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Sample records for esophageal stricture secondary

  1. Refractory benign esophageal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractory benign esophageal stricture (RBES is a frequently encountered problem worldwide. These strictures arise from various causes such as corrosive injury, radiation therapy, peptic origin, ablative therapy, and after surgery. Most strictures can be treated successfully with endoscopic dilatation using bougies or balloons, with only a few complications. Those patients who fail after serial dilatation with bougies or balloons will come to the category of refractory strictures. Dilatation combined with intralesional steroid injections can be considered for peptic strictures, whereas incisional therapy has been demonstrated to be effective for short anastomotic strictures. When these therapeutic options do not resolve the stenosis, stent placement should be considered. Self-bougienage can be proposed to a selected group of patients with a proximal stenosis. Most of the patients of RBES respond to above-mentioned treatment and occasional patient may require surgery as the final treatment option. This review aims to provide a comprehensive approach toward endoscopic management of RBESs based on current literature and personal experience.

  2. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De

    1990-01-01

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used

  3. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-04-15

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used.

  4. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Yook; Choi, Woo Suk; Nam, Kyung Jin; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    The authors performed 27 fluoroscopically guided balloon dilatation in 12 patients of esophageal stricture during recent 3 years. The causes of esophageal stricture were corrosive esophagitis (N=2) and congenital narrowing (N=1), including postoperative narrowing in achalasia (N=3), esophageal varix (N=3), lye stricture (N=2) and esophageal cancer (N=1). Successful dilatation of the stricture was achieved during the procedure in 10 patients(83%). Major complication such as esophageal rupture was not found. The authors conclude that fluoroscopically guided esophageal balloon dilatation is a safe and effective method for treatment of symptomatic esophageal strictures.

  5. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Yook; Choi, Woo Suk; Nam, Kyung Jin; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1990-01-01

    The authors performed 27 fluoroscopically guided balloon dilatation in 12 patients of esophageal stricture during recent 3 years. The causes of esophageal stricture were corrosive esophagitis (N=2) and congenital narrowing (N=1), including postoperative narrowing in achalasia (N=3), esophageal varix (N=3), lye stricture (N=2) and esophageal cancer (N=1). Successful dilatation of the stricture was achieved during the procedure in 10 patients(83%). Major complication such as esophageal rupture was not found. The authors conclude that fluoroscopically guided esophageal balloon dilatation is a safe and effective method for treatment of symptomatic esophageal strictures

  6. Endoscopic Management of Benign Esophageal Strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravich, William J

    2017-08-24

    This paper presents the author's approach to esophageal dilation. It offers a tailored approach to the application of dilation to specific types of esophageal stenotic lesions. In patients with inflammatory stricture, recent studies confirm the importance of treating the underlying inflammatory condition in order to decrease the rate of recurrence. The paper reviews some of the novel techniques that have been suggested for the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures, including incisional therapy, stenting, or the injection steroids or antifibrotic agents. The endoscopist who treats esophageal strictures must be familiar with the tools of the dilation and how they are best applied to specific types of stenotic lesions. If inflammation is present, effective management requires treatment of the inflammatory process in addition to mechanical dilation of the stenotic lesion. Controlled trials of novel approaches to treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures are limited and will be necessary to determine efficacy.

  7. Refractory esophageal strictures: what to do when dilation fails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckel, P.G. van; Siersema, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    OPINION STATEMENT: Benign esophageal strictures arise from a diversity of causes, for example esophagogastric reflux, esophageal resection, radiation therapy, ablative therapy, or the ingestion of a corrosive substance. Most strictures can be treated successfully with endoscopic dilation using

  8. Stent placement for esophageal strictures : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, Meike Madeleine Catharine; Vleggaar, Frank Paul; Siersema, Peter Derk

    The use of stents for esophageal strictures has evolved rapidly over the past 10 years, from rigid plastic tubes to flexible self-expanding metal (SEMS), plastic (SEPS) and biodegradable stents. For the palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia both SEMS and SEPS effectively provide a rapid relief

  9. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  10. [Evaluation of stents in treating childhood benign esophageal strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinshagen, K; Kähler, G; Manegold, B C; Waag, K-L

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal stenting is a popular of treatment of esophageal strictures in adults. It has also been described for children with benign strictures who did not respond to standard dilatation therapy. The aim of the study was to evaluate weather esophageal stents could be used safely and effectively in the treatment of benign esophageal strictures in children. From 1993 to 2005 stenting therapy was performed in 12 children with complicated esophageal strictures. Etiologies of the strictures were caustic burns in 9 patients, postoperative strictures due to complicated esophageal atresia in 2 patients and iatrogenic esophageal injury in 1 patient. Esophageal silicon tubi, covered retrievable expandable nitinol and plastic stents were placed endoscopically. The clinical course and the long term follow up were evaluated retrospectively The stents and tubi were placed in all patients without complications and were later removed successfully. 6 patients were treated with a self expanding plastic stent. The plastic stents showed a distinct tendency to migrate but in 5/6 patients esophageal stricture was treated successfully. 3 patients were treated by a covered self expanding nitinol stent. No migration occurred. One patient was asymptomatic after therapy, one required further dilatation therapy and the third had esophageal resection. 3 patients were treated by esophageal tubi. 2 patients required surgery in the follow up, one patient is asymptomatic. The use of stenting devices in children to treat benign esophageal strictures is safe and efficient. The self expanding plastic stents had the best long term results but required high compliance of parents and children due to the tendency of stent migration. Self expanding nitinol stents are more traumatic at the extraction procedure and are useful in patients with low compliance. Recurrence of strictures occurred most often after esophageal tubi possibly due to the lack of radial expansion.

  11. Esophageal stricture causes and pattern of presentation at Ibn Sina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dysphagia was the commonest presenting symptom. Malignant and benign strictures were located at different site of the esophagus. In males postsclerotherapy was more common especially in the young, while peptic stricture was common in elderly. In females peptic stricture and esophageal webs were common in young ...

  12. Esophageal stent implantation for the treatment of esophageal strictures: its current situation and research progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Haidong; Guo Jinhe; Teng Gaojun

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal stent implantation has been the most common therapy for the treatment of malignant and benign esophageal stenosis. At present, this technique is widely used in treating advanced esophageal cancerous stricture, refractory esophageal benign stricture and all kinds of esophageal fistulae or perforation. This paper aims to make a comprehensive review of the current situation and research progress of the esophageal stent implantation in clinical practice. (authors)

  13. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepanshu Jain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs. SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed.

  14. Balloon dilatation of the esophageal stricture in infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Sung Wook; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kim, Woo Ki; Park, Kwi Won; Han, Man Chung; Lee, Gi Jae; Yu, Pil Mun

    1992-01-01

    Balloon dilatation has been applied in treating of various pathologic narrowing of the hollow viscus. It is now accepted as a very effective modality especially in treating esophageal stenosis obviating surgical procedure. We performed 128 balloon dilatations in 29 patients with the number of dilatations in each patient ranging from once to 12 times. The age distribution of the patients was from 3 weeks to 6 years, with the median age of 3 months. Twenty nine patients consisted of 25 postoperative esophageal strictures (21 esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 congenital esophageal stenosis, 2 tracheobronchial remnant, and 1 congenital esophageal stenosis with esophageal atresia), 2 achalasia, 1 congenital esophageal stenosis, and 1 corrosive esophagitis. We had successful dilatation in 22 patients, who showed subsequent relief of symptoms and improvement in the diameter of stenotic segment. In 14 patients, esophageal perforation occurred during the procedure, one requiring emergency thoracotomy and the other three conservative management. Seven patients had no improvement in stenotic sites after several balloon dilatations. Failed cases were congenital stenosis, achalasia, corrosive esophagitis and four postoperative strictures. We believe that balloon dilatation is the procedure of choice in the treatment of postoperative esophageal stricture in infants and children and is a safe method as the perforation which can complicate the procedure could be managed conservatively

  15. Balloon dilatation of the esophageal stricture in infants and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Sung Wook; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kim, Woo Ki; Park, Kwi Won; Han, Man Chung [Seoul Natioal University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gi Jae [Inje University Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Pil Mun [Dankuk University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-09-15

    Balloon dilatation has been applied in treating of various pathologic narrowing of the hollow viscus. It is now accepted as a very effective modality especially in treating esophageal stenosis obviating surgical procedure. We performed 128 balloon dilatations in 29 patients with the number of dilatations in each patient ranging from once to 12 times. The age distribution of the patients was from 3 weeks to 6 years, with the median age of 3 months. Twenty nine patients consisted of 25 postoperative esophageal strictures (21 esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 congenital esophageal stenosis, 2 tracheobronchial remnant, and 1 congenital esophageal stenosis with esophageal atresia), 2 achalasia, 1 congenital esophageal stenosis, and 1 corrosive esophagitis. We had successful dilatation in 22 patients, who showed subsequent relief of symptoms and improvement in the diameter of stenotic segment. In 14 patients, esophageal perforation occurred during the procedure, one requiring emergency thoracotomy and the other three conservative management. Seven patients had no improvement in stenotic sites after several balloon dilatations. Failed cases were congenital stenosis, achalasia, corrosive esophagitis and four postoperative strictures. We believe that balloon dilatation is the procedure of choice in the treatment of postoperative esophageal stricture in infants and children and is a safe method as the perforation which can complicate the procedure could be managed conservatively.

  16. Does Dysphagia Indicate Recurrence of Benign Esophageal Strictures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle Ekberg

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal dilatation in dysphagic patients with benign strictures is usually considered successful if the patients' dysphagia is alleviated. However, the relation between dysphagia and the diameter of a stricture is not well understood. Moreover, the dysphagia may also be caused by an underlying esophageal motor disorder. In order to compare symptoms and objective measurements of esophageal stricture, 28 patients were studied with interview and a radiologic esophagram. The latter included swallowing of a solid bolus. All patients underwent successful balloon dilatation at least one month prior to this study. Recurrence of a stricture with a diameter of less than 13 mm was diagnosed by the barium swallow in 21 patients. Recurrence of dysphagia was seen in 15 patients. Thirteen patients denied any swallowing symptoms. Chest pain was present in 9 patients. Of 15 patients with dysphagia 2 (13% had no narrowing but severe esophageal dysmotility. Of 13 patients without dysphagia 9 (69% had a stricture with a diameter of 13 mm or less. Of 21 patients with a stricture of 13 mm or less 14 (67% were symptomatic while 7 (33% were asymptomatic. Four of 11 patients with retrosternal pain had a stricture of less than 10 mm. Three patients with retrosternal pain and obstruction had severe esophageal dysmotility. Whether or not the patients have dysphagia may be more related to diet and eating habits than to the true diameter of their esophageal narrowing. We conclude that the clinical history is non-reliable for evaluating the results of esophageal stricture dilatation. In order to get an objective measurement of therapeutic outcome, barium swallow including a solid bolus is recommended.

  17. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures in children and an infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kim, In One

    1986-01-01

    Severe postoperative strictures in two children and an infant and mild postoperative stricture in a child were treated with balloon catheter. A child with post-fundoplication stricture showed symptomatic improvement. Anastomotic strictures after esophageal atresia repair in an infant and a child were successfully dilated with improved luminal diameter and symptoms. In a child with mild postoperative stricture, balloon dilatation was performed to prevent stricture of the anastomotic site. Radiological esophageal dilatation using balloon catheters is a safe effective method for dilating symptomatic esophageal strictures which obviates surgery and allows subsequent standard bougienage.

  18. Clinical application of esophageal stent in the treatment of benign and malignant esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Weiping; Wang Zhimin; Yang Renjie; Wang Yiqing; Zhang Hongxin; Wu Zhiqun; Li Wenxian; Ni Daihui; Guan Yan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the indications and complications in the treatment of benign and malignant strictures using esophageal stents in order to avoid abusing effects in clinical practice. Methods: A series of 20 patients, 12 men, 8 women, aged from 45-72, with esophageal stricture. There were 3 cases had stricture at the anastomosis site. 4 cases with esophagobronchial fistula. 1 case with esophago-mediastinal fistula after surgical operation ten cases used imported stents and another 10 with domestic Nickel-Titanium stents. Results: Successful stent placement was achieved in all cases. Dysphagia were relieved in most of 20 cases. The fistula vanished in 5 cases of complications with esophagobronchial and esophago-mediastinal fistulas. Conclusions: The esophageal stent placement is an effective treatment for benign and malignant esophageal strictures. The domestic Nickel-Titanium stents is well effective as the imported ones

  19. Novel strategy for prevention of esophageal stricture after endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Taro; Tadauchi, Akimitsu; Arinobe, Manabu; Narita, Yuji; Kato, Ryuji; Niwa, Yasumasa; Ohmiya, Naoki; Itoh, Akihiro; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Honda, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Minoru; Goto, Hidemi

    2010-01-01

    Recently, novel endoscopic surgery, including endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), was developed to resect a large superficial gastrointestinal cancer. However, circumferential endoscopic surgery in the esophagus can lead to esophageal stricture that affects the patient's quality of life. This major complication is caused by scar formation, and develops during the two weeks after endoscopic surgery. We hypothesized that local administration of a controlled release anti-scarring agent can prevent esophageal stricture after endoscopic surgery. The aims of this study were to develop an endoscopically injectable anti-scarring drug delivery system, and to verify the efficacy of our strategy to prevent esophageal stricture. We focused on 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) as an anti-scarring agent, which has already been shown to be effective not only for treatment of cancers, but also for treatment of hypertrophic skin scars. 5-FU was encapsulated by liposome, and then mixed with injectable 2% atelocollagen (5FLC: 5FU-liposome-collagen) to achieve sustained release. An in vitro 5-FU releasing test from 5FLC was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Inhibition of cell proliferation was investigated using normal human dermal fibroblast cells (NHDF) with 5FLC. In addition, a canine esophageal mucosal resection was carried out, and 5FLC was endoscopically injected into the ulcer immediately after the operation, and compared with a similar specimen injected with saline as a control. 5-FU was gradually released from 5FLC for more than 2 weeks in vitro. The solution of 5-FU released from 5FLC inhibited NHDF proliferation more effectively than 5-FU alone. In the canine model, no findings of stricture were observed in the 5FLC-treated dog at 4 weeks after the operation and no vomiting occurred. In contrast, marked esophageal strictures were observed with repeated vomiting in the control group. Submucosal fibrosis was markedly reduced histologically in the 5FLC

  20. Role of metallic stents in benign esophageal stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Chan Sup

    2012-10-01

    Simple esophageal strictures, which are focal, straight, and large in diameter, usually require 1 - 3 dilation sessions to relieve symptoms. However, complex strictures, which are long, tortuous, or associated with a severely compromised luminal diameter, are usually more difficult to treat with conventional bougie or balloon dilation techniques, and often have high recurrence rates. Although the permanent placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) has been used to manage refractory benign esophageal strictures, this procedure is associated with additional problems, such as stricture from tissue hyperplasia, stent migration, and fistula formation. Thus, several new types of stents have been developed, including temporary SEMS, self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS), and biodegradable stents. The use of these new products has produced varied results. Temporary SEMS that have been used to relieve benign esophageal conditions have caused granulation tissue at both ends of the stent because of contact between the mucosa and the exposed metal components of the stent, thus hindering stent removal. We examined the tissue response to two new types of SEMS, a flange-type and a straighttype, each coated with a silicone membrane on the outside of the metal mesh. These two SEMS were evaluated individually and compared with a conventional control stent in animal experiments. Although the newly designed stents resulted in reduced tissue hyperplasia, and were thus more easily separated from the esophageal tissue, some degree of tissue hyperplasia did occur. We suggest that newly designed DES (drug-eluting stents) may provide an alternative tool to manage refractory benign esophageal stricture.

  1. Balloon Dilatation of Esophageal Strictures/Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Sabharwal, Tarun; Adam, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motor disorder characterized by increased lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, diminished-to-absent peristalsis in the distal portion of the esophagus composed of smooth muscle, and lack of a coordinated LES relaxation in response to swallowing. These abnormalities are recognized radiographically by aperistalsis, esophageal dilatation, and decreased opening of the LES, with a characteristic “bird-beak” appearance. The principal symptom of this disorder is dysp...

  2. Self-dilation for therapy-resistant benign esophageal strictures: towards a systematic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halsema, Emo E.; 't Hoen, Chantal A.; de Koning, Patricia S.; Rosmolen, Wilda D.; van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Bergman, Jacques J.

    2018-01-01

    Patients with therapy-resistant benign esophageal strictures (TRBES) suffer from chronic dysphagia and generally require repeated endoscopic dilations. For selected patients, esophageal self-dilation may improve patient's autonomy and reduce the number of endoscopic dilations. We evaluated the

  3. Extensive caustic esophageal stricture in children can be treated by serial dilatations interspersed with silicone-covered nitinol stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent esophageal stenosis secondary to caustic ingestion may be challenging to treat. Self-expandable esophageal stents may be an alternative to repetitive endoscopic esophageal dilatation. We report a case of a 2-year-old male child with an extensive esophageal caustic stricture successfully treated using a combination of endoscopic dilatation and stenting. After 5 months of serial balloon dilatations, three nitinol internal silicone covered self-expandable stents were placed through the patient′s gastrostomy spanning the entire esophagus. The stents were positioned using a combination of both endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure was repeated with only one stent 3 months later. A new stricture in the proximal esophagus needed surgical resection and anastomosis, followed by two pneumatic dilatations with progressively longer asymptomatic intervals. The results are promising with the patient able to use his own esophagus; however, this is a single case and optimal stent standing time is still to be determined.

  4. Recovery of normal esophageal function in a kitten with diffuse megaesophagus and an occult lower esophageal stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jaycie; Ames, Marisa; DiCicco, Michael; Savage, Mason; Atkins, Clarke; Wood, Michael; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    An 8-week-old male domestic shorthair was presented to the Internal Medicine Service at North Carolina State University for regurgitation. Radiographic diagnosis of generalized esophageal dilation and failure of esophageal peristalsis were compatible with diagnosis of congenital megaesophagus. Endoscopic examination of the esophagus revealed a fibrous stricture just orad to the lower esophageal sphincter. Conservative management to increase the body condition and size of the kitten consisted of feeding through a gastrostomy tube, during which time the esophagus regained normal peristaltic function, the stricture orifice widened in size and successful balloon dilatation of the stricture was performed. Esophageal endoscopy should be considered to rule out a stricture near the lower esophageal sphincter in kittens with radiographic findings suggestive of congenital megaesophagus. Management of such kittens by means of gastrostomy tube feeding may be associated with a return of normal esophageal motility and widening of the esophageal stricture, and facilitate subsequent success of interventional dilation of the esophageal stricture. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  5. Biodegradable Stents for Caustic Esophageal Strictures: Do They Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Rakesh; Samanta, Jayanta; Basha, Jahangeer; Verma, Abhai; Choudhuri, Gourdas; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2017-08-01

    Biodegradable (BD) stents have been used for the management of various esophageal strictures (ES) but the experience of its use in caustic strictures is limited. The present study, aimed at evaluating efficacy of BD stents for the treatment of refractory caustic-induced ES, was a retrospective multi-center study conducted at three tertiary care centers in India wherein adult patients with refractory caustic induced strictures underwent placement of a BD stent. Patients were followed up for immediate complications and long term outcome. All 13 patients (39.3 ± 15.1 years) underwent successful BD stent placement. Retrosternal chest pain occurred in 2 patients and stent migration in 1 (7.6%) patient. At 3 months, restenosis with recurrence of dysphagia was seen in nine (69.2%) patients, at 6 months, 10 (77%) patients had dysphagia of whom three underwent surgery and the remaining seven patients required dilatations. At 1 year, one patient remained asymptomatic while nine had dysphagia. The requirement for dilatation was once in 3 months in seven patients & once in a month in two patients. At 2 years, the requirement of dilatations was further reduced to once in 4-6 months in all patients. Over a 3 year follow up three (23%) patients had undergone surgery, one was free of symptoms while nine patients continued to be on periodic dilatation although the requirement had reduced to once in 4-6 months. Efficacy of BD stents in patients with caustic-induced ES is limited and the short term radial force applied by the currently available BD stents is inadequate to provide long term relief in such patients.

  6. Role of fluoroscopic guided self expandable metallic stents in the management of malignant esophageal strictures

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Shaker; Ahmed Deif; Amr Abdelaal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of fluoroscopic guided self expanding metallic stents in the management of dysphagia caused by malignant esophageal strictures. Materials and methods: During the period between April 2010 and October 2012, 31 patients with malignant esophageal strictures were subjected to fluoroscopic guided self expanding metallic stent application. The study included 22 males and 9 females ranging in age between 22 and 75 years old with mean age of 56.8 years. Lesions wer...

  7. Cornelia de Lange syndrome and esophageal stricture in a 9-year-old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Artamonov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with rare diseases may be found to have various malformations, including those of the gastrointestinal tract. The authors followed up a 9‑year-old child with Cornelia de Lange syndrome, who was found to have esophageal stricture with the development of gastroesophageal reflux and esophagitis.

  8. Locoregional mitomycin C injection for esophageal stricture after endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, H; Tominaga, K; Minamino, H; Sugimori, S; Okazaki, H; Yamagami, H; Tanigawa, T; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, T; Fujiwara, Y; Arakawa, T

    2012-06-01

    This prospective study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of locoregional mitomycin C (MMC) injection to treat refractory esophageal strictures after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for superficial esophageal carcinoma. Patients with dysphagia and strictures that were refractory to repeated endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) were eligible. After EBD, MMC was injected into the dilated site. Between June 2009 and August 2010, five patients were recruited. The treatment was performed once in two patients and twice in three patients with recurrent dysphagia or restenosis. In all patients, passing a standard endoscope through the site was easy and the dysphagia grade improved (grade 3→1 in 3 patients, grade 4→2 in 2 patients). No serious complications were noted. During the observation period of 4.8 months, neither recurrent dysphagia nor re-stricture appeared in any of the patients. The combination of locoregional MMC injections and EBD is feasible and safe for the treatment of esophageal strictures after ESD.Recently, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been developed and accepted as a new endoscopic treatment for gastrointestinal tumors. ESD is a promising treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma (SEC), and it has a reliable en bloc resection rate. However, the application of ESD for widespread lesions is challenging because of the high risk of the development of severe strictures, which lead to a low quality of life after ESD. Although endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) is effective for benign strictures, it needs to be performed frequently until the dysphagia disappears 1. Mitomycin C (MMC), which is a chemotherapeutic agent derived from some Streptomyces species 2, reduces scar formation when topically applied to a surgical lesion. MMC has been applied to treat strictures in a variety of anatomical locations, including a variety of organs 3. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate both the feasibility and the safety of

  9. Amniotic membrane grafts for the prevention of esophageal stricture after circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Pratico, Carlos Alberto; Camus, Marine; Beuvon, Frédéric; Jarraya, Mohamed; Nicco, Carole; Mangialavori, Luigi; Chaussade, Stanislas; Batteux, Frédéric; Prat, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The prevention of esophageal strictures following circumferential mucosal resection remains a major clinical challenge. Human amniotic membrane (AM) is an easily available material, which is widely used in ophthalmology due to its wound healing, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. We studied the effect of AM grafts in the prevention of esophageal stricture after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in a swine model. In this prospective, randomized controlled trial, 20 swine underwent a 5 cm-long circumferential ESD of the lower esophagus. In the AM Group (n = 10), amniotic membrane grafts were placed on esophageal stents; a subgroup of 5 swine (AM 1 group) was sacrificed on day 14, whereas the other 5 animals (AM 2 group) were kept alive. The esophageal stent (ES) group (n = 5) had ES placement alone after ESD. Another 5 animals served as a control group with only ESD. The prevalence of symptomatic strictures at day 14 was significantly reduced in the AM group and ES groups vs. the control group (33%, 40% and 100%, respectively, p = 0.03); mean esophageal diameter was 5.8±3.6 mm, 6.8±3.3 mm, and 2.6±1.7 mm for AM, ES, and control groups, respectively. Median (range) esophageal fibrosis thickness was 0.87 mm (0.78-1.72), 1.19 mm (0.28-1.95), and 1.65 mm (0.7-1.79) for AM 1, ES, and control groups, respectively. All animals had developed esophageal strictures by day 35. The anti-fibrotic effect of AM on esophageal wound healing after ESD delayed the development of esophageal stricture in our model. However, this benefit was of limited duration in the conditions of our study.

  10. Amniotic membrane grafts for the prevention of esophageal stricture after circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection.

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    Maximilien Barret

    Full Text Available The prevention of esophageal strictures following circumferential mucosal resection remains a major clinical challenge. Human amniotic membrane (AM is an easily available material, which is widely used in ophthalmology due to its wound healing, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. We studied the effect of AM grafts in the prevention of esophageal stricture after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD in a swine model.In this prospective, randomized controlled trial, 20 swine underwent a 5 cm-long circumferential ESD of the lower esophagus. In the AM Group (n = 10, amniotic membrane grafts were placed on esophageal stents; a subgroup of 5 swine (AM 1 group was sacrificed on day 14, whereas the other 5 animals (AM 2 group were kept alive. The esophageal stent (ES group (n = 5 had ES placement alone after ESD. Another 5 animals served as a control group with only ESD.The prevalence of symptomatic strictures at day 14 was significantly reduced in the AM group and ES groups vs. the control group (33%, 40% and 100%, respectively, p = 0.03; mean esophageal diameter was 5.8±3.6 mm, 6.8±3.3 mm, and 2.6±1.7 mm for AM, ES, and control groups, respectively. Median (range esophageal fibrosis thickness was 0.87 mm (0.78-1.72, 1.19 mm (0.28-1.95, and 1.65 mm (0.7-1.79 for AM 1, ES, and control groups, respectively. All animals had developed esophageal strictures by day 35.The anti-fibrotic effect of AM on esophageal wound healing after ESD delayed the development of esophageal stricture in our model. However, this benefit was of limited duration in the conditions of our study.

  11. Anastomotic Strictures after Esophageal Atresia Repair: Incidence, Investigations, and Management, Including Treatment of Refractory and Recurrent Strictures

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    Renato Tambucci

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Improved surgical techniques, as well as preoperative and postoperative care, have dramatically changed survival of children with esophageal atresia (EA over the last decades. Nowadays, we are increasingly seeing EA patients experiencing significant short- and long-term gastrointestinal morbidities. Anastomotic stricture (AS is the most common complication following operative repair. An esophageal stricture is defined as an intrinsic luminal narrowing in a clinically symptomatic patient, but no symptoms are sensitive or specific enough to diagnose an AS. This review aims to provide a comprehensive view of AS in EA children. Given the lack of evidence-based data, we critically analyzed significant studies on children and adults, including comments on benign strictures with other etiologies. Despite there is no consensus about the goal of the luminal diameter based on the patient’s age, esophageal contrast study, and/or endoscopy are recommended to assess the degree of the narrowing. A high variability in incidence of ASs is reported in literature, depending on different definitions of AS and on a great number of pre-, intra-, and postoperative risk factor influencing the anastomosis outcome. The presence of a long gap between the two esophageal ends, with consequent anastomotic tension, is determinant for stricture formation and its response to treatment. The cornerstone of treatment is endoscopic dilation, whose primary aims are to achieve symptom relief, allow age-appropriate capacity for oral feeding, and reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration. No clear advantage of either balloon or bougie dilator has been demonstrated; therefore, the choice is based on operator experience and comfort with the equipment. Retrospective evidences suggest that selective dilatations (performed only in symptomatic patients results in significantly less number of dilatation sessions than routine dilations (performed to prevent symptoms with equal long

  12. Balloon Dilatation for Corrosive Esophageal Strictures in Children: Radiologic and Clinical Outcomes

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    Youn, Byung Jae; Kim, Woo Sun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Kim, Wha Young; Shin, Su Mi; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of the esophageal balloon dilatation (EBD) in children with a corrosive esophageal stricture. The study subjects included 14 patients (M:F = 8:6, age range: 17-85 months) who underwent an EBD due to a corrosive esophageal stricture. The causative agents for the condition were glacial acetic acid (n = 9) and lye (n = 5). A total of 52 EBD sessions were performed in 14 patients (range 1-8 sessions). During the mean 15-month follow-up period (range 1-79 months), 12 patients (86%) underwent additional EBD due to recurrent esophageal stricture. Dysphagia improved after each EBD session and oral feeding was possible between EBD sessions. Long-term success (defined as dysphagia relief for at least 12 months after the last EBD) was achieved in two patients (14%). Temporary success of EBD (defined as dysphagia relief for at least one month after the EBD session) was achieved in 17 out of 52 sessions (33%). A submucosal tear of the esophagus was observed in two (4%) sessions of EBD. Only a limited number of children with corrosive esophageal strictures were considered cured by EBD. However, the outcome of repeated EBD was sufficient to allow the children to eat per os prior to surgical management.

  13. Balloon Dilatation for Corrosive Esophageal Strictures in Children: Radiologic and Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Byung Jae; Kim, Woo Sun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Kim, Wha Young; Shin, Su Mi; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    2010-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of the esophageal balloon dilatation (EBD) in children with a corrosive esophageal stricture. The study subjects included 14 patients (M:F = 8:6, age range: 17-85 months) who underwent an EBD due to a corrosive esophageal stricture. The causative agents for the condition were glacial acetic acid (n = 9) and lye (n = 5). A total of 52 EBD sessions were performed in 14 patients (range 1-8 sessions). During the mean 15-month follow-up period (range 1-79 months), 12 patients (86%) underwent additional EBD due to recurrent esophageal stricture. Dysphagia improved after each EBD session and oral feeding was possible between EBD sessions. Long-term success (defined as dysphagia relief for at least 12 months after the last EBD) was achieved in two patients (14%). Temporary success of EBD (defined as dysphagia relief for at least one month after the EBD session) was achieved in 17 out of 52 sessions (33%). A submucosal tear of the esophagus was observed in two (4%) sessions of EBD. Only a limited number of children with corrosive esophageal strictures were considered cured by EBD. However, the outcome of repeated EBD was sufficient to allow the children to eat per os prior to surgical management

  14. The effectiveness of sucralfate against stricture formation in experimental corrosive esophageal burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temir, Z Günyüz; Karkiner, Aytaç; Karaca, Irfan; Ortaç, Ragip; Ozdamar, Aykut

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of sucralfate against stricture formation in experimental corrosive esophageal burn is reported. Sixty-four Swiss albino adult male rats were divided into three groups, group A (control; n, 7), group B (esophageal burn induced but not treated; n, 25), and group C (esophageal burn induced and treated with sucralfate, n, 32). Groups B and C were further subdivided into subgroups for evaluation on days 2, 7, and 28. A standard esophageal burn was performed by the method of Gehanno, using 50% NaOH. Oral sucralfate treatment was given to group C at a dosage of 50 mg/100 g twice daily. The rats were then killed after 2, 7, or 28 days. Levels of tissue hydroxyproline were measured in excised abdominal esophageal segments, and a histopathological evaluation was performed with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. The tissue hydroxyproline levels were significantly lower in group C than in group B (P = 0.017). There was a significant difference in the stenosis index between groups B and C (P = 0.016). When compared with group B, the collagen deposition in the submucosa and tunica muscularis was significantly lower in group C (P = 0.02). Sucralfate has an inhibitory effect on stricture formation in experimental corrosive burns and can be used in the treatment of corrosive esophageal burns to enhance mucosal healing and suppress stricture formation.

  15. Balloon dilatation in esophageal strictures in epidermolysis bullosa and the role of anesthesia.

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    Gollu, Gulnur; Ergun, Ergun; Ates, Ufuk; Can, Ozlem S; Dindar, Huseyin

    2017-02-01

    Esophageal involvement, which causes stricture, is a complication in epidermolysis bullosa. This causes dysphagia and malnutrition and leads to deterioration of skin lesions in these patients. The charts of 11 patients with epidermolysis bullosa and esophageal stricture who were included into dilatation program between 2003 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Seven of the patients were female and four were male. The median age was 14 (2-32) years. The mean body weight of patients was 27.8 (9-51) kg. The location and number of strictured parts of the esophagus were previously evaluated with upper gastrointestinal contrast study and after that flexible endoscopy was used for dilatation. Eight patients had middle esophageal, three patients had proximal esophageal and one of them had both proximal and middle esophageal strictures. The strictures were dilated 56 times in total (mean 5 times). One patient underwent gastrostomy and was medically followed-up after a perforation occurrence during the dilatation procedure. In a 32-year-old female patient, colon interposition was performed after four dilatations since optimal nutritional and developmental status could not be achieved. The dilatation program of nine patients is still in progress. Seven of them can easily swallow solid food but two of them have some difficulties in swallowing between dilatations. One patient rejected the program and quitted, while one patient refused colon interposition and died because of complications related to amyloidosis during the dilatation program. After resolution of the swallowing problem, skin lesions were observed to heal quickly. Epidermolysis bullosa is a rare cause of dysphagia. Esophageal balloon dilatation with flexible endoscopy is a safe and efficient method in patients with this condition. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  16. Experimental study of the mechanism in esophageal restenosis after balloon dilation of benign stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yingsheng; Yang Renjie; Shang Kezhong; Zhang Huizhen; Li Minghua; Zhuang Qixin; Jiang Zhiming; Ding Zaixian

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Experimental study of the mechanism in esophageal restenosis after balloon dilation of benign stricture. Methods: Esophageal stenosis model of the rats was created by 5 ml of 50% NaOH solution burn with double balloon method, and esophageal restenosis (RS) model was developed by esophageal stenosis with dilation of PTCA balloon catheter. Quantitative and quantitative analysis of esophageal stenosis and RS formation in the rats were observed and recorded by analytic measurements imaging and immuno-histologic chemistry respectively. Results: Esophageal benign stricture and RS model of 49 rats were developed. Cross section area and perimeter of esophageal mucosa layer, muscular layer and the whole layer had increased in experimental group. Comparing to control group, it had remarkable significance in statistics (P < 0.05). PCNA was expressed in 5th day after dilation, and persisted to 1st month. FN was expressed in the 1st day after dilation, still positive on 21st days, partly strong on 30th day. Conclusions: The continued over secretion at all stage of PCNA and FN plays an important role in the RS after balloon dilation of esophageal benign stenosis

  17. Clinical observation of covered for malignant esophageal stricture and esophagus-bronchial fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Hailong; Lin Youen; Ye Zhi; Zhu Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical value of self-expanded covered stents for advanced stage esophageal cancer complicated by esophageal stricture and esophagus-bronchial fistula. Methods: Self-expanded covered stents were placed into 48 patients with advanced stage esophageal cancer under fluoroscopy. Of the 48 patients, 39 had malignant esophageal stricture and 9 had esophagus-bronchus fistula. Results: Stents were successfully inserted into all but one patient with lower esophageal cancer and gastric volvulus. Deglutition was improved in all patients and coughing resolved in patients with esophagus-bronchus fistula. Thoracodynia and foreign body sensation vanished within one week after operation in all patients. Dyspnea caused by compression of the left main bronchus occurred in one patient. Re-stenosis of the stents occurred three to seven months after operation in eight patients. The mean survival time was seven months in all patients. Conclusion: Self-expanded covered stent placement is a simple, safe and reliable treatment method for advanced stage esophageal cancer and can effectively lengthen survival time. (authors)

  18. Dilation of Malignant Strictures in Endoscopic Ultrasound Staging of Esophageal Cancer and Metastatic Spread of Disease

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    Shawn M. Hancock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dilation of malignant strictures in endoscopic ultrasound (EUS staging of esophageal cancer is safe, but no data exists regarding the subsequent development of metastases. Aim. Compare the rates of metastases in esophageal cancer patients undergoing EUS staging who require esophageal dilation in order to pass the echoendoscope versus those who do not. Methods. We reviewed consecutive patients referred for EUS staging of esophageal cancer. We evaluated whether dilation was necessary in order to pass the echoendoscope, and for the subsequent development of metastases after EUS at various time intervals. Results. Among all patients with similar stage (locally advanced disease, defined as T3, N0, M0 or T1-3, N1, M0, there was no difference between the dilated and nondilated groups in the rates of metastases at 3 months (14% versus 10%, =1.0, 6 months (28% versus 20%, =0.69, 12 months (43% versus 40%, =1.0, or ever during a mean followup of 15 months (71% versus 55%, =0.48. Conclusions. Dilation of malignant strictures for EUS staging of esophageal cancer does not appear to lead to higher rates of distant metastases.

  19. Results of Eder-Puestow dilatation in the management of esophageal peptic strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, E; Boesby, S; Spencer, J

    1983-01-01

    Eder-Puestow dilatation of esophageal strictures is a safe procedure. The treatment is followed by symptomatic improvement, but the effect of dilatation on the patients' nutritional state has so far not been reported. We have reviewed 33 patients with benign esophageal stricture with special regard to the effect of dilatation on body weight. A total of 152 dilatations was carried out. All patients had dysphagia, 32 patients had heartburn and 20 had regurgitation. Hiatus hernia was present in 29 patients. Thirteen patients had antireflux surgery; 10 operations were performed before, and four during the dilatation period. One patient required no further dilatations after operation. Dilators greater than 35 FG were passed in 85% of the dilatations. No serious complications occurred. Patients were followed for up to 5 yr (mean follow-up: 27 months). The mean interval between dilatations was 7 months. Body weight was recorded before and one month after dilatation on 78 occasions. There was a significant overall weight increase of 0.78 kg 1 month after dilatation. The mean weight increase was greater after the first dilatation (1.06 kg) than after subsequent ones (0.6 kg). We found that Eder-Puestow dilatation in patients with benign esophageal stricture led to symptomatic improvement and was followed by an increase in body weight.

  20. Intraluminal Radioactive Stent Compared with Covered Stent Alone for the Treatment of Malignant Esophageal Stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongmin; Huang Xunbo; Cao Jun; Huang Gang; Chen Kemin; LIu Yu; Liu Fenju

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to compare the clinical effectiveness of intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation versus covered stent alone insertion in patients with malignant esophageal stricture. Methods: We studied two groups of patients with malignant esophageal stricture. Group A comprised 28 patients (19 men and 9 women) who underwent intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation and were followed prospectively. Group B comprised 30 patients (18 men and 12 women) who had previously received covered stent alone insertion; these patients were evaluated retrospectively. There was no crossover between the two groups during follow-up. Informed consent was obtained from each patient, and our institutional review board approved the study. The dysphagia score, overall survival rates, complication rates, and reintervention rates were compared in the two groups. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Stent placement was technically successful and well tolerated in all patients. The dysphagia score was improved in both groups after stent placement. The median survival was significantly longer in group A than in group B: 11 versus 4.9 months, respectively (P < 0.001). The complications of chest pain, esophageal reflux, and stent migration was more frequent in group B, but this difference did not reach statistical significance. There was no statistical difference in reintervention between two groups. Conclusions: Intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation was a feasible and practical management in treating malignant esophageal stricture and was superior to covered stent alone insertion, as measured by survival.

  1. Palliation of dysphagia in patients with malignant esophageal strictures. Comparison of results of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and esophageal stent treatment

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    Cwikiel, M. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Cwikiel, W. [Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Albertsson, M. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden)

    1996-06-01

    Dysphagia is the earliest and the most common symptom of malignant disease in the esophagus. The palliative effects on dysphagia of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) were evaluated retrospectively and compared with the effect of the self-expanding stent, evaluated in the prospective study. After completion of treatment, 78 (56%) of 140 patients treated with RT; 31 (49%) of 63 patients treated with CT; and 53 (81%) of 66 patients treated with stent insertion were free from dysphagia. Stent treatment has a good and prompt effect on dysphagia and can be recommended for palliation of patients with malignant esophageal strictures. (orig.).

  2. Safety and outcome using endoscopic dilation for benign esophageal stricture without fluoroscopy

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    E R Siddeshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim was to investigate the use of Savary-Gilliard marked dilators in tight esophageal strictures without fluoroscopy. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and six patients with significant dysphagia from benign strictures due to a variety of causes were dilated endoscopically. Patients with achalasia, malignant lesions, and external compression were excluded. The procedure consisted of two parts. First, Savary-Gilliard or zebra guide wire was placed through video endoscopy and then dilatation was performed without fluoroscopy. In general, "the rule of three" was followed. Effective treatment was defined as the ability of patients, with or without repeated dilatations, to maintain a solid or semisolid diet for more than 12 months. Results: One thousand and twenty-four dilatations sessions in a total of 408 patients were carried out. The success rate for placement of a guide wire was 100% and for dilatation 97% without the use of fluoroscopy, after 6 months-24 years of follow-up. The number of sessions per patient was between one and seven, with an average of three sessions. The ability of patients, after one or more sessions of dilatations to maintain a solid or semisolid diet for more than 12 months was obtained in 386 patients (95.8%. All patients improved clinically without complications after the endoscopic procedure without fluoroscopy, but we noted 22 failures. Conclusions: Dilatation (dilation using Savary-Gilliard dilators without fluoroscopy are safe and effective in the treatment of very tight esophageal strictures if performed with care.

  3. Omentopexy improves vascularization and decreases stricture formation of esophageal anastomoses in a dog model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayari, Lili; Hershko, Dan D; Shoshani, Hadas; Maor, Ron; Mordecovich, Daniel; Shoshani, Gideon

    2004-04-01

    Anastomotic strictures are common after primary esophageal anastomosis in pediatric patients. Recent studies provided evidence that omentopexy may improve vascularization of gastroesophageal anastomoses and decrease the rate of stricture-related complications. The effect of omentopexy on primary esophago-esophageal anastomosis, however, is unknown. The aim of the current study was to examine the role of omentopexy on the healing process of primary midesopageal anastomoses. Six dogs were operated on. A 5-cm portion of the midesophagus was resected, and continuity was restored by end-to-end anastomosis. In 3 dogs, an omental pedicle was placed around the anastomotic region. Eating patterns were recorded and functional swallowing was evaluated by fluoroscopic studies. Eight weeks after the operations, the experimental animals were killed and anastomotic lumen diameters and vascularization of the anastomotic sites were evaluated by radiographic studies and histologic examination, respectively. Two dogs in the omentopexy group were able to resume regular feeding, whereas none of the dogs in the control group were able to tolerate solid food intake. Fluoroscopic studies found preserved motility patterns of the esophagus in the omentoesophagopexy group, while prestenotic dilatation and delayed food clearance through the anastomosis were observed in the control group. Histologically, neovascularization was observed at the anastomotic site in the omentoesophagopexy group in contrast to the marked degree of fibrosis displayed in the control group. Omentopexy may improve vascularization and decrease stricture formation after primary esophagoesophageal anastomosis.

  4. The Role of Esophagogastric Anastomotic Technique in Decreasing Benign Stricture Formation in the Surgery of Esophageal Carcinoma

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    Sokouti Mohsen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative stenosis and dysphagia after esophageal carcinoma resection is the major problem. The aim of this study is to compare two types cervical esophagogastric anastomosis in reduction of stricture formation in esophageal cancer surgery. Methods: The subjects of this study were 223 patients undergoing esophageal carcinoma resection during 1998 to 2007. Twenty two patients were excluded from the study because of recurrent malignancy of anastomosis, mortality and losing in follow up period. Two hundred and one patients remained by the end of study were classified into two groups: 98 patients were treated by routinely transverse hand-sewn cervical esophagogastric anastomosis (group 1; and 103 patients were treated by the proposed oblique hand-sewn esophagogastric anastomotic technique (group 2. All the operations were with high abdominal and left cervical incisions (Transhiatal esophagectomy. All patients of both groups were followed up at least 6-month for detection of anastomotic strictures. Results: Postoperative dysphagia occurred in 20 patients of group 1 versus 5 patients of group 2. In working up by rigid esophagoscopy, two patients of group 2 and four patients of group 1 had not true strictures. Anastomotic strictures occurred in 16 cases of group 1, versus 3 cases of group 2. Statistical comparative analysis results of two groups about stricture formation were significant (3% versus 16% P= 0.003. Conclusion: The oblique hand-sewn esophagogastric anastomostic techniques reduce markedly the rate of stricture formation after esophagectomy.

  5. Esophageal stricture caused by rib osteoma in a cat: case report

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    Simone CS Cunha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 6-year-old male domestic shorthair cat presented with frequent food regurgitation and dysphagia. Plain thoracic radiographs revealed a calcified mass overlying the topography of the mediastinum, as well as dilation of the cervical portion of the esophagus due to an accumulation of food. Endoscopic examination showed a severe extraluminal esophageal stricture at the mediastinum entrance. Surgery and a gastric tube were declined by the cat’s owner, with palliative support preferred. However, 1 year later, the cat presented with severe cachexia, dysphagia, salivation, dehydration and inspiratory dyspnea. Thoracic computed tomography was performed to evaluate the possibility of surgical resection. A mass of bone density originating in the second left rib was observed. The mass did not appear to have invaded adjacent structures but marked compression of the mediastinal structures was observed. Surgical resection was performed and a prosthetic mesh was used to reconstruct the thoracic wall. Transient Horner’s syndrome developed in the left eye postoperatively, and was resolved within 4 weeks. Histopathology revealed a benign osteoma. Thirty-two months after surgery, the cat was well and free of disease. Relevance and novel information Rib tumors should be included in a differential diagnosis in cats with extraluminal esophageal stricture. CT should be performed for treatment planning. Surgical treatment was curative in this case.

  6. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with moderately severe dysphagia due to esophageal strictures

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    Jenny Tu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA is a chronic, autoimmune condition involving the skin and mucous membranes. Symptomatic mucosal involvement is rare, but can impact on quality of life, due to esophageal strictures and dysphagia. We report a case involving a 60-year-old male presenting with bullous skin lesions on areas of friction on his hands, feet and mouth. Milia were visible on some healed areas. Biopsy showed a subepidermal vesicle. Direct immunofluorescence showed intense linear junctional IgG and C3 at the dermo-epidermal junction. Serological tests also supported the diagnosis of EBA. Screening tests for underlying malignancies were negative. Despite treatment with systemic steroids, the patient developed increasing dysphagia, requiring further investigation with esophagoscopy and a barium swallow. Confirmation of extensive esophageal stricturing prompted adjustment of medications including an increase in systemic steroids and addition of azathioprine. Currently, the patient′s disease remains under control, with improvement in all his symptoms and return of anti-basement membrane antibody levels to normal, whilst he remains on azathioprine 150 mg daily and prednisolone 5 mg daily. This case highlights the fact that the treatment of a given patient with EBA depends on severity of disease and co-morbid symptoms. Newer immunoglobulin and biological therapies have shown promise in treatment resistant disease. Considering that long-term immunosuppressants or biologicals will be required, potential side effects of the drugs should be considered. If further deterioration occurs in this patient, cyclosporin A or intravenous immunoglobulin (IV Ig will be considered. Vigilance for associated co-morbidities, especially malignancies, should always be maintained.

  7. Endoscopic Stenting and Clipping for Anastomotic Stricture and Persistent Tracheoesophageal Fistula after Surgical Repair of Esophageal Atresia in an Infant

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    Mohammed Amine Benatta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anastomotic stricture (AS and recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF are two complications of surgical repair of esophageal atresia (EA. Therapeutic endoscopic modalities include stenting, tissue glue, and clipping for TEF and endoscopic balloon dilation bougienage and stenting for esophageal strictures. We report herein a two-month infant with both EA and TEF who benefited from a surgical repair for EA, at the third day of life. Two months later he experienced deglutition disorders and recurrent chest infections. The esophagogram showed an AS and a TEF confirmed with blue methylene test at bronchoscopy. A partially covered self-expanding metal type biliary was endoscopically placed. Ten weeks later the stent was removed. This allows for easy passage of the endoscope in the gastric cavity but a persistent recurrent fistula was noted. Instillation of contrast demonstrated a fully dilated stricture but with a persistent TEF. Then we proceeded to placement of several endoclips at the fistula site. The esophagogram confirmed the TEF was obliterated. At 12 months of follow-up, he was asymptomatic. Stenting was effective to alleviate the stricture but failed to treat the TEF. At our knowledge this is the second case of successful use of endoclips placement to obliterate recurrent TEF after surgical repair of EA in children.

  8. Treatment of benign esophageal stricture by Eder-Puestow or balloon dilators: a comparison between randomized and prospective nonrandomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Hughes, R W; Schroeder, K W; Viggiano, T R; DiMagno, E P

    1992-03-01

    To determine whether the natural history of strictures is affected by the type of dilator used to treat newly diagnosed peptic strictures, we designed a prospective randomized trial to compare the results after Eder-Puestow or Medi-Tech balloon dilation. We entered 31 patients into the trial. We also prospectively followed up all 92 nonrandomized patients who underwent their first dilation for a benign stricture during the same period as the prospective randomized trial. The nonrandomized patients also underwent dilation with either the Eder-Puestow or the balloon technique at the discretion of the gastroenterologist performing the endoscopy. We found no statistically significant differences in the immediate or long-term results of the two methods among the randomized, nonrandomized, and overall combined groups. All but 1 of the 123 patients had immediate relief of dysphagia. Within each group of patients, the probability of remaining free of dysphagia 1 year after the initial dilation was approximately 20%, and the probability of not requiring a second dilation was approximately 65% with either technique. Major (esophageal rupture) and minor (bleeding or chest pain) complications occurred in 1% and 5% of the patients and 0.4% and 3% of the total dilation procedures, respectively. The esophageal rupture and four of six minor complications occurred after repeated dilations. Five of the six minor complications occurred with use of the Eder-Puestow dilators. We conclude that Eder-Puestow and balloon dilations of benign esophageal strictures are associated with similar outcomes, but repeated dilations and the Eder-Puestow technique may be associated with an increased risk of complications.

  9. Penfigoide de membranas mucosas com estenose esofágica grave Mucous membrane pemphigoid with severe esophageal stricture

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    Lívia do Nascimento Barbosa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O penfigoide de membranas mucosas é entidade nosológica encarada como um fenótipo, que engloba várias dermatoses autoimunes com lesões bolhosas subepidérmicas, ocorrendo predominantemente nas membranas mucosas, com êxito cicatricial. O acometimento esofágico no penfigoide de membranas mucosas é raro e observado em pacientes com lesão disseminada. As alterações mais comuns são múltiplas membranas ou constrições esofagianas. No presente relato, os autores apresentam paciente com PMM sem lesões cutâneas e estenose esofágica grave, que entrou em remissão após uso de imunoglobulina venosaMucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP is a rare nosological entity. MMP consists of a clinical phenotype in which several autoimmune subepidermal bullous diseases are classified. It occurs predominantly in the mucous membranes and usually results in scarring. Esophageal involvement in MMP is rare and is generally seen in patients in whom lesions are widespread. The most common alterations are multiple esophageal membranes or strictures. In the present case, the authors report on a patient with MMP without any skin lesions and with severe esophageal strictures who went into remission following use of intravenous immunoglobulin

  10. Self-assembling peptide matrix for the prevention of esophageal stricture after endoscopic resection: a randomized controlled trial in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, M; Bordaçahar, B; Beuvon, F; Terris, B; Camus, M; Coriat, R; Chaussade, S; Batteux, F; Prat, F

    2017-05-01

    Esophageal stricture formation after extensive endoscopic resection remains a major limitation of endoscopic therapy for early esophageal neoplasia. This study assessed a recently developed self-assembling peptide (SAP) matrix as a wound dressing after endoscopic resection for the prevention of esophageal stricture. Ten pigs were randomly assigned to the SAP or the control group after undergoing a 5-cm-long circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection of the lower esophagus. Esophageal diameter on endoscopy and esophagogram, weight variation, and histological measurements of fibrosis, granulation tissue, and neoepithelium were assessed in each animal. The rate of esophageal stricture at day 14 was 40% in the SAP-treated group versus 100% in the control group (P = 0.2). Median interquartile range (IQR) esophageal diameter at day 14 was 8 mm (2.5-9) in the SAP-treated group versus 4 mm (3-4) in the control group (P = 0.13). The median (IQR) stricture indexes on esophagograms at day 14 were 0.32 (0.14-0.48) and 0.26 (0.14-0.33) in the SAP-treated and control groups, respectively (P = 0.42). Median (IQR) weight variation during the study was +0.2 (-7.4; +1.8) and -3.8 (-5.4; +0.6) in the SAP-treated and control groups, respectively (P = 0.9). Fibrosis, granulation tissue, and neoepithelium were not significantly different between the groups. The application of SAP matrix on esophageal wounds after a circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection delayed the onset of esophageal stricture in a porcine model. © International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Role of fluoroscopic guided self expandable metallic stents in the management of malignant esophageal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shaker

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Fluoroscopic guided esophageal stenting is a highly effective and safe method for palliating dysphagia in patients with obstructing esophageal cancer with significant clinical improvement.

  12. Metallic stents provide better QOL than plastic stents in patients with stricture of unresectable advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Kazuki; Nagahara, Akihito; Iijima, Katsuyori

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the utility and safety of treatment with esophageal stents (plastic and metallic stents) for unresectable advanced esophageal cancer. Between 1992 and 2002, 14 cases of unresectable advanced esophageal cancer were treated with esophageal stents (the plastic stent group, 7 cases; and the metallic stent group, 7 cases). Of these, 10 cases had a history of chemotherapy and or radiotherapy. An improvement in oral intake and performance status (PS), survival time, periods at home, and adverse events were compared between the two groups. After stenting, oral intake and PS were significantly improved in the metallic stent group. Follow-up at home was possible in 71.4%. There was no significant difference in survival or duration of time at home between the two groups. All adverse events were controllable and there was no difference between the two groups. Stenting not only improved oral intake and PS but also allowed a stay at home, resulting in a marked improvement in patients' quality of life (QOL). Stenting was performed safely even in cases with a history of radiotherapy. There was no difference in survival, ratios of staying at home, and safety between the two groups, but QOL was significantly improved in the metallic stent group. These outcomes indicate that placement of metallic stents should be actively considered to treat stricture due to advanced esophageal cancer. (author)

  13. Temporary metallic stent placement in the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures: results and factors associated with outcome in 55 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Kyung Rae; Shin, Ji Hoon; Lim, Jin-Oh [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Song, Ho-Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)]|[University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Choi, Eugene K. [Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of temporary metallic stenting in 55 patients with treatment-resistant benign esophageal strictures and to identify factors associated with clinical outcomes. Under fluoroscopic guidance, covered retrievable stents were placed in 55 patients with benign esophageal strictures and were removed with retrieval hook 1 week to 6 months after placement. Stent placement was successful in all patients, and the mean dysphagia score was reduced from 2.8 to 1.3 (p<0.001). The most common complications were tissue hyperproliferation (31%), severe pain (24%), and stent migration (25%). During follow-up (mean: 38 months), recurrence of the stricture necessitating balloon dilation was seen in 38 (69%) of 55 patients. Maintained patency rates after temporary stenting at 1, 3, and 6 months and 1, 2, and 4 years were 58%, 43%, 38%, 33%, 26%, and 21%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, length (p=0.003) of the stricture was the only significant factor associated with maintained patency after temporary stenting. In conclusion, temporary metallic stenting for refractory benign esophageal strictures may be effective during the period of stent placement, but is disadvantaged by the high recurrence rates after stent removal, particularly in patients with a long length of stricture (>7cm). (orig.)

  14. Ureteric stricture secondary to unusual extension of prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Venu; Macek, Petr; O'Neill, Gordon F; Barret, Wade

    2010-02-01

    This article describes an unusual finding in a patient who presented with an adenocarcinoma of the prostate and right hydronephrosis. A 68-year-old male presented with right hydronephrosis and a PSA of 96. DRE was consistent with cT3 carcinoma. Cystoscopy showed an exophytic superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder and a transrectal biopsy of the prostate confirmed adenocarcinoma Gleason score 4+3. Staging investigations (CT pelvis and bone scan) were negative; androgen deprivation therapy was therefore initiated for the prostatic adenocarcinoma. Upper tract imaging showed multiple filling defects in the proximal ureter. Ureteroscopy showed a stricture at the level of the iliac vessels. With a working diagnosis of upper tract TCC, right open nephroureterectomy was performed. Final histology showed prostatic adenocarcinoma infiltrating the adventitia of the entire ureter up to the level of the renal pelvis. A rare cause of ureteric stricture, contiguous spread of prostatic adenocarcinoma, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with upper tract obstruction and a known history of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Androgen deprivation therapy for several months did not seem to cause resolution of the tumor in the periureteric, ureteric and perihilar tissues.

  15. Esophageal variceal ligation in the secondary prevention of variceal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pan African Medical Journal ... Introduction: Long-term outcome of patients after band ligation have been poorly defined. ... endoscopic band ligation, liver cirrhosis, complication of band ligation, esophageal varices, secondary prevention ...

  16. Treatment of a Ruptured Anastomotic Esophageal Stricture Following Bougienage with a Dacron-Covered Nitinol Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindel, Walter; Gossmann, Axel; Fischbach, Roman; Michel, Olaf; Lackner, Klaus

    1996-01-01

    A patient suffering from esophagorespiratory fistula after bougienage of a benign stricture at the site of the anastomosis between a jejunal interposition and the esophagus was referred for interventional treatment. A prototype nitinol stent centrally covered with Dacron was implanted under regional anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. The self-expanding prosthesis dilated the stenosis completely and closed the fistula, with consequent improvement in respiratory and nutritional status and thus the general quality of life. The patient was able to eat and drink normally until death 3 months later due to progression of his underlying malignant disease

  17. The roles of connective tissue growth factor in the development of anastomotic esophageal strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haibin; Zhao, Lingna; Zhou, Zhihua; Wu, Yaoyi

    2015-08-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the development of anastomotic strictures after surgical repair of the esophagus. Tissues collected from the patients were divided into three groups based on the results of endoscopy and clinical grading. Patients without dysphagia after esophagectomy were used as the control population. The protein levels of CTGF, TGF-β1, Smad2, and Smad4 were determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blot analyses, while the mRNA levels of the two growth factors were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, significantly increased (p tissues collected from the patients with stenosis were significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05) as compared with those from the control group. In addition, the levels of Smad2 and Smad4 protein were also significantly increased (p < 0.05) with the increasing severity of stenosis, and the protein levels were positively correlated with the levels of CTGF (r = 0.59, p < 0.05) and TGF-β1 (r = 0.63, p < 0.05). Inhibition of CTGF protein or mRNA expression may be a distinctive and effective therapy for the treatment of postoperative anastomotic strictures.

  18. The effect of disc-shaped gastric resection of anastomosis site on reducing postoperative dysphagia and stricture after esophagogastric anastomosis in patients with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Shateri, Kamran; Homayooni, Faramarz; Hatami, Sanaz

    2017-02-01

    Esophagectomy remains the most reliable technique for managing esophageal cancer, but anastomotic complications including postoperative leak, ischemia and stricture negatively affect outcomes of this specific surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a novel method of esophagogastric anastomosis for reducing postoperative dysphagia and stricture formation. Eighty patients who were scheduled for esophagectomy due to esophageal cancer were randomly assigned into two groups: intervention and control (40 each). In the control group, the esophagogastric anastomosis was performed with a linear gastric incision, whilst in the intervention group a new method of disc-shaped gastric resection for anastomosis was applied. Postoperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. The incidence of postoperative dysphagia and anastomotic stricture was significantly lower in the disc-shaped resection group (dysphagia 45% vs 75%, P = 0.02; stricture 12.5% vs 32.5%, P = 0.03), whilst the length of stay in an intensive care unit (ICU), anastomotic leakage and other complications were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05). Anastomotic complications can be reduced by improving surgical techniques. The decreased incidence of postoperative dysphagia and anastomotic stricture in our study may be partly due to providing the proper diameter for the site of anastomosis when using the disc-shaped gastric resection method. Hence, this new method can improve the clinical outcomes of patients who undergo esophagectomy with esophagogastric anastomosis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press and Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University.

