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Sample records for esophageal sphincter relaxations

  1. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and esophageal motor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joachim H; Küper, Markus A; Königsrainer, Alfred; Brücher, Björn L D M

    2010-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is caused by transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in healthy individuals and in most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Refluxate is normally propelled by pharyngeally induced swallowing events, but TLESRs may also be accompanied by retrograde esophageal motor responses (EMRs). These contractions have not previously been investigated and their effect on esophageal clearance is not known. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of EMRs after TLESR in healthy individuals and GERD patients and to develop an animal model for further investigation of EMRs. The frequency of TLESRs and esophageal body contractions after TLESRs was assessed using ambulatory manometry in five healthy individuals and five GERD patients. An animal model was developed for reproducible provocation of TLESRs and subsequent EMRs. Patients with GERD have significantly more TLESRs than healthy individuals. However, post-TLESR EMRs were not more frequent in the GERD group. All post-TLESR EMRs presented as simultaneous contractions of the esophagus. The feline model allowed reproducible initiation of the esophageal motor response after TLESR, showing that EMRs can be induced by external mechanoreceptor stimulation simultaneously with LES relaxation. This experimental design imitates the conditions after fundoplication in humans. The study demonstrated that GERD patients have significantly more TLESRs in comparison with healthy individuals, but these were only incidental to EMRs. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of esophageal motility disorders. The animal model presented offers a feasible tool for investigating TLESR-induced esophageal motility.

  2. Is glutamate involved in transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, D. P.; Tytgat, G. N. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate is an important excitatory amino acid and plays a major role in brain stem neurotransmission. Although the effect of glutamate on esophaoreal motility is well studied, its role in the triggering of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) remains to be determined.

  3. [Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and the related esophageal motor activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Hyo; Hong, Su Jin

    2012-03-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR) is defined as LES relaxation without a swallow. TLESRs are observed in both of the normal individuals and the patients with gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD). However, TLESR is widely considered as the major mechanism of the GERD. The new equipments such as high resolution manometry and impedance pH study is helped to understand of TLESR and the related esophageal motor activities. The strong longitudinal muscle contraction was observed during development of TLESR. Most of TLESRs are terminated by TLESR related motor events such as primary peristalsis and secondary contractions. The majority of TLESRs are associated with gastroesophageal reflux. Upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contraction is mainly associated with liquid reflux during recumbent position and UES relaxation predominantly related with air reflux during upright position. The frequency of TLESR in GERD patients seems to be not different compared to normal individuals, but the refluxate of GERD patients tend to be more acidic during TLESR.

  4. Objective definition and detection of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation revisited: is there room for improvement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holloway, R. H.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.; Penagini, R.; Sifrm, D. A.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The advent of drugs that inhibit transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR) necessitates accurate identification and scoring. We assessed the intra-and inter-assessor variability of the existing objective criteria for TLESR, improving them where necessary. Methods Two 3-h

  5. Subtle lower esophageal sphincter relaxation abnormalities in patients with unexplained esophageal dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, T. V. K.; van Hoeij, F. B.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a relatively common symptom. We aimed to evaluate whether subtle, presently not acknowledged forms of dysfunction of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could explain dysphagia in a subset of patients with normal findings at high-resolution manometry (HRM) according to the

  6. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography is superior to conventional sleeve manometry for the detection of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations associated with a reflux event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O. A.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.; Hirsch, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are the main mechanism underlying gastro-esophageal reflux and are detected during manometric studies using well defined criteria. Recently, high-resolution esophageal pressure topography (HREPT) has been introduced and is now considered as

  7. Radiographic and manometric correlation in achalasia with apparent lower esophageal sphincter relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Richter, J.E.; Chen, Y.M.; Wu, W.C.; Gelfand, D.W.; Castell, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors compared the clinical, radiographic, and manometric findings in ten patients with atypical achalasia showing complete but short-duration lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation with findings in 39 patients with classic achalasia. Patients with atypical achalasia were younger, had dysphagia and weight loss of shorter duration, and had less esophageal dilation than patients with classic achalesia. LES pressure and esophagogastric junction caliber, however, were similar in the two groups. The majority of patients in both groups responded well to pneumatic dilation. They conclude that achalasia with apparent LES relaxation may represent an early form of this motor disorder and that the radiographic findings remain characteristic except for less dilation of the esophagus

  8. Validation of criteria for the definition of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations using high-resolution manometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, S; Holloway, R; Keller, J; Herbella, F; Zerbib, F; Xiao, Y; Bernard, L; Bredenoord, A J; Bruley des Varannes, S; Chen, M; Fox, M; Kahrilas, P J; Mittal, R K; Penagini, R; Savarino, E; Sifrim, D; Wu, J; Decullier, E; Pandolfino, J E; Mion, F

    2017-02-01

    Criteria for transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are well-defined for Dentsleeve manometry. As high-resolution manometry (HRM) is now the gold standard to assess esophageal motility, our aim was to propose a consensus definition of TLESRs using HRM. Postprandial esophageal HRM combined with impedance was performed in 10 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations identification was performed by 17 experts using a Delphi process. Four investigators then characterized TLESR candidates that achieved 100% agreement (TLESR events) and those that achieved less than 25% agreement (non-events) after the third round. Logistic regression and decision tree analysis were used to define optimal diagnostic criteria. All diagnostic criteria were more frequently encountered in the 57 TLESR events than in the 52 non-events. Crural diaphragm (CD) inhibition and LES relaxation duration >10 seconds had the highest predictive value to identify TLESR. Based on decision tree analysis, reflux on impedance, esophageal shortening, common cavity, upper esophageal sphincter relaxation without swallow and secondary peristalsis were alternate diagnostic criteria. Using HRM, TLESR might be defined as LES relaxation occurring in absence of swallowing, lasting more than 10 seconds and associated with CD inhibition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage decreases lower esophageal sphincter pressure and increases frequency of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Akash; Meshram, Megha; Gopan, Amrit; Ganjewar, Vaibhav; Kumar, Praveen; Bhatia, Shobna J

    2012-06-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (tLESR) and decreased basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure are postulated mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). There is conflicting evidence on the effect of carbonated drinks on lower esophageal sphincter function. This study was conducted to assess the effect of a carbonated beverage on tLESR and LES pressure. High resolution manometry tracings (16 channel water-perfused, Trace 1.2, Hebbard, Australia) were obtained in 18 healthy volunteers (6 men) for 30 min each at baseline, and after 200 mL of chilled potable water and 200 mL of chilled carbonated cola drink (Pepsi [Pepsico India Ltd]). The sequence of administration of the drinks was determined by random number method generated by a computer. The analysis of tracings was done using TRACE 1.2 software by a physician who was unaware of the sequence of administration of fluids. The mean (SD) age of the participant was 37.3 (12.9) years. The median (range) frequency of tLESr was higher after the carbonated beverage (10.5 [0-26]) as compared to baseline (0 [0-3], p = 0.005) as well as after water (1 [0-14], p = 0.010). The LES pressure decreased after ingestion of the carbonated beverage (18.5 [11-37] mmHg) compared to baseline (40.5 [25-66] mmHg, p = 0.0001) and after water (34 [15-67] mmHg, p = 0.003). Gastric pressure was not different in the three groups. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage increases tLESr and lowers LES pressure in healthy subjects.

  10. Increase of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation associated with cascade stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Akiyo; Kusano, Motoyasu; Hosaka, Hiroko; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Kawamura, Osamu; Akiyama, Junichi; Yamada, Masanobu; Akuzawa, Masako

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that cascade stomach was associated with reflux symptoms and esophagitis. Delayed gastric emptying has been believed to initiate transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR). We hypothesized that cascade stomach may be associated with frequent TLESR with delayed gastric emptying. Eleven subjects with cascade stomach and 11 subjects without cascade stomach were enrolled. Postprandial gastroesophageal manometry and gastric emptying using a continuous 13C breath system were measured simultaneously after a liquid test meal. TLESR events were counted in early period (0–60 min), late period (60–120 min), and total monitoring period. Three parameters of gastric emptying were calculated: the half emptying time, lag time, and gastric emptying coefficient. The median frequency of TLESR events in the cascade stomach and non-cascade stomach groups was 6.0 (median), 4.6 (interquartile range) vs 5.0, 3.0 in the early period, 5.0, 3.2 vs 3.0, 1.8 in the late period, and 10.0, 6.2 vs 8.0, 5.0 in the total monitoring period. TLESR events were significantly more frequent in the cascade stomach group during the late and total monitoring periods. In contrast, gastric emptying parameters showed no significant differences between the two groups. We concluded that TLESR events were significantly more frequent in persons with cascade stomach without delayed gastric emptying. PMID:28584403

  11. THE PARTICIPATION OF THE NITRERGIC PATHWAY IN INCREASED RATE OF TRANSITORY RELAXATION OF LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER INDUCED BY RECTAL DISTENSION IN DOGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Santos PALHETA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context The rectal distension in dogs increases the rate of transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation considered the main factor causing gastroesophageal reflux. Objectives The aim of this study was evaluate the participation of the nitrergic pathway in the increased transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation rate induced by rectal distension in anesthetized dogs. Methods Male mongrel dogs (n = 21, weighing 10-15 kg, were fasted for 12 hours, with water ad libitum. Thereafter, they were anesthetized (ketamine 10 mg.Kg-1 + xylazine 20 mg.Kg-1, so as to carry out the esophageal motility evaluation protocol during 120 min. After a 30-minute basal period, the animals were randomly intravenous treated whith: saline solution 0.15M (1ml.Kg-1, L-NAME (3 mg.Kg-1, L-NAME (3 mg.Kg-1 + L-Arginine (200 mg.Kg-1, glibenclamide (1 mg.Kg-1 or methylene blue (3 mg.Kg-1. Forty-five min after these pre-treatments, the rectum was distended (rectal distension, 5 mL.Kg-1 or not (control with a latex balloon, with changes in the esophageal motility recorded over 45 min. Data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Student Newman-Keuls test. Results In comparison to the respective control group, rectal distension induces an increase in transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Pre-treatment with L-NAME or methylene blue prevents (P<0.05 this phenomenon, which is reversible by L-Arginine plus L-NAME. However, pretreating with glibenclamide failed to abolish this process. Conclusions Therefore, these experiments suggested, that rectal distension increases transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in dogs via through nitrergic pathways.

  12. Failed Deglutitive Upper Esophageal Sphincter Relaxation Is a Risk Factor for Aspiration in Stroke Patients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taeheon; Park, Jung Ho; Sohn, Chongil; Yoon, Kyung Jae; Lee, Yong-Taek; Park, Jung Hwan; Jung, Il Seok

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims We attempted to examine the relationship between abnormal findings on high-resolution manometry (HRM) and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) of the pharynx and upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and to identify the risk factors for aspiration. Methods We performed VFSS and HRM on the same day in 36 ischemic stroke patients (mean age, 67.5 years) with dysphagia. Pressure (basal, median intra bolus, and nadir), relaxation time interval of the UES, and mesopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal contractility (as a contractile integral) were examined using HRM. The parameters of VFSS were vallecular residue, pyriform sinus residue, vallecular overflow, penetration, and aspiration. The association between the parameters of VFSS and HRM was analyzed by the Student’s t test. Results Three (8.3%) and 4 (11.1%) stroke patients with dysphagia had pyriform sinus residue and vallecular sinus residue, respectively, and 5 (13.8%) patients showed aspiration. Mesopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal contractile integrals in patients with residue in the pyriform sinus were significantly lower than those in patients without residue in the pyriform sinus (P < 0.05). Relaxation time intervals in patients with aspiration were significantly shorter than those in patients without aspiration (P < 0.05), and multivariate regression analysis revealed a shorter relaxation time interval as the main risk factor for aspiration (OR, 0.03; 95% CI, 0.01–0.65; P < 0.05). Conclusions Manometric measurements of the pharynx and UES were well correlated with abnormal findings in the VFSS, and a shorter relaxation time interval of the UES during deglutition is an important parameter for the development of aspiration. PMID:27510474

  13. Localization of mGluR5, GABAB, GABAA, and cannabinoid receptors on the vago-vagal reflex pathway responsible for transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in humans: an immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O.; Aronica, E.; Beaumont, H.; Troost, D.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are the predominant mechanisms underlying gastro-esophageal reflux. TLESRs are mediated by a vago-vagal reflex, which can be blocked by interaction with metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGluR5), ?-aminobutyric acid type B

  14. The gastric accommodation response to meal intake determines the occurrence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations and reflux events in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, A; Altan, E; Tack, J

    2014-04-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER), the retrograde flow of gastric contents into the esophagus is a physiologic phenomenon, which can evoke symptoms and/or lesions in the esophagus (=gastro-esophageal reflux disease or GERD). Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) reduce gastric acidity; however, as they are unable to control transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs), the main mechanism for reflux in GERD, they do not abolish reflux. TLESRs occur predominantly in the postprandial period, and they are believed to be triggered by gastric distention. Gastric accommodation (GA) is the physiologic response to gastric distention and serves to prevent a rise in gastric wall tension during food intake. We aimed to study the relationship between GA and TLESRs, as they both are triggered by gastric distention. We studied 12 GERD patients (average age 37 years [range 18-62], 7m/5f) and nine healthy volunteers (average age 27 years [range 22-36], 2m/7f) using high resolution manometry-impedance measurement before and after a mixed meal challenge. We determined the number of TLESRs (with or without reflux) and measured pre- and postprandial IGP. The change in IGP between the pre- and postprandial period (ΔIGP) is used as surrogate for GA. We also measured LES pressure before and after the meal and calculated the change (ΔLESp). There were no statistical differences between pre- and postprandial IGP in GERD and healthy volunteers and similarly, there was no significant difference between pre- and postprandial LES pressures in GERD patients and healthy volunteers. The number of TLESRs (with or without reflux) was similar in GERD and healthy volunteers. More importantly, we did observe a negative correlation between ΔIGP and the number of TLESRs, irrespective of whether they were associated with reflux or not, in the GERD patients (without reflux r = -0.67, p = 0.017; with reflux r = -0.81, p = 0.0014). The same observations were found in healthy volunteers, where ΔIGP and

  15. Effects of lesogaberan on reflux and lower esophageal sphincter function in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Beaumont, Hanneke; Mertens, Veerle; Denison, Hans; Ruth, Magnus; Adler, John; Silberg, Debra G.; Sifrim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are a major mechanism behind reflux. This study assessed the effects of lesogaberan (AZD3355), a novel gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor agonist, on reflux and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function when used as

  16. Esophageal Sphincter Device for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganz, Robert A.; Peters, Jeffrey H.; Horgan, Santiago; Bemelman, Willem A.; Dunst, Christy M.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Lipham, John C.; Luketich, James D.; Melvin, W. Scott; Oelschlager, Brant K.; Schlack-Haerer, Steven C.; Smith, C. Daniel; Smith, Christopher C.; Dunn, Dan; Taiganides, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who have a partial response to proton-pump inhibitors often seek alternative therapy. We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of a new magnetic device to augment the lower esophageal sphincter. METHODS We prospectively assessed 100 patients

  17. Impaired Upper Esophageal Sphincter Reflexes in Patients with Supra-Esophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Arash; Venu, Mukund; Naini, Sohrab Rahimi; Gonzaga, Jason; Lang, Ivan; Massey, Benson; Jadcherla, Sudarshan; Shaker, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Normal responses of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and esophageal body to liquid reflux events prevent esophagopharyngeal reflux and its complications, but abnormal responses have not been characterized. We investigated whether patients with supra-esophageal reflux disease (SERD) have impaired UES and esophageal body responses to simulated reflux events. Methods We performed a prospective study of 25 patients with SERD (19–82 y old, 13 female) and complaints of regurgitation and supra-esophageal manifestations of reflux. We also included 10 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD; 32–60 y old, 7 female) without troublesome regurgitation and supra-esophageal symptoms and 24 healthy asymptomatic individuals (controls; 19–49 y old, 13 female). UES and esophageal body pressure responses, along with luminal distribution of infusate during esophageal rapid and slow infusion of air or liquid, were monitored by concurrent high-resolution manometry and intraluminal impedance. Results A significantly smaller proportion of patients with SERD had UES contractile reflexes in response to slow esophageal infusion of acid than controls or patients with GERD. Only patients with SERD had abnormal UES relaxation responses to rapid distension with saline. Diminished esophageal peristaltic contractions resulted in esophageal stasis in patients with GERD or SERD. Conclusions Patients with SERD and complaints of regurgitation have impaired UES and esophageal responses to simulated liquid reflux events. These patterns could predispose them to esophagopharyngeal reflux. PMID:26188682

  18. Effect of clebopride on lower esophageal sphincter pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, V; da Silva, A L; Castro, L de P

    1981-01-01

    In 12 individuals without gastrointestinal symptoms, the IV administration of metoclopramide and of clebopride produced both a significant increase on the lower esophageal sphincter pressure. The increase induced by clebopride was significantly higher than that induced by metoclopramide. The tolerability of clebopride was satisfactory with just mild drowsiness being noted in most cases.

  19. Upper esophageal sphincter (UES) metrics on high-resolution manometry (HRM) differentiate achalasia subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, P; Patel, A; Sayuk, G S; Gyawali, C P

    2017-12-01

    The upper esophageal sphincter (UES) reflexively responds to bolus presence within the esophageal lumen, therefore UES metrics can vary in achalasia. Within consecutive patients undergoing esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM), 302 patients (58.2±1.0 year, 57% F) with esophageal outflow obstruction were identified, and compared to 16 asymptomatic controls (27.7±0.7 year, 56% F). Esophageal outflow obstruction was segregated into achalasia subtypes 1, 2, and 3, and esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (EGJOO with intact peristalsis) using Chicago Classification v3.0. UES and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) metrics were compared between esophageal outflow obstruction and normal controls using univariate and multivariate analysis. Linear regression excluded multicollinearity of pressure metrics that demonstrated significant differences across individual subtype comparisons. LES integrated relaxation pressure (IRP) had utility in differentiating achalasia from controls (P<.0001), but no utility in segregating between subtypes (P=.27). In comparison to controls, patients collectively demonstrated univariate differences in UES mean basal pressure, relaxation time to nadir, recovery time, and residual pressure (UES-RP) (P≤.049). UES-RP was highest in type 2 achalasia (P<.0001 compared to other subtypes and controls). In multivariate analysis, only UES-RP retained significance in comparison between each of the subgroups (P≤.02 for each comparison). Intrabolus pressure was highest in type 3 achalasia; this demonstrated significant differences across some but not all subtype comparisons. Nadir UES-RP can differentiate achalasia subtypes within the esophageal outflow obstruction spectrum, with highest values in type 2 achalasia. This metric likely represents a surrogate marker for esophageal pressurization. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Influence of hiatal hernia on lower esophageal sphincter function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, G B; Bombeck, C T; Nyhus, L M

    1981-01-01

    Sliding hiatal hernia has long term been implicated as a cause of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) incompetence and gastroesophageal reflux. The physics of LES function in hiatal hernia were investigated in in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro models of sliding hernias were constructed from excised canine gastroesophageal specimens. A "sphincter" was simulated with a rubber band around the gastroesophageal junction. It was found that placement of a ligature "hernia ring" on the stomach increased the opening pressure of the model sphincter. Addition of a tissue "hernia sac" sutured to the esophagus above the sphincter further increased the opening pressure, the protective effect being related to the pressure transmitted from the stomach to the hernia sac. There was no fluid leakage from the hernia sac between the hernia ring and the stomach. In anesthetized dogs (in vivo model) gastric and esophageal pressures were measured during gastric infusion while the LES gas way to reflux. A ligature tied loosely around the stomach to simulate a "hernia ring" and a sliding hernia without a hernia sac increased both the opening and the closing pressures of the LES by 36 +/- 18% and 35 +/- 20% (mean +/- SD), respectively. The opening pressure was increased by a decrease in gastric wall tension at the gastroesophageal junction, which was caused by the decreased radius of the herniated portion of the stomach. Pressure transmitted from the stomach to the hernia sac added to the LES pressure, and thereby further increased the opening pressure of the sphincter. The results explain how gastroesophageal reflux may be prevented in patients with hiatal hernia. It was recognized that the hernia sac may protect the sphincter, provided that it inserts into the esophagus above the LES. PMID:7469555

  1. Colonic fermentation influences lower esophageal sphincter function in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piche, Thierry; des Varannes, Stanislas Bruley; Sacher-Huvelin, Sylvie

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Colonic fermentation of carbohydrates is known to influence gastric and esophageal motility in healthy subjects. This study investigated the effects of colonic fermentation induced by oral administration of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux...... were monitored. RESULTS: Compared with placebo, FOS led to a significant increase in the number of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) and reflux episodes, esophageal acid exposure, and the symptom score for GERD. The integrated plasma response of GLP-1 was significantly higher...... after FOS than placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Colonic fermentation of indigestible carbohydrates increases the rate of TLESRs, the number of acid reflux episodes, and the symptoms of GERD. Although different mechanisms are likely to be involved, excess release of GLP-1 may account, at least in part...

  2. Pharmacologic manipulation of lower esophageal sphincter pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owman, T; Lunderquist, A

    1983-03-01

    Ten patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices had percutaneous transhepatic portography with selective catheterization of the short gastric or left gastric vein. The effect was studied on variceal blood flow after injection of various drugs. Vasopressin had no effect on variceal flow; pentagastrin gave a total occlusion of flow in five of nine patients; somatostatin interrupted the flow in one of four patients; domperidone obstructed flow completely in one patient, while another receiving the same dose was unaffected; methylcholine did not affect the flow in three patient examined.

  3. Upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities: frequent finding on high-resolution esophageal manometry and associated with poorer treatment response in achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Yamile H; Ciarleglio, Maria M; Clarke, John O; Nandwani, Monica; Stein, Ellen; Roland, Bani C

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) on high-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) have been observed in both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals and are often interpreted as incidental findings of unclear clinical significance. Our primary aims were: (1) to assess the frequency of UES abnormalities in consecutive patients referred for HREM studies; and (2) to characterize the demographics, clinical symptoms, and manometric profiles associated with UES abnormalities as compared with those with normal UES function. We performed a retrospective study of 200 consecutive patients referred for HREM. Patients were divided into those with normal and abnormal UES function, including impaired relaxation (residual pressure >12 mm Hg), hypertensive (>104 mm Hg), and hypotensive (achalasia were significantly more likely to have UES abnormalities as compared with normal UES function (57.2% vs. 42.9%, P=0.04), with the most frequent abnormality being a hypertensive UES (50%). In addition, patients with impaired lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction or achalasia) were more likely to have an UES abnormality present as compared with those with normal LES relaxation (53.1% vs. 28.6%, P=0.01). When we assessed for treatment response among patients with achalasia, we found that subjects with evidence of UES dysfunction had significantly worse treatment outcomes as compared with those without UES abnormalities present (20% improved vs. 100%, P=0.015). This remained true even after adjusting for type of treatment received (surgical myotomy, per-oral endoscopic mytotomy, botulinum toxin injection, pneumatic dilatation, medical therapy, P=0.67) and achalasia subtype (P=1.00). UES abnormalities are a frequent finding on HREM studies, especially in patients with impaired LES relaxation, including both achalasia and esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Interestingly, the most common UES abnormality associated

  4. Pneumatic Dilation of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter Can Now Be Successfully Performed Without Morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Bustamante, Marco; Moraveji, Sharareh; McCallum, Richard W

    2016-11-01

    Patients with dysphagia may be diagnosed with impaired lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and treated with pneumatic dilation (PD), stretching and tearing LES muscle fibers. Esophageal perforation has been reported to be as high as 10%. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the perforation rate of PD when used for impaired relaxation of the LES using current techniques. A chart review was conducted to identify patients referred for esophageal manometry by high-resolution manometry and later received PD from January 2013 to April 2016. The diagnoses of achalasia, gastroesophageal junction outlet obstruction or hypertensive LES with accompanying impaired LES relaxation were based on the Chicago Classification III. Demographic data, clinical findings, treatment approaches and outcomes were explored. A total of 187 patients were referred for dysphagia and had esophageal manometry during this time frame. In all, 62 patients (34 female), mean age of 52 years, met the criteria for incomplete relaxation of the LES and underwent a total of 88 PD procedures. All initial PD procedures used the 30-mm diameter balloon, 18 subsequently required a 35-mm balloon and 8 went on to 40-mm balloon size. No perforations or other complications were documented by esophagogastroduodenoscopy, gastrografin testing immediately postdilation or by subsequent clinical outcome. PD by an experienced gastroenterologist using general anesthesia, fluoroscopic guidance, Rigiflex balloon equipment and a specific repetitive technique can be successfully performed without perforation. Hence, the already known therapeutic efficacy of PD can now be combined with the knowledge that there is essentially no accompanying perforation rate. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes reduced in lower esophageal sphincter of patients with achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Zheng, Z; Wang, T; Zhao, C; Zhou, G; Jin, H; Wang, B

    2016-10-01

    The etiology of achalasia remains largely unknown. Considerable evidence reveals that the lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction is due to the lack of inhibitory neurotransmitter, secondary to esophageal neuronal inflammation or loss. Recent studies suggest hydrogen sulfide may act as an inhibitory transmitter in gastrointestinal tract, but study about hydrogen sulfide in human esophagus still lack. The aim of the study was to investigate if hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes could be detected in human esophagus and if the synthesis of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide could be affected in achalasia patients. Tissue samples in cardia, lower esophageal sphincter, 2 cm and 4 cm above lower esophageal sphincter were obtained from achalasia patients undergoing peroral endoscopic myotomy. Control tissues in lower esophageal sphincter were obtained from esophageal carcinoma patients. Expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in lower esophageal sphincter of achalasia patients and control were detected by immunohistochemical staining. In addition, expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase were compared among different parts of esophagus in achalasia patients. Compared with control, the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in lower esophageal sphincter of achalasia patients was significantly reduced (χ 2 = 11.429, P = 0.010). The expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase were lower in lower esophageal sphincter than that in 2 cm and 4 cm above lower esophageal sphincter, respectively (all P achalasia, which implicates the involvement of the two hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes in the pathophysiology of achalasia. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  6. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.

  7. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with 131 I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism

  8. Manometric Changes to the Lower Esophageal Sphincter After Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation in Patients With Chronic Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Heather F; Louie, Brian E; Farivar, Alexander S; Wilshire, Candice; Aye, Ralph W

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the manometric changes, function, and impact of magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) on the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Implantation of a MSA around the gastroesophageal junction has been shown to be a safe and effective therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease, but its effect on the LES has not been elucidated. Retrospective case control study (n = 121) evaluating manometric changes after MSA. Inclusion criteria consisted of a confirmed diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease by an abnormal esophageal pH study (body mass index <35 kg/m, hiatal hernia <3 cm, and absence of endoscopic Barrett disease). Manometric changes, pH testing, and proton pump inhibitor use were assessed preoperatively and 6 and 12 months after MSA. MSA was associated with an overall increase in the median LES resting pressure (18 pre-MSA vs 23 mm Hg post-MSA; P = 0.0003), residual pressure (4 vs 9 mm Hg; P < 0.0001), and distal esophageal contraction amplitude (80 vs 90 mm Hg; P = 0.02). The percent peristalsis remained unaltered (94% vs 87%; P = 0.71).Overall, patients with a manometrically defective LES were restored 67% of the time to a normal sphincter with MSA. Those with a structurally defective or severely defective LES improved to a normal LES in 77% and 56% of patients, respectively. Only 18% of patients with a normal preoperative manometric LES deteriorated to a lower category. MSA results in significant manometric improvement of the LES without apparent deleterious effects on the esophageal body. A manometrically defective LES can be restored to normal sphincter, whereas a normal LES remains stable.

  9. Investigation of intra-esophageal air kinetics and esophageal sphincters in patients with total laryngectomy during esophageal speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozan, Aykut; Vardar, Rukiye; Akyildiz, Serdar; Kirazli, Tayfun; Ogut, Fatih; Yildirim, Esra; Bor, Serhat

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the air kinetics of well- and poor-speaking patients and their upper (UES) and lower (LES) esophageal sphincter pressures . The esophageal speech capability of 23 total laryngectomy patients was assessed with the Wepman scale. LES and UES points and pressures were measured, and air kinetics were compared. All patients were male, with an average age of 58 years. Both the LES and UES pressures were not statistically different between good-speaking and poor-speaking patients (p > 0.05). The ability to speak was estimated only by looking at tracings. Good speakers are able to retain air successfully and on a long-term basis between the upper and lower esophageal sphincters. During short and/or rapid speech, these patients are able to rapidly suck and then expel the air from their upper esophagus. During long speeches, after sucking the air into their distal esophagus, they used the air in the upper part of the esophagus during the speech, only later seeming to fill the lower esophagus with the air as a possible reserve in the stomach. It has been shown that the basic requirement for speaking is the capacity to suck and store the air within the esophagus. For successful speech, the air should be stored inside the esophagus. MII technology contributes to our understanding of speech kinetics and occupies an important place in patient training as a biofeedback technique.

  10. Residual lower esophageal sphincter pressure as a prognostic factor in the pneumatic balloon treatment of achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Ho; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Hyuk; Park, Hyojin; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyung Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Kyoung Sup

    2015-01-01

    Pneumatic balloon dilatation (PD) is a mainstay in achalasia treatment. The aim of this study was to identify predictive factors for successful treatment. We retrospectively reviewed 76 patients with a diagnosis of achalasia who underwent PD from June 2010 to May 2013. Clinical symptoms were assessed using Eckardt score and manometry data were analyzed using resting and relaxation pressure (4sIRP) of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and the distal contractile integral (DCI), which was calculated for 10 s from the start of deglutition between the upper margin of the LES and lower margin of upper esophageal contraction. Patients with achalasia were classified into three groups based on the Chicago classification. Among 76 patients, 52 patients received PD, and the treatment was unsuccessful in 9 patients (6 in class I and 3 in class III). When comparing prognostic factors between successful and unsuccessful treatment groups, the mean value for 4sIRP in the unsuccessful treatment group was significantly lower than that in the successful treatment group (P treatment of achalasia (odds ratio, 1.092; 95% confidence interval, 1.001-1.191) even after adjustment for a series of confounding factors. Lower 4sIRP may be a prognostic indicator for poor treatment outcome after PD. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Balloon dilation of the esophago-gastric junction affects lower and upper esophageal sphincter function in achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, L; Van Oudenhove, L; Selleslagh, M; Vanuytsel, T; Boeckxstaens, G; Tack, J; Omari, T; Rommel, N

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic dilation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in achalasia has an unappreciated effect on upper esophageal sphincter (UES) function. We studied UES pressure patterns at baseline and alterations in UES parameters resulting from therapy. High-resolution manometry (HRM) tracings from 50 achalasia patients, seen at a tertiary center between January 2009 and July 2011, were reviewed. Manometric parameters studied were (i) LES: resting pressure (restP), 4-second integrated relaxation pressure (IRP4); (ii) UES: resting pressure (restP), minimal relaxation pressure (MRP), peak pressure (PP), relaxation interval (RI), intrabolus pressure (IBP), and deglutitive sphincter resistance (DSR). Mixed models analyses with LES and UES parameters as dependent variables and treatment stage as within-subject independent variable of interest were used. Correlations between treatment-induced changes in LES, UES, and esophageal body (EB) parameters were performed. Pre- and posttreatment HRM tracings were available from 50 patients (mean age 52.7 ± 18.6 years, 29 men). Upper esophageal sphincter parameters MRP (17.9 ± 1.2 vs 15.2 ± 0.9 mmHg; p = 0.02) and IBP (31.5 ± 1.5 vs 27.4 ± 1.2 mmHg; p = 0.009) were significantly reduced after initial balloon dilation and this effect was significant in type II achalasia (p = 0.002 and p = 0.0006). Peak pressure, RI, and DSR were not. The therapeutic effect on LES IRP4 correlated significantly with the change in UES MRP, statistically mediated by the change in EB deglutitive pressure (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0002). We present the first HRM study demonstrating that pneumatic dilation of the LES affects intraesophageal and UES pressures in patients with achalasia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Clinical study of columnar balloon dilatation therapy for severe dysphagia caused by upper esophageal sphincter achalasia after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-bo SHAO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the mechanism and effect of columnar balloon dilatation therapy on treating patients with severe dysphagia caused by upper esophageal sphincter (UES achalasia after stroke. Methods Sixty -four patients with severe dysphagia caused by UES achalasia after stroke were diagnosed through Video Fluoroscopic Swallowing Study (VFSS and esophageal dynamics testing. The patients were randomly divided into control group (N = 32 and treatment group (N = 32. Patients in control group were treated with routine drug treatment and routine rehabilitation training, while patients in treatment group were treated with columnar balloon dilatation therapy on the basis of routine treatment. The treatment end point was either the patient resuming an oral diet or after 4-weeks treatment. All cases were evaluated by swallowing function of VFSS, high resolution manometry (HRM and scores of the severity of dysphagia before treatment and at treatment end point. Results Compared with before treatment, UES resting pressure (P = 0.000 and residual pressure (P = 0.000 were significantly decreased, peak pressure was significantly increased (P = 0.000, duration of relaxation was prolonged (P = 0.000, and scores of the severity of dysphagia were significantly increased (P = 0.000, 0.000 in both groups after treatment. Compared with control group, UES resting pressure (P = 0.001 and residual pressure (P = 0.000 were significantly decreased, peak pressure was significantly increased (P = 0.002, duration of relaxation was prolonged (P = 0.000, and scores of the severity of dysphagia were significantly increased (P = 0.000 in treatment group after treatment. Until the treatment end point or after 4-week treatment, the total effective rate in treatment group was significantly higher than that in control group [93.75% (30/32 vs. 81.25% (26/32; χ2 = 4.010, P = 0.000]. Conclusions Columnar balloon dilatation therapy is effective for reducing the tension of upper

  13. Comparison of angiotensin II (Ang II) effects in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) and lower esophageal sphincter smooth muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Satish; Fan, Ya-Ping; Puri, Rajinder N

    2002-03-22

    Studies were performed to compare the actions of Ang II in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) vs. lower esophageal sphincter (LES) smooth muscles in vitro, in opossum and rabbit. Studies also were carried out in isolated smooth muscle cells. In opossum, Ang II produced no discernible effects in the IAS, but did produce a concentration-dependent contraction in the LES. Conversely, in the rabbit, while Ang II caused a modest response in the LES, it caused a significant contraction in the IAS. The contractile responses of Ang II in the opossum LES were mostly resistant to different neurohumoral antagonists but were antagonized by AT1 antagonist losartan. AT2 antagonist PD 123,319, rather than inhibiting, prolonged the contractile action of Ang II. The contractile actions of Ang II in the opossum LES were not modified by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin 1 x 10(-6) M) but were partially attenuated by the PKC inhibitor H-7 (1 x 10(-6) M), Ca2+ channel blocker nicardipine (1 x 10(-5) M), Rho kinase inhibitor HA-1077 (1 x 10(-7) M) or p(44/42) MAP kinase inhibitor PD 98059 (5 x 10(-5) M). The combination of HA-1077 and H-7 did not cause an additive attenuation of Ang II responses. Western blot analyses revealed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors. We conclude that Ang lI-induced contraction of sphincteric smooth muscle occurs primarily by the activation of AT1 receptors at the smooth muscle cells and involves multiple pathways, influx of Ca2+, and PKC, Rho kinase and p(44/42) MAP kinase.

  14. Prolonged-Release Oxycodone/Naloxone Improves Anal Sphincter Relaxation Compared to Oxycodone Plus Macrogol 3350

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Brock, Christina; Grønlund, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    /naloxone or PR oxycodone plus macrogol 3350. Resting anal pressure, anal canal distensibility, and relaxation of the internal sphincter to rectal distension were evaluated before treatment (baseline) and on day 5. The Patient Assessment of Constipation Symptom (PAC-SYM) questionnaire, stool frequency, and stool...

  15. Calculation of upper esophageal sphincter restitution time from high resolution manometry data using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungheim, Michael; Busche, Andre; Miller, Simone; Schilling, Nicolas; Schmidt-Thieme, Lars; Ptok, Martin

    2016-10-15

    After swallowing, the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) needs a certain amount of time to return from maximum pressure to the resting condition. Disturbances of sphincter function not only during the swallowing process but also in this phase of pressure restitution may lead to globus sensation or dysphagia. Since UES pressures do not decrease in a linear or asymptotic manner, it is difficult to determine the exact time when the resting pressure is reached, even when using high resolution manometry (HRM). To overcome this problem a Machine Learning model was established to objectively determine the UES restitution time (RT) and moreover to collect physiological data on sphincter function after swallowing. HRM-data of 15 healthy participants performing 10 swallows each were included. After manual annotation of the RT interval by two swallowing experts, data were transferred to the Machine Learning model, which applied a sequence labeling modeling approach based on logistic regression to learn and objectivize the characteristics of all swallows. Individually computed RT values were then compared with the annotated values. Estimates of the RT were generated by the Machine Learning model for all 150 swallows. When annotated by swallowing experts mean RT of 11.16s±5.7 (SD) and 10.04s±5.74 were determined respectively, compared to model-generated values from 8.91s±3.71 to 10.87s±4.68 depending on model selection. The correlation score for the annotated RT of both examiners was 0.76 and 0.63 to 0.68 for comparison of model predicted values. Restitution time represents an important physiologic swallowing parameter not previously considered in HRM-studies of the UES, especially since disturbances of UES restitution may increase the risk of aspiration. The data presented here show that it takes approximately 9 to 11s for the UES to come to rest after swallowing. Based on maximal RT values, we demonstrate that an interval of 25-30s in between swallows is necessary until the

  16. Injection of Botulinum Toxin a to Upper Esophageal Sphincter for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Two Patients with Inclusion Body Myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis WC Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body myositis (IBM is a progressive degenerative skeletal muscle disease leading to weakening and atrophy of both proximal and distal muscles. Dysphagia is reported in up to 86% of IBM patients. Surgical cricopharyngeal myotomy may be effective for cricopharyngeal dysphagia and there is one published report that botulinum toxin A, injected into the cricopharyngeus muscle using a hypopharyngoscope under general anesthesia, relieved IBM-associated dysphagia. This report presents the first documentation of botulinum toxin A injection into the upper esophageal sphincter using a flexible esophagogastroduodenoscope under conscious sedation, to reduce upper esophageal sphincter pressure and successfully alleviate oropharyngeal dysphagia in two IBM patients.

  17. Pharyngeal weakness and upper esophageal sphincter opening in patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domer, Amanda S; Leonard, Rebecca; Belafsky, Peter C

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate pharyngeal strength and upper esophageal sphincter opening in patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility (UVFI). Case control study. Charts of individuals with UVFI who underwent a videofluoroscopic swallow study were reviewed. To exclude confounding variables associated with pharyngeal weakness, inclusion was limited to patients with iatrogenic and idiopathic UVFI. Data abstracted included patient demographics, etiology of UVFI, pharyngeal constriction ratio (PCR), and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening (UESmax). Data were compared to age/gender-matched controls with no history of dysphagia or UVFI. Discrete variables were analyzed using a chi-square test of independence, and an independent samples t test was used to compare the UVFI and control groups (P = 0.05). A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare iatrogenic and idiopathic UVFI groups. The mean age of the cohort (n = 25) was 61 (±14 SD) years and 52% was female. The etiologies of UVFI were iatrogenic (n = 17) and idiopathic (n = 8). Thirty-eight percent of UVFI patients (n = 25) aspirated compared to 0% of controls (P  0.05). Individuals with UVFI of iatrogenic and idiopathic etiologies with subjective dysphagia demonstrate objective evidence of pharyngeal weakness. The increased prevalence of aspiration in this population may not be solely the result of impaired airway protection. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. The role of GABA(A) receptors in the control of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations in the dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, H.; Jönsson-Rylander, A.-C.; Carlsson, K.; Pierrou, S.; Ahlefelt, M.; Brändén, L.; Jensen, J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Lehmann, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are triggered by activation of mechanosensitive gastric vagal afferents and are the major cause of gastroesophageal reflux and therefore an important target for therapeutic intervention in gastroesophageal reflux

  19. Achalasia in Pregnancy: Botulinum Toxin A Injection of Lower Esophageal Sphincter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Hooft

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Achalasia, a rare esophageal motility disorder that may cause malnutrition during pregnancy, can result in fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Many medical treatment regimens are contraindicated or not tolerated during pregnancy, and surgery is generally avoided due to potential risks to the fetus. Case Report. Severe, medically refractory achalasia in a 23-year-old pregnant woman that caused malnutrition was successfully managed by administering a botulinum toxin A injection to the lower esophageal sphincter. The injection was performed at approximately 14 weeks’ gestation and the patient reported clinically significant relief from dysphagia. She gained weight and ultimately delivered a healthy baby girl at term, but her symptoms returned a few months postpartum. She underwent a second treatment of botulinum toxin A injection, but it offered only one month of relief. Roughly eight months after delivery, the patient underwent a laparoscopic extended Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication. The patient resumed a normal diet one week postoperatively, and her baby has had no complications. Conclusion. This is only the second reported case of botulinum toxin A injection being used to treat achalasia in pregnancy. This treatment proved to be a safe temporary alternative without the risks of surgery and anesthesia during pregnancy.

  20. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan-Wen; Du, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow's relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  1. The Kagoshima consensus on esophageal achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triadafilopoulos, G.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Gullo, R.; Patti, M. G.; Pandolfino, J. E.; Kahrilas, P. J.; Duranceau, A.; Jamieson, G.; Zaninotto, G.

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by lack of peristalsis and a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax appropriately in response to swallowing. This article summarizes the most salient issues in the diagnosis and management of achalasia as discussed

  2. A human model of restricted upper esophageal sphincter opening and its pharyngeal and UES deglutitive pressure phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Hongmei; Mei, Ling; Sharma, Tarun; Kern, Mark; Sanvanson, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia due to upper esophageal sphincter (UES) dysfunction is commonly encountered in the clinical setting. Selective experimental perturbation of various components of the deglutitive apparatus can provide an opportunity to improve our understanding of the swallowing physiology and pathophysiology. The aim is to characterize the pharyngeal and UES deglutitive pressure phenomena in an experimentally induced restriction of UES opening in humans. We studied 14 volunteers without any dysphagic symptoms (7 men, 66 ± 11 yr) but with various supraesophageal reflux symptoms. To induce UES restriction, we used a handmade device that with adjustment could selectively apply 0, 20, 30, or 40 mmHg pressure perpendicularly to the cricoid cartilage. Deglutitive pharyngeal and UES pressure phenomena were determined during dry and 5- and 10-ml water swallows × 3 for each of the UES perturbations. External cricoid pressure against the UES resulted in a significant increase in hypopharyngeal intrabolus pressure and UES nadir deglutitive relaxation pressure for all tested swallowed volumes (P < 0.05). Application of external cricoid pressure increased the length of the UES high pressure zone from 2.5 ± 0.2 to 3.1 ± 0.2, 3.5 ± 0.1, and 3.7 ± 0.1 cm for 20, 30, and 40 mmHg cricoid pressure, respectively (P < 0.05). External cricoid pressure had no significant effect on pharyngeal peristalsis. On the other hand, irrespective of external cricoid pressure deglutitive velopharyngeal contractile integral progressively increased with increased swallowed volumes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, acute experimental restriction of UES opening by external cricoid pressure manifests the pressure characteristics of increased resistance to UES transsphincteric flow observed clinically without affecting the pharyngeal peristaltic contractile function. PMID:27198193

  3. Lubrication Theory Model to Evaluate Surgical Alterations in Flow Mechanics of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudip K.; Brasseur, James G.; Zaki, Tamer; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2003-11-01

    Surgery is commonly used to rebuild a weak lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and reduce reflux. Because the driving pressure (DP) is proportional to muscle tension generated in the esophagus, we developed models using lubrication theory to evaluate the consequences of surgery on muscle force required to open the LES and drive the flow. The models relate time changes in DP to lumen geometry and trans-LES flow with a manometric catheter. Inertial effects were included and found negligible. Two models, direct (opening specified) and indirect (opening predicted), were combined with manometric pressure and imaging data from normal and post-surgery LES. A very high sensitivity was predicted between the details of the DP and LES opening. The indirect model accurately captured LES opening and predicted a 3-phase emptying process, with phases I and III requiring rapid generation of muscle tone to open the LES and empty the esophagus. Data showed that phases I and III are adversely altered by surgery causing incomplete emptying. Parametric model studies indicated that changes to the surgical procedure can positively alter LES flow mechanics and improve clinical outcomes.

  4. Electrical stimulation of the sacral dorsal gray commissure evokes relaxation of the external urethral sphincter in the cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Bertil F.M.; Maarseveen, Jos T.P.W.; Holstege, Gert

    1998-01-01

    Stimulation of the pontine micturition center (PMC) results in micturition, i.e. an immediate relaxation of the urethral sphincter and a contraction of the detrusor muscle of the bladder. The PMC generates the bladder contraction by way of a direct excitatory pathway to the parasympathetic bladder

  5. High-Resolution Manometry Evaluation of the Pharynx and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Motility in Patients with Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Mariano A; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2015-10-01

    The motility of the pharynx and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) is still poorly understood. It is also unclear if the motility of this area may be compromised in patients with achalasia. This study aims to evaluate the motility of the pharynx, UES, and proximal esophagus in patients with esophageal achalasia. Sixty patients with achalasia underwent high-resolution manometry (HRM) (52 % females, mean age 54 years). Esophageal dilatation was classified according to the radiologic diameter in Type I (10 cm): 24 %. HRM classified 43 % of the patients as Chicago Type I and 57 % as Type II. Manometric parameters were compared to normal values obtained from a previous study in volunteers. The motility of the velopharynx showed short, premature, and hypertonic contraction. The epiglottis also showed hypertonic contraction. The UES had increased residual pressure. Chicago classification Type II patients had higher UES residual pressure (p = 0.03). The degree of esophageal dilatation did not correlate with manometric parameters. Achalasia may affect the motility of the pharyngo-upper esophageal area. The changes observed may represent functional alterations to prevent aspiration, especially in patients with Chicago classification Type II achalasia.

  6. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Bonavina, Luigi

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is the most commonly diagnosed primary esophageal motor disorder and the second most common functional esophageal disorder. Current therapy of achalasia is directed toward elimination of the outflow resistance caused by failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax completely upon swallowing. The advent of minimally invasive surgery has nearly replaced endoscopic pneumatic dilation as the first-line therapeutic approach. In this editorial, the rationale and the evide...

  7. Effect of Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, on the triggering of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations in dogs and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, H.; Jensen, J.; Carlsson, A.; Ruth, M.; Lehmann, A.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are the main mechanism underlying gastro-oesophageal reflux and are a potential pharmacological treatment target. We evaluated the effect of the CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol

  8. Patterns of gas and liquid reflux during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation: a study using intraluminal electrical impedance

    OpenAIRE

    Sifrim, D; Silny, J; Holloway, R; Janssens, J

    1999-01-01

    Background—Belching has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying acid gastro-oesophageal reflux in normal subjects. However, the presence of oesophageal gas has not been measured directly but only inferred from manometry. 
Aims—To investigate, using intraluminal electrical impedance, the patterns of gas and liquid reflux during transient lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) relaxations, the main mechanism of acid reflux in normal subjects. 
Methods—Impedance changes ass...

  9. Value of X-ray cinematography of deglutition to establish the indication for myotomy of the pharyngo-esophageal sphincter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustiny, N.; Schmid, H.; Bruehlmann, W.F.

    1987-05-01

    Fourteen patients were examined one to four years after cricopharyngeal myotomy that had been carried out because of dysfunction of the pharyngo-esophageal sphincter. Twelve patients were examined radiologically. Eleven of the 14 patients were clinically improved or cured. In two patients who were not improved, the underlying condition was a polymyositis. The other patients suffered from an idiopathic dysfunction. Because of the small numbers involved, no detailed statistical analysis was carried out. Nevertheless, our results indicate that: Cricopharyngeus myotomy produces marked improvement or cure in patients with idiopathic dysfunction. Weak propulsive peristalsis of the pharyngeal constrictors is a prognostic factor indicating a poor clinical result of surgery. There is little chance of clinical improvement in patients with polymyositis.

  10. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Shoukat H; Madhu, Vijay P; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in pati...

  11. Balloon Dilatation of Esophageal Strictures/Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Sabharwal, Tarun; Adam, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motor disorder characterized by increased lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, diminished-to-absent peristalsis in the distal portion of the esophagus composed of smooth muscle, and lack of a coordinated LES relaxation in response to swallowing. These abnormalities are recognized radiographically by aperistalsis, esophageal dilatation, and decreased opening of the LES, with a characteristic “bird-beak” appearance. The principal symptom of this disorder is dysp...

  12. Hypertrophy of the muscularis propria of the lower esophageal sphincter and the body of the esophagus in patients with primary motility disorders of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Kassab, Ghassan; Puckett, James L; Liu, Jianmin

    2003-08-01

    Patients with diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) and nutcracker esophagus/high amplitude esophageal contraction (HAEC) have a thicker esophageal muscularis propria than do healthy subjects. The goals of this study were to determine the esophageal muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA), a measure of muscle mass, in patients with achalasia of the esophagus; and to compare it with that in patients with DES, patients with HAEC, and normal subjects. Using a high-frequency ultrasound probe catheter, concurrent manometry and ultrasound images of the esophagus were recorded in four subject groups: normal volunteers, patients with HAEC, patients with DES, and patients with achalasia of the esophagus. Recordings were obtained from the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and multiple sites in the esophagus 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 cm above the LES. The LES and esophageal muscle thickness as well as esophageal MCSA were greater in all three patient groups than in the normal subject group. Muscle thickness and MCSA were observed to be greatest in patients with achalasia, which were greater than in patients with DES, which were greater than in those with HAEC, which in turn were greater than in normal subjects. We propose that an increase in the MCSA is an important feature of patients with primary motility disorders of the esophagus. The degree of increase in muscle mass may be an important determinant of the type and the severity of esophageal motor dysfunction.

  13. The efficacy of balloon dilation in achalasia is the result of stretching of the lower esophageal sphincter, not muscular disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhan-Manesh, F; Kaviani, M J; Taghavi, A R

    2016-04-01

    Pneumatic dilation (PD) of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in achalasia is a major palliative treatment. It is generally believed, although never substantiated, that therapeutic efficacy of ballooning in achalasia is the result of the disruption and tearing of the muscular layers of the LES. To clarify this issue, we investigated the frequency of muscular disruption at the LES, 24 hours after PD, by employing the endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), in a group of 43 consented patients with achalasia. Between July 2009 and March2012, 51 consecutive adult patients with tentative diagnosis of achalasia, some with recurrence of symptoms after an earlier treatment with balloon dilation, were evaluated and underwent PD, using Rigiflex balloon without major adverse effect. Out of the 51 evaluated, 43 eligible and consenting patients who underwent EUS, 24 hours after PD, using Olympus GF-UE 160 echoendoscope and an Aloka Prosound probe at 7.5 MHZ, are the subjects of this study. The EUS in 43 eligible patients revealed an intact LES in 36 (83.7%), small area of muscular disruption in 5 (11.6%) and small hematoma in 2 patients (4.6%). Our data convincingly demonstrate that the clinical effectiveness of balloon dilation in achalasia is not the result of muscular disruption, but of circumferential stretching of the LES. Our findings on the mechanism of action of PD in achalasia could result in modifying the current method of dilation for a safer procedure, by slowing the rate of inflation and allowing the sphincter to slowly stretch itself to the distending balloon. © 2015 The Authors. Diseases of the Esophagus published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  14. Breathing training on lower esophageal sphincter as a complementary treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, M; Sabatino, L; Moffa, A; Capuano, F; Luccarelli, V; Vitali, M; Ribolsi, M; Cicala, M; Salvinelli, F

    2016-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) represents one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders, but is still a challenge to cure. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are currently the GERD's standard treatment, although not successful in all patients; some concerns have been raised regarding their long term consumption. Recently, some studies showed the benefits of inspiratory muscle training in increasing the lower esophageal sphincter pressure in patients affected by GERD, thereby reducing their symptoms. Relevant published studies were searched in Pubmed, Google Scholar, Ovid or Medical Subject Headings using the following keywords: "GERD" and physiotherapy", "GERD" and "exercise", "GERD" and "breathing", "GERD and "training". At the end of our selection process, four publications have been included for systematic review. All of them were prospective controlled studies, mainly based on the training of the diaphragm muscle. GERD symptoms, pH-manometry values and PPIs usage were assessed. Among the non-surgical, non-pharmacological treatment modalities, the breathing training on diaphragm could play an important role in selected patients to manage the symptoms of GERD.

  15. Salvia miltiorrhiza Induces Tonic Contraction of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter in Rats via Activation of Extracellular Ca2+ Influx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chung Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Up to 40% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD suffer from proton pump inhibitor refractory GERD but clinically the medications to strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter (LES to avoid irritating reflux are few in number. This study aimed to examine whether Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM extracts induce tonic contraction of rat LES ex vivo and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. To investigate the mechanism underlying the SM extract-induced contractile effects, rats were pretreated with atropine (a muscarinic receptor antagonist, tetrodotoxin (a sodium channel blocker, nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker, and Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA, followed by administration of cumulative dosages of SM extracts. SM extracts induced dose-related tonic contraction of the LES, which was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, atropine, or nifedipine. However, the SM extract-induced LES contraction was significantly inhibited by Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with EGTA. Next, SM extracts significantly induce extracellular Ca2+ entry into primary LES cells in addition to intracellular Ca2+ release and in a dose-response manner. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the SM extracts consistently induced significant extracellular Ca2+ influx into primary LES cells in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, SM extracts could induce tonic contraction of LES mainly through the extracellular Ca2+ influx pathway.

  16. Associations between the lower esophageal sphincter function and the level of physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waśko-Czopnik, Dorota; Jóźków, Paweł; Dunajska, Katarzyna; Mędraś, Marek; Paradowski, Leszek

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a very frequent and multifactorial disease. It has been found that GERD is associated with obesity, smoking, esophagitis, diet and lifestyle. Physical activity is among the factors involved in the occurrence of GERD. The aim of the study was to evaluate the associations between the different parameters of lower esophageal pressure (LES) and the level of everyday physical activity in patients with GERD. The authors examined 100 consecutive patients who underwent manometry and pH-metry because of symptoms suggesting GERD. Physical activity was assessed by means of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). In accordance with IPAQ categorical scoring, the authors divided the studied subjects into 3 groups according to their level of physical activity. The investigation comprised 59 men and 41 women, with the mean age 49 ± 14 years. The authors analyzed the relationships between the LES parameters (pressure, total LES length and HPZ length) and physical activity. The authors did not find any significant correlations between the studied parameters and the amount of physical activity. The authors also did not observe any association between the LES pressure and the level of physical activity. The subgroups distinguished on the basis of LESP did not differ as to the amount of everyday physical activity as well. Although most data indicates that intense exercise exacerbates GERD symptoms, the authors did not find any associations between LES parameters and physical activity. In view of the present results maintaining the recommended level of everyday physical activity does not interfere with the mechanisms of GERD.

  17. Regulation of basal tone, relaxation and contraction of the lower oesophageal sphincter. Relevance to drug discovery for oesophageal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, R; Sifrim, D

    2008-03-01

    The lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) is a specialized region of the oesophageal circular smooth muscle that allows the passage of a swallowed bolus to the stomach and prevents the reflux of gastric contents into the oesophagus. The anatomical arrangement of the LOS includes semicircular clasp fibres adjacent to the lesser gastric curvature and sling fibres following the greater gastric curvature. Such anatomical arrangement together with an asymmetric intrinsic innervation and distinct proportion of neurotransmitters in both regions produces an asymmetric pressure profile. The LOS tone is myogenic in origin and depends on smooth muscle properties that lead to opening of L-type Ca(2+) channels; however it can be modulated by enteric motor neurons, the parasympathetic and sympathetic extrinsic nervous system and several neurohumoral substances. Nitric oxide synthesized by neuronal NOS is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter involved in LOS relaxation. Different putative neurotransmitters have been proposed to play a role together with NO. So far, only ATP or related purines have shown to be co-transmitters with NO. Acetylcholine and tachykinins are involved in the LOS contraction acting through acetylcholine M(3) and tachykinin NK(2) receptors. Nitric oxide can also be involved in the regulation of LOS contraction. The understanding of the mechanisms that originate and modulate LOS tone, relaxation and contraction and the characterization of neurotransmitters and receptors involved in LOS function are important to develop new pharmacological tools to treat primary oesophageal motor disorders and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  18. New measures of upper esophageal sphincter distensibility and opening patterns during swallowing in healthy subjects using EndoFLIP®

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Regan, J

    2013-01-01

    Background  This paper aims to measure upper esophageal sphincter (UES) distensibility and extent and duration of UES opening during swallowing in healthy subjects using EndoFLIP(®) . Methods  Fourteen healthy subjects (20-50 years) were recruited. An EndoFLIP(®) probe was passed trans-orally and the probe balloon was positioned across the UES. Two 20-mL ramp distensions were completed and UES cross-sectional area (CSA) and intra-balloon pressure (IBP) were evaluated. At 12-mL balloon volume, subjects completed dry, 5- and 10-mL liquid swallows and extent (mm) and duration (s) of UES opening and minimum IBP (mmHg) were analyzed across swallows. Key Results  Thirteen subjects completed the study protocol. A significant change in UES CSA (P < .001) and IBP (P < .000) was observed during 20-mL distension. UES CSA increased up to 10-mL distension (P < .001), from which point IBP raised significantly (P = 0.004). There were significant changes in UES diameter (mm) (P < .000) and minimum IBP (mmHg) (P < .000) during swallowing events. Resting UES diameter (4.9 mm; IQR 0.02) and minimum IBP (18.8 mmHg; IQR 2.64) changed significantly during dry (9.6 mm; IQR 1.3: P < .001) (3.6 mmHg; IQR 4.1: P = 0.002); 5 mL (