 34-37cm from the incisors reached complete remission after one PDT session. No recurrence was found at a 24-month follow-up. There were no serious adverse events found in either of the two cases. Results of this preliminary study indicate that PDT may be a potential method to deal with esophageal candidiasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Palliative Treatment of Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad; Goosenberg; Frucht; Coia

    1994-07-01

    Palliative interventions for advanced esophageal cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, chemoradiation, endoscopic procedures, and combinations of the above. Palliative esophagectomy or bypass procedures are difficult to justify in these patients because their life expectancy is so short. Palliative external beam radiation to doses of 50 to 60 Gy is successful in 50% to 70% of patients. The addition of brachytherapy may improve these results. One third to one half of patients treated with radiation develop benign or maglinant stricture. Although response rates to combination chemotherapy are only 50% at best, the majority of patients do have improvement of dysphagia. These regimens are commonly used as part of a multidisciplinary approach with radiation andøor surgery, rather than as a sole modality of treatment. Chemoradiation regimens results in better survival than treatment with radiation alone, and provide palliation of dysphagia in up to 90% of patients. Although acute toxicity of chemoradiation is more severe than radiation alone, this is of limited duration. Chemoradiation may be the treatment of choice for the majority of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Endoscopic techniques are available that provide palliation of dysphagia. The most commonly used technique is esophageal dilatation, either alone or before performing other palliative procedures such as laser therapy or stent placement. The most significant limitation of dilatation alone is that palliation is short-lived and most patients require repeat dilatations. Esophageal stents offer a high degree of palliation, but procedure-related morbidity and mortality rates are not insignificant. Expandable metal stents are associated with few complications but tumor ingrowth through the metallic mesh is frequent. Conventional plastic stents are not affected by tumor ingrowth but can migrate. Endoscopic laser therapy also provides symptoms relief and complication rates are

  2. Esophageal scintigraphy: A comparison with esophagoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellen, G.; Andersson, P.; Sandstroem, S.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty consecutive patients with different esophageal symtoms were investigated with esophageal endoscopy, transit scintigraphy, and gastroesophageal (GE) scintigraphy with extra-abdominal compression. Scintigraphic findings were abnormal in 27 of those 31 patients (87%) who were classified as abnormal at endoscopy. A prolonged transit time was the commonest finding, but hiatal hernia and GE reflux were also found. However, the scintigraphic procedure showed abnormalities in 6 of 19 (31%) patients who were classified as normal at endoscopy. Esophageal scintigraphy is recommended as a screening test before endoscopy is decided on. 20 refs.

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis: emerging therapies and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straumann, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Twenty years have passed since eosinophilic esophagitis was first recognized as a new and distinct entity. Current treatment modalities for eosinophilic esophagitis include the "3 Ds": drugs, allergen avoidance with diet, and esophageal dilation. Drugs entail the limitation that only corticosteroids have a proven efficacy; most other compounds evoke only a minimal effect. Diets must be maintained continuously and they interfere markedly with the quality of life, possibly even involving some risk of malnutrition. A greater understanding of the immunopathogenesis, natural history, and disease spectrum will inevitably lead to improved therapeutic outcomes for this emerging entity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of Oesophageal Varices and Splanchnic Vein Thromboses in Patients with JAK2-Positive Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Presentation of Two Cases and Data from a Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia S. Link

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oesophageal varices and gastrointestinal bleeding are common complications of liver cirrhosis. More rarely, oesophageal varices occur in patients with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension that results from thromboses of portal or splanchnic veins. Case Report: We describe 2 young men who initially presented with varices as a result of portal vein thromboses. In the clinical follow-up, both were tested positive for a JAK2 mutation and consequently diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. In an attempt to characterise the frequency of gastrointestinal complications in patients with JAK2-positive MPNs, we retrospectively analysed all known affected patients from our clinic for the diagnosis of portal vein thromboses and oesophageal varices. Strikingly, 48% of those who had received an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy had detectable oesophageal or gastric varices, and 82% of those suffered from portal or splanchnic vein thromboses. Conclusion: While the association between JAK2, myeloproliferative disease and thrombotic events is well established, patients with idiopathic oesophageal varices are not regularly tested for JAK2 mutations. However, the occurrence of oesophageal varices may be the first presenting symptom of a MPN with a JAK2 mutation, and affected patients may profit from a close haematological monitoring to assure the early detection of developing MPN.

  5. Embolization for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal tract haemorrhage: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsadraee, S.; Tirukonda, P.; Nicholson, A. [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Everett, S.M. [Department of Gastroenterology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); McPherson, S.J., E-mail: simon.mcpherson@leedsth.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: To assess the published evidence on the endovascular treatment of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Materials and methods: An Ovid Medline search of published literature was performed (1966-2009). Non-English literature, experimental studies, variceal haemorrhage and case series with fewer than five patients were excluded. The search yielded 1888 abstracts. Thirty-five articles were selected for final analysis. Results: The total number of pooled patients was 927. The technical and clinical success of embolization ranged from 52-100% and 44-100%, respectively. The pooled mean technical/clinical success rate in primary upper gastrointestinal tract haemorrhage (PUGITH) only, trans-papillary haemorrhage (TPH) only, and mixed studies were 84%/67%, 93%/89%, and 93%/64%, respectively. Clinical outcome was adversely affected by multi-organ failure, shock, corticosteroids, transfusion, and coagulopathy. The anatomical source of haemorrhage and procedural variables did not affect the outcome. A successful embolization improved survival by 13.3 times. Retrospective comparison with surgery demonstrated equivalent mortality and clinical success, despite embolization being applied to a more elderly population with a higher prevalence of co-morbidities. Conclusions: Embolization is effective in this very difficult cohort of patients with outcomes similar to surgery.

  6. Treatment of malignant esophageal obstructions with covered metallic Z stents: long-term results in 52 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, R R; Barton, R E; Katon, R M; Petersen, B D; Lakin, P C; Timmermans, H; Uchida, B; Keller, F S; Rösch, J

    1995-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the clinical efficacy of silicone-covered Gianturco-Rösch self-expandable Z (GRZ) stents in the treatment of malignant esophageal obstruction. GRZ stents were placed in 52 patients (39 men, 13 women) with severe dysphagia due to high-grade malignant esophageal obstruction. Stent placement was technically successful, and immediate relief of dysphagia was achieved in 50 of 52 patients (96%), with long-term relief in 47 patients (90%). Fifty-one patients (98%) died during follow-up (range, 1 week to 33 months; mean, 4.3 months). Late complications were most prevalent and included stent migration (n = 5), food impaction (n = 2), chest pain (n = 2), membrane disruption with tumor ingrowth (n = 1), granulomatous reaction above the stent (n = 1), esophageal perforation with mediastinitis (n = 1), and upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (n = 4). Twelve complications were easily managed with medical, endoscopic, or radiologic intervention. Four deaths may have been related to stent placement (early mortality rate, 7.7%). GRZ stents provide relatively safe and effective long-term palliation in patients with severe, malignant esophageal obstruction.

  7. Advanced esophageal cancer and esophageal stenosis endoscopic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piazze, A. E mail: apiazze@hc.edu.uy

    2005-01-01

    Advanced esophageal cancer (AEC) is diagnosed during those stages in which surgery is possible, it is palliative for disphagia, with high morbimortality.In inoperable or irresectable cases, resorting to alternative treatment such as radiotherapy or endoscopy may palliate dsphagia.Endoscopically it is possible to place a transtumoral nasogastric catheter (NGC) for preoperative nutrition or branchial therapy (intratumoral iridium).It is possible to dilate the tumor and place and indwelling plastic or auto expandable prosthesis or to inject absolute intratumoral alcohol.There is and evaluation of results and morbimortality of personal case material through the retrospective study of 54 patients in whom 120 procedures such as those referred to above were carried out.The series includes 41 men and 13 women (3-1), 79.5% of which were of ages between 61 and 90.Optic fiber endoscopes or video endoscopes, coaxial dilators, hydro-pneumatic balloons, metallic guides and non industrial and autoexpandable plastic prosthesis were used; 34.1% of procedures were performed under used; 34.1% of procedures were performed under radioscopy.Eleven patient (8 for nutritional purposes and 3 for brachiotherapy)form part of Groups 1 and 2 of NGC.Group 3 consist of:dilations of radicular stenosis with or without neopasic recurrence, or neoplasic infiltration of esophagus, 6 patient; Group 4: 14 patients for the purpose of dilation of esophageal neoplasm; Group 5:prosthesis, 12 patients; Group 6: 11 patients with anastomotic stenosis.In patients in Group 1-2-3 solution was achieved.In Group 3 there was 1 perforation.In Group 4, out of 14 patient 13 were dilated.In Group 5 it proved impossible to place prosthesis in 2 patient, (3.7%).The conclusion arrived at is that various endoscopic techniques may palliate disphagia in patient with AEC, collaborate with preoperative nutrition through enteral path, with brachioterapy or by treating post surgical stenosis, with low mortality

  8. Thrombocytopenia in Patients with Gastric Varices and the Effect of Balloon-occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration on the Platelet Count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W E Saad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Gastric varices primarily occur in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension and splenomegaly and thus are probably associated with thrombocytopenia. However, the prevalence and severity of thrombocytopenia are unknown in this clinical setting. Moreover, one-third of patients after balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO have aggravated splenomegaly, which potentially may cause worsening thrombocytopenia. The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence and degree of thrombocytopenia in patients with gastric varices associated with gastrorenal shunts undergoing BRTO, to determine the prognostic factors of survival after BRTO (platelet count included, and to assess the effect of BRTO on platelet count over a 1-year period. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of 35 patients who underwent BRTO (March 2008-August 2011. Pre- and post-BRTO platelet counts were noted. Potential predictors of bleeding and survival (age, gender, liver disease etiology, platelet count, model for end stage liver disease [MELD]-score, presence of ascites or hepatocellular carcinoma were analyzed (multivariate analysis. A total of 91% (n = 32/35 of patients had thrombocytopenia (90% of patients in patients undergoing BRTO. However, BRTO (with occlusion of the gastrorenal shunt has little effect on the platelet count. Long-term outcomes of BRTO for bleeding gastric varices using sodium tetradecyl sulfate in the USA are impressive with a 4-year variceal rebleed rate and transplant-free survival rate of 9% and 76%, respectively. Platelet count is not a predictor of higher rebleeding or patient survival after BRTO.

  9. The recent reduction in mortality from bleeding oesophageal varices is primarily observed from Days 1 to 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Lise; Krag, Aleksander; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several new treatments of bleeding oesophageal varices (BOV) have been introduced during the last 25 years; among these are vasoactive drugs, improved endoscopic techniques and prophylactic antibiotics. AIMS: The aim was to compare clinical outcomes based on Baveno IV criteria in two...

  10. Long-term effects of oral propranolol on splanchnic and systemic haemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis and oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Sørensen, T I

    1991-01-01

    1 year of treatment with propranolol, whereas a decrease in azygos blood flow was observed only in the propranolol group. The beneficial effect of propranolol on the risk of bleeding from oesophageal varices may, therefore, mostly be due to a selective decrease in collateral blood flow and thereby...

  11. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EE) or (EoE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delayed, caused primarily by immune mechanisms other than classical IgE-mediated food allergy. Once a causative food ... specific responses in allergy? » Dietary Therapy and Nutrition Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Work Group Report of ...

  12. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Chojnowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease.

  13. Esophageal pH monitoring (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esophageal pH monitoring is a test that measures how often and how long stomach acid is entering the esophagus. ... to a monitor which records the level of acidity in the esophagus. The patient records symptoms and ...

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Esophageal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat esophageal cancer. A plastic ...

  15. The radiology of early esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, S.

    1988-01-01

    The radiographic diagnosis of early esophageal cancer is described based on 25 cases in which depth of invasion was limited to not more than the submucosal layer. It is emphasized that double contrast radiography should be designed to delineate the subtle abnormalities of the esophageal mucosa and margins of lesions which are characteristic of early cancer, and that further investigation should be directed to improving the method of examination so that the detection of ep- and mm-cancer which has a better prognosis than sm cancer can be detected more readily. A macroscopic classification of early esophageal cancer (elevated, flat, depressed and mixed type) which is useful for both endoscopic and radiographic diagnosis is proposed. The 5-year survival rate of esophageal cancer which was limited to the submucosal layer or less (ep-, mm- and sm-cancer) was 50%

  16. Intracranial hemorrhagic embolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hang Yeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A febrile and unconscious man was sent to our emergency department. On physical examinations, some dark red ecchymosis/discoloration over the trunk and track mark in the left-sided groin region were seen. Brain CT scan showed septic emboli complicated with hemorrhage. Chest X-ray revealed pulmonary emboli. Aortic valve vegetation was found by echocardiography. Although aggressive treatment and resuscitation were taken, he died of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus sepsis and multiple organ failure. Intravenous drug users are susceptible to right-sided infective endocarditis. In our case, leftsided infective endocarditis with lung and brain embolism resulting in fatality was relatively uncommon. Review of literature was also made for this article.

  17. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  18. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    OpenAIRE

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde Filho, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomos...

  19. Role of diagnostic tests in esophageal evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverstein, B.D.; Pope, C.E. II

    1980-01-01

    In the evaluation of esophageal disease, the appropriate question must be asked before the correct tests can be selected. Reflux can be demonstrated by radiologic methods, pH testing or radioisotopic techniques. Esophageal mucosal damage is best evaluated by x-ray, endoscopy, or biopsy. Chest pain is demonstrated by acid infusion or by manometry. Two algorithms are presented for the evaluation of chest pain and reflux symptoms

  20. Opportunistic esophagitis in AIDS: radiographic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, M S; Woldenberg, R; Herlinger, H; Laufer, I

    1987-12-01

    Thirty-five of 90 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) seen between 1983 and 1986 underwent esophagography (double contrast in all but two) to rule out opportunistic esophagitis; 20 of the 35 were found to have fungal or viral esophagitis. A radiographic diagnosis of Candida esophagitis was made in 17 patients because of varying degrees of plaque formation. Seven of those patients had a grossly irregular or "shaggy" esophagus; in four, the diagnosis of AIDS was initially suspected from this finding. In the remaining three patients, a radiographic diagnosis of viral esophagitis (herpes simplex in two and cytomegalovirus in one) was made because of discrete ulcers on a normal background mucosa. Eighteen patients had endoscopic, clinical, or autopsy findings that corroborated the radiographic diagnosis; follow-up data were not available for two patients with Candida esophagitis. This experience suggests that fungal and viral esophagitis can often be differentiated with double-contrast esophagography, enabling appropriate antifungal or antiviral therapy to be instituted without endoscopic intervention.

  1. Imaging features of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmit, M.; Vogel, W.; Horger, M.

    2006-01-01

    There are diverse etiologies of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage, so specific diagnosis may be difficult. Conventional radiography tends to be misleading as hemoptysis may lacking in patients with hemorrhagic anemia. Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage should be differentiated from focal pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, active infection (tuberculosis) neoplasia, trauma, or embolism. (orig.)

  2. Hemorrhagic Lacrimation and Epistaxis in Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shireen Mreish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy is an uncommon benign cutaneous vasculitis. Despite its worrisome presentation, it carries good prognosis with rarely reported systemic involvement. Management of these cases has been an area of debate with majority of physicians adopting conservative modalities. We report a case that presented with classic triad of rash, low grade fever, and peripheral edema along with two rarely reported manifestations in literature: hemorrhagic lacrimation and epistaxis.

  3. Subtle lower esophageal sphincter relaxation abnormalities in patients with unexplained esophageal dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, T. V. K.; van Hoeij, F. B.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a relatively common symptom. We aimed to evaluate whether subtle, presently not acknowledged forms of dysfunction of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could explain dysphagia in a subset of patients with normal findings at high-resolution manometry (HRM) according to the

  4. Chronic xerostomia increases esophageal acid exposure and is associated with esophageal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsten, M.A.; Rosman, A.S.; Fishbein, S.; Shlein, R.D.; Goldberg, H.E.; Biener, A.

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of chronic xerostomia on parameters of gastroesophageal reflux and esophagitis. DESIGN: Observational study of a cohort of male patients with xerostomia and age-matched control subjects. SETTING: Tertiary-care Veterans Affairs Medical Center. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male patients with chronic xerostomia secondary to radiation for head and neck cancers or medications. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects with comparable alcohol and smoking histories. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Esophageal motility was similar in patients with xerostomia and controls. Clearance of acid from the esophagus and 24-hour intraesophageal pH were markedly abnormal in patients with xerostomia. Symptoms and signs of esophagitis were significantly more frequent in subjects with xerostomia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic xerostomia may predispose to esophageal injury, at least in part, by decreasing the clearance of acid from the esophagus and altering 24-hour intraesophageal pH. Esophageal injury is a previously unreported complication of long-term salivary deficiency

  5. Eosinophilic esophagitis after esophageal atresia: is there an association? Case presentation and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Ramon R; Heij, Hugo A; van der Voorn, J Patrick; Kneepkens, C M Frank

    2012-06-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a relatively new condition resulting in dysphagia or symptoms resembling gastroesophageal reflux disease, symptoms that also are common in patients with a history of esophageal atresia. We present 2 patients with persistent dysphagia after repair of esophageal atresia that was caused by EoE. Although the exact etiology and pathogenesis of EoE remain unclear, it is now generally accepted that it is the result of a T-helper cell 2-type immune response with a crucial role for the eosinophil-specific chemotaxis factor eotaxin 3 and eosinophils. Because there are genetic similarities between esophageal atresia and EoE, we speculate that patients with esophageal atresia are at increased risk for developing EoE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypomagnesemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, Walter M.; Algra, Ale; van der Sprenkel, Jan Willem Berkelbach; Tulleken, Cornelis A.F.; Rinkel, Gabriël J.E.

    OBJECTIVE: Hypomagnesemia frequently occurs in hospitalized patients, and it is associated with poor outcome. We assessed the frequency and time distribution of hypomagnesemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and its relationship to the severity of SAH, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI),

  7. [Endoscopic surgery of hemorrhagic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash'ian, V G; Korshikova, A N; Godkov, I M; Krylov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Demonstration and analysis of possibilities of video-endoscopy in the surgical treatment of hypertensive hemorrhages Materials and methods. We analyzed the results of surgical treatment of 35 patients with hypertensive intracranial hematomas which were removed using endoscopic method. Twenty-eight patients had putamen, 3 thalamic, 3 cerebellar and 1 subcortical hematoma; the volume of hematomas ranged from 14 to 84 cm3. Results. Neurological lesions completely disappeared in 7 patients, 6 patients had moderate and 17 severe disability. Five (14%) patients died. Outcome of treatment was significantly (psurgery, localization of the hemorrhage, presence and degree of transverse brain dislocation, repeated hemorrhages. Risk factors for poor outcome were depressed consciousness, recurrent hemorrhages, the transverse dislocation >6 mm and deep intracranial hematoma. Conclusions. The efficacy of endoscopic aspiration of hematomas is comparable to open surgical interventions but less traumatic.

  8. Splenic Artery Embolization for the Treatment of Gastric Variceal Bleeding Secondary to Splenic Vein Thrombosis Complicated by Necrotizing Pancreatitis: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Joon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic vein thrombosis is a relatively common finding in pancreatitis. Gastric variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of splenic vein thrombosis, resulting from increased blood flow to short gastric vein. Traditionally, splenectomy is considered the treatment of choice. However, surgery in necrotizing pancreatitis is dangerous, because of severe inflammation, adhesion, and bleeding tendency. In the Warshaw operation, gastric variceal bleeding is rare, even though splenic vein is resected. Because the splenic artery is also resected, blood flow to short gastric vein is not increased problematically. Herein, we report a case of gastric variceal bleeding secondary to splenic vein thrombosis complicated by necrotizing pancreatitis successfully treated with splenic artery embolization. Splenic artery embolization could be the best treatment option for gastric variceal bleeding when splenectomy is difficult such as in case associated with severe acute pancreatitis or associated with severe adhesion or in patients with high operation risk.

  9. Chicago Classification of Esophageal Motility Disorders: Lessons Learned

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O. A.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) is increasingly performed worldwide, to study esophageal motility. The Chicago classification is subsequently applied to interpret the manometric findings and facilitate a diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders. This review will discuss new insights regarding the

  10. Nutrition in peri-operative esophageal cancer management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhagen, E.; Vulpen, J.K. van; Hillegersberg, R. van; May, A.M.; Siersema, P.D.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nutritional status and dietary intake are increasingly recognized as essential areas in esophageal cancer management. Nutritional management of esophageal cancer is a continuously evolving field and comprises an interesting area for scientific research. Areas covered: This review

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of horseshoe lung and esophageal atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Shlomit; Ringertz, Hans [Stanford University School of Medicine, Radiology Department, Stanford, CA (United States); Barth, Richard A. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Radiology Department, Stanford, CA (United States); Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Radiology, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2006-09-15

    We present a case of horseshoe lung (HL) and esophageal atresia suspected prenatally on US imaging and confirmed with fetal MRI. Prenatal diagnosis of HL and esophageal atresia allowed for prenatal counseling and informed parental decisions. (orig.)

  12. Breast varices: imaging findings of an unusual presentation of collateral pathways in superior vena caval syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezdemir, Ayseguel; Ilgit, Erhan T.; Konus, Oeznur L.; Cetin, Meltem; Oezsunar, Yelda

    2000-01-01

    Imaging findings are presented of an unusual pathway of collateral circulation consisting of bilateral and diffuse dilated breast veins from a patient with long standing superior vena caval syndrome. The main importance of this case is the extent of the collateral development through the breast veins, serving as the major pathway of collateral circulation. Identification of this unusual collateral development, which resembles breast varices, was performed with contrast-enhanced chest CT scans, digital subtraction venography, color Doppler ultrasonography, and mammographic studies. Collateral development was secondary to a long segment idiopathic venous occlusion involving bilateral subclavian and brachiocephalic veins as well as vena cava superior. We conclude that dilated breast veins when detected on any imaging modality should raise the suspicion of central venous obstruction

  13. Effect of Transfusion Strategy in Acute Non-variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Rasmus; Svenningsen, Peter; Hillingsø, Jens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is a common cause of admissions as well as aggressive transfusion of blood products. Whether the transfusion strategy in NVUGIB impacts on hemostasis is unknown and constitutes the focus of this study. METHOD: Retrospective...... analysis of all hospital admissions in Denmark between 2011 and 2013 where hemostatic endoscopic interventions in either the stomach or duodenum had been employed. Regression modeling was used to predict the effect of units transfused of packed red blood cells (PRBC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP......), and platelets (PLT) on primary outcome 30-day mortality as well as secondary hemostasis-related outcomes and need for re-endoscopy and conversion to surgery. The model was corrected for confounders, including transfusion of other blood products (PRBC, FFP, and PLT, respectively), patient age as well as pre...

  14. Hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munaka, Masahiro; Nishikawa, Michio; Hirai, Osamu; Kaneko, Takaaki; Watanabe, Syu; Fukuma, Jun; Handa, Hajime

    1988-01-01

    In the past six years, we have had experience with 40 patients with hypertensive thalamic hemorrhages, as verified by CT scan at our hospital within 24 hours. These patients were classified into the following three groups according to the location of the bleeding point and the size of the hematoma: (1) anteromedial (4 cases), (2) posterolateral (16 cases), and (3) massive (20 cases). The (1) and (2) hematomas were small (less than 3 cm in diameter), while those in (3) were large (more than 3 cm in diameter). Twenty cases (50% of all the thalamic hematomas) were small hematomas. The characteristic clinical symptoms of the anteromedial type were a mild disturbance of consciousness and thalamic dementia, while those of the posterolateral type were motor and sensory disturbance, and thalamic aphasia, respectively. Twenty cases (50%) were large hematomas. The clinical symptoms of these cases were mainly consciousness disturbance; 7 of them expired. Based on this experience, it may be considered that the patients whose hematoma size was larger than 3 cm had a poor prognosis and that the patients with the posterolateral type had a poor functional diagnosis. (author)

  15. High Prevalence of Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma After Repair of Esophageal Atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergouwe, Floor W T; IJsselstijn, Hanneke; Biermann, Katharina; Erler, Nicole S; Wijnen, René M H; Bruno, Marco J; Spaander, Manon C W

    2018-04-01

    Esophageal atresia is rare, but improved surgical and intensive care techniques have increased rates of survival in children, so there are now many adults with this disorder. Many patients with esophageal atresia develop gastroesophageal reflux (GER), raising concerns about increased risk of Barrett's esophagus (BE; prevalence of 1.3%-1.6% in general population) and esophageal carcinoma. We assessed the prevalence of BE and esophageal carcinoma in this population. We performed a prospective study of 289 patients with esophageal atresia at the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Erasmus MC University Medical Center in The Netherlands, from May 2012 through March 2017. A total of 151 (median age, 25.4 y; age range, 16.8-68.6 y) underwent upper endoscopies as part of a surveillance program for (pre)malignant esophageal lesions. Biopsies were collected and analyzed by histology. We collected data on patients' use of medications, tobacco, and alcohol; gastrointestinal symptoms; ability to swallow; complaints of GER; and type of atresia and surgeries. Prevalence of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was determined using data from The Netherlands Cancer Registry. The number of persons alive on January 1, 2016, in the esophageal atresia cohort and in the general Dutch population were used to calculate the 10-year prevalence of ESCC per 100,000 persons in both populations. Forty-seven percent of patients with esophageal atresia had a history of GER and 20.5% had undergone fundoplication surgery. Endoscopy revealed normal esophagus in 68.2% of patients, esophagitis in 7.3%, and columnar-lined esophagus in 24.5%. Histology revealed normal mucosa in 50.3% of patients, esophagitis in 23.2%, gastric metaplasia in 17.2%, and BE in 6.6% (at a median age of 31.6 years). A history of fundoplication surgery was associated with BE (P = .03). Three ESCCs developed, in 2 men, at ages 42, 44, and 60 years. This corresponded to a prevalence of 0.7% in patients with

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided coil or glue injection in post-cyanoacrylate gastric variceal re-bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkada, Roy J; Antony, Rajesh; Chooracken, Mathew J; Francis, Jose V; Chettupuzha, Antony P; Mathew, Pradeep G; Augustine, Philip; Koshy, Abraham

    2018-04-09

    N-butyl-cyanoacrylate injection is recommended in bleeding/recently bled gastric varices. However, cyanoacrylate injection is associated with re-bleed in 25% to 50% of patients. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided coil application is an emerging treatment modality for bleeding gastric varices. The aim of this study was to compare EUS-guided coil application combined with or without cyanoacrylate glue injection to injection alone in post-glue gastric variceal re-bleed. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database was performed. Thirty patients who re-bled after cyanoacrylate injection and who had EUS-guided coil application to gastric varices were included. The comparison was done with data of 51 patients who had only repeat cyanoacrylate injection. Both groups had a follow up for 12 months. EUS-guided coil application was done under endosonographic guidance. A single coil was placed in 7, two coils in each of 13 patients, three in 5, four in 3, five in one, and 6 coils in one patient. In addition, cyanoacrylate glue injection was given in 15 patients. Eight patients had repeat EUS-guided coil application 1 month later. Re-bleed and mortality were assessed. Coilng: Six out of 30 (20%) patients re-bled during follow up of 9 to 365 days. Three out of 30 (10%) died. One patient died 9 days after the procedure due to acute respiratory distress syndrome, one died 4 months after the procedure due to a re-bleed and one 5 months after the procedure due to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Glue only: 26/51 (51%) re-bled during follow up of 45 to 365 days. EUS-guided coil application resulted in significantly less re-bleed than glue-only (Kaplan-Meir survival analysis with log-rank test, z = 5.4, p guided coil application with/without cyanoacrylate injection for the obliteration of gastric varices is effective for post-cyanoacrylate gastric variceal re-bleed.

  17. Radiological evaluation of esophageal speech on total laryngectomee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae Sub; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Kim, Gwi Eon; Hong, Won Phy; Lee, Won Sang

    1988-01-01

    Total laryngectomee requires some form of alaryngeal speech for communication. Generally, esophageal speech is regarded as the most available and comfortable technique for alaryngeal speech. But esophageal speech is difficult to train, so many patients are unable to attain esophageal speech for communication. To understand mechanism of esophageal of esophageal speech on total laryngectomee, evaluation of anatomical change of the pharyngoesophageal segment is very important. We used video fluoroscopy for evaluation of pharyngesophageal segment during esophageal speech. Eighteen total laryngectomees were evaluated with video fluoroscopy from Dec. 1986 to May 1987 at Y.U.M.C. Our results were as follows: 1. Peseudoglottis is the most important factor for esophageal speech, which is visualized in 7 cases among 8 cases of excellent esophageal speech group. 2. Two cases of longer A-P diameter at the pseudoglottis have the best quality of esophageal speech than others. 3. Two cases of mucosal vibration at the pharyngoesophageal segment can make excellent esophageal speech. 4. The cases of failed esophageal speech are poor aerophagia in 6 cases, abscence of pseudoglottis in 4 cases and poor air ejection in 3 cases. 5. Aerophagia synchronizes with diaphragmatic motion in 8 cases of excellent esophageal speech.

  18. Esophageal replacement by gastric tube: is three-stage surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    useful alternative under a resource-limited condition, with optimal outcome. Ann Pediatr Surg 10:7–9 c 2014 Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Annals of Pediatric Surgery 2014, 10:7–9. Keywords: esophageal replacement, gastric tube, long gap esophageal atresia, pure esophageal atresia. Departments of aPediatric Surgery ...

  19. Esophageal achalasia and secondary megaesophagus in a dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boria, Pedro A.; Webster, Cynthia R.L.; Berg, John

    2003-01-01

    A 5-year-old, castrated male, golden retriever was presented with a history of regurgitation. An esophagram revealed normal peristalsis with failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to open, supporting the diagnosis of esophageal achalasia. Prior to surgery, the dog developed megaesophagus. Heller's esophagomyotomy resolved the clinical signs and the esophageal dilation. PMID:12677694

  20. Hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and cerebellar hemorrhage caused by cryptic angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shinichi; Sano, Keiji; Kwak, Suyong; Saito, Isamu.

    1981-01-01

    A series of 44 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and nine patients with cerebellar hemorrhage caused by small angiomas is described. Hypertensive hemorrhage occurred most frequently in the patients in their seventies, whereas the onset of angioma-caused hemorrhage was often seen below the age of 40. Clinical syndromes of cerebellar hemorrhages can be categorized into three basic types: the vertigo syndrome, cerebellar dysfunction syndrome and brain stem compression syndrome. Patients with small (>= 2 cm in diameter in CT scans) and medium-sized (2 cm = 3 cm) hematomas deteriorated into unresponsive conditions and developed signs of brain stem compression. Surgical mortality was 32% in the hypertensive group, while it was 0% in the angioma group. Mortality as well as morbidity in both groups was strongly influenced by the preoperative status of consciousness. Our results suggest that substantial improvement could be obtained in the overall outcome of this disease by emergency craniectomy and removal of hematomas in all patients with large hematomas regardless of the levels of consciousness and regardless of the causes of bleeding. Furthermore, when clinical information and CT findings are suggestive of a ''cryptic'' angioma as the causative lesion, posterior fossa surgery may be indicated to extirpate the lesion, even if the hematoma is small. (author)

  1. Esophageal carcinoma. From the viewpoint of surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Nakajima, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Tomoyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Therapeutic performance of the esophageal cancer has improved rapidly. Now in the decision of therapeutic strategy not only life prognosis but also treatments-related morbidity and late term quality of life should be considered. The most important factor of the improvement of esophageal cancer treatment is a progress in early detection of esophageal cancers and active use of treatment methods such as endoscopic mucosal resection. In addition, the role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy has improved as an arm of multidisciplinary therapy, and the establishment of chemoradiotherapy as one of the standard therapy for esophageal cancer is also very important. This shows that surgical and non-surgical approach has been getting more interactive and the relationship to one another should always be considered. Surgical therapy is very effective in patients with localized esophageal tumor and the patient's satisfaction is high. However, many problems are remained, and the improvement of diagnosis for metastasis and lessening surgical invasiveness and early/late complications are expected. Moreover, the chemoradiotherapy as an esophagus preserving method will establish more important standpoint and the salvage surgery will be applied more actively. On the other hand, a new strategy such as chemoradiotherapy immediate after esophagectomy for the patients with possible residual tumor for improving therapeutic results may be considered under the status of reliable surgical procedures. (author)

  2. Pharmacological Management of Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Mohammed Khayyat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Soft esophageal bolus impaction is an emergency that requires skilled endoscopic removal if persistent obstructive symptoms do not resolve spontaneously after careful observation. Expedited care of these patients is crucial to avoid respiratory and mechanical complications. Other possible options for management include medical agents used to manage it prior to performing endoscopy if access to endoscopy was not available or declined by the patient. Aim. To review the available pharmacological and other nonmedicinal options and their mechanism of relief for soft esophageal impaction. Method. Pubmed, Medline and Ovid were used for search of MESH terms pertinent including “foreign body, esophageal, esophageal bolus and medical” for pharmacological and non medicinial agents used for management of esophageal soft bolus impaction as well as manual review of the cross-references. Results. Several agents were identified including Buscopan, Glucagon, nitrates, calcium channel blockers, and papaveretum. Non medicinal agents are water, effervescent agents, and papain. No evidence was found to suggest preference or effectiveness of use of a certain pharmacological agent compared to others. Buscopan, Glucagon, benzodiazepines, and nitrates were studied extensively and may be used in selected patients with caution. Use of papain is obsolete in management of soft bolus impaction.

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis: a bulk of mysteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straumann, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), which was first described in the early 1990s, has rapidly evolved as a distinctive chronic inflammatory esophageal disease. The diagnosis is based clinically on the presence of symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and histologically by an eosinophil-predominant inflammation once other conditions leading to esophageal eosinophilia are excluded. This striking male-prevalent disease has an increasing incidence and prevalence in the Westernized countries. Currently, EoE represents the main cause of dysphagia and bolus impaction in adult patients. Despite the fact that EoE often occurs in atopic patients, the value of allergic testing is still under discussion. Topical corticosteroids lead to a rapid improvement of active EoE clinically and histologically; they are therefore regarded as first-line drug therapy. Elimination diets have similar efficacy as topical corticosteroids, but their long-term use is limited by practical issues. Esophageal dilation of EoE-induced strictures can also be effective in improving symptoms, but this therapy has no effect on the underlying inflammation. Neither the diagnostic nor the long-term therapeutic strategies have been fully defined. Currently, the list of unsolved issues--or mysteries--is still long and a concerted effort on behalf of clinicians and scientists is required to improve the understanding and the therapeutic management of this mysterious disease. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  5. Airway and esophageal stenting in patients with advanced esophageal cancer and pulmonary involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Paganin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most inoperable patients with esophageal-advanced cancer (EGC have a poor prognosis. Esophageal stenting, as part of a palliative therapy management has dramatically improved the quality of live of EGC patients. Airway stenting is generally proposed in case of esophageal stent complication, with a high failure rate. The study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of scheduled and non-scheduled airway stenting in case of indicated esophageal stenting for EGC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The study is an observational study conducted in pulmonary and gastroenterology endoscopy units. Consecutive patients with EGC were referred to endoscopy units. We analyzed the outcome of airway stenting in patients with esophageal stent indication admitted in emergency or with a scheduled intervention. Forty-four patients (58+/-\\-8 years of age with esophageal stenting indication were investigated. Seven patients (group 1 were admitted in emergency due to esophageal stent complication in the airway (4 fistulas, 3 cases with malignant infiltration and compression. Airway stenting failed for 5 patients. Thirty-seven remaining patients had a scheduled stenting procedure (group 2: stent was inserted for 13 patients with tracheal or bronchial malignant infiltration, 12 patients with fistulas, and 12 patients with airway extrinsic compression (preventive indication. Stenting the airway was well tolerated. Life-threatening complications were related to group 1. Overall mean survival was 26+/-10 weeks and was significantly shorter in group 1 (6+/-7.6 weeks than in group 2 (28+/-11 weeks, p<0.001. Scheduled double stenting significantly improved symptoms (95% at day 7 with a low complication rate (13%, and achieved a specific cancer treatment (84% in most cases. CONCLUSION: Stenting the airway should always be considered in case of esophageal stent indication. A multidisciplinary approach with initial airway evaluation improved prognosis and decreased

  6. Surgical indication in Schistosomiasis mansoni portal hypertension: follow-up from 1985 to 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Conceição

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The study had the objective to evaluate the benefits of surgical indication for portal hypertension in schistosomiasis patients followed from 1985 to 2001. Schistosoma mansoni eggs were confirmed by at least six stool examinations or rectal biopsy. Clinical examination, abdominal ultrasonography, and digestive endoscopy confirmed the diagnosis of esophageal varices. A hundred and two patients, 61.3% male (14-53 years old were studied. Digestive hemorrhage, hypersplenism, left hypochondrial pain, abdominal discomfort, and hypogonadism were, in a decreasing order, the major signs and symptoms determining surgical indication. Among the surgical techniques employed, either splenectomy associated to splenorenal anastomosis or azigoportal desvascularization, esophageal gastric descompression and esophageal sclerosis were used. Follow-up of patients revealed that, independent on the technique utilized, a 9.9% of death occurred, caused mainly by digestive hemorrhage due to the persistence of post-treatment varices. The authors emphasize the benefits of elective surgical indication allowing a normal active life.

  7. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  8. Thalamic hemorrhage following carotid angioplasty and stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Jonathan A.; Kallmes, David F.; Wijdicks, Eelco F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) has emerged as an alternative treatment of carotid stenosis for patients poorly suited for endarterectomy. Intracerebral hemorrhage following carotid revascularization is rare and thought to be related to hyperperfusion injury in most cases. Early experience suggests an increased incidence of hemorrhage following CAS as compared to endarterectomy. We describe a patient who suffered a thalamic hemorrhage following CAS. Because this hemorrhage occurred in a vascular territory unlikely to have been supplied by the treated artery, this case suggests that the mechanism of intracerebral hemorrhage following CAS may in some cases be different from the hyperperfusion hemorrhage classically described following endarterectomy. (orig.)

  9. Hemorrhagic stroke and cerebral paragonimiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yong; Ju, Yan; Chen, Jing; You, Chao

    2014-11-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and imaging characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment outcomes of 10 patients with hemorrhagic cerebral paragonimiasis (CP), and we evaluated the influence of Paragonimus infection on cerebrovascular damage. Ten patients (7 male and 3 female; median age 15.7 years, range 4-46 years) with hemorrhagic CP were diagnosed between April 2009 and January 2013. All patients underwent the head computed tomography scans and 9 patients underwent MRI examinations. Four patients underwent computed tomographic angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and digital subtraction angiography. Liquid-based cytological examination of cerebrospinal fluid was performed in 7 patients. Follow-up examinations were performed for 9 cases for a period of 12 to 62 months. Hemorrhagic CP accounted for 37% of CP cases (10/27). No patients were initially diagnosed with CP. The major symptoms of hemorrhagic CP included acute headache, vomiting, hemiparalysis, epilepsy, blurred vision, sensory impairment, and tinnitus. Four cases were surgically treated. Most symptoms markedly improved, but fine motor dysfunction and mental dysfunction remained in 3 surgical patients. Hemorrhagic stroke typically occurred during the acute stage and in the early stages of further Paragonimus migration. Delay of treatment increased the risk of initial and recurrent stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Early esophageal carcinoma treated with intracavitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

    1985-01-01

    Five patients with early esophageal carcinoma were treated by 6-12 Gy of intracavitary irradiation following 50-60 Gy of external irradiation as a boost therapy. Surgery was not performed in these cases. None of the patients had local recurrence after radiation therapy, as demonstrated by esophagography and endoscopy. Three patients have been alive for 1-3 years 10 months. Esophageal ulceration induced by intracavitary irradiation has occurred in three of the five patients; however, intracavitary irradiation is still a beneficial treatment because of its efficacy in controlling local lesions and because radiation ulceration can eventually be cured. Intracavitary irradiation is recommended to follow external irradiation as a boost therapy for the treatment of early esophageal carcinoma

  11. Herpetic esophagitis: a diagnosis to remember

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pinheiro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Herpetic esophagitis is a well-recognized infection in immunocompromised hosts, having been rarely described in immunocompetent individuals. Case report: The authors describe a case of a 16-year-old female adolescent admitted to the emergency room with a threeday history of fever, odynophagia, dysphagia for liquid and solid food and retrosternal pain. The upper endoscopy revealed linear and round erosions in the distal esophagus and the histologic findings were compatible with herpetic esophagitis. Discussion/conclusion: Herpetic esophagitis is an underdiagnosed condition in immunocompetent children and adolescents, but it should not be overlooked. An esophagoscopy is required to make a definitive diagnosis. It is usually a selflimited infection and the mainstay of treatment is supportive care. The use of acyclovir is still controversial but its early initiation may shorten the clinical course of the disease.

  12. Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis Complicated With Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Min Liu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of diffuse esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis in a 35-year-old man complaining of severe dysphagia and vomiting for several months. The advanced morphological change in the esophagus caused irregular track formation, mimicking an ulcerative lesion on esophagogram. Endoscopic examination revealed an esophageal stricture with intact mucosa. Endoscopic ultrasonography and chest computed tomography showed multiple hyperechoic lesions of unknown nature and multiple air collection sites in the esophageal wall, respectively, making diagnosis difficult. The patient finally received a subtotal esophagectomy because of severe symptoms. The lesion was pathologically proven to be intramural pseudodiverticulosis with marked submucosal fibrosis. Our experience suggests that awareness of this rare pathology and the related image changes will be helpful for early diagnosis and treatment in the future.

  13. Correlation of adjusted blood requirement index with treatment intervention and outcome in patients presenting with acute variceal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaberi, B.F.; Riaz, M.F.; Sultan, B.A.; Gobindram, P.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the correlation of ABRI with treatment intervention and outcome as discharged or expired in patients of acute variceal bleed. Records of all the patients admitted in Medical Unit-IV, Civil Hospital Karachi with acute variceal bleeding during January 2004 to October 2006 were retrieved. Use of vasoactive agents (Terlipressin/Octreotide), endoscopic band ligation (EBL) and outcome (Discharged/Expired) were noted. ABRI was calculated by the following formula. ABRI= Blood Units Transfused/((Final Hematocrit-Initial Hematocrit)+0.01) Mean ABRI were compared by student's 't' test according to vasoactive therapy, EBL and outcome. Correlation of ABRI with the same variables was also studied by plotting Receiver Operative Curves (ROC). Seventy six patients fulfilling inclusion criteria were selected. No statistically significant difference was observed in the mean ABRI scores when compared according to vasoactive drug administration, EBL and outcome. Significant correlation with mortality was seen on ROC plot with significantly larger area under the curve. (author)

  14. Reproducibility of esophageal scintigraphy using semi-solid yoghurt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Yukinori; Kinoshita, Manabu; Asakura, Yasushi; Kakinuma, Tohru; Shimoji, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Kenji; Suzuki, Kenji; Miyamae, Tatsuya [Saitama Medical School, Moroyama (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    Esophageal scintigraphy is a non-invasive method which evaluate esophageal function quantitatively. We applied new technique using semi-solid yoghurt, which can evaluate esophageal function in a sitting position. To evaluate the reproducibility of this method, scintigraphy were performed in 16 healthy volunteers. From the result of four swallows except the first one, the mean coefficients of variation in esophageal transit time and esophageal emptying time were 12.8% and 13.4% respectively (interday variation). As regards the interday variation, this method had also good reproducibility from the result on the 2 separate days. (author)

  15. Endoscopic ultrasonography in the management of esophageal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowers, Eugene A.

    2000-05-01

    Precise tumor-staging is critical in the management of early esophageal caner. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allows the endoscopist a view beyond the esophageal wall which opens the door to a variety of new gastroenterologic techniques. Endoscopic mucosal resection, laser photoablation and photodynamic therapy may be successfully employed in early esophageal cancer management. Combination radiation therapy and chemotherapy have shown better responses in advanced cancer. Expandable metallic stents may also provide palliation with inoperable esophageal cancer. The efficacy of EUS in the management of esophageal cancer is critically reviewed.

  16. Spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuster, M.J.; Saez, J.; Perez-Paya, F.J.; Fernandez, F.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the role of CT in the etiologic diagnosis of spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage. The CT findings are described in 13 patients presenting subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage. Those patients in whom the bleeding was not spontaneous were excluded. Surgical confirmation was obtained in nine cases. In 11 of the 13 cases (84.6%), involving five adenocarcinomas, five angiomyolipoma, two complicated cysts and one case of panarterities nodosa, CT disclosed the underlying pathology. In two cases (15.4%), it only revealed the extension of the hematoma, but gave no clue to its origin. CT is the technique of choice when spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage is suspected since, in most cases, it reveals the underlying pathology. (Author)

  17. Involvement of nitric oxide in human transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations and esophageal primary peristalsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, D. P.; Holloway, R. H.; Tytgat, G. N.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Nitric oxide (NO) is well accepted as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the gastrointestinal tract; however, its role in the triggering of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in humans remains to be determined. Therefore, the effect of

  18. Acute Herpes Simplex Viral Esophagitis Occurring in 5 Immunocompetent Individuals With Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Dorothee; Criblez, Dominique H; Dellon, Evan S; Bussmann, Christian; Pfeifer, David; Froh, Matthias; Straumann, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is an acute, severe viral infection of the esophagus, rarely occurring in immunocompetent individuals. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a rare immune-mediated esophageal disorder. We recently observed 5 severe HSE cases in diagnosed EoE patients. Four of the 5 patients had active, untreated EoE at the time of infection, so HSE is not likely a side effect of swallowed topical corticosteroids, the first-line medical treatment of EoE. However, this coincidence of these 2 rare conditions raises the question of a causal relationship between these 2 forms of esophagitis, and whether active EoE might predispose to HSE infection.

  19. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Tomonaga, Masanori; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hiroyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy was studied clinicopathologically, with special attention given to the CT images. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy is characterized, by a lobar-type hemorrhage involving the cortex, with direct extension into the subarachnoid space. Multiple hemorrhages are frequent, and cortical infarctions are present as complications in elderly patients without risk factors. CT scans taken in 5 cases demonstrated lobar hemorrhages in superficial locations, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently, with surrounding edema and mass effect. A subarachnoid extension of the hemorrhage through the superficial cortex, proven pathologically in all cases, was noted by CT in 4 of the 5 cases. However, cortical infarction was not detected by CT in any case. Therefore, CT is of value in the diagnosis of cerebral hemorrhage due to amyloid angiopathy based on distinctive findings such as a lobar hemorrhage in superficial regions, with extension into the subarachnoid space, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently. (author)

  20. Recurrent encephalic hemorrhage associated with cocaine abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumar, J.; Otero, E.; Castineira, A.; Arrojo, L.; Linares, M.; Castineira, J.A.; Vidal, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage secondary to cocaine abuse in a patient with no other predisposing factors. The hemorrhages were located both supra- and infratentorially. (orig.)

  1. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancel Submit Search the CDC Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is caused by infection with a tick- ...

  2. Computed tomographic findings of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seung Sook; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Young Chul [College of Medicine, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was a reliable technique to evaluate the exact size and location of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and to predict it's prognosis. Fifty-nine cases of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage were evaluated and reviewed by CT scan. The following results were obtained. 1. The sex ratio of male to female was 1 to 1.4, The highest incidence was in 6th and 7th decades. 2. The most common cause of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage was hypertension (74.6%), followed by the aneurysm (13.5%), arteriovenous malformation (5.1%), occlusive vascular disease (3.4%), and blood dyscrasia (3.4%). 3. The most common location was basal ganglia and thalamic hemorrhage (37.3%), followed by lobar hemorrhage (27.1%), cerebellar hemorrhage (13.5%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (11.9%). 4. Primary intraventricular hemorrhage carried the highest mortality. 5. The larger volume of hematoma, the higher the mortality rate.

  3. Use of "Gore-Tex surgical membrane" to minimize surgical adhesions in multistaged extrathoracic esophageal elongation for esophageal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessanti, A; Caccia, G; Iannuccelli, M; Dettori, G

    2000-04-01

    The procedure of choice in the surgical correction of "long gap" esophageal atresia should, when possible, preserve the native esophagus. We present a modification of "the multistaged extrathoracic esophageal elongation method," designed to facilitate esophageal elongation and use of a Gore-Tex (W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) surgical membrane to minimize surgical adhesions. We used this technique to successfully treat a 1-kg infant, with type A esophageal atresia, associated aortic coartation, and severe necrotizing enterocolitis with multiple perforations. Multistaged extrathoracic esophageal elongation was begun at the age of 9 months and concluded at 17 months.

  4. Growing Hemorrhagic Choroidal Fissure Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Ayse; Gelal, Fazıl; Gurkan, Gokhan; Feran, Hamit

    2016-03-01

    Choroidal fissure cysts are often incidentally discovered. They are usually asymptomatic. The authors report a case of growing and hemorrhagic choroidal fissure cyst which was treated surgically. A 22-year-old female presented with headache. Cranial MRI showed a left-sided choroidal fissure cyst. Follow-up MRI showed that the size of the cyst had increased gradually. Twenty months later, the patient was admitted to our emergency department with severe headache. MRI and CT showed an intracystic hematoma. Although such cysts usually have a benign course without symptoms and progression, they may rarely present with intracystic hemorrhage, enlargement of the cyst and increasing symptomatology.

  5. Noninvasive predictors of large esophageal varices: is there an emerging role of aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index in hepatocellular carcinoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Sedrak

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion Splenomegaly, CTP, ascites could be used as noninvasive predictors for large EVs. However, at the moment, these tests could not substitute for endoscopy. Although APRI is a poor predictor for the size and bleeding of EV, yet it might have a role in prediction of HCC and number of focal lesions.

  6. Hemorrhagic pleural effusion secondary to an unusual type III hiatal hernia in a 4-year-old great dane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lena C; Friend, Edward J; Hamilton, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    An unusual case of combined axial and paraesophageal (type III) hiatal hernia (HH) in a 4-year-old Great Dane is reported. The main presenting complaint was dyspnea, and no history of trauma was present. A tentative diagnosis of HH with secondary pleural effusion was made based on clinical signs and radiographic findings. Exploratory celiotomy revealed herniation of the gastric cardia, fundus, and body through the esophageal hiatus and an adjacent, distinct defect in the diaphragm. Rupture of the short gastric vessels lead to the formation of a hemorrhagic pleural effusion that impaired ventilation. The esophageal hiatus was surgically reduced in size, and the second defect was closed with nonabsorbable sutures. Esophagopexy and tube gastropexy procedures were also performed. The dog was clinically normal 9 months postoperatively. This type of HH is not currently defined within the traditional classification system and to the authors' knowledge has not been previously reported.

  7. Eosinophilic Esophagitis-Associated Chemical and Mechanical Microenvironment Shapes Esophageal Fibroblast Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Amanda B; Dods, Kara; Henry, Steven J; Benitez, Alain J; Lee, Dale; Whelan, Kelly A; DeMarshall, Maureen; Hammer, Daniel A; Falk, Gary; Wells, Rebecca G; Spergel, Jonathan; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an immune-mediated allergic disease characterized by progressive esophageal dysmotility and fibrotic stricture associated with chronic esophageal fibroblast activation. It remains unknown how esophageal fibroblasts respond to EoE-relevant matrix stiffness or inflammatory cytokines. Immunofluorescence was used to evaluate α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in endoscopic esophageal biopsies. Primary esophageal fibroblasts from adult and pediatric patients with or without EoE were exposed to transforming growth factor (TGF)β to determine gene expression, collagen-matrix contractility, and cytoskeletal organization. The influence of matrix stiffness upon fibroblast behavior was assessed on the engineered surface of polyacrylamide gels with varying stiffness. Fibroblast traction forces were measured using microfabricated-post-array-detectors. EoE esophageal fibroblasts had enhanced α-SMA expression. TGFβ not only stimulated enhanced fibroblast-specific gene expression but also promoted fibroblast-mediated collagen-matrix contraction, despite disease state or age of patients as the origin of cells. Unlike conventional monolayer cell, culture conditions using plastic surface (1 GPa) that activates fibroblasts constitutively, our engineered platforms recapitulating physiologically relevant stiffness (1-20 kPa) revealed that matrix stiffness defines the extent of α-SMA expression, intracellular collagen fibril organization, SMAD3 phosphorylation, and fibroblast traction force. Matrix stiffness may critically influence TGFβ-mediated gene expression and functions of esophageal fibroblasts ex vivo independent of age and disease conditions. These findings provide a novel insight into the pathogenesis of fibrostenotic disease in EoE.

  8. Occurrence of chronic esophageal ulcer after high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejima, Toshinori; Hirota, Saeko; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Takada, Yoshiki

    1995-01-01

    Ninety-eight patients with esophageal cancer were treated by high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy at the Department of Radiology of the Hyogo Medical Center for Adults between January 1982 and December 1993. Twenty patients with complete response after intraluminal radiation therapy, who were followed up with esophageal fiberscopy in our institute, were reviewed. The one-year cumulative rate of occurrence of esophageal ulcers was 81%, and in 69% of the cases the ulcers occurred from 4 to 8 months after completion of intraluminal radiation therapy. We graded esophageal ulcer by fiberscopic findings. Grade 0 was defined as no ulcer, grade 1 as superficial ulcer, grade 2 as deep ulcer, grade 3 as circumferencial ulcer, and severe stenosis. Factors related to grade were studied, and shorter distances from the source to the surface of the mucosa and lower surface doses of intraluminal radiation therapy appear to reduce the severity as graded on the above scale, of the esophageal ulcer. Four of the five 2-year recurrence-free patients suffered esophageal ulcers, which were cured from 15 to 22 months after intraluminal radiation therapy. However ulcers recurred in two patients, ong term care was thought to be necessary. (author)

  9. Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Asao, Toyohiko; Shibata, Takeo

    1981-01-01

    Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage were diagnosed and followed up by CT scanning. By CT, hemorrhagic lesions were shown as high density areas in an acute stage and imaged as low density areas after the hemorrhage was absorbed. The time of absorption varies depending upon the site and the severity of hemorrhage. Intraventricular hemorrhage, petechial hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were absorbed rapidly in more than 70% of the exanimed cases, CT scanning 1 - 2 weeks after the onset revealed absorption of hemorrhage. However, the absorption delayed in intracerebral hematoma; CT scan taken after one month showed hemorrhagic lesions remaining in 75% of the cases. In nine cases who survived, following the absorption of the hemorrhagic lesions, cerebral atrophy was observed in 4 cases (44%), ventricular enlargement in 3 cases (33%), and complete recovery in 2 cases (22%). From these results, CT scanning for diagnosis of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage should be done before the hemorrhagic lesion is absorbed (within 7 days of the onset). Follow-up study by CT is important for observing changes and predicting prognosis of intracranial hemorrhage. (Ueda, J.)

  10. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Girod S, Bailly S, Plauchu H. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: from molecular biology to patient care. J Thromb Haemost. 2010 Jul; ... Bayrak-Toydemir P. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: genetics and molecular diagnostics in a new era. Front Genet. 2015 Jan 26;6:1. doi: ... JA. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: ...

  11. ESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE, PEPTIC ULCER AND HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION – A PROSPECTIVE, CONTROLLED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skok

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. A possible association of esophageal reflux disease with peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori infection or the results of eradication, has not been elucidated. It is an alarming fact that in developed countries the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma, which is associated with reflux disease, is increasing.Aim. The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of esophageal reflux disease after eradication of H. pylori infection in patients with hemorrhaging and nonhemorrhaging peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum.Patients and methods. Study was approved in 1998 by the Slovenian Medical Ethics Committee (No. 90/09/98. Prospective, controlled and randomized, carried out between 1998– 2000.The study included 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av. age 57.5 years, SD ± 17.1, range 22–80 years in which endoscopy confirmed hemorrhage from peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and HP infection. The control group was made up of 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av. age 56.8 years, SD ± 16.8, range 19–80 years with peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and H.pylori infection in the same period of time. In all cases the recommended drug combinations were used in the treatment of the infection: a proton pump inhibitor, omeprazol (4 weeks, and combination of antibiotics, claritromycin and metronidazole or with regard to the antibiogram (1 week. The therapeutic success was ascertained endoscopically four weeks after inclusion in the study. Infection eradication was confirmed by the rapid urease test and histologic investigation of the gastric mucosa. One year later, in the course of follow-up, in patients with endoscopic investigations, 24-hour pH-metry or fiberoptic spectrophotometric bilirubin determination, bilimetry, we tried to establish signs of esophageal reflux disease.Results. Four weeks after inclusion in the study the success of infection eradication was 92.5% in the study group while in the control group reached 91.25%, p > 0

  12. Association between serum ascites albumin gradient and esophagogastric variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis: a Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Hui

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the association between serum ascites albumin gradient (SAAG and esophagogastric variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis. MethodsThe databases PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data, VIP, and CNKI were searched to obtain Chinese articles on SAAG and esophagogastric variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis published between January 2001 and June 2015, and each article should include a bleeding group and a non-bleeding group. Strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology (STROBE was used as a reference to evaluate the quality of articles. The mean±standard deviation (SD of SAAG in bleeding groups and non-bleeding groups were pooled and analyzed. The Meta-Analyst software was used to calculate standardized mean differences (SMD of SAAG between bleeding groups and non-bleeding groups and perform the meta-analysis. The chi-square test was applied for comparison of categorical data between groups. ResultsThirteen articles met the inclusion criteria. SAAG was (2254±4.69 g/L in bleeding groups and (15.91±4.20 g/L in non-bleeding groups. The test for heterogeneity showed significant heterogeneity (Q=100.735, I2=89065, P<0.001, and the bleeding groups had a significantly higher SAAG than the non-bleeding groups (SMD=1.970, 95% CI: 1.425-2.515, P<0.001. According to the SAAG level, the patients were divided into the group with a SAAG of <15 g/L, the group with a SAAG of ≥15 g/L and ≤19.9 g/L, and the group with a SAAG of ≥20 g/L, and with the increasing SAAG, the proportion of patients experiencing variceal bleeding increased significantly (χ2=111.702, P<0.001. ConclusionsSAAG is closely associated with esophagogastric variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis, and the bleeding groups have a higher SAAG than the non-bleeding groups. SAAG may be applied as a valuable indicator to predict esophagogastric variceal bleeding in patients with liver

  13. Histopathologic profile of esophageal atresia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tissue were observed in only three LP specimens. Gastric- .... with gastric alternating with esophageal epithelium (Fig. 1) and three with ... Table 1 Histologic profile in seven control cases. Histopathologic features. Upper esophagus. (n = 7). Lower esophagus. (n = 7). Lining epithelium. Stratified squamous. 4. 4. Not seen. 3.

  14. Esophageal achalasia in adolescence - two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Vaz Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Achalasia is a rare disorder, particularly in pediatrics, characterized by esophageal aperistalsis and inadequate relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Its etiology remains unclear. Cases: We describe two adolescents with dysphagia for solids and liquids, vomiting, weight loss and nocturnal cough for a few months. Initially it was considered to be an eating disorder, and the diagnosis of achalasia was reached later by esophageal manometry in one case and by intraoperative biopsy in another. The patients were submitted to Heller myotomy with an antireflux procedure, laparoscopically in one case, and by laparotomy in another, both with a favorable outcome. Discussion/Conclusions: We emphasize the rarity and diagnostic challenge of these cases. The nonspecific symptoms often lead to the diagnosis of an eating disorder, delaying the correct treatment. If symptoms persist achalasia must be considered and the esophageal manometry is the diagnostic test of choice. The gold standard in treatment is surgical, and we highlight the effectiveness of the techniques applied.

  15. Esophageal leiomyoma arising in an epiphrenic diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, S.

    1988-01-01

    A 32-year old woman was found at surgery to have an esophageal leiomyoma arising within an epiphrenic diverticulum. These uncommon conditions may rarely occur together, causing difficulty in diagnosis of the leiomyoma. Other neoplasms may also arise in an epiphrenic diverticulum and should be borne in mind in this situation. (orig.)

  16. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsugoe, Shoji; Matsumoto, Masataka; Okumura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The limitations of surgical treatment for advanced esophageal cancer have been clarified, although esophagectomy with extended lymph node dissection has been widespread in Japan. Preoperative adjuvant therapy has been investigated in Western countries, and recently preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has been introduced for the treatment of resectable esophageal cancer. There are several reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing CRT followed by surgery and surgery alone. According to the results of a meta-analysis, preoperative CRT is considered to be the standard therapy in Western countries. However, problems in the clinical heterogeneity of meta-analyses include: small number of patients in each RCT; differences in stage grouping; presence of both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma; various surgical techniques used; and differences in the amount of radiation administered. Preoperative CRT appears to be a promising method for the treatment of potentially resectable advanced esophageal cancer patients with nodal metastasis. Currently, phase I and II trials of new anticancer agents or molecular targeting agents are ongoing. However, since the surgical procedure in the Western method is still being debated, well-designed RCTs are necessary, especially in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The effectiveness of CRT followed by surgery should be clarified based on excellent Japanese surgical techniques. (author)

  17. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal or Junctional Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hagen, P.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.; Steyerberg, E. W.; van Berge Henegouwen, M. I.; Wijnhoven, B. P. L.; Richel, D. J.; Nieuwenhuijzen, G. A. P.; Hospers, G. A. P.; Bonenkamp, J. J.; Cuesta, M. A.; Blaisse, R. J. B.; Busch, O. R. C.; ten Kate, F. J. W.; Creemers, G.-J.; Punt, C. J. A.; Plukker, J. T. M.; Verheul, H. M. W.; Spillenaar Bilgen, E. J.; van Dekken, H.; van der Sangen, M. J. C.; Rozema, T.; Biermann, K.; Beukema, J. C.; Piet, A. H. M.; van Rij, C. M.; Reinders, J. G.; Tilanus, H. W.; van der Gaast, A.; Bergman, J. J. G. H. M.; Bartelsman, J. F.; Bissumbar, A.; Blom, R. L.; Geijsen, E. D.; van Heijl, M.; Obertop, H.; Koning, C. C. E.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Omloo, J. M.; Wilmink, H.; Aparicio Pages, M. N.; van den Nieuwenhof-Biesheuvel, L.; Eijkenboom, W. M. H.; Koppert, L. B.; Meijer, D. A.; Siersema, P. D.; Spaander, M. C. V.; Verheij, C.; Vollebregt, C.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; van Mansum, W.; van Dam, G.; van Dullemen, H. M.; Eerens, A.; van der Jagt, E.; Karnebeld, A.; Kluin, Ph; Mul, V. E. M.; Pruim, J.; Siemerink, E.; Weersma, R. K.; Fraikin, T.; Peters, C. W. A. H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The role of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of patients with esophageal or esophagogastric-junction cancer is not well established. We compared chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery with surgery alone in this patient population. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with

  18. Epidemiology and histopathological features of esophageal cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Esophageal cancer is the 6th most common cause of cancer death in the world. During the past two decades some changes have occurred in histologic type and primary tumor location in some parts of the world but there is a little information about histopathological aspect of disease in Iran. The purpose of the ...

  19. Esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula and early ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Several recent reports showed that associated anomalies represent the main cause of postoperative mortality in infants born with esophageal atresia (EA) and/or tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). Our observations present additional causes of mortality to the above mentioned. The aim of this study is to identify ...

  20. Preoperative therapy in locally advanced esophageal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Sharma, Jyoti; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Goel, Aakanksha; Gaur, Manish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is an aggressive malignancy associated with dismal treatment outcomes. Presence of two distinct histopathological types distinguishes it from other gastrointestinal tract malignancies. Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment in locally advanced esophageal cancer (T2 or greater or node positive); however, a high rate of disease recurrence (systemic and loco-regional) and poor survival justifies a continued search for optimal therapy. Various combinations of multimodality treatment (preoperative/perioperative, or postoperative; radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy) are being explored to lower disease recurrence and improve survival. Preoperative therapy followed by surgery is presently considered the standard of care in resectable locally advanced esophageal cancer as postoperative treatment may not be feasible for all the patients due to the morbidity of esophagectomy and prolonged recovery time limiting the tolerance of patient. There are wide variations in the preoperative therapy practiced across the centres depending upon the institutional practices, availability of facilities and personal experiences. There is paucity of literature to standardize the preoperative therapy. Broadly, chemoradiotherapy is the preferred neo-adjuvant modality in western countries whereas chemotherapy alone is considered optimal in the far East. The present review highlights the significant studies to assist in opting for the best evidence based preoperative therapy (radiotherapy, chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy) for locally advanced esophageal cancer. PMID:27818590

  1. [Corrosive esophagitis in children (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcand, P; Guerguerian, A J

    1982-01-01

    The treatment of corrosive esophagitis in children remains a controversial subject. A review of the literature and the various forms of treatment is presented with a retrospective study done a the Ste-Justine Hospital in Montreal. We studied the charts (327) of patients hospitalized for ingestion of corrosive substances for the period extending between 1970 to 1976 inclusively. The mean age of the patients involved was 2 years 4 months with a slight male predominance (60%). Javel water, sodium hydroxide, Chlorine, ammoniac and different acids were, in this order, the agents most frequently encountered. Esophageal burns proven by endoscopy was noted in 81 cases. Even in the absence of oropharyngeal burns, esophageal involvement was still present in 46% of cases. The low incidence of stenosis (9%) tends to confirm the beneficial role of steroids in the treatment of corrosive esophagitis. This is particularly true for 1st and 2nd degree burns whereas their administration in severe 3rd degree burn remains controversial.

  2. [Eosinophilic esophagitis: increasing incidence in paediatric population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga-Tavares, Hugo; Teles, Andreia; Nogueira, Rosete; Cardoso Rodrigues, Fernando; Costa, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis has been increasingly diagnosed and results from a chronic esophagic inflammation with eosinophilic infiltrate. Evaluation of the diagnosed paediatric cases in our centre between 2004 and 2008 and revision of current literature on this subject. Four caucasian boys, aged eight to fifteen years old, were diagnosed with Eosinophilic Esophagitis. They presented with disphagia and food impaction and endoscopic findings included multiple concentric rings (pseudo-trachea pattern) and friable mucosa. All of them had mucosal eosinophil counts higher than 20 eosinophils/high-powered field and were given corticosteroids, either topic or systemic (one case) with therapeutic success. The diagnosis of Eosinophilic Esophagitis must be considered in presence of disphagia, food impaction or gastroesophageal reflux symptoms refractory to treatment. Endoscopic evaluation may be normal and the diagnosis is based on histological findings, making biopsy mandatory whenever clinically suspected. The increasing incidence of the last years associated with the high recurrence rate will lead to future prevalence increased both in child and adulthood.

  3. Stent placement for esophageal strictures : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, Meike Madeleine Catharine; Vleggaar, Frank Paul; Siersema, Peter Derk

    2011-01-01

    The use of stents for esophageal strictures has evolved rapidly over the past 10 years, from rigid plastic tubes to flexible self-expanding metal (SEMS), plastic (SEPS) and biodegradable stents. For the palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia both SEMS and SEPS effectively provide a rapid relief

  4. [Reangiography after perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringelstein, A; Mueller, O; Timochenko, O; Moenninghoff, C; Sure, U; Forsting, M; Schlamann, M

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the value of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the detection of causative vascular lesions in patients with perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after initially negative noninvasive and invasive neurovascular imaging, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA), DSA and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). We analyzed the value of repeated DSA for the detection of causative vascular lesions in 750 patients presenting to our institution with SAH and including 30 with a purely perimesencephalic pattern of subarachnoidal hemorrhage and initially negative noninvasive and invasive neurovascular imaging over a 10-year period. Repeated DSA demonstrated a causative vascular lesion in 1 patient (3.3%) but no causative vascular lesions were detected in the other patients. Repeated DSA can be used to detect a source of hemorrhage after initially negative imaging diagnostics in some rare cases. Such a finding has a therapeutic and prognostic impact especially for aneurysms in the posterior circulation which bear a higher risk of renewed hemorrhaging. Therefore, we believe that repeated DSA should be recommended in patients with perimesencephalic SAH even under consideration of the risk of complications caused by a second invasive DSA.

  5. Reducing postpartum hemorrhage in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Lalonde, A

    2005-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. This is being addressed by leading professional organizations, which point to the importance of a skilled attendant at birth. But they also emphasize that the active management of the third stage of labor...

  6. Respiratory arrest in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijdra, A.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.; van Crevel, H.

    1984-01-01

    Sudden loss of consciousness and cardiorespiratory disorders occurred in 43 of 254 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Two patients had ventricular fibrillation, 37 had one or more episodes with a disturbance of respiratory rhythm that required assisted ventilation, and 4 died suddenly without

  7. Rebleeding After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Astrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms leading to rebleeding and the prevention of rebleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: A literature search was performed to investigate factors associated with rebleeding after SAH. RESULTS: The review of the literature...

  8. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Won Kim

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR. As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively. Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases, 9% (2 cases and 32% (7 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases versus 10% (2 cases, respectively (P < 0.05. Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively. In conclusion, diffuse

  9. CT differential diagnosis between hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage and hemorrhagic infarction localized in basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazawa, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Masahiro; Kawase, Takeshi.

    1984-01-01

    The symptoms of hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage and of middle cerebral artery occlusion are sometimes similar to each other. Hemorrhage sometimes occurs following cerebral infarction. We experienced 7 patients with hemorrhages localized in the basal ganglia following cerebral infarction. The CT findings of 55 patients with putaminal hemorrhage and 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction localized at the basal ganglia were investigated retrospectively in order to discuss their characteristics. The high-density area (HD) of a putaminal hemorrhage was homogeneous on a plain CT within a week of the onset. There was a close correlation between the size of the HD and the timing of its disappearance. The HD with a maximum diameter of A cm generally disappeared A weeks after. On the other hand, the HD of a hemorrhagic infarction was lower in density than that of the putaminal hemorrhage. The HD of a hemorrhagic infarction generally disappeared earlier than that of a putaminal hemorrhage. Ring enhancement was visualized on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) from 2 or 3 weeks after the onset in patients with putaminal hemorrhages except in the case of small hemorrhages (less than 1 cm diameter). Ring enhancement was also visualized in 6 out of 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction; one of them was recognized within a week of the onset. Contrast enhancement of the cortex in the territory of the middle cerebral artery was visualized in 4 out of 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction. This finding seems to indicate one characteristic of hemorrhagic infarction. (author)

  10. Computed tomography in intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Tomonaga, Masanori.

    1984-01-01

    In tracranial hemorrhage in leukemia was clinicopathologically studied in 62 cases of autopsy materials, with special attention paid to a morphological comparison of CT images with pathological findings. Intracranial hemorrhage was found in 32 of the 62 leukemic patients (51.6%), and in 13 of these patients (21.0%) it was responsible for death. Leukemic intracranial hemorrhage occurred more often in the acute leukemic type than in the chronic type, and even more often in younger leukemic patinents; it was pathologically characterized by multiple lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemisphere, prone to combination with SAH or SDH. The hemorrhages could be divided into five types: (1) scattered small hemorrhagic type, (2) hematoma type, (3) fusion type (large hemorrhage composed of assembled small hemorrhages), (4) SAH type, and (5) SDH type. Among these types, the fusion type was considered to be characteristic of leukemia. CT was undertaken in 5 pathologically proven cases, with findings of the scattered small hemorrhagic type in 1, of the SDH type in 3, and of the fusion type in 1. Yet, one case with scattered small hemorrhages and two cases with SDH failed to be detected by CT. However, one case with a typical fusion hemorrhage was found to have multiple, irregular, high-density areas with surrounding edema and a mass effect as well as pathological findings. Therefore, a large-fusion hemorrhage, which is one of the most characteristic types of leukemic intracranial hemorrhage, could be demonstrated as distinctive CT images which reflected neuropathological findings. On the other hand, small parenchymal hemorrhages and relatively thin subdural hemorrhages could not be detected by CT. In conclusion, it seems that CT has value in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  11. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography for differentiation between perigastric and submucosal gastric fundal varices; Kontrastmittelverstaerkte MR-Angiographie zur Differenzierung zwischen perigastrischen und submukoesen Fundusvarizen des Magens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willmann, J.K.; Boehm, T.; Lutz, A.M.; Goepfert, K.; Marincek, B.; Weishaupt, D. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Universitaetsspital Zuerich (Switzerland); Bauerfeind, P. [Abt. fuer Gastroenterologie, Universitaetsspital Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2003-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate contrast-enhanced MR angiography for the distinction between perigastric and submucosal fundal varices. Materials and Methods: Nineteen consecutive patients with clinically suspected fundal varices underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) within one week. Diagnostic confidence for the detection of perigastric and submucosal fundal varices was compared between MR angiography (two radiologists) and EUS (one gastroenterologist), and the agreement of size and location was evaluated. Results: Both MR angiography and EUS detected perigastric varices in all 19 patients and submucosal fundal varices in 14 of the 19 patients. The interobserver reliability of MR angiography was good for measuring the variceal diameter ({kappa} = 0.76) and excellent for localizing the varices ({kappa} = 1.0). EUS and MR angiography agreed in 12 of 14 patients (86%) in determining variceal diameter and location. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced MR angiography is comparable to endoscopic ultrasound in the detection and characterization of gastric fundal varices. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung: Das Ziel dieser Studie war es, die kontrastmittelverstaerkte MR-Angiographie bei der Diagnose von Fundusvarizen des Magens, insbesondere bei der Differenzierung von perigastrischen und submukoesen Fundusvarizen mit dem endoskopischen Ultraschall (EUS) zu vergleichen. Methoden: Neunzehn Patienten mit klinischem Verdacht auf Fundusvarizen wurden prospektiv in die Studie eingeschlossen und innerhalb einer Woche mittels kontrastmittelverstaerkter MR-Angiographie und EUS untersucht. Die Uebereinstimmungen zwischen MR-Angiographie (Radiologe 1 und 2) und EUS (1 Gastroenterologe) bei der diagnostischen Sicherheit bezueglich der Diagnose perigastrischer und submukoeser Fundusvarizen sowie bei der Groessen- und Lokalisationsbestimmung submukoeser Fundusvarizen wurden untersucht. Ergebnisse: Sowohl bezueglich der Diagnose perigastrischer (19/19 Patienten) als

  12. with esophageal squamous cell cancer

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    Tao Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to retrospectively observe and analyze the long-term treatment outcomes of 191 elderly patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC who were treated with californium-252 (252Cf neutron brachytherapy (NBT in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Material and methods : From January 2002 to November 2012, 191 patients with ESCC underwent NBT in combination with EBRT. The total radiation dose to the reference point via NBT was 8-25 Gy-eq in two to five fractions with one fraction per week. The total dose via EBRT was 50-60 Gy, which was delivered over a period of 5 to 6 weeks with normal fractionation. Results : The median survival time for the 191 patients was 23.6 months, and the 5-year rates for overall survival (OS and local-regional control (LRC were 28.7% and 54.2%, respectively. The patients’ age was a factor that was significantly associated with OS (p = 0.010, according to univariate analysis. The 5-year OS (LRC was 37.3% (58.6% for patients aged 70-74 years and 14.5% (47.9% for patients aged > 74 years (p = 0.010 and p = 0.038. In multivariate analysis, age and clinical N stage were associated with OS and LRC (p = 0.011 [0.041] and p = 0.005 [0.005]. From the time of treatment completion to the development of local-regional recurrence or death, 5 (2.6% patients experienced fistula and 15 (7.9% experienced massive bleeding. The incidence of severe late complications was related to older age (p = 0.027, higher NBT dose/fraction (20-25 Gy/5 fractions, and higher total dose (> 66 Gy. Conclusions : The clinical data indicated that NBT in combination with EBRT produced favorable local control and long-term survival rates for elderly patients with ESCC, and that the side effects were tolerable. Patient’s age, clinical stage N status, and radiation dose could be used to select the appropriate treatment for elderly patients.

  13. Esophageal Cancer in Iran: A Review

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    Siavosh Nasseri-Moghaddam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal cancer is the second and third most common malignancy in Iranian malesand females, respectively, claiming lives of approximately 5800 Iranians each year.Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is presently the most common type accounting forabout 90% of all esophageal cancers in Iran. Recent studies have shown that there isa gradual increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus alongwith gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Thirty-five years ago, the age standardizied rate (ASR of esophageal SCC in thecity of Gonbad (Golestan Province, northeast of Iran was found to be one of the highestrates for any single cancer that had been reported worldwide (ASR >100/105/year.Recent studies have shown that the incidence of SCC in Gonbad has declined to lessthan half of what it was in the past. This decline in the incidence of esophageal SCCparallels an improvement in the socioeconomic situation of people living in thisregion. According to recent cancer registry data in Iran there is still an obviousintracountry variability between the incidence of esophageal cancer in the south withan ASR of 3 for males and 2 for females in Kerman and 43 and 36 in the northeasternprovince of Golestan. The reasons for this very high rate of SCC in northeastern Iranhave been the subject of several studies during the past 35 years. According to resultsof these studies the suspected risk factors are: low intake of fruits and vegetables, drinkinghot tea, consumption of opium products and tobacco, H.pyloriinfection in the stomach,using unhealthy drinking water from cisterns and genetic susceptibility. The mainsuspected mutagens are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH and N-nitrosocompounds. In order to embark primary and secondary prevention of this fatal cancer,further prospective studies are presently underway in the region. The Golestanesophageal cancer cohort study which follows of 50,000 subjects is on going. We expectsimple and feasible evidence based

  14. Associated anomalies in cases with esophageal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Claude; Alembik, Yves; Dott, Beatrice; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2017-08-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is a common type of congenital anomaly. The etiology of esophageal atresia is unclear and its pathogenesis is controversial. Infants with esophageal atresia often have other non-EA associated congenital anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of these associated anomalies in a defined population. The associated anomalies in cases with EA were collected in all livebirths, stillbirths, and terminations of pregnancy during 29 years in 387,067 consecutive births in the area covered by our population-based registry of congenital malformations. Of the 116 cases with esophageal atresia, representing a prevalence of 2.99 per 10,000, 54 (46.6%) had associated anomalies. There were 9 (7.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 6 trisomies 18, and 20 (17.2%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions including 12 cases with VACTERL association and 2 cases with CHARGE syndrome. Twenty five (21.6%) of the cases had multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the cardiovascular, the digestive, the urogenital, the musculoskeletal, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. The anomalies associated with esophageal atresia could be classified into a recognizable malformation syndrome or pattern in 29 out of 54 cases (53.7%). This study included special strengths: each affected child was examined by a geneticist, all elective terminations were ascertained, and the surveillance for anomalies was continued until 2 years of age. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was close to one in two cases, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with EA. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with EA. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effect of age on proximal esophageal response to swallowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Oliveira Dantas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: It has been demonstrated that the ageing process affects esophageal motility. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of the age on the proximal esophageal response to wet swallows. METHOD: We measured the proximal esophageal response to swallows of a 5 mL bolus of water in 69 healthy volunteers, 20 of them aged 18-30 years (group I, 27 aged 31-50 years (group II, and 22 aged 51-74 years (group III. We used the manometric method with continuous perfusion. The proximal esophageal contractions were recorded 5 cm from a pharyngeal recording site located 1 cm above the upper esophageal sphincter. The time between the onset of the pharyngeal and of the proximal esophageal recording (pharyngeal-esophageal time and the amplitude, duration and area under the curve of the proximal esophageal contraction were measured. RESULTS: The pharyngeal-esophageal time was shorter in group I subjects than in group II and III subjects (P<0.05. The duration of proximal esophageal contractions was longer in group I than in groups II and III (P<0.001. There was no differences between groups in the amplitude or area under the curve of contractions. There were no differences between groups II and III for any of the measurements. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the age may affects the response of the proximal esophagus to wet swallows.

  16. Magnetic compression anastomosis as a nonsurgical treatment for esophageal atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaritzky, Mario [Hospital de Ninos de La Plata, Department of Radiology, Buenos Aires (Argentina); University of Chicago Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ben, Ricardo [Hospital de Ninos de La Plata, Department of Gastroenterology, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zylberg, Gaston I.; Yampolsky, Brian [Hospital de Ninos de La Plata, Department of Radiology, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-09-15

    We describe a unique technique to promote a nonsurgical esophageal anastomosis with magnets in children with esophageal atresia. To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic lengthening of atretic esophageal ends to produce an anastomosis and to communicate our results after more than 2 years of follow-up. Between September 2001 and March 2004, five children were selected for treatment. Two of the children had esophageal atresia without fistula (type A) and three had atresia with fistula converted to type A surgically; however, surgeons failed to achieve an anastomosis because of the width of the gap. Neodymium-iron-boron magnets were used. Daily chest radiographs were taken until union of the magnets was observed. They were then replaced with an orogastric tube. Anastomosis was achieved in all patients in an average of 4.8 days. One patient, with signs of early sepsis, was successfully treated with antibiotics. In four of the five patients, esophageal stenosis developed. At the time of this report, two patients were free of treatment and on an oral diet (after 26 months), two patients required periodic balloon dilatation, and one patient had recently undergone surgery due to recurrent esophageal stenosis not amenable to balloon dilatation. Magnetic esophageal anastomosis is a feasible method in selected patients with esophageal atresia. Esophageal anastomosis was achieved in all patients. The only observed complication of significance was esophageal stenosis. One patient needed surgery because of stenosis. (orig.)

  17. Intracranial pressure after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerle, Tommaso; Lombardo, Alessandra; Colombo, Angelo; Longhi, Luca; Zanier, Elisa R; Rampini, Paolo; Stocchetti, Nino

    2015-01-01

    To describe mean intracranial pressure after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, to identify clinical factors associated with increased mean intracranial pressure, and to explore the relationship between mean intracranial pressure and outcome. Analysis of a prospectively collected observational database. Neuroscience ICU of an academic hospital. One hundred sixteen patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracranial pressure monitoring. None. Episodes of intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg lasting at least 5 minutes and the mean intracranial pressure for every 12-hour interval were analyzed. The highest mean intracranial pressure was analyzed in relation to demographic characteristics, acute neurologic status, initial radiological findings, aneurysm treatment, clinical vasospasm, and ischemic lesion. Mortality and 6-month outcome (evaluated using a dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale) were also introduced in multivariable logistic models. Eighty-one percent of patients had at least one episode of high intracranial pressure and 36% had a highest mean intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg. The number of patients with high intracranial pressure peaked 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage and declined after day 7. Highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg was significantly associated with initial neurologic status, aneurysmal rebleeding, amount of blood on CT scan, and ischemic lesion within 72 hours from subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patients with highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg had significantly higher mortality. When death, vegetative state, and severe disability at 6 months were pooled, however, intracranial pressure was not an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome. High intracranial pressure is a common complication in the first week after subarachnoid hemorrhage in severe cases admitted to ICU. Mean intracranial pressure is associated with the severity of early brain injury and with mortality.

  18. Intracranial hemorrhage: ultrasound, CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is one of the most common causes of acute focal neurologic deficit in children and adults. Neuroimaging including ultrasonography (US), computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage. Imaging findings should guide treatment. The highly variable appearance of an intracranial hemorrhage can be challenging. A thorough knowledge of hematoma evolution and US, CT and MR hematoma characteristics is mandatory for adequate interpretation of findings. The purpose of this review is (1) to summarize the imaging characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage on various imaging techniques and (2) to review the various types of intracranial hemorrhage, and their causes. (orig.)

  19. Small bowel varices secondary to chronic superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Maria C; Ahlenstiel, Golo; Mahajan, Hema; van der Poorten, David

    2015-10-01

    Bleeding ectopic small bowel varices pose a clinical dilemma for the physician, given their diagnostic obscurity and the lack of evidence-based medicine to guide therapy. They often occur in the context of portal hypertension, secondary to either liver disease or extrahepatic causes. Rarely is their presence associated with chronic superior mesenteric vein thrombosis and hereditary coagulopathies. A 74-year-old white woman, with a heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation and no underlying liver disease or portal hypertension, presented over the course of 13 months for recurrent episodes of melena and per rectal bleeding. An initial endoscopy showed a clean-based chronic gastric ulcer, while colonoscopies showed multiple, non-bleeding angioectasias which were treated with argon plasma coagulation. Subsequent video capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy revealed red wale marks overlying engorged submucosal veins in her distal ileum, consistent with ectopic varices. A chronic superior mesenteric vein thrombus, found via computed tomography venogram, was the cause of the ileal varices. She underwent curative surgical resection of the affected bowel, with no re-bleeding episodes 17 months post-surgery, despite needing lifelong anticoagulation for recurrent venous thromboembolisms. Clinicians should consider ectopic varices in patients who present with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, even in the absence of portal hypertension or liver disease. In those with a known thrombophilia, patients should be screened for splanchnic thrombosis, which may precipitate ectopic varices.

  20. [Surgical treatment of varices at the stage of trophic disorders in chronic venous insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludin, A; Ammann, J

    1991-01-01

    Most ulcers of the lower limbs are caused by existing chronic venous insufficiency. Later on, true social and professional problems will arise, with serious economic and psychological consequences not only for the patient himself, but for the community as well, such as huge medical costs--hence the importance of prevention and treatment, which must in no case be purely symptomatic. The ligation of the arch and of the perforating veins and stripping of the affected vein are part of the classical management of varices. These procedures can may prove to be virtually impossible in case of chronic venous insufficiency, if the patient also presents with subcutaneous liposclerosis or atrophy in an already pregangrenous skin. This preulcerous stage can be aggravated later on if the requirements for surgical repair are not met. Necrosis can then occur, if too aggressive surgery directly or indirectly injures the microcirculatory system of the damaged skin. Omitted or undesirable acts are dangerous at the stage of trophic disorders and surgery may fail to reach its aim, which of course would be to definitively and quickly eliminate the varicose disease.

  1. Small pelvic varices as a cause of pathospermia and ways of its correction

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    A. Yu. Tsukanov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Eighty patients (mean age 33.0 ± 6.2 years with idiopathic pathospermia were enrolled in the investigation. The infertility period averaged 18.8 ± 3.9 years. The patients were made up of two groups: 1 51 patients who had the signs of small pelvic varices (SPV (a study group and 2 29 patients with no signs of SPV (a comparison group, and 34 healthy volunteers also participated in the investigation. The study group was randomized to 2 subgroups: 1 phlebotropic therapy only (n = 26; 2 phlebotropic therapy in combination with AndroDoz (n = 25. The comparison group used AndroDoz only. The treatment cycle was 3 months. Analysis was made by the results of a spermogram, biochemical examination of the ejaculate, resistive index, pulsatility index, peak blood flow velocity in the intraprostatic arteries, diameter of small pelvic veins, and their reflux. Subgroup 1 of the study group showed statistically significant differences in all parameters, other than hemodynamic ones. The greatest changes were noted in subgroup 2 of the study group; there were significant changes in all the parameters.

  2. Intracranial hemorrhage of the mature newborn infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemine, Hisao

    1983-01-01

    Concerning four mature newborn infants with intracranial hemorrhage diagnosed by CT, the labour course, treatment, and prognoses were discussed. Of intracranial hemorrhage, 70.7% was small hemorrhage along the cerebellar tentorium and the falx cerebri, 12.2% subdural hemorrhage in the posterior cranial fossa, and 9.8% subdural hemorrhage in the fornex. Intraventricular or extradural hemorrhage was rarely found. The prognosis is determined by severeness of neurotic symptoms due to cerebral hypoxia. Subdural hemorrhage of the posterior cranial fossa resulted in cerebral palsy in one fifth of the cases, and in slight enlargement of the ventricle in three fifths. Subdural hematoma left porencephaly in one fourth of the patients, but the remaining recovered to normal. (Ueda, J.)

  3. Antigen presentation and MHC class II expression by human esophageal epithelial cells: role in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Daniel J; Pooni, Aman; Mak, Nanette; Hurlbut, David J; Basta, Sameh; Justinich, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) play a crucial role in initiating immune responses. Under pathological conditions, epithelial cells at mucosal surfaces act as nonprofessional APCs, thereby regulating immune responses at the site of exposure. Epithelial cells in the esophagus may contribute to the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) by presenting antigens on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II. Our goal was to demonstrate the ability of esophageal epithelial cells to process and present antigens on the MHC class II system and to investigate the contribution of epithelial cell antigen presentation to EoE. Immunohistochemistry detected HLA-DR, CD80, and CD86 expression and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detected interferon-γ (IFNγ) in esophageal biopsies. Antigen presentation was studied using the human esophageal epithelial cell line HET-1A by reverse transcriptase-PCR, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. T helper cell lymphocyte proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and IL-2 secretion. IFNγ and MHC class II were increased in mucosa of patients with EoE. IFNγ increased mRNA of HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, HLA-DR, and CIITA in HET-1A cells. HET-1A engulfed cell debris and processed ovalbumin. HET-1A cells expressed HLA-DR after IFNγ treatment. HET-1A stimulated T helper cell activation. In this study, we demonstrated the ability of esophageal epithelial cells to act as nonprofessional APCs in the presence of IFNγ. Esophageal epithelial cell antigen presentation may contribute to the pathophysiology of eosinophilic esophagitis. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional luminal imaging probe topography: an improved method for characterizing esophageal distensibility in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiyue; Kahrilas, Peter J; Xiao, Yinglian; Nicodème, Frédéric; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Hirano, Ikuo; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-03-01

    The aims of this study were to develop a new method for analysis and presentation of esophageal distensibility data using high-resolution impedance planimetry recordings during a volume-controlled distention. Two control subjects and six patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) with stricture, narrow caliber or normal endoscopy according to EndoFLIP studies were included for analysis. Median filtering and pulse detection techniques were applied to the pressure signal and a wavelet decomposition technique was applied to the 16 channels of raw esophageal diameter data to reduce vascular artifact, respiratory effect and remove esophageal contraction interference. These data were used to generate a functional luminal imaging probe (FLIP) topography plot that describes regional variation of cross-sectional area (CSA). A previously developed computer program was used to calculate and model the CSA-pressure data to derive the slope of line fitting and distension plateau for each individual subject. The results were compared among the four endoscopic phenotypes. Patients with EoE and normal endoscopy had similar esophageal distensibility parameters to those of normal controls whereas patients with EoE and stricture or narrow caliber had much lower distensibility than patients with EoE and normal endoscopy. The FLIP topography plots provided a global assessment of the esophageal distensibility along the axial plane of measurement that differentiated patients with varying degrees of endoscopic abnormality. New techniques can be leveraged to improve data analysis and presentation using EndoFLIP assessment of the esophageal body in EoE. These techniques may be helpful in defining clinically relevant phenotypes and guiding treatment strategies and should be helpful in structuring future outcome trials.

  5. Size of gastroesophageal varices: its behavior after the surgical treatment of portal hypertension Variações no calibre das varizes esôfago-gástricas após tratamentos cirúrgicos de hipertensão portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Strauss

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The size of gastroesophageal varices is one of the most important factors leading to hemorrhage related to portal hypertension. An endoscopic evaluation of the size of gastroesophageal varices before and after different operations for portal hypertension was performed in 73 patients with schistosomiasis, as part of a randomized trial: proximal splenorenal shunt (PSS n=24, distal splenorenal shunt (DSS n=24, and esophagogastric devascularization with splenectomy (EGDS n=25. The endoscopic evaluation was performed before and up to 10 years after the operations. Variceal size was graded according to Palmer's classification: grade 1 -- up to 3 mm, grade 2 -- from 3 to 6 mm, grade 3 -- greater than 6 mm, and were analyzed in four anatomical locations: inferior, middle or superior third of the esophagus, and proximal stomach. The total number of points in the pre-operative grading minus the number of points in the post-operative grading gave a differential grading, allowing statistical comparison among the surgical groups. Good results, in terms of disappearance or decrease of variceal size, were observed more frequently after PSS than after DSS or EGDS - 95.8%, 83.3%, and 72%, respectively. When differential grading was analyzed, a statistically significant difference was observed between PSS and EGDS, but not between proximal and distal splenorenal shunts. In conclusion, shunt surgeries were more efficient than devascularization in diminishing variceal size.Um dos mais importantes fatores que levam à hemorragia digestiva por hipertensão portal é o calibre das varizes esôfago-gástricas. Visamos, no presente trabalho, avaliar endoscopicamente as variações de calibre antes e após diferentes cirurgias de hipertensão portal, realizadas em 73 pacientes com esquistossomose hépato-esplênica, no contexto de um estudo controlado e aleatorizado, sendo 24 deles submetidos a Anastomose Espleno-Renal (AER, 24 a Descompressão Portal Seletiva (DPS e 25

  6. A case of a resected benign myxoma-like hemorrhagic cyst, which later recurred as undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma in the left atrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunju; Choi, Seo-Won; Min, Daniel; Kim, Sang Hoon; Yang, Woo-In; Moon, Jae Youn; Sung, Jung Hoon; Kim, In Jai; Lim, Sang-Wook; Cha, Dong-Hun; Moon, Byung; Cho, Sang-Ho; Kim, Won-Jang

    2017-04-01

    An intracardiac cystic mass is a rare type of mass found in the left atrium. The differential diagnosis of an intracardiac cystic mass includes hydatid cysts, bronchogenic cysts, intracardiac varices, and hemorrhages in some tumor types, including myxoma. We present the case of a 68-year-old woman who presented with episodic dyspnea. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed the presence of a left atrial mass mimicking myxoma. However, in postoperative findings, it was determined that the mass was actually a hemorrhagic cyst. Eighteen months later, the patient presented with recurrent exertional dyspnea and TTE revealed the recurrence of a left atrial mass. Computed tomography showed that the mass extended into the right atrium, inferior vena cava, and coronary sinus. After re-operation, the final histological diagnosis was determined to be an undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma in the left atrium. An intracardiac hemorrhagic cyst was suspected during the operation of a benign-looking LA mass. As such, we recommend that other rare etiologies be considered and more biopsies be performed when possible.

  7. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-01-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ([/sup 99m/Tc]Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of [/sup 99m/Tc]Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. [/sup 99m/Tc]Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, [/sup 99m/Tc]Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa

  8. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

  9. Epidemiologic differences in esophageal cancer between Asian and Western populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han-Ze; Jin, Guang-Fu; Shen, Hong-Bing

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal cancer is a common cancer worldwide and has a poor prognosis. The incidence of esophageal squamous cell cancer has been decreasing, whereas the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing rapidly, particularly in Western men. Squamous cell cancer continues to be the major type of esophageal cancer in Asia, and the main risk factors include tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, hot beverage drinking, and poor nutrition. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma predominately affects the whites, and the risk factors include smoking, obesity, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, Asians and Caucasians may have different susceptibilities to esophageal cancer due to different heritage backgrounds. However, comparison studies between these two populations are limited and need to be addressed in the near future. Ethnic differences should be taken into account in preventive and clinical practices.

  10. Dysmotility in Esophageal Atresia: Pathophysiology, Characterization, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Christophe; Righini Grunder, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal dysmotility is almost universal after esophageal atresia (EA) repair and is mainly related to the developmental anomaly of the esophagus. Esophageal dysmotility is involved in the pathophysiology of numerous symptoms and comorbidities associated with EA such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, aspiration and respiratory complications, and symptoms of dysphagia and feeding disorders. High-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) has facilitated the characterization of the dysmotility, but there is an incomplete correlation between symptoms and manometrical patterns. Impedance coupled to HREM should help to predict the clinical outcome and therefore personalize patient management. Nowadays, the management of esophageal dysmotility in patients with EA is essentially based on treatment of associated inflammation related to peptic or eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:28620599

  11. Esophageal eosinophilia in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nápolis, Ana Carolina Ramos de; Alves, Flavia Araujo; Rezende, Erica Rodrigues Mariano de Almeida; Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues Silva

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical picture, test results, and clinical evolution of patients with cerebral palsy associated with diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, monitored at tertiary centre. Cross-sectional, retrospective and descriptive study that evaluated the medical records data of pediatric patients with diagnosis of cerebral palsy and eosinophilic esophagitis in a tertiary center of pediatric gastroenterology between August 2005 and August 2013. Seven out of 131 patients with cerebral palsy had the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis. The mean age at diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis was 52.3 months and the mean number of eosinophils in esophagus was 35 per high-power field. Symptoms more frequent were recurrent vomiting and disphagia. Endoscopic alterations found were mucosal thickening, vertical lines, mucosal opacificacion and white plaques. The frequency of eosinophilic esophagitis found was higher than in general pediatric population. The investigation of eosinophilic esophagitis should be done regularly in those patients, once this entity could overlap other gastrointestinal diseases.

  12. Esophageal motility disorders; Motilitaetsstoerungen des Oesophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Muenchen (Germany); Wuttge-Hannig, A. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [German] Zum Verstaendnis der Motilitaet des Oesophagus sind muskulaere Architektur und Verteilung der quergestreiften und glatten Muskelfasern von Bedeutung. Die Physiologie des Oesophagus wird in soweit kurz dargestellt, als sie fuer das Verstaendnis von peristaltischen Stoerungen notwendig ist. Neben der Erfassung rein morphologischer Kriterien ist bei der Untersuchung der Speiseroehre eine diagnostische Bewertung der Motilitaet erforderlich. Es stehen uns heute strahlungsarme dynamische Aufzeichnungsverfahren (digitale dynamische Aufzeichnung, Videofluoroskopie) mit Bildsequenzen von 4-30 Bildern/s zur Verfuegung. Die Kombination einer funktionellen Methode zur Darstellung der Morphologie und der

  13. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for nutritional palliation of upper esophageal cancer unsuitable for esophageal stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Grilo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Esophageal cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis. Most patients with advanced esophageal cancer have significant dysphagia that contributes to weight loss and malnutrition. Esophageal stenting is a widespread palliation approach, but unsuitable for cancers near the upper esophageal sphincter, were stents are poorly tolerated. Generally, guidelines do not support endoscopic gastrostomy in this clinical setting, but it may be the best option for nutritional support. OBJECTIVE: Retrospective evaluation of patients with dysphagia caused advanced esophageal cancer, no expectation of resuming oral intake and with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for comfort palliative nutrition. METHOD: We selected adult patients with unresecable esophageal cancer histological confirmed, in whom stenting was impossible due to proximal location, and chemotherapy or radiotherapy were palliative, using gastrostomy for enteral nutrition. Clinical and nutritional data were evaluated, including success of gastrostomy, procedure complications and survival after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, and evolution of body mass index, albumin, transferrin and cholesterol. RESULTS: Seventeen males with stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 60.9 years. Most of the patients had toxic habits. All underwent palliative chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Gastrostomy was successfully performed in all, but nine required prior dilatation. Most had the gastrostomy within 2 months after diagnosis. There was a buried bumper syndrome treated with tube replacement and four minor complications. There were no cases of implantation metastases or procedure related mortality. Two patients were lost and 12 died. Mean survival of deceased patients was 5.9 months. Three patients are alive 6, 14 and 17 months after the gastrostomy procedure, still increasing the mean survival. Mean body mass index and laboratory

  14. Role of fluoroscopic guided self expandable metallic stents in the management of malignant esophageal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shaker

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Fluoroscopic guided esophageal stenting is a highly effective and safe method for palliating dysphagia in patients with obstructing esophageal cancer with significant clinical improvement.

  15. Endoscopic polypectomy: A promising therapeutic choice for esophageal carcinosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Feng; Xu, Yue-Mei; Xu, Cheng-Fu

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal carcinosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor composing of both carcinomatous and sarcomatous elements. Endoscopic therapy is less invasive and may represent an alternative to esophagectomy for superficial esophageal carcinosarcoma. Here, we report a 61-year-old male who was diagnosed as esophageal carcinosarcoma and underwent endoscopic polypectomy with well tolerance and favorable prognosis. We also present a brief review of the literature. PMID:19610152

  16. HER2 amplification, overexpression and score criteria in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingchuan; Bandla, Santhoshi; Godfrey, Tony E.; Tan, Dongfeng; Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Qiu, Xing; Hicks, David G.; Peters, Jeffrey; Zhou, Zhongren

    2011-01-01

    The HER2 oncogene was recently reported to be amplified and overexpressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the relationship of HER2 amplification in esophageal adenocarcinoma with prognosis has not been well defined. The scoring systems for clinically evaluating HER2 in esophageal adenocarcinoma are not established. The aims of the study were to establish a HER2 scoring system and comprehensively investigate HER2 amplification and overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion. Using a tissue microarray, containing 116 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, 34 cases of BE, 18 cases of low grade dysplasia and 15 cases of high grade dysplasia, HER2 amplification and overexpression were analyzed by HercepTest and CISH methods. The amplification frequency in an independent series of 116 esophageal adenocarcinoma samples was also analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. In our studies, we have found that HER2 amplification does not associate with poor prognosis in total 232 esophageal adenocarcinoma patients by CISH and high density microarrays. We further confirm the similar frequency of HER2 amplification by CISH (18.10%; 21/116) and SNP 6.0 microarrays (16.4%, 19/116) in esophageal adenocarcinoma. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 12.1 % (14/116) of esophageal adenocarcinoma and 6.67% (1/15) of HGD. No HER2 amplification or overexpression was identified in BE or LGD. All HER2 protein overexpression cases showed HER2 gene amplification. Gene amplification was found to be more frequent by CISH than protein overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma (18.10% vs 12.9%). A modified two-step model for esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 testing is recommend for clinical esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 trial. PMID:21460800

  17. Whole greater than the parts: integrated esophageal centers (IEC) and advanced training in esophageal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Clarke, J; Hawn, M

    2017-10-01

    An integrated esophageal center (IEC) is a multidisciplinary team with expertise, skill, range, and facilities necessary to achieve optimal outcomes in patients with esophageal diseases efficiently and expeditiously. Within IEC, patients presenting with esophageal symptoms undergo a detailed clinical, functional and structural evaluation of their esophagus prior to implementation of tailored medical, endoscopic or surgical therapy. Serving as a core, the IEC clinical practice also supports research and innovation in esophageal diseases as well as public and physician education. Referrals to the unit may be primary, either from primary care or self-initiated, or secondary from other specialty practices, to reassess patients who have previously failed therapies and to manage complex or complicated cases. The fundamental goals of the IEC are to provide value for patients with esophageal diseases, streamlining complex diagnostic investigations and expediting therapies aiming at reducing costs while improving clinical outcomes, and to accelerate knowledge generation through robust interaction and cross-training across disciplines. The organization of the IEC goes beyond traditional academic and clinical silos and involves a director and administrative team coordinating faculty and fellows from both medical and surgical disciplines and supported by other clinical lines, such as radiology, pathology, etc., while it interfaces with physicians, the public, basic, translational and clinical research groups, and related industry partners. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Acute interventional diagnosis and treatment of upper gastrointestinal arterial hemorrhage: its clinical value and influence factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongli; Cui Shitao; Zhang Jiaxing; Ru Fuming; Xu Jiahua; Xu Jichong

    2009-01-01

    drunk after the treatment. Angiography showed that the original bleeding arteries remained occluded. Gastro-duodenal artery infusion with embolization was carried out in one patient, but the patient died of massive hemorrhage due to esophago-fundal varices caused by arterial portal hypertension which was resulted from the formation of the arteriovenous fistula between hepatic artery and portal vein. Conclusions: Emergent arterial angiography and interventional therapy is an effective measure to promptly find out the bleeding site and to control the hemorrhage. The diagnostic accuracy, the revealing rate of bleeding and the therapeutic effect are influenced by multiple factors. (authors)

  19. Alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatments for enlarged veins in the esophagus (esophageal varices) Removal of fluid from the abdomen (paracentesis) Placement ... esophagus, stomach, or intestines that bleed easily (esophageal varices) Increased pressure in the blood vessels of the ...

  20. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis characterized by barium esophagography: a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Owen J

    2010-05-21

    Abstract Introduction Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis is a rare condition characterized by the dilatation of the submucosal glands. Case presentation We present a case of esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis in a 72-year-old Caucasian man who presented with dysphagia and with a background history of alcohol abuse. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy of our patient showed an esophageal stricture with abnormal mucosal appearances, but no malignant cells were seen at biopsy. Appearances on a barium esophagram were pathognomonic for esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis. Conclusion We demonstrate the enduring usefulness of barium esophagography in the characterization of abnormal mucosal appearances at endoscopy.