  19. [Perineal urethrostomy plus secondary urethroplasty for ultralong urethral stricture: clinical outcomes and influence on the patient's quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Quan; Zhang, Heng; Shen, Wen-Hao; Li, Long-Kun; Li, Wei-Bing; Xiong, En-Qing

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the outcomes of perineal urethrostomy plus secondary urethroplasty for ultralong urethral stricture and assess its influence on the patient's quality of life. We retrospectively analyzed 54 cases of ultralong urethral stricture treated by perineal urethrostomy from 2000 to 2010. The mean age of the patients was 40 years, and the average length of stricture was 6.5 cm. We evaluated the patients'quality of life by questionnaire investigation and the clinical outcomes based on IPSS, Qmax, the necessity of urethral dilation and satisfaction of the patients. The mean Qmax of the 54 patients was (14.0 +/- 4.7) ml/min. Of the 34 cases that underwent secondary urethroplasty, 22 (64.7%) achieved a mean Qmax of (12.0 +/- 3.5) ml/min, 8 (23.5%) needed regular urethral dilatation and 4 (11.8%) received internal urethrotomy because of restenosis. IPSS scores were 5.4 +/- 2.1 and 8.5 +/- 5.8 after perineal urethrostomy and secondary urethroplasty, respectively. Fifty of the total number of patients (92.6%) were satisfied with the results of perineal urethrostomy, and 22 of the 34 (64.7%) with the results of secondary urethroplasty. Perineal urethrostomy plus secondary urethroplasty is safe and effective for ultralong urethral stricture, and affects very little the patient's quality of life.

  20. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement for a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woon Ha; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Kim, Kyu Jong; Lee, Sang Ho; Ko, Ji Ho; Jeong, Kyung Soon

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical effectiveness of stent placement for the treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer. Under fluoroscopic guidance, one or two covered stents were placed in 20 consecutive patients (age range, 44-75 years) with an anastomotic stricture due to a recurrent gastric malignancy. Before stent placement, all patients had severe nausea and recurrent vomiting after ingestion. Stent placement was technically successful for all patients, and no procedural complications occurred. After stent placement, 18 of 20 (90.0%) patients were able to ingest at least a liquid diet and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting. During the follow-up of 2-116 weeks (mean, 25.5 weeks), stent migration occurred in two patients (10.0%) on one day after the procedure. All patients with stent migration were treated successfully by means of placing a second stent. Three patients showed a recurrence of the stricture due to tumor overgrowth; two of the patients were treated with coaxial placement of a second stent. Another patient refused additional management. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement seems to be technically feasible and effective for palliative treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

  1. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement for a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woon Ha; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Kim, Kyu Jong; Lee, Sang Ho [Gospel Hospital, College of Medicine, Kosin University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Ji Ho [Masan Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of University, Masan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kyung Soon [University of Ulsan Colleg of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical effectiveness of stent placement for the treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer. Under fluoroscopic guidance, one or two covered stents were placed in 20 consecutive patients (age range, 44-75 years) with an anastomotic stricture due to a recurrent gastric malignancy. Before stent placement, all patients had severe nausea and recurrent vomiting after ingestion. Stent placement was technically successful for all patients, and no procedural complications occurred. After stent placement, 18 of 20 (90.0%) patients were able to ingest at least a liquid diet and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting. During the follow-up of 2-116 weeks (mean, 25.5 weeks), stent migration occurred in two patients (10.0%) on one day after the procedure. All patients with stent migration were treated successfully by means of placing a second stent. Three patients showed a recurrence of the stricture due to tumor overgrowth; two of the patients were treated with coaxial placement of a second stent. Another patient refused additional management. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement seems to be technically feasible and effective for palliative treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer.

  2. Unusual postoperative complication of minimally invasive transhiatal esophagectomy and esophageal substitution for absolute dysphagia in a child with corrosive esophageal stricture

    OpenAIRE

    Kandpal, D. K.; Bhargava, D. K.; Jerath, N.; Darr, L. A.; Chowdhary, Sujit K.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal substitution in children is a rare and challenging surgery. The minimally invasive approach for esophageal substitution is novel and reported from a few centers worldwide. While detailed report on the various complications of this approach has been discussed in adult literature, the pediatric experience is rather limited. We report the laparoscopic management of a rare complication which developed after laparoscopic esophagectomy and esophageal substitution. The timely recognition ...

  3. Unusual postoperative complication of minimally invasive transhiatal esophagectomy and esophageal substitution for absolute dysphagia in a child with corrosive esophageal stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D K Kandpal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal substitution in children is a rare and challenging surgery. The minimally invasive approach for esophageal substitution is novel and reported from a few centers worldwide. While detailed report on the various complications of this approach has been discussed in adult literature, the pediatric experience is rather limited. We report the laparoscopic management of a rare complication which developed after laparoscopic esophagectomy and esophageal substitution. The timely recognition and management by the minimally invasive approach have been highlighted.

  4. Congenital esophageal stenosis in 3 children: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackenzie C. Lees

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES is rare condition found in 1 per 25,000 to 50,000 live births. It is characterized by intrinsic narrowing of the esophagus secondary to congenital malformation of the esophageal wall architecture. Diagnosis is often difficult to definitively establish as the symptoms are often initially attributed to esophageal strictures secondary to reflux, or occur within the context of a tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF in the newborn. Endoscopic dilation and surgical repair are the mainstays of treatment. We report a series of three cases seen recently at our institution, the University of Alberta/Stollery Children's Hospital.

  5. The successful medical management of severe duodenal strictures secondary to eosinophilic gastroenteritis in an infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H. L.; Sithasanan, N.; Foley, P.; Davidson, G. P.

    2003-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition of unknown etiology that has only been relatively recently reported. Its clinical manifestations range from a mild disease to more severe forms resembling Crohn's disease. Enteric strictures are a rare but recognized complication of this

  6. A comparison of the temporary placement of 3 different self-expanding stents for the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures: a prospective multicentre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canena Jorge Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Refractory benign esophageal strictures (RBESs have been treated with the temporary placement of different self-expanding stents with conflicting results. We compared the clinical effectiveness of 3 types of stents: self-expanding plastic stents (SEPSs, biodegradable stents, and fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMSs, for the treatment of RBES. Methods This study prospectively evaluated 3 groups of 30 consecutive patients with RBESs who underwent temporary placement of either SEPSs (12 weeks, n = 10, biodegradable stents (n = 10 or FCSEMSs (12 weeks, n = 10. Data were collected to analyze the technical success and clinical outcome of the stents as evaluated by recurrent dysphagia, complications and reinterventions. Results Stent implantation was technically successful in all patients. Migration occurred in 11 patients: 6 (60% in the SEPS group, 2 (20% in the biodegradable group and 3 (30% in the FCSEMS group (P = 0.16. A total of 8/30 patients (26.6% were dysphagia-free after the end of follow-up: 1 (10% in the SEPS group, 3 (30% in the biodegradable group and 4 (40% in the FCSEMS group (P = 0.27. More reinterventions were required in the SEPS group (n = 24 than in the biodegradable group (n = 13 or the FCSEMS group (n = 13 (P = 0.24. Multivariate analysis showed that stricture length was significantly associated with higher recurrence rates after temporary stent placement (HR = 1.37; 95% CI = 1.08-1.75; P = 0.011. Conclusions Temporary placement of a biodegradable stent or of a FCSEMS in patients with RBES may lead to long-term relief of dysphagia in 30 and 40% of patients, respectively. The use of SEPSs seems least preferable, as they are associated with frequent stent migration, more reinterventions and few cases of long-term improvement. Additionally, longer strictures were associated with a higher risk of recurrence.

  7. Balloon dilatation of ureteric strictures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punekar S

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Evaluation of dilatation as a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of ureteric strictures. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We evaluated this technique in 16 patients with ureteric and secondary pelviureteric junction strictures from June 1998. Of these, 7 were men and 9 were women. The age range was from 14 to 40 years. RESULTS: Balloon dilatation was successful in 69% of patients. Strictures secondary to previous surgery had nearly 100% success. Of the 8 cases diagnosed as genitourinary tuberculosis, success rate was 50%. CONCLUSIONS: Factors affecting success of balloon dilatation are: a age of the stricture b length of the stricture and c etiology of the stricture. In a select group of patients with fresh post-operative or post-inflammatory strictures, balloon dilatation may be an attractive alternative to surgery.

  8. Outcomes of the Use of Fully Covered Esophageal Self-Expandable Stent in the Management of Colorectal Anastomotic Strictures and Leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad J. Cooper

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Colorectal anastomotic leak or stricture is a dreaded complication leading to significant morbidity and mortality. The novel use of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS in the management of postoperative colorectal anastomotic leaks or strictures can avoid surgical reintervention. Methods. Retrospective study with particular attention to the indications, operative or postoperative complications, and clinical outcomes of SEMS placement for patients with either a colorectal anastomotic stricture or leak. Results. Eight patients had SEMS (WallFlex stent for the management of postoperative colorectal anastomotic leak or stricture. Five had a colorectal anastomotic stricture and 3 had a colorectal anastomotic leak. Complete resolution of the anastomotic stricture or leak was achieved in all patients. Three had recurrence of the anastomotic stricture on 3-month flexible sigmoidoscopy follow-up after the initial stent was removed. Two of these patients had a stricture that was technically too difficult to place another stent. Stent migration was noted in 2 patients, one at day 3 and the other at day 14 after stent placement that required a larger 23 mm stent to be placed. Conclusions. The use of SEMS in the management of colorectal anastomotic leaks or strictures is feasible and is associated with high technical and clinical success rate.

  9. Primary and secondary esophageal contractions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.G. Aben-Athar

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied the primary and secondary esophageal peristalsis in 36 patients with heartburn and acid regurgitation and in 14 asymptomatic volunteers. Primary peristalsis was elicited by ten swallows of a 5-mL bolus of water and secondary peristalsis was elicited by intra-esophageal infusion of 5, 10, and 15 mL water, 0.1 N hydrochloric acid and air. Esophageal contractions were measured by an 8-lumen manometric catheter assembly incorporating a 6-cm sleeve device. Contractions were registered at 3, 9, and 15 cm from the upper margin of the sleeve and the infusion was done through a side hole located at 12 cm. Twenty patients had normal endoscopic esophageal examination, 10 with normal (group I and 10 with abnormal pH-metric examination (group II, and 16 had esophagitis (group III. The amplitude of contractions after swallows was lower (97.8 ± 10.0 mmHg in the distal esophagus of group III patients than in controls (142.3 ± 14.0 mmHg. Patients of group III had fewer secondary contractions (water: 25% of infusion than patients of the other groups and controls (67% of infusion. Patients of group III also had a lower amplitude of secondary peristalsis in the distal esophagus (water: 70.1 ± 9.6 mmHg than controls (129.2 ± 18.2 mmHg. We conclude that patients with esophagitis have an impairment of primary and secondary peristalsis in the distal esophagus.

  10. Urethral stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It can also occur after a disease or injury. Rarely, it may be caused by pressure from a growing tumor near the urethra. Other factors that increase the risk for this condition include: Sexually ... Injury to the pelvic area Repeated urethritis Strictures that ...

  11. Influence of repeated infusion of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce on esophageal secondary peristalsis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T T; Yi, C H; Lei, W Y; Hung, X S; Yu, H C; Chen, C L

    2014-10-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 has been implicated as a target mediator for heartburn perception and modulation of esophageal secondary peristalsis. Our aim was to determine the effect of repeated esophageal infusion of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce on heartburn perception and secondary peristalsis in healthy adults. Secondary peristalsis was performed with mid-esophageal injections of air in 15 healthy adults. Two separate protocols including esophageal infusion with saline and capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce and 2 consecutive sessions of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce were randomly performed. After repeated infusion of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce, the threshold volume to activate secondary peristalsis was significantly increased during slow (p sauce enhanced heartburn perception (p sauce infusion (p = 0.007). Acute infusion of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce significantly increased pressure wave amplitudes of distal esophagus during slow (p = 0.003) and rapid air injections (p = 0.01), but repeated infusion of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce significantly decreased pressure wave amplitude of distal esophagus during slow (p = 0.0005) and rapid air injections (p = 0.003). Repeated esophageal infusion of capsaicin appears to attenuate heartburn perception and inhibit distension-induced secondary peristalsis in healthy adults. These results suggest capsaicin-sensitive afferents in modulating sensorimotor function of secondary peristalsis in human esophagus. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Brain Abscess after Esophageal Dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, S; Grand, M; Michelsen, J

    2007-01-01

    Brain abscess formation is a serious disease often seen as a complication to other diseases and to procedures. A rare predisposing condition is dilatation therapy of esophageal strictures. A case of brain abscess formation after esophageal dilatations is presented. A 59-year-old woman was admitted...... with malaise, progressive lethargy, fever, aphasia and hemiparesis. Six days before she had been treated with esophageal dilatation for a stricture caused by accidental ingestion of caustic soda. The brain abscess was treated with surgery and antibiotics. She recovered completely. This clinical case...... illustrates the possible association between therapeutic esophageal dilatation and the risk of brain abscess formation....

  13. Eder Puestow dilatation of benign rectal stricture following anterior resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, A; Tydeman, G; Lewis, M H

    1990-01-01

    Benign anastomotic stricture following anterior resection can be difficult to manage when the stricture is proximal. The acceptable surgical options are either a redo low resection with its accompanying hazards or, alternatively, the formation of a permanent colostomy. Although dilatation of such strictures is possible by blind passage of metal bougies, the authors believe that this technique must be regarded as hazardous. A technique of dilatation is described that is usually reserved for esophageal stricture, namely, Eder Puestow dilatation over a guide wire inserted under direct vision. Although this technique may not be without risk, this readily available equipment may be valuable in making a further resection unnecessary.

  14. Upper gastrointestinal strictures: The results of balloon dilatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kil Woo; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choo, In Wook; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Hyung Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    Balloon catheter dilatation of upper gastrointestinal strictures is an accepted mode of therapy. The authors report the balloon dilatation in 11 consecutive patients. The lesions treated included 10 benign strictures, and 1 esophageal cancer. Esophageal balloon were ranged from 2 mm in diameter, 4 cm in length, to 30 mm in diameter, 8 cm in length. Inflation was held for from 30 to 60 seconds and then repeated two or three times during each session. The balloons were inflated to pressure of from 2 to 12 atmospheres. There were from 1 to 13 dilatations. Two esophageal perforations were occurred in one esophagitis patient and other lye stricture patient. Two perforations were not required any surgical repair. All dilatation were performed without anesthesia. All strictures were responded immediately to dilatation. Prolonged course of treatment were needed with chronic severe esophagitis, lye stricture, gastrojejunostomy with chemotherapy, as a result, all patients, except esophageal cancer, could take regular diet after balloon catheter dilatation. Balloon catheter dilatation of upper gastrointestinal stenosis was effective and safe. It should be considered before other methods of treatment applicable.

  15. Endoscopic Assessment of Children with Esophageal Atresia: Lack of Relationship of Esophagitis and Esophageal Metaplasia to Symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Castilloux

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Late complications of esophageal atresia (EA, particularly esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus, are increasingly being recognized. With the exception of patients with dysphagia associated with esophageal stricture, it is unknown whether patient symptomatology can predict endoscopic findings.

  16. Secondary Prevention of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Areas Where Smoking, Alcohol, and Betel Quid Chewing are Prevalent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Shuan Chung

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal cancer is ranked as the sixth most common cause of cancer death worldwide and has a substantial effect on public health. In contrast to adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett's esophagus in Western countries, the major disease phenotype in the Asia-Pacific region is esophageal squamous cell carcinoma which is attributed to the prevalence of smoking, alcohol, and betel quid chewing. Despite a multidisciplinary approach to treating esophageal cancer, the outcome remains poor. Moreover, field cancerization reveals that esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is closely linked with the development of head and neck cancers that further sub-optimize the treatment of patients. Therefore, preventive strategies are of paramount importance to improve the prognosis of this dismal disease. Since obstacles exist for primary prevention via risk factor elimination, the current rationale for esophageal cancer prevention is to identify high-risk groups at earlier stages of the disease, and encourage them to get a confirmatory diagnosis, prompt treatment, and intensive surveillance for secondary prevention. Novel biomarkers for identifying specific at-risk populations are under extensive investigation. Advances in image-enhanced endoscopy do not just substantially improve our ability to identify small precancerous or cancerous foci, but can also accurately predict their invasiveness. Research input from the basic sciences should be translated into preventive measures in order to decrease the disease burden of esophageal cancer.

  17. Management of congenital esophageal stenosis associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim The aim of this work was to study the incidence, management of congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) associated with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), and its impact on esophageal stricture (ES) after primary repair. Patients and methods From January 2006 to December 2014, ...

  18. Evaluation and management of anterior urethral stricture disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangera, Altaf; Osman, Nadir; Chapple, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stricture disease affects many men worldwide. Traditionally, the investigation of choice has been urethrography and the management of choice has been urethrotomy/dilatation. In this review, we discuss the evidence behind the use of ultrasonography in stricture assessment. We also discuss the factors a surgeon should consider when deciding the management options with each individual patient. Not all strictures are identical and surgeons should appreciate the poor long-term results of urethrotomy/dilatation for strictures longer than 2 cm, strictures in the penile urethra, recurrent strictures, and strictures secondary to lichen sclerosus. These patients may benefit from primary urethroplasty if they have many adverse features or secondary urethroplasty after the first recurrence. PMID:26918169

  19. Imaging of Esophageal Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.; Lal, A.; Gulati, M.; Suri, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the various radiological abnormalities in patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis. Material and Methods: The case records of 23 patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis were evaluated retrospectively for various radiological abnormalities. Twenty-two patients had secondary involvement of esophagus in the form of direct extension of mediastinal and pulmonary tuberculosis or spinal tuberculosis. Only 1 patient had primary involvement of the esophagus with no evidence of disease elsewhere. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic and CT-guided biopsy/aspiration cytology in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Diagnosis was made on the basis of surgical biopsy of lymph node and autopsy in 1 patient each. In the remaining 8 patients the diagnosis was based on radiological and endoscopic findings and the response to antituberculous treatment. Results: Chest radiography (CXR) was abnormal in 65% patients. While the findings were non-conclusive for esophageal tuberculosis, characteristic lesions of tuberculosis in lungs or spine were suggestive of tuberculous etiology. In 15 patients, CT of the chest confirmed the corresponding CXR findings and also showed additional findings of mediastinal lymphadenopathy when CXR was normal. Fourteen patients showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy on CT of the chest. In all these patients, more than one group of lymph nodes was involved. The characteristic hypodense center of lymph nodes suggestive of tuberculosis was seen in 12 patients. Radiological abnormalities seen in barium swallow examination were extrinsic compression, traction diverticula, strictures, sinus/fistulous tracts, kinking and pseudotumor mass of esophagus in decreasing order of frequency. The middle third of the esophagus was found to be the most frequent site of involvement

  20. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-12-21

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE.

  1. Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Qasim; Fass, Ronnie; Gyawali, C Prakash; Miwa, Hiroto; Pandolfino, John E; Zerbib, Frank

    2016-02-15

    Functional esophageal disorders consist of a disease category that present with esophageal symptoms (heartburn, chest pain, dysphagia, globus) not explained by mechanical obstruction (stricture, tumor, eosinophilic esophagitis), major motor disorders (achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus), or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While mechanisms responsible are unclear, it is theorized that visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance play an important role in symptom generation, in the context of normal or borderline function. Treatments directed at improving borderline motor dysfunction or reducing reflux burden to sub-normal levels have limited success in symptom improvement. In contrast, strategies focused on modulating peripheral triggering and central perception are mechanistically viable and clinically meaningful. However, outcome data from these treatment options are limited. Future research needs to focus on understanding mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance so that appropriate targets and therapies can be developed. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Should patients with esophageal atresia be submitted to esophageal substitution before they start walking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannuri, U; Tannuri, A C A

    2011-01-01

    Esophagocoloplasty and gastric transposition are two major methods for esophageal substitution in children with esophageal atresia, and there is broad agreement that these operations should not be performed before the children start walking. However, there are some reported advantages of performing such operations in the first months of life or in the neonatal period. In this study, we compared our experience with esophageal substitution procedures performed in walking children with esophageal atresia, with the outcomes of children who had the operation before the third month of life reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to establish if we have to wait until the children start walking before indicating the esophageal replacement procedure. From February 1978 to October 2009, 129 children with esophageal atresia underwent esophageal replacement in our hospital (99 colonic interpositions and 30 gastric transpositions). The records of these patients were reviewed for data regarding demographics, complications (leaks, graft failures, strictures, and graft torsion), and mortality and compared with those reported in the two main articles on esophageal replacement in the neonatal period or in patients less than 3 months of age. The main complication of our casuistic was cervical anastomosis leakage, which sealed spontaneously in all except in four patients. One patient of the esophagocoloplasty group developed graft necrosis and three patients in the gastric transposition group had gastric outlet obstruction, secondary to axial torsion of the stomach placed in the retrosternal space. The long-term outcome of the patients in both groups was considered good to excellent in terms of normal weight gain, absence of dysphagia, and other gastrointestinal symptoms. The comparisons of the main complications and mortality rates in walking children with esophageal substitutions performed in the first months of life showed that the incidences of cervical

  3. Acute Management and Secondary Prophylaxis of Esophageal Variceal Bleeding: A Western Canadian Survey

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    Justin Cheung

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis. Guidelines have been published in 1997; however, variability in the acute management and prevention of EVB rebleeding may occur.

  4. Congenital Midureteric Stricture

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    Singh Shalinder

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital midureteric obstruction is a rare entity which can be caused by either ureteric valves or strictures. We report our experience with four patients with midureteric obstruction due to stricture over a six-year period. The condition needs to be differentiated from obstruction of the pelviureteric and vesicoureteric junctions. Obstruction can be initially screened by ultrasound and confirmed by a radionuclide scan with furosemide challenge. Retrograde ureteropyelography and/or intravenous urography may be required to define the level of the stricture.

  5. The glucose breath test: a diagnostic test for small bowel stricture(s) in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Daniel; Boston, Francis M; Blank, David; Yalovsky, Morty; Mishkin, Seymour

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an indirect noninvasive indicator of proximal bacterial overgrowth, the glucose breath test, was of diagnostic value in inflammatory bowel disease. Twenty four of 71 Crohn's disease patients tested had a positive glucose breath test. No statistical conclusions could be drawn between the Crohn's disease activity index and glucose breath test status. Of patients with radiologic evidence of small bowel stricture(s), 96.0% had a positive glucose breath test, while only one of 46 negative glucose breath test patients had a stricture. The positive and negative predictive values for a positive glucose breath test as an indicator of stricture formation were 96.0% and 97.8%, respectively. This correlation was not altered in Crohn's disease patients with fistulae or status postresection of the terminal ileum. The data in ulcerative colitis were nondiagnostic. In conclusion, the glucose breath test appears to be an accurate noninvasive inexpensive diagnostic test for small bowel stricture(s) and secondary bacterial overgrowth in Crohn's disease.

  6. Malignant strictures involving the esophagogastric junction : palliative treatment with balloon dilation combined with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyoek Jin; Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young; Cho, Yong Soo; Sung, Kyu Bo

    2001-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of expandable metallic stent placement by using balloon dilation combined with chemotherapy or radiation therapy in the treatment of malignant esophageal strictures involving the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation was performed in 14 patients with strictures due to squamous cell carcinoma (n=5) or adenocarcinoma (n=9). After balloon dilation all patients underwent chemotherapy or radiation therapy. There were no failures or major complications After dilation, dysphagia improved in 13 (92%) of 14 patients, and the long-term success rate was 50%. Six of the seven patients in whom the condition recurred underwent further balloon dilation (n=4) or placement of an expandable metallic stent (n=2). Ten of the 13 who were followed up died after diffuse metastasis. Prior to their eventual death (mean survial, 20 weeks), the dysphagia experienced by seven (70%) of these ten improved, and thus they required no further treatment. Balloon dilation combined with chemotherapy or radiation therapy seems to be a safe and effective secondary therapy for patients with dysphagia due to malignant stricture involving the EGJ

  7. Evaluation and management of anterior urethral stricture disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Altaf Mangera

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture disease affects many men worldwide. Traditionally, the investigation of choice has been urethrography and the management of choice has been urethrotomy/dilatation. In this review, we discuss the evidence behind the use of ultrasonography in stricture assessment. We also discuss the factors a surgeon should consider when deciding the management options with each individual patient. Not all strictures are identical and surgeons should appreciate the poor long-term results of urethrotomy/dilatation for strictures longer than 2 cm, strictures in the penile urethra, recurrent strictures, and strictures secondary to lichen sclerosus. These patients may benefit from primary urethroplasty if they have many adverse features or secondary urethroplasty after the first recurrence.

  8. Percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct strictures

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    Koecher, Martin [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: martin.kocher@seznam.cz; Cerna, Marie [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Havlik, Roman [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kral, Vladimir [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Gryga, Adolf [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Duda, Miloslav [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term results of treatment of benign bile duct strictures. Materials and methods: From February 1994 to November 2005, 21 patients (9 men, 12 women) with median age of 50.6 years (range 27-77 years) were indicated to percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct stricture. Stricture of hepatic ducts junction resulting from thermic injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy was indication for treatment in one patient, stricture of hepaticojejunostomy was indication for treatment in all other patients. Clinical symptoms (obstructive jaundice, anicteric cholestasis, cholangitis or biliary cirrhosis) have appeared from 3 months to 12 years after surgery. Results: Initial internal/external biliary drainage was successful in 20 patients out of 21. These 20 patients after successful initial drainage were treated by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage. Sixteen patients were symptoms free during the follow-up. The relapse of clinical symptoms has appeared in four patients 9, 12, 14 and 24 months after treatment. One year primary clinical success rate of treatment for benign bile duct stricture was 94%. Additional two patients are symptoms free after redilatation (15 and 45 months). One patient is still in treatment, one patient died during secondary treatment period without interrelation with biliary intervention. The secondary clinical success rate is 100%. Conclusion: Benign bile duct strictures of hepatic ducts junction or biliary-enteric anastomosis are difficult to treat surgically and endoscopically inaccessible. Percutaneous treatment by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage is feasible in the majority of these patients. It is minimally invasive, safe and effective.

  9. Risk factors associated with refractoriness to esophageal dilatation for benign dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Pinto, Eduardo; Pereira, Pedro; Ribeiro, Armando; Lopes, Susana; Moutinho-Ribeiro, Pedro; Silva, Marco; Peixoto, Armando; Gaspar, Rui; Macedo, Guilherme

    2016-06-01

    Benign esophageal strictures need repeated dilatations to relieve dysphagia. Literature is scarce on the risk factors for refractoriness of these strictures. This study aimed to assess the risk factors associated with refractory strictures. This is a retrospective study of patients with benign esophageal strictures who were referred for esophageal dilatation over a period of 3 years. A total of 327 esophageal dilatations were performed in 103 patients; 53% of the patients reported dysphagia for liquids. Clinical success was achieved in 77% of the patients. There was a need for further dilatations in 54% of patients, being more frequent in patients with dysphagia for liquids [78 vs. 64%, P=0.008, odds ratio (OR) 1.930], in those with caustic strictures (89 vs. 70%, P=0.007, OR 3.487), and in those with complex strictures (83 vs. 70%, P=0.047, OR 2.132). Caustic strictures, peptic strictures, and complex strictures showed statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Time until subsequent dilatations was less in patients with dysphagia for liquids (49 vs. 182 days, Pdysphagia for liquids [hazard ratio (HR) 1.506, P=0.004], in those with peptic strictures (HR 1.644, P=0.002), in those with caustic strictures (HR 1.581, P=0.016), and in patients with complex strictures (HR 1.408, P=0.046). Caustic, peptic, and complex strictures were associated with a greater need for subsequent dilatations. Time until subsequent dilatations was less in patients with dysphagia for liquids and in those with caustic, peptic, and complex strictures.

  10. Management of aorto-esophageal fistula secondary after thoracic endovascular aortic repair: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kaname; Koike, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Seiichi; Komazawa, Daisuke; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-10-01

    Aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF) is a rare and lethal entity, and the difficulty of making diagnosis of AEF is well-known. As promising results in the short-term effectiveness of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) promote its usage, the occurrence of AEF after TEVAR (post-TEVAR AEF) increases as one of the major complications. Therefore, we provide a review concerning the management strategy of post-TEVAR AEF. Although its representative symptom was reported as the triad of mid-thoracic pain and sentinel hematemesis followed by massive hematemesis, the symptom-free interval between sentinel hemorrhage and massive exsanguination is unpredictable. However, the physiological condition represents a surgical contraindication. Accordingly, early diagnosis is important, but either CT or esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy rarely depicts a typical image. The formation of post-TEVAR AEF might be associated with the infection of micro-organisms, which is uncontrollable with anti-biotic administration. The current first-line strategy is combination therapy as follows, (1) to control bleeding by TEVAR in the urgent phase, and (2) radical debridement and aortic/esophageal re-construction in the semi-urgent phase. In view of the high mortality and morbidity rate, it is proposed that the choice in treatment strategies might be affected by patient`s condition, size of the wall defects and the etiology of AEF. Practically, we should keep in mind the importance of making an early diagnosis and, once a suspicious symptom has occurred in a patient with a history of TEVAR, the existence of post-TEVAR AEF should be suspected. A prospective registry together with more developed technologies will be needed to establish a future strategy.

  11. Hemodynamic effects of terlipressin in patients with bleeding esophageal varices secondary to cirrhosis of liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budruddin, A.H.; Rasool, G.; Chaudhry, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    To study the hemodynamics of terlipressin in bleeding esophageal varices due to cirrhosis of the liver. Seventy-eight consecutive patients with bleeding esophageal varices were evaluated. The diagnosis of cirrhosis was based on history, physical examination, laboratory data and abdominal ultrasound. Blood-pressure and pulse rate were monitored. Injection terlipressin 2 mg intravenous bolus was given followed by 2 mg i/v 6 hourly. Intravenous plasma expanders, whole blood, fresh frozen plasma and platelet concentrates were transfused as needed. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed for evaluation and grading of varices, detection of portal gastropathy, and banding. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied as applicable. Seventy patients of either gender, aged 18 - 95 years were included in the study. Systolic blood pressure(SP) increased by 7.77 mmHg (mean SP: 108.1 mmHg, SD + 9.84, 95% CI: 105.77 - 110.43 mmHg; p-value: 0.0002); diastolic blood-pressure(DP) by 21.57 mmHg (mean DP: 79.71 mmHg, SD + 7.35, 95% CI: 77.97 - 81.45 mmHg; p-value: 0.001) and mean arterial pressure by 9.42 mmHg(mean MAP: 89.12 mmHg, SD + 6.98, 95% CI: 87.45 - 90.78 mmHg; p-value: 0.0007) within 24 hours of initiating terlipressin in majority of patients. The pulse rate decreased in 34 (48.5%) patients by 6-24 beats/min in 30 min, and by 2-12 beats/min in 24 hours; and increased in 30 (42.85)% patients by 10-15 beats/min at 30 min and by 2-8 beats/min at 24 hours. (author)

  12. Consumo alimentar de crianças e adolescentes com disfagia decorrente de estenose de esôfago: avaliação com base na pirâmide alimentar brasileira Food consumption by children and adolescent with dysphagia due to esophageal stricture: assessment based on the Brazilian food guide pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Marciano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o consumo alimentar de pacientes com disfagia decorrente de estenose de esôfago, comparando a dieta de consistência líquida com a dieta de consistência pastosa e sólida, com base na Pirâmide Alimentar Brasileira. MÉTODOS: Estudo de corte transversal, no qual foram incluídos consecutivamente 31 pacientes com estenose esofágica, sendo 18 (58,0% cáustica, 7 (22,6% pós-cirúrgica, 3 (9,7% péptica e 3 (9,7% sem causa definida. Empregou-se o recordatório de 24 horas; os alimentos foram transformados em porções em função dos oito grupos de alimentos, conforme recomendado por Philippi. Utilizou-se o teste Kruskal-Wallis e Exato de Fisher, fixando em 5% o nível de rejeição da hipótese de nulidade. RESULTADOS: A idade variou entre 15 e 176 meses (mediana, 56 meses, sendo 28 crianças e três adolescentes, e 18 do sexo masculino. Vinte e nove pacientes (93,5% apresentavam disfagia, sendo grave em 34,4% (10/29, moderada em 41,3% (12/29, e leve em 24,1% (7/29. O consumo mediano de porções de cereais, leguminosas, e óleos e gorduras foi menor no grupo com dieta líquida (pOBJECTIVE: This study assessed food intake by patients with dysphagia due to esophageal stricture and compared liquid, soft and solid diets based on the Brazilian Food guide pyramid. METHODS: This cross-sectional study consecutively included 31 patients with esophageal stricture, of which 18 (58.0% were caustic, 7 (22.6% were postoperative, 3 (9.7% were peptic and 3 (9.7% were of unknown etiology. The 24-hour dietary recall was used and the foods were converted into servings according to the eight food groups, as recommended by Philippi. The Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher's Exact Test were used and the significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: The ages of the patients varied from 15 to 176 months (median: 56 months. There were 28 children and 3 adolescents, of which 28 were males. Twenty-nine patients (93.5% presented dysphagia, of which 34.4% (10

  13. Management of panurethral strictures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. Kulkarni

    2016-02-28

    Feb 28, 2016 ... either local flaps or buccal mucosal grafts to repair complex strict- ures. In this paper, we would like to present our .... 1 and kept in hospital until postoperative day 2. They receive a single dose of broad- ... urethra and form a complex subset of urethral stricture dis- ease. Lichen sclerosus remains a primary ...

  14. Management of panurethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kulkarni

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Repair of pan-urethral stricture in a single-stage, with one-sided dissection and dorsal onlay of oral mucosa, is a minimally invasive technique that is simple, fast, safe, effective and reproducible in the hand of any surgeon.

  15. esophageal carcinoma complicating achalasia, 25 years post

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mine

    Some degree of stasis usually persists despite adequate treatment and relief of symptoms. Complications or recurrent symptoms include dysphagia, esophageal reflux, stricture and carcinoma. 5. This case report suggests that long term surveillance of the patient with achalasia is essential even after successful treatment.

  16. Fatal central venous air embolism: a rare complication of esophageal dilation by rendezvous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zald, Philip B; Andersen, Peter E

    2011-03-01

    Esophageal dilation by rendezvous is a useful technique for the treatment of complicated esophageal strictures. We present a case of a 74-year-old man with chronic dysphagia caused by a complete cervical esophageal stricture that developed after external beam radiotherapy for treatment of papillary thyroid carcinoma. During attempted dilation using the rendezvous technique, the patient suffered a fatal pulmonary air embolism. The technique of esophageal dilation by rendezvous, complications, and risk factors for development of venous air embolism are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of fatal venous air embolism after dilation by rendezvous. Copyright © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Management of Tracheobronchial Strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Shim, Tae Sun

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the use of tracheobronchial stents has increased greatly sue to the advantages of easy placement and prompt airway relief. in addition, trachebronchial stents provide an alternative to open surgical procedures in select patients with benign tracheobronchial stenosis or obstruction, in particular those with tracheobronchial tuberculosis. This paper review the indications for tracheobronchial stent placement, appropriate stent selection, pre-procedure evaluation, and the results of stent placement for benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures

  18. Transarterial embolization of an aortoesophageal fistula secondary to placement of a palliative esophageal stent: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Eun Young; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Ko, Gi Young; Sung, Kyu Bo; Kwong, Dong Il; Song, Ho Young

    2007-01-01

    An aortoesophageal fistula is a rare condition caused by descending aortic diseases such as an aneurysm, foreign body ingestion, esophageal malignancy, and ulcers. An aortoesophageal fistula as a complication of esophageal stent placement is extremely rare and only one case had been reported previously worldwide, to the best of our knowledge. We report a case of an aortoesophageal fistula in a 64-year-old man who previously underwent palliative esophageal stent placement due to local tumor recurrence after a total gastrectomy of vanced gastric cancer in the cardia. The fistula was occluded by glue embolization

  19. Ultrasonographic evaluation of urethral stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Eun; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Nam Hee; Tae, Seok; Shin, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sang Chun

    1990-01-01

    We studied sonography of saline filled male urethra in 21 cases, who had a urinary symptoms of urethral stricture. There were 11 cases of anterior urethral stricture, 2 cases of stricture with stone, and 8 cases of posterior urethral stricture. Sonography length of urethral stricture was compared with that of retrograde urethrography. The level and length of urethral stricture in sonography and retrograde urethrography compared to surgical findings in 7 out of 21 cases. The average lengths of anterior urethral strictures measured by sonography and retrograde urethroography were 28.15 and 18.75 mm. In cases of operation, the sonographic measurement was confirmed to be more accurate than urethrographic measurement. Sonography is easier to perform, more available in follow up and has no radiation hazard to the testis than X-ray study. Sonography is more accurate to determine the site, length and degree of anterior urethral stricture than X-ray study. As sonographic evaluations concerning posterior urethra stricture is impossible because of angulations of the urethra in posterior urethra, retrograde urethrography is preferable

  20. Ultrasonographic evaluation of urethral stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Eun; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Nam Hee; Tae, Seok; Shin, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sang Chun [Seoul Red Cross Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    We studied sonography of saline filled male urethra in 21 cases, who had a urinary symptoms of urethral stricture. There were 11 cases of anterior urethral stricture, 2 cases of stricture with stone, and 8 cases of posterior urethral stricture. Sonography length of urethral stricture was compared with that of retrograde urethrography. The level and length of urethral stricture in sonography and retrograde urethrography compared to surgical findings in 7 out of 21 cases. The average lengths of anterior urethral strictures measured by sonography and retrograde urethroography were 28.15 and 18.75 mm. In cases of operation, the sonographic measurement was confirmed to be more accurate than urethrographic measurement. Sonography is easier to perform, more available in follow up and has no radiation hazard to the testis than X-ray study. Sonography is more accurate to determine the site, length and degree of anterior urethral stricture than X-ray study. As sonographic evaluations concerning posterior urethra stricture is impossible because of angulations of the urethra in posterior urethra, retrograde urethrography is preferable.

  1. Health-Care Utilization and Complications of Endoscopic Esophageal Dilation in a National Population

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    Abhinav Goyal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims Esophageal stricture is usually managed with outpatient endoscopic dilation. However, patients with food impaction or failure to thrive undergo inpatient dilation. Esophageal perforation is the most feared complication, and its risk in inpatient setting is unknown. Methods We used National Inpatient Sample (NIS database for 2007–2013. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify patients with esophageal strictures. Logistic regression was used to assess association between hospital/patient characteristics and utilization of esophageal dilation. Results There were 591,187 hospitalizations involving esophageal stricture; 4.2% were malignant. Endoscopic dilation was performed in 28.7% cases. Dilation was more frequently utilized (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; p<0.001, had higher in-hospital mortality (3.1% vs. 1.4%, p<0.001, and resulted in longer hospital stays (5 days vs. 4 days, p=0.01, among cases of malignant strictures. Esophageal perforation was more common in the malignant group (0.9% vs. 0.5%, p=0.007. Patients with malignant compared to benign strictures undergoing dilation were more likely to require percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or jejunostomy (PEG/J tube (14.1% vs. 4.5%, p<0.001. Palliative care services were utilized more frequently in malignant stricture cases not treated with dilation compared to those that were dilated. Conclusions Inpatient endoscopic dilation was utilized in 29% cases of esophageal stricture. Esophageal perforation, although infrequent, is more common in malignant strictures.

  2. Health-Care Utilization and Complications of Endoscopic Esophageal Dilation in a National Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Abhinav; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Yadlapati, Sujani; Singh, Shailender

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal stricture is usually managed with outpatient endoscopic dilation. However, patients with food impaction or failure to thrive undergo inpatient dilation. Esophageal perforation is the most feared complication, and its risk in inpatient setting is unknown. Methods We used National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database for 2007–2013. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify patients with esophageal strictures. Logistic regression was used to assess association between hospital/patient characteristics and utilization of esophageal dilation. Results There were 591,187 hospitalizations involving esophageal stricture; 4.2% were malignant. Endoscopic dilation was performed in 28.7% cases. Dilation was more frequently utilized (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; p<0.001), had higher in-hospital mortality (3.1% vs. 1.4%, p<0.001), and resulted in longer hospital stays (5 days vs. 4 days, p=0.01), among cases of malignant strictures. Esophageal perforation was more common in the malignant group (0.9% vs. 0.5%, p=0.007). Patients with malignant compared to benign strictures undergoing dilation were more likely to require percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or jejunostomy (PEG/J) tube (14.1% vs. 4.5%, p<0.001). Palliative care services were utilized more frequently in malignant stricture cases not treated with dilation compared to those that were dilated. Conclusions Inpatient endoscopic dilation was utilized in 29% cases of esophageal stricture. Esophageal perforation, although infrequent, is more common in malignant strictures. PMID:28301921

  3. Radiologic placement of metallic esophageal stents: preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good, S.; Asch, M.R.; Jaffer, N.; Casson, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of covered, self expanding metallic stents for alleviating stricture associated with malignant esophageal lesions. Patients and methods: Self-expanding metallic stents were placed in 10 patients with dysphagia related to stricture caused by malignant esophageal lesions. The stents were placed fluoroscopically with local anesthesia, and patency of the esophageal lumen was assessed by barium study after the procedure. The patients were then followed clinically. Results: In all 10 cases patency of the lumen was renewed after stent placement. After the procedure 9 of the patients could tolerate a normal or near-normal diet; in the other patient esophageal perforation occurred, and clinical deterioration prevented oral intake of food. In one patient, 2 stents were needed because of the length of the stricture. Two patients experienced reflux after placement of the stent across the gastro-esophageal junction. Another patient had asymptomatic aspiration after stent placement in the proximal esophagus. In 2 patients, symptoms associated with tracheoesophageal fistula were relieved after placement of the stents. Six of the 10 patients died; mean survival after the procedure was 12 (range 1 to 56) weeks. The other 4 patients were alive at the time of writing, having survived for a mean of 7.5 (range 2 to 13) weeks; all of these patients tolerated a near-normal diet. Conclusions: The placement of covered, self-expanding metallic stents is a quick, effective method of palliating dysphagia related to stricture caused by malignant esophageal lesions. (author)

  4. Endoscopic Removal of an Esophageal Stent After Diffuse Hyperplastic Tissue Ingrowth

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    Ivo Boškoski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic placement of esophageal Self-Expandable Metal Stents (SEMS is a therapeutic option for post-surgical esophageal leaks. Partially covered SEMS are mainly designed for malignant esophageal strictures, but are used off-label to close post-surgical leaks due to their lower migration rate than fully covered SEMS, and better adherence to the esophageal wall. Partially covered esophageal SEMS can achieve post-surgical fistula healing, but their removal is difficult due to tissue ingrowth through the uncovered part. A challenging case of a difficult removal of a partially covered esophageal SEMS (remove the indefinite article is (below presented.

  5. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Gelman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty.

  6. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  7. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function

  8. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function.

  9. Esophageal circumferential en bloc endoscopic submucosal dissection: assessment of a new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Pratico, Carlos Alberto; Beuvon, Frédéric; Mangialavori, Luigi; Chryssostalis, Ariane; Camus, Marine; Chaussade, Stanislas; Prat, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Endoscopic esophageal piecemeal mucosectomy for high-grade dysplasia on Barrett's esophagus leads to suboptimal histologic evaluation, as well as recurrence on remaining mucosa. Circumferential en bloc mucosal resection would significantly improve the management of dysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Our aim was to describe a new method of esophageal circumferential endoscopic en bloc submucosal dissection (CESD) in a swine model. After submucosal injection, circumferential incision was performed at each end of the esophageal segment to be removed. Mechanical submucosal dissection was performed from the proximal to the distal incision, using a mucosectomy cap over the endoscope. The removed mucosal ring was retrieved. Clinical, endoscopic, and histologic data were prospectively collected. Esophageal CESD was conducted on 5 pigs. A median mucosal length of 6.5 cm (range, 4 to 8 cm) was removed in the lower third of the esophagus. The mean duration of the procedure was 36 minutes (range, 17 to 80 min). No procedure-related complication, including perforation, was observed. All animals exhibited a mild esophageal stricture at day 7, and a severe symptomatic stricture at day 14. Necropsy confirmed endoscopic findings with cicatricial fibrotic strictures. On histologic examination, an inflammatory cell infiltrate, diffuse fibrosis reaching the muscular layer, and incomplete reepithelialization were observed. CESD enables expeditious resection and thorough examination of large segments of esophageal mucosa in safe procedural conditions, but esophageal strictures occur in the majority of the cases. Efficient methods for stricture prevention are needed for this technique to be developed in humans.

  10. Emprego da submucosa de intestino delgado na correção de estenose esofágica em cães Small intestinal submucosa for reconstruction of esophageal stricture in a dog model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacarias Alves de Souza Filho

    2004-08-01

    esophagogram was performed. Esophageal width was measured at the proximal and middle third portions, before and after the SIS patch placement. Animals were sacrified, and esophagus were sent for histological examinations. RESULTS: No fistula or infection were found. Microscopic analysis revealed complete mucous membrane regeneration, discrete inflamatory reaction and moderate vascular proliferation. Esophageal width was enlarged in 70% of studied animals (43% ± 13% (p = 0,2135. Proximal measurement increased from 0,76cm to 0,95cm; no significantly change occurred at the medial portion. CONCLUSION: SIS proved to be reliable graft reapair for canine esophageal stenotic lesions. It integrates to the esophageal wall and adequately replaces it.

  11. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis characterized by barium esophagography: a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Owen J

    2010-05-21

    Abstract Introduction Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis is a rare condition characterized by the dilatation of the submucosal glands. Case presentation We present a case of esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis in a 72-year-old Caucasian man who presented with dysphagia and with a background history of alcohol abuse. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy of our patient showed an esophageal stricture with abnormal mucosal appearances, but no malignant cells were seen at biopsy. Appearances on a barium esophagram were pathognomonic for esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis. Conclusion We demonstrate the enduring usefulness of barium esophagography in the characterization of abnormal mucosal appearances at endoscopy.

  12. Nitinol Esophageal Stents: New Designs and Clinical Indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strecker, Ernst-Peter; Boos, Irene; Vetter, Sylvia; Strohm, Michael; Domschke, Sigurd

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical use of covered and noncovered, knitted nitinol stents in patients presenting new stent indications. Methods: Self-expandable, knitted nitinol stents were implanted in four patients for treatment of dysphagia. In two patients who had malignant strictures and had esophago-respiratory fistulae and in one patient with an esophagocutaneous fistula, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents were implanted. One patient received a noncovered stent, but a retrograde approach through a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) fistula had to be chosen for recanalization of an esophageal occlusion. Two patients received stents for treatment of benign strictures. Results: Recanalization of the stricture and stent implantation were performed under fluoroscopic control without any procedure-related morbidity or mortality. Dysphagia improved in all patients and the esophageal fistulae could be sealed off by covered stents. During a maximum follow-up of 18 months, there was no stent migration or esophageal perforation. Complications observed were stent stenosis due to food impaction (1/4) and benign stent stenosis (2/2). Most complications could be treated by the interventional radiologist. Conclusion: Self-expandable, covered Nitinol stents provide an option for the treatment of dysphagia combined with esophageal fistulae. In combination with interventional radiology techniques, even complex strictures are accessible. For benign strictures, the value of stent treatment has not yet been proven

  13. Complication after self expandable metallic stent for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagahama, Takeshi; Maruyama, Michio; Kato, Kiyomi; Shinoura, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kumi; Takashima, Itaru; Ebuchi, Masakazu

    2003-01-01

    Major complications after placement of esophageal stent and airway stent were reviewed and evaluated. Four patients, including two patients with perforations and two patients with fistula formation, developed major complications after placement of a self expandable metallic stent. Two patients underwent additional radiation to improve stricture after stent placement. In one patient, stent placement was selected to improve esophageal stricture that occurred after radical radiation therapy. In one patient, migration of stent into the lesion caused a perforation. It can be concluded that additional radiation after stent placement increases the risk of complication. Stent migration also can lead to the risk of perforation. (author)

  14. Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis: A Rare Endoscopic Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Lopes de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old woman, presenting with a 4-year history of progressive dysphagia, was submitted to endoscopic examination. The upper endoscopy revealed a proximal esophageal stricture and inflammatory mucosa associated with multiples small orifices in the esophageal wall, some of them fulfilled with white spots suggestive of fungal infection. This was a typical endoscopic finding of esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis, a benign and rare condition, related to chronic esophagitis and others comorbid states, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease or infectious esophagitis, diabetes mellitus, alcohol consumption, and achalasia. Dysphagia is the predominant symptom and can be accompanied by esophageal stricture in 80% to 90% of patients. The pathogenesis is unknown, and as the pseudodiverticulosis is an intramural finding, endoscopy biopsies are inconclusive. The main histological finding is dilation of the submucosal glands excretory ducts, probably obstructed by inflammatory cells. The treatment consists in management of the underlying diseases and symptoms relief. In this particular case, the patient was submitted to antifungal drugs followed by endoscopic dilation with thermoplastic bougies, with satisfactory improvement of dysphagia.

  15. Esophageal dilatation using the Eder Puestow dilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, C M; Dowling, B L; Gear, M W

    1976-06-01

    We have performed fifty-one dilatations in twenty-six patients using an end-viewing fiberoptic endoscope and Eder Puestow dilators. All (except two) were performed using intravenous diazepam, the majority on an outpatient basis. The only complication has been a single case of aspiration pneumonia. We have found this method of esophageal dilatation particularly useful in the preoperative dilatation of benign strictures, and in those elderly frail patients who are unsuitable for surgery. Transthoracic resection of the stricture is avoided and thus transabdominal repair of the hiatus hernia may be undertaken.

  16. Randomized controlled trial comparing esophageal dilation to no dilation among adults with esophageal eosinophilia and dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitt, R T; Ates, F; Slaughter, J C; Higginbotham, T; Shepherd, B D; Sumner, E L; Vaezi, M F

    2016-11-01

    The role of esophageal dilation in patients with esophageal eosinophilia with dysphagia remains unknown. The practice of dilation is currently based on center preferences and expert opinion. The aim of this study is to determine if, and to what extent, dysphagia improves in response to initial esophageal dilation followed by standard medical therapies. We conducted a randomized, blinded, controlled trial evaluating adult patients with dysphagia and newly diagnosed esophageal eosinophilia from 2008 to 2013. Patients were randomized to dilation or no dilation at time of endoscopy and blinded to dilation status. Endoscopic features were graded as major and minor. Subsequent to randomization and endoscopy, all patients received fluticasone and dexlansoprazole for 2 months. The primary study outcome was reduction in overall dysphagia score, assessed at 30 and 60 days post-intervention. Patients with severe strictures (less than 7-mm esophageal diameter) were excluded from the study. Thirty-one patients were randomized and completed the protocol: 17 randomized to dilation and 14 to no dilation. Both groups were similar with regard to gender, age, eosinophil density, endoscopic score, and baseline dysphagia score. The population exhibited moderate to severe dysphagia and moderate esophageal stricturing at baseline. Overall, there was a significant (P dysphagia score at 30 and 60 days post-randomization compared with baseline in both groups. No significant difference in dysphagia scores between treatment groups after 30 (P = 0.93) or 60 (P = 0.21) days post-intervention was observed. Esophageal dilation did not result in additional improvement in dysphagia score compared with treatment with proton pump inhibitor and fluticasone alone. In patients with symptomatic esophageal eosinophilia without severe stricture, dilation does not appear to be a necessary initial treatment strategy. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  17. Endometriotic stricture of the sigmoid colon presenting with intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to an emergency department with intestinal obstruction secondary to an endometriotic stricture of the sigmoid colon, without evidence of disease elsewhere in the peritoneal cavity. Although large-bowel obstruction is usually caused by a malignant tumour, it can sometimes result from rare causes such as endometriosis.

  18. Evaluation of secondary dose and cancer risk for out-of-field organ in esophageal cancer IMRT in a chinese hospital using atom phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Yaping; He, Lijuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Hongdong; Huo, Wanli; Chen, Zhi; Wang, Zhi; Xu, X. George

    2017-01-01

    There have been few studies on the secondary cancer after radiation treatment in Chinese hospitals. This study has measured out-of-field absorbed organ doses from intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) radiotherapy for esophageal cancer in a Chinese hospital and evaluated the risks of secondary cancer. The dose measurements were based on the thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) and the ATOM phantom, which represents an adult male. Over 100 TLD chips were placed in 35 different organ sites and one group of the same TLDs was set as background contrast. All TLDs were calibrated against the same Linac accelerator performing an IMRT plan for esophageal cancer. The measured doses were used to calculate the secondary cancer risks according to biological effects of ionizing radiation (BEIR) VII methodology. The baseline risks and survival data were based on relevant statistics for the Chinese population. It is found that the out-of-field organ doses depended greatly on the distance between organ sites and the target isocenter. The organ doses decreased exponentially as the distance from the target isocenter increased, and, for distances <15 cm, the organ doses fell off more rapidly and almost decreased by 99.55%. When compared with the calculation results by the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS), most of the out-of-field organ doses were underestimated in the TPS and the percentage of underestimation reached 100% for distant organs such as the bladder, prostate and testis. These trends are due to a known fact that out-of-field organs received secondary radiation resulted from patients and collimator scattering as well as leakage in the gantry head. The higher lifetime attribute risks (LARs) per 100 000 population were in the lower esophagus (186) and lungs (93.2) near the target. But all LARs of considered organs were found to be less than the baseline cancer risks. Results in this article can help to provide a database about the effect of radiotherapy

  19. Biliary Stricture Following Hepatic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B. Matthews

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomic distortion and displacement of hilar structures due to liver lobe atrophy and hypertrophy occasionally complicates the surgical approach for biliary stricture repair. Benign biliary stricture following hepatic resection deserves special consideration in this regard because the inevitable hypertrophy of the residual liver causes marked rotation and displacement of the hepatic hilum that if not anticipated may render exposure for repair difficult and dangerous. Three patients with biliary stricture after hepatectomy illustrate the influence of hepatic regeneration on attempts at subsequent stricture repair. Following left hepatectomy, hypertrophy of the right and caudate lobes causes an anteromedial rotation and displacement of the portal structures. After right hepatectomy, the rotation is posterolateral, and a thoracoabdominal approach may be necessary for adequate exposure. Radiographs obtained in the standard anteroposterior projection may be deceptive, and lateral views are recommended to aid in operative planning.

  20. Successful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) treatment of a symptomatic massive biliary stone proximal to an anastomotic biliary stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Rosangela; Mandolesi, Daniele; Galaverni, Maria Cristina; Azzaroli, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    Postoperative benign biliary stricture in the anastomotic site is one of the most common complications of biliary-enteric anastomosis, with a rate of 6.87% after 2-13 years of follow-up. If untreated, biliary strictures can induce other complications such as recurrent cholangitis, intrahepatic stones, pancreatitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. We report our experience with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) in a patient with a massive symptomatic stone proximal to an anastomotic biliary stricture.

  1. Role of Endoscopy in Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Amanda B; Merves, Jamie; Liacouras, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic allergic (immune-mediated) disease that leads to esophageal dysfunction and feeding disorders in children. Foods, and possibly environmental triggers, cause an inflammatory response in the esophagus, leading to esophageal inflammation, eosinophilic infiltration, and esophageal dysmotility, which may progress to dysphagia, food impaction, and esophageal stricture. Endoscopy with biopsy and histologic evaluation is currently the only method to diagnose EoE. Once diagnosed with EoE, children undergo follow-up endoscopy after therapy initiation and adjustments to ensure remission. Furthermore, children with food impactions or strictures may require endoscopic intervention such as foreign body removal and/or esophageal dilation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Metastatic Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer Presenting Clinically with Esophageal Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Lilit Karapetyan; Heather Laird-Fick; Reuben Cuison

    2017-01-01

    Background. Intra-abdominal metastases of invasive lobular breast cancer (ILBC) may be insidious. We report a case of metastatic ILBC that presented with dysphagia within weeks of a negative mammogram and before the development of intra-abdominal symptoms. Case. A 70-year-old female developed esophageal dysphagia. She underwent EGD which showed a short segment of stricture of the distal esophagus without significant mucosal changes. Biopsy was unremarkable and patient underwent lower esophage...

  3. Dysphagia with malignant stricture of esophagogastric junction: treatment with self-expandable nitinol stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Hyeong; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness, patency and safety of a self-expandable nitinol stent for palliative treatment of malignant stricture of gastroesophageal junction. An esophageal stent was inserted in five consecutive patients with malignant stricture of esophagogastric junction. Histologically, four cases were adenocarcinoma, and one was squamous cell carcinoma. The location and severity of stricture were evaluated with gastrografin just before stent insertion. In one patient with past subtotal gastrectomy, esophagography revealed fistulous fract at stricture site. No technical failure or procedural complications occurred, and improvement of dysphagia was noted in all patients soon after stent insertion. On follow up esophagograms performed 3 to 7 days after stent insertion, all stents were completely expanded and unchanged in positions. In one patient with fistulous connection at stricture site, esophagogram immediately after the procedure revealed complete occlusion of the fistula. Three patients died within 4, 7 and 8 consecutive months after stent insertion. Two patients are alive maintaining adequate body weight and passing most diet. Seft-expandable nitinol stent with it's good longitudinal flexibility and efficient radial force was effective in the palliative treatment of dysphagia in patient with malignant stricture at esophagogastric junction

  4. Dysphagia with malignant stricture of esophagogastric junction: treatment with self-expandable nitinol stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Hyeong; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness, patency and safety of a self-expandable nitinol stent for palliative treatment of malignant stricture of gastroesophageal junction. An esophageal stent was inserted in five consecutive patients with malignant stricture of esophagogastric junction. Histologically, four cases were adenocarcinoma, and one was squamous cell carcinoma. The location and severity of stricture were evaluated with gastrografin just before stent insertion. In one patient with past subtotal gastrectomy, esophagography revealed fistulous fract at stricture site. No technical failure or procedural complications occurred, and improvement of dysphagia was noted in all patients soon after stent insertion. On follow up esophagograms performed 3 to 7 days after stent insertion, all stents were completely expanded and unchanged in positions. In one patient with fistulous connection at stricture site, esophagogram immediately after the procedure revealed complete occlusion of the fistula. Three patients died within 4, 7 and 8 consecutive months after stent insertion. Two patients are alive maintaining adequate body weight and passing most diet. Seft-expandable nitinol stent with it's good longitudinal flexibility and efficient radial force was effective in the palliative treatment of dysphagia in patient with malignant stricture at esophagogastric junction.

  5. Esophageal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E.; Wuttge-Hannig, A.

    2007-01-01

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [de

  6. Health-Care Utilization and Complications of Endoscopic Esophageal Dilation in a National Population

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal, Abhinav; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Yadlapati, Sujani; Singh, Shailender

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal stricture is usually managed with outpatient endoscopic dilation. However, patients with food impaction or failure to thrive undergo inpatient dilation. Esophageal perforation is the most feared complication, and its risk in inpatient setting is unknown. Methods We used National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database for 2007?2013. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify patients with esophageal s...

  7. Health-Care Utilization and Complications of Endoscopic Esophageal Dilation in a National Population

    OpenAIRE

    Abhinav Goyal; Kshitij Chatterjee; Sujani Yadlapati; Shailender Singh

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal stricture is usually managed with outpatient endoscopic dilation. However, patients with food impaction or failure to thrive undergo inpatient dilation. Esophageal perforation is the most feared complication, and its risk in inpatient setting is unknown. Methods We used National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database for 2007–2013. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify patients with esophageal s...

  8. The use of ileocolic segment for esophageal replacement in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshjeet Singh Bal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate and describe the procedure and outcome of ileocolic replacement of esophagus. Materials and Methods: We review 7 children with esophageal injuries, who underwent esophageal replacement using ileocolic segment in Christian Medical College, Vellore, India between 2006 and 2014. Results: The ileocolic segment was used in 7 children with scarred or inadequate esophagus. There were 4 girls and 3 boys, who underwent esophageal replacement using isoperistaltic ileocolic segment in this period. Age at presentation varied from 1 month to 14 years with an average of 4.6 years. The indications for ileocolic replacements were corrosive strictures in 5, failed esophageal atresia repair in one and gastric volvulus related esophageal stricture in another. The average follow-up duration was 37 months. One child with corrosive stricture lost to follow-up and died 2 years later in another center. Other 6 children were free of dysphagia till the last follow-up. Conclusions: Although the ileocolic segment is not commonly used for esophageal substitution, it can be useful in special situations where the substitution needs to reach the high cervical esophagus and also where the stomach is scarred and not suitable for gastric pull-up.

  9. Pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis: radiologic findings with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkovitz, Larry A.; Lorenz, Emily A.; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Kahwash, Samir

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized as a cause of dysphagia or food impaction in pediatric patients. It has a high male predominance and is often associated with a history of allergy or asthma. To correlate fluoroscopic findings in eosinophilic esophagitis with the endoscopic and histologic findings. We retrospectively reviewed the upper gastrointestinal (UGI) findings of eosinophilic esophagitis and correlated them with the clinical, endoscopic and histologic findings in a series of 17 children (12 boys, 5 girls). UGI findings were normal in 12 children, including 4 who had a normal UGI exam after endoscopic disimpaction for an obstructing food bolus. Five children had strictures identified on UGI: one was demonstrated with endoscopy. This suggests that the impactions and strictures were due to an esophageal dysmotility rather than a fixed anatomic abnormality. Because the UGI findings are frequently normal in eosinophilic esophagitis, radiologists need to have a high index of suspicion for this disease. In children with a strong clinical history, especially impaction in the absence of an esophageal stricture, endoscopy and biopsy are indicated for further evaluation. (orig.)

  10. Pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis: radiologic findings with pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkovitz, Larry A. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Mayo Clinic, Division of Pediatric Radiology, E-2, Rochester, MN (United States); Lorenz, Emily A. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Di Lorenzo, Carlo [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Columbus, OH (United States); Kahwash, Samir [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized as a cause of dysphagia or food impaction in pediatric patients. It has a high male predominance and is often associated with a history of allergy or asthma. To correlate fluoroscopic findings in eosinophilic esophagitis with the endoscopic and histologic findings. We retrospectively reviewed the upper gastrointestinal (UGI) findings of eosinophilic esophagitis and correlated them with the clinical, endoscopic and histologic findings in a series of 17 children (12 boys, 5 girls). UGI findings were normal in 12 children, including 4 who had a normal UGI exam after endoscopic disimpaction for an obstructing food bolus. Five children had strictures identified on UGI: one was demonstrated with endoscopy. This suggests that the impactions and strictures were due to an esophageal dysmotility rather than a fixed anatomic abnormality. Because the UGI findings are frequently normal in eosinophilic esophagitis, radiologists need to have a high index of suspicion for this disease. In children with a strong clinical history, especially impaction in the absence of an esophageal stricture, endoscopy and biopsy are indicated for further evaluation. (orig.)

  11. Follow-up of a cohort of children and adolescents with gastro-esophageal reflux disease who were free of reflux esophagitis at initial diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruigómez, Ana; Lundborg, Per; Johansson, Saga; Wallander, Mari-Ann; García Rodríguez, Luis A

    2010-08-01

    Few studies have examined the incidence of complications from gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children and adolescents in primary care. Here we aimed to describe the natural history of GERD in a pediatric population with no reflux esophagitis at initial diagnosis, assessing diagnoses of new esophageal complications and extra-esophageal conditions. We used The Health Improvement Network UK primary care database (which includes data on more than 2 million patients) to identify individuals aged 1-17 years with a first diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux or heartburn in the period 2000-2005, via a computerized search followed by a manual review of the patient records. This search identified 1242 individuals with an incident diagnosis of GERD but no record of esophagitis. This cohort was followed-up to detect new diagnoses of esophageal complications and extra-esophageal conditions. During a mean follow-up period of almost 4 years, 40 children and adolescents had a confirmed new diagnosis of reflux esophagitis (incidence: 10.9 per 1000 person-years). No cases of Barrett's esophagus, esophageal stricture or esophageal ulcer were reported. Individuals with GERD had double the risk of an extra-esophageal condition such as asthma, pneumonia, cough or chest pain compared with children and adolescents with no diagnosis of GERD. Children and adolescents with GERD may be at risk of developing reflux esophagitis and a range of other extra-esophageal conditions, but more severe esophageal complications are rare.

  12. Posterior Tracheopexy for Severe Tracheomalacia Associated with Esophageal Atresia (EA: Primary Treatment at the Time of Initial EA Repair versus Secondary Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hester F. Shieh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available PurposeWe review outcomes of posterior tracheopexy for tracheomalacia in esophageal atresia (EA patients, comparing primary treatment at the time of initial EA repair versus secondary treatment.MethodsAll EA patients who underwent posterior tracheopexy from October 2012 to September 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical symptoms, tracheomalacia scores, and persistent airway intrusion were collected. Indication for posterior tracheopexy was the presence of clinical symptoms, in combination with severe tracheomalacia as identified on bronchoscopic evaluation, typically defined as coaptation in one or more regions of the trachea. Secondary cases were usually those with chronic respiratory symptoms who underwent bronchoscopic evaluation, whereas primary cases were those found to have severe tracheomalacia on routine preoperative dynamic tracheobronchoscopy at the time of initial EA repair.ResultsA total of 118 patients underwent posterior tracheopexy: 18 (15% primary versus 100 (85% secondary cases. Median (interquartile range age was 2 months (1–4 months for primary (22% type C and 18 months (8–40 months for secondary (87% type C cases (p < 0.001. There were statistically significant improvements in most clinical symptoms postoperatively for primary and secondary cases, with no significant differences in any postoperative symptoms between the two groups (p > 0.1. Total tracheomalacia scores improved significantly in primary (p = 0.013 and secondary (p < 0.001 cases. Multivariable Cox regression analysis indicated no differences in persistent airway intrusion requiring reoperation between primary and secondary tracheopexy adjusting for imbalances in age and EA type (p = 0.67.ConclusionPosterior tracheopexy is effective in treating severe tracheomalacia with significant improvements in clinical symptoms and degree of airway collapse on bronchoscopy. With no significant differences in outcomes between primary and

  13. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  14. Balloon catheter dilation of benign esophageal stenosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Guoping; Yu Juming; Zhong Weixing; Zhu Ming; Wu Yeming; Shi Chengren

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the methods and effect of balloon catheter dilation of benign esophageal stenosis in children. Methods: 9 cases had an anastomotic stenosis after surgical correction of esophageal atresia; 11 cases of esophageal stenosis due to ingestion of caustics; one case had an lower esophageal stenosis after Nissen surgery and one case after gastro-esophagoplasty. Age ranged from 17 days to 7 years. Each case had a barium esophagram before balloon dilation. The balloon size varied from 3 to 10 mm in diameter. Results: 21 cases were successful after dilation of balloon catheter. There were no esophageal perforation and complications. The satisfactory results maintained from six months to thirty months. Conclusions: Balloon catheter dilation is a simple, safe and reliable method for the treatment of benign esophageal strictures in children as the first choice

  15. Fluoroscopic extraction of esophageal foreign body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chon, Su Bin; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Sohn, Myung Hee; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul; Song, Young Ho; Choi, Yeon Wha

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report our 5 year experience with fluoroscopic removal of blunt esophageal foreign body or impacted food in 15 consecutive patients who were referred by endoscopists because they couln't remove it endoscopically. The foreign body or impacted food was a piece of meat, a bean, a badug stone or a beef bone. Thirteen patients had underlying disease (11 of corrosive stricture, 2 of postopertive stricture) but 2 patient did not. We removed the object using one of the following 4 techniques: Basket extraction technique. Foley catheter technique, single balloon technique (dilatation of stenosis for passing the food into the stomach and for the treatment of the stricture as well), double balloon technique (removal of the foregin body by trapping it with two valvuloplasty balloons). Removal was successful in all patients. Esophageal performation occurred in one patient using the sibgle balloon technique, who treated nonoperatively by means of fasting, antibiotics and parenteral alimentation. No procedure related death occurred in these series. In conclusion, fliuroscopic removal of blunt esophageal foreign bodies of impacted food with various techniques is promising alternative to esophagoscopic removal

  16. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A H; Iorio, N; Schey, R

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus and is a potential cause of dysphagia and food impaction, most commonly affecting young men. Esophageal manometry findings vary from normal motility to aperistalsis, simultaneous contractions, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus or hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (LES). It remains unclear whether esophageal dysmotility plays a significant role in the clinical symptoms of EoE. Our aim is to review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and effect of treatment on esophageal dysmotility in EoE. A literature search utilizing the PubMed database was performed using keywords: eosinophilic esophagitis, esophageal dysmotility, motility, manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagogram, endoscopic ultrasound, and dysphagia. Fifteen studies, totaling 387 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis were identified as keeping in accordance with the aim of this study and included in this review. The occurrence of abnormal esophageal manometry was reported to be between 4 and 87% among patients with EoE. Esophageal motility studies have shown reduced distensibility, abnormal peristalsis, and hypotonicity of the LES in patients with EoE, which may also mimic other esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia or nutcracker esophagus. Studies have shown conflicting results regarding the presence of esophageal dysmotility and symptoms with some reports suggesting a higher rate of food impaction, while others report no correlation between motor function and dysphagia. Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on

  17. Lymphocytic esophagitis: Report of three cases and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jideh, Bilel; Keegan, Andrew; Weltman, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is a rare condition characterised histologically by high numbers of esophageal intraepithelial lymphocytes without significant granulocytes infiltration, in addition to intercellular edema (“spongiosis”). The clinical significance and natural history of LyE is poorly defined although dysphagia is reportedly the most common symptom. Endoscopic features range from normal appearing esophageal mucosa to features similar to those seen in eosinophilic esophagitis, including esophageal rings, linear furrows, whitish exudates, and esophageal strictures/stenosis. Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease is an inconsistent association. LyE has been associated in paediatric Crohn’s disease, and recently in primary esophageal dysmotility disorder in adults. There are no studies assessing effective treatment strategies for LyE; empirical therapies have included use of proton pump inhibitor and corticosteroids. Esophageal dilatation have been used to manage esophageal strictures. LyE has been reported to run a benign course; however there has been a case of esophageal perforation associated with LyE. Here, we describe the clinical, endoscopic and histopathological features of three patients with lymphocytic esophagitis along with a review of the current literature. PMID:28035315

  18. Clinical outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal diseases: A pooled analysis of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halsema, Emo E.; van Hooft, Jeanin E.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal strictures and benign esophageal leaks in the literature. METHODS: The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and July 2014. Eight prospective

  19. Benign Biliary Strictures and Leaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devière, Jacques

    2015-10-01

    The major causes of benign biliary strictures include surgery, chronic pancreatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune cholangitis. Biliary leaks mainly occur after surgery and, rarely, abdominal trauma. These conditions may benefit from a nonsurgical approach in which endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) plays a pivotal role in association with other minimally invasive approaches. This approach should be evaluated for any injury before deciding about the method for repair. ERCP, associated with peroral cholangioscopy, plays a growing role in characterizing undeterminate strictures, avoiding both unuseful major surgeries and palliative options that might compromise any further management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Lugol staining on stenosis formation induced by radiofrequency ablation of esophageal squamous epithelium: a study in a porcine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schölvinck, D. W.; Alvarez Herrero, L.; Visser, M.; Bergman, J. J. G. H. M.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary data show higher stricture rates after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for early esophageal squamous neoplasia compared with Barrett's esophagus. We studied the effects of Lugol stain (LS) directly prior to RFA on stricture formation in squamous epithelium. Of 16 pigs, the distal half of

  1. Radiologic Findings of Immunoglobulin G4 Related Sclerosing Esophagitis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Byung Hoon; Hwang, Yoon Joon; Han, Yoon Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    We describe a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing esophagitis occurring in a 63-year-old man with progressive dysphagia and 10-kg weight loss over 9 months. An esophagoscopy revealed significant stricture with diffuse mucosal friability and ulceration at mid esophagus level. Barium esophagogram showed diffuse stenosis at the mid and lower esophagus levels with ulcerations and irregularity of the mucosa. Multidetector computed tomography revealed diffuse edematous and circumferential thickening of the submucosa and muscle layer of this esophageal segment. Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) revealed diffuse mild FDG uptake in mid to lower esophagus. Although benign inflammatory lesion was suspected based on the imaging findings, the patient underwent surgery for worsening esophageal stricture and the esophageal lesion was pathologically confirmed as IgG4-related sclerosing esophagitis. Radiologic benignancy and high clinical suspicion for IgG4-related sclerosing disease may help making a proper decision and avoiding unnecessary operation.

  2. Radiologic Findings of Immunoglobulin G4 Related Sclerosing Esophagitis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Byung Hoon; Hwang, Yoon Joon; Han, Yoon Hee

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing esophagitis occurring in a 63-year-old man with progressive dysphagia and 10-kg weight loss over 9 months. An esophagoscopy revealed significant stricture with diffuse mucosal friability and ulceration at mid esophagus level. Barium esophagogram showed diffuse stenosis at the mid and lower esophagus levels with ulcerations and irregularity of the mucosa. Multidetector computed tomography revealed diffuse edematous and circumferential thickening of the submucosa and muscle layer of this esophageal segment. Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) revealed diffuse mild FDG uptake in mid to lower esophagus. Although benign inflammatory lesion was suspected based on the imaging findings, the patient underwent surgery for worsening esophageal stricture and the esophageal lesion was pathologically confirmed as IgG4-related sclerosing esophagitis. Radiologic benignancy and high clinical suspicion for IgG4-related sclerosing disease may help making a proper decision and avoiding unnecessary operation.

  3. Esophageal Replacement in Children: Presentation of 18 Cases and Results of Their Surgical Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Delshad

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Esophageal replacement is indicated in certain circumstances including long gap esophageal atresia,severe strictures due to gastro-esophageal reflux (GER and caustic burns. We analyzed our results of 18 patients who underwent esophageal replacement in our university hospital. Methods:We reviewed esophageal replacements carried out in our department between June 1996 and August 2004.We report 18 patients(4 girls and 14 boys with ages ranging from 3.5 until 30 months.Fifteen patients had long gap atresia,two had strictures due to GER,and one case had caustic burn. Esophageal replacement was performed through an abdominal midline incision by one of three methods, namely: colon transposition in 15, gastric replacement in 2, and gastric tube in 1 case. Results: Leakage and stricture were the most common complications of esophageal replacement.Most deaths were due to aspiration pneumonia and congenital cardiac disease.Conclusion:Esophageal replacement has limited indications.It allows a good functional result,with adequate oral feeding and normal growth.

  4. Advances in urethral stricture management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Maxx A.; Santucci, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stricture/stenosis is a narrowing of the urethral lumen. These conditions greatly impact the health and quality of life of patients. Management of urethral strictures/stenosis is complex and requires careful evaluation. The treatment options for urethral stricture vary in their success rates. Urethral dilation and internal urethrotomy are the most commonly performed procedures but carry the lowest chance for long-term success (0–9%). Urethroplasty has a much higher chance of success (85–90%) and is considered the gold-standard treatment. The most common urethroplasty techniques are excision and primary anastomosis and graft onlay urethroplasty. Anastomotic urethroplasty and graft urethroplasty have similar long-term success rates, although long-term data have yet to confirm equal efficacy. Anastomotic urethroplasty may have higher rates of sexual dysfunction. Posterior urethral stenosis is typically caused by previous urologic surgery. It is treated endoscopically with radial incisions. The use of mitomycin C may decrease recurrence. An exciting area of research is tissue engineering and scar modulation to augment stricture treatment. These include the use of acellular matrices or tissue-engineered buccal mucosa to produce grafting material for urethroplasty. Other experimental strategies aim to prevent scar formation altogether. PMID:28105329

  5. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  6. A Unique Case of a Patient with Rectal Cancer Who Developed Benign Esophageal Stenosis after Localized Rectal Radiation and Systemic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Chahla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute esophagitis and esophageal strictures typically occur after local radiation therapy to the thoracic field. Toxicity is usually limited to the field of radiation and potentially augmented by concomitant use of chemotherapy, however esophageal stricturing due to chemotherapy alone is exceedingly rare. Gastrointestinal toxicity has been previously reported in the setting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-based chemotherapy with abnormal thymidylate synthase or dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activities. We present a unique case of isolated chemotherapy-induced esophageal stricture in the setting of stage IIIa rectal adenocarcinoma which presented shortly after initiation of treatment with 5-FU-based chemotherapy in a patient with normal thymidylate synthase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase assays. These findings prompt further investigation of pathways and potential risk factors leading to esophageal toxicity in patients treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

  7. Treatment of urethral strictures with balloon dilation: A forgotten tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatiou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization and dilation, urethroplasty and endoscopic internal urethrotomy as well. Although treatment option depends on the type, length and aetiology of stricture, the choice can be influenced to varying degrees by the simplicity of the method, the preferences of the patient the available accoutrements and the patient health condition. Both urethroplasty and endoscopic internal urethrotomy require anaesthesia and thus are not suitable for many elder and unfit for surgical treatment patients. On the other hand, dilations are easy to perform in every day clinical practice however they have been associated with iatrogenic urethral trauma. In contrast, balloon dilation under vision dilates by radial application of forces against the stricture, avoiding the potentially shearing forces associated with sequential rigid dilation. Since it reduces the possibility of an iatrogenic urethral trauma and the subsequent spongiofibrosis may lead into improved therapeutic outcomes. In this report we describe a technique for the treatment of urethral strictures with balloon dilation in elder and unfit for surgical treatment patients.

  8. Herpetic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium

  9. Palliative metallic stent placement for managing esophageal cancer of the aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qnqi; Yin Huabin; Yue Wei; Ji Chengzhou; Yang Yufeng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of self-expanding metallic stent in the treatment of the old patients with malignant esophageal stricture. Methods: 32 old patients with malignant esophageal stricture were treated with covered self-expandable metallic stents, 32 stents were placed by X-TV guiding, without pre-dilatation of the stenosis by balloon catheter. Results: All 32 stents were successfully placed, the successful rate was 100%. All of the patients obtained the improvement of the food intake ability. No fatal stent-related complications occurred. The average survival time was 6.5 months. Conclusions: The covered self-expandable metallic stent is effective in the palliative management of malignant esophageal stricture of the aging

  10. Traumatic tracheobronchial stricture treated with the Eder-Puestow dilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erichsen, H G

    1980-09-01

    A case of tracheobronchial stenosis secondary to trauma is presented. Primary reconstruction resulted in stricture in the distal part of the trachea. Resection and anastomosis was followed by restenosis, which had to be treated endoscopically. Endobronchial resections and forceful dilatations with stiff bronchoscopes were done weekly for about 11 months without lasting benefit. After changing to Eder-Puestow dilators, the dilatations could be done at steadily increasing intervals. This method of dilatation was found to be safe, effective and less traumatic.

  11. Self-expendable metallic stents for palliative treatment of malignant esophagogastric strictures: experiences in 103 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ah; Do, Young Soo; Lee, Byung Hee; Oh, Hoon Il; Kim, Soo Ah; Kim, Ki Soo; Chin, Soo Yil [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    To evaluate the effects and complication of self-expandable metallic stent for the treatment of malignant esophagogastric strictures. From September 1991 to March 1995, 110 stents were placed under fluoroscopic guidance in 103 patients. Of the 103 patients, there were 73 patients with esophageal cancer, 14 patients with gastric cancer, 12 patients with recurrence after surgery, three patients with esophageal compression by metastatic mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and one patient with esophageal invasion by lung cancer. Seventeen patients had esophagorespiratory fistulas. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 113 self-expandable metallic stents (99 Song stents, 14 Strecker stents) were placed in 103 patients. After stent placement, 68 (66%) of the patients could ingest solid food, 26 (25.2%) could ingest soft food whereas three (2.9%) were not able to have food. Esophagorespiratory fistulas were occluded immediately after stent insertion. All stents were placed without any technical failures or procedural morbidity or mortality. Complications included restenosis in 13, gastroesophageal reflux in 11, stent tube migration in eight, massive bleeding in four, delayed esophageal perforation in one, stent obstruction by food impaction in one patient. Self-expandable metallic stent seems to be relatively safe and effective procedure in the palliative treatment of malignant esophagogastric stricture.

  12. Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement for the Palliation of Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kun Yung; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Song, Ho Young; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Park, Jung Hoon

    2017-07-01

    Esophageal stents have been used to palliate patients with dysphagia caused by esophageal cancer. Early rigid plastic prostheses have been associated with a high risk of complications. However, with the development of self-expanding stents, it has developed into a widely accepted method for treating malignant esophageal strictures and esophagorespiratory fistulas (ERFs). The present review covers various aspects of self-expanding metallic stent placement for palliating esophageal cancer, including its types, placement procedures, indications, contraindications, complications, and some of innovations that will become available in the future. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  13. Mitomycin C application in resistant caustic esophageal stricture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    procedures and in laryngotracheal stenosis [4]. Topical application of .... replacement [1], stents with its high incidence of failure and morbidity [5], and .... 8 Fröhlich T, Greess H, Köhler H. Topical mitomycin C treatment of a benign oesophageal ...

  14. Interventional management of tracheobronchial strictures

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Ji Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Tracheobronchial balloon dilation and stent placement have been well used in the treatment of patients with benign and/or malignant diseases. Balloon dilation is the first option in the treatment of benign airway stenosis. Although balloon dilation is simple and fast, recurrence rate is high. Stent placement promptly relieves acute airway distress from malignant extraluminal and intraluminal airway obstruction. Temporary stent placement may be an alternative for benign airway strictures refra...

  15. Effectiveness of a new nitinol stent manufactured locally, in the treatment of the obstruction malign esophageal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano, Rodrigo; Ruiz, Mario; Juliao Banos, Fabian; Sanin, Eugenio; Alvarez, Oscar; Lopera, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Esophageal strictures and esophasorespiratory fistulas are complications of malignant esophageal tumors and benign conditions, which are difficult to manage. The efficacy of a locally (Medellin-Colombia) produced self- expanding metal stents (SEMS) for palliation of malignant esophageal strictures and fistulas was investigated prospectively. Eighty-one SEMS were inserted in 77 patients, 73 patients with malignant esophageal stricture (l0 with fistula) and 4 benign. Our series included 45 men and 32 women, of whom median age was 65 years. Sixty-three stents were inserted for malignant strictures, ten for esophagus-tracheal fistula, and four for benign conditions. Stents were inserted endoscopically only in 83% and under endoscopy and fluoroscopic control in 17%. SEMS implantation was technically successful in 100%. A second stentins was needed in four patients. Median dysphasia score improved from 2,8 to 1,4 (p<0,0l) the covered SEMS was successful in completely sealing 100% of the fistulas. Complication occurred in 28,4% patients. Procedure-related mortality was 0%. We conclude that treatment of malignant esophageal obstructions, including esophasorespiratory fistulas, with SEMS locally produced is a good alternative palliative; Furthermore SEMS implantation seems safe in the case of benign stenoses

  16. [Primary esophageal motility disorders; especially about esophageal achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Sakai, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders are classified primary and secondary, and primary esophageal motility disorders are classified esophageal achalasia and other diseases by manometry. An esophageal emptying disorder associated with insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and elimination of peristaltic waves on the esophageal body is the major abnormality of achalasia. Esophagogram, endoscopy, and manometry are used for diagnosis. As pharmacological therapy, administration of a calcium channel blocker or nitrate is useful. The pharmacological therapy is not recommended as long-term basic therapy but as a temporary treatment. At 1st, the balloon dilation method is chosen in treatment of achalasia Surgical treatment is indicated in the following cases: (1) Patients uneffected by balloon dilation, (2) Flask type with grade II to III dilation, and sigmoid type, (3) the gradual progression to the pathophysiological stage, (4) young patients, (5) complicated with esophageal cancer. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure is the most popular surgical procedure, recently. It is somewhat difficult to perform surgical treatment for this functional disease. We should select the most suitable individualized treatment with efficient comprehension of the pathophysiological situation.

  17. Successful treatment of esophageal metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma using the da Vinci robotic surgical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonnuch, Wiroon; Akaraviputh, Thawatchai; Nino, Carnivale; Yiengpruksawan, Anusak; Christiano, Arthur Andrew

    2011-01-01

    A 59-year-old man with metastatic an esophageal tumor from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) presented with progressive dysphagia. He had undergone liver transplantation for HCC three and a half years prevously. At presentation, his radiological and endoscopic examinations suggested a submucosal tumor in the lower esophagus, causing a luminal stricture. We performed complete resection of the esophageal metastases and esophagogastrostomy reconstruction using the da Vinci robotic system. Recovery was uneventful and he was been doing well 2 mo after surgery. α-fetoprotein level decreased from 510 ng/mL to 30 ng/mL postoperatively. During the follow-up period, he developed a recurrent esophageal stricture at the anastomosis site and this was successfully treated by endoscopic esophageal dilatation. PMID:21765971

  18. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Dietary therapy and nutrition management of eosinophilic esophagitis: ... of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract . 2017;5(2): ...

  19. Topical hemostatic powder promotes reepithelialization and reduces scar formation after extensive esophageal mucosal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beye, B; Barret, M; Alatawi, A; Beuvon, F; Nicco, C; Pratico, C A; Chereau, C; Chaussade, S; Batteux, F; Prat, F

    2016-08-01

    The development of techniques for endoscopic resection has provided new strategies for radical conservative treatment of superficial esophageal neoplasms, even those that are circumferential, such as Barrett's neoplasia. However, it is necessary to prevent the formation of scar tissue that can be responsible for esophageal strictures following circumferential resection. Preliminary data have suggested the possible efficacy of a hemostatic powder in the promotion of wound healing. The study aims to assess the effectiveness of Hemospray (Cook Medical) in a swine model of post-endoscopic esophageal stricture. Our prospective controlled study included 21 pigs. A 6-cm circumferential submucosal dissection of the esophagus (CESD) was performed in each pig. Group 1 (n = 11) only underwent CESD and Group 2 (n = 10) had repeated Hemospray applications after CESD. Clinical, endoscopic, and radiological monitoring were performed, blood levels of four inflammatory or pro-fibrotic cytokines were assessed, and histological analysis was performed. Median esophageal diameter was greater in the group treated with Hemospray (2 mm [1-3] vs. 3 mm [2-4], P = 0.01), and the rate of symptomatic esophageal stricture was 100% and 60% in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.09). The thicknesses of esophageal fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltrate were significantly lower in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P = 0.002 and 0.0003, respectively). The length of the neoepithelium was greater in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P = 0.0004). Transforming growth factor-β levels were significantly lower in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P = 0.01). The application of Hemospray after esophageal CESD reduces scar tissue formation and promotes reepithelialization, and therefore is a promising therapeutic approach in the prevention of post-endoscopic esophageal stricture. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  20. Review of the Burden of Esophageal Cancer in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Wan-Nor-Asyikeen, Wan Adnan; Norsa'adah, Bachok

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the top leading causes of cancer-related deaths in Malaysia. To date, neither the prevalence nor incidence of esophageal cancer nationally have been recorded. Esophageal cancer remains a major and lethal health problem even if it is not common in Malaysia. The late presentation of esophageal cancer makes it a difficult and challenging medical problem. Therefore, more governmental and non-governmental organizations of Malaysia should emphasize primary and secondary prevention strategies.

  1. Balloon dilatation of iatrogenic urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acunas, B.; Acunas, G.; Gokmen, E.; Celik, L.

    1988-01-01

    Balloon dilatation of the urethra was performed in five patients with iatrogenic urethral strictures. The urethral strictures were successfully negotiated and dilated in all patients. Redilatation became necessary in a period ranging from 3 to 10 months. The authors believe that balloon dilatation of the urethra can be safely and successfully performed; the procedure produces minimal trauma and immediate relief of symptoms. (orig.)

  2. Male urethral strictures and their management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Lindsay A.; McAninch, Jack W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2014-01-01

    Male urethral stricture disease is prevalent and has a substantial impact on quality of life and health-care costs. Management of urethral strictures is complex and depends on the characteristics of the stricture. Data show that there is no difference between urethral dilation and internal urethrotomy in terms of long-term outcomes; success rates range widely from 8–80%, with long-term success rates of 20–30%. For both of these procedures, the risk of recurrence is greater for men with longer strictures, penile urethral strictures, multiple strictures, presence of infection, or history of prior procedures. Analysis has shown that repeated use of urethrotomy is not clinically effective or cost-effective in these patients. Long-term success rates are higher for surgical reconstruction with urethroplasty, with most studies showing success rates of 85–90%. Many techniques have been utilized for urethroplasty, depending on the location, length, and character of the stricture. Successful management of urethral strictures requires detailed knowledge of anatomy, pathophysiology, proper patient selection, and reconstructive techniques. PMID:24346008

  3. A brief review on anterior urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of urethral strictures remains a challenging field in urology even though there are a variety of procedures to treat it at present, as no one approach is superior over another. This paper reviewed the surgical options for the management of different sites and types of anterior urethral stricture, providing a brief discussion of the controversies regarding this issue and suggesting possible future advancements. Among the existing procedures, simple dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy are more commonly used for short urethral strictures ( <1 cm, soft and no previous intervention. Currently, urethroplasty using buccal mucosa or penile skin is the most widely adopted clinical techniques and have proved successful. Nonetheless, complications such as donor site morbidity remain problem. Tissue engineering techniques are considered as a promising solution for urethral reconstruction, but require further investigation, as does stem cell therapy. Keywords: Anterior urethral strictures, Urethral reconstruction, Tissue engineering, Urethral strictures

  4. Percutaneous balloon dilatation for transplant ureteral strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Chul [Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Taechun (Korea, Republic of); Banner, Marc P [University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-09-15

    We report 10 kidney allografted patients treated for 11 ureteral strictures with standard endourlogic balloon catheter dilatation and internal stenting between August 1979 and December 1991. They have been followed until 2 to 140 months (mean 42). We compared and analyzed the 6 successful strictures (54%) and 5 unsuccessful strictures. There was no statistically significant difference of demographic, clinical and radiologic interventional techniques between two groups. But there was slightly higher success rate in abruptly narrowed shorter fibrotic strictures in ureteroneocystomy sites than smoothly taped longer ones in other sites of the ureter. Longterm stenting by the transplantation team with cystoscopic removal of internal ureteral stents by urologists resulted in 3 cases of stent occlusion, encrustation or fracture. Exact early diagnosis of ureteral stricture with continued close follow up and proper radiologic interventional procedure with optimal stenting period may increase the success rate and still provide an alternative to surgery.

  5. Challenges in oral drug delivery in patients with esophageal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappelle, Wouter F W; Siersema, Peter D; Bogte, Auke; Vleggaar, Frank P

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a commonly reported symptom with various benign and malignant causes. Esophageal dysphagia can impede intake of oral medication, which often poses a major challenge for both patients and physicians. The best way to address this challenge depends of the cause of dysphagia. The pathophysiology of esophageal dysphagia is discussed, diagnostic tools to determine its cause are reviewed and recent developments in the treatment of esophageal dysphagia are discussed. Alternative options to administer medication in dysphagia are discussed and the appropriateness of them reviewed. Two ways can be followed to allow medication intake in patients with esophageal dysphagia, i.e. altering medication or resolving dysphagia. The latter is generally preferred, since esophageal dysphagia rarely only impedes medication intake. Esophageal resection is possible in more advanced esophageal cancer stages due to advances in neo-adjuvant therapy. Due to recent improvements in intraluminal radiotherapy, it can be expected that this will be the primary treatment in a palliative setting. Temporary self-expandable metal stent placement is a promising new alternative for bougienage in difficult-to-treat benign strictures.

  6. N-acetylcysteine for the prevention of stricture after circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection of the esophagus: a randomized trial in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Batteux, Frédéric; Beuvon, Frédéric; Mangialavori, Luigi; Chryssostalis, Ariane; Pratico, Carlos; Chaussade, Stanislas; Prat, Frédéric

    2012-05-28

    Circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection (CESD) of the esophagus would allow for both the eradication of Barrett's esophagus and its related complications, such as advanced neoplasia. However, such procedures generally induce inflammatory repair resulting in a fibrotic stricture. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is an antioxidant that has shown some efficacy against pulmonary and hepatic fibrosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the benefit of NAC in the prevention of esophageal cicatricial stricture after CESD in a swine model. Two groups of six pigs each were subjected to general anesthesia and CESD: after randomization, a first group received an oral NAC treatment regimen of 100 mg/kg/day, initiated one week before the procedure, whereas a second group was followed without any prophylactic treatment. Follow-up endoscopies took place seven, fourteen, twenty-one, and twenty-eight days after CESD. Necropsy, histological assessment of esophageal inflammation, and fibrosis were performed on day 28. The median esophageal lumen diameter on day 21 (main judgment criterion) was 4 mm (range 2 to 5) in group 1 and 3 mm (range 1 to 7) in group 2 (P = 0.95). No significant difference was observed between the two groups regarding clinical evaluation (time before onset of clinically significant esophageal obstruction), number of dilations, esophageal inflammation and fibrosis, or oxidative stress damage on immunohistochemistry. Despite its antioxidant effect, systemic administration of NAC did not show significant benefit on esophageal fibrosis in our animal model of esophageal wound healing within the experimental conditions of this study. Since the administered doses were relatively high, it seems unlikely that NAC might be a valuable option for the prevention of post-endoscopic esophageal stricture.

  7. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Weiss

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on patients with EoE.

  8. Dysphagia as a manifestation of esophageal tuberculosis: a report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Aurora

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Esophageal involvement by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is rare and the diagnosis is frequently made by means of an esophageal biopsy during the evaluation of dysphagia. There are few cases reported in the literature. Case presentation We present two cases of esophageal tuberculosis in 85- and 65-year-old male Caucasian patients with initial complaints of dysphagia and epigastric pain. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy resulted in the diagnosis of esophageal tuberculosis following the biopsy of lesions of irregular mucosa in one case and a sessile polyp in the other. Pulmonary tuberculosis was detected in one patient. In one patient esophageal stricture developed as a complication. Antituberculous therapy was curative in both patients. Conclusion Although rare, esophageal tuberculosis has to be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Pulmonary involvement has important implications for contact screening.

  9. [Eight Cases of Esophagus and Tracheobronchial Stenting for Advanced Esophageal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Yujiro; Takachi, Ko; Tsujimura, Naoto; Wakasugi, Masaki; Hirota, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Oshima, Satoshi

    2017-11-01

    Malignant stricture and fistula of the esophagus and tracheobronchus adversely affect the quality of life(QOL)in patients with advanced esophageal cancer. Stenting is one ofthe therapies available for these patients. We investigated the outcomes ofesophagus and tracheobronchial stenting in our institution. Eight patients with advanced esophageal cancer underwent double stenting from 2010 to 2016. Among them, 4 patients underwent double stenting as planned. One patient underwent an emergency tracheal stenting because ofstenosis ofthe trachea caused by esophageal stenting. Three patients underwent tracheobronchial stenting later on because ofan increase in the tumor size after esophageal stenting. Dysphagia score was improved in 5(67.5%)out ofthe 8 patients. Respiratory symptoms were improved in all patients, and 4 patients(50.0%) were discharged. The median survival time after esophageal stenting was 70.5 days. Esophagus and tracheobronchial stenting for advanced esophageal cancer was useful for the improvement of the QOL.

  10. Esophageal Lichen Planus: Clinical and Radiographic Findings in Eight Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschecker, Andreas M; Levine, Marc S; Whitson, Matthew J; Tondon, Rashmi; Rubesin, Stephen E; Furth, Emma E; Metz, David C

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the clinical and radiographic findings of esophageal lichen planus. A search of computerized medical records identified 15 patients with pathologic findings of esophageal lichen planus on endoscopic biopsy specimens. Three other patients had presumed esophageal lichen planus, although no biopsy specimens were obtained. Twelve of these 18 patients (67%) had double-contrast esophagography performed at our institution; for eight of the 12 patients (67%), the studies revealed abnormalities in the esophagus. These eight patients constituted our study group. The barium esophagrams and medical records of these eight patients were reviewed to determine the clinical, radiographic, and endoscopic findings of esophageal lichen planus as well as the treatment and patient outcome. All eight patients were women (median age, 66.5 years), and all eight presented with dysphagia (mean duration, 3.2 years). Four patients had previous lichen planus that involved the skin (n = 1), the oral cavity (n = 2), or both (n = 1), and one patient later had lichen planus that involved the vagina. Five patients had a small-caliber esophagus with diffuse esophageal narrowing. The remaining three patients had segmental strictures in the cervical (n = 1), upper thoracic (n = 1), and distal thoracic (n = 1) esophagus. Esophageal lichen planus typically occurs in older women with longstanding dysphagia and often develops in the absence of extraesophageal disease. Barium esophagrams may reveal a small-caliber esophagus or, less commonly, segmental esophageal strictures. Greater awareness of the radiographic findings of esophageal lichen planus hopefully will lead to earlier diagnosis and better management of this condition.

  11. Management of Benign Biliary Strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Martin, Derrick F.

    2002-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures are most commonly a consequence of injury at laparoscopic cholecystectomy or fibrosis after biliary-enteric anastomosis. These strictures are notoriously difficult to treat and traditionally are managed by resection and fashioning of acholedocho- or hepato-jejunostomy. Promising results are being achieved with newer minimally invasive techniques using endoscopic or percutaneous dilatation and/or stenting and these are likely to play an increasing role in the management. Even low-grade biliary obstruction carries the risks of stone formation, ascending cholangitis and hepatic cirrhosis and it is important to identify and treat this group of patients. There is currently no consensus on which patient should have what type of procedure, and the full range of techniques may not be available in all hospitals. Careful assessment of the risks and likely benefits have to be made on an individual basis. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the options available. The techniques of endoscopic and percutaneous dilatation and stenting are described with evaluation of the likely success and complication rates and compared to the gold standard of biliary-enteric anastomosis

  12. Esophageal replacement in children: Challenges and long-term outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampiero Soccorso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of a nonexistent or damaged esophagus continues to pose a significant challenge to pediatric surgeons. Various esophageal replacement grafts and techniques have not produced consistently good outcomes to emulate normal esophagus. Therefore, many techniques are still being practiced and recommended with no clear consensus. We present a concise literature review of the currently used techniques and with discussions on the advantages and anticipated morbidity. There are no randomized controlled pediatric studies to compare different types of esophageal replacements. Management and graft choice are based on geographical and personal predilections rather than on any discernible objective data. The biggest series with long-term outcome are reported for gastric transposition and colonic replacement. Comparison of different studies shows no significant difference in early (graft necrosis and anastomotic leaks or late complications (strictures, poor feeding, gastro-esophageal reflux, tortuosity of the graft, and Barrett′s esophagus. The biggest series seem to have lower complications than small series reflecting the decennials experience in their respective centers. Long-term follow-up is recommended following esophageal replacement for the development of late strictures, excessive tortuosity, and Barrett′s changes within the graft. Once child overcomes initial morbidity and establishes oral feeding, long-term consequences and complications of pediatric esophageal replacement should be monitored and managed in adult life.

  13. A case report on esophageal tuberculosis – A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatsal Khanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a rare form of tuberculosis in a patient presenting with dysphagia. Patient was subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, which revealed an ulcerative growth in the distal esophagus. Histopathology revealed esophageal tuberculosis. Patient was managed conservatively with Anti-Tuberculosis Treatment (ATT. Follow up endoscopy after two months revealed resolution of the growth and patient was symptomatically better. In spite of the rare nature of the disease, it can be managed effectively with ATT to avoid complications (fistula, stricture, and esophageal perforation, which might warrant surgery.

  14. Urethroplasty, by perineal approach, for bulbar and membranous urethral strictures in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenfeld, Ofer Z; Gdor, Joshua; Katz, Ran; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov; Landau, Ezekiel H

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of urethroplasty for bulbar and membranous urethral strictures using the perineal approach in children and adolescents. Urethroplasty by the perineal approach is considered the best treatment for bulbar and membranous urethral strictures in adults. It is not as clear whether this also holds true in children, because the published data addressing this question are scant. We retrospectively reviewed our urethroplasty database to identify patients who had undergone urethroplasty using the perineal approach surgery at age 1 to 13 years (children) and 14 to 18 years (adolescents). A total of 14 patients who had undergone urethroplasty by the perineal approach were identified, including 5 children (mean age 10.8 years) and 9 adolescents (mean age 16.7 years). Of the 14 patients, 7 had membranous and 7 bulbar urethral strictures. The membranous strictures were all secondary to pelvic fractures. The bulbar strictures were "idiopathic" in 57%, traumatic in 29%, and secondary to hypospadias in 14%. All bulbar strictures had been previously treated for 2.5 years, on average, by repeated dilation or urethrotomy that failed. Anastomotic urethroplasty was used in 79% of the patients and tissue transfer techniques in the remainder. The mean follow-up was 30 months (range 12 to 54). Surgery was primarily successful in 93% of the patients, and subsequently successful in 100%. The mean maximal urinary flow increased from 2.65 mL/s preoperatively to 27.65 mL/s postoperatively. No significant complications occurred, and success was similar in both groups. In pediatric patients, as in adults, bulbar and membranous strictures can be treated successfully with urethroplasty using the perineal approach. These patients should probably not be treated "conservatively" with urethral dilation or endoscopic incision. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm that these good results are maintained as these patients cross into adulthood, especially for those who

  15. A Rare Coincidence of Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis and Esophageal Atresia with TracheoEsophageal Fistula: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim Coskun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The coincidence of Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis (IHPS and Esophageal Atresia (EA with Tracheo-Esophageal Fistula (TEF is rare. Although, vomiting and regurgitation in operated cases of EA and TEF are attributed to Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER and the stricture of the anastomosis, it may be also associated with IHPS as well. We report a case of 3-hour-old female infant, who had EA and TEF operation and diagnosed to have IHPS at 9th week of age. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent complications.

  16. The significance of stricture length and prior treatments

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The median age was 49.5 years (range 21–90), median stricture length was 4 cm (range 1–18 cm) and the overall recurrence rate was 27.8%. Postinfectious strictures, pan urethral strictures or multiple strictures involving the penile and bulbar urethra were more common. Most patients had penile circular ...

  17. Sequential stenotic strictures of the small bowel leading to obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are primarily caused by adhesions, hernias, neoplasms, or inflammatory strictures. Intraluminal strictures are an uncommon cause of SBO. This report describes our findings in a unique case of sequential, stenotic intraluminal strictures of the small intestine, discusses the differential diagnosis of intraluminal intestinal strictures, and reviews the literature regarding intraluminal pathology.

  18. Esophageal hypermotility: cause or effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespin, O M; Tatum, R P; Yates, R B; Sahin, M; Coskun, K; Martin, A V; Wright, A; Oelschlager, B K; Pellegrini, C A

    2016-07-01

    Nutcracker esophagus (NE), Jackhammer esophagus (JHE), distal esophageal spasm (DES), and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES) are defined by esophageal manometric findings. Some patients with these esophageal motility disorders also have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. It is unclear to what extent these patients' symptoms are caused by the motility disorder, the acid reflux, or both. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) on esophageal motility disorders, gastroesophageal reflux, and patient symptoms. Between 2007 and 2013, we performed high-resolution esophageal manometry on 3400 patients, and 221 patients were found to have a spastic esophageal motility disorder. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to determine the manometric abnormality, presence of gastroesophageal symptoms, and amount of esophageal acid exposure. In those patients that underwent LNF, we compared pre- and postoperative esophageal motility, gastroesophageal symptom severity, and esophageal acid exposure. Of the 221 patients with spastic motility disorders, 77 had NE, 2 had JHE, 30 had DES, and 112 had HTLES. The most frequently reported primary and secondary symptoms among all patients were: heartburn and/or regurgitation, 69.2%; respiratory, 39.8%; dysphagia, 35.7%; and chest pain, 22.6%. Of the 221 patients, 192 underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 103 demonstrated abnormal distal esophageal acid exposure. Abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring was detected in 62% of patients with heartburn and regurgitation, 49% of patients with respiratory symptoms, 36.8 % of patients with dysphagia, and 32.6% of patients with chest pain. Sixty-six of the 103 patients with abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring underwent LNF. Thirty-eight (13NE, 2JHE, 6 DES, and 17 HTLES) of these 66 patients had a minimum of 6-month postoperative follow-up that included clinical evaluation, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour pH monitoring

  19. Esophageal microbiome in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kirk Harris

    Full Text Available The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis.In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST. Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease.Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects.Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD.

  20. Clinical evaluation of the efficacy and influencing factors for stent placement in treating benign and malignant esophageal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaohua; He Jianrong; Lin Kaiqin; Jin Honglai; Li Maoquan; Zhang Qing

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical effectiveness and influence factors in the treatment of benign and malignant esophageal stenosis by placing esophageal stent. Methods: A series of this research comprised of 29 cases with esophageal cancer, 10 cardiac carcinoma, 5 cardiac achalasia, 6 benign esophageal stricture after operation. The lengths of lesion ranged from 2 to 14 cm in length with mean of 7.3 cm. Fistula were found among malignant esophageal stenosis in 6 cases. According to the dysphagia scores, 12 cases were designated at I grade, 31 with II, and 14 with III. 46 cases of malignancy were undertaken radiation therapy combined with transcatheter arterial chemotherapy from 15 to 30 days after stent placement. Results: 62 stents were placed in 57 cases (52 domestic stents, 10 Boston ultraflex), including 4 cases with 2 stents being once placed, 1 case with second time stent placement because of restenosis 4 month later. All stents were placed successfully without serious complications, such as esophageal perforation, massive hemorrhage. 5 cases of cardiac achalasia and 6 cases of benign esophageal stricture are still alive now. The survival rates of 6, 12, 24 and 36 months in 46 malignant cases, were 67.4%(31/46), 43.5%(20/46), 26.1%(12/46), and 19.6(9/46) respectively. Dysphagia were relieved significantly from 7 to 15 days after stent placement. Conclusions: Esophageal stent placement combined with radiation therapy and transcatheter arterial chemotherapy could improve patient life qualities and survival rates significantly in malignant stricture. The effects on benign esophageal stricture by stent placement are comparable with that of surgical treatment

  1. Esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, O.; Ganem, G.; Denis, F.; Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Pradier, O.; Martin, P.; Mirabel, X.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancers are highly malignant tumours with often a poor prognosis, except for minimal lesions treated with surgery. Radiation therapy, or combined radiation and chemotherapy is the most used therapeutic modality, alone or before oesophagectomy. The delineation of target volumes is now more accurate owing the possibility to use routinely the new imaging techniques (mainly PET). The aim of this work is to precise the radio-anatomical particularities, the pattern of spread of esophageal cancer and the principles of 3D conformal radiotherapy illustrated with a clinical case. (authors)

  2. Esophageal abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marc S; Carucci, Laura R

    2018-06-01

    Fluoroscopic esophagography is a widely available, safe, and inexpensive test for detecting gastroesophageal reflux disease. In this article, we review the technique for performing a high-quality esophagram, including upright, double-contrast views of the esophagus and cardia with high-density barium; prone, single-contrast views of the esophagus with low-density barium; and evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux. We then discuss the radiographic findings associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease, including esophageal dysmotility, reflux esophagitis, peptic strictures, and Barrett's esophagus. Finally, we consider the differential diagnosis for the various radiographic findings associated with this condition. When carefully performed and interpreted, the esophagram is a useful test for evaluating gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications.

  3. Stricture of the duodenum and jejunum in an abused child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, P.; Applegate, K.E.; Buonomo, C.

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of abdominal injury secondary to child abuse in which the child had both a duodenal hematoma and contained perforations of the duodenum and proximal jejunum. These injuries were evaluated by both CT scan and upper gastrointestinal (GI) series. The child's nausea and vomiting persisted despite conservative treatment; after 3 weeks a repeat upper GI series demonstrated high-grade duodenal obstruction. An exploratory laparotomy was performed and a calcified, fibrotic mesentery and strictures in the distal duodenum and proximal jejunum were found. To our knowledge, his unusual complication of blunt abdominal trauma has not been described in association with child abuse. (orig.)

  4. A Simple Technique to Facilitate Treatment of Urethral Strictures with Optical Internal Urethrotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Papadatou, Aggeliki; Moschouris, Hippocrates; Kornezos, Ioannis; Pavlis, Anargiros; Christopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization, urethroplasty, endoscopic internal urethrotomy, and dilation. Optical internal urethrotomy offers faster recovery, minimal scarring, and less risk of infection, although recurrence is possible. However, technical difficulties associated with poor visualization of the stenosis or of the uret...

  5. Esophageal perforation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... esophagus into the space around the lungs. Collapsed lung. X-rays taken after you drink a non-harmful dye can help pinpoint the location of the perforation. You may also have chest CT scan look for an abscess in the chest or esophageal cancer.

  6. Esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas in esophageal cancer (EC) has changed, and focus directed towards tumors of the distal esophagus and the esophagogastric junction. The genetic events leading to EC are not fully clarified, but important risk factors have been...

  7. Salivary gland enlargement during oesophageal stricture dilatation.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, D.

    1980-01-01

    A case of recurrent salivary gland enlargement occurring during fibreoptic oesophagoscopy and oesophageal stricture dilatation with Eder-Puestow dilators is described. The genesis of this condition is discussed and its transient and usually benign nature emphasized.

  8. Laparoscopic Collis gastroplasty and Dor fundoplication for reflux esophagitis complicated by a penetrating ulcer and shortened esophagus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Fumiaki; Omura, Nobuo; Tsuboi, Kazuto; Nakada, Koji; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2007-08-01

    The patient was a 72-year-old man, who was referred to us at the beginning of July 2005 with a chief complaint of difficulty with swallowing. After a thorough medical examination, the patient was diagnosed with a penetrating ulcer due to reflux esophagitis, lower esophageal stricture, Barrett esophagus, and shortened esophagus. After administration of a proton pump inhibitor and 2 sessions of endoscopic dilatation, esophagitis was cured and the stricture was eliminated. Subsequently, Collis gastroplasty and Dor fundoplication, which seemed appropriate to certainly avoid injuring communication with the mediastinum created by the penetrating ulcer and provide radical cure, were performed laparoscopically. The patient made a good postoperative progress, was discharged on the 11th hospital day, and is now being followed up on an outpatient basis. There have been no signs of recurrence of esophagitis, and the penetrating ulcer was cured. To our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous laparoscopic Collis gastroplasty and Dor fundoplication in the English literature.

  9. Endoductal tissue sampling of biliary strictures through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopan creatography (ERCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, V; Antonelli, G; Vincenti, M; Gatteschi, B

    1997-01-01

    Pathological proof of malignant in biliary strictures is useful in the preoperative setting as it helps define therapeutic planning and prognosis, and reduces the length of the subsequent surgical intervention. However, it is difficult to obtain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the yield of histological and cytological examination of endobiliary samples obtained during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Endobiliary forceps biopsy and brush cytology were performed during ERCP examination in 52 consecutive patients, 36 with malignant and 16 with benign strictures. Histology and cytology turned out to have the same sensitivity (53%). The gain in sensitivity achieved by combining the two techniques was limited, reaching a value of 61%. The specificity, however, was 100% for both methods. Most of the few complications observed were due to sphincterotomy and subsided spontaneously or with medical treatment. However, one patient experienced a serous complication and chose to be treated by surgical intervention. The complication was caused by forceps biopsy. This study shows that 1) sampling of biliary strictures during ERCP is the primary approach to tissue diagnosis; 2) brush cytology alone is sufficient in clinical practice; 3) forceps biopsy must always be used to sample intra-ampullary strictures but should be considered as a secondary step to sample strictures located more proximally, in the bile ducta, if previous cytology was negative.

  10. Expandable metallic stents for tracheobronchial stenoses in esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamori, S; Fujita, H; Hayashi, A; Tayama, K; Mitsuoka, M; Ohtsuka, S; Shirouzu, K

    1996-09-01

    Tracheobronchial stenosis in patients with esophageal cancer can be life threatening. Few reports have discussed use of expandable metallic stents for central airway stenoses in patients with esophageal cancer. Twelve patients with esophageal cancer underwent placement of expandable metallic stents for respiratory distress caused by tracheobronchial stricture. Single or double metallic stents were placed in the stenotic airways under fluoroscopic guidance. Improvement in respiratory symptoms and clinical outcome were assessed. Most stenoses were located in the trachea or the left main bronchus. From one to four expandable metallic stents were placed in each stricture site, with immediate relief of respiratory symptoms in 8 patients. One patient with tracheomalacia in alive 3 years after stent placement and another is alive 6 months after stent insertion. The other 10 patients lived from 10 to 70 days (mean; survival, 35 days) after stent placement. Death was due to progression of disease. Although metallic stents are useful for relieving respiratory distress in patients with advanced esophageal cancer, additional therapies should be considered.

  11. Management of the stricture of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrawan K Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Management of distal anterior urethral stricture is a common problem faced by practicing urologists. Literature on urethral stricture mainly pertains to bulbar urethral stricture and pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect. The present article aims to review the management of the strictures of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethra. Materials and Methods : The literature in English language was searched from the National Library of Medicine database, using the appropriate key words for the period 1985-2010. Out of 475 articles, 115 were selected for the review based on their relevance to the topic. Results : Etiology of stricture is shifting from infective to inflammatory and iatrogenic causes. Stricture of fossa navicularis is most often caused by lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and instrumentation. Direct visual internal urethrotomy is limited to selected cases in the management of pendulous urethral stricture. With experience and identification of various prognostic factors, conservative management by dilatation and internal urethrotomy is being replaced by various reconstructive procedures, using skin flaps and grafts with high success rates. Single-stage urethroplasty is preferred over the 2-stage procedure as the latter disfigures the penis and poses sexual problems temporarily. Conclusions : Flaps or grafts are useful for single-stage reconstruction of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures. The buccal and lingual mucosa serves as a preferred resource material for providing the inner lining of the urethra. Off-the-shelf materials, such as acellular collagen matrix, are promising.

  12. Management of the stricture of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shrawan K.; Agrawal, Santosh K.; Mavuduru, Ravimohan S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Management of distal anterior urethral stricture is a common problem faced by practicing urologists. Literature on urethral stricture mainly pertains to bulbar urethral stricture and pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect. The present article aims to review the management of the strictures of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethra. Materials and Methods: The literature in English language was searched from the National Library of Medicine database, using the appropriate key words for the period 1985-2010. Out of 475 articles, 115 were selected for the review based on their relevance to the topic. Results: Etiology of stricture is shifting from infective to inflammatory and iatrogenic causes. Stricture of fossa navicularis is most often caused by lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and instrumentation. Direct visual internal urethrotomy is limited to selected cases in the management of pendulous urethral stricture. With experience and identification of various prognostic factors, conservative management by dilatation and internal urethrotomy is being replaced by various reconstructive procedures, using skin flaps and grafts with high success rates. Single-stage urethroplasty is preferred over the 2-stage procedure as the latter disfigures the penis and poses sexual problems temporarily. Conclusions: Flaps or grafts are useful for single-stage reconstruction of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures. The buccal and lingual mucosa serves as a preferred resource material for providing the inner lining of the urethra. Off-the-shelf materials, such as acellular collagen matrix, are promising. PMID:22022062

  13. Frey procedure for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis associated with common bile duct stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebibo, Lionel; Yzet, Thierry; Cosse, Cyril; Delcenserie, Richard; Bartoli, Eric; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2013-12-01

    The Frey procedure (FP) is the treatment of choice for symptomatic chronic pancreatitis (CP). In cases of biliary stricture, biliary derivation can be performed by choledochoduodenostomy, Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy or, more recently, reinsertion of the common bile duct (CBD) into the resection cavity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the outcomes associated with each of these three types of biliary derivation. We retrospectively analyzed demographic, CP-related, surgical and follow-up data for patients having undergone FP for CP with biliary derivation between 2004 and 2012 in our university medical center. The primary efficacy endpoint was the rate of CBD stricture recurrence. The secondary endpoints were surgical parameters, postoperative complications, postoperative follow-up and the presence of risk factors for secondary CBD stricture. Eighty patients underwent surgery for CP during the study period. Of these, 15 patients received biliary derivation with the FP. Eight of the FPs (53.3%) were combined with choledochoduodenostomy, 4 (26.7%) with choledochojejunostomy and 3 (20.0%) with reinsertion of the CBD into the resection cavity. The mean operating time was 390 minutes. Eleven complications (73.3%) were recorded, including one major complication (6.7%) that necessitated radiologically-guided drainage of an abdominal collection. The mean (range) length of stay was 17 days (8-28) and the median (range) follow-up time was 35.2 months (7.2-95.4). Two patients presented stricture after CBD reinsertion into the resection cavity; one was treated with radiologically-guided dilatation and the other underwent revisional Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy. Three patients presented alkaline reflux gastritis (37.5%), one (12.5%) cholangitis and one CBD stricture after FP with choledochoduodenostomy. No risk factors for secondary CBD stricture were identified. As part of a biliary derivation, the FP gave good results. We did not observe any

  14. Esophageal Mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Boatright

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare invasive fungal infection with high mortality. It usually affects patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or hematological malignancies. Gastroenterologists need to be aware of this rare infection because endoscopy can facilitate early diagnosis and prompt appropriate therapy. Here we describe a case of invasive esophageal mucormycosis that developed in a 63-year-old man with diabetes, acute promyelocytic leukemia, and prolonged leukopenia after chemotherapy. Upper endoscopy showed distal circumferential esophageal wall thickening with devitalization. The mucosa did not bleed after endoscopic biopsy. Histopathology confirmed mucormycosis. He was treated with various antifungal agents including echinocandins, fluconazole, and liposomal amphotericin B. Despite aggressive antifungal therapy and supportive care, the patient died 24 days later.

  15. Fully covered self-expanding metal stents are effective for benign esophagogastric disruptions and strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jennifer L; Louie, Brian E; Farivar, Alexander S; Vallières, Eric; Aye, Ralph W

    2013-12-01

    Self-expanding fully covered metal stents (CSs) are ideal for use in benign esophagogastric disease. We reviewed our experience with CS to evaluate outcomes, to determine a role for CS in a standard treatment for benign esophageal conditions, and to compare our results with recently published studies. We performed a retrospective chart review from 2005 to 2012. A total of 57 CSs were placed in 44 patients. Indications were stricture (11 patients), anastomotic leak (20), perforation (7), and tracheoesophageal fistulae (6). For GI tract disruptions, open repair or diversion was avoided in 31/33 patients (93.9 %) but required an associated drainage procedure in 22/33 (67 %) patients. Resolution does not depend on achieving radiological control with 6/26 (23 %) having evidence of a persistent leak. Benign strictures were dilated at a mean of 3.7 times prior to stenting. Adjunctive intra-mucosal steroid injections were used in 8/11 patients. Stents were removed at a mean of 33 days. At a mean of 283 days of follow-up, 6/11 (54.5 %) had symptom resolution. The most common complication was stent migration occurring in 17.5 % of patients overall. Covered stents are an effective adjunct in the management of benign upper gastrointestinal tract fistulae, leaks, perforations and benign strictures.

  16. Esophageal stent migration can lead to intestinal obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatepe, Oguzhan; Acet, Ersin; Altiok, Merih; Battal, Muharrem; Adas, Gokhan; Karahan, Servet

    2009-01-01

    Background: Self-expanding metallic stents are the devices of choice in the treatment of malign or benign strictures of the esophagus. Stent migration is a well-known complication of this procedure. Aims: We report a case of intestinal obstruction caused by esophageal stent migration, in which surgical intervention was used. Methods: A 65-year-old woman, who had a medical history of gastric cancer operations and esophageal stent applications, was admitted to our emergency department with a 48-hour history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. An emergency laparotomy was performed and the migrated stent causing intestinal obstruction was removed. Results: The patient recovered without incident and was discharged on postoperative day 3. Conclusion: This case illustrates that esophageal stent migration has to be considered as a potential life-threatening complication. PMID:22666672

  17. The efficiency of sucralfate in corrosive esophagitis: a randomized, prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümürdülü, Yüksel; Karakoç, Emre; Kara, Banu; Taşdoğan, Burçak Evren; Parsak, Cem Kaan; Sakman, Gürhan

    2010-03-01

    Ingestion of a chemical agent is a serious problem, and several treatment protocols to prevent stricture formation have been proposed. We conducted a randomized prospective study to evaluate the effectiveness of oral intensive sucralfate plus conventional therapy compared to conventional therapy alone. Fifteen patients with stage 2b and 3 corrosive esophagitis admitted to our gastroenterology, general surgery and intensive care units between 2004 and 2007 were included. Patients were divided into two groups. The patients in the first group (n=8) received intensive sucralfate therapy plus conventional therapy, while the other group (n=7) received only conventional therapy. We performed upper endoscopic procedures on days: 0, 21, 45, 90 and 180 to identify the emergent complications. In the first group, only one patient had stricture formation, allowing passage of a 9.2 mm endoscope and causing no dysphagia, on day 45. There was no progression in the stricture on follow-ups at the 3rd and 6th months. In the second group, 6 patients had stricture formation causing narrowing and dysphagia. Intensive sucralfate therapy may decrease the frequency of stricture formation in patients with advanced corrosive esophagitis. Further studies with large groups of patients are required to confirm our findings.

  18. Lymphocytic Esophagitis: An emerging clinicopathologic disease associated with dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasricha, Sarina; Gupta, Amit; Reed, Craig C.; Speck, Olga; Woosley, John T.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphocytic Esophagitis (LyE) is a recently described clinicopathological condition, but little is known about its features and clinical associations. Aim To characterize patients with LyE, compare them to non-LyE controls, and identify risk factors. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of all patients ≥18 years old who underwent upper endoscopy with esophageal biopsy between January 1, 2000 and June 1, 2012. Archived pathology slides were re-reviewed and LyE was diagnosed if there was lymphocyte-predominant esophageal inflammation with no eosinophils or granulocytes. Three non-LyE controls groups were also defined: reflux, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), and normal. Clinical data were extracted from electronic medical records, and LyE cases were compared to non-LyE controls. Results 27 adults were diagnosed with LyE, and the majority were female (63%). The most common symptom was dysphagia (70%). 52% had a prior or current diagnosis of reflux. Endoscopic findings included strictures (37%), erosive esophagitis (33%), rings (26%), and hiatal hernia (26%); 33% of patients required dilation. After histology re-review, 78% of LyE patients were found to have more than 20 lymphs/hpf. In comparison to the normal, reflux and EoE controls, patients with LyE tended to be non-white (pdysphagia due to esophageal strictures which require dilation. Smoking was associated with LyE whereas atopy was not. LyE should be considered as a diagnostic possibility in patients with these characteristics undergoing upper endoscopy. PMID:27343035

  19. Lymphocytic Esophagitis: An Emerging Clinicopathologic Disease Associated with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasricha, Sarina; Gupta, Amit; Reed, Craig C; Speck, Olga; Woosley, John T; Dellon, Evan S

    2016-10-01

    Lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is a recently described clinicopathological condition, but little is known about its features and clinical associations. The aim of this study was to characterize patients with LyE, compare them to non-LyE controls, and identify risk factors. We conducted a retrospective study of all patients ≥18 years old who underwent upper endoscopy with esophageal biopsy between January 1, 2000, and June 1, 2012. Archived pathology slides were re-reviewed, and LyE was diagnosed if there was lymphocyte-predominant esophageal inflammation with no eosinophils or granulocytes. Three non-LyE controls groups were also defined: reflux, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), and normal. Clinical data were extracted from electronic medical records, and LyE cases were compared to non-LyE controls. Twenty-seven adults were diagnosed with LyE, and the majority were female (63 %). The most common symptom was dysphagia (70 %). Fifty-two percentage had a prior or current diagnosis of reflux. Endoscopic findings included strictures (37 %), erosive esophagitis (33 %), rings (26 %), and hiatal hernia (26 %); 33 % of patients required dilation. After histology re-review, 78 % of LyE patients were found to have more than 20 lymphs/hpf. In comparison with the normal, reflux and EoE controls, patients with LyE tended to be nonwhite (p dysphagia due to esophageal strictures which require dilation. Smoking was associated with LyE, whereas atopy was not. LyE should be considered as a diagnostic possibility in patients with these characteristics undergoing upper endoscopy.

  20. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Broadly defined, urethral strictures are narrowing of the urethral lumen that is surrounded by corpus spongiosum, i.e., urethral meatus through the bulbar urethra. Urethral stenosis is narrowing of the posterior urethra, i.e., membranous urethra through bladder neck/prostate junction, which is not enveloped by corpus spongiosum. The disease has significant quality of life ramifications because many times younger patients are affected by this compared to many other urological diseases. Methods: A review of the scientific literature concerning urethral stricture, stenosis, treatment, and outcomes was performed using Medline and PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health). Abstracts from scientific meetings were included in this review. Results: There is level 3 evidence regarding the etiology and epidemiology of urethral strictures, stenoses, and pelvic fracture urethral injuries. Outcomes data from literature regarding intervention for urethral stricture are largely limited to level 3 evidence and expert opinion. There is a single level 1 study comparing urethral dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy. Urethroplasty outcomes data are limited to level 3 case series. Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts. PMID:26941491

  1. Percutaneous dilatation of biliary benign strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Choi, Byung Ihn; Sung, Kyu Bo; Han, Man Chung; Park, Yong Hyun; Yoon, Yong Bum [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-06-15

    Percutaneous biliary dilation was done in 3 patients with benign strictures. The first case was 50-year-old male who had multiple intrahepatic stones with biliary stricture. The second 46-year-old female and the third 25-year-old male suffered from recurrent cholangitis with benign stricture of anastomotic site after choledocho-jejunostomy. In the first case, a 6mm diameter Grunzing dilatation balloon catheter was introduced through the T-tube tract. In the second case, the stricture was dilated with two balloons of 5mm and 8mm in each diameter sequentially through the U-loop tract formed by surgically made jejunostomy and percutaneous transhepatic puncture. In the third case, the dilatation catheter was introduced through the percutaneous transhepatic tract. Dilatation was made with a pressure of 5 to 10 atmospheres for 1 to 3 minutes duration for 3 times. In all 3 cases, the strictures were successfully dilated and in second and third cases internal stent was left across the lesion for prevention of restenosis.

  2. Management of esophageal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, L.D.; Mercer, C.D.; McCallum, R.W.; Kozarek, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book integrates gastroenterology and thoracic surgery to detail the comprehensive management of esophageal disease. It describes radiologic and functional evaluation of the esophagus, endoscopy, medical and surgical treatments, and results and also covers gastroesophageal reflux disease, tumors motility, esophageal replacement, intubation, esophageal diverticula, caustic esophageal injury. It presents Dr. Hill's surgical procedures in detail.

  3. [Enteral nutrition in patients with ulcerative and postburn cicatrix strictures of the esophagus and stomach outcome region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakumov, M M; Kostiuchenko, L N

    2009-01-01

    Decompensated cicatrices stricture of upper alimentary canal is a complex disease clinically presenting a high mechanical blocking and leads to expressed abnormality of homeostasis, which requires its pathogenetic correction of urgency evidence. The greatest difficulty is correct protein-energy malnutrition and water-electrolyte metabolism. Prior to the imposition of stoma for feeding should begin immediately with standard parenteral nutrition solutions. In a subsequent it is nessesary to resort more physiologecal tube alimentasion. As with esophageal postambustion stricture electrical activity of the stomach inhibiting and in essentially remains small bowel function, preference should be given to ways of enteral threpsology support. This can be used as a balanced composition in breeding (primary breeding should be 1: 2) and special blends for intraintestinal alimentation (close chyme on line carrying the major components). In the case of postambustion struck of outlet termination stomach department when identified violations of the underlying functions of the digestive canal division, rational come to gentle tactics of enteral alimentation using mixtures, completely similar in composition to himus. At stricture janitor ulcer genesis appropriate tactics is enteral correction, similar to that used in the event of postambustion strictures of the zones when bowel function is largely preserved.

  4. Prevention strategies for ureteral stricture following ureteroscopic lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Dong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral stricture formation after ureteroscopic lithotripsy is a late complication that can lead to hydronephrosis and a subsequent risk of renal deterioration. The specific incidence is unknown, and the mechanism of stricture formation has not been completely explained. In this review, we summarize the current evidence regarding the incidence of this condition and discuss its pathogenesis. We then list preventive strategies to reduce the morbidity of ureteral strictures. Keywords: Ureteroscopy, Ureteral stricture, Lithotripsy, Complications

  5. Impaired esophageal motor function in eosinophilic esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilio Santander

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immunoallergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus that represents a major cause of digestive morbidity among the pediatric and young adult populations. Despite the fact that key symptoms in adults include dysphagia and food impaction, many patients lack structural changes in the esophagus to account for their complaints, which suggests the presence of underlying motor disorders and esophageal distensibility impairment. In the last few years the esophageal motility of these patients has been studied using various approaches, most particularly high-resolution manometry, ambulatory manometry, and impedance planimetry. This review focuses on the most relevant findings and scientific evidence regarding esophageal motor disorders in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  6. Impaired esophageal motor function in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Cecilio; Chavarría-Herbozo, Carlos M; Becerro-González, Irene; Burgos-Santamaría, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immunoallergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus that represents a major cause of digestive morbidity among the pediatric and young adult populations. Despite the fact that key symptoms in adults include dysphagia and food impaction, many patients lack structural changes in the esophagus to account for their complaints, which suggests the presence of underlying motor disorders and esophageal distensibility impairment. In the last few years the esophageal motility of these patients has been studied using various approaches, most particularly high-resolution manometry, ambulatory manometry, and impedance planimetry. This review focuses on the most relevant findings and scientific evidence regarding esophageal motor disorders in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  7. Improved Accuracy of Percutaneous Biopsy Using “Cross and Push” Technique for Patients Suspected with Malignant Biliary Strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Prashant, E-mail: p.patel@bham.ac.uk [University of Birmingham, School of Cancer Sciences, Vincent Drive (United Kingdom); Rangarajan, Balaji; Mangat, Kamarjit, E-mail: kamarjit.mangat@uhb.nhs.uk, E-mail: kamarjit.mangat@nhs.net [University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeVarious methods have been used to sample biliary strictures, including percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy, intraluminal biliary washings, and cytological analysis of drained bile. However, none of these methods has proven to be particularly sensitive in the diagnosis of biliary tract malignancy. We report improved diagnostic accuracy using a modified technique for percutaneous transluminal biopsy in patients with this disease.Materials and MethodsFifty-two patients with obstructive jaundice due to a biliary stricture underwent transluminal forceps biopsy with a modified “cross and push” technique with the use of a flexible biopsy forceps kit commonly used for cardiac biopsies. The modification entailed crossing the stricture with a 0.038-in. wire leading all the way down into the duodenum. A standard or long sheath was subsequently advanced up to the stricture over the wire. A Cook 5.2-Fr biopsy forceps was introduced alongside the wire and the cup was opened upon exiting the sheath. With the biopsy forceps open, within the stricture the sheath was used to push and advance the biopsy cup into the stricture before the cup was closed and the sample obtained. The data were analysed retrospectively.ResultsWe report the outcomes of this modified technique used on 52 consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice secondary to a biliary stricture. The sensitivity and accuracy were 93.3 and 94.2 %, respectively. There was one procedure-related late complication.ConclusionWe propose that the modified “cross and push” technique is a feasible, safe, and more accurate option over the standard technique for sampling strictures of the biliary tree.

  8. Percutaneous transhepatic balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures after surgical repair of iatrogenic bile duct injuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Y Lee

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures resulting from surgical repair of laparoscopic cholecystectomy-related bile duct injuries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 61 patients were referred to our institution from 1995 to 2010 for treatment of obstruction at the biliary-enteric anastomosis following surgical repair of laparoscopic cholecystectomy-related bile duct injuries. Of these 61 patients, 27 underwent surgical revision upon stricture diagnosis, and 34 patients were managed using balloon dilation. Of these 34 patients, 2 were lost to follow up, leaving 32 patients for analysis. The primary study objective was to determine the clinical success rate of balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures. Secondary study objectives included determining anastomosis patency, rates of stricture recurrence following treatment, and morbidity. RESULTS: Balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures was clinically successful in 21 of 32 patients (66%. Anastomotic stricture recurred in one of 21 patients (5% after an average of 13.1 years of follow-up. Patients who were unsuccessfully managed with balloon dilation required significantly more invasive procedures (6.8 v. 3.4; p = 0.02 and were left with an indwelling biliary catheter for a significantly longer period of time (8.8 v. 2.0 months; p = 0.02 than patients whose strictures could be resolved by balloon dilation. No significant differences in the number of balloon dilations performed (p = 0.17 or in the maximum balloon diameter used (p = 0.99 were demonstrated for patients with successful or unsuccessful balloon dilation outcomes. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous balloon dilation of anastomotic biliary strictures following surgical repair of laparoscopic cholecystectomy-related injuries may result in lasting patency of the biliary-enteric anastomosis.

  9. Improved Accuracy of Percutaneous Biopsy Using “Cross and Push” Technique for Patients Suspected with Malignant Biliary Strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Prashant; Rangarajan, Balaji; Mangat, Kamarjit

    2015-01-01

    PurposeVarious methods have been used to sample biliary strictures, including percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy, intraluminal biliary washings, and cytological analysis of drained bile. However, none of these methods has proven to be particularly sensitive in the diagnosis of biliary tract malignancy. We report improved diagnostic accuracy using a modified technique for percutaneous transluminal biopsy in patients with this disease.Materials and MethodsFifty-two patients with obstructive jaundice due to a biliary stricture underwent transluminal forceps biopsy with a modified “cross and push” technique with the use of a flexible biopsy forceps kit commonly used for cardiac biopsies. The modification entailed crossing the stricture with a 0.038-in. wire leading all the way down into the duodenum. A standard or long sheath was subsequently advanced up to the stricture over the wire. A Cook 5.2-Fr biopsy forceps was introduced alongside the wire and the cup was opened upon exiting the sheath. With the biopsy forceps open, within the stricture the sheath was used to push and advance the biopsy cup into the stricture before the cup was closed and the sample obtained. The data were analysed retrospectively.ResultsWe report the outcomes of this modified technique used on 52 consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice secondary to a biliary stricture. The sensitivity and accuracy were 93.3 and 94.2 %, respectively. There was one procedure-related late complication.ConclusionWe propose that the modified “cross and push” technique is a feasible, safe, and more accurate option over the standard technique for sampling strictures of the biliary tree

  10. Physiology of Normal Esophageal Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Raj K; Chaudhury, Arun

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus consists of two different parts. In humans, the cervical esophagus is composed of striated muscles and the thoracic esophagus is composed of phasic smooth muscles. The striated muscle esophagus is innervated by the lower motor neurons and peristalsis in this segment is due to sequential activation of the motor neurons in the nucleus ambiguus. Both primary and secondary peristaltic contractions are centrally mediated. The smooth muscle of esophagus is phasic in nature and is innervated by intramural inhibitory (nitric oxide releasing) and excitatory (acetylcholine releasing) neurons that receive inputs from separate sets of preganglionic neurons located in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus. The primary peristalsis in this segment involves both central and peripheral mechanisms. The primary peristalsis consist of inhibition (called deglutitive inhibition) followed by excitation. The secondary peristalsis is entirely due to peripheral mechanisms and also involves inhibition followed by excitation. The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is characterized by tonic muscle that is different from the muscle of the esophageal body. The LES, like the esophageal body smooth muscle, is also innervated by the inhibitory and excitatory neurons. The LES maintains tonic closure due to its myogenic property. The LES tone is modulated by the inhibitory and the excitatory nerves. Inhibitory nerves mediate LES relaxation and the excitatory nerves mediate reflex contraction or rebound contraction of the LES. Clinical disorders of esophageal motility can be classified on the basis of disorders of the inhibitory and excitatory innervations and the smooth muscles. PMID:18364578

  11. One-day transhepatic billary stricture dilatation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.R.; Saini, S.; Hahn, P.F.; Silverman, S.G.; Ferrucci, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    To overcome technical problems in percutaneous transhepatic dilatation or biliary strictures, the authors performed the entire procedure in a single session with the patient under general anesthesia (N = 7). Six patients had a biliary-enteric anastomosis, and one patient had a traumatic mid common bile duct stricture. All bile ducts were of normal caliber or were minimally dilated by US or transhepatic cholangiography. Dilatation was performed via a fresh transhepatic drainage catheter in six patients and via an in-dwelling T-tube in one patient. High-pressure balloons (10-12 mm) were placed after catheter dilation of the tract, and balloons were inflated for 5-10 minutes three to five times. Dilation was stopped with a waist was no longer present. No strictures have recurred in patients followed up to 24 months

  12. URETHROPLASTY FOR COMPLICATED ANTERIOR URETHRAL STRICTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Katsuya; Hori, Shunta; Morizawa, Yosuke; Nakai, Yasushi; Miyake, Makito; Anai, Satoshi; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Yoneda, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Yoshida, Katsunori; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2016-01-01

    (Objectives) To compare efficacy and outcome of urethroplasty for complicated anterior urethral strictures. (Methods) Twelve patients, included 3 boys, with anterior urethral stricture underwent urethroplasty after the failure of either urethral dilatation or internal urethrotomy. We evaluated pre- and post-operative Q max and surgical outcome. (Results) Four patients were treated with end-to-end anastomosis, included a case of bulbar urethral elongation simultaneously, one patient was treated with augmented anastomotic urethroplasty, three patients were treated with onlay urethroplasty with prepucial flap, one patient was treated with tubed urethroplasty with prepucial flap (Ducket procedure) and three patients were treated with onlay urethroplasty with buccal mucosal graft. Postoperative Qmax improved in all patients without major complications and recurrence during follow-up periods ranging from 17 to 102 months (mean 55 months). (Conclusions) Urethroplasty is an effective therapeutic procedure for complicated anterior urethral stricture.

  13. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensibility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Some substances can induce chemical urethritis severe enough to cause stricture. We present a case of long segment anterior urethral stricture in a young Nigerian patient cause by self-application of podophyllin for ...

  14. Benign Strictures of the Esophagus and Gastric Outlet: Interventional Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Benign strictures of the esophagus and gastric outlet are difficult to manage conservatively and they usually require intervention to relieve dysphagia or to treat the stricture-related complications. In this article, authors review the non-surgical options that are used to treat benign strictures of the esophagus and gastric outlet, including balloon dilation, temporary stent placement, intralesional steroid injection and incisional therapy

  15. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O. Areo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensibility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Some substances can induce chemical urethritis severe enough to cause stricture. We present a case of long segment anterior urethral stricture in a young Nigerian patient cause by self-application of podophyllin for the treatment of genital warts.

  16. Short Segment Bulbar Urethral Strictures: Review of 48 Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Fall astride injuries accounted for most strictures, 39(89.3%) of cases. The mean stricture lenght was 1.04 cm ± 0.49 and ... such as the elderly with impotence and proximal bulbar strictures in a selected group of patients, BAU ... BUS was diagnosed from history, physical examination, combined retrograde ...

  17. [Ureteral stricture after ESWL for ureteral calculi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Tomoyuki; Tsukamoto, Takuji; Mori, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Ken; Fujioka, Toshio

    2003-01-01

    There are many reports on the effects of ESWL, but few reports on the complications, especially remaining ureteral stricture after this treatment. Therefore we have retrospectively reviewed our cases to define the predisposing factors of this complication. Since 1991 we have treated urolithiasis with ESWL using a Siemens Lithostar for the first therapy. We had 16 cases of ureteral stricture after this treatment. Ureteral stricture is the most common complication after ESWL treatment. To define the risk factor of the stricture we have compared 549 cases that were successfully treated between 1994 and 1996 without this complication. In these two groups we examined ages, sexes, chief complaints, size, position and components of the calculi, the degree of hydronephrosis, the frequency of ESWL, the presence of urinary tract infection, the duration of stone impaction and the after endourological treatment using multiple logistic regression analysis. Patients with the stone incidentally found and those with the UTI seemed to be more frequently associated with ureteral stricture, however there was not a significant difference. The hydronephrosis more than grade 3 (p = 0.025), the frequency of ESWL (p = 0.0325) and the after endourological treatment, especially TUL (p = 0.0184) were statistically significant among the other factors. The stricture occurred in 5 out of 29 patients with the hydronephrosis of grade 4 and 5 between 1994 and 1996. We should carefully treat patients with grade 3 or more hydronephrosis with ESWL. We should not repeatedly treat the patients with ESWL. We should take care of TUL treatment after ESWL.

  18. Chronic xerostomia increases esophageal acid exposure and is associated with esophageal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsten, M.A.; Rosman, A.S.; Fishbein, S.; Shlein, R.D.; Goldberg, H.E.; Biener, A. (Gastrointestinal Section, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York (USA))

    1991-06-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of chronic xerostomia on parameters of gastroesophageal reflux and esophagitis. DESIGN: Observational study of a cohort of male patients with xerostomia and age-matched control subjects. SETTING: Tertiary-care Veterans Affairs Medical Center. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male patients with chronic xerostomia secondary to radiation for head and neck cancers or medications. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects with comparable alcohol and smoking histories. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Esophageal motility was similar in patients with xerostomia and controls. Clearance of acid from the esophagus and 24-hour intraesophageal pH were markedly abnormal in patients with xerostomia. Symptoms and signs of esophagitis were significantly more frequent in subjects with xerostomia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic xerostomia may predispose to esophageal injury, at least in part, by decreasing the clearance of acid from the esophagus and altering 24-hour intraesophageal pH. Esophageal injury is a previously unreported complication of long-term salivary deficiency.

  19. Chronic xerostomia increases esophageal acid exposure and is associated with esophageal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsten, M.A.; Rosman, A.S.; Fishbein, S.; Shlein, R.D.; Goldberg, H.E.; Biener, A.

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of chronic xerostomia on parameters of gastroesophageal reflux and esophagitis. DESIGN: Observational study of a cohort of male patients with xerostomia and age-matched control subjects. SETTING: Tertiary-care Veterans Affairs Medical Center. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male patients with chronic xerostomia secondary to radiation for head and neck cancers or medications. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects with comparable alcohol and smoking histories. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Esophageal motility was similar in patients with xerostomia and controls. Clearance of acid from the esophagus and 24-hour intraesophageal pH were markedly abnormal in patients with xerostomia. Symptoms and signs of esophagitis were significantly more frequent in subjects with xerostomia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic xerostomia may predispose to esophageal injury, at least in part, by decreasing the clearance of acid from the esophagus and altering 24-hour intraesophageal pH. Esophageal injury is a previously unreported complication of long-term salivary deficiency

  20. Radiation-induced esophageal structure in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Itoh, Hisao; Kawamura, Masashi

    1989-01-01

    Five out 165 cases (3.0%) which were treated for non-small cell lung cancer with radiotherapy (98 cases were treated with chemoradiotherapy, and the other 67 case, radiotherapy alone) developed esophageal stricture. Their clinical courses, the relationship among radiation dosage, combination with chemotherapy, the length of the irradiated esophagus, and the occurrence of esophageal stricture were reviewed. One of the 5 cases was a case with lung cancer in Bloom's syndrome, which developed an esophageal stricture after receiving only 30.6 Gy (the TDF value was 46.2) to the esophagus. This case suggests the possibility that a patient with Bloom's syndrome is more radiosensitive than normal controls. The other 4 cases were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy. One of the 4 cases was treated with concomitant use of bleomycin (BLM), while the TDF value was not more than 100 (75.4). The concomitant use of BLM was almost certainly the cause of the esophageal stricture. The other 3 cases were treated with chemoradiotherapy, the TDF values of which were more than 100 (108.7, 112.5, and 129.3). The chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and the overdosage were considered to be the cause of the esophageal stricture in these 3 cases. These data suggest that in Bloom's syndrome, radiotherapy should be performed carefully and that BLM should not be used simultaneously with irradiation to the esophagus. It is also believed that a radiation dose over 100 in TDF value to the esophagus should be discouraged when chemotherapy is codmbined. (author)

  1. Esophageal button battery ingestion in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şencan, Arzu; Genişol, İncinur; Hoşgör, Münevver

    2017-07-01

    Button battery lodged in the esophagus carries a high risk of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to present cases of patients with esophageal button battery ingestion treated at our clinic and to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and treatment. Records of patients admitted to our hospital for foreign body ingestion between January 2010 and May 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Cases with button battery lodged in the esophagus were included in the study. Patient data regarding age, sex, length of time after ingestion until admission, presenting clinical symptoms, type and localization of the battery, management, and prognosis were analyzed. Among 1891 foreign body ingestions, 71 were localized in the esophagus, and 8 of those (11.2%) were cases of button battery ingestion. Mean age was 1.7 years. Admission was within 6 hours of ingestion in 5 cases, after 24 hours had elapsed in 2, and 1 month after ingestion in 1 case. All patients but 1 knew the history of ingestion. Prompt endoscopic removal was performed for all patients. Three patients developed esophageal stricture, which responded to dilatation. Early recognition and timely endoscopic removal is mandatory in esophageal button battery ingestion. It should be suspected in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  2. Dynamic esophageal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilley, J.J.; Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.; Applegate, G.; DeVegvar, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Esophageal scintigraphy was developed in order to quantitatively evaluate esophageal transit in patients with a variety of esophageal disorders. The study is performed with orally administered technetium-99m sulfur colloid in water, using a gamma camera on-line to a digital computer. Esophageal transit is expressed as the percent emptying for each of the first 15-sec intervals for 10 min after an initial swallow and at 15-sec intervals after serial swallows. Esophageal transit is significantly decreased in patients with motor disorders of the esophagus, compared to normal controls. In patients with reflux esophagitis, esophageal transit was abnormal when the reflux disease was accompanied by abnormal motor function. The technique we describe is the first quantitative test of esophageal function; it is a useful, sensitive, scintigraphic technique for evaluation of esophageal transit

  3. [Transurethral thulium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Lai; Zhang, Xi-Ling; Liu, Yi-Li; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of endourethrotomy with thulium laser as a minimally invasive treatment for urethral stricture. We treated 36 cases of urethral stricture or atresia by endourethrotomy with thulium laser, restored the urethral continuity by vaporization excision of the scar tissue, and observed the clinical effects and complications. The mean operation time was 35 min, ranging from 10 to 90 min. Smooth urination was achieved after 2-6 weeks of catheter indwelling, with no urinary incontinence. The patients were followed up for 4-24 (mean 12) months, during which 27 did not need any reintervention, 5 developed urinary thinning but cured by urethral dilation, 3 received another laser urethrotomy for previous negligence of timely urethral dilation, and the other 1 underwent open urethroplasty. Thulium laser urethrotomy is a safe and effective minimally invasive option for short urethral stricture, which is also suitable for severe urethral stricture and urethral atresia. Its short-term outcome is satisfactory, but its long-term effect remains to be further observed.

  4. Salivary gland enlargement during oesophageal stricture dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D.

    1980-01-01

    A case of recurrent salivary gland enlargement occurring during fibreoptic oesophagoscopy and oesophageal stricture dilatation with Eder-Puestow dilators is described. The genesis of this condition is discussed and its transient and usually benign nature emphasized. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7393809

  5. Tubercular biliary stricture – a malignant masquerade

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-04

    Nov 4, 2013 ... chest radiograph and the results of blood tests were essentially normal ... basis of the imaging findings. Diagnostic ... stricture formation.[4] In this situation, comprehensive investigations usually fail to provide an accurate preoperative diagnosis. If the lesion appears to be resectable on imaging, surgery ...

  6. Balloon dilatation for the treatment of stricture of gastrojejunostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yeon Hwa [Lee Rha Hospital, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Young [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Young Min; Chon, Su Bin; Chung, Gyung Ho; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    Enteroenteric anastomotic strictures of UGI tract are common and require treatment if significant obstruction occurs. We performed fluoroscopic guided balloon dilatation in 6 patients who had symptomatic stricture of gastrojejunostomy. The stricture was successfully resolved in 4 patients with benign stricture. But 2 patients with malignant stricture had recurrence of obstructive symptoms 2 weeks later, and they required a stent. Asymptomatic balloon rupture was seen in one patients, but other procedural complications did not occur. We found that fluoroscopic guided balloon dilatation is an effective and safe method in the treatment of anastomotic stricture of gastrojejunostomy. We also found transient effect in malignant gastrojejunal anastomotic strictures, which required an interventional procedure, such as placement of a stent.

  7. Prevalence of esophageal disorders in patients with recurrent chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manterola, C; Barroso, M S; Losada, H; Muñoz, S; Vial, M

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of esophageal disorders (ED) associated with recurrent chest pain (RCP) and the utility of esophageal functional tests (EFT) in the study of these patients. The cross-sectional study was conducted at Hospital Clínico de La Frontera, Chile. One hundred and twenty-three patients with RCP were studied using esophageal manometry, edrophonium stimulation and 24-h pH monitoring. The performance of EFT was considered acceptable when they were capable of finding ED. To state the probability that RCP had an esophageal origin, patients were classified according to whether their pain had a probable, possible or unlikely esophageal origin. The prevalence of ED was determined according to diagnoses obtained after applying EFT and a multivariate analysis was performed to examine the association between the esophageal origin of RCP and ED. Rates of correct diagnosis of 65.9%, 56.9% and 31.7% was verified for 24-h pH monitoring, esophageal manometry and edrophonium stimulation, respectively. In 38.2% of patients with RCP, the pain was probably of esophageal origin, in 42.3% there was a possible esophageal origin and in 19.5% an unlikely esophageal origin. A 44.7% prevalence of GERD, 26.8% of GERD with secondary esophageal motor dysfunction and 8.9% of pure esophageal motor dysfunction were verified. The multivariate analysis allowed us to verify the association between the probability of esophageal origin of RCP, the variables RCP duration, esophagitis and dysphagia coexistence (P= 0.037, P= 0.030 and P= 0.024, respectively), and a statistically significant association between ED and dysphagia coexistence (P= 0.028). A high prevalence of ED was identified in patients with RCP.

  8. Feasibility of intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Nam P; Desai, Anand; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Jang, Siyoung; Vock, Jacqueline; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Pugh, Judith; Vo, Richard A; Ceizyk, Misty

    2014-01-01

    In this study the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for locally advanced esophageal cancer was assessed. A retrospective study of ten patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who underwent concurrent chemotherapy with IMRT (1) and IGRT (9) was conducted. The gross tumor volume was treated to a median dose of 70 Gy (62.4-75 Gy). At a median follow-up of 14 months (1-39 months), three patients developed local failures, six patients developed distant metastases, and complications occurred in two patients (1 tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 esophageal stricture requiring repeated dilatations). No patients developed grade 3-4 pneumonitis or cardiac complications. IMRT and IGRT may be effective for the treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer with acceptable complications

  9. Feeding Problems and Their Underlying Mechanisms in the Esophageal Atresia–Tracheoesophageal Fistula Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Lisa; Rosen, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Feeding difficulties such as dysphagia, coughing, choking, or vomiting during meals, slow eating, oral aversion, food refusal, and stressful mealtimes are common in children with repaired esophageal atresia (EA) and the reasons for this are often multifactorial. The aim of this review is to describe the possible underlying mechanisms contributing to feeding difficulties in patients with EA and approaches to management. Underlying mechanisms for these feeding difficulties include esophageal dysphagia, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aspiration, and aversions related to prolonged gastrostomy tube feeding. The initial diagnostic evaluation for feeding difficulties in a patient with EA may involve an esophagram, videofluoroscopic imaging or fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation during swallowing, upper endoscopy with biopsies, pH-impedance testing, and/or esophageal motility studies. The main goal of management is to reduce the factors contributing to feeding difficulties and may include reducing esophageal stasis, maximizing reflux therapies, treating underlying lung disease, dilating strictures, and altering feeding methods, routes, or schedules. PMID:28620597

  10. Time trends of US hospitalization for esophageal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Amnon

    2014-09-01

    The occurrence of reflux disease seems to be rising in the United States. The aim of the present study was to follow the time trends of hospitalization for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other esophageal disease during the past 4 decades. US hospital utilization data were available for individual years from 1970 to 2010 through the National Hospital Discharge Survey. Esophageal diagnoses were stratified by their ninth revision of the International Classification of Diseases codes. Annual hospitalizations were expressed as rates per 100,000 living US population. GERD was by far the most common esophageal disorder resulting in hospitalization. However, in only 5% of instances did GERD-related diagnoses constitute the primary cause of hospitalization. Between 1970 and 2010 the rates of GERD-related hospitalizations increased in an exponential manner almost 10-fold. This rise affected both sex and all age groups alike. A 3-fold rise was noted in hospitalizations for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Other esophageal diagnoses, such as achalasia, dyskinesia, or stricture were characterized by falling or stable trends. US hospitalization data show a continued exponential rise in the occurrence of GERD without any signs of leveling off. These trends are likely to represent ongoing changes in the underlying incidence and prevalence of the disease.

  11. Fabrication of a Delaying Biodegradable Magnesium Alloy-Based Esophageal Stent via Coating Elastic Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianwen Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal stent implantation can relieve esophageal stenosis and obstructions in benign esophageal strictures, and magnesium alloy stents are a good candidate because of biodegradation and biological safety. However, biodegradable esophageal stents show a poor corrosion resistance and a quick loss of mechanical support in vivo. In this study, we chose the elastic and biodegradable mixed polymer of Poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL and poly(trimethylene carbonate (PTMC as the coated membrane on magnesium alloy stents for fabricating a fully biodegradable esophageal stent, which showed an ability to delay the degradation time and maintain mechanical performance in the long term. After 48 repeated compressions, the mechanical testing demonstrated that the PCL-PTMC-coated magnesium stents possess good flexibility and elasticity, and could provide enough support against lesion compression when used in vivo. According to the in vitro degradation evaluation, the PCL-PTMC membrane coated on magnesium was a good material combination for biodegradable stents. During the in vivo evaluation, the proliferation of the smooth muscle cells showed no signs of cell toxicity. Histological examination revealed the inflammation scores at four weeks in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC stent group were similar to those in the control group (p > 0.05. The α-smooth muscle actin layer in the media was thinner in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC stent group than in the control group (p < 0.05. Both the epithelial and smooth muscle cell layers were significantly thinner in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC stent group than in the control group. The stent insertion was feasible and provided reliable support for at least four weeks, without causing severe injury or collagen deposition. Thus, this stent provides a new stent for the treatment of benign esophageal stricture and a novel research path in the development of temporary stents in other cases of benign stricture.

  12. Traumatic strictures of the posterior urethra in boys with special reference to recurrent strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Satish Kumar; Sinha, Shandip K; Kumar, Arun; Pant, Nitin; Borkar, Nitin Kumar; Dhua, Anjan

    2011-06-01

    We report 18 years' experience of traumatic urethral strictures in boys with emphasis on recurrent strictures. Thirty-four boys with pelvic fracture urethral strictures underwent 35 repairs: 23 in the primary group (initial suprapubic cystostomy, but no urethral repair) and 12 in the re-do group (previously failed attempt(s) at urethroplasty elsewhere). The median age at operation and stricture length was 8.4 years and 3 cm in the primary and 9 years and 5.4 cm in the re-do group, respectively. Anastomotic urethroplasty was performed wherever possible, or failing this a substitution urethroplasty. Median follow up was 9 years for primary group and 8 years for re-do group. Primary group: urethroplasty was successful in 22/23, with 10 by perineal and 13 by additional transpubic approach. Two have stress incontinence. Erectile function is unchanged in all and upper tracts are maintained. One had recurrent stricture. Re-do group (12 including 1 recurrence from primary group): anastomotic urethroplasty was done in 5 and substitution urethroplasty in 7. Patients needing substitution had long stricture (>5 cm), stricture extending to distal bulb, or high riding bladder neck. All patients are voiding urethrally. Two patients with substitution required dilatation for early re-stenosis. One appendix substitution required delayed revision. Two have stress incontinence. Erectile function was unaffected. Upper tracts are maintained. Anastomotic urethroplasty was successful in over 95% of primary cases. In re-do cases it was viable in only 41% of cases; the rest required substitution urethroplasty. Urethral substitution also gave acceptable results. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of radiographic and sonographic urethrography for assessing urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babnik Peskar, Darja; Visnar Perovic, Alenka

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiourethrography (RUG) and sonourethrography (SUG) for assessment of urethral strictures and to evaluate whether RUG underestimates stricture length, as has been reported. Fifty-one men with suspected urethral strictures were evaluated by both methods performed consecutively. Stricture lengths and diameters measured by RUG were significantly greater (mean 22%, 30%) than those measured by SUG because of radiographic magnification. Both methods, however, detected a similar percentage lumen reduction and similarly graded stricture severity. Equally significant non-correlation between both methods for length measurements in the bulbar and penile urethra (p 2 =0.33 and 0.34, respectively) supported radiographic magnification. Previous inaccuracies appear to relate to RUG measurements of the central tight stricture (mean 44% of the entire length in our series), not the full stricture length. Use of sonographic contrast medium intra-urethrally improved the definition of long narrow strictures. The SUG gave information about peri-urethral tissues not provided by RUG. Once radiographic magnification was taken into account, there were no major differences in the assessment of urethral strictures by both methods. With correct measurement methods, RUG does not underestimate stricture length. For full assessment, the combination of RUG and SUG, which gives information about peri-urethral disease, is optimal in many patients. (orig.)

  14. Preliminary study of efficacy of hyaluronic acid on caustic esophageal burns in an experimental rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Muazez; Demir, Tuncer; Karadag, Cetin Ali; Ketani, Muzaffer Aydin; Celik, Hakim; Kaplan, Davut Sinan; Boleken, Mehmet Emin

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid on the prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after experimental caustic (alkaline) esophageal injury in rats. Twenty-one Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into three groups. A caustic esophageal burn was created following the Gehanno model: Group l (n=7) underwent operation, but no injury; Group 2 (n=7) was injured and left untreated; and Group 3 (n=7) was injured and treated with hyaluronic acid, first topically and then orally by gavage (2×0.3mL; 12.5mg/mL for 7days). The caustic esophageal burn was created by instilling 25% NaOH into the distal esophagus. All rats were euthanized on day 22 for evaluation. The efficacy of hyaluronic acid treatment was assessed histopathologically and biochemically via blood determination of the total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and sulfhydryl group (SH) and lipid hydroperoxidase (LOOH) levels. Statistical analyses were performed. Weight gain was significantly lower in Group 2 than in the other two groups (POSI, and SH and LOOH levels were higher in Group 2 than in the other two groups. The mean stenosis index, inflammation, TAS, SH and OSI in Group 2 were significantly different than those in the other two groups (P<0.05). Hyaluronic acid treatment is effective in treating damage and preventing strictures after caustic esophageal burn in rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonsurgical Management of Severe Esophageal and Gastric Injury Following Alkali Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy D Abaskharoun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The ingestion of caustic substances may result in significant gastrointestinal injury. Endoscopy can play a major role in the initial evaluation and subsequent therapy of such injuries. The case of a 50-year-old man who ingested an alkaline floor stripper is described, including the endoscopic management of esophageal and pyloric strictures, with good functional results. The role of endoscopy, steroids and acid suppression in the management of such patients is also explored.

  16. Esophageal heterotopic gastric mucosa in esophageal atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan J.R. Harrison

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM is occasionally found at endoscopy in the proximal esophagus of adults and children, when it manifests as an asymptomatic small island of reddish pink mucosa just below the upper esophageal sphincter. There are few reports of esophageal HGM detected by endoscopy after repair of esophageal atresia (EA with tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF. We report a child with multiple patches of HGM in the proximal and distal esophagus seen at endoscopy after EA/TEF repair. No obvious symptoms were related to the HGM and she remains under endoscopic surveillance. The incidence of esophageal HGM may be increased in patients with EA and its distribution can be more extensive than a simple “inlet patch”. There is evidence to suggest that esophageal HGM increases the risk of developing Barrett's esophagus and has a malignant potential. Heterotopic gastric mucosa extends the spectrum of potential pathologies affecting the esophagus in patients with EA/TEF and supports current international guidelines for endoscopic surveillance of these patients. Keywords: Tracheo-esophageal fistula, Ectopic mucosa, Esophageal malignancy

  17. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Smith

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts.

  18. Different healing process of esophageal large mucosal defects by endoscopic mucosal dissection between with and without steroid injection in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Kouichi; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Ban, Shinichi; Aikawa, Masayasu; Akimoto, Naoe; Koyama, Isamu; Kita, Hiroto

    2013-04-25

    Stricture formation is one of the major complications after endoscopic removal of large superficial squamous cell neoplasms of the esophagus, and local steroid injections have been adopted to prevent it. However, fundamental pathological alterations related to them have not been well analyzed so far. The aim of this study was to analyze the time course of the healing process of esophageal large mucosal defects resulting in stricture formation and its modification by local steroid injection, using an animal model. Esophageal circumferential mucosal defects were created by endoscopic mucosal dissection (ESD) for four pigs. One pig was sacrificed five minutes after the ESD, and other two pigs were followed-up on endoscopy and sacrificed at the time of one week and three weeks after the ESD, respectively. The remaining one pig was followed-up on endoscopy with five times of local steroid injection and sacrificed at the time of eight weeks after the ESD. The esophageal tissues of all pigs were subjected to pathological analyses. For the pigs without steroid injection, the esophageal stricture was completed around three weeks after the ESD on both endoscopy and esophagography. Histopathological examination of the esophageal tissues revealed that spindle-shaped α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive myofibroblasts arranged in a parallel fashion and extending horizontally were identified at the ulcer bed one week after the ESD, and increased contributing to formation of the stenotic luminal ridge covered with the regenerated epithelium three weeks after the ESD. The proper muscle layer of the stricture site was thinned with some myocytes which seemingly showed transition to the myofibroblast layer. By contrast, for the pig with steroid injection, esophageal stricture formation was not evident with limited appearance of the spindle-shaped myofibroblasts, instead, appearance of stellate or polygocal SMA-positive stromal cells arranged haphazardly in the persistent granulation

  19. Inhibition of proliferation and migration of stricture fibroblasts by epithelial cell-conditioned media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilima Nath

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results demonstrate the ability of ECCM to inhibit the proliferation and migration of stricture fibroblasts and present it as an effective adjunct in urethroplasty, which may influence stricture wound healing and inhibit the recurrence of stricture.

  20. Palliation of Postoperative Gastrointestinal Anastomotic Malignant Strictures with Flexible Covered Metallic Stents: Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Min; Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Kim, Chong Soo; Yang, Doo Hyun; Lee, Seung Ok

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of the placement of covered metallic stents for palliation of gastrointestinal anastomotic strictures secondary to recurrent gastric cancer.Methods: Under fluoroscopic guidance, placement of one or two self-expandable covered metallic stents was attempted perorally in 11 patents (aged 48-76 years) with anastomotic stenoses due to recurrent gastric malignancies. The strictures involved both the afferent and efferent loops in three patients. All patients had poor peroral food intake with severe nausea and vomiting after ingestion. The technical and clinical success was evaluated.Results: Placement of the covered stent was technically successful in 13 of 15 (87%) attempts in ten patients. After the procedure, 9 of 11 (82%) patients overall were able to ingest at least a liquid diet and had markedly decreased incidence of vomiting. During the follow-up of 2-31 weeks (mean 8.5 weeks) there were no major complications.Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that flexible, covered stents may provide effective palliation of malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

  1. Esophagitis dissecans associated with eosinophilic esophagitis in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie-Anne R. Guerra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis are distinct esophageal pathologies with characteristic clinical and histologic findings. Esophagitis dissecans superficialis is a rare finding on endoscopy consisting of the peeling of large fragments of esophageal mucosa. Histology shows sloughing of the epithelium and parakeratosis. Eosinophilic esophagitis is an allergic disease of the esophagus characterized by eosinophilic inflammation of the epithelium and symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. Both of these esophageal processes have been associated with other diseases, but there is no known association between them. We describe a case of esophagitis dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis in an adolescent patient. To our knowledge, this is the first case describing an association between esophageal dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis.

  2. A new approach to the diagnosis of esophageal rupture due to balloon dilatation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ho Young; Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Young; Kuh, Ja Hong; Lee, Dong Kun; Chae, Soo Wan

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of esophageal rupture in balloon dilatation is usually made from clinical symptom of sharp chest pain, plain chest radiographs and esophagograms after dilation. It has some problems; the pain is varied patients to patients and bacterial flora in the mouth or esophagus can be mixed with the contrast media to flow into the mediastinum during esophagography, to create mediastinitis. We could make the diagnosis of esophageal rupture without using contrast media by the observation of the pressure change in the balloon during dilatation. An infusion pump, transducer and esophageal balloon were connected through a multi-way connector, and the transducer of them was also connected to an amplifier which was connected to a pressure monitor to record the balloon pressure. As balloon(20mm/3cm) inserted in the mid-thoracic esophagus under the fluoroscopic control was inflated until the esophagus was ruptured. Balloon was distended by injecting air in 15 rabbits(A group), and by injecting diluted contrast medium in 15 rabbits(B group). The pressure decrease after esophageal rupture was ranged from 94 to 160 mmHg(mean; 103) in A group and 340 to 1040 mmHg(mean; 537) in B group. The pressure curve of A group was smooth, regular and so accurate to make the diagnosis of esophageal rupture, whereas that of B group was irregular and not so accurate. In conclusion, our new method to make the diagnosis of esophageal rupture during balloon dilatation may be useful in patients of esophageal stricture

  3. Effects of circular myotomy on the healing of esophageal suture anastomosis: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannuri, U; Tannuri, A C; Fukutaki, M F; de Oliveira, M S; Muoio, V M; Massaguer, A A

    1999-01-01

    For esophageal reconstruction in newborns with esophageal atresia, esophageal reunion with an end-to-end anastomosis is the ideal procedure, although it may result in leaks and strictures due to tension on the suture line, mainly in cases with a wide gap between the ends. Circular myotomy (Livaditis' procedure) is the best method to elongate the proximal esophageal pouch and reduce anastomotic tension. This experimental investigation in dogs was undertaken to attempt to verify that circular myotomy decreases the anastomotic leak rate in newborns with wide gap esophageal atresia, and to analyze whether the technique promotes morphologic changes in the anastomotic scar. A pilot study demonstrated that it is necessary to resect more than 8 cm (40% of the total esophageal length) in order to obtain high leak rates. In the experimental project, such resection was performed in dogs divided into two groups (control group, anastomosis only, and experimental group, anastomosis plus circular myotomy in the proximal esophageal segment). The animals were killed in the 14th postoperative day, submitted to autopsy, and were evaluated as to the presence of leaks and strictures, as well as to the features (macroscopic and microscopic aspects) of the anastomosis. Leak rates were the same in both groups. Morphometric analysis revealed that in animals in the experimental group, the anastomotic scar was thinner than the control animals, and the isolated muscular manchette distal to the site of myotomy was replaced by fibrous tissue. Correspondingly, a decreased number of newly formed small vessels were noted in the experimental animals, compared to control animals. We concluded that circular myotomy does not decrease the incidence of anastomotic leaks, and it also promotes deleterious changes in anastomotic healing.

  4. Perioperative morbidity and outcome of esophageal surgery in dogs and cats: 72 cases (1993-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jessie S; Culp, William T N; Scotti, Katherine; Seibert, Rachel L; Lux, Cassie N; Singh, Ameet; Wormser, Chloe; Runge, Jeffrey J; Schmiedt, Chad W; Corrie, Jessica; Phillips, Heidi; Selmic, Laura E; Nucci, Daniel J; Mayhew, Philipp D; Kass, Philip H

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate perioperative morbidity and outcome in dogs and cats undergoing esophageal surgery. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 63 client-owned dogs and 9 client-owned cats. PROCEDURES Medical records of dogs and cats that underwent esophageal surgery were reviewed for information on signalment, history, results of preoperative diagnostic testing, condition treated, details of surgery, intraoperative complications, and postoperative complications. Long-term follow-up data were obtained via veterinarian and client telephone conversations. The relationship between complications and survival to hospital discharge was evaluated by means of regression analysis. RESULTS The most common indication for surgical intervention was an esophageal foreign body in dogs (50/63 [79%]) and esophageal stricture in cats (3/9). Complications were documented in 54% (34/63) of dogs and 3 of 9 cats. The most common immediate postoperative complications were respiratory in nature (9 dogs, 1 cat). Partial esophagectomy and resection with anastomosis were significantly associated with the development of immediate postoperative complications in dogs. The most common delayed postoperative complications were persistent regurgitation (7 dogs) and esophageal stricture formation (3 dogs, 1 cat). For dogs, a mass lesion and increasing lesion size were significantly associated with the development of delayed postoperative complications. Six dogs (10%) and 1 cat died or were euthanized prior to discharge, and pneumomediastinum and leukopenia were negative prognostic factors for dogs being discharged from the hospital. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this study suggested that the short-term prognosis for dogs and cats that survive surgery for treatment of esophageal lesions is favorable, with 90% of patients discharged from the hospital (57/63 dogs; 8/9 cats). However, dogs treated for more extensive esophageal lesions as well as those undergoing esophagectomy or

  5. Effects of circular myotomy on the healing of esophageal suture anastomosis: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tannuri Uenis

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available For esophageal reconstruction in newborns with esophageal atresia, esophageal reunion with an end-to-end anastomosis is the ideal procedure, although it may result in leaks and strictures due to tension on the suture line, mainly in cases with a wide gap between the ends. Circular myotomy (Livaditis' procedure is the best method to elongate the proximal esophageal pouch and reduce anastomotic tension. This experimental investigation in dogs was undertaken to attempt to verify that circular myotomy decreases the anastomotic leak rate in newborns with wide gap esophageal atresia, and to analyze whether the technique promotes morphologic changes in the anastomotic scar. A pilot study demonstrated that it is necessary to resect more than 8 cm (40% of the total esophageal length in order to obtain high leak rates. In the experimental project, such resection was performed in dogs divided into two groups (control group, anastomosis only, and experimental group, anastomosis plus circular myotomy in the proximal esophageal segment. The animals were killed in the 14th postoperative day, submitted to autopsy, and were evaluated as to the presence of leaks and strictures, as well as to the features (macroscopic and microscopic aspects of the anastomosis. Leak rates were the same in both groups. Morphometric analysis revealed that in animals in the experimental group, the anastomotic scar was thinner than the control animals, and the isolated muscular manchette distal to the site of myotomy was replaced by fibrous tissue. Correspondingly, a decreased number of newly formed small vessels were noted in the experimental animals, compared to control animals. We concluded that circular myotomy does not decrease the incidence of anastomotic leaks, and it also promotes deleterious changes in anastomotic healing.

  6. Post-ischemic bowel stricture: CT features in eight cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Sil [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Jin; Hong, Sung Mo; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Ah Young; Ha, Hyun Kwon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To investigate the characteristic radiologic features of post-ischemic stricture, which can then be implemented to differentiate that specific disease from other similar bowel diseases, with an emphasis on computed tomography (CT) features. Eight patients with a diagnosis of ischemic bowel disease, who were also diagnosed with post-ischemic stricture on the basis of clinical or pathologic findings, were included. Detailed clinical data was collected from the available electronic medical records. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed all CT images. Pathologic findings were also analyzed. The mean interval between the diagnosis of ischemic bowel disease and stricture formation was 57 days. The severity of ischemic bowel disease was variable. Most post-ischemic strictures developed in the ileum (n = 5), followed by the colon (n = 2) and then the jejunum (n = 1). All colonic strictures developed in the “watershed zone.” The pathologic features of post-ischemic stricture were deep ulceration, submucosal/subserosal fibrosis and chronic transmural inflammation. The mean length of the post-ischemic stricture was 7.4 cm. All patients in this study possessed one single stricture. On contrast-enhanced CT, most strictures possessed concentric wall thickening (87.5%), with moderate enhancement (87.5%), mucosal enhancement (50%), or higher enhancement in portal phase than arterial phase (66.7%). Post-ischemic strictures develop in the ileum, jejunum and colon after an interval of several weeks. In the colonic segment, strictures mainly occur in the “watershed zone.” Typical CT findings include a single area of concentric wall thickening of medium length (mean, 7.4 cm), with moderate and higher enhancement in portal phase and vasa recta prominence.

  7. Esophageal pH monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... Esophageal pH monitoring is used to check how much stomach acid is entering the esophagus. It also checks how well the acid is cleared downward into the ...

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of superficial esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Prat, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    Endoscopy allows for the screening, early diagnosis, treatment and follow up of superficial esophageal cancer. Endoscopic submucosal dissection has become the gold standard for the resection of superficial squamous cell neoplasia. Combinations of endoscopic mucosal resection and radiofrequency ablation are the mainstay of the management of Barrett's associated neoplasia. However, protruded, non-lifting or large lesions may be better managed by endoscopic submucosal dissection. Novel ablation tools, such as argon plasma coagulation with submucosal lifting and cryoablation balloons, are being developed for the treatment of residual Barrett's esophagus, since iatrogenic strictures still hamper the development of extensive circumferential resections in the esophagus. Optimal surveillance modalities after endoscopic resection are still to be determined. The assessment of the risk of lymph-node metastases, as well as of the need for additional treatments based on qualitative and quantitative histological criteria, balanced to the patient's condition, requires a dedicated multidisciplinary team decision process. The need for trained endoscopists, expert pathologists and surgeons, and specialized multidisciplinary meetings underlines the role of expert centers in the management of superficial esophageal cancer.

  9. Cyclosporine in the Management of Esophageal Lichen Planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Chaklader

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus (LP is an uncommon disorder of unknown etiology, mostly affecting patients in their fifth and sixth decade of life. It is believed to be an autoimmune process involving T cells directed against basal keratinocytes. It affects the skin, nails, oral pharynx and genitals. Esophageal involvement is quite rare and can cause strictures, ulcerations and squamous cell cancer. The present article describes the case of a 54-year-old woman who was referred for assessment of dysphagia that initially occurred with solids, which then progressed to soft foods but spared liquids. The patient reported a weight loss of 9.1 kg. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed and she was subsequently diagnosed with pill esophagitis. At the same time, she was also diagnosed with oral LP, with no involvement of the esophagus. She was treated with a proton pump inhibitor that resolved her gastrointestinal symptoms. The symptoms returned one year later and a repeat esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed white plaques due to LP. She was treated with intermittent glucocorticoids. Diagnosis of esophageal LP is crucial for the proper treatment. Some patients may require systemic immunosuppression and mechanical dilation to prevent weight loss. Surveillance endoscopies should be performed to monitor for squamous cell cancer. Cyclosporine has been used for genital and oral LP, but the present case is the first in which it has been used successfully to treat esophageal LP.

  10. Metastatic Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer Presenting Clinically with Esophageal Dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilit Karapetyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intra-abdominal metastases of invasive lobular breast cancer (ILBC may be insidious. We report a case of metastatic ILBC that presented with dysphagia within weeks of a negative mammogram and before the development of intra-abdominal symptoms. Case. A 70-year-old female developed esophageal dysphagia. She underwent EGD which showed a short segment of stricture of the distal esophagus without significant mucosal changes. Biopsy was unremarkable and patient underwent lower esophageal sphincter (LES dilation. Severe progressive dysphagia led to esophageal impaction and three LES dilatations. CT scan showed bilateral pleural effusions, more prominent on right side, and ascites. The pleural effusions were transudative. Repeat EGD with biopsy showed lymphocytic esophagitis, and she was started on swallowed fluticasone. Abdominal ultrasound with Doppler showed that the main portal vein had atypical turbulent flow that was felt to possibly be due to retroperitoneal process. The patient underwent diagnostic laparoscopy which revealed diffuse punctate lesions on the peritoneum. Pathology was consistent with metastatic ILBC. Conclusion. Dysphagia in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis from metastatic ILBC is a rare finding. The case highlights the importance of metastatic ILBC as a differential diagnosis for female patients with progressive dysphagia and associated ascites or pleural effusions.

  11. Radioisotope esophageal transit test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazono, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kazuo; Toyonaga, Atsushi

    1982-01-01

    A new technique employed sup(99m)Tc-MAA for the study of esophageal dysfunction and its clinical implication were evaluated in the patients with achalasia, progressive systemic sclerosis, reflux esophagitis and 10 normal controls. To investigate esophageal emptying and gastroesophageal reflux, a homogeneous bolus of sup(99m)Tc-MAA in 15ml of water was swallowed in the upright and supine positions under the collimeter of a gamma camera linked to nuclear medicine data analyser (Shimazu Scinti Pack 1200). This radionuclide transit studies made a quantitative evaluation of the esophageal dysfunction possible in all cases. Comparing the conventional esophageal function test procedures, this test is a safe, noninvasive and more physiological and sensitive in detecting abnormal esophageal emptying and gastroesophageal reflux. (author)

  12. Peptic oesophageal stricture in children: Management problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zouari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptic oesophageal stricture (PES is a serious complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in childhood. The treatment of PES is still controversial, ranging from simple oesophageal dilations to resection/anastomosis of the stenotic portion of the oesophagus. In this study, we want to share our experience with 11 children with GERD and PES. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of clinical data obtained from children who underwent dilation and antireflux surgery for PES was performed. Results: A total of 11 patients were diagnosed with PES. The clinical picture was dominated by dysphagia. Barium swallow showed hiatal hernia in nine cases (82%. Oesophageal strictures were located most commonly in the lower third of the oesophagus (91%. Three Children (27% with PES had a neurologic impairment and patients had a mean duration of symptoms of 20 months (range, 3 month to 6.2 years before intervention. Children received a median of four dilations (range, 1-21 dilations for PES. Time to first dilation from age of diagnosis was a mean of 4.5 months (range, 2-14 months. Antireflux surgery was performed in all patients. Post-operatively, seven patients required repeat oesophageal dilation. Patients were followed with serial dilation for a median of 6 years (range, 1-9 years and only one patient has a continued requirement of oesophageal dilation for PES. Conclusion: GERD complicated by PES is an important condition affecting a significant number of children. Early and effective treatment of both stricture and GERD is required to improve the prognosis of this serious condition.

  13. American brachytherapy society (ABS) guidelines for brachytherapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Gaspar, Laurie; Herskovic, Arnold; Mantravadi, Prasad; Speiser, Burton

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: There is wide variation in the indications, techniques, treatment regimens and dosimetry being used to treat cancer of the esophagus and no guidelines exist for optimal therapy. Methods: The Clinical Research Committee of the ABS met to formulate consensus guidelines for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. Results: Good candidates for brachytherapy include patients with unifocal disease, with thoracic tumor 10 cm primary regional lymph adenopathy or tumor located in the gastro-esophageal junction or cervical esophagus. Contraindications include tracheo-esophageal fistula or stenosis that cannot be by-passed. The esophageal or nasogastric tube inserted should have a diameter of 6-10 mm whenever possible. If 5FU-based chemotherapy and 50 Gy external beam (EBRT) are used, it is suggested that the low dose rate brachytherapy (LDR) dose be 20 Gy at 0.4-1 Gy/hr, prescribed at 1 cm from the source. If high dose rate (HDR) is used, the dose recommended is 10 Gy in 2 weekly fractions of 5 Gy each, given after EBRT. Chemotherapy is not usually given concurrently with brachytherapy, and when it is, the brachytherapy dose is reduced. The length of esophagus treated by brachytherapy includes the post-EBRT involved area and a 1-2 cm margin proximally and distally. Supportive care, given during EBRT includes an antifungal agent (e.g., diflucan) and carafate. Gradual dilatation of the esophagus is required post-treatment for esophageal strictures. Conclusion: Guidelines were developed for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. As more clinical data becomes available, these guidelines will be updated by the ABS

  14. Clinical presentation and treatment of urethral stricture: Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.N. Ekeke

    2016-08-23

    Aug 23, 2016 ... demography, aetiology, site, treatment and outcome of treatment of USD were collated and analyzed using. SPSS 20.0. Results: ... Eighty two patients (42.27%) had anterior urethral stricture; while 78 (40.20%) had posterior urethral strictures. ..... to leave a catheter and, if so, for what duration [34,4,35–37] in.

  15. Direct vision internal urethrotomy in 459 urethral stricture patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Direct vision, internal, urethrotomy, urethral and stricture.;. Four hundred and fifty nine patients seen with simple urethral strictures between 1990 and 1998 underwent direct vision urethrotomy.. The procedure was successful in 441 patients and failed in only 18 patients. Postoperative complications included fever.

  16. Urethroplasty for male urethral strictures: Experience from a national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. Fall

    The success of urethroplasty was more frequent for urethral strictures between 1 and 5 cm (46/69) than in ... advent, endoscopic internal urethrotomy (EIU) raised great hopes because it is a .... The comparative analysis of the variables was performed with .... thral stricture are neither clinically effective nor cost-effective.

  17. Editorial comment on “Etiology of male urethral strictures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    My colleagues and I are strongly convinced that urethral stricture disease presents different etiologies and pathological characteris- tics in developed compared to developing countries [1]. Recently, we reported the differences in posterior urethral stricture after pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects in developing (India) ...

  18. Management of panurethral strictures | Kulkarni | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present our experience of pan-urethral stricture repair using a single stage, one-sided dissection, dorsal onlay repair with oral mucosa graft. Subjects and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 318 consecutive men undergoing management of pan-urethral stricture from June 1995 to December 2014.

  19. Aetiology of Urethral Strictures at Moi Teaching and Refferal Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    16.3 years. Conclusion. Urethritis, iatrogenic and accidental trauma are still the commonest causes of urethral strictures in our environment. These causes are preventable. Introduction. Urethral stricture disease is caused by any process that injures the urethral epithelium or the underlying spongiosum leading to healing by.

  20. The balloon dilatation and large profile catheter maintenance method for the management of the bile duct stricture following liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Sung Wook; Shin, Sung Wook; Do, Young Soo; Park, Kwang Bo; Sung, Yon Mi; Choo, In Wook [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Wei Chiang [Sungae General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    We wanted to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the percutaneous balloon dilatation and large profile catheter maintenance method for the management of patients with anastomotic biliary strictures following liver transplant. From May 1999 to June 2003, 12 patients with symptomatic benign biliary stricture complicated by liver transplantation were treated with the percutaneous balloon dilatation and large profile catheter maintenance method (1-6 months). The patients were eight males and four females, and their ages ranged from 20 to 62 years (mean age: 44 years). Ten patients underwent living donor liver transplantation and two underwent cadaveric liver transplantation. Postoperative biliary strictures occurred from two to 21 months (mean age: 18 months) after liver transplantation. The initial technical success rate was 92%. Patency of the bile duct was preserved for eight to 40 months (mean period: 19 months) in 10 of 12 (84%) patients. When reviewing two patients (17%), secondary balloon dilatations were needed for treating the delayed recurrence of biliary stricture. In one patients, no recurrent stenosis was seen during the further 10 months follow-up after secondary balloon dilatation. Another patient did not response to secondary balloon dilatation, and he was treated by surgery. Eleven of 12 patients (92%) showed good biliary patency for 8-40 months (mean period: 19 months) of follow-up. The percutaneous balloon dilatation and large profile catheter maintenance method is an effective therapeutic alterative for the treatment of most biliary strictures that complicate liver transplantation. It has a high success rate and it should be considered before surgery.

  1. Sigmoid stricture associated with diverticular disease should be an indication for elective surgery with lymph node clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venara, A; Toqué, L; Barbieux, J; Cesbron, E; Ridereau-Zins, C; Lermite, E; Hamy, A

    2015-09-01

    The literature concerning stricture secondary to diverticulitis is poor. Stricture in this setting should be an indication for surgery because (a) of the potential risk of cancer and (b) morbidity is not increased compared to other indications for colectomy. The goal of this report is to study the post-surgical morbidity and the quality of life in patients after sigmoidectomy for sigmoid stricture associated with diverticular disease. This is a monocenter retrospective observational study including patients with a preoperative diagnosis of sigmoid stricture associated with diverticular disease undergoing operation between Jan 1, 2007 and Dec 31, 2013. The GastroIntestinal Quality of Life Index was used to assess patient satisfaction. Sixteen patients were included of which nine were female. Median age was 69.5 (46-84) and the median body mass index was 23.55kg/m(2) (17.2-28.4). Elective sigmoidectomy was performed in all 16 patients. Overall, complications occurred in five patients (31.2%) (4 minor complications and 1 major complication according to the Dindo and Clavien Classification); none resulted in death. Pathology identified two adenocarcinomas (12.5%). The mean GastroIntestinal Quality of Life Index was 122 (67-144) and 10/11 patients were satisfied with their surgical intervention. Sigmoid stricture prevents endoscopic exploration of the entire colon and thus it may prove difficult to rule out a malignancy. Surgery does not impair the quality of life since morbidity is similar to other indications for sigmoidectomy. For these reasons, we recommend that stricture associated with diverticular disease should be an indication for sigmoidectomy including lymph node clearance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Esophageal lichen planus

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen ...

  3. Esophageal lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis.

  4. Sonourethrography in the evaluation of anterior urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Kwag, Jin Geun

    1994-01-01

    To determine the reliability of sonourethrography (SUG) in the evaluation of male anterior urethral strictures. Both SUG with retrograde saline infusion and retrograde urethrography (RUG) were performed in 5 young normal volunteers and 20 patients with symptoms of impaired urine flow. Those findings were compared with urethroscopic and operative findings in all patients. SUG was more accurate in the evaluation of the stricture length and degree than RUG in 7 patients with anterior urethral strictures, when compared with their subsequent open urethroplasty findings. Only SUG could classify the degree of spongiofibrosis surrounding the strictures in 15 patients. So, SUG was diagnostically as efficacious as or, superior to, RUG in all 20 patients. SUG can be used as one of complementary and reliable tools for diagnosis, evaluation and follow-up of anterior urethral strictures

  5. Impact of preoperative patient characteristics on posturethroplasty recurrence: The significance of stricture length and prior treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibril Oyekunle Bello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urethral strictures are common in urologic practice of Sub-Saharan Africa including Nigeria. We determine the rate of stricture recurrence following urethroplasty for anterior urethral strictures and evaluate preoperative variables that predict of stricture recurrence in our practice. Subjects and Methods: Thirty-six men who had urethroplasty for proven anterior urethral stricture disease between February 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Preoperative factors including age, socioeconomic factors, comorbidities, etiology of strictures, stricture location, stricture length, periurethral spongiofibrosis, and prior stricture treatments were assessed for independent predictors of stricture recurrence. Results: The median age was 49.5 years (range 21-90, median stricture length was 4 cm (range 1-18 cm and the overall recurrence rate was 27.8%. Postinfectious strictures, pan urethral strictures or multiple strictures involving the penile and bulbar urethra were more common. Most patients had penile circular fasciocutaneous flap urethroplasty. Following univariate analysis of potential preoperative predictors of stricture recurrence, stricture length, and prior treatments with dilations or urethrotomies were found to be significantly associated with stricture recurrence. On multivariate analysis, they both remained statistically significant. Patients who had prior treatments had greater odds of having a recurrent stricture (odds ratio 18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-224.3. Stricture length was dichotomized based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis, and strictures of length ≥5 cm had significantly greater recurrence (area under ROC curve of 0.825, 95% CI 0.690-0.960, P = 0.032. Conclusion: Patients who had prior dilatations or urethrotomies and those with long strictures particularly strictures ≥5 cm have significantly greater odds of developing a recurrence following urethroplasty in Nigerian

  6. Comprehensive swallowing exercises to treat complicated dysphagia caused by esophageal replacement with colon: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Wang, Yujue; Li, Na; Qiu, Weihong; Wu, Huixiang; Huo, Jianshan; Dai, Meng; Yu, Yong; Wan, Guifang; Dou, Zulin; Guo, Weiping

    2017-02-01

    Surgical procedures for colonic replacement of the esophagus are most commonly associated with anastomotic stricture which cause dysphagia. In this report, we describe a rare case of a patient who demonstrated dysphagia resulting from an anastomotic stricture following esophageal replacement with the colon. All the treatments to dilate the anastomotic stricture were ineffective. To investigate the new treatment strategy for a case with complicated dysphagia, clinical dysphagia evaluations, functional oral intake scale (FOIS), videofluoroscopic swallowing study as well as high-resolution manometry were used to evaluate the swallowing function of the patient before and after treatments. Comprehensive swallowing exercises included the protective airway maneuver, tongue pressure resistance feedback exercise, Masako Maneuver swallowing exercise, and the effortful swallowing exercise. Comprehensive swallowing exercises showed good effect in the patient. The FOIS score increased from level 1 to level 7. The videofluoroscopy digital analysis showed that the pharynx constriction rate was 23% and 50%, before and after treatment, respectively. The data from the high-resolution manometry displayed that: the value of the velopharyngeal pressure peak was 82.8 mmHg before treatment and 156.9 mmHg after treatment; the velopharyngeal contraction duration time was 310 milliseconds before treatment and 525 milliseconds after treatment; the value of the hypopharynx pressure peak was 53.7 mmHg before treatment and 103.2 mmHg after treatment; and the hypopharynx contraction duration time was 390 milliseconds before treatment and 1030 milliseconds after treatment. The swallowing visualization illustrated that a bolus could normally pass through the anastomotic stoma, and the bolus leakage was no longer present. The patient was able to eat various consistencies of food independently, and we were able to remove the jejunum nutrient catheter before discharging the patient. For

  7. Oesophageal strictures caused by the ingestion of corrosive agents: effectiveness of balloon dilatation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo, E.-Y. [Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Shin, J.H. [Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jhshin@amc.seoul.kr; Kim, J.H.; Song, H.-Y. [Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Aim: To evaluate the safety and clinical effectiveness of balloon dilatation in children for oesophageal strictures caused by the ingestion of corrosive agents. Materials and methods: The study comprised 11 children (median age 6 years; range 1-14 years) with oesophageal strictures caused by corrosive agents, who underwent a total of 36 balloon dilatation sessions. The technical and clinical success, recurrence of dysphagia, complications, and primary and secondary patency rates were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Technical success was achieved in 91% of patients and in 97% of balloon dilatation sessions. Clinical success (defined as improved food intake and reduced dysphagia within 1 month of the first balloon dilatation session) was achieved in 64% of patients (7/11). During the mean 35-month follow-up period (range 1-89 months), 10 (91%) patients experienced recurrence. Oesophageal rupture (types 1 or 2) occurred in 45% of patients and in 31% of balloon dilatation sessions. Primary patency rates at 6 months and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 36, 27, 14, 14, 14, and 14%, respectively. Secondary patency rates at 6 months and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 82, 82, 82, 56, 42, and 42%, respectively. The secondary patency rate was higher than the primary patency rate (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The present study examined oesophageal balloon dilatation for paediatric oesophageal strictures caused by the ingestion of corrosive agents. Although the technical success rate was high and there were no deaths, the clinical success rate was low owing to a high recurrence rate. However, repeated balloon dilatations resulted in an acceptable secondary patency rate.

  8. Balloon catheter dilatation of benign urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, L.; Cavallo, A.; Perin, B.; Bighi, G.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report their experience of benign urethral stricture dilatation by balloon catheter in 11 male patients. Ten posterior and 2 anterior urethral strictures were treated; in 1 patients several narrowings coexisted at various levels. Etiology was inflammatory in 4 cases, iatrogen in 3, post-traumatic in 2, and equivocal in 2. The patients were studied both before and soon after dilatation by means of retrograde and voiding cystourethrogram and uroflowgraphy; the follow-up (2-14 months) was performed by urodynamic alone. In all cases, dilatation was followed by the restoration of urethral gauge, together with prompt functional improvement of urodynamic parameters. The latter result subsisted in time in 9 patients. In 2 cases recurrences were observed demonstrated at once by clinics and urodynamics. Both lesions were successfully re-treated. Neither early not late complication occurred. In spite of the limited material, the valuable results obtained, together with the absence of complications, the peculiar morphology of recurrences, and the chance of repeating it make the procedure advisable as a valid alternative to conventional techniques for these pathologies

  9. Adult urethral stricture: practice of Turkish urologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Mehmet; Sertkaya, Zulfu; Koca, Orhan; Calıskan, Selahattin; Kutluhan, Musab Ali; Karaman, Muhammet Ihsan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate national practice patterns in the treatment of male anterior urethral strictures among Turkish urologists. Materials and Methods: A survey form including 12 questions prepared to determine active Turkish urologists' approach to diagnosis and treatment of the adult urethral stricture (US) were filled out. Based on the survey results, the institutions which 218 urologists work and their years of expertise, methods they used for diagnosis and treatment, whether or not they perform open urethroplasty and timing of open urethroplasty were investigated. Results: Optic internal urethrotomy and dilatation are the most commonly used minimal invasive procedures in treatment of US with the ratios of 93.5% and 63.3% respectively. On the other hand it was seen that urethroplasty was a less commonly used procedure, compared to minimal invasive techniques, with the ratio of 36.7%. Survey results showed us that the number of US cases observed and open urethroplasty procedures performed increases with increasing years of professional experience. Conclusions: As a method demanding special surgical experience and known as a time-consuming and challenging procedure, open urethroplasty will be able to take a greater part in current urological practice with the help of theoretical education and practical courses given by specific centers and experienced authors. PMID:27256189

  10. Adult urethral stricture: practice of Turkish urologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akyuz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate national practice patterns in the treatment of male anterior urethral strictures among Turkish urologists. Materials and Methods: A survey form including 12 questions prepared to determine active Turkish urologists' approach to diagnosis and treatment of the adult urethral stricture (US were filled out. Based on the survey results, the institutions which 218 urologists work and their years of expertise, methods they used for diagnosis and treatment, whether or not they perform open urethroplasty and timing of open urethroplasty were investigated. Results: Optic internal urethrotomy and dilatation are the most commonly used minimal invasive procedures in treatment of US with the ratios of 93.5% and 63.3% respectively. On the other hand it was seen that urethroplasty was a less commonly used procedure, compared to minimal invasive techniques, with the ratio of 36.7%. Survey results showed us that the number of US cases observed and open urethroplasty procedures performed increases with increasing years of professional experience. Conclusions: As a method demanding special surgical experience and known as a time-consuming and challenging procedure, open urethroplasty will be able to take a greater part in current urological practice with the help of theoretical education and practical courses given by specific centers and experienced authors.

  11. 192Ir Intraluminal brachytherapy for the prevention of urethral re-stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Changuo; Guo Hui; Du Chun; Yang Keqiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of 192 Ir intraluminal brachytherapy for the prevention of urethral restricture after transurethral incision or transurethral resection of scar. Methods: From Mar. 2004 to Jun. 2006, 48 patients aging 18-81 years were treated by 192 Ir intraluminal brachytherapy. The length of stricture(0.5-5.5 cm) was ≤3.0 cm in 90% of the patients. The stricture was caused by trauma in 23 patients and prostate hyperplasia operation in 19 patients. The cause of remaining 6 patients was unclear. All patients were diagnosed by urethra photograph or endoscopy. Radiotherapy was the initial treatment in 26 patients and the second time treatment in 22. The irradiation dose was from 14 Gy to 18 Gy. Results: The median follow up was 10 months, and the total response rate was 98%. Only one patient recurred and received transurethral incision again. The uresis was fluency in 47 patients and the maximum flow rate was 13.9-36.4 (19.2 ± 10.3) ml/s. No secondary urethral bleeding or urethral cancer was observed. Conclusions: Being a safe and feasible treatment, 192 Ir intraluminal brachytherapy following transurethral incision or transurethral resection of scar can effectively prevent urethral re-stricture. (authors)

  12. Experimental esophagitis: evaluation by radionuclide esophagogram (sup(99m)TC-sulfur colloid). Manometric and histopathologic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Devito, M.P.; Lamoureux, C.; Levasseur, A.

    1983-01-01

    The radionuclide esophageal transit time (using sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid) is abnormal in peptic esophagitis. The mechanisms responsible for such results are not fully understood. The hypothesis are multiple. In order to evaluate the effects of acute inflammation of esophageal wall on the radionuclide esophagogram (RE), 12 cats were submitted to manometry, endoscopy and RE before and after esophageal infusion of chlorhydric acid (HCl 0.1 N). Manometry results demonstrated a marked decline of the esophageal contraction waves pressure and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure. There was also an increased esophageal contraction duration and duration of LES relaxation. The radionuclide esophageal transit time was markedly increased. The radiocolloid retention was secondary to adherence of it to the sites of inflamed and ulcerated esophageal wall. The radionuclide adhesion corresponded to the degree of esophagitis. These results confirm that peptic esophagitis can cause esophageal motor dysfunction which can be identified by a sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid esophagogram. The retention of radiocolloid corresponded to the sites inflamed esophageal wall. Thus, the radionuclide retention and transit time, when abnormal, are an index of esophageal disorders [fr

  13. Experimental esophagitis: evaluation by radionuclide esophagogram (sup(99m)TC-sulfur colloid). Manometric and histopathologic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Devito, M.P.; Lamoureux, C.; Levasseur, A. (Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Universite de Montreal (Canada))

    1983-01-01

    The radionuclide esophageal transit time (using sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid) is abnormal in peptic esophagitis. The mechanisms responsible for such results are not fully understood. The hypothesis are multiple. In order to evaluate the effects of acute inflammation of esophageal wall on the radionuclide esophagogram (RE), 12 cats were submitted to manometry, endoscopy and RE before and after esophageal infusion of chlorhydric acid (HCl 0.1 N). Manometry results demonstrated a marked decline of the esophageal contraction waves pressure and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure. There was also an increased esophageal contraction duration and duration of LES relaxation. The radionuclide esophageal transit time was markedly increased. The radiocolloid retention was secondary to adherence of it to the sites of inflamed and ulcerated esophageal wall. The radionuclide adhesion corresponded to the degree of esophagitis. These results confirm that peptic esophagitis can cause esophageal motor dysfunction which can be identified by a sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid esophagogram. The retention of radiocolloid corresponded to the sites of inflamed esophageal wall. Thus, the radionuclide retention and transit time, when abnormal, are an index of esophageal disorders.

  14. Frequency, types and complications of barrett's esophagus in patients with symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, A.L.; Sadiq, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study was carried out to evaluate the frequency, types and complications of Barrett's esophagus in symptomatic gastro-esophageal reflux patients. Subjects: A total of 100 patients of gastro-esophageal reflux were studied to evaluate the frequency, types and complications of Barrett's esophagus. Endoscopic biopsies were taken and examined with H and E and various special stains like PAS, Alcian blue/PAS, high iron diamine/ Alcian blue and Giemsa stains. Results: Of 100 cases studied, 32 were found to have Barrett's esophagus on microscopy. The remaining 68 cases showed low and high grade changes of gastro-esophageal reflux. Conclusion: In comparison with studies from western countries, Barrett's esophagus was found to be relatively more common in our population. However, the frequency of complications like ulcer, stricture, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma was lesser. (author)

  15. Related issues in repair of bile duct injury and traumatic biliary stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Shuguang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate treatment of bile duct injury and traumatic biliary stricture may cause serious consequences such as recurrent cholangitis, formation of hepatolithiasis, and biliary cirrhosis. This article elaborates on the influencing factors for the effect of the repair of bile duct injury and traumatic biliary stricture, repair principles, timing of repair or reconstruction, and related methods and techniques. It is pointed out that if there is no significant local infection and the bile duct wall defect is <2 cm, end-to-end anastomosis should be used for repair; if the bile duct wall defect is >2 cm, Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy should be used for reconstruction. If the upper wall of the bile duct had a large defect and the lower wall has an integral structure, pedicled umbilical vein graft, pedicled jejunal wall seromuscular flap, or gastric wall seromuscular flap should be used for repair. The patients with severe congestion and edema at the site of injury should be treated with sufficient external drainage of the injured bile duct and then selective repair or reconstruction. Patients with hepatic duct stenosis in the liver lobe or hepatic segments and liver tissue atrophy can be treated with hepalobectomy or segmental hepatectomy. The key to successful repair is exposure and removal of high hilar bile duct stricture, while segmental hepatectomy of the Ⅳb segment can fully expose the left and right hepatic pedicles and help with the incision of the left and right hepatic ducts and secondary hepatic ducts, and therefore, it is a good method for exposing high bile duct stricture.

  16. The dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy-induced urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Tollenaar, Bryan G.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: There is a paucity of data regarding the incidence of urethral strictures after prostate brachytherapy. In this study, we evaluate multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters to identify factors associated with the development of brachytherapy-induced urethral strictures. Methods and Materials: 425 patients underwent transperineal ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy using either 103 Pd or 125 I for clinical T1b/T3a NxM0 (1997, American Joint Committee on Cancer) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland from April 1995 to October 1999. No patient was lost to follow-up. 221 patients were implanted with 103 Pd and 204 patients with 125 I. The median patient age was 68 years (range 48-81 years). The median follow-up was 35.2 months (range 15-72 months). Follow-up was calculated from the day of implantation. Thirteen patients developed brachytherapy-induced strictures, and all strictures involved the membranous urethra. A control group of 35 patients was rigorously matched to the stricture patients in terms of treatment approach; i.e., choice of isotope, plus or minus radiation therapy, and plus or minus hormonal manipulation. Nine of the 13 stricture patients had detailed Day 0 urethral dosimetry available for review. The apex of the prostate gland and the membranous urethra were defined by CT evaluation. Urethral dosimetry was reported for the prostatic urethra, the apical slice of the prostate gland, and the membranous urethra which was defined as extending 20 mm in length. Results: The 5-year actuarial risk of a urethral stricture was 5.3%, with a median time to development of 26.6 months (range 7.8-44.1 months). Of multiple clinical and treatment parameters evaluated, only the duration of hormonal manipulation (>4 months, p=0.011) was predictive for the development of a urethral stricture. The radiation dose to the membranous urethra was significantly greater in patients with strictures than those without: 97.6%±20.8% vs. 81.0%±19.8% of

  17. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Presentation of case: We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diver...

  18. Sonourethrography of anterior urethral strictures: assessment of length and degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Jeong, Youn Sin

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed out experience of sonourethrography(SUG) in male anterior urethral strictures to correlate the stricture length and degree seen on SUG with those on urethroscopy, surgery or biopsy. During the recent 6 years,both the retrograde urethrography (RUG) and SUG were preformed in 50 occasions for 47 patients with anteriorurethral stricture, that were subsequently evaluated urethroscopically or at surgery. As a whole, the length of the stricture seen on SUG did not correlate very well with that seen on RGU (r2=0.71, p<0.005). Considering the data from the operation as the gold standard, SUG was more accurate than RUG in depicting the exact stricturelength (r2=0.97 and 0.75 respectively,p<0.005). The shorter the lesion, the more accurate the data obtained.Although SUG certainly identified periurethral tissue, it was not adequate in predicting the depth of spongiofibrosis compared with full-depth biopsies in 20 patients. In conclusion, SUG, a dynamic study, accurately defined the stricture site, number and calibre. When compared with RUG, SUG was more accurate in the measurement of stricture length and in the demonstration of periurethral tissue, making it a valuable method in the evaluation of patients with suspected anterior urethral strictures

  19. [Interventional radiology in treatment of biliodigestive anastomoses strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhotnikov, O I; Yakovleva, M V; Grigoriev, S N

    2016-01-01

    To analyze efficacy of interventional methods via antegrade transhepatic approach in treatment of patients with strictures of biliodigestive anastomoses. 24 patients aged 47.2 years were treated for the period 2002-2015. Average time from extrahepatic biliary reconstruction using transhepatic stented tubes to strictures appearance varied from 9 months to 12 years. One- and double-sided percutaneous transhepatic cholangiostomy was performed to abort biliary hypertension. Stricture recanalization was achieved using «catheter-wire» system. Antegrade dilatation of stricture was made using balloon catheter 8 mm and pressure up to 6 atm and stage exposition up to 10 minutes. Balloon repair of anastomosis was supplemented by stented outer-inner drainage of the area of stricture. Restoration of patency of stricture area using antegrade interventional methods was effective in 22 patients. Recurrent stricture occurred in 2 cases within 1.5 years that required repeated biliary reconstruction including antegrade extraction of blocked uncovered stent in 1 patient. There were no major postoperative complications and deaths. Maximal recurrence-free follow-up after stent installation was 11 years.

  20. Outcome of urethral strictures treated by endoscopic urethrotomy and urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinaut-Ranera, Javier; Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Ángel; Merino-Salas, Sergio; Nogueras-Ocaña, Mercedes; López-León, Víctor Manuel; Palao-Yago, Francisco; Arrabal-Martín, Miguel; Lahoz-García, Clara; Alaminos, Miguel; Zuluaga-Gomez, Armando

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the outcomes of patients with urethral stricture who underwent surgical treatment within the past 5 years. This is a retrospective study of male patients who underwent surgery for urethral stricture at our service from January 2008 to June 2012. We analyzed the comorbidities, type, length and location of the stricture and the surgical treatment outcome after endoscopic urethrotomy, urethroplasty or both. In total, 45 patients with a mean age of 53.7 ± 16.7 years underwent surgical treatment for urethral stricture. Six months after surgery, 46.7% of the patients had a maximum urinary flow greater than 15 mL/s, whereas 87.3% of the patients exhibited no stricture by urethrography after the treatment. The success rate in the patients undergoing urethrotomy was 47.8% versus 86.4% in those undergoing urethroplasty (p = 0.01). Twenty percent of the patients in whom the initial urethrotomy had failed subsequently underwent urethroplasty, thereby increasing the treatment success. In most cases, the treatment of choice for urethral stricture should be urethroplasty. Previous treatment with urethrotomy does not appear to produce adverse effects that affect the outcome of a urethroplasty if urethrotomy failed, so urethrotomy may be indicated in patients with short strictures or in patients at high surgical risk.

  1. Endoscopic Management of Anastomotic Strictures after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic treatment of biliary strictures involving plastic stent placement has been used widely. The use of self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs has been described for anastomotic strictures following liver transplantation (LT. This review aimed to assess and compare the efficacy of plastic stents with SEMS in LT patients. Information was retrieved regarding technical success, stricture resolution, the number of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography procedures, follow-up, immediate, and late complications. Eight studies involving plastic stents had a stricture resolution rate of 84.5%, with the rates ranging from 63% to 100%. These rates are comparable with the stricture resolution rate of 75% determined from six studies that involved 236 patients who received metal stents and the rates ranged from 53% to 81%. The observed success rate for metal stents used to manage post-LT anastomotic biliary strictures was below the reported rate for multiple plastic stents. Hence, the currently available metal stents should not be offered for the management of post-LT anastomotic biliary strictures.

  2. Revisional surgery after failed esophagogastric myotomy for achalasia: successful esophageal preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Benjamin R; Goldberg, Ross F; Bowers, Steven P; Thomas, Mathew; Hinder, Ronald A; Smith, C Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Treatment failure with recurrent dysphagia after Heller myotomy occurs in fewer than 10 % of patients, most of whom will seek repeat surgical intervention. These reoperations are technically challenging, and as such, there exist only limited reports of reoperation with esophageal preservation. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who sought operative intervention from March 1998 to December 2014 for obstructed swallowing after esophagogastric myotomy. All patients underwent a systematic approach, including complete hiatal dissection, takedown of prior fundoplication, and endoscopic assessment of myotomy. Patterns of failure were categorized as: fundoplication failure, inadequate myotomy, fibrosis, and mucosal stricture. A total of 58 patients underwent 65 elective reoperations. Four patients underwent esophagectomy as their initial reoperation, while three patients ultimately required esophagectomy. The remainder underwent reoperations with the goal of esophageal preservation. Of these 58, 46 were first-time reoperations; ten were second time; and two were third-time reoperations. Forty-one had prior operations via a trans-abdominal approach, 11 via thoracic approach, and 6 via combined approaches. All reoperations at our institution were performed laparoscopically (with two conversions to open). Inadequate myotomy was identified in 53 % of patients, fundoplication failure in 26 %, extensive fibrosis in 19 %, and mucosal stricture in 2 %. Intraoperative esophagogastric perforation occurred in 19 % of patients and was repaired. Our postoperative leak rate was 5 %. Esophageal preservation was possible in 55 of the 58 operations in which it was attempted. At median follow-up of 34 months, recurrent dysphagia after reoperation was seen in 63 % of those with a significant fibrosis versus 28 % with inadequate myotomy, 25 % with failed wrap, and 100 % with mucosal stricture (p = 0.10). Laparoscopic reoperation with esophageal preservation is

  3. Esophageal trachealization: A feature of eosinophilic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlHussaini, Abdulrahman A; Semaan, Toufic; ElHag, Imad A

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an inflammatory condition characterized by intense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. EE is frequently misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Here, we present a child with EE and a characteristic endoscopic finding, r inged esophagus . An 11-year-old Saudi boy presented with dysphagia for 1 year. He had experienced an intermittent sensation of solid food sticking in his chest, which was relieved by drinking liquids. A barium swallow excluded anatomical causes of dysphagia, but revealed multiple-ringed esophagus. Endoscopy showed a furrowing and trachealizing appearance of the entire esophagus. Hisologically, extensive eosinophilic infiltration was a feature in biopsies obtained from the esophagus. The child responded well to a 2-month course of inhaled fluticasone. Symptoms recurred 3 months after discontinuation of therapy, which necessitated resumption of inhaled fluticasone. The endoscopic appearance of multiple esophageal rings should raise suspicion of EE and be confirmed by esophageal biopsies. (author)

  4. A simple technique to facilitate treatment of urethral strictures with optical internal urethrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Papadatou, Aggeliki; Moschouris, Hippocrates; Kornezos, Ioannis; Pavlis, Anargiros; Christopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization, urethroplasty, endoscopic internal urethrotomy, and dilation. Optical internal urethrotomy offers faster recovery, minimal scarring, and less risk of infection, although recurrence is possible. However, technical difficulties associated with poor visualization of the stenosis or of the urethral lumen may increase procedural time and substantially increase the failure rates of internal urethrotomy. In this report we describe a technique for urethral catheterization via a suprapubic, percutaneous approach through the urinary bladder in order to facilitate endoscopic internal urethrotomy.

  5. A Simple Technique to Facilitate Treatment of Urethral Strictures with Optical Internal Urethrotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatiou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization, urethroplasty, endoscopic internal urethrotomy, and dilation. Optical internal urethrotomy offers faster recovery, minimal scarring, and less risk of infection, although recurrence is possible. However, technical difficulties associated with poor visualization of the stenosis or of the urethral lumen may increase procedural time and substantially increase the failure rates of internal urethrotomy. In this report we describe a technique for urethral catheterization via a suprapubic, percutaneous approach through the urinary bladder in order to facilitate endoscopic internal urethrotomy.

  6. Cytomegalovirus-induced colonic stricture presenting as acute intestinal obstruction in an immunocompetent adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, B V; Selvaraju, Karthikeyan; Kumar, Sampath; Thota, Sumath

    2013-09-10

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection causes significant morbidty and mortality in immunopromised patients. Though it is usually silent in immunocompetent adults, rarely it can cause serious life-threatening complications. Gastrointestinal tract is one of the commonly involved organs, where it produces a spectrum of clinical manifestation ranging from mild non-specific abdominal pain and diarrhoea to severe infection with toxic megacolon and death. We present a 65-year-old immunocompetent male patient admitted with acute colonic obstruction secondary to CMV-induced colonic stricture, highlighting the importance of considering it as a differential diagnosis for colonic obstruction and reviewing its management.

  7. Clinical outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal diseases: A pooled analysis of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halsema, Emo E; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal strictures and benign esophageal leaks in the literature. METHODS: The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and July 2014. Eight prospective studies were identified that analyzed the outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures. The outcomes of stent placement for benign esophageal leaks, perforations and fistulae were extracted from 20 retrospective studies that were published after the inclusion period of a recent systematic review. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FC SEMS) (n = 85), biodegradable (BD) stents (n = 77) and self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS) (n = 70) were inserted in 232 patients with refractory benign esophageal strictures. The overall clinical success rate was 24.2% and according to stent type 14.1% for FC SEMS, 32.9% for BD stents and 27.1% for SEPS. Stent migration occurred in 24.6% of cases. The overall complication rate was 31.0%, including major (17.7%) and minor (13.4%) complications. A total of 643 patients were treated with self-expandable stents mainly for postsurgical leaks (64.5%), iatrogenic perforations (19.6%), Boerhaave’s syndrome (7.8%) and fistulae (3.7%). FC SEMS and partially covered SEMS were used in the majority of patients. Successful closure of the defect was achieved in 76.8% of patients and according to etiology in 81.4% for postsurgical leaks, 86.0% for perforations and 64.7% for fistulae. The pooled stent migration rate was 16.5%. Stent-related complications occurred in 13.4% of patients, including major (7.8%) and minor (5.5%) complications. CONCLUSION: The outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures were poor. However, randomized trials are needed to put this into perspective. The evidence on successful stent placement for benign

  8. Clinical outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal diseases: A pooled analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halsema, Emo E; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-02-16

    To analyze the outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal strictures and benign esophageal leaks in the literature. The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and July 2014. Eight prospective studies were identified that analyzed the outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures. The outcomes of stent placement for benign esophageal leaks, perforations and fistulae were extracted from 20 retrospective studies that were published after the inclusion period of a recent systematic review. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FC SEMS) (n = 85), biodegradable (BD) stents (n = 77) and self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS) (n = 70) were inserted in 232 patients with refractory benign esophageal strictures. The overall clinical success rate was 24.2% and according to stent type 14.1% for FC SEMS, 32.9% for BD stents and 27.1% for SEPS. Stent migration occurred in 24.6% of cases. The overall complication rate was 31.0%, including major (17.7%) and minor (13.4%) complications. A total of 643 patients were treated with self-expandable stents mainly for postsurgical leaks (64.5%), iatrogenic perforations (19.6%), Boerhaave's syndrome (7.8%) and fistulae (3.7%). FC SEMS and partially covered SEMS were used in the majority of patients. Successful closure of the defect was achieved in 76.8% of patients and according to etiology in 81.4% for postsurgical leaks, 86.0% for perforations and 64.7% for fistulae. The pooled stent migration rate was 16.5%. Stent-related complications occurred in 13.4% of patients, including major (7.8%) and minor (5.5%) complications. The outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures were poor. However, randomized trials are needed to put this into perspective. The evidence on successful stent placement for benign esophageal leaks, perforations and

  9. [Sachse internal urethrotomy: endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzgraf, D; Häcker, A

    2013-05-01

    The most commonly used treatment modality for urethral strictures is the direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVUI) method according to Sachse. It is an effective short-term treatment, but the long-term success rate is low. A number of factors influence the outcome of DVUI including stricture location, spongiofibrosis and previous endoscopic stricture treatment. Multiple urethrotomy has a negative impact on the success rate of subsequent urethroplasty. A thorough preoperative diagnostic work-up including combined retrograde urethrogram/voiding cystourethrogram (RUG/VCUG) and urethrocystoscopy is, therefore, mandatory to allow for patient counselling regarding the risk of stricture recurrence and other treatment options. After a failed primary DVUI, subsequent urethrotomy cannot be expected to be curative.

  10. Patient knowledge of urethral stricture disease in a state sector ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M. Barnard

    2018-02-16

    Feb 16, 2018 ... Introduction: The knowledge urethral stricture patients in a developing country Specialist Clinic have ... A systematic review done by DeWalt et al. confirms that low literacy ... The questionnaire was translated into Afrikaans and.

  11. Radiographic examination of tracheal strictures by means of powdered tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheel, W.; Dippmann, A.

    1979-01-01

    This report deals with the diagnostic value of a tracheobronchography with powdered tantalum in 5 patients who suffer from a severe stricture of the trachea. The own experiences with this method are described. (orig.) [de

  12. Diffuse esophageal spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Chen, Y.M.; Hewson, E.G.; Richter, J.E.; Wu, W.C.; Gelfand, D.W.; Castell, D.O.

    1988-01-01

    Radiologic and manometric findings were correlated in 17 patients with diffuse esophageal spasm (DES). All patients initially had chest pain and/or dysphagia and had a manometric diagnosis of DES. Mean percentage of normal peristalsis manometrically was 46% (range, 20%-80%). Based on radiologic examination, an esophageal motor disorder consistent with DES was diagnosed in 12 of 17 patients, and there was one misinterpretation of achalasia. Radiologic detection was not related significantly to the percentage of peristalsis seen on manometric examination. Mean esophageal wall thickness as measured radiographically in patients with DES was 2.6 mm, compared with 2.5 mm in 17 individuals with normal results of manometry

  13. THE ROLE OF OPTICAL INTERNAL URETHROTOMY FOR MALE URETHRAL STRICTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem Akdeniz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Urethral stricture is characterized by decrease in urethral flow severe enough to cause acute urinary retention. Urethral strictures may develop after traumas to urethral epithelium and/or corpus spongiosum. Complication rates due to untreated urethral stricture are very high. Although various treatment methods have been described, the second most common method after urethral dilation in practice is cold-knife internal urethrotomy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate data of patients who were treated with internal urethrotomy in our clinic. Methods:This study included patients who were treated with internal urethrotomy due to internal stricture between January 2011 and May 2015. Demographic, clinical, radiological, uroflowmetric (maximum and mean urine flow rate and operative datas of the patients were retrospectively evaluated and recorded. Results:This study included 155 patients with a mean (±standard deviation age of 71.70 (±13.7. Etiologically the most common reason was urological surgical procedures (67% and the most common stricture was seen at bulbomembranous urethra region (85.2%. Mean length of stricture was 5.4±2.4mm. Mean duration to remove the catheter was 1.8±1.3 days. Regional anesthesia was used in 67.7% of the patients. Our success rate was 78,1%. Comparison of maximum and mean urine flow rates pre and postoperatively revealed significant increases postoperatively. Conclusion:Internal urethrotomy is a first line treatment method for urethral strictures because it is easily applied, has a low complication rate, and can be applied with local aenesthesia in high risk patients who are unable to take general anesthesia. Although recurrence rate is high, repeatability is its greatest advantage and it causes significant relief in patients with urethral strictures, but it must be kept in mind that definitive treatment is urethroplasty.

  14. Urethral stricture following high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Lisa; Williams, Scott G.; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Cleeve, L.; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, timing, nature and outcome of urethral strictures following high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from 474 patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated with HDRB were analysed. Ninety percent received HDRB as a boost to external beam radiotherapy (HDRBB) and the remainder as monotherapy (HDRBM). Urethral strictures were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 38 patients (8%) were diagnosed with a urethral stricture (6-year actuarial risk 12%). Stricture location was bulbo-membranous (BM) urethra in 92.1%. The overall actuarial rate of grade 2 or more BM urethral stricture was estimated at 10.8% (95% CI 7.0-14.9%), with a median time to diagnosis of 22 months (range 10-68 months). All strictures were initially managed with either dilatation (n = 15) or optical urethrotomy (n = 20). Second line therapy was required in 17 cases (49%), third line in three cases (9%) and 1 patient open urethroplasty (grade 3 toxicity). Predictive factors on multivariate analysis were prior trans-urethral resection of prostate (hazard ratio (HR) 2.81, 95% CI 1.15-6.85, p = 0.023); hypertension (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.37-5.85, p = 0.005); and dose per fraction used in HDR (HR for 1 Gy increase per fraction 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.64, p = 0.008). Conclusions: BM urethral strictures are the most common late grade 2 or more urinary toxicity following HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Most are manageable with minimally invasive procedures. Both clinical and dosimetric factors appear to influence the risk of stricture formation.

  15. Elimination diets in the management of eosinophilic esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wechsler JB

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Joshua B Wechsler, Sally Schwartz, Katie Amsden, Amir F Kagalwalla Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Eosinophilic esophagitis, an increasingly recognized chronic inflammatory disorder isolated to the esophagus, is triggered by an abnormal allergic response to dietary antigens. Current treatment includes swallowed topical steroids and dietary modification, which aim to resolve symptoms and prevent long-term complications such as formation of strictures. The dietary approach has become more widely accepted because long-term steroid therapy is associated with potential risks. Dietary treatment includes elemental and elimination diets. An exclusive elemental diet, which requires replacement of all intact protein with amino acid-based formula, offers the best response of all available therapies, with remission in up to 96% of subjects proving it to be superior to all other available therapies including topical steroids. However, compliance with this approach is challenging because of poor taste and monotony. The high cost of formula and the associated psychosocial problems are additional drawbacks of this approach. Empiric and allergy test-directed elimination diets have gained popularity given that elimination of a limited number of foods is much easier and as such is more readily acceptable. There is a growing body of literature supporting this type of therapy in both children and adults. This paper reviews the evidence for all types of dietary therapy in eosinophilic esophagitis. Keywords: eosinophilic esophagitis, dietary therapy, empiric elimination, elemental, allergy test-directed

  16. Dorsal onlay vaginal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manmeet Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Female urethral stricture is an underdiagnosed and overlooked cause of female bladder outlet obstruction. The possible etiologies may be infection, prior dilation, difficult catheterization with subsequent fibrosis, urethral surgery, trauma, or idiopathic. We present our technique and results of dorsal onlay full thickness vaginal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed on 16 female patients with mid-urethral stricture who underwent dorsal onlay vaginal graft urethroplasty from January 2007 to June 2011.Of these, 13 patients had previously undergone multiple Hegar dilatations, three had previous internal urethrotomies. The preoperative work up included detailed voiding history, local examination, uroflowmetry, calibration, and micturating cystourethrogram. Results: All patients had mid-urethral stricture. Mean age was 47.5 years. Mean Q max improved from 6.2 to 27.6 ml/s. Mean residual volume decreased from 160 to 20 ml. Mean duration of follow-up was 24.5 months (6 months to 3 years. Only one patient required self-calibration for 6 months after which her stricture stabilized. None of the patient was incontinent. Conclusion: Dorsal vaginal onlay graft urethroplasty could be considered as an effective way to treat female urethral stricture.

  17. Lymphogranuloma venereum as a cause of rectal strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagrigoriadis, S.; Rennie, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Rectal strictures are uncommon in young patients without a history of malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease or previous surgery. Lymphogranuloma venereum of the rectum has been described as a rare cause of rectal strictures in the western world, mainly in homosexual men and in blacks. It presents with nonspecific symptoms, rectal ulcer, proctitis, anal fissures, abscesses and rectal strictures. Clinical and endoscopic findings as well as histology resemble Crohn's disease, which may be misdiagnosed. Serology is often positive for Chlamydia trachomatis but negative serology is not uncommon. We present two young black women who suffered from chronic diarrhoea, abdominal pain and weight loss. There was no previous history and investigations showed in both cases a long rectal stricture. Serology was positive in one patient. They were treated with erythromycin and azithromycin and they both underwent an anterior resection of the rectum. Postoperative histology confirmed the presence of lymphogranuloma venereum of the rectum. We conclude that rectal lymphogranuloma venereum is a rare cause of rectal strictures but surgeons should be aware of its existence and include it in the differential diagnosis of unexplained strictures in high-risk patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9640444

  18. [Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and the related esophageal motor activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Hyo; Hong, Su Jin

    2012-03-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR) is defined as LES relaxation without a swallow. TLESRs are observed in both of the normal individuals and the patients with gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD). However, TLESR is widely considered as the major mechanism of the GERD. The new equipments such as high resolution manometry and impedance pH study is helped to understand of TLESR and the related esophageal motor activities. The strong longitudinal muscle contraction was observed during development of TLESR. Most of TLESRs are terminated by TLESR related motor events such as primary peristalsis and secondary contractions. The majority of TLESRs are associated with gastroesophageal reflux. Upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contraction is mainly associated with liquid reflux during recumbent position and UES relaxation predominantly related with air reflux during upright position. The frequency of TLESR in GERD patients seems to be not different compared to normal individuals, but the refluxate of GERD patients tend to be more acidic during TLESR.

  19. Prevalence of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    multiruka1

    Esophageal cancer is one of the common malignancies worldwide, with ... similar changes in the incidence in Kenyan populations, especially .... low socioeconomic status and the cost of investigation ... thus it is difficult to explain its impact on.

  20. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000268.htm Bleeding esophageal varices To use the sharing features on ... veins in the esophagus to balloon outward. Heavy bleeding can occur if the veins break open. Any ...

  1. Esophageal intramural pseudoverticulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.R.; Sanders, M.M.; Turner, M.A.; Liu, C.I.

    1981-01-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIP) is a rare condition of unknown etiology. It is characterized by multiple, small, flaskshaped outpouchings in the esophageal wall. Involvement may be segmental or diffuse. Since this entity was first reported in 1960, there have been 43 cases described in the English literature. These cases are reviewed and six additional cases are reported with emphasis on clinical and radiographic parameters of this entity. (orig.) [de

  2. Functional esophageal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Clouse, R; Richter, J; Heading, R; Janssens, J; Wilson, J

    1999-01-01

    The functional esophageal disorders include globus, rumination syndrome, and symptoms that typify esophageal diseases (chest pain, heartburn, and dysphagia). Factors responsible for symptom production are poorly understood. The criteria for diagnosis rest not only on compatible symptoms but also on exclusion of structural and metabolic disorders that might mimic the functional disorders. Additionally, a functional diagnosis is precluded by the presence of a pathology-based motor disorder or p...

  3. Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    disease of the esophagus that affects at least 4 in 10,000 persons.1 Although symptomatically resembling gastroe - sophageal reflux disease, EE is...clinically defined as esophageal eosinophilia (>_15 intraepithelial eosinophils per high-powered field) in the absence of abnormal acid reflux disease...that distinguish eosin- ophilic esophagitis (EoE) from other inflammatory disorders, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). As the prev

  4. Biodegradable stent or balloon dilatation for benign oesophageal stricture: Pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Anjan; Close, Helen; Viswanath, Yirupaiahgari K; Rees, Colin J; Hancock, Helen C; Dwarakanath, A Deepak; Maier, Rebecca H; Wilson, Douglas; Mason, James M

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To undertake a randomised pilot study comparing biodegradable stents and endoscopic dilatation in patients with strictures. METHODS: This British multi-site study recruited seventeen symptomatic adult patients with refractory strictures. Patients were randomised using a multicentre, blinded assessor design, comparing a biodegradable stent (BS) with endoscopic dilatation (ED). The primary endpoint was the average dysphagia score during the first 6 mo. Secondary endpoints included repeat endoscopic procedures, quality of life, and adverse events. Secondary analysis included follow-up to 12 mo. Sensitivity analyses explored alternative estimation methods for dysphagia and multiple imputation of missing values. Nonparametric tests were used. RESULTS: Although both groups improved, the average dysphagia scores for patients receiving stents were higher after 6 mo: BS-ED 1.17 (95%CI: 0.63-1.78) P = 0.029. The finding was robust under different estimation methods. Use of additional endoscopic procedures and quality of life (QALY) estimates were similar for BS and ED patients at 6 and 12 mo. Concomitant use of gastrointestinal prescribed medication was greater in the stent group (BS 5.1, ED 2.0 prescriptions; P dysphagia, co-medication and adverse events. Rigorously conducted and adequately powered trials are needed before widespread adoption of this technology. PMID:25561787

  5. Endoscopically placed stents: a useful alternative for the management of refractory benign cervical esophageal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Nogales

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign esophageal strictures are relatively frequent and can severely affect the quality of life of a patient. Stenting has been proposed for the treatment of refractory cases. Lesions affecting the cervical esophagus are more difficult to treat, and the placement of stents in this location has traditionally been restricted due to potential adverse events. The aim of this study was to describe the efficacy and safety of endoscopic stenting in the management of refractory benign cervical esophageal strictures (RBCES in a single-center cohort study. Methods: We analyzed 12 patients with RBCES (Kochman's criteria and severe dysphagia. We recorded previous endoscopic treatments, stricture characteristics and demographic data. The two types of stents used were fully covered self-expandable metallic stents (FCSEMS and uncovered biodegradable stents (BDS. FCSEMS were removed eight weeks after placement, and BDS were followed-up until degradation. We assessed technical and clinical success, rate of stricture recurrence and adverse events. Results: The mean age of participants was 64 years (range 30-85. A total of 23 stents (13 FCSEMS and 10 BDS were placed in 12 patients (median 1.92, range 1-4. The technical success rate was 96% (22/23 stents. Eight patients (66.6% maintained adequate oral intake at the end of follow-up (median 33.3 months, range 3-84 months. Migration was recorded in 7/23 stents (30.4% and epithelial hyperplasia in 4/23 stents (17.4%. No severe adverse events were noted. All patients complained of minor cervical pain after placement that was well controlled with mild analgesia. Conclusions: Endoscopic stent therapy seems to be effective and safe in the management of RBCES.

  6. Endoscopically placed stents: a useful alternative for the management of refractory benign cervical esophageal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Óscar; Clemente, Ana; Caballero-Marcos, Aránzazu; García-Lledó, Javier; Pérez-Carazo, Leticia; Merino, Beatriz; López-Ibáñez, María; Pérez Valderas, María Dolores; Bañares, Rafael; González-Asanza, Cecilia

    2017-07-01

    Benign esophageal strictures are relatively frequent and can severely affect the quality of life of a patient. Stenting has been proposed for the treatment of refractory cases. Lesions affecting the cervical esophagus are more difficult to treat, and the placement of stents in this location has traditionally been restricted due to potential adverse events. The aim of this study was to describe the efficacy and safety of endoscopic stenting in the management of refractory benign cervical esophageal strictures (RBCES) in a single-center cohort study. We analyzed 12 patients with RBCES (Kochman's criteria) and severe dysphagia. We recorded previous endoscopic treatments, stricture characteristics and demographic data. The two types of stents used were fully covered self-expandable metallic stents (FCSEMS) and uncovered biodegradable stents (BDS). FCSEMS were removed eight weeks after placement, and BDS were followed-up until degradation. We assessed technical and clinical success, rate of stricture recurrence and adverse events. The mean age of participants was 64 years (range 30-85). A total of 23 stents (13 FCSEMS and 10 BDS) were placed in 12 patients (median 1.92, range 1-4). The technical success rate was 96% (22/23 stents). Eight patients (66.6%) maintained adequate oral intake at the end of follow-up (median 33.3 months, range 3-84 months). Migration was recorded in 7/23 stents (30.4%) and epithelial hyperplasia in 4/23 stents (17.4%). No severe adverse events were noted. All patients complained of minor cervical pain after placement that was well controlled with mild analgesia. Endoscopic stent therapy seems to be effective and safe in the management of RBCES.

  7. Single stage reconstruction of complex anterior urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Dubey

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Single stage reconstruction of long, com-plex urethral strictures is technically demanding and may require the use of more than one tissue transfer technique. We describe our experience in the manage-ment of such strictures with a variety of urethroplasty techniques. Materials and Methods: Between 1989 and 1999, 25 men (mean age 38.5 years underwent single stage re-construction of panurethral, multiple segment or focally dense strictures [mean length 11.2 cm (range 8-17 cm]. 8 patients had combined substitution urethroplasty with a circumpenile fasciocutaneous flap and a free graft of bladder/buccal mucosa or tunica vaginalis . flap. In 10 patients a single tissue transfer technique was used. 3 patients underwent an augmented roof/floor strip ure-throplasty with a penile skin flap. 4 patients with multi-ple segment strictures (separate pendulous and bulbar underwent distal onlay flap and proximal anastomotic urethroplasty. Results: The median ,follow-up was 46.5 months (range 6-88 months. The mean postoperative flow rate improved to 22.5 ml/sec. 2 patients developed fistulae requiring repair. Recurrent stricture developed in 5 (20.8% patients, of which 2 were managed with visual internal urethrotomy, 2 with anastomotic urethroplasty and 1 with a two-stage procedure. Pseudodiverticulum and post-void dribbling were seen in 6 (25% patients. Conclusions: Successful outcome of single stage re-construction of long complex strictures can be achieved with a combination of various tissue transfer methods. The urologist who has a thorough knowledge of penile skin and urethral vascular anatomy and a wide array of substitution techniques in his armamentarium can un-dertake approach to such strictures.

  8. EUS-guided recanalization of complete gastrointestinal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Martínez-Guillén

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Complete gastrointestinal strictures are a technically demanding problem. In this setting, an anterograde technique is associated with a high risk of complications and a combined anterograde-retrograde technique requires a prior ostomy. Our aim was to assess the outcome of a first case series for the management of complete gastrointestinal strictures using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS-guided puncture as a novel endoscopic approach. Patients and methods: This retrospective case-series describes four cases that were referred for treatment of complete benign gastrointestinal strictures, three upper and one lower. Recanalization was attempted with EUS-guided puncture using a 22G or 19G needle and contrast filling was visualized by fluoroscopy. Afterwards, a cystotome and/or a dilator balloon were used under endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. A fully covered metal stent was placed in two cases, keeping the strictures open in order to prevent another stricture. Feasibility, adverse events, efficacy and the number of dilations required after recanalization were evaluated. Results: Technical and clinical success was achieved in three of the four cases (75%. A first dilation was performed using a dilator balloon in all successful cases and fully covered metal stents were used in two cases. These patients underwent a consecutive number of balloon dilatations (range 1-4 and all three were able to eat a soft diet. No adverse events were related to the EUS-guided approach. In the failed case with a long stricture (> 3 cm, an endoscopic rendezvous technique was attempted which caused a pneumothorax requiring a chest tube placement. Conclusion: EUS-guided recanalization, as a first approach in the treatment of complete digestive stricture, is a feasible and promising procedure that can help to avoid major surgery.

  9. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcohol use, and Barrett esophagus can affect the risk of developing esophageal cancer. Anything that increases the ... tissue gives off less light than normal tissue. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening Key Points Screening tests ...

  10. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specific responses in allergy? » Dietary Therapy and Nutrition Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Work Group Report of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology » Eosinophilic esophagitis can ...

  11. Interesting case of spontaneously resolved dysphagia in a young female due to complicated esophageal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval Choksi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis can affect any organ of the body. Gastrointestinal tubercular involvement is fairly common. Esophageal tuberculosis though is uncommon. Esophageal tuberculosis accounts for only 0.3% of gastrointestinal tuberculosis. It presents with dysphagia, retrosternal pain, cough or constitutional symptoms. Complications like hemorrhage from the ulcer and development of fistulas like esophagomediastinal fistula is extremely uncommon. We report a case of a 27 years old female who presented with retrosternal pain, dysphagia and hematemesis. The patient had esophageal ulcer secondary to erosion of the esophagus by the subcarinal lymph nodes. Imaging was suggestive of esophagomediastinal fistula. Esophageal ulcer biopsy showed chronic tubercular infection. Culture from the esophageal biopsy confirmed the presence of tubercular bacilli. Patient responded to anti-tubercular therapy. Spontaneous dysphagia resolution prior to starting therapy was likely due to the rupture of the lymph node into the esophagus, which was compressing it initially. Esophageal tuberculosis presenting with hematemesis and fistula is extremely uncommon.

  12. Structural airway abnormalities contribute to dysphagia in children with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Katherine J; Baxter, Lauren M; Landry, April M; Wulkan, Mark L; Bhatia, Amina M

    2018-01-31

    Long-term dysphagia occurs in up to 50% of repaired esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) patients. The underlying factors are unclear and may include stricture, esophageal dysmotility, or associated anomalies. Our purpose was to determine whether structural airway abnormalities (SAA) are associated with dysphagia in EA/TEF. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children who underwent EA/TEF repair in our hospital system from 2007 to 2016. Children with identified SAA (oropharyngeal abnormalities, laryngeal clefts, laryngomalacia, vocal cord paralysis, and tracheomalacia) were compared to those without airway abnormalities. Dysphagia outcomes were determined by the need for tube feeding and the modified pediatric Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) at 1 year. SAA was diagnosed in 55/145 (37.9%) patients with EA/TEF. Oropharyngeal aspiration was more common in children with SAA (58.3% vs. 36.4%, p=0.028). Children with SAA were more likely to require tube feeding both at discharge (79.6% vs. 48.3%, pesophageal stricture, the presence of SAA remained a significant risk factor for dysphagia (OR 4.17 (95% CI 1.58-11.03)). SAA are common in children with EA/TEF and are associated with dysphagia, even after accounting for gestational age, esophageal gap and stricture. This study highlights the need for a multidisciplinary approach, including early laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy, in the evaluation of the EA/TEF child with dysphagia. Level II retrospective prognostic study. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Predictive factors for complications in children with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, R; Varjavandi, V; Krishnan, U

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of complications in children with esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) at a tertiary pediatric hospital and to identify predictive factors for their occurrence. A retrospective chart review of 110 patients born in or transferred to Sydney Children's Hospital with EA/TEF between January 1999 and December 2010 was done. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify predictive factors for the occurrence of complications in these children. From univariate analysis, early esophageal stricture formation was more likely in children with 'long-gap' EA (odds ratio [OR] = 16.32). Patients with early strictures were more likely to develop chest infections (OR = 3.33). Patients with severe tracheomalacia were more likely to experience 'cyanotic/dying' (OR = 180) and undergo aortopexy (OR = 549). Patients who had gastroesophageal reflux disease were significantly more likely to require fundoplication (OR = 10.83) and undergo aortopexy (OR = 6.417). From multivariate analysis, 'long-gap' EA was a significant predictive factor for late esophageal stricture formation (P = 0.007) and for gastrostomy insertion (P = 0.001). Reflux was a significant predictive factor for requiring fundoplication (P = 0.007) and gastrostomy (P = 0.002). Gastrostomy insertion (P = 0.000) was a significant predictive factor for undergoing fundoplication. Having a prior fundoplication (P = 0.001) was a significant predictive factor for undergoing a subsequent aortopexy. Predictive factors for the occurrence of complications post EA/TEF repair were identified in this large single centre pediatric study. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  14. Ambulatory reflux monitoring for diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: Update of the Porto consensus and recommendations from an international consensus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, S; Gyawali, C P; Savarino, E; Yadlapati, R; Zerbib, F; Wu, J; Vela, M; Tutuian, R; Tatum, R; Sifrim, D; Keller, J; Fox, M; Pandolfino, J E; Bredenoord, A J

    2017-10-01

    An international group of experts evaluated and revised recommendations for ambulatory reflux monitoring for the diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Literature search was focused on indications and technical recommendations for GERD testing and phenotypes definitions. Statements were proposed and discussed during several structured meetings. Reflux testing should be performed after cessation of acid suppressive medication in patients with a low likelihood of GERD. In this setting, testing can be either catheter-based or wireless pH-monitoring or pH-impedance monitoring. In patients with a high probability of GERD (esophagitis grade C and D, histology proven Barrett's mucosa >1 cm, peptic stricture, previous positive pH monitoring) and persistent symptoms, pH-impedance monitoring should be performed on treatment. Recommendations are provided for data acquisition and analysis. Esophageal acid exposure is considered as pathological if acid exposure time (AET) is greater than 6% on pH testing. Number of reflux episodes and baseline impedance are exploratory metrics that may complement AET. Positive symptom reflux association is defined as symptom index (SI) >50% or symptom association probability (SAP) >95%. A positive symptom-reflux association in the absence of pathological AET defines hypersensitivity to reflux. The consensus group determined that grade C or D esophagitis, peptic stricture, histology proven Barrett's mucosa >1 cm, and esophageal acid exposure greater >6% are sufficient to define pathological GERD. Further testing should be considered when none of these criteria are fulfilled. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Esophageal Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The most common types of esophageal cancer are adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. These forms of esophageal cancer develop in some parts of the esophagus and are driven by genetic changes. Start here to find information on esophageal cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  16. Esophageal stenting for benign and malignant disease: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaander, Manon C W; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Schumacher, Brigitte; Escorsell, Àngels; Garcia-Pagán, Juan-Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Conio, Massimo; de Ceglie, Antonella; Skowronek, Janusz; Nordsmark, Marianne; Seufferlein, Thomas; Van Gossum, André; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruno, Marco J

    2016-10-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), endorsed by the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), the European Society of Digestive Endoscopy (ESDO), and the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations for malignant disease 1 ESGE recommends placement of partially or fully covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) for palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia over laser therapy, photodynamic therapy, and esophageal bypass (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 2 For patients with longer life expectancy, ESGE recommends brachytherapy as a valid alternative or in addition to stenting in esophageal cancer patients with malignant dysphagia. Brachytherapy may provide a survival advantage and possibly a better quality of life compared to SEMS placement alone. (Strong recommendation, high quality evidence.) 3 ESGE recommends esophageal SEMS placement as the preferred treatment for sealing malignant tracheoesophageal or bronchoesophageal fistula (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 ESGE does not recommend the use of concurrent external radiotherapy and esophageal stent treatment. SEMS placement is also not recommended as a bridge to surgery or prior to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. It is associated with a high incidence of adverse events and alternative satisfactory options such as placement of a feeding tube are available. (Strong recommendation, low quality evidence.) Main recommendations for benign disease 1 ESGE recommends against the use of self-expandable stents (SEMSs) as first-line therapy for the management of benign esophageal strictures because of the potential for adverse events, the availability of alternative therapies, and costs (strong

  17. Comparative study of three methods of esophageal anastomosis in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. T. Abd Al-Maseeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to compare three methods of esophageal anastomosis. Twenty four healthy adult dogs were used in this study. The animals were divided into three groups; each one consisted of 8 animals. In group 1; two layers were used to perform the esophageal anastomosis. The first layer represented simple interrupted suture to close the mucosa with knot inside the lumen, and the second layer represented horizontal mattress interrupted suture to close the other layers of esophagus. While in group 2; one layer of cross interrupted mattress suture was used to close all layers of esophageal wall, and in group 3; one layer of Schmieden's suture was used to close all layers of esophageal wall. The results of clinical, radiological and histopathological studies after 15 and 30 days of surgical operation revealed that most of the animals showed different degrees of difficulty concerning the moderate dysphagia and regurgitation. The radiological study showed significant difference of stenosis. The best results were recorded in the second group where the mean degree of stenosis was 7.69%, however the mean degree of stenosis was 42.80% in the first group, while the mean degree of stenosis in the third groups was 37.81%, through 30 days. The histopathological study of group 2 showed rapid healing of the site of anastomosis, lack of granulation tissue and consequently the less degree of stricture and other complications as compared with groups 1 and 3. The Schmieden's suture was characterized by its standard short time as compared with group 1 and 2, although accompanied by some complications. In conclusion this study revealed that the cross mattress suture used in the second group characterized by faster healing and minimal amount of fibrous tissue formation manifested by decrease in moderate degree of stenosis as compared with the two other suture patterns used in the first and third groups.

  18. Esophageal stents, percutaneous gastrostomy, gastrojejunostomy and celiac ganglion block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroglu, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Indications, contraindications, procedure and complications will be discussed along with the technical aspects. Interesting cases will be demonstrated. Fluoroscopic guided placement of a metallic (bare or covered) stent is increasingly being used for the treatment of malignant and benign esophageal strictures. Percutaneously placed feeding catheters (e.g. gastrostomy) offer the best option for the patients who require long term nutrition. These procedures are generally simpler, have higher technical success rates and considered to be safer than endoscopic or surgical placement techniques. Celiac ganglia block is effective in relieving chronic abdominal pain, especially originating from the malignancies of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and alimentary tract from the stomach to the transverse portion of the large colon. The relevant anatomy, indications, contraindications, different application techniques and results of celiac blockade will be reviewed.

  19. Esophageal Leiomyomatosis – An Unusual Cause of Pseudoachalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanta Ray

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal leiomyomatosis is a rare hamartomatous disorder with varied presentation. In the literature, it is described mostly in children, and is associated with Alport’s syndrome. A case of leiomyomatosis that presented as achalasia not associated with Alport’s syndrome is described in a 35-year-old woman with a 16-year history of dysphagia. Barium swallow showed a smooth narrowing at the lower end of the esophagus with a longer than usual stricture length. Endoscopy showed a dilated esophagus with a submucosal nodule in the region of the cardia. A computed tomography scan revealed circumferential thickening of the esophagus involving the gastroesophageal junction, with fat planes maintained with the adjacent structure. Endoscopic ultrasound demonstrated a lesion arising from the muscularis propria. The manometry findings were suggestive of achalasia. She underwent transhiatal esophagectomy with gastric pull-up.

  20. Incidence and management of benign anastomotic stricture after cervical oesophagogastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierie, J P; de Graaf, P W; Poen, H; van der Tweel, I; Obertop, H

    1993-04-01

    Benign anastomotic stricture after transhiatal oesophagectomy and gastric tube reconstruction constitutes a major problem. From August 1988 to April 1991, 81 patients were followed after cervical oesophagogastrostomy. Twenty-four patients (30 per cent) developed a benign anastomotic stricture 3-23 (median 8) weeks after operation. Poor vascularization of the gastric tube, determined during operation, and postoperative anastomotic leakage were statistically significant risk factors for stricture formation. Symptoms related to stricture were often typical and were confirmed by endoscopy and/or radiography. Radiography did not yield information additional to that obtained from endoscopy. Strictures were treated in the outpatient clinic by dilatation with Savary dilators. Repeated dilatation completely alleviated dysphagia in 20 of the 24 patients (83 per cent). In ten patients dilatations could be discontinued after a median of 8 (range 1-17) sessions. Dilatation was continued until the end of follow-up in nine patients or until death from recurrent disease in five. No complications of dilatation were seen.

  1. Radiographic features of esophageal involvement in chronic graft-vs.-host disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, G.B.; Sullivan, K.M.; Plumley, T.F.

    1984-01-01

    Chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) is an important late complication of allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation. It resembles several naturally occurring autoimmune diseases and involves the skin, mouth, eyes, liver, and esophagus. The radiographic findings of 14 symptomatic patients with chronic GVHD involving the esophagus were reviewed and found to include webs, ringlike narrowings, and tapering strictures in the mid and upper esophagus. Esophagoscopy revealed characteristic desquamation in the 13 patients studied, but barium studies detected this lesion in only one patient. Knowledge of the site and characteristics of esophageal involvement with chronic GVHD assists the radiologic evaluation of this disorder

  2. Scintigraphy in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkina, V.V.; Piperkova, E.N.; Okulov, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Esophagoscintigraphy with labelled liquid and solid food was performed in 34 patients disease of the esophagus in the patient history permitting the determination of quantitative and qualitive characteristics of normal motor-evacuatory function of the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter (LES). A total of 46 patients with esophageal cancer and stomach cancer with the envolvement of the esophagus before treatment were examined. In cancer of the esophagus its function depended on a tumor site and stage. In order to raise diagnostic sensitivity dynamic esophagoscintigraphy should be performed using liquid and solid food because during liquid passage a study with a hard bolus of patients with severe esophageal disfunction showed that in 36.9% of the patients the quantitative and qualitative indices were within normal. Radionuclide methods permit the determination of the level of a pathological focus, a degree of esophageal permeability, quantitative characterization of a degree of disorder of esophageal function in order to raise the functional diagnosis of the esophaeous and LES, and the determination of motor disorders at the earliest stages of tumor development

  3. An audit of the management of oesophageal stricture in children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    are to relieve dysphagia, ensure adequate nutrition for growth and development, and to prevent aspiration pneumonia and recurrence of the stricture ..... strictures in infants and toddlers: Experience of an expectant protocol from. North African ...

  4. Esophageal Cancer in Iran: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavosh Nasseri-Moghaddam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal cancer is the second and third most common malignancy in Iranian malesand females, respectively, claiming lives of approximately 5800 Iranians each year.Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is presently the most common type accounting forabout 90% of all esophageal cancers in Iran. Recent studies have shown that there isa gradual increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus alongwith gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Thirty-five years ago, the age standardizied rate (ASR of esophageal SCC in thecity of Gonbad (Golestan Province, northeast of Iran was found to be one of the highestrates for any single cancer that had been reported worldwide (ASR >100/105/year.Recent studies have shown that the incidence of SCC in Gonbad has declined to lessthan half of what it was in the past. This decline in the incidence of esophageal SCCparallels an improvement in the socioeconomic situation of people living in thisregion. According to recent cancer registry data in Iran there is still an obviousintracountry variability between the incidence of esophageal cancer in the south withan ASR of 3 for males and 2 for females in Kerman and 43 and 36 in the northeasternprovince of Golestan. The reasons for this very high rate of SCC in northeastern Iranhave been the subject of several studies during the past 35 years. According to resultsof these studies the suspected risk factors are: low intake of fruits and vegetables, drinkinghot tea, consumption of opium products and tobacco, H.pyloriinfection in the stomach,using unhealthy drinking water from cisterns and genetic susceptibility. The mainsuspected mutagens are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH and N-nitrosocompounds. In order to embark primary and secondary prevention of this fatal cancer,further prospective studies are presently underway in the region. The Golestanesophageal cancer cohort study which follows of 50,000 subjects is on going. We expectsimple and feasible evidence based

  5. Office-based esophageal dilation in head and neck cancer: Safety, feasibility, and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Rebecca J; Schopper, Melissa A; Giliberto, John Paul; Collar, Ryan M; Khosla, Sid M

    2018-02-08

    To review experience, safety, and cost of office-based esophageal dilation in patients with history of head and neck cancer (HNCA). The medical records of patients undergoing esophageal dilation in the office were retrospectively reviewed between August 2015 and May 2017. Patients were given nasal topical anesthesia. Next, a transnasal esophagoscopy (TNE) was performed. If the patient tolerated TNE, we proceeded with esophageal dilation using Seldinger technique with the CRE™ Boston Scientific (Boston Scientific Corp., Marlborough, MA) balloon system. Patients were discharged directly from the outpatient clinic. Forty-seven dilations were performed in 22 patients with an average of 2.1 dilations/patient (range 1-10, standard deviation [SD] ± 2.2). Seventeen patients (77%) were male. The average age was 67 years (range 35-78 years, SD ± 8.5). The most common primary site of cancer was oral cavity/oropharynx (n = 10), followed by larynx (n = 6). All patients (100%) had history of radiation treatment. Four patients were postlaryngectomy. The indication for esophageal dilation was esophageal stricture and progressive dysphagia. All dilations occurred in the proximal esophagus. There were no major complications. Three focal, superficial lacerations occurred. Two patients experienced mild, self-limited epistaxis. One dilation was poorly tolerated due to discomfort. One patient required pain medication postprocedure. Office-based esophageal dilation generated $15,000 less in health system charges compared to traditional operating room dilation on average per episode of care. In patients with history of HNCA and radiation, office-based TNE with esophageal dilation appears safe, well-tolerated, and cost-effective. In a small cohort, the technique has low complication rate and is feasible in an otolaryngology outpatient office setting. 4. Laryngoscope, 2018. © 2018 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Study in the Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    Esophageal motility was evaluated from the analysis of 10 consecutive swallows using liquid bolus containing 0.5 mCi of {sup 99m}Tc tin colloid. We have reviewed our experience of esophageal transit study in the 20 normal volunteers and 55 patients with dysphagia that was not related to mechanical obstruction. The purpose of this study is to measure the esophageal transit in normal subjects and in patients with various esophageal motility disorders. The overall sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide esophageal transit study in detecting esophageal motor abnormality were compared with manometric results as a gold standard, which were 80% and 100% respectively. Radionuclide transit study is a safe, rapid, noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  7. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Study in the Esophageal Motility Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook

    1993-01-01

    Esophageal motility was evaluated from the analysis of 10 consecutive swallows using liquid bolus containing 0.5 mCi of 99m Tc tin colloid. We have reviewed our experience of esophageal transit study in the 20 normal volunteers and 55 patients with dysphagia that was not related to mechanical obstruction. The purpose of this study is to measure the esophageal transit in normal subjects and in patients with various esophageal motility disorders. The overall sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide esophageal transit study in detecting esophageal motor abnormality were compared with manometric results as a gold standard, which were 80% and 100% respectively. Radionuclide transit study is a safe, rapid, noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  8. Efficacy and safety of a new fully covered self-expandable non-foreshortening metal esophageal stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Kulwinder S; Latif, Sahibzada U; Yang, Juliana F; Fang, Tom C; Khan, Abdul; Oh, Young

    2014-10-01

    Fully covered esophageal self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) are potentially removable but can be associated with high migration rates. For precise positioning, non-foreshortening SEMSs are preferred. Recently, a new fully covered non-foreshortening SEMS with anti-migration features was introduced. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of this new esophageal SEMS. Retrospective study. Single, tertiary-care center. Consecutive patients with malignant and benign strictures with dysphagia grade of ≥3 and patients with fistulas/leaks were studied. Stent placement and removal. Technical success in stent deployment/removal, efficacy in relieving dysphagia and sealing fistulas/leaks, and adverse events. Forty-three stents were placed in 35 patients (mean [± standard deviation] age 65 ± 11 years; 31 male), 24 for malignant and 11 for benign (5 strictures, 6 leaks) indications. Technical success in precise SEMS placement was 100%. The after-stent dysphagia grade improved significantly (at 1 week: 1.5 ± 0.7; at 4 weeks: 1.2 ± 0.4; baseline: 3.8 ± 0.4; P stents were removed for clinical indications, with technical success of 100%. All leaks sealed after SEMS placement and did not recur after stent removal. All benign strictures recurred after stent removal. Adverse events included migration (14%), chest pain (11%), and dysphagia from tissue hyperplasia (6%). There was no stent-related mortality. Nonrandomized, single-center study. The new esophageal SEMS was effective in relieving malignant dysphagia, allowed for precise placement, and was easily removable. It was effective in treating benign esophageal fistulas and leaks. Stent-related adverse events were acceptable. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Anastomotic urethroplasty in posttraumatic strictures of bulbomembraneous urethra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivov, A V; Loran, O B; Bogdanov, A B; Kotov, S V; Makedonskaia, T P; Plekhanov, A Iu

    2010-01-01

    Efficacy of surgical treatment of patients with strictures of the bulbomembraneous portion of the urethra by R. Turner-Warwick in G. Webster modification was studied in 30 patients operated in 2008-2009. Efficacy of the operation was assessed by uroflowmetry and urethrography findings. Follow-up covered 3 to 20 months (median 10 months). Posttraumatic urethral strictures arose after car accident in 89% cases. Mean length of the destruction defect was 2.7 cm (1.5-5.5 cm). Efficacy of surgical treatment reached 96.7%. Erectile dysfunction due to the operation developed in 2 of 23 (8.6%) patients. Thus, urethroplasty by Turner-Warwick in Webster modification is effective and safe in the treatment of posttraumatic strictures of the posterior urethra and can be used widely in specialized centers for urethral surgery.

  10. Outlook with conservative treatment of peptic oesophageal stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, A L; Ferguson, R; Atkinson, M

    1980-01-01

    In order to assess the outlook for patients with peptic oesophageal strictures treated by Eder Puestow dilatation at fibreoptic endoscopy, 50 patients were followed up for periods ranging from nine months to four years. Twenty patients (40%) required only a single dilatation, and the remaining 30 (60%) required multiple dilatations. The frequency of dilatation tended to decrease with time. There was one death attributable to the procedure. Two patients developed an adenocarcinoma at the site of the stricture. We conclude that conservative management of peptic oesophageal stricture combining the use of dilatation at fibreoptic endoscopy with medical measures to control gastro-oesophageal reflux offers a relatively safe means of providing symptomatic relief, maintaining nutrition, and allowing the patient an acceptable quality of life. PMID:7364314

  11. Estenoses benignas de esôfago: abordagem endoscópica com velas de Savary-Gilliard Benign strictures of the esophagus: endoscopic approach with Savary-Gilliard bougies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Novais

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: As estenoses benignas de esôfago são complicações decorrentes de diversas causas. Possuem tratamentos similares, na maioria dos casos necessitando de dilatação endoscópica, no entanto a resposta terapêutica, tempo ideal de tratamento, assim como intervalo entre as sessões podem ser variáveis. OBJETIVO: Analisar, do ponto de vista endoscópico, as estenoses benignas de esôfago em 14 anos de experiência no Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ, avaliando etiologia, a extensão da estenose, o número de dilatações necessário para atingir resposta terapêutica satisfatória, assim como a relação entre a extensão da estenose e a resposta terapêutica. MÉTODO: Foram analisadas 2.568 dilatações endoscópicas com uso de velas de Savary-Gilliard em 236 pacientes, durante um período de 14 anos e 10 meses, até junho de 2007. RESULTADOS: A estenose péptica foi a causa mais freqüentemente encontrada, seguida pela estenose cáustica. As estenoses longas e cáusticas necessitaram de maior número de sessões para ausência de disfagia. Estenoses pépticas e curtas responderam melhor a número menor de sessões de dilatação. CONCLUSÃO: A estenose péptica foi a causa mais comum e respondeu bem à terapia endoscópica, em concordância com a literatura. As estenoses cáusticas foram as mais refratárias, principalmente as longas. Quanto maior foi a extensão da estenose, também maior foi o número de sessões necessárias. Estenoses curtas apresentaram boa evolução na maioria dos casos. O número de dilatações necessárias dependeu diretamente da causa e da extensão da estenose.BACKGROUND: Benign esophageal strictures are complications that result from different causes. They are usually similarly approached, most of the cases needing endoscopic dilation. However the response to therapy, optimal timing for treatment and interval between sessions can vary. AIM: The

  12. A prospective group sequential study evaluating a new type of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for the treatment of benign biliary strictures (with video).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poley, Jan-Werner; Cahen, Djuna L; Metselaar, Herold J; van Buuren, Henk R; Kazemier, Geert; van Eijck, Casper H J; Haringsma, Jelle; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bruno, Marco J

    2012-04-01

    Fully-covered self expandable metal stents (fcSEMSs) are an alternative to progressive plastic stenting for the treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBS) with the prospect of a higher treatment efficacy and the need for fewer ERCPs, thereby reducing the burden for patients and possibly costs. Key to this novel treatment is safe stent removal. To investigate the feasibility and safety of stent removal of a fcSEMS with a proximal retrieval lasso: a long wire thread integrated in the proximal ends of the wire mesh that hangs freely in the stent lumen. Pulling it enables gradual removal of the stent inside-out. A secondary aim was success of stricture resolution. Non-randomized, prospective follow-up study with 3 sequential cohorts of 8 patients with BBS. Academic tertiary referral center. Eligible patients had strictures either postsurgical (post-cholecystectomy (LCx) or liver transplantation (OLT)), due to chronic pancreatitis (CP), or papillary stenosis (PF). Strictures had to be located at least 2 cm below the liver hilum. All patients had one plastic stent in situ across the stricture and had not undergone previous treatment with either multiple plastic stents or fcSEMS. The first cohort of patients underwent stent placement for 2 months, followed by 3 months if the stricture had not resolved. The second and third cohort started with 3 months and 4 months, respectively, both followed by another 4 months if indicated. Treatment success was defined by stricture resolution at cholangiography, the ability to pass an inflated extraction balloon and clinical follow-up (at least 6 months). safety of stent removal. Secondary outcomes were complications and successful stricture resolution. A total of 23 patients (11 female; 20-67 yrs) were eligible for final analysis. One patient developed a malignant neuroendocrine tumor in the setting of CP. Strictures were caused by CP (13), OLT (6), LCx (3) and PF (1). In total 39 fcSEMS were placed and removed. Removals were easy

  13. Esophageal motility disorders; Motilitaetsstoerungen des Oesophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Muenchen (Germany); Wuttge-Hannig, A. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [German] Zum Verstaendnis der Motilitaet des Oesophagus sind muskulaere Architektur und Verteilung der quergestreiften und glatten Muskelfasern von Bedeutung. Die Physiologie des Oesophagus wird in soweit kurz dargestellt, als sie fuer das Verstaendnis von peristaltischen Stoerungen notwendig ist. Neben der Erfassung rein morphologischer Kriterien ist bei der Untersuchung der Speiseroehre eine diagnostische Bewertung der Motilitaet erforderlich. Es stehen uns heute strahlungsarme dynamische Aufzeichnungsverfahren (digitale dynamische Aufzeichnung, Videofluoroskopie) mit Bildsequenzen von 4-30 Bildern/s zur Verfuegung. Die Kombination einer funktionellen Methode zur Darstellung der Morphologie und der

  14. Epiphrenic esophageal diverticula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epiphrenic esophageal diverticula (EED are rare. The estimated incidence is about 1:500,000/year. EED usually result from a combination of esophageal obstruction, functional or mechanical and a point of weakness of the muscularis propria. Most of the symptoms are unspecific, but dysphagia is most common. Chest radiograph, barium esophagogram, endoscopy and manometry are diagnostic tools. The treatment methods are conservative medical therapy, myotomy, diverticulectomy and fundoplication. In addition, endoscopic pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin injection are a good alternative for symptomatic patients with motility disorders who are unfit for or unwilling to undergo surgery.

  15. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan-Wen; Du, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow's relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  16. Bleomycin induced urethral stricture in Hodgkin′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Tapkire

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin is a glycoprotein that is extensively used in combination with other anti-cancer agents because of its relative lack of hematological and gastrointestinal toxicity. However, pulmonary toxicity is common with bleomycin and limits its therapeutic utility. Urethral stricture as a result of bleomycin toxicity has not been reported in literature. In this case report, a young male patient who developed urethral stricture after bleomycin-based chemotherapy is described and the possible effects of bleomycin on the urethra are discussed.

  17. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary stricture: Surgery is the gold standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiq S Sikora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Post cholecystectomy bile duct strictures present a challenge to the treating physicians. Advancement in skills and technology offers alternative treatment modalities to the standard surgical repair. Contemporary series of surgical repair by experienced surgeons report excellent long-term results with <5% restricture rates. Endoscopic therapy is conceptually flawed, is not applicable to all patients, requires prolonged duration of treatment with multiple interventions. Surgical repair by an experienced surgeon is the "Gold Standard" of care in management of postcholecystectomy bile duct strictures.

  18. Self-expandable covered metallic esophageal stent impregnated with beta-emitting radionuclide: an experimental study in canine esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Je Hwan; Lee, Jong Doo; Wang, Hee Jung; Kim, Gui-Eon; Kim, Bong Wan; Yim, Hyunee; Han, Sang Keon; Park, Chan H.; Joh, Chul Woo; Kim, Kyung-Hwa; Park, Kyung Bae; Shin, Kyong-Min

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: A specially designed self-expandable covered metallic stent impregnated with the β-emitting radioisotope 166 Ho ( 166 Ho, energy: 1.85 and 1.76 MeV, T((1)/(2)): 26.8 h) was developed at our institute for the purpose of intraluminal palliative brachytherapy, as well as for treating malignant esophageal stricture and swallowing difficulty. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tissue response to brachytherapy and the safety of the radioactive metallic stent with regard to the normal canine esophagus before clinical application. Methods and Materials: 166 Ho was impregnated into the polyurethane membrane (50 μ thickness) covering the outer surface of a self-expandable metallic stent (diameter, 18 mm; length, 40 mm). Stents with radioactivity 4.0-7.8 mCi (Group A, n=15), 1.0-1.8 mCi (Group B, n 5), and 0.5-0.7 mCi (Group C, n=5) were placed in the esophagi of 25 healthy beagle dogs, and the stents were tightly anchored surgically to prevent migration. The estimated radiation dose calculated by Monte Carlo simulation was 194-383 Gy in Group A, 48-90 Gy in Group B, and 23-32 Gy in Group C. The dogs were killed 8-12 weeks after insertion of the stents, and histologic examinations of the esophageal walls were performed. Results: In Group A, 3 of 15 dogs died of wound infection, so specimens were obtained from only 12 dogs; all 12 cases showed esophageal stricture with mucosal ulceration. Microscopically, severe fibrosis and degeneration of the muscular propria were found in 3 dogs, complete fibrosis of the entire esophageal wall was found in 7 dogs, and esophageal fibrosis with radiation damage within periesophageal soft tissue was found in 2 dogs. However, esophageal perforation did not develop, despite extremely high radiation doses. In Group B, glandular atrophy and submucosal fibrosis were found, but the muscular layer was intact. In Group C, no histologic change was found in 3 dogs, but submucosal inflammation and glandular atrophy with intact mucosa

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound as an adjunctive evaluation in patients with esophageal motor disorders subtyped by high-resolution manometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Kumar; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Keswani, Rajesh; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J; Komanduri, Srinadh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Esophageal motor disorders are a heterogenous group of conditions identified by esophageal manometry that lead to esophageal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of endoscopic ultrasound in the further evaluation of patients with esophageal motor disorders categorized using the updated Chicago Classification. Methods We performed a retrospective, single center study of 62 patients with esophageal motor disorders categorized according to the Chicago Classification. All patients underwent standard radial endosonography to assess for extra esophageal findings or alternative explanations for esophageal outflow obstruction. Secondary outcomes included esophageal wall thickness among the different patient subsets within the Chicago Classification Key Results EUS identified 9/62 (15%) clinically relevant findings that altered patient management and explained the etiology of esophageal outflow obstruction. We further identified substantial variability in esophageal wall thickness in a proportion of patients including some with a significantly thickened non-muscular layer. Conclusions EUS findings are clinically relevant in a significant number of patients with motor disorders and can alter clinical management. Variability in esophageal wall thickness of the muscularis propria and non-muscular layers identified by EUS may also explain the observed variability in response to standard therapies for achalasia. PMID:25041229

  20. Reinforcement of esophageal anastomoses with an extracellular matrix scaffold in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieponice, Alejandro; Gilbert, Thomas W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2006-12-01

    The gastric pull-up procedure, a standard intervention after radical esophagectomy, is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to leaks and stricture. A previous preclinical study showed that an extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold with autologous muscle tissue could be used to repair a complete circumferential defect in the cervical esophagus. The aim of the present study was to determine if healing of end-to-end anastomoses of the esophagus could be improved by reinforcement with an ECM scaffold. Twelve female mongrel dogs underwent a complete transection of either the cervical esophagus (n = 6) or the gastroesophageal junction (n = 6). A portion of the endomucosa at the anastomotic site was resected and replaced with an ECM scaffold in contact with the subjacent muscle and the muscle was anastomosed. The measured end points included macroscopic and microscopic evaluation and quantification of the esophageal diameter at the anastomotic site. No anastomotic leaks or systemic complications were observed in the ECM-treated animals. Morphologic findings in both groups showed complete mucosal covering of the surgery site. The remodeled esophageal tissue showed angiogenesis and complete epithelialization. Intact, organized layers of muscle tissue were present between the native muscularis externa and the submucosal layer and effectively bridged the transected ends. The ECM scaffold altered the default mechanism of esophageal repair. Scar tissue formation with associated stricture was virtually eliminated, and the esophageal healing response was characterized by the replacement with structurally normal tissue layers. These findings suggest that the high morbidity rate associated with esophagectomy procedures may be reduced by this ECM augmentation procedure at the anastomotic site.

  1. Albert-Lembert versus hybrid-layered suture in hand sewn end-to-end cervical esophagogastric anastomosis after esophageal squamous cell carcinoma resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fan; Sun, Li; Xu, Guanghui; Hong, Liu; Yang, Jianjun; Cai, Lei; Li, Guocai; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Zhang, Hongwei

    2015-11-01

    Hand sewn cervical esophagogastric anastomosis (CEGA) is regarded as preferred technique by surgeons after esophagectomy. However, considering the anastomotic leakage and stricture, the optimal technique for performing this anastomosis is still under debate. Between November 2010 and September 2012, 230 patients who underwent esophagectomy with hand sewn end-to-end (ETE) CEGA for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) were analyzed retrospectively, including 111 patients underwent Albert-Lembert suture anastomosis and 119 patients underwent hybrid-layered suture anastomosis. Anastomosis construction time was recorded during operation. Anastomotic leakage was recorded through upper gastrointestinal water-soluble contrast examination. Anastomotic stricture was recorded during follow up. The hybrid-layered suture was faster than Albert-Lembert suture (29.40±1.24 min vs. 33.83±1.41 min, P=0.02). The overall anastomotic leak rate was 7.82%, the leak rate in hybrid-layered suture group was significantly lower than that in Albert-Lembert suture group (3.36% vs. 12.61%, P=0.01). The overall anastomotic stricture rate was 9.13%, the stricture rate in hybrid-layered suture group was significantly lower than that in Albert-Lembert suture group (5.04% vs. 13.51%, P=0.04). Hand sewn ETE CEGA with hybrid-layered suture is associated with lower anastomotic leakage and stricture rate compared to hand sewn ETE CEGA with Albert-Lembert suture.

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Phrenic Nerve Block for Intractable Hiccups following Placement of Esophageal Stent for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsanious, David; Khoury, Spiro; Martinez, Edgar; Nawras, Ali; Filatoff, Gregory; Ajabnoor, Hossam; Darr, Umar; Atallah, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Hiccups are actions consisting of sudden contractions of the diaphragm and intercostals followed by a sudden inspiration and transient closure of the vocal cords. They are generally short lived and benign; however, in extreme and rare cases, such as esophageal carcinoma, they can become persistent or intractable, up to and involving significant pain, dramatically impacting the patient's quality of life. This case involves a 60-year-old man with a known history of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. He was considered to have high surgical risk, and therefore he received palliative care through the use of fully covered metallic esophageal self-expandable stents due to a spontaneous perforated esophagus, after which he developed intractable hiccups and associated mediastinal pain. Conservative treatment, including baclofen, chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, and omeprazole, provided no relief for his symptoms. The patient was referred to pain management from gastroenterology for consultation on pain control. He ultimately received an ultrasound-guided left phrenic nerve block with bupivacaine and depomedrol, and 3 days later underwent the identical procedure on the right phrenic nerve. This led to complete resolution of his hiccups and associated mediastinal pain. At follow-up, 2 and 4 weeks after the left phrenic nerve block, the patient was found to maintain complete alleviation of the hiccups. Esophageal dilatation and/or phrenic or vagal afferent fiber irritation can be suspected in cases of intractable hiccups secondary to esophageal stenting. Regional anesthesia of the phrenic nerve through ultrasound guidance offers a long-term therapeutic option for intractable hiccups and associated mediastinal pain in selected patients with esophageal carcinoma after stent placement. Esophageal stent, esophageal stenting, intractable hiccups, intractable singultus, phrenic nerve block, phrenic nerve, ultrasound, palliative care, esophageal carcinoma.

  3. Esophageal Foreign Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal foreign body aspiration is a common event which can cause serious morbidity and mortality in the children and adult population. For that reason, early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for preventing these life threateining complications. Children most often ingest coins and toys whereas adults commonly tend to have problems with meat and bones. Esophageal foreign bodies are located at the cricopharyngeus muscle level in 70%, the thoracic esophagus in 15% and the gastroesophageal junction in the remaining 15%. Symptoms can vary according to the shape and structure of the ingested object, type of location, patient%u2019s age and complications caused by the foreign body. Delay in treatment, esophageal perforation and an underlying esophageal disease are poor prognostic factors. In treatment, observation, foley catheter, rigid or flexible esophagoscopy and removing the foreign body with a Magill forceps, pushing the foreign body into the stomach, giving intravenous glucagon and surgical treatment methods can be used. Rigid esophagoscopy is an effective and safe procedure for foreign body diagnosis and removal. Improved endoscopic experience and clinical management of thoracic surgeons led to reduced morbidity and mortality in recent years. Most of those emergencies of childhood are preventable. Family education is very important.

  4. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, T.A.; Ajani, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings contain 33 papers grouped under the headings of: Heath memorial award lecture; Large bowel cancer; Esophageal cancer; Pancreatic, Endocrime, and Hepatobiliary cancer; Gastric cancer; Joanne Vandenberge hill award and William O. Russell lectureship in anatomic pathology; and Jeffrey A. Gottlieb memorial lecture

  5. Use of Cutting Balloon in the Treatment of Urethral Stricture: A Novel Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, Erkan; Cicek, Tufan; Istanbulluoglu, Okan; Ozturk, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    The peripheral cutting balloon has been used to treat various nonvascular strictures as well as vascular stenosis. In this article, we describe for the first time the use of the cutting balloon in the treatment of patients with urethral stricture. Four patients with bulbar urethral stricture were included in the study. All strictures were successfully dilated with the cutting balloon, and patients were free of symptoms at 6-month follow-up. Cutting-balloon dilatation is a safe, easy-to-perform, and effective treatment for patients with tight urethral strictures.

  6. Advances in esophageal motor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smout, André Jpm

    2008-07-01

    Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. A number of studies have addressed the issue of heterogeneity in achalasia, the best defined esophageal motility disorder. The spastic esophageal motility disorders nutcracker esophagus and diffuse esophageal spasm may coexist with gastroesophageal reflux disease, which has consequences for the management of patients with these disorders. The entity labelled ineffective esophageal motility is associated with reflux esophagitis, but also with morbid obesity. For the detection of disordered transit caused by ineffective esophageal motility, application of intraluminal impedance monitoring in conjunction with manometry leads to improved diagnosis. New data on the effect of Nissen fundoplication on esophageal motility were published during the last year. Recent knowledge on the heterogeneity of achalasia and the association of spastic esophageal motor disorders and ineffective motility with reflux disease will help the clinician in the management of patients with these disorders.

  7. Original article Urethral Stricture and HIV: Unusual Presentations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    cause of urethral stricture in this series was traumatic injury The other important cause was post-inflammatory (after gonococcal urethritis) with HIV co-infection. These patients posed a challenge due to our lack of experience and the absence of literature guidelines on the optimal management. The first unusual feature in the ...

  8. Epidemiology of urethral stricture at Tygerberg Hospital | Steenkamp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over a 12-month period, 120 consecutive male patients with confirmed urethral stricture were prospectively studied with regard to the epidemiology of the disease. Specific urethritis is the main aetiological factor (45%) and internal and external trauma account for an alarming 38,3% of cases. The prevalence is highest ...

  9. Direct vision internal urethrotomy in 459 urethral stricture patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four hundred and fifty nine patients seen with simple urethral strictures between 1990 and 1998 underwent direct vision urethrotomy.. The procedure was successful in 441 patients and failed in only 18 patients. Postoperative complications included fever in 31 patients, urethral bleeding in 14 and epididymitis in 17 patients.

  10. Adult bile duct strictures: differentiating benign biliary stenosis from cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Canh, Hiep; Harada, Kenichi

    2016-12-01

    Biliary epithelial cells preferentially respond to various insults under chronic pathological conditions leading to reactively atypical changes, hyperplasia, or the development of biliary neoplasms (such as biliary intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct, and cholangiocarcinoma). Moreover, benign biliary strictures can be caused by a variety of disorders (such as IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis, eosinophilic cholangitis, and follicular cholangitis) and often mimic malignancies, despite their benign nature. In addition, primary sclerosing cholangitis is a well-characterized precursor lesion of cholangiocarcinoma and many other chronic inflammatory disorders increase the risk of malignancies. Because of these factors and the changes in biliary epithelial cells, biliary strictures frequently pose a diagnostic challenge. Although the ability to differentiate neoplastic from non-neoplastic biliary strictures has markedly progressed with the advance in radiological modalities, brush cytology and bile duct biopsy examination remains effective. However, no single modality is adequate to diagnose benign biliary strictures because of the low sensitivity. Therefore, understanding the underlying causes by compiling the entire clinical, laboratory, and imaging data; considering the under-recognized causes; and collaborating between experts in various fields including cytopathologists with multiple approaches is necessary to achieve an accurate diagnosis.

  11. Biliary strictures and liver transplantation : clinical and biomedical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebib Korkmaz, Kerem

    2014-01-01

    The current thesis describes short and long term results of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) performed with livers from donation after brain death (DBD) and livers from donation after cardiac death (DCD) with an emphasis on biliary complications, especially nonanastomotic biliary strictures

  12. Surgical treatment of anterior urethral stricture diseases: brief overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Barbagli

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed an up-to-date review of the surgical techniques suggested for the treatment of anterior urethral strictures. References for this review were identified by searching PubMed and MEDLINE using the search terms "urethral stricture" or "urethroplasty" from 1995 to 2006. Descriptive statistics of the articles were provided. Meta-analyses or other multivariate designs were not employed. Out of 327 articles, 50 (15% were determined to be germane to this review. Eight abstracts were referenced as the authors of this review attended the meetings where the abstract results were presented, thus it was possible to collect additional information on such abstracts. Urethrotomy continues to be the most commonly used technique, but it does have a high failure rate and many patients progress to surgical repair. Buccal mucosa has become the most popular substitute material in urethroplasty; however, the skin appears to have a longer follow-up. Free grafts have been making a comeback, with fewer surgeons using genital flaps. Short bulbar strictures are amenable using primary anastomosis, with a high success rate. Longer strictures are repaired using ventral or dorsal graft urethroplasty, with the same success rate. New tools such as fibrin glue or engineered material will become a standard in future treatment. In reconstructive urethral surgery, the superiority of one approach over another is not yet clearly defined. The surgeon must be competent in the use of various techniques to deal with any condition of the urethra presented at the time of surgery.

  13. Outcome Of Urethroplasty For Urethral Stricture At Jos Universitry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 24 patients in whom the stricture length at operation was specified, six, 11 and sevenwere 4cmrespectively. The stricturewas located in the anterior urethra in 18(58.1%), posterior urethra in 2(6.4%) and bulbomembranous in 11(35.5%) of patients (unspecified in one). The bulbar urethra was the ...

  14. Urethral Stricture as seen in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    urethritis have increasingly been incriminated as a major etiological factor of inflammatory urethral stricture especially in the developed world. Organisms which fall in this group include. Ureaplasma (T-strain), Mycoplasma, Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida albicans, and Haemophilus vaginalis, Herpes simplex virus type II, ...

  15. Comparison between strictureplasty and resection anastomosis in tuberculous intestinal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, A.; Qureshi, A.M.; Iqbal, M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness, safety and morbidity of strictureplasty with resection anastomosis in patients with tuberculous small gut strictures. Subjects and Methods: Thirty patients who presented with intestinal obstruction due to tuberculous strictures, and underwent either resection anastomosis or strictureplasty where included in the study. Data was collected on a proforma and analyzed using software SPSS (version 8.0). Chi-square and t-test were used to test the hypothesis. Main outcome measures included the presence or absence of postoperative leakage anastomosis, wound infection, recurrence of intestinal obstruction and postoperative study. Results: Chi-square test applied to see the effectiveness showed no significant difference (p>0.5) between the two procedures. t-Test on the score of morbidity also showed no significant difference (p>0.5) between the two procedures. Conclusion: Both procedures performed were equally effective and had equal morbidity in cases of intestinal tuberculous strictures. Strictureplasty is superior to resection anastomosis in cases of multiple strictures as it conserves gut length and can even be performed safely in cases with coexistent gut perforation. (author)

  16. Review: Management of anterior urethral strictures with buccal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urethral stricture management is a challenging surgery. Multiplicity of techniques means that none of them is ideal. No single technique is appropriate for all situations and the successful surgeon should have a store of operations to choose from according to each specific case. This review aims to provide an update on the ...

  17. Fetal demise by umbilical cord around abdomen and stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shun-Jen; Chen, Chi-Huang; Wu, Gwo-Jang; Chen, Wei-Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord abnormalities are accepted as conditions associated with intrauterine fetal demise (IUFD), and umbilical cord stricture is most frequently encountered. In addition, although cord entanglement with multiple loops rarely increases the perinatal mortality, it is associated with a significant increase in variable kind of morbidity such as growth restriction. We describe a 27-year-old woman, with a missed abortion history at about 10 weeks' gestation in her first pregnancy, who presented to our outpatient department at 34 4/7 weeks of gestation due to decreased fetal activity during the preceding week. No fetal heart activity and blood flow had been detected by ultrasonography and pulsed-wave Doppler. A demised fetus with umbilical cord stricture and three loops around abdomen was delivered and was weighted 1,830 g that was below the tenth percentile for the gestational age. Either umbilical cord stricture or entanglement around the body can affect the development of the fetus and even be lethal. The former might play a more important role in this case. Their etiology and the sequence of the events are still undetermined, and additional evaluation such as autopsy and further research may be needed. In addition, counsel and frequent fetal surveillance should be done in patients with previous IUFD attributed to cord stricture during next pregnancy because of undetermined risk of recurrence.

  18. The inconsistent nature of symptomatic pancreatico-jejunostomy anastomotic strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirjian, Aram N; Kent, Tara S; Callery, Mark P; Vollmer, Charles M

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancreatico-jejunostomy strictures (PJS) after pancreatiocoduodenectomy (PD) are poorly understood. Methods Patients treated for PJS were identified from all PDs (n =357) performed for all indications in our practice (2002 to 2009). Technical aspects of the original operation, as well as the presentation, management and outcomes of the resultant stricture were assessed. Results Seven patients developed a symptomatic PJS for an incidence of 2%. ‘Soft’ glands and small ducts (≤3 mm) were each present in 3/7 of the original anastomoses. Pancreatic fistula occurred in 6/7. The latency period to stricture presentation averaged 41 months. Diagnosis of PJS was confirmed by secretin magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP). Therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was attempted – each unsuccessfully – in four patients. All patients required operative correction of their PJS by takedown/revision of the original pancreatico-jejunal anastomoses (PJA) (n =4) ± a modified Puestow (n =2). One patient's PJS was completely inaccessible due to dense adhesions. Another patient's stricture recurred and was successfully revised with a stricturoplasty. At a mean follow-up of 25 months, all are alive, but only 4/7 are pain free. Conclusion A symptomatic PJS appears to be independent of original pathological, glandular or technical features but pancreatic fistulae may contribute. Secretin MRCP is diagnostically useful, whereas ERCP has been proven to be therapeutically ineffective. Durable resolution of symptoms after surgical revision is unpredictable. PMID:20815857

  19. The Treatment of Complex Urethral Strictures Using Ventral Onlay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the outcome of free onlay Buccal Mucosa Graft (BMG) with onlay penile Skin Island Flap (SIF) urethroplasty in the treatment of complex urethral strictures. Patients and Methods: A prospective comparative study was conducted at the Universitas Academic Hospital in Bloemfontein, South Africa.

  20. New techniques for stenting severely strictured or occluded ureters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mygind, T; Dorph, S; Nielsen, H; Nielsen, L

    1985-11-01

    Percutaneous stenting of the severely strictured ureter is facilitated by catheterization through a rigid curved tube leading through the kidney. Alternatively, bidirectional traction tensioning of a guide wire pulled through the entire urinary tract permits antegrade dilatation and stent drainage. Complete occlusion near the ureteric orifice may be bypassed by transureteral puncture of the bladder followed by stent insertion.

  1. [Esophageal complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease: consequences or defensive reactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Örs Péter; Bognár, Laura; Papp, András; Vereczkei, András

    2017-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease affects more than 10% of the adult population. Most patients can be effectively treated with lifestyle changes and adequate acid-reducing therapy. However, about 10% of the patients remain symptomatic despite treatment and severe complications may develop. Interestingly, some of these complications seem to be a sort of defensive mechanism that may either alleviate the patient's symptoms or prevent developing further complications. In Barrett's esophagus, which can be unambigously considered as a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease, reflux symptoms ruining the quality of life may significantly improve, since the metaplastic Barrett epithelium is much more resistent to gastric acid, than the normal epithelial lining of the esophagus. Furthermore, the motility disorders (hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, achalasia, cricopharyngeal achalasia) and structural changes (Schatzki's ring, esophageal stricture, subglottic trachea stenosis), which develop as a complication of reflux may help to prevent aspiration that can cause new complaints and may lead to further complications. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(20): 763-769.

  2. Elimination diets in the management of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Schwartz, Sally; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, an increasingly recognized chronic inflammatory disorder isolated to the esophagus, is triggered by an abnormal allergic response to dietary antigens. Current treatment includes swallowed topical steroids and dietary modification, which aim to resolve symptoms and prevent long-term complications such as formation of strictures. The dietary approach has become more widely accepted because long-term steroid therapy is associated with potential risks. Dietary treatment includes elemental and elimination diets. An exclusive elemental diet, which requires replacement of all intact protein with amino acid-based formula, offers the best response of all available therapies, with remission in up to 96% of subjects proving it to be superior to all other available therapies including topical steroids. However, compliance with this approach is challenging because of poor taste and monotony. The high cost of formula and the associated psychosocial problems are additional drawbacks of this approach. Empiric and allergy test-directed elimination diets have gained popularity given that elimination of a limited number of foods is much easier and as such is more readily acceptable. There is a growing body of literature supporting this type of therapy in both children and adults. This paper reviews the evidence for all types of dietary therapy in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  3. Interesting rendezvous location in a liver transplantation patient with anastomosis stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odemis, Bulent; Oztas, Erkin; Yurdakul, Mehmet; Torun, Serkan; Suna, Nuredtin; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2014-11-14

    An endoscopic or radiologic percutaneous approach may be an initial minimally invasive method for treating biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation; however, cannulation of biliary strictures is sometimes difficult due to the presence of a sharp or twisted angle within the stricture or a complete stricture. When an angulated or twisted biliary stricture interrupts passage of a guidewire over the stricture, it is difficult to replace the percutaneous biliary drainage catheter with inside stents by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The rendezvous technique can be used to overcome this difficulty. In addition to the classical rendezvous method, in cases with complete transection of the common bile duct a modified technique involving the insertion of a snare into the subhepatic space has been successfully performed. Herein, we report a modified rendezvous technique in the duodenal bulb as an extraordinary location for a patient with duct-to-duct anastomotic complete stricture after liver transplantation.

  4. A novel optical probe for pH sensing in gastro-esophageal apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, F.; Ghini, G.; Giannetti, A.; Senesi, F.; Trono, C.

    2011-03-01

    Monitoring gastric pH for long periods, usually 24 h, may be essential in analyzing the physiological pattern of acidity, in obtaining information on changes in activity during peptic ulcer disease, and in assessing the effect of antisecretory drugs. Gastro-esophageal reflux, which causes a pH decrease in the esophagus content from pH 7 even down to pH 2, can determine esophagitis with possible strictures and Barrett's esophagus. One of the difficulties of the optical measurement of pH in the gastro-esophageal apparatus lies in the required extended working range from 1 to 8 pH units. The present paper deals with a novel optical pH sensor, using methyl red as optical pH indicator. Contrary to all acidbase indicators characterized by working ranges limited to 2-3 pH units, methyl red, after its covalent immobilization on controlled pore glass (CPG), is characterized by a wide working range which fits with the clinical requirements. The novel probe design here described is suitable for gastro-esophageal applications and allows the optimization of the performances of the CPG with the immobilised indicator. This leads to a very simple configuration characterized by a very fast response time.

  5. Esophageal motor disorders in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moawad, Fouad J; Maydonovitch, Corinne L; Veerappan, Ganesh R; Bassett, John T; Lake, Jason M; Wong, Roy K H

    2011-05-01

    An association between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and esophageal motility disorders has been described in small studies. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of esophageal motor disorders in a large cohort of adults with EoE and examine whether an association exists between esophageal dysmotility and dysphagia. A retrospective review of esophageal manometry studies in adult EoE patients was performed. Tracings were reviewed for abnormalities including nutcracker esophagus and ineffective swallows, defined as low amplitude peristalsis (esophagus was found in three patients. There was no significant difference in eosinophil count among the motility groups: normal 46.5 ± 3.1, mild IEM 56.9 ± 36.9, moderate IEM 45.5 ± 23.7, severe IEM 34.3 ± 12.6 (P = 0.157). In this cohort of EoE patients, the majority had normal esophageal motility studies, although a subset of these patients had some esophageal dysmotility. It is unlikely that esophageal dysmotility is a major contributing factor to dysphagia, although it is reasonable to consider esophageal manometry testing in EoE patients to identify potential abnormalities of the smooth muscle esophagus.

  6. Esophageal bypass after failed chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matono, Satoru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Mori, Naoki; Nagano, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiromasa; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal stenosis and/or fistula often occur after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for unresectable esophageal cancer. In such patients, an esophageal stent can help achieve oral intake. However an esophageal stent cannot be inserted where there is complete stenosis or where the tumor is located. In such cases, esophageal bypass surgery may be necessary. Here, we investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients who underwent esophageal bypass surgery in our institution. We reviewed 10 cases of esophageal bypass surgery (gastric tube in 8 cases, colon in 2 cases) after CRT for unresectable esophageal cancer, between 2001 and 2009. There were 5 of stenosis-only cases, 4 fistula-only cases, and 1 case of stenosis and fistula. There were postoperative complications in 5 cases (50%), and all these were treated conservatively and healed. The median survival from surgery to peroral intake was 20 days (range 9-90 days), and the median survival after starting peroral intake was 130 days (range 48-293 days). Esophageal bypass surgery can achieve good performance status and improve peroral intake. (author)

  7. Esophageal Rupture as a Primary Manifestation in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vernon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is a chronic inflammatory process characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and, histologically, by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. In adults, it commonly presents with dysphagia, food impaction, and chest or abdominal pain. Chronic inflammation can lead to diffuse narrowing of the esophageal lumen which may cause food impaction. Endoscopic procedures to relieve food impaction may lead to complications such as esophageal perforation due to the friability of the esophageal mucosa. Spontaneous transmural esophageal rupture, also known as Boerhaave’s syndrome, as a primary manifestation of EoE is rare. In this paper, we present two adult patients who presented with esophageal perforation as the initial manifestation of EoE. This rare complication of EoE has been documented in 13 other reports (11 adults, 2 children and only 1 of the patients had been previously diagnosed with EoE. A history of dysphagia was present in 1 of our patients and in the majority of previously documented patients. Esophageal perforation is a potentially severe complication of EoE. Patients with a history of dysphagia and patients with spontaneous esophageal perforation should warrant an evaluation for EoE.

  8. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. In this case, the patient's symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Stricture location predicts swallowing outcomes following endoscopic rendezvous procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Katherine N; Shah, Rupali N; Buckmire, Robert A

    2017-06-01

    Complete pharyngoesophageal strictures may be encountered by the otolaryngologist as a consequence of radiation/chemoradiotherapy therapies for head and neck cancer. A combined anterograde and retrograde dilation procedure (rendezvous procedure) has proven to be a useful surgical intervention in these cases. We assess the long-term swallowing outcomes of this patient cohort including gastrostomy tube (G-tube) reliance, swallowing quality of life, and variables that contribute to improved swallowing outcomes. Retrospective chart review. A retrospective chart review of 18 consecutive patients treated with rendezvous procedures between April 2007 and May 2015 was carried out. Data were collected from chart review and follow-up telephone calls including demographics, surgical/postoperative course details, and Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) (swallowing quality of life) scores. The completion rate of the procedure was 83% (15 completed/3 procedures aborted). Average follow-up was 22 months. Thirteen of 15 (86.7%) achieved an oral diet, and 7/15 (46.7%) had their G-tube removed. G-tube-independent (GTI) patients had an average stricture length of 2.33 cm and an average distance from the incisors of 17.4 cm compared to G-tube dependent-(GTD) patients who had an average stricture length of 2.63 cm and 14.6 cm mean distance from the incisors (P = .66 and .0343, respectively). Final EAT-10 scores averaged 20.1 in GTI patients and 33.8 in GTD patients (P = .022). Stricture/incisor distance and EAT-10 scores demonstrated a moderate to strong negative correlation (r = -0.67). Following the endoscopic rendezvous procedure, swallowing outcomes and G-tube status is related to the distance of the stricture from the incisors. 2b Laryngoscope, 127:1388-1391, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Predictors of urethral stricture recurrence after endoscopic urethrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redón-Gálvez, L; Molina-Escudero, R; Álvarez-Ardura, M; Otaola-Arca, H; Alarcón Parra, R O; Páez-Borda, Á

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the clinical-demographic variables of the series and the predictors of urethral stricture recurrence after endoscopic urethrotomy. We retrospectively analysed 67 patients who underwent Sachse endoscopic urethrotomy between June 2006 and September 2014. Those patients who had previously undergone endoscopic urethrotomy or urethroplasty were excluded. The other patients who presented urethral stricture were included. We analysed age, weight, smoking habit, and cardiovascular risk factors, as well as the number, location, length and aetiology of the strictures, previous urethrotomies, vesical catheter duration and postsurgical dilatations. A univariate and multivariate analysis was conducted using the chi-squared test or Fisher's test and logistic regression to identify the variables related to recurrence. Thirty-seven percent of the patients had a relapse. The majority of the patients were older than 60 years (56.7%), obese (74.6%), nonsmokers (88%) and had no cardiovascular factors (56.7%). The majority of the strictures were single (94%), urethrotomy (89.6%). The majority of the patients carried a vesical catheter for urethrotomy, a stricture length >1cm is the only factor that predicts an increase in the risk of recurrence. We found no clinical or demographic factors that caused an increase in the incidence of recurrence. Similarly, technical factors such as increasing the bladder catheterisation time and urethral dilatations did not change the course of the disease. Their routine use is therefore unnecessary. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Thulium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linhui; Wang, Zhixiang; Yang, Bo; Yang, Qing; Sun, Yinghao

    2010-09-01

    The outcome of thulium laser urethrotomy for patients with urethral stricture had not been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcome of endourethrotomy with the thulium laser as a minimally invasive treatment for urethral stricture. Twenty-one consecutive patients with urethral stricture were evaluated by retrograde uroflowmetry, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and quality of life preoperatively at a single academic center. All patients were treated with thulium laser urethrotomy. All patients were followed up for 12-24 months postoperatively by uroflowmetry and by retrograde with voiding cystourethrogram every 3 months. And all patients were followed up by mailed questionnaire, including IPSS and quality of life. Retrograde endoscopic thulium laser urethrotomy was performed in all 21 patients. Most patients (N = 16; 76.2%) did not need any reintervention. Five patients developed recurrent strictures, of them two patients were treated by another laser urethrotomy, one patient was treated by open urethroplasty with buccal mucosa and the other two patients' reintervention were treated by urethral dilation. No intraoperative complications were encountered, although in 9.5% (N = 2) of patients, a urinary tract infection was diagnosed postoperatively. No gross hematuria occurred. Including two patients treated with repeat laser urethrotomy, 17(81.0%) showed good flow of urine (Q(ave)>16.0 ml/second) and adequate caliber urethra in retrograde urethrogram (RGU) 12 months after operation. Three (14.3%) patients showed narrow stream of urine (Q(ave)urethrotomy. The thulium laser urethrotomy was a safe and effective minimally invasive therapeutic modality for urethral stricture. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. [Oral mucosa graft urethroplasty for complicated urethral strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Akio; Sumitomo, Makoto; Kanbara, Taiki; Tsujita, Yujiro; Yoshii, Takahiko; Yoshii, Hidehiko; Satoh, Akinori; Asakuma, Junichi; Ito, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Masamichi; Asano, Tomohiko

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and outcome of one-stage oral mucosa graft urethroplasty, which is currently the procedure of choice for treating lengthy and complicated urethral strictures not amenable to excision and primary end-to-end anastomosis. Seven patients 33 to 74 years old (mean age = 53.7) underwent one-stage oral mucosa graft urethroplasty for a stricture in either the bulbar urethra (four patients), penile urethra (two patients), or pan-anterior urethra (one patient). Three of the strictures were due to trauma, one was due to inflammation, and one was due to a failed hypospadia repair. The other two were iatrogenic. All patients had previously undergone either internal urethrotomy or repeated urethral dilation. Three patients received a tube graft, three received a ventral onlay, and one received a dorsal onlay. A free graft of oral mucosa was harvested from the inside of each patient's left cheek, and if necessary to obtain a sufficient length, the harvest was extended to include mucosa from the lower lip and the right cheek. The graft lengths ranged from 2.5 to 12 cm (mean = 4.6 cm). A urethral catheter was left in place for 3 weeks postoperatively. While no severe complications at the donor site were observed during follow-up periods ranging from 3 to 55 months (mean = 14 months), two patients who had received a tube graft developed distal anastomotic ring strictures that were managed by internal urethrotomy. The other five required no postoperative urological procedure even though one who had received a ventral onlay developed a penoscrotal fistula. Oral mucosa is an ideal urethral graft, and oral mucosa graft urethroplasty is an effective procedure for repairing complicated urethral strictures involving long portions of the urethra.

  13. Pancreaticoduodenectomy after esophageal and gastric surgery preserving right gastroepiploic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Mami; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Minagawa, Masami; Imamura, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2006-02-01

    Secondary pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed in 2 patients, 1 who had undergone proximal gastrectomy for a gastric carcinoma and 1 who had undergone subtotal esophagectomy with stomach tube reconstruction for an inferior thoracic esophageal carcinoma. To prevent ischemia and congestion of the remnant stomach, the inflow and outflow pathways to the stomach, such as the right gastroepiploic artery and vein, were preserved. In this article, we describe the preservation procedures and discuss the problems of the secondary abdominal surgical procedure.

  14. Outcomes of nutritional interventions to treat dysphagia in esophageal cancer: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, R M; Mikhail, S; Ciombor, K; Perry, K A; Hinton, A; Stanich, P P; Zhang, C; Conwell, D L; Krishna, S G

    2017-11-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is increasing in prevalence due to rising incidence and improved treatment strategies. Dysphagia is a significant morbidity in patients with EC requiring nutritional intervention. We sought to evaluate outcomes of nutritional interventions for EC patients hospitalized with dysphagia at a population level. The National Inpatient Sample (2002-2012) was utilized to include all adult inpatients (≥18 years of age) with EC and presence of dysphagia and stricture that underwent nutritional interventions including feeding tube (FT) placement, esophageal stenting, or parenteral nutrition (PN). Temporal trends were examined with multivariate analysis performed for mortality, length of stay (LOS), and cost of hospitalization. A total of 509,593 EC patients had 12,205 hospitalizations related to dysphagia. The hospitalization rates doubled over the study period (1.52% vs. 3.28%, p esophageal stenting (13%), and PN (11%). PN was more frequently associated with a diagnosis of sepsis (6.1%, p = 0.023) compared to FT (2.5%) or esophageal stenting (1.8%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated FT and esophageal stenting had comparable mortality (OR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.49, 2.32); however, PN was associated with higher mortality (OR 2.37, 95% CI: 1.22, 4.63), cost of hospitalization ($5,510, 95% CI: 2,262, 8,759), and LOS (2.13 days, 95% CI: 0.72, 3.54). This study shows that hospitalizations for EC with dysphagia and related nutritional interventions are increasing. As a single modality, parenteral nutrition should be avoided. Among our esophageal stent and FT population, further studies are necessary to determine adequate interventions based on disease stage. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-01-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression

  16. Esophageal dissection and hematoma associated with obstruction in an Indian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phair, Kristen A; Sutherland-Smith, Meg; Pye, Geoffrey W; Pessier, Allan P; Clippinger, Tracy L

    2014-06-01

    A 42-year-old female Indian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus) developed a sudden onset of excessive salivation and dysphagia. Esophageal obstruction was suspected; possibly related to palm frond ingestion. Esophageal endoscopy revealed a mat of plant material in the distal esophagus. An initial attempt at relieving the obstruction was unsuccessful, but subsequent use of custom-made instruments along with insufflation and hydropulsion enabled partial removal of the material. Postimmobilization care included aggressive intravenous and rectal fluids, anti-inflammatory and antibiotic administration, and fasting. Despite treatment, the dysphagia persisted and the elephant was euthanized due to lack of improvement and grave prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed remaining plant material in the esophagus, complicated by an esophageal dissection, mural hematoma, and secondary bacterial infection. Iatrogenic trauma may have contributed to the extent of esophageal injury. Although treatment was ultimately unsuccessful, the supportive care employed could potentially aid recovery in cases of less severe esophageal trauma.

  17. Two cases of esophageal eosinophilia: eosinophilic esophagitis or gastro-esophageal reflux disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE and gastro-esophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE. Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders. In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts.

  18. VIDEOFLUOROSCOPIC SWALLOWING STUDY: esophageal alterations in patients with dysphagia

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    Betina SCHEEREN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Videofluoroscopic swallowing study is a dynamic exam and allows the evaluation of the complete swallowing process. However, most published studies have only reported alterations in the oropharynx and pharyngoesophageal transition, leaving the analysis of the esophagus as a secondary goal. Objectives The goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alterations in the esophageal phase thorough videofluoroscopic swallowing study in patients with dysphagia. Methods Consecutive patients with dysphagia who underwent videofluoroscopic swallowing study including esophageal analysis between May 2010 and May 2012 had their exams retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified into two groups: Group I - without a pre-established etiological diagnosis and Group II - with neurological disease. During the exam, the patients ingested three different consistencies of food (liquid, pasty and solid contrasted with barium sulfate and 19 items were analyzed according to a protocol. The esophageal phase was considered abnormal when one of the evaluated items was compromised. Results Three hundred and thirty-three (n = 333 consecutive patients were studied - 213 (64% in Group I and 120 (36% in Group II. Esophageal alterations were found in 104 (31% patients, with a higher prevalence in Group I (36.2%, especially on the items esophageal clearance (16.9% and tertiary contractions (16.4%. It was observed that 12% of individuals in Group I only presented alterations on the esophageal phase. Conclusion Evaluation of the esophageal phase of swallowing during videofluoroscopic swallowing study detects abnormalities in patients with cervical dysphagia, especially in the group without pre-established etiological diagnosis.

  19. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshitani, Takashi; Kuwata, Yoichiro; Kano, Kyoko

    1988-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma were treated by high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using specially designed balloon application at Hyogo medical Center for Adults. 32 patients were treated from January 1982 through July 1986. According to the stage of UICC (1978), 10 patients were classified into stage I, 7 into II, 13 into III and 2 into IV. Acturial 5 year survival rate was 17.9 % in all 32 patients and that of 23 patients who received radical radiotherapy was 24 %. Local CR rate was 66 %. However, since 9 (53 %) of 17 CR patients were relapsed, local control rate for 2 years was 25 %. Mild adverse effects were experienced in 9 (47 %) of 19 CR patients. Our balloon applicator was easily fixed, could have an adequate space from esophageal mucosa and clarify the tumor site by filling with 20 % gastrografin. It is concluded that high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation with our balloon applicator is an effective boost therapy and decline a lethal adverse effect in radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. (author)

  20. esophageal cancer: preliminary results

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    Afsaneh Maddah Safaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Dysphagia is a common initial presentation in locally advanced esophageal cancer and negatively impacts patient quality of life and treatment compliance. To induce fast relief of dysphagia in patients with potentially operable esophageal cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy was applied prior to definitive radiochemotherapy. Material and methods : In this single arm phase II clinical trial between 2013 to 2014 twenty patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (17 squamous cell and 3 adenocarcinoma were treated with upfront 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy, followed by 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. Results : Tumor response, as measured by endoscopy and/or computed tomography scan, revealed complete remission in 16 and partial response in 4 patients (overall response rate 100%. Improvement of dysphagia was induced by brachytherapy within a few days and maintained up to the end of treatment in 80% of patients. No differences in either response rate or dysphagia resolution were found between squamous cell and adenocarcinoma histology. The grade 2 and 3 acute pancytopenia or bicytopenia reported in 4 patients, while sub-acute adverse effects with painful ulceration was seen in five patients, occurring after a median of 2 months. A perforation developed in one patient during the procedure of brachytherapy that resolved successfully with immediate surgery. Conclusions : Brachytherapy before EBRT was a safe and effective procedure to induce rapid and durable relief from dysphagia, especially when combined with EBRT.

  1. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome.

  2. Doxycycline induced Esophagitis

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    Banu Karakus Yilmaz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis is a hazardous condition such as acid reflux of esophageal mucosa, infection, systemic diseases, radiation, drugs and trauma. Drug- induced esophagial injury (DIEI is a disease with the use of variety of drugs that caused serious damage and ulcer in the mucosa of the esophagus. The most commonly implicated drugs are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, chloride and especially antibiotics. Thirty-six year-old female patient presented to the emergency department with odynophagia during swallowing and complaining of retrosternal pain. One week before 100 mg doxycycline (2x1 PO for therapeutic abortion were prescribed. It was learned that in the third day of the initiation of medication, the patient\\'s symptoms began and stopped using drug by the fourth day due to advers effect of drugs, but her symptoms didn’t regressed although she didn’t use them. Endoscopy appointment was taken, proton pump inhibitor and antiacid treatment was given, than patient was discharged from the emergency department. In the endoscopy, 20 mm segment esophageal ulcer was seen approximately in the 30.th cm of the esophagius. DIEI is a relatively common, although under-recognized, so this case was presented for remainding DIEI to emergency medicine personals and reweiving its diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

  3. Comparative rate and risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture during different surgical procedures

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    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective – to identify the major risk factors leading to worse results of surgical treatment in patients with urethral stricture.Subjects and methods. Two hundred and forty-eight patients with urethral stricture underwent different surgical interventions: internal optical urethrotomy (IOU for strictures of different portions of the urethra in 157 patients (the operation was made once in 121 patients, twice in 24 patients, and thrice or more in 12; replacement urethroplasty using a buccal mucosa graft for strictures of the anterior urethra in 46 patients; Turner-Warwick’s anastomotic urethroplasty modified by Webster for strictures (distraction defects of the posterior urethra in 45 patients. The results of surgical treatment were studied using urethrography, uroflowmetry, urethrocystoscopy, the international prostate symptom score, quality of life (QoL questionnaire, and the international index of erectile function (IIEF questionnaire. The role of risk factors for postoperative recurrent urethral stricture was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses.Results. The rate of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU was 66.9 % (59.5, 87.5, and 100 % after the first, second, third or more subsequent operations, respectively; 12.1 % after all types of urethroplasty, 15.2 % after augmentation urethroplasty, and 8.9 % after anastomotic urethroplasty. The major risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU were recognized to be the location of urethral stricture in the penile or bulbomembranous portions, a urethral stricture length of > 1 cm, severe urethral lumen narrowing, and performance of 2 or more operations; those after augmentation urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, a stricture length of > 4 cm, lichen sclerosus, and smoking; those after anastomotic urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, smoking, and a stricture length of > 4 cm.Conclusion. The results of the investigation have shown that only

  4. Comparative rate and risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture during different surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective – to identify the major risk factors leading to worse results of surgical treatment in patients with urethral stricture.Subjects and methods. Two hundred and forty-eight patients with urethral stricture underwent different surgical interventions: internal optical urethrotomy (IOU for strictures of different portions of the urethra in 157 patients (the operation was made once in 121 patients, twice in 24 patients, and thrice or more in 12; replacement urethroplasty using a buccal mucosa graft for strictures of the anterior urethra in 46 patients; Turner-Warwick’s anastomotic urethroplasty modified by Webster for strictures (distraction defects of the posterior urethra in 45 patients. The results of surgical treatment were studied using urethrography, uroflowmetry, urethrocystoscopy, the international prostate symptom score, quality of life (QoL questionnaire, and the international index of erectile function (IIEF questionnaire. The role of risk factors for postoperative recurrent urethral stricture was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses.Results. The rate of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU was 66.9 % (59.5, 87.5, and 100 % after the first, second, third or more subsequent operations, respectively; 12.1 % after all types of urethroplasty, 15.2 % after augmentation urethroplasty, and 8.9 % after anastomotic urethroplasty. The major risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU were recognized to be the location of urethral stricture in the penile or bulbomembranous portions, a urethral stricture length of > 1 cm, severe urethral lumen narrowing, and performance of 2 or more operations; those after augmentation urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, a stricture length of > 4 cm, lichen sclerosus, and smoking; those after anastomotic urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, smoking, and a stricture length of > 4 cm.Conclusion. The results of the investigation have shown that only

  5. The Role of Esophageal Hypersensitivity in Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Ruffle, James K; Aziz, Qasim

    2017-02-01

    The Rome IV diagnostic criteria delineates 5 functional esophageal disorders which include functional chest pain, functional heartburn, reflux hypersensitivity, globus, and functional dysphagia. These are a heterogenous group of disorders which, despite having characteristic symptom profiles attributable to esophageal pathology, fail to demonstrate any structural, motility or inflammatory abnormalities on standard clinical testing. These disorders are associated with a marked reduction in patient quality of life, not least considerable healthcare resources. Furthermore, the pathophysiology of these disorders is incompletely understood. In this narrative review we provide the reader with an introductory primer to the structure and function of esophageal perception, including nociception that forms the basis of the putative mechanisms that may give rise to symptoms in functional esophageal disorders. We also discuss the provocative techniques and outcome measures by which esophageal hypersensitivity can be established.

  6. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Mediastinal Tumors Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Pleural Diseases Mesothelioma Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Overview The esophagus (ĕ-sof´ah-gus) is the hollow, muscular tube that moves food and liquid from your mouth to your stomach. If the ...

  7. Esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzinger, M A; Daneman, A

    1983-02-01

    The radiologic appearance of esophageal involvement due to eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 15-year-old boy is presented. The lower two thirds of the esophagus was narrowed and the peristalsis diminished. The mucosa appeared smooth. This is the fourth reported case of esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

  8. Advances in esophageal motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, André Jpm

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. RECENT

  9. Advances in esophageal motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, Andre J. P. M.

    Purpose of review Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. Recent

  10. Techniques and principles of endoscopic treatment of benign gastrointestinal strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Shayan; Kozarek, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    The fundamental goal of treating any stenosis is luminal enlargement to ameliorate the underlying obstructive symptoms. Symptoms depend on the etiology and the site of the stricture and may include dysphagia, nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, obstipation, or frank bowel obstruction. This article compares the various current technologies available for the treatment of gastrointestinal stenoses with regard to ease and site of application, patient tolerance, safety and efficacy data, and cost-benefit ratio. Recent studies indicate that gastrointestinal dilation and stenting have evolved to a point at which in many if not most situations they can be the first line therapy and potentially the final therapy needed to treat the underlying condition. Following techniques and principles in the management of gastrointestinal strictures would allow for the well tolerated and effective treatment of most patients with the tools currently available today.

  11. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  12. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G.

    2017-01-01

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esoph...

  13. LAPAROSCOPIC PLASTIC WITH PRIMARY STRICTURES OF THE URETEROPELVIC SEGMENT

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    N. V. Polyakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of indications for performing reconstructive and plastic surgical interventions in stricture of UPS is a difficult task. When making an incorrect decision, the treatment can be ineffective. Functional and anatomical preservation of the kidney can significantly affect the outcome of the operation.Purpose. Evaluation of the effectiveness of laparoscopic plastic surgery of stricture of UPS, depending on the anatomical and functional state of the ipsilateral kidney.Material and method. The results of treatment of 134 patients, who underwent for the period from 2012 to 2015 the different types of reconstructive surgical interventions for stricture of the pelvic-ureteral segment (Calp de Virde scrappy plastic surgery, Andersen-Heinz ureteropyelanastomosis, and antineoplastic ureteropyeloanastomosis, were analyzed. To analyze the effectiveness of the treatment, in the preand postoperative period, the following parameters were evaluated: the presence of pain syndrome, the presence of pyeloectasia, the functional state of the renal parenchyma (according to radioisotope renography, and the absence of recurrence of the UPS stricture.Result. The overall efficacy of laparoscopic UPS reconstruction was 94.7%. The results of treatment did not depend on the chosen technique of operative intervention. In this case, the effectiveness of the treatment was dependent on the initial deficiency of kidney function: the best results were seen in patients with kidney function deficiency of less than 25%, and the proportion of ineffective interventions was highest among patients with a deficit of more than 75%. The degree of dilatation of the pelvis in the postoperative period was also associated with preoperative indicators of kidney function deficiency, this may be due to the presence of cup-pelvis-plating system atony.Conclusion. Thus, the results of our work demonstrated the high efficiency of laparoscopic plastics of UPS. The effective- ness of

  14. [Results of anastomotic urethroplasty for male urethral stricture disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, B; Zeondo, C; Sow, Y; Sarr, A; Sine, B; Thiam, A; Faye, S T; Sow, O; Traoré, A; Diao, B; Fall, P A; Ndoye, A K; Ba, M

    2018-04-04

    To report our experience with anastomotic uretroplasty (AU) due to male urethral stricture disease (USD) and to identify factors affecting the results. We conducted a retrospective study over a period of 4 years and 6 months (July 2012 to December 2016). Any subsequent use of endoscopic urethrotomy or new urethroplasty was considered a failure. Forty-eight cases were included. The mean age of patients was 53.5±17.3 years (23-87 years). Urinary retention was the reason for consultation in 42 cases (87.5%). The most common localization of USD was the bulbar urethra (n=45). The mean length of USD was 1.23±0.62cm (0.5-3cm) with a median length of 1cm. The etiology was post-infectious in 56.3% of cases. More than half (58.3%) of patients had already undergone at least one urethral manipulation. After an average follow-up of 21.1±12.6 months (1 to 52 months), the overall success rate was 77.1%. In univariate analysis, length, cause and location of the stricture, age of patient, the presenting symptoms of the stricture, previous urethral manipulation and surgeon experience did not significantly impact on the success rate of anastomotic urethroplasty at one and two years follow-up. The AU had provided good results in our practice. The infectious origin of the stricture and previous urethral manipulation did not significantly impact the result of this surgical technique. 4. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. THE MINIMALLY INVASIVE METHODS OF TREATMENT OF ANTERIOR URETHRA STRICTURES

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    V. L. Medvedev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is to evaluate literature concerning different methods of treatment of anterior urethra strictures: internal optical urethrotomy (OIU, laser urethrotomy, urethra stenting, urethra dilatation, OIU in combination with selfdilatation, OIU combined with chemicals injection. Evaluation of expedience, advisability and reasonableness of the chosen methods and techniques. Hereby presented statistical assessment of longtime postoperative data, low efficiency researches analysis. This research is compiled using Medline, PubMed and Embase databases.

  16. Congenital Midureteric Stricture: Challenges in Diagnosis and Management

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    Raashid Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital midureteric stricture (MUS is a rare malformation. We report our experience with five cases seen over a period of 4 years from 2010 to 2014. Materials and Methods. The study was based on the retrospective analysis of five patients diagnosed as having MUS. Diagnosis was suspected after fetal ultrasonography (USG in one patient and magnetic resonance urography (MRU in four patients. Retrograde pyelography (RGP was performed on three patients. The final diagnosis was confirmed during surgical exploration in all the patients. Results. MRU was found to be a good investigation method. It showed the site of obstruction in the ureter in all instances. Intravenous urography detected proximal ureteric dilatation present in two of the patients. RGP delineates the level of stricture and the course of ureter, as shown in our cases. All patients had significant obstruction on the affected side. Four patients underwent ureteroureterostomy, all of whom had satisfactory results. In one patient, ureteric reimplantation was carried out due to distal small ureteric caliber. Conclusion. This rare entity is often misdiagnosed initially as pelviureteric junction obstruction. MRU is an excellent option for the anatomical location and functional assessment of the involved system. At the time of surgical correction of a ureteral obstruction, RGP is a useful adjunct for delineating the stricture level and morphology.

  17. Intraureteral metallic endoprosthesis in the treatment of ureteral strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daskalopoulos, George; Hatzidakis, Adam; Triantafyllou, Theodosis; Delakas, Dimitrios; Anezinis, Ploutarchos; Metaxari, Maria; Cranidis, Angelos

    2001-09-01

    Objective: We report our experience on intraureteral metallic stents placement for the treatment of malignant and benign ureteral strictures. Methods: Eight patients (six men and two women) with inoperable malignant or benign ureteral strictures, underwent insertion of metallic stents through percutaneous tracts. Six lesions (three malignant, three benign) involved ureterointestinal anastomoses after cystectomy for bladder cancer and ureteroileal urinary diversion or bladder substitution, and two malignant lesions involved the midureter. Self-expandable stents were used in seven cases and a balloon-expandable stent in the remaining one case. One stent was sufficient in seven ureters, and in one ureter, two overlapping stents were placed. Results: Metallic stents were inserted without technical difficulties in all obstructed ureters and patency was achieved in all patients. Ultrasonography revealed resolution of pre-existing hydronephrosis. The duration of follow-up was 6-17 months (mean, 9 months). One ureter was occluded 8 months after stent placement because of ingrowth of tumor and granulation tissue. The other ureters showed no signs of obstruction during follow-up. No major complications directly attributable to the metallic stent occurred. Conclusions: Our results suggest that insertion of a metallic stent in the ureter is feasible and safe for the treatment of benign or malignant ureteral strictures. However, more work needs to be done to establish the use of these stents for the treatment of ureteral obstruction.

  18. Management of Long-Segment and Panurethral Stricture Disease

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    Francisco E. Martins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-segment urethral stricture or panurethral stricture disease, involving the different anatomic segments of anterior urethra, is a relatively less common lesion of the anterior urethra compared to bulbar stricture. However, it is a particularly difficult surgical challenge for the reconstructive urologist. The etiology varies according to age and geographic location, lichen sclerosus being the most prevalent in some regions of the globe. Other common and significant causes are previous endoscopic urethral manipulations (urethral catheterization, cystourethroscopy, and transurethral resection, previous urethral surgery, trauma, inflammation, and idiopathic. The iatrogenic causes are the most predominant in the Western or industrialized countries, and lichen sclerosus is the most common in India. Several surgical procedures and their modifications, including those performed in one or more stages and with the use of adjunct tissue transfer maneuvers, have been developed and used worldwide, with varying long-term success. A one-stage, minimally invasive technique approached through a single perineal incision has gained widespread popularity for its effectiveness and reproducibility. Nonetheless, for a successful result, the reconstructive urologist should be experienced and familiar with the different treatment modalities currently available and select the best procedure for the individual patient.

  19. Anastomic urethroplasty in bulbar urethral stricture. 13 years experience in a department of urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Barranquero, F; Herrera-Imbroda, B; Yáñez-Gálvez, A; Sánchez-Soler, N; Castillo-Gallardo, E; Cantero-Mellado, J A; Julve-Villalta, E; Machuca-Santa Cruz, F J

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stenosis is a common disease in the clinical practice of urology, with a major impact on the quality of life of patients. The anastomotic urethroplasty is a technique with very precise indications usually membranous or bulbar urethra stenosis with a length of 3 cm or up to 7 cm when it is secondary to urethral disruptions (no stenosis) after pelvic trauma. We review anastomotic urethroplasty performed in our department between 2002 and 2015. A retrospective, descriptive and inferential analysis on 107 patients out of 482 treated with Anastomotic urethroplasty by urethral strictures at the Urology Department of the Hospital "Virgen de la Victoria" (Malaga) from January 2002 to September 2015, establishing effectiveness and safety of the technique, as well as factors that might influence the results. The main diagnostic method was retrograde urethrography and voiding cystourethrography in 100% of patients undergoing surgery, using voiding uroflowmetry for subsequent monitoring. The definition of success was a postoperative flowmetry with Qmax>15 ml/s, and in case of lower flow, we perform a cystoscopy to verify recurrence of stenosis or exclude other pathology. The median age was 42 years, with a mean follow up of 59 months. The length of stenosis valued by retrograde urethrography and voiding cystourethrography was in 91.6% of cases of >1 cm and urethroplasty was the initial treatment, followed in frequency by direct vision internal urethrotomy 9.3%. In the case of comorbidities associated with treatment with anastomotic urethroplasty it was observed that only Diabetes Mellitus had a tendency to statistical significance, with p=0.092, not demonstrating such significance in the case of hypertension or when the subject presented Diabetes Mellitus together with hypertension. Finally, the intervention was successful in 102 cases (95.3%), with only 5 cases (4.7%) where it failed, 4 of them treated with a new Anastomotic urethroplasty, with resolution of the

  20. Surgical tips and tricks during urethroplasty for bulbar urethral strictures focusing on accurate localisation of the stricture: results from a tertiary centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tricia L C; Venugopal, Suresh; Inman, Richard D; Chapple, Christopher R

    2015-04-01

    There are several techniques for characterising and localising an anterior urethral stricture, such as preoperative retrograde urethrography, ultrasonography, and endoscopy. However, these techniques have some limitations. The final determinant is intraoperative assessment, as this yields the most information and defines what surgical procedure is undertaken. We present our intraoperative approach for localising and operating on a urethral stricture, with assessment of outcomes. A retrospective review of urethral strictures operated was carried out. All patients had a bulbar or bulbomembranous urethroplasty. All patients were referred to a tertiary centre and operated on by two urethral reconstructive surgeons. Intraoperative identification of the stricture was performed by cystoscopy. The location of the stricture is demonstrated externally on the urethra by external transillumination of the urethra and comparison with the endoscopic picture. This is combined with accurate placement of a suture through the urethra, at the distal extremity of the stricture, verified precisely by endoscopy. Clinical data were collected in a dedicated database. Intraoperative details and postoperative follow-up data for each patient were recorded and analysed. A descriptive data analysis was performed. A representative group of 35 male patients who had surgery for bulbar stricture was randomly selected from January 2010 to December 2013. Mean follow-up was 13.8 mo (range 2-43 mo). Mean age was 46.5 yr (range 17-70 yr). Three patients had undergone previous urethroplasty and 26 patients had previous urethrotomy or dilatation. All patients had preoperative retrograde urethrography and most (85.7%) had endoscopic assessment. The majority of patients (48.6%) had a stricture length of >2-7 cm and 45.7% of patients required a buccal mucosa graft. There were no intraoperative complications. Postoperatively, two patients had a urinary tract infection. All patients were assessed

  1. Esophageal scintigraphy: Applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, M.K.; Byrne, P.J.; Keeling, P.; Hennessy, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia, scleroderma, esophageal carcinoma, Barrett esophagus, and reflux esophagitis. We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery. (orig.)

  2. Esophageal scintigraphy: Applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, M.K.; Byrne, P.J.; Keeling, P.; Hennessy, T.P.

    1988-06-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia, scleroderma, esophageal carcinoma, Barrett esophagus, and reflux esophagitis. We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery.

  3. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and esophageal motor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joachim H; Küper, Markus A; Königsrainer, Alfred; Brücher, Björn L D M

    2010-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is caused by transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in healthy individuals and in most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Refluxate is normally propelled by pharyngeally induced swallowing events, but TLESRs may also be accompanied by retrograde esophageal motor responses (EMRs). These contractions have not previously been investigated and their effect on esophageal clearance is not known. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of EMRs after TLESR in healthy individuals and GERD patients and to develop an animal model for further investigation of EMRs. The frequency of TLESRs and esophageal body contractions after TLESRs was assessed using ambulatory manometry in five healthy individuals and five GERD patients. An animal model was developed for reproducible provocation of TLESRs and subsequent EMRs. Patients with GERD have significantly more TLESRs than healthy individuals. However, post-TLESR EMRs were not more frequent in the GERD group. All post-TLESR EMRs presented as simultaneous contractions of the esophagus. The feline model allowed reproducible initiation of the esophageal motor response after TLESR, showing that EMRs can be induced by external mechanoreceptor stimulation simultaneously with LES relaxation. This experimental design imitates the conditions after fundoplication in humans. The study demonstrated that GERD patients have significantly more TLESRs in comparison with healthy individuals, but these were only incidental to EMRs. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of esophageal motility disorders. The animal model presented offers a feasible tool for investigating TLESR-induced esophageal motility.

  4. Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Presenting with Streptococcus intermedius Cerebral Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabih Nayfe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral abscess is caused by inoculation of an organism into the brain parenchyma from a site distant from the central nervous system. Streptococcus intermedius (S. intermedius is a commensal organism that is normally present in the aerodigestive tract and was reported to be the cause of brain abscesses after esophageal dilatation or upper endoscopy. Case Presentation. We report the case of a 53-year-old female who presented with hematemesis and melena followed by left-sided weakness. Initially, her hemiplegia was found to be secondary to a right thalamic brain abscess caused by S. intermedius. Investigations led to the diagnosis of a mid-esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. We hypothesize that the cause of the abscess with this bacterium that naturally resides in the digestive tract and oral cavity is secondary to hematogenous spread from breach in the mucosal integrity from ulceration due to the cancer. Conclusion. To our knowledge, our case is the first in the literature to describe a brain abscess caused by S. intermedius in association with a previously undiagnosed esophageal squamous cell carcinoma without any prior esophageal intervention.

  5. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis

  6. Esophageal diverticula and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbella, F A M; Dubecz, A; Patti, M G

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal diverticula are rare. The association of cancer and diverticula has been described. Some authors adopt a conservative non-surgical approach in selected patients with diverticula whereas others treat the symptoms by diverticulopexy or myotomy only, leaving the diverticulum in situ. However, the risk of malignant degeneration should be may be taken in account if the diverticulum is not resected. The correct evaluation of the possible risk factors for malignancy may help in the decision making process. We performed a literature review of esophageal diverticula and cancer. The incidence of cancer in a diverticulum is 0.3-7, 1.8, and 0.6% for pharyngoesophageal, midesophageal, and epiphrenic diverticula, respectively. Symptoms may mimic those of the diverticulum or underlying motor disorder. Progressive dysphagia, unintentional weight loss, the presence of blood in the regurgitated material, regurgitation of peaces of the tumor, odynophagia, melena, hemathemesis, and hemoptysis are key symptoms. Risk factors for malignancy are old age, male gender, long-standing history, and larger diverticula. A carcinoma may develop in treated diverticula, even after resection. Outcomes are usually quoted as dismal because of a delayed diagnosis but several cases of superficial carcinoma have been described. The treatment follows the same principals as the therapy for esophageal cancer; however, diverticulectomy is enough in cases of superficial carcinomas. Patients must be carefully evaluated before therapy and a long-term follow-up is advisable. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  7. MR urethrogram versus combined retrograde urethrogram and sonourethrography in diagnosis of urethral stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-ghar, Mohamed Abou; Osman, Yasser; Elbaz, Elsayed; Refiae, Huda; El-Diasty, Tarek

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) urethrogram versus combined RUG and sonourethrography (SUG) in diagnosis urethral stricture with evaluation of their impact in management choice. Material and methods: From March 2006 through February 2007; 30 male patients (mean age, 45 ± 18 years, range 15-75) with clinically suspected urethral stricture. All patients underwent RUG, SUG and MR urethrogram. Results: The final diagnosis of the 30 cases included in our study, after endoscopy and surgical management, was classified into two main groups either isolated stricture (20 cases) or associated with other pathologies (9 cases). There was one case with normal urethral caliber at endoscopy. For the anterior stricture the sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of RUG was 91%, 90% and 90%, respectively and for the posterior stricture it was 89%, 91.7% and 90%, respectively. At SUG, all cases of anterior were detected with 100% accuracy while for cases of posterior stricture, the overall accuracy was 60%. MR urethrogram diagnosed all the cases of anterior and posterior stricture with exact delineation of its length except one case of normal caliber was diagnosed falsely at MR as anterior short segment urethral with 100% sensitivity, 91.7% specificity and 95% overall accuracy. Conclusion: MR urethrogram has comparable results with the combined RUG and SUG in diagnosing the anterior and posterior urethral strictures as regard the site and extension and degree of spongiofibrosis but MR is superior in diagnosis of associated pathologies with stricture.

  8. A comparative study of ascending urethrogram and sono-urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar B.R.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To compare the efficacy of sono-urethrogram and ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. Materials and Methods In this prospective study 40 patients with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and suspected to be having stricture urethra were subjected to ascending urethrogram and sonourethrogram. The radiologist was blinded to the findings of ascending urethrogram. All the sonourethrograms were done by the same radiologist. The findings of sonourethrogram & ascending urethrogram were compared with the findings of cystoscopy and intra-operative findings. The specificity, sensitivity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value of each modality in the diagnosis of various urethral anomalies were estimated. Results The sonourethrogram identified stricture disease in all the patients who had abnormal ascending urethrogram. In addition, other abnormalities like spongiofibrosis, diverticula and stones which were not picked up in ascending urethrogram were diagnosed by sonourethrogram. The cystoscopic and intra-operative findings with respect to stricture length, diameter and spongiofibrosis correlated well with sono-urethrogram findings. 5 patients who had stricture in the ascending urethrogram were found to be having the normal urethra in sonourethrogram and confirmed by cystoscopy. Conclusion sonourethrogram is an effective alternative to ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. It is more sensitive in the diagnosis of anterior urethral strictures than posterior urethral strictures. It is superior to ascending urethrogram in the identification of spongiofibrosis, diameter and length of the stricture. The complications were lower in sonourethrogram group compared to ascending urethrogram.

  9. A comparative study of ascending urethrogram and sono-urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, B R; Tejus, Chiranjeevi; Madappa, K M; Prashant, Dharakh; Dhayanand, G S

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of sono-urethrogram and ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. In this prospective study 40 patients with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and suspected to be having stricture urethra were subjected to ascending urethrogram and sonourethrogram. The radiologist was blinded to the findings of ascending urethrogram. All the sonourethrograms were done by the same radiologist. The findings of sonourethrogram & ascending urethrogram were compared with the findings of cystoscopy and intra-operative findings. The specificity, sensitivity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value of each modality in the diagnosis of various urethral anomalies were estimated. The sonourethrogram identified stricture disease in all the patients who had abnormal ascending urethrogram. In addition, other abnormalities like spongiofibrosis, diverticula and stones which were not picked up in ascending urethrogram were diagnosed by sonourethrogram. The cystoscopic and intra-operative findings with respect to stricture length, diameter and spongiofibrosis correlated well with sono-urethrogram findings. 5 patients who had stricture in the ascending urethrogram were found to be having the normal urethra in sonourethrogram and confirmed by cystoscopy. sonourethrogram is an effective alternative to ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. It is more sensitive in the diagnosis of anterior urethral strictures than posterior urethral strictures. It is superior to ascending urethrogram in the identification of spongiofibrosis, diameter and length of the stricture. The complications were lower in sonourethrogram group compared to ascending urethrogram.

  10. [Surgical management of postoperative stricture of anastomosis after operation of intersphincteric resection for lower rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bing-qiang; Wang, Zhen-jun; Zhao, Bo; Wei, Guang-hui; Han, Jia-gang; Ma, Hua-chong; Zhao, Bao-cheng

    2013-07-01

    To study surgical treatment of postoperative stricture of anastomosis for lower rectal cancer. The data of 9 cases who were diagnosed as postoperative stricture of anastomosis after operation of intersphincteric resection for lower rectal cancer during January 2008 to June 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Transanal excision of stricture were used in 3 cases diagnosed as membranous stricture. Transanal radial incision of stricture were used in 5 cases diagnosed as tubulous stricture. Biologic patch was used to repair the defect of the posterior wall of rectum after excision of severe stricture in 1 case. All 9 cases of postoperative stricture of anastomosis were cured by surgery. Anal dilation were performed every day by patients themselves after discharge. Digital examination showed that 1 to 2 fingers could pass through the anastomosis after operation. The patient whose rectal defect was repaired by biological patch underwent colonoscopy examination two weeks after operation. Colonoscopy showed that the biological patch had been filled with granulation and integrated into the surrounding intestinal tissue. All patients defecated without difficulty and the anal function of all patients was good after restoration of intestinal continuity. Aggressive surgery, combining with the use of biological patch if necessary is an effective therapy of postoperative stricture of anastomosis for lower rectal cancer.

  11. Etiology and management of esophageal food impaction: a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretarsdottir, Helga M; Jonasson, Jon Gunnlaugur; Björnsson, Einar S

    2015-05-01

    Esophageal food impaction (FI) is a common clinical problem with limited information on incidence. Previous population based studies are lacking. The incidence, main etiological factors, recurrence and outcome of FI was determined in the present study in a population based setting. This was a study of consecutive adult patients who presented with FI from 2008 to 2013 at the National University Hospital of Iceland. The mean crude incidence rate of FI was calculated. Retrospective analysis was undertaken on relevant clinical data such as type of bolus, management, complications, recurrence rate, risk factors for recurrence, and outcome. Overall 308 patients had endoscopically confirmed FI, males 199/308 (65%), median age 62 years. The mean crude incidence was 25 per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The types of FI was meat (68%), fish (12%), vegetable (4%) and other food/objects (16%). Causes for the FI included: esophageal strictures (45%), hiatal hernia (22%), eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) (16%) and esophageal carcinoma (2%). Recurrence appeared in 21%, in which 24/48 (50%) had EoE vs. 40/260 (15%) in others (p = 0.0001). The removal of the foreign body was successful in 98% of the cases during the first endoscopy. Endoscopic associated complications included four (1.3%) aspirations, one (0.3%) esophageal perforation and one Boerhaave syndrome at presentation (both had EoE). The incidence of FI is the highest reported to date. EoE was strongly associated with recurrence of FI. In a population based setting endoscopy is a safe and effective procedure for removing FI.

  12. Safety of endoscopic removal of self-expandable stents after treatment of benign esophageal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halsema, Emo E; Wong Kee Song, Louis M; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Vleggaar, Frank P; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Shah, Pari M; Fleischer, David E; Ratuapli, Shiva K; Fockens, Paul; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Rando, Giacomo; Repici, Alessandro; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2013-01-01

    Temporary placement of self-expandable stents has been increasingly used for the management of benign esophageal diseases. To evaluate the safety of endoscopic removal of esophageal self-expandable stents placed for the treatment of benign esophageal diseases. Multicenter retrospective study. Six tertiary care centers in the United States and Europe. A total of 214 patients with benign esophageal diseases undergoing endoscopic stent removal. Endoscopic stent removal. Endoscopic techniques for stent removal, time to stent removal, and adverse events related to stent removal. A total of 214 patients underwent a total of 329 stent extractions. Stents were mainly placed for refractory strictures (49.2%) and fistulae (49.8%). Of the removed stents, 52% were fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMSs), 28.6% were partially covered self-expandable metal stents (PCSEMSs), and 19.5% were self-expandable plastic stents. A total of 35 (10.6%) procedure-related adverse events were reported, including 7 (2.1%) major adverse events. Multivariate analysis revealed that use of PCSEMSs (P stent removal. Favorable factors for successful stent removal were FCSEMSs (P ≤ .012) and stent migration (P = .010). No significant associations were found for stent indwelling time (P = .145) and stent embedding (P = .194). Retrospective analysis, only tertiary care centers. With an acceptable major adverse event rate of 2.1%, esophageal stent removal in the setting of benign disease was found to be a safe and feasible procedure. FCSEMSs were more successfully removed than self-expandable plastic stents and PCSEMSs. Adverse events caused by stent removal were not time dependent. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment results of chemoradiotherapy for clinical stage I (Taman) esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazunari; Murakami, Masao; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Okuno, Yoshishige; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Kusumi, Fusako; Takakuwa, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Satoru

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In 1991, we started a clinical prospective trial for operable esophageal carcinoma, foreseeing organ preservation, to assess the treatment results after definitive chemoradiotherapy (Crt) for clinical Stage I (Taman) esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Between 1992 and 2003, 63 patients were enrolled in this study. Tumor depth was mucosal cancer (T 1a) in 23 and submucosal cancer (T 1b) in 40. Crt consisted of 55-66 Gy/50-60 fractions (median, 59.4 Gy); from 1 to 3 cycles (median, 2) of concurrent chemotherapy (Cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil), followed by high-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy 10-12 Gy/2-3 fractions. Results: The 5-year overall and cause-specific and disease-free survival rates were 66.4%, 76.3%, and 63.7%, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific survival rates for T 1a and T 1b cancer patients were 85.2% and 70.0%, respectively (p = 0.06). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for T 1a and T 1b were 84.4% and 50.5%, respectively (p < 0.01). Esophageal fistula as a late toxicity occurred in 2 patients (G: 1; G: 1), and esophageal stricture requiring a liquid diet occurred in 2 patients. Pericardial effusion was observed in 3 patients. Conclusion: We confirmed that patients with Taman esophageal carcinoma had their esophagus preserved in 89.2% of cases after definitive Crt, and the survival rates were equivalent to those of previous reports of surgery

  14. Esofagitis necrosante aguda: análisis retrospectivo Acute esophageal necrosis: a retrospective case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramos

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la esofagitis necrosante aguda es una entidad rara. Se reconoce por el aspecto negro difuso del esófago a la endoscopia. Su incidencia e patogénesis se desconoce. Pacientes y métodos: se analizaron retrospectivamente 11 pacientes con esofagitis necrosante aguda desde el punto de vista de los datos clínicos, de laboratorio y endoscopicos en 2 años. Resultados: se analizaron las endoscopias realizadas a 3.976 pacientes, observándose esofagitis necrosante aguda en 11 pacientes. El estado nutricional era malo en 6 pacientes. La resolución completa de la esofagitis se observó en cuatro pacientes. Durante el seguimiento se observó una estenosis en un paciente y un nuevo episodio de esofagitis necrosante aguda en otro paciente. Siete pacientes fallecieron, pero esta elevada mortalidad parece deberse a las enfermedades de base y no es atribuible a las lesiones de la esofagitis necrosante. Conclusiones: la incidencia de esofagitis necrosante aguda en nuestra serie fue 0,28%. La esofagitis necrosante aguda tiene una elevada mortalidad.Background: acute esophageal necrosis has been considered a rare event. It is defined as the presence of diffuse dark pigmentation of the esophagus on upper endoscopy. Its incidence has not yet been established. The pathogenesis remains unknown. Patients and methods: a retrospective analysis of clinical, laboratory, endoscopic, and histological data, and of the clinical course of 11 patients with acute necrotizing esophagitis was carried out over a 2-year period. Results: among 3,976 patients who underwent upper endoscopy, 11 (0.28% with acute esophageal necrosis were identified. Nutritional status was poor for 6 patients. Complete resolution of acute esophageal necrosis without further recurrence was observed in 4. One stricture appeared during follow-up and other patient developed new-onset acute esophageal necrosis. Seven patients died, but no death was directly related to acute esophageal necrosis

  15. Hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes reduced in lower esophageal sphincter of patients with achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Zheng, Z; Wang, T; Zhao, C; Zhou, G; Jin, H; Wang, B

    2016-10-01

    The etiology of achalasia remains largely unknown. Considerable evidence reveals that the lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction is due to the lack of inhibitory neurotransmitter, secondary to esophageal neuronal inflammation or loss. Recent studies suggest hydrogen sulfide may act as an inhibitory transmitter in gastrointestinal tract, but study about hydrogen sulfide in human esophagus still lack. The aim of the study was to investigate if hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes could be detected in human esophagus and if the synthesis of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide could be affected in achalasia patients. Tissue samples in cardia, lower esophageal sphincter, 2 cm and 4 cm above lower esophageal sphincter were obtained from achalasia patients undergoing peroral endoscopic myotomy. Control tissues in lower esophageal sphincter were obtained from esophageal carcinoma patients. Expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in lower esophageal sphincter of achalasia patients and control were detected by immunohistochemical staining. In addition, expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase were compared among different parts of esophagus in achalasia patients. Compared with control, the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in lower esophageal sphincter of achalasia patients was significantly reduced (χ 2 = 11.429, P = 0.010). The expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase were lower in lower esophageal sphincter than that in 2 cm and 4 cm above lower esophageal sphincter, respectively (all P achalasia, which implicates the involvement of the two hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes in the pathophysiology of achalasia. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  16. Esophageal motor disorders: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Ibrahim; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight literature published during the last year in the context of previous knowledge. A number of novel techniques - high-resolution manometry, esophageal electrical impedance and intra-luminal ultrasound imaging - have improved our understanding of esophageal function in health and disease. Several studies address the function of longitudinal muscle layer of the esophagus in normal subjects and patients with motor disorders of the esophagus. Esophageal electrical impedance recordings reveal abnormal transit in patients with diffuse esophageal spasm, achalasia and patients with normal manometry. Loss of the mammalian Sprouty2 gene leads to enteric neuronal hyperplasia and esophageal achalasia. Several studies showed excellent long-term results of medical and surgical treatment of achalasia of the esophagus. For the first time, mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients are reported. Novel pharmacologic strategies in the treatment of reflux disease are highlighted. Several novel techniques, perfected during recent years, have improved our understanding of esophageal function and dysfunction. A number of important observations, reviewed here, provide important insight into the pathogenesis of esophageal motor disorders and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  17. Radiation induced esophageal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Endo, Mitsuo; Yamazaki, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was referred to us on Dec. 22, 1986 because of dysphagia and esophageal ulcer. She had a previous history of left radical mastectomy for breast cancer, followed by postoperative 60 Co irradiation to parasternal and supraclavicular regions with 50 Gy about 15 years before. UGIs and endoscopy showed a small ulcer surrounded by submucosal tumor-like protrusion in the esophagus at the thoracic inlet. Examination one month later revealed the ulcer which became larger despite medical treatment, now measuring 1 cm in diameter. Severe dysphagia continued. Right thoractomy and subtotal esophagectomy were performed on Jan 13, 1987. Histological examination revealed nonspecific ulcer, 5 cm in diameter, surrounded by fibrous granulation tissue. Proliferation of dilated capillary vessels was also seen in the bottom of the ulcer, the surrounding wall of which was free from remarkable infiltration of inflammatory cells. Based on these findings and previous medical history, the patient was diagnosed as having a postirradiation ulcer which appeared 15 years after irradiation. Dysphagia was considered due to esophageal dysfunction caused by severe fibrosis of the proper muscle layer. (author)

  18. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  19. Challenging surgical dogma in the management of proximal esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula: Outcomes from the Midwest Pediatric Surgery Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dave R; Gadepalli, Samir K; Downard, Cynthia D; Ostlie, Daniel J; Minneci, Peter C; Swedler, Ruth M; Chelius, Thomas H; Cassidy, Laura; Rapp, Cooper T; Billmire, Deborah; Bruch, Steven; Burns, R Carland; Deans, Katherine J; Fallat, Mary E; Fraser, Jason D; Grabowski, Julia; Hebel, Ferdynand; Helmrath, Michael A; Hirschl, Ronald B; Kabre, Rashmi; Kohler, Jonathan; Landman, Matthew P; Leys, Charles M; Mak, Grace Z; Raque, Jessica; Rymeski, Beth; Saito, Jacqueline M; St Peter, Shawn D; von Allmen, Daniel; Warner, Brad W; Sato, Thomas T

    2017-06-01

    Perioperative management of infants with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) is frequently based on surgeon experience and dogma rather than evidence-based guidelines. This study examines whether commonly perceived important aspects of practice affect outcome in a contemporary multi-institutional cohort of patients undergoing primary repair for the most common type of esophageal atresia anomaly, proximal EA with distal TEF. The Midwest Pediatric Surgery Consortium conducted a multicenter, retrospective study examining selected outcomes on infants diagnosed with proximal EA with distal TEF who underwent primary repair over a 5-year period (2009-2014), with a minimum 1-year follow up, across 11 centers. 292 patients with proximal EA and distal TEF who underwent primary repair were reviewed. The overall mortality was 6% and was significantly associated with the presence of congenital heart disease (OR 4.82, p=0.005). Postoperative complications occurred in 181 (62%) infants, including: anastomotic stricture requiring intervention (n=127; 43%); anastomotic leak (n=54; 18%); recurrent fistula (n=15; 5%); vocal cord paralysis/paresis (n=14; 5%); and esophageal dehiscence (n=5; 2%). Placement of a transanastomotic tube was associated with an increase in esophageal stricture formation (OR 2.2, p=0.01). Acid suppression was not associated with altered rates of stricture, leak or pneumonia (all p>0.1). Placement of interposing prosthetic material between the esophageal and tracheal suture lines was associated with an increased leak rate (OR 4.7, p24h were used in 193 patients (66%) with no difference in rates of infection, shock or death when compared to antibiotic use ≤24h (all p>0.3). Hospital volume was not associated with postoperative complication rates (p>0.08). Routine postoperative esophagram obtained on day 5 resulted in no delayed/missed anastomotic leaks or a difference in anastomotic leak rate as compared to esophagrams obtained on day 7

  20. Esophageal dilations in eosinophilic esophagitis: A single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ukleja, Andrew; Shiroky, Jennifer; Agarwal, Amitesh; Allende, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To diagnose the clinical and histologic features that may be associated with or predictive of the need for dilation and dilation related complications; examine the safety of dilation in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE).

  1. Severe complications caused by dissolution of latex with consequent self-disintegration of esophageal plastic tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löser, C

    2000-09-01

    A case of decisive material degeneration of an esophageal Celestin tube is described: a 50-year-old man with adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus received a Celestin tube for palliative endoscopic treatment and 8 months later presented with suddenly occurring complete dysphagia. Dissolution of the latex layer in the proximal as well as the distal part of the tube had caused self-disintegration of the Celestin tube and had liberated the monofilament nylon coil which completely obstructed the lumen of the tube. Endoscopic tube removal was only possible by careful attachment of a balloon catheter and peroral extraction after insufflation with contrast medium up to 5 atm. A Medline-based review of the literature revealed different but predominantly severe complications (perforation, hemorrhage, obstruction, and peritonitis) based on material fatigue of the latex layer in esophageal Celestin tubes. At least 6 months after placement of a Celestin tube, regular fluoroscopic controls should be performed to detect early disintegration of the tube. Indication for the placement of Celestin tubes in patients with benign esophageal strictures and longer life expectancy should be assessed very critically.

  2. Indications and interpretation of esophageal function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C Prakash; de Bortoli, Nicola; Clarke, John; Marinelli, Carla; Tolone, Salvatore; Roman, Sabine; Savarino, Edoardo

    2018-05-12

    Esophageal symptoms are common, and can arise from mucosal, motor, functional, and neoplastic processes, among others. Judicious use of diagnostic testing can help define the etiology of symptoms and can direct management. Endoscopy, esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM), ambulatory pH or pH-impedance manometry, and barium radiography are commonly used for esophageal function testing; functional lumen imaging probe is an emerging option. Recent consensus guidelines have provided direction in using test findings toward defining mechanisms of esophageal symptoms. The Chicago Classification describes hierarchical steps in diagnosing esophageal motility disorders. The Lyon Consensus characterizes conclusive evidence on esophageal testing for a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and establishes a motor classification of GERD. Taking these recent advances into consideration, our discussion focuses primarily on the indications, technique, equipment, and interpretation of esophageal HRM and ambulatory reflux monitoring in the evaluation of esophageal symptoms, and describes indications for alternative esophageal tests. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography for esophageal motility disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri; Gholamreza Hamsi; Tayeb Ramim

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-resolution manometer (HRM) of the esophagus has become the main diagnostic test in the evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The first step of the Chicago classification described abnormal esophagogastric junction deglutitive relaxation. The latest classification system, proposed...

  4. Esophageal tissue engineering: a new approach for esophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-12-21

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds

  5. Percutaneous balloon dilatation and long-term drainage as treatment of anastomotic and nonanastomotic benign biliary strictures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Jan Jaap; van Delden, Otto M.; van Lienden, Krijn P.; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Busch, Olivier R. C.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Laméris, Johan S.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effectiveness of percutaneous balloon dilation and long-term drainage of postoperative benign biliary strictures. Medical records of patients with postoperative benign biliary strictures, in whom percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) and balloon

  6. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... excluded usually include dairy, egg, wheat, soy, peanut, tree nuts and fish/shellfish. These diets have been ... minorities » IgE ab to minor milk proteins may identify the proteins that are relevant to eosinophilic esophagitis » ...

  7. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  8. Prevention of Esophageal Variceal Rebleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin-Ho Lo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate of rebleeding of esophageal varices remains high after cessation of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage. Many measures have been developed to prevent the occurrence of rebleeding. When considering their effectiveness in reduction of rebleeding, the associated complications cannot be neglected. Due to unavoidable high incidence of complications, shunt surgery and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy are now rarely used. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt was developed to replace shunt operation but is now reserved for rescue therapy. Nonselective beta-blockers alone or in combination with isosorbide mononitrate and endoscopic variceal ligation are currently the first choices in the prevention of variceal rebleeding. The combination of nonselective beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal ligation appear to enhance the efficacy. With the advent of newly developed measures, esophageal variceal rebleeding could be greatly reduced and the survival of cirrhotics with bleeding esophageal varices could thereby be prolonged.

  9. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. (Children University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium))

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  10. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to GERD medication Failure to thrive (poor growth, malnutrition and weight loss) When to see a doctor ... Originally, eosinophilic esophagitis was thought to be a childhood disease, but now it is known to be ...

  11. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as fatty or fried foods, tomato sauce, alcohol, chocolate, mint, garlic, onion, and caffeine, may make heartburn ... the waist up. Alternative medicine No alternative medicine therapies have been proved to treat eosinophilic esophagitis. Still, ...

  12. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2017-06-30

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus, absent contractility) and minor disorders of peristalsis (ineffective esophageal motility, fragmented peristalsis). The aim of this study was to review the current diagnosis and management of esophageal motility disorders other than achalasia.

  13. Understanding the sensory irregularities of esophageal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gregersen, Hans; Khan, Sheeba; Lelic, Dina; Lottrup, Christian; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms relating to esophageal sensory abnormalities can be encountered in the clinical environment. Such sensory abnormalities may be present in demonstrable disease, such as erosive esophagitis, and in the ostensibly normal esophagus, such as non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain. In this review, the authors discuss esophageal sensation and the esophageal pain system. In addition, the authors provide a primer concerning the techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of esophageal sensory function. Such technological advances, whilst not readily available in the clinic may facilitate the stratification and individualization of therapy in disorders of esophageal sensation in the future.

  14. Endoscopic Dilatation versus Oesophageal Stent in Benign Oesophageal Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadyanto Caputra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Oesophageal stricture is one of the causes of dysphagia. It is a condition in which the lumen of oesophagus is narrowed by fibrotic tissue in the oesophageal wall. It is usually caused by inflammation or any other cause that leads to necrotizing of tissue. It is mainly differentiated into benign or malignant. The aim of this article is to answer the clinical question on the effectiveness of oesophageal stenting compared to endoscopic dilatation in patient with benign oesophageal stricture due to ingestion of corrosive substances, who had undergone several endoscopic dilatations. Method: We conducted search of relevant articles using PubMed search engine to answer the clinical question. Keywords being used during the search process were: ("oesophageal stricture"[All Fields] OR "oesophageal stenosis"[All Fields] AND (("dilatation"[All Fields] AND ("stents"[MeSH Terms] OR "stents"[All Fields] OR "stent"[All Fields]. Results were further converged by adding specific filters, which were full text articles and clinical trial. Results: The chosen article was further appraised in order to identify its validity and eligibility to answer the clinical question. We chose to use CONSORT (statement to improve the quality of reporting of RCTs to facilitate the critical appraisal and interpretation of RCTs. Conclusion: Stenting was associated with greater dysphagia, co-medication and adverse events. No randomized controlled trials which compared biodegradable stents with other stents or with balloon dilatation was identified. Lack of adequately robust evidence for effectiveness and cost-effectiveness formed the rationale of this trial.

  15. Use of penile skin flap in complex anterior urethral stricture repair: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem, A.; Asghar, M.; Kiani, F.; Alvi, M.S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To present our experience of treatment of complex anterior urethral strictures using penile skin flap. Study Design: Descriptive, case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of urology Combined Military Hospital Malir Cantonment, Karachi and Armed Forces Institute of Urology, Rawalpindi from Jan 2012 to Feb 2014. Material and Methods: Total 18 patients with complex anterior urethral strictures and combined anterior and bulborurethral strictures were included. Patients underwent repair using Orandi or circularfacio-cutaneous penile skin flap depending upon the size and site of stricture. First dressing was changed after two days and an in dwelling silicone two way foleycatheter was kept in place for three weeks. Graft was assessed with regards to local infection, fistula formation and restricturing. Re-stricture was assessed by performing uroflowmetery at 6 months and 1 year. Ascending urethrogram was reserved for cases with less than 10 ml/sec Q max on uroflowmetery. Repair failure was considered when there was a need for any subsequent urethral procedure asurethral dilatation, dorsal visual internal urethrotomy, or urethroplasty. Results: Overall success rate was 83.3 percent. Of all the patients operated 1(5.6 percent) had infection with loss of flap, 3(16.7 percent) had urethral fistula and none had re stricture confirmed by uroflowmetery. Conclusion: In our study the excellent results of the penile skin flap both in anterior urethral strictures and combined anterior and bulbar urethral strictures are quite encouraging. It is easy to harvest and seems anatomically more logical. (author)

  16. Dorsal inlay buccal mucosal graft (Asopa) urethroplasty for anterior urethral stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Stephen D; Raup, Valary T; Brandes, Steven B

    2015-02-01

    Asopa described the inlay of a graft into Snodgrass's longitudinal urethral plate incision using a ventral sagittal urethrotomy approach in 2001. He claimed that this technique was easier to perform and led to less tissue ischemia due to no need for mobilization of the urethra. This approach has subsequently been popularized among reconstructive urologists as the dorsal inlay urethroplasty or Asopa technique. Depending on the location of the stricture, either a subcoronal circumferential incision is made for penile strictures, or a midline perineal incision is made for bulbar strictures. Other approaches for penile urethral strictures include the non-circumferential penile incisional approach and a penoscrotal approach. We generally prefer the circumferential degloving approach for penile urethral strictures. The penis is de-gloved and the urethra is split ventrally to exposure the stricture. It is then deepened to include the full thickness of the dorsal urethra. The dorsal surface is made raw and grafts are fixed on the urethral surface. Quilting sutures are placed to further anchor the graft. A Foley catheter is placed and the urethra is retubularized in two layers with special attention to the staggering of suture lines. The skin incision is then closed in layers. We have found that it is best to perform an Asopa urethroplasty when the urethral plate is ≥1 cm in width. The key to when to use the dorsal inlay technique all depends on the width of the urethral plate once the urethrotomy is performed, stricture etiology, and stricture location (penile vs. bulb).

  17. The Accordion Sign in the Transplant Ureter: Ramifications During Balloon Dilation of Strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriegshauser, J. Scott, E-mail: skriegshauser@mayo.edu; Naidu, Sailen G. [Mayo Clinic Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Chang, Yu-Hui H. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Biostatistics (United States); Huettl, Eric A. [Mayo Clinic Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to demonstrate the accordion sign within the transplant ureter and evaluate its ramifications during balloon dilation of strictures.MethodsA retrospective electronic chart and imaging review included demographic characteristics, procedure reports, and complications of 28 renal transplant patients having ureteral strictures treated with percutaneous balloon dilation reported in our transplant nephrology database during an 8-year period. The accordion sign was deemed present or absent on the basis of an imaging review and was defined as present when a tortuous ureter became kinked and irregular when foreshortened after placement of a wire or a catheter. Procedure-related urine leaks were categorized as occurring at the stricture if within 2 cm; otherwise, they were considered away from the stricture.ResultsThe accordion sign was associated with a significantly greater occurrence of leaks away from the stricture (P = 0.001) but not at the stricture (P = 0.34).ConclusionsThe accordion sign is an important consideration when performing balloon dilation procedures on transplant ureteral strictures, given the increased risk of leak away from the stricture. Its presence should prompt additional care during wire and catheter manipulations.

  18. Lymphogranuloma venereum: a rare and forgotten cause of rectal stricture formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craxford, Leia; Fox, Ashini

    2018-01-01

    Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is caused by L1, L2 and L3 serovars of Chlamydia trachomatis. The anorectal syndrome caused by LGV is often misdiagnosed as inflammatory bowel disease and may rarely lead to stricture formation. Recurrent stricture formation, despite adequate LGV treatment, has not to our knowledge, previously been reported.

  19. Management of complex urethral stricture disease: Algorithm and experience from a single institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Shau

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Complex urethral strictures can be managed by a variety of surgical techniques according to specific stricture locations. However, a careful postoperative follow-up for recurrences is mandatory, since ∼40% of patients undergoing buccal mucosal graft-augmented urethroplasties were expected to have additional procedures after the index urethroplasty.

  20. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography for esophageal motility disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-resolution manometer (HRM of the esophagus has become the main diagnostic test in the evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The first step of the Chicago classification described abnormal esophagogastric junction deglutitive relaxation. The latest classification system, proposed by Pandolfino et al, includes contraction patterns and peristalsis integrity based on integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4. It can be discriminating the achalasia from non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders. The aim of this study was to assessment of clinical findings in non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders based on the most recent Chicago classification. Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 963 patients that had been referred to manometry department of Gastrointestinal and Liver Research Center, Firozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April, 2012 to April, 2015. They had upper GI disorder (Dysphasia, non-cardiac chest pain, regurgitation, heartburn, vomiting and asthma and weight loss. Data were collected from clinical examinations as well as patient questionnaires. Manometry, water-perfused, was done for all patients. Manometry criteria of the patients who had integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4 ≤ 15 mmHg were studied. Results: Our finding showed that the non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders (58% was more common than the achalasia (18.2%. Heartburn (68.5%, regurgitation (65.4% and non-cardiac chest pain (60.6% were the most common clinical symptoms. Although, vomiting (91.7% and weight loss (63% were the most common symptoms in referring patients but did not discriminate this disorders from each other’s. Borderline motor function (67.2% was the most common, absent peristalsis (97% and the hyper

  1. Effect of Slip Time in Forming Neo-Esophageal Stenosis After Replacement of a Thoracic Esophagus With Nitinol Artificial Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xian-Liang; Liang, Jian-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Attempts have been made to investigate the effect of slip time of nitinol artificial esophagus for forming neo-esophageal stenosis after replacement of a thoracic esophagus with nitinol artificial esophagus in 20 experimental pigs. The pigs whose slip time was less than 90 days postoperatively had severe dysphagia (Bown's III) immediately after they were fed, and the dysphagia aggravated gradually later on (Bown's III-IV). The pigs whose slip time was more than 90 days postoperatively had mild/moderate dysphagia (Bown's I-II) immediately after they were fed, and the dysphagia relieved gradually later on (Bown's II-I-0). The ratios between the diameter of neo-esophagus in different slip time and normal esophagus were 25% (at 2 months postoperatively), 58% (at 4 months postoperatively), and 93% (at 6 months postoperatively), respectively. The relationship between nitinol artificial esophagus slip time and neo-esophageal stenosis showed a positive correlation. After replacement of a thoracic esophagus with nitinol artificial esophagus, the artificial esophageal slip time not only affected the original diameter of the neo-esophagus immediately, but also affected the neo-esophageal scar stricture forming process later on. The narrowing of neo-esophagus is caused by overgrowth of scar tissue. But there is the positive correlation between artificial esophagus slip time and neo-esophageal stenosis, so this can be a way of overcoming neo-esophageal stenosis by delaying slip time of artificial esophagus. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Stent migration following endoscopic suture fixation of esophageal self-expandable metal stents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ryan; Prabhu, Anoop; Fujii-Lau, Larissa; Shannon, Carol; Singh, Siddharth

    2018-02-01

    Covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are utilized for the management of benign and malignant esophageal conditions; however, covered SEMS are prone to migration. Endoscopic suture fixation may mitigate the migration risk of covered esophageal SEMS. Hence, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of endoscopic suture fixation for covered esophageal SEMS. Following PRISMA guidelines, we performed a systematic review from 2011 to 2016 to identify studies (case control/case series) reporting the technical success and migration rate of covered esophageal SEMS following endoscopic suture fixation. We searched multiple electronic databases and conference proceedings. We calculated pooled rates (and 95% confidence intervals [CI]) of technical success and stent migration using a random effects model. We identified 14 studies (212 patients) describing covered esophageal SEMS placement with endoscopic suture fixation. When reported, SEMS indications included leak/fistula (n = 75), stricture (n = 65), perforation (n = 10), and achalasia (n = 4). The pooled technical success rate was 96.7% (95% CI 92.3-98.6), without heterogeneity (I 2  = 0%). We identified 29 SEMS migrations at rate of 15.9% (95% CI 11.4-21.6), without heterogeneity (I 2  = 0%). Publication bias was observed, and using the trim-and-fill method, a more conservative estimate for stent migration was 17.0%. Suture-related adverse events were estimated to occur in 3.7% (95% CI 1.6-8.2) of cases. Endoscopic suture fixation of covered esophageal SEMS appears to reduce stent migration when compared to published rates of non-anchored SEMS. However, SEMS migration still occurs in approximately 1 out of 6 cases despite excellent immediate technical success and low risk of suture-related adverse events.

  3. Genetics of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottyan, L C; Rothenberg, M E

    2017-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, allergic disease associated with marked mucosal eosinophil accumulation. EoE disease risk is multifactorial and includes environmental and genetic factors. This review will focus on the contribution of genetic variation to EoE risk, as well as the experimental tools and statistical methodology used to identify EoE risk loci. Specific disease-risk loci that are shared between EoE and other allergic diseases (TSLP, LRRC32) or unique to EoE (CAPN14), as well as Mendellian Disorders associated with EoE, will be reviewed in the context of the insight that they provide into the molecular pathoetiology of EoE. We will also discuss the clinical opportunities that genetic analyses provide in the form of decision support tools, molecular diagnostics, and novel therapeutic approaches.

  4. [Clinical analysis of diagnosis and treatment on retro-esophageal space abscess].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ze; Zhong, Zhaotang; Liang, Minzhi

    2014-12-01

    To explore the clinical manifestations and treatments of retro-esophageal space abscess. The clinical data of 27 cases with retro-esophageal space abscess were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-one cases (77. 78%) were secondary to acute injury of esophageal meatus caused by foreign bodies. 2 cases (7. 41%)were secondary to old foreign body infection in retro-esophageal space, 3 cases (11. 11%) after secondary to pharyngeal abscess, and 1 case (3. 70%) was unknown to etiology. All patients were confirmed by sectional medicalimageology. Six cases(Conservation group, C group) were treated conservatively and 6 cases (Oropharyngeal incision group, OI group) were performed with oropharyngeal incision drainage. 15 cases(Extra-neck incision group, ENI group)were performed with extra-neck incision and vacuum sealing drainage. In C group, 6 cases were cured with conservative therapy and the average hospital stay was 15. 6 days. In OI group, 5 cases were healed with oropharyngeal drainage but aspiration pneumonia complicated with septic shock occurred in 2 cases, and 1 case dead from septic shock secondary to mediastinum and lung abscess. The average hospital stay was 18. 8 days. In ENI group, 15 patients were cured with extra-neck drainage without complication and the average hospital stay was 9. 5 days. The main causes of retro-esophageal space abscess are foreign body injury of upper esophagus and remnant of retro-esophageal space. Sectional medicalimageology can be of important value of diagnosis and treatment for displaying the retro-esophageal space abscess and other deep cervical fascia space sufficiently. Incision and vacuum sealing drainage via extra-neck is an effective therapy while oropharyngeal drainage is less effective and is not advocated as a primary treatment because of aspiration pneumonia complication . Conservative cure is a choice for patients without dyspnoea and background diseases, and it is necessary to recognize and treat severe complications early.

  5. Jejunal Gastric Heterotopia causing Multiple Strictures and Perforation Peritonitis- A Case Report with Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vani, M; Nambiar, Ajit; Geetha, K; Kundil, Byju

    2017-03-01

    Gastric heterotopias beyond the ligament of Treitz though rare, should be thought of in the differential diagnosis of polypoid lesions presenting with gastrointestinal bleed or obstructive symptoms especially in children and in the young. Here is a 24-year-old male with multifocal jejunal gastric heterotopias causing multiple strictures and perforation peritonitis. Patient presented with acute abdomen pain and an emergency laparotomy was performed revealing jejunum with multiple strictures and perforation, followed by jejunal resection. On gross examination polypoid mucosa was noted at the stricture sites which showed heterotopic gastric mucosa on microscopy. Jejunal gastric heterotopias are extremely rare with less than ten reported cases and those presenting with multiple strictures are even rarer. To our knowledge this is the second case of jejunal gastric heterotopia presenting with multiple strictures.

  6. Reoperation of Anastomotic Stricture after Oesophageal Atresia Repair: An Uncommon Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A L Azakpa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oesophageal atresia is a common malformation in which the survival rate in developed countries is around 90%, while its mortality remains very high in developing countries. Oesophageal stricture post-oesophageal atresia repair is traditionally treated by non-surgical approach. However, surgical resection of the oesophageal stricture may be necessary after the failure of dilations. We report one case of refractory oesophageal stricture post-EA repair in a 3-year-old girl, who underwent oesophageal atresia Type III repair at 11-day-old. We performed an end-to-end oesophageal anastomosis with tracheal oesophageal fistula closure by extra-pleural approach. The patient was lost to follow-up for 3 years. She was seen later for anastomotic oesophageal stricture with the failure of oesophageal dilatations. Surgical resection of oesophageal stricture was performed with end-to-end oesophageal anastomosis.

  7. Clinical outcomes of enteroscopy using the double-balloon method for strictures of the small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunada, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Hironori; Kita, Hiroto; Yano, Tomonori; Sato, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Miyata, Tomohiko; Sekine, Yutaka; Kuno, Akiko; Iwamoto, Michiko; Ohnishi, Hirohide; Ido, Kenichi; Sugano, Kentaro

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical outcome of enteroscopy, using the double-balloon method, focusing on the involvement of neoplasms in strictures of the small intestine. METHODS: Enteroscopy, using the double-balloon method, was performed between December 1999 and December 2002 at Jichi Medical School Hospital, Japan and strictures of the small intestine were found in 17 out of 62 patients. These 17 consecutive patients were subjected to analysis. RESULTS: The double-balloon enteroscopy contributed to the diagnosis of small intestinal neoplasms found in 3 out of 17 patients by direct observation of the strictures as well as biopsy sampling. Surgical procedures were chosen for these three patients, while balloon dilation was chosen for the strictures in four patients diagnosed with inflammation without involvement of neoplasm. CONCLUSION: Double-balloon enteroscopy is a useful method for the diagnosis and treatment of strictures in the small bowel. PMID:15742422

  8. Holmium laser urethrotomy for treatment of traumatic stricture urethra: a review of 78 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Manzoor; Lal, Murli; Askari, Syed Hasan; Hashmi, Altaf; Rizvi, Syed Adibul Hasan

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and long-term results of laser urethrotomy as minimally invasive treatment for traumatic stricture urethra. Between January 2006 and June 2008, 78 male patients were treated with Holmium Laser urethrotomy. 16 Fr urethroscope was used through which 600um laser fiber was introduced through side channel. Stricture was visualized and incised at 12 o'clock position with energy set at 1500-2000 MJ at pulse rate of 10-12. Two other incisions were given at 2 and 10 o'clock positions. Further ablation was done till 16Fr Foley's catheter was passed. Patients were followed in a stricture clinic. Patients age ranged from 15-73 years. All strictures were due to trauma, Road traffic accident in 40 (52%) post catheter trauma 4 (5%), fall as ride 27 (35%) and failed urethroplasty 7 (8%). Site of stricture was bulbar 57 (73%), bulbomembranous 16 (20%) and membranoprostatic 5 (2.5%). Length of stricture ranged from 0.8-2.5 cms. At 3 months follow-up, 60 (77%) patients remained catheter and symptoms free while 18 (23%) developed recurrence of stricture but at the end of 36 months follow-up success rate decreased to 47 (60%). Among those who developed re-strictures, 6 ( 7.6%) had 2nd sitting laser while 4 (5.1%) had urethroplasty, and others were on intermittent dilatation. Immediate complications were sepsis 10 (13%), extravasation 2 (4%), failed urethrotomy 2 (4%) and mild haematuria 3 (5.8%). Hospital stay ranged from day care to 3 days. Laser urethrotomy is minimally invasive and an effective treatment for short strictures in bulbarurethra. The recurrence rate is 40% in the long-term follow-up and is more commonly seen in completely obliterated strictures.

  9. Internal urethrotomy in patients with recurrent urethral stricture after buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Clemens M; Schmid, Marianne; Ludwig, Tim A; Kluth, Luis A; Reiss, Philip; Dahlem, Roland; Engel, Oliver; Chun, Felix K-H; Riechardt, Silke; Fisch, Margit; Ahyai, Sascha A

    2015-09-01

    To determine the success rate of direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU) in the treatment of short stricture recurrence after buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty (BMGU). Patients who underwent DVIU for the treatment of short, "veil-like" recurrent urethral strictures (urethroplasty database. Stricture recurrence was defined as maximum flow rate (Q max) <15 ml/s and a consecutively verified stricture in a combined retro- and antegrade voiding cystography or cystoscopy at a follow-up visit. The success rate of DVIU was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Univariable Cox regression analyses evaluated risk factors for stricture recurrence following DVIU. Forty-three patients underwent DVIU for short stricture recurrence after BMGU for bulbar (81.3 %), penile (14.0 %) and membranous (4.7 %) strictures. Relapse had occurred proximally to the buccal mucosa graft in 28 (65.1 %) and distally in 12 (27.9 %) patients, respectively. At a mean follow-up of 11.7 (±9.7) months, stricture recurrence was observed in 48.8 % of our patients. Stricture recurrence was significantly associated with weak urinary stream (9.3 ml/s vs. no recurrence 19.5 ml/s) and patient dissatisfaction (66.7 % vs. no recurrence 18.1 %; both p < 0.001). The overall success rate was 60.5 % 15 months after DVIU. The main limitations of this study are its retrospective design, the small sample size and the short follow-up. DVIU after BMGU showed a moderate success rate and therefore might be a viable treatment option in selected patients with very short strictures after BMGU. However, longer follow-up is warranted to prove long-term effectiveness.

  10. Management for the anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture: a 9-year single centre experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tuo; Liao, Banghua; Luo, Deyi; Liu, Bing; Wang, Kunjie; Liu, Jiaming; Jin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Therapy for anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture is difficult and controversial. This study aims to introduce a standard process for managing anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture. Patients and methods: 19 patients with anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture were treated following our standard process. Average (range) age was 52 (21-72) years old. In this standard process, anterior urethral stricture should be treated first. Endoscopic surgery is applied for anterior urethra stricture as a priority as long as obliteration does not occur, and operation for posterior urethral stricture can be conducted in the same stage. Otherwise, an open reconstructive urethroplasty for anterior urethral is needed; while in this condition, the unobliterated posterior urethra can also be treated with endoscopic surgery in the same stage; however, if posterior urethra obliteration exists, then open reconstructive urethroplasty for posterior urethral stricture should be applied 2-3 months later. Results: The median (range) follow-up time was 25.8 (3-56) months. All 19 patients were normal in urethrography after 1 month of the surgery. 4 patients (21.1%) recurred urethral stricture during follow-up, and the locations of recurred stricture were bulbomembranous urethra (2 cases), bulbar urethra (1 case) and bladder neck (1 case). 3 of them restored to health through urethral dilation, yet 1 underwent a second operation. 2 patients (10.5%) complaint of dripping urination. No one had painful erection, stress urinary incontinence or other complications. Conclusions: The management for anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture following our standard process is effective and safe. PMID:26064293

  11. Holmium laser urethrotomy for treatment of traumatic stricture urethra: A review of 78 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.; Lal, M.; Askari, S.H.; Hashmi, A.; Rizvi, S.A.H.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and long-term results of laser urethrotomy as minimally invasive treatment for traumatic stricture urethra. Methods: Between January 2006 and June 2008, 78 male patients were treated with Holmium Laser urethrotomy. 16 Fr urethroscope was used through which 600um laser fiber was introduced through side channel. Stricture was visualized and incised at 12 o'clock position with energy set at 1500-2000 MJ at pulse rate of 10-12. Two other incisions were given at 2 and 10 o'clock positions. Further ablation was done till 16 Fr Foley's catheter was passed. Patients were followed in a stricture clinic. Results: Patients age ranged from 15-73 years. All strictures were due to trauma, Road traffic accident in 40(52%) post catheter trauma 4(5%), fall as ride 27(35%) and failed urethroplasty 7(8%). Site of stricture was bulbar 57(73%), bulbomembranous 16(20%) and membranoprostatic 5(2.5%). Length of stricture ranged from 0.8-2.5 cms. At 3 months follow-up, 60(77%) patients remained catheter and symptoms free while 18(23%) developed recurrence of stricture but at the end of 36 months follow-up success rate decreased to 47 (60%). Among those who developed re-strictures, 6(7.6%) had second sitting laser while 4(5.1%) had urethroplasty, and others were on intermittent dilatation. Immediate complications were sepsis 10(13%), extravasation 2(4%), failed urethrotomy 2(4%) and mild haematuria 3(5.8%). Hospital stay ranged from day care to 3 days. Conclusion: Laser urethrotomy is minimally invasive and an effective treatment for short strictures in bulbar urethra. The recurrence rate is 40% in the long-term follow-up and is more commonly seen in completely obliterated strictures. (author)

  12. Role of tissue engineered buccal mucosa for treatment of urethral stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaddi S

    2013-10-01

    next challenge awaiting researchers in the urogenital tissue engineering field. Genitalia reconstruction is also possible with cell therapy. Engineered penile prosthesis can be reconstructed by culturing autologous chondrocytes which are seeded onto a Poly-glycolic acid scaffold and then implanting the scaffold into the corporal space of penis [6]. Microencapsulated Leydig cells in animal studies have been used to replace or supplement testosterone in testicular failure [7]. Cell therapy techniques are also used for treatment of urinary incontinence, vesicoureteric reflux by injecting cultured myoblasts or adipocytes [5]. The major limitation in engineering solid organs is the vascularisation of the regenerated tissue. Recent developments in angiogenesis research [8] may provide answer to this complex problem and accomplish the goal. Most of the research to date in urological tissue engineering is done in animals. Before these engineering techniques can be applied to humans, further studies need to be performed. Buccal Mucosal Epithelium for repair of the short segment urethral stricture: Urethral stricture is the narrowing of the lumen of the urethra which occurs as a terminal event secondary to many etiologies. Patients present with difficulty in voiding urine. There are endoscopic and open surgical reconstructive procedures to treat this disorder. Endoscopic treatment is often temporary and eventually results in recurrence of the disease. Many open surgical procedures have been described but none of the procedures offer permanent cure. The use of buccal mucosal grafts for stricture repair is in practice [9,10] with considerable success. However the donor site morbidity and complications like stricture recurrence with the present techniques [11,12] warrant the advent of novel techniques. The use of buccal mucosal cells which can be obtained by harvesting a 2mm x 2mm tissue bit compared to that of 5-6cm tissue usually harvested in conventional techniques for a graft

  13. Bile duct anastomotic stricture after pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chok, Kenneth S H; Chan, See Ching; Chan, Kwong Leung; Sharr, William W; Tam, Paul K H; Fan, Sheung Tat; Lo, Chung Mau

    2012-07-01

    Hepaticojejunostomy is a well-accepted method, whereas duct-to-duct anastomosis is gaining popularity for bile duct reconstruction in pediatric living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Biliary complications, especially biliary anastomotic stricture (BAS), are not clearly defined. The aim of the present study is to determine the rate of BAS and its associated risk factors. The study included 78 pediatric patients (duct-to-duct anastomosis during LDLT. The median follow-up period for the BAS group and the non-BAS group was 57.8 and 79.5 months, respectively (P = .683). Ten of the patients with BAS required percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage with or without dilatation for treating the stricture. Multivariable analysis showed that hepatic artery thrombosis and duct-to-duct anastomosis were 2 risk factors associated with BAS. In pediatric LDLT, hepaticojejunostomy is the preferred method for bile duct reconstruction, but more large-scale research needs to be done to reconfirm this result. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal ... What symptoms are displayed by a child with GERD? While GER and EER in children often cause ...

  15. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Esophagitis (EoE) (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology) Also in Spanish Latest News Eosinophilic Esophagitis May ... Pediatric and Adolescent Patients (American College of Gastroenterology) Topic Image Related Health Topics Eosinophilic Disorders Esophagus Disorders ...

  16. Esophageal Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of esophageal cancer has risen in recent decades, coinciding with a shift in histologic type and primary tumor location. Find evidence-based information on esophageal cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  17. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class II...

  18. Histopathologic profile of esophageal atresia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dUMAss Memorial Pathology, UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, ..... 2 Yokoi A, Nishijima E. Long-term complications of esophageal atresia. Nihon ... long upper esophageal pouch and short gap, associated with left congenital.

  19. Esophageal perforation during or after conformal radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haiyan; Ma Xiumei; Ye Ming; Hou Yanli; Xie Huaying; Bai Yongrui

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors and prognosis for patients with esophageal perforation occurring during or after radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 322 patients with esophageal carcinoma. These patients received radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal tumors, residual tumors after operation, or local recurrence. Of these, 12 had radiotherapy to the esophagus before being admitted, 68 patients had concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and 18 patients had esophageal perforation after RT (5.8%). Covered self-expandable metallic stents were placed in 11 patients. Two patients continued RT after stenting and control of infection; one of these suffered a new perforation, and the other had a massive hemorrhage. The median overall survival was 2 months (0-3 months) compared with 17 months in the non-perforation group. In univariate analysis, the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) being ≤ 70, age younger than 60, T4 stage, a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus, extracapsular lymph nodes (LN) involving the esophagus, a total dose > 100 Gy (biologically effective dose -10 ), and CRT were risk factors for perforation. In multivariate analysis, age younger than 60, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, T4 stage, and a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus were risk factors. In conclusion, patients with T4 stage, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, and those receiving a second course of RT should be given particular care to avoid perforation. The prognosis after perforation was poor. (author)

  20. Investigating Esophageal Stent-Placement Outcomes in Patients with Inoperable Non-Cervical Esophageal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Forootan, Mojgan; Tabatabaeefar, Morteza; Mosaffa, Nariman; Ashkalak, Hormat Rahimzadeh; Darvishi, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Background: Esophageal stent insertion in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer is usually accompanied with relatively high adverse symptoms and even mortality. The current study aims at investigating the outcomes of esophageal stenting in patients with inoperable non-cervical esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: The current descriptive-analytical research evaluates 25 patients with esophageal cancer. The stent was placed in esophagus based upon endoscopy analysis with or without fl...

  1. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Bonavina, Luigi

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is the most commonly diagnosed primary esophageal motor disorder and the second most common functional esophageal disorder. Current therapy of achalasia is directed toward elimination of the outflow resistance caused by failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax completely upon swallowing. The advent of minimally invasive surgery has nearly replaced endoscopic pneumatic dilation as the first-line therapeutic approach. In this editorial, the rationale and the evide...

  2. Urethroplasty for treatment of long anterior urethral stricture: buccal mucosa graft versus penile skin graft-does the stricture length matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mohamed M; Almogazy, Hazem; Mamdouh, Ahmed; Farag, Fawzy; Rashed, Elnesr; Gamal, Wael; Rashed, Ahmed; Zaki, Mohamed; Salem, Esam; Ryad, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the surgical outcomes of dorsal onlay urethroplasty (DOU) using buccal mucosa graft (BMG) or penile skin graft (PSG) and to assess the effect of stricture length in men with anterior urethral strictures. A prospective cohort included men with anterior urethral strictures between 2008 and 2015. Patients underwent DOU using PSG or BMG. Patients had urethrography and uroflowmetry at 0, 3, 6, 12 months, and urethroscopy when needed. Student's t test, Mann-Whitney U tests, and Pearson's Chi-square test were used for analysis. Sixty-nine patients (43 ± 14 year) were included, 31 received BMG, and 38 received PSG. Mean stricture length was 8 ± 3 cm, mean operative time was 145 ± 31 min, and mean follow-up was 56 ± 10 mo. Success rate was 87 % (90 % BMG vs. 84 % PSG, p = 0.4). Mean operative time was significantly shorter in PSG group (136 ± 29 min vs. 256 ± 58 min, p = 0.0005). Complications of grade I developed in 36 % (wound infection = 10 %, postvoiding dribbling = 18.8 %). Thirty of 69 patients (43 %) had strictures ≥8 cm, and 39 (57 %) had strictures <8 cm-success rate was equal for both subgroups (87 %). Mean blood loss, mean operative time, and incidence of postvoid dribbling were significantly lower in strictures <8 cm. BMG and PSG have comparable success rates in treatment of long anterior urethral strictures. Operative time is significantly longer in BMG. Long-segment strictures are associated with longer operative time, more blood loss, and more occurrence of postvoid dribbling. However, the length of the stricture has no influence on the success rate and functional outcomes of DOU.

  3. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope is a nonpowered device that is inserted into a patient's esophagus to...

  4. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F.

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis

  5. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. (Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  6. The Kagoshima consensus on esophageal achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triadafilopoulos, G.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Gullo, R.; Patti, M. G.; Pandolfino, J. E.; Kahrilas, P. J.; Duranceau, A.; Jamieson, G.; Zaninotto, G.

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by lack of peristalsis and a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax appropriately in response to swallowing. This article summarizes the most salient issues in the diagnosis and management of achalasia as discussed

  7. Feasibility study of corticosteroid treatment for esophageal ulcer after EMR in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Michitaka; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Hori, Yoshio; Shionoya, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Kazumichi; Nishizawa, Yuji; Kojima, Fumitsugu; Shigeno, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    Intralesional or systemic steroid administration is a promising strategy for the prevention of esophageal stricture after endoscopic therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of steroid therapy on the process of healing of defects in the esophageal mucosa after endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Nine beagle dogs were divided into three equal groups: group A, intralesional injection (n = 3), group B, peroral administration (n = 3), and group C, untreated control (n = 3). In group A, triamcinolone acetonide 1 ml (10 mg) was injected directly into the exposed submucosal layer immediately after EMR, and again on postoperative day (POD) 7. In group B, dogs were administered prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/day orally for 14 days after EMR. In group C, 1 ml normal saline was injected by the same method as that used for group A. On POD 28, histological examination was performed to evaluate epithelialization, inflammation, angiogenesis, and atrophy of the muscularis propria. In groups A, B, and C, the mean ulcer area was 50.1, 22.7, and 7.4 mm(2), respectively. The difference between groups A and C was significant (p < 0.01). Inflammatory cells were significantly more evident in the lesions of group A than in those of group C (p < 0.05). In all groups, atrophy of the muscularis propria was evident. However, transmural destruction and fibrosis were observed only in group A. It was speculated that the esophageal ulcer causes the fibrosis of the submucosa and atrophy of the muscularis propria during process of healing. Intralesional steroid injection deepened the esophageal ulcers and delayed epithelialization, whereas systemic administration did not clearly improve the lesion healing process.

  8. The Comparison Between the Complications after Two Surgical Techniques of Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Taghi Rajabi Mashhadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Esophageal cancer is a common gastro intestinal malignancy. One of the most common techniques of surgery in esophageal cancer is transhiatal esophagectomy with esophagogastric anastomosis in the neck. This technique is accompanied by complications like chronic gastero-esophegeal reflux and late stenosis. This study was designed to compare the risk of complications after two surgical techniques for esophageal cancer: esophagogastric anastomosis with partial fundoplication and esophagogastric anastomosis without it. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, 100 patients with distal two thirds of esophageal cancer who underwent transhiatal esophagectomy in Ghaem and Omid hospitals Mashhad University of Medical Sciences from 2005 to 2010 were included. Esophagogastric anastomosis to the posterior gastric wall was performed with a partial gastric fundoplication in the first group but simple routine anastomosis was done to the posterior gastric wall in the second group. Results: In a retrospective cohort study 100 patients entered the study with 59 male & 41 female and with a mean age 54.6±6.4 years. Squamous cell carcinoma was observed in 77% of the patients and adenocarcinoma was reported in 23% of them. Seventy-two percent of tumours were located in distal third and 28% were in middle third of esophagus. Esophagogastric anastomotic leakage was observed in 3 cases of fundoplication group and 7 cases of simple anastomosis technique (P=0.182 so there was no significant difference between the two groups. Benign anastomosis stricture was reported in one of the patients who underwent esophagogastric anastomosis with fundoplication, but it was observed in 8 cases with simple anastomosis technique (P=0.03 so there was a significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Esophagogastric anastomosis with partial fundal fundoplication is a safe technique with low incidence of anatomic leakage and late stenosis.

  9. Two Cases of Cerebral Air Embolism That Occurred during Esophageal Ballooning and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyeon Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral air embolism is an extremely rare complication of endoscopic procedure and often life threatening. We present two cases of cerebral infarction due to air embolization caused by an endoscopic intervention. The first case occurred during esophageal balloon dilatation for the treatment of a stricture of an anastomosis site in a 59-year-old man and the second case occurred during endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation in a 69-year-old man who had distal common bile duct stones. After the procedure, cardiopulmonary instability and altered mental status were observed in both patients, and cerebral air embolism was diagnosed in both cases. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was started in the first case, and high FiO2 therapy was applied in the second case. Although this complication is rare, patient outcomes can be improved if physicians are aware of this potential complication, and immediately begin proper management.

  10. Congenital esophageal atresia with tracheo-esophageal fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Chung Sik

    1970-01-01

    Three cases of esophageal atresia with tracheo-esophageal fistula. 1). Case 1: A female infant birth Wt. 1.95 kg , Apgar Score 10, Skeletal anomalies, was delivered after a pregnancy compeicated by hydroamnious on Aug. 17, 1970. The family history was not contributory. 2) Case 2: A male infant birth Wt. 2.8 kg , Apgar Score 8, was forcep delivered after a pregnancy on Feb. 8, 1970. This infant is twin. The family history was not contributory. 3) Case 3: A female infant birth Wt. 2.22 kg , Apgar Score 10, was C-section after a pregnancy on May, 16. 1970. The family history was not contributory. All cases: After 24 hours 5% glucose solution was given and immediately vomited and some of it regurgitating through the nose and mouth with associated cyanosis and dyspnea. A catheter was inserted through the nose into the esophagus under diagnosis of the esophageal atresia

  11. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Avi Lemberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE is an emerging disease characterised by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf, lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with TGF-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE.

  12. Single stage: dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using perineal route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Prabha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To assess the outcome of single stage dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures (>4cm long using a perineal incision. Materials and Methods From August 2010 to August 2013, 20 patients underwent BMG urethroplasty. The cause of stricture was Lichen sclerosis in 12 cases (60%, Instrumentation in 5 cases (25%, and unknown in 3 cases (15%. Strictures were approached through a perineal skin incision and penis was invaginated into it to access the entire urethra. All the grafts were placed dorsolaterally, preserving the bulbospongiosus muscle, central tendon of perineum and one-sided attachement of corpus spongiosum. Procedure was considered to be failure if the patient required instrumentation postoperatively. Results Mean stricture length was 8.5cm (range 4 to 12cm. Mean follow-up was 22.7 months (range 12 to 36 months. Overall success rate was 85%. There were 3 failures (meatal stenosis in 1, proximal stricture in 1 and whole length recurrent stricture in 1. Other complications included wound infection, urethrocutaneous fistula, brownish discharge per urethra and scrotal oedema. Conclusion Dorsolateral buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using a single perineal incision is simple, safe and easily reproducible by urologists with a good outcome.

  13. Direct visual internal urethrotomy for isolated, post-urethroplasty strictures: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elizabeth Timbrook; Mock, Stephen; Dmochowski, Roger; Reynolds, W Stuart; Milam, Douglas; Kaufman, Melissa R

    2017-02-01

    Urethroplasty is often successful for the treatment of male urethral stricture disease, but limited data exists on recurrence management. Our goal was to evaluate direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) as a treatment option for isolated, recurrent strictures after urethroplasty. We retrospectively identified male patients who underwent urethroplasty from 1999 to 2013 and developed an isolated, recurrent stricture at the urethroplasty site treated with DVIU. Success was defined as lack of symptomatology and no subsequent intervention. Comparative analysis identified characteristics and stricture properties associated with success. A total of 436 urethroplasties were performed in 401 patients at our institution between 1999 and 2013. Stricture recurrence was noted in 64 (16%) patients. Of these, 47 (73%) underwent a DVIU. A total of 37 patients met inclusion criteria and underwent 50 DVIU procedures at the urethroplasty site. A single DVIU was successful in 13 of 37 patients (35%). A total of 4 of 6 patients required a second DVIU (67%). Overall, 17 of 43 (40%) of the total DVIUs were successful after urethroplasty. Success did not differ by age, stricture length or location, surgical technique, radiation history, prior urethroplasty or DVIU, time to failure, or etiology. Post-urethroplasty DVIU for isolated, recurrent strictures may be offered as a minimally invasive treatment option. Approximately 40% of patients were spared further intervention.

  14. Endoscopic balloon dilatation of intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease: safe alternative to surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajlouni, Yousef; Iser, John H; Gibson, Peter R

    2007-04-01

    Endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD), a non-surgical treatment option for intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease, appears to be applied infrequently, possibly due to the perceived risk of perforation and early recurrence. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of EBD by a single endoscopist using a defined technique. The records of all patients with Crohn's disease in whom EBD was attempted over a 12-year period were examined to determine the rate of technical success, complications and outcome. A stricture was defined as that which prevented passage of the 14 mm diameter colonoscope. Technical success was defined as the ability to traverse the stricture postdilatation. Patients were selected on the colonoscopic appearance of the stricture and dilatation was performed using through-the-endoscope balloons. Antibiotics were given during and for 7 days postdilatation. EBD was attempted on 83 strictures (31 anastomotic and 52 primary) in 37 patients (15 males) and was successful in 75 (90%) of 31 patients. A single dilatation only was required in 21 patients who had a median follow-up of 20 months (range 6-122 months). Recurrent symptomatic stricture requiring dilatation (eight patients) or surgery (two patients) occurred 8 (1-112) months after the initial dilatation. The only complication occurred in one patient where an intra-abdominal fistula and abscess were probably related to the dilatation. EBD of intestinal strictures associated with Crohn's disease has a low complication rate and leads to prolonged clinical benefit. It should be considered as a real alternative to surgery.

  15. Balloon Dilatation of Salivary Duct Strictures: Report on 36 Treated Glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drage, Nicholas A.; Brown, Jackie E.; Escudier, Michael P.; Wilson, Ron F.; McGurk, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This paper describes the technique for balloon dilatation of salivary duct strictures and evaluates the clinical and radiographic findings in a consecutive series of 36 affected glands. Methods: Thirty-four patients (36 glands) had balloon dilatation of their salivary duct strictures performed under fluoroscopic control. They were evaluated immediately afterwards and at review by sialography. Results: In 36 cases attempted, 33 (92%) strictures were dilated. The immediate post-treatment sialogram was available in 28 cases, of which 23 (82%) demonstrated complete and four (14%) partial elimination of stricture. In one case the appearance was unchanged(4%). Review data (mean 6.8 months) were available on 25 glands: 12 were asymptomatic (48%), 12 (48%) had reduced symptoms and one (4%)failed to improve. Sialographic data were available on 21 glands: in 10(48%) the duct remained patent, in one (5%) the stricture was partially eliminated, in seven (33%) the strictures had returned and in the remaining three (14%) cases there was complete obstruction. Conclusions: Balloon dilatation is an effective treatment of salivary duct stenosis. In half the cases the stricture recurred but symptomatic improvement was achieved and maintained in the majority of cases

  16. Antegrade balloon dilatation and ureteral stenting for the benign ureteral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hyup; Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Man Chung

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the role of antegrade balloon dilatation and ureteral stenting in benign ureteral strictures. Percutaneous antegrade balloon dilatation was attempted in 46 patients with benign ureteral strictures. The underlying causes of the strictures were urinary tract tuberculosis in 20 patients, congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction in eight, ureteroneocystostomy or ureteroileostomy state in five, postoperative or post-extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy state for ureteral calculi in eight, ureteral injury during surgery in four, and retroperitoneal fibrosis in one. Antegrade balloon dilatation was performed with initial technical success in 43 patients but the procedure was aborted in the remaining three with urinary tract tuberculosis due to the failure in passing a guidewire through the stenotic lesions. Intravenous urograms obtained 4-76 months after the procedure showed improvements in 76% (13/17) with urinary tract tuberculosis, in 63%(5/8) with congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction, in 88%(7/8) with strictures associated with ureteral calculi, and in 100%(4/4) with iatrogenic ureteral injury. The results were relatively poor in strictures of the ureteral anastomosis(1/5) and in ureteral strictures associated with retroperitoneal fibrosis (0/1). Antegrade balloon dilatation of the urinary tract combined with ureteral stenting was an effective technique for the management of the benign ureteral strictures

  17. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgia Totonelli; Panagiotis Maghsoudlou; Jonathan M Fishman; Giuseppe Orlando; Tahera Ansari; Paul Sibbons; Martin A Birchall

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement.Various surgical techniques,such as gastric and colonic interposition,are standards of treatment,but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems.Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function.We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering,discuss its implications,compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future.Medline,Embase,the Cochrane Library,National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms:stem cell and esophagus,esophageal replacement,esophageal tissue engineering,esophageal substitution.Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information.All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed.Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation.When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality.Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration,whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit.Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds,but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution.Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds prior to implantation is a

  18. The relationship between erectile function and complex panurethral stricture: a preliminary investigative and descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Xie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate erectile function in patients with panurethral stricture after urethral reconstruction. Totally, 65 patients were enrolled. Different urethral reconstructions were performed according to the details of urethral strictures. The erectile function was evaluated before and after surgery. The length and location of stricture and duration from initial diagnosis to operation were recorded. The International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5 scores, the quality of life (QoL scores and the maximal flow rate were obtained before and 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. A significant improvement in QoL and maximal flow rate was observed 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery compared with those observed before surgery (P < 0.05. An impairment of erectile function was observed in patients with multi-site stricture 3 months after surgery (P < 0.05. Subsequently, these patients recovered 6 and 12 months after surgery. Three months after surgery, the IIEF-5 scores in patients with anterior urethral stricture were higher than those with multi-site stricture. Similar results were observed 6 and 12 months after surgery. No significant difference in age or duration from initial diagnosis to final operation was observed between patients with erectile dysfunction after surgery and patients with normal erectile function. However, a linear regressive relationship was detected between IIEF-5 scores and location of urethral stricture. Surgical reconstruction for treating panurethral strictures has limited effects on erectile function. The location of the stricture, particularly when extended to posterior urethra, was found to be associated with erectile function after surgery.

  19. Outcome of end-to-end urethroplasty in post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Akbar; Pansota, Mudassar Saeed; Rasool, Mumtaz; Tabassum, Shafqat Ali; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Saleem, Muhammad Shahzad

    2013-04-01

    To determine the outcome of delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty in blind post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra at our setup. Case series. Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Quaid-e-Azam Medical College/Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, from January 2009 to June 2011. Adult patients with completely obliterated post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra ≤ 2 cm were included in the study. Patients with post-prostatectomy (TUR-P, TVP) stricture, stricture more than 2 cm in size or patients of stricture with neurogenic bladder and patients with any perineal disease were excluded from the study. Retrograde urethrogram and voiding cysto-urethrogram was done in every patient to assess stricture length and location. Stricture excision and delayed end-to-end anastomosis of urethra with spatulation was performed in every patient. Minimum followup period was 6 months and maximum 18 months. There were 26 cases with road traffic accident (indirect) and 14 had history of fall/direct trauma to perineum or urethra. Majority of the patients (57.5%) were between 16 to 30 years of age. Twelve (30.0%) patients developed complications postoperatively. Early complications of wound infection occurred in 01 (2.5%) patient. Late complications were seen in 11 (27.5%) patients i.e. stricture recurrence in 7 (17.5%), erectile dysfunction in 2 (5.0%), urethrocutaneous fistula and urinary incontinence in one patient (2.5%) each. Success rate was 70.0% initially and 87.5% overall. Delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty is an effective procedure for traumatic posterior urethral strictures with success rate of about 87.5%.

  20. Outcome of end-to-end urethroplasty in post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Pansota, M. S.; Rasool, M.; Tabassum, S. A.; Ahmad, I.; Saleem, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the outcome of delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty in blind post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra at our setup. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Quaid-e-Azam Medical College/ Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, from January 2009 to June 2011. Methodology: Adult patients with completely obliterated post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra 2 cm/sup 2/ were included in the study. Patients with post-prostatectomy (TUR-P, TVP) stricture, stricture more than 2 cm in size or patients of stricture with neurogenic bladder and patients with any perineal disease were excluded from the study. Retrograde urethrogram and voiding cysto-urethrogram was done in every patient to assess stricture length and location. Stricture excision and delayed end-to-end anastomosis of urethra with spatulation was performed in every patient. Minimum followup period was 6 months and maximum 18 months. Results: There were 26 cases with road traffic accident (indirect) and 14 had history of fall/direct trauma to perineum or urethra. Majority of the patients (57.5%) were between 16 to 30 years of age. Twelve (30.0%) patients developed complications postoperatively. Early complications of wound infection occurred in 01 (2.5%) patient. Late complications were seen in 11 (27.5%) patients i.e. stricture recurrence in 7 (17.5%), erectile dysfunction in 2 (5.0%), urethrocutaneous fistula and urinary incontinence in one patient (2.5%) each. Success rate was 70.0% initially and 87.5% overall. Conclusion: Delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty is an effective procedure for traumatic posterior urethral strictures with success rate of about 87.5%. (author)

  1. Outcome of end-to-end urethroplasty in post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, A.; Pansota, M. S.; Rasool, M.; Tabassum, S. A.; Ahmad, I.; Saleem, M. S. [Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur (Pakistan). Dept. of Urology

    2013-04-15

    Objective: To determine the outcome of delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty in blind post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra at our setup. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Quaid-e-Azam Medical College/ Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, from January 2009 to June 2011. Methodology: Adult patients with completely obliterated post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra 2 cm/sup 2/ were included in the study. Patients with post-prostatectomy (TUR-P, TVP) stricture, stricture more than 2 cm in size or patients of stricture with neurogenic bladder and patients with any perineal disease were excluded from the study. Retrograde urethrogram and voiding cysto-urethrogram was done in every patient to assess stricture length and location. Stricture excision and delayed end-to-end anastomosis of urethra with spatulation was performed in every patient. Minimum followup period was 6 months and maximum 18 months. Results: There were 26 cases with road traffic accident (indirect) and 14 had history of fall/direct trauma to perineum or urethra. Majority of the patients (57.5%) were between 16 to 30 years of age. Twelve (30.0%) patients developed complications postoperatively. Early complications of wound infection occurred in 01 (2.5%) patient. Late complications were seen in 11 (27.5%) patients i.e. stricture recurrence in 7 (17.5%), erectile dysfunction in 2 (5.0%), urethrocutaneous fistula and urinary incontinence in one patient (2.5%) each. Success rate was 70.0% initially and 87.5% overall. Conclusion: Delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty is an effective procedure for traumatic posterior urethral strictures with success rate of about 87.5%. (author)

  2. Esophageal cancer in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samawi, Abdullah S; Aulaqi, Saleh M

    2014-03-01

    To document the age and gender distribution, histopathologic type as well as grading characteristics of Esophageal Cancer (EC) in Yemen. A case series. Department of Pathology, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Yemen, from January 2005 to December 2011. Three hundred twenty five cases of EC were included for review. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and the cases were categorized into Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC). Out of the 325 EC cases, 163 (50%) were SCC (females 67%, males 33%) and 158 (49%) were ADC (females 30%, males 70%). The rest of the cases were 2 adenosquamous carcinoma and 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The mean age, for SCC was 60 years while the mean age for ADC was 65 years. The peak incidence for SCC was found in the age groups of fifth and sixth decades for females and in fifth and seventh decades for males. The maximum number of patients with ADC was seen in sixth and seventh decades for both gender. Well-differentiated histological grading accounted for 247 (77%) for both genders and types. The moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated accounted, for 17% and 6% respectively. The EC in Yemen had a predominance of SCC in female patients and predominance of ADC in male patients which was usually of a well-differentiated grade.

  3. Esophageal cancer in yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samawi, A.S.A.; Aulaqi, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    To document the age and gender distribution, histopathologic type as well as grading characteristics of Esophageal Cancer (EC) in Yemen. Study Design: A case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Yemen, from January 2005 to December 2011. Methodology: Three hundred twenty five cases of EC were included for review. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and the cases were categorized into Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC). Results: Out of the 325 EC cases, 163 (50%) were SCC (females 67%, males 33%) and 158 (49%) were ADC (females 30%, males 70%). The rest of the cases were 2 adenosquamous carcinoma and 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The mean age, for SCC was 60 years while the mean age for ADC was 65 years. The peak incidence for SCC was found in the age groups of fifth and sixth decades for females and in fifth and seventh decades for males. The maximum number of patients with ADC was seen in sixth and seventh decades for both gender. Well-differentiated histological grading accounted for 247 (77%) for both genders and types. The moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated accounted, for 17% and 6% respectively. Conclusion: The EC in Yemen had a predominance of SCC in female patients and predominance of ADC in male patients which was usually of a well-differentiated grade. (author)

  4. Anastomotic Urethroplasty for an Obstructing Calculus Within a Bulbar Urethral Diverticulum and Urethral Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Banapour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old male with prior history of endoscopic urethral calculus removal presented to the emergency room with urinary retention and a palpable perineal mass. A CT showed a large calcification within the bulbar urethra. After multiple unsuccessful attempts at foley catheter insertion, the urology service was consulted. The patient was taken to the operating room where an obstructing urethral calculus with associated urethral stricture was visualized on cystoscopy. We present an exceedingly rare case of recurrent urethrolithiasis with associated urethral stricture managed with initial suprapubic tube and delayed primary end-to-end urethroplasty, excision of urethral stricture and urethral diverticulectomy.

  5. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction and ureteral strictures treated by simple high-pressure balloon dilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Geertsen, U; Nielsen, H V

    1998-01-01

    The long-term results of simple high-pressure balloon dilation in the treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) and ureteral strictures were evaluated. A total of 77 consecutive patients were treated: 40 had UPJO and 37 ureteral strictures. The etiology of the obstruction included...... years, success was achieved in only 25% of cases. There were no major complications. It was concluded that simple high-pressure balloon dilation is a safe and reasonably effective technique for the management of most ureteral strictures and congenital UPJO with symptom debut in adult life. Balloon...

  6. Benign rectal strictures managed with transanal resection--a novel application for transanal endoscopic microsurgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, G; Svensen, R; Ellensen, V S

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Six cases of management of rectal strictures by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) are described. METHOD: Patients are placed in the lithotomy - Trendelenburg position and the stricture is resected from 4-8 o'clock through the entire thickness of the fibrosis. The upper resection...... edge is mobilized including all layers of the rectal wall and the defect is sutured along the circumference. RESULTS: Satisfactory anatomical and functional long-term results were obtained in 5 of 6 patients. CONCLUSION: TEM resection of benign strictures is feasible in some patients and should...

  7. Application of Mitomycin C after dilation of an anastomotic stricture in a newborn with necrotizing enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Green

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is a common life-threatening condition in premature infants. Bacterial translocation, localized inflammation and subsequent perforation often require surgery for source control and definitive treatment. Small and large intestinal strictures may result from either creation of a surgical anastomosis or the disease process itself. Current methods to treat strictures include, balloon dilation and surgical resection with or without anastomosis. We report the diagnosis and surgical management of a premature infant treated for NEC, who developed an anastomotic stricture and was successfully treated with topical Mitomycin C after balloon stricturoplasty.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux after esophageal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Osamu; Yokoi, Hideki; Maebeya, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    By means of esophageal transit scintigram using 99m Tc-DTPA, 15 patients (13 esophageal carcinomas and 2 cardia carcinomas) were studied, in whom esophagogastric anastomosis was done according to the posterior invagination anastomosis technique we had devised. In all 8 patients with anastomosis at cervical region, gastroesophageal reflux was not seen on both scintigrams before and after meals, and the average pressure gradient of high pressure zone at anastomosis was 39.8 cmH 2 O. In 2 of 7 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, the scintigram before meals showed severe reflux. and the endoscopic findings showed diffuse and moderate erosion in the esophageal mucosa. The average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 6.5 cmH 2 O. In these 2 patients, the new fornix with a sharp angle of His was not formed. In the remaining 5 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, reflux was not seen on the scintigram before meals. However, in 2 of them, the scintigram after meal and endoscopic examination revealed mild reflux and mild esophagitis respectively. Furthermore in one patient very mild reflux was observed only on the scintigram after meals but the endoscopic findings showed the normal esophageal mucosa. In these 5 patients, the average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 17.0 cmH 2 O, which was significantly higher (p<0.01) than that in 2 patients with severe reflux and was significantly lower (p<0.01) than the mean value of high pressure zone in 8 patients with cervical anastomosis. In conclusion, it is presumed that the formation of a large fornix enough to store food and a sharp angle of His are important factors in maintaining an anti-reflux mechanism. The esophageal transit scintigram was proved to be an excellent technique in detecting and evaluating quantitatively gastroesophageal reflux. (author)

  9. Radiation Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, W. Y.; Suh, C. O.; Kim, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    63 patients who were irradiated with a goal of long term control among 101 patients with esophageal cancer seen during an 11 years period between Jan, 1970 and Dec, 1980 at Yonsei Cancer Center in Seoul, Korea have retrospectively analysed. 52(82.5%) among the 63 patients were confirmed to have epidermoid carcinoma in the histology. The actuarial 3 and 5 years survival rates of 17 cased of T1, esophageal cancer were 24.7% and 20.8%. Statistically, there was no significant difference in survival rate according to tumor location (p>0.05)

  10. Reflux esophagitis revisited: Prospective analysis of radiologic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    A prospective radiologic-endoscopic study of the esophagogastric region in 266 patients, including 206 normals and 60 with esophagitis, is reported. The endoscopic classification grading severity of esophagitis was grade 1-normal; grades 2. 3. and 4-mild, moderate, and severe esophagitis, respectively. Radiology detected 22% of patient with mild esophagitis, 83% with moderate esophagitis, and 95% with severe esophagitis. Although hiatal hernia was present in 40% of normals and 89% with esophagitis, absence of radiographic hiatal hernia excluded esophagitis with 95% accuracy. The implications of this study regarding the role of radiology in evaluating patient with suspected reflux esophagitis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  11. Contractile profile of esophageal and gastric fundus strips in experimental doxorubicin-induced esophageal atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A. Capeto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal atresia (EA is characterized by esophageal and gastric motility changes secondary to developmental and postsurgical damage. This study evaluated the in vitro contractile profile of the distal esophagus and gastric fundus in an experimental model of EA induced by doxorubicin (DOXO. Wistar pregnant rats received DOXO 2.2 mg/kg on the 8th and 9th gestational days. On day 21.5, fetuses were collected, sacrificed, and divided into groups: control, DOXO without EA (DOXO-EA, and DOXO with EA (DOXO+EA. Strips from the distal esophagus and gastric fundus were mounted on a wire myograph and isolated organ-bath system, respectively, and subjected to increasing concentrations of carbamylcholine chloride (carbachol, CCh. The isolated esophagus was also stimulated with increasing concentrations of KCl. In esophagus, the concentration-effect curves were reduced in response to CCh in the DOXO+EA and DOXO-EA groups compared to the control group (P0.05. In response to KCl, the distal esophagus samples in the three groups were not statistically different with regard to Emax or EC50 values (P>0.05. No significant difference was noted for EC50 or Emax values in fundic strips stimulated with CCh (P>0.05. In conclusion, exposure of dams to DOXO during gestation inhibited the contractile behavior of esophageal strips from offspring in response to CCh but not KCl, regardless of EA induction. The gastric fundus of DOXO-exposed offspring did not have altered contractile responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation.

  12. Esophageal Replacement for Long-Gap Esophageal Atresia in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    humility to know when to consider a replacement procedure (3). To replace the esophagus of a baby is a major decision in many pediatric surgical units world over. Fortunately, the need for this procedure has decreased in the recent years due to the increase in the variety of techniques of lengthening the upper esophageal ...

  13. Esophageal Dysmotility in Patients following Total Laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Maclean, Julia; Szczesniak, Michal; Bertrand, Paul P; Quon, Harry; Tsang, Raymond K; Wu, Peter I; Graham, Peter; Cook, Ian J

    2018-02-01

    Objectives Dysphagia is common in total laryngectomees, with some symptoms suggesting esophageal dysmotility. Tracheoesophageal (TE) phonation requires effective esophagopharyngeal air passage. Hence, esophageal dysmotility may affect deglutition or TE phonation. This study aimed to determine (1) the characteristics of esophageal dysmotility in laryngectomees, (2) whether clinical history is sensitive in detecting esophageal dysmotility, and (3) the relationship between esophageal dysmotility and TE prosthesis dysfunction. Study Design Multidisciplinary cross-sectional study. Setting Tertiary academic hospital. Subjects and Methods For 31 participants undergone total laryngectomy 1 to 12 years prior, clinical histories were taken by a gastroenterologist and a speech pathologist experienced in managing dysphagia. Esophageal high-resolution manometry was performed and analyzed using Chicago Classification v3.0. Results Interpretable manometric studies were obtained in 23 (1 normal manometry). Esophageal dysmotility patterns included achalasia, esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, diffuse esophageal spasm, and other major (30%) and minor (50%) peristaltic disorders. The sensitivity of predicting any esophageal dysmotility was 28%, but it is noteworthy that patients with achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) were predicted. Two of 4 participants with TE puncture leakage had poor esophageal clearance. Of 20 TE speakers, 12 had voice problems, no correlation between poor voice, and any dysmotility pattern. Conclusions Peristaltic and lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction are common in laryngectomees. Clinical history, while not predictive of minor motor abnormalities, predicted correctly cases with treatable spastic motor disorders. Dysmotility was not associated with poor phonation, although TE puncture leakage might be linked to poor esophageal clearance. Esophageal dysmotility should be considered in the laryngectomees with persisting dysphagia or

  14. Prevention of urethral stricture recurrence using clean intermittent self-catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, B; Walter, S; Bartholin, J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) on prevention of urethral stricture recurrence after internal urethrotomy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Of 55 men who were randomly selected, 43 completed the investigation. Of these, 21 patients performed CIC weekly for 1...... year following Sachse's operation for urethral stricture and 22 patients formed the control group after the same operation. All had an objective examination for urethral stricture every 2 months after surgery. RESULTS: Significantly fewer (P urethral stricture...... within the first postoperative year in the CIC group (n = 4) compared with the control group (n = 15). No CIC complications were seen, and patients who completed the CIC programme considered the method fully acceptable. CONCLUSION: Weekly CIC is a simple method of reducing the frequency of urethral...

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 genotype is associated with nonanastomotic biliary strictures after orthotopic liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Hove, W. Rogier; Korkmaz, Kerem S.; den Dries, Sanna Op; de Rooij, Bert-Jan F.; van Hoek, Bart; Porte, Robert J.; van der Reijden, Johan J.; Coenraad, Minneke J.; Dubbeld, Jeroen; Hommes, Daniel W.; Verspaget, Hein W.

    Background: Nonanastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) are a serious complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in connective tissue remodelling in chronic liver disease and complications after OLT. Aim: To evaluate the relationship between

  16. Long anterior urethral stricture: Reconstruction by dorsally quilted penile skin flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sayed Abdel-Kader

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Free penile skin flaps offer good results (functional and cosmetic in long anterior urethral stricture. Meticulously fashioned longitudinal, circular or spiral penile skin flaps could bridge urethral defects up to 15 cm long.

  17. Groove Pancreatitis with Biliary and Duodenal Stricture: An Unusual Cause of Obstructive Jaundice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gravito-Soares

    2016-05-01

    Discussion: Groove pancreatitis is a benign cause of obstructive jaundice, whose main differential diagnosis is duodenal or pancreatic neoplasia. When this condition causes duodenal or biliary stricture, surgical treatment can be necessary.

  18. Minimally invasive treatment of intrahepatic cholangiolithiasis after stricture of hepaticojejunal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varabei, Aliaksandr; Arlouski, Yury; Lagodich, Natalli; Arehay, Vitaly

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the study was to improve the results of treatment of patients with intrahepatic cholangiolithiasis for hepaticojejunostomy stricture with use of miniinvasive methods. In our centre during the period from 2002 till 2016 were treated in 58 patients with hepaticojejunostomy strictures. Thirteen patients from their was coexistant intrahepatic cholangiolithiasis. Forty-six (79.3%) patients was performed rehepaticojejunostomy. Twelve patients was performed a minimally invasive intervention such as laser recanalisation using double balloon enteroscopy (7 patients) and lithoextraction with double balloon enteroscopy (1), transhepatic cholangioscopy (2 patients) with laser lithotripsy (1), balloon dilatation of the stricture rehepaticojejunostomosis (4), lithoextraction (4), including with double balloon enteroscopy ("randevoux" procedure) (1), stenting (2). We observed several complication such as cholangitis (5); recurrent cholangiolithiasis (1); restricture of rehepaticojejunostomosis (2). Miniinvasive endoscopic techniques treatment and endobiliary correction of rehepaticojejunostomosis strictures and cholangiolithiasis have shown good results.

  19. Esophageal transit scintigraphy and structured questionnaire in patients with systemic sclerosis with endoscopically proven reflux esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Inaki, Anri; Hiramatsu, Takashi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Kinuya, Seigo

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal complications are common in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms and dysmotility was examined in endoscopically confirmed patients suspected of having reflux esophagitis. A total of 32 patients with limited and diffuse type SSc (lSSc, dSSc) were examined based on a structured questionnaire score (QS) of GER symptoms, retention fraction of esophageal scintigraphy at 90 s (R 90 ) and gastric emptying time. The QS was significantly higher in the reflux esophagitis group than in the non-esophagitis group (5.4±3.5, 1.4±2.9, P=0.003). When the non-esophagitis group was further divided into lSSc and dSSc groups, R 90 was higher in the reflux esophagitis group (31±18%) and the non-esophagitis group with dSSc (34±32%) than in the non-esophagitis group with lSSc (8±3%, P=0.02). Both high R 90 ≥15% and QS≥4 indicated reflux esophagitis. Conversely, both normal R 90 and QS indicated no reflux esophagitis. A combination of esophageal scintigraphy and structured questionnaire demonstrated different aspects of esophageal dysfunction, namely dysmotility and GER. Patients with high QS and dysmotility may be indicated for further evaluation including endoscopic examination and medical treatment.(author)

  20. Self-bougienage of oesophageal stricture by an 8-year-old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Mueller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oesophageal corrosive injuries have a high potential to result in stricture formation with the requirement for repeat oesophageal dilation. Especially in children, oesophageal bougienage is performed under general anaesthesia or strong sedation. In developing countries without comprehensive medical care, this service might not be available. We report the case of daily oesophageal self-bougienage performed by an 8-year-old Afghan child as highly effective treatment of recurrent oesophageal stricture formation after caustic substance ingestion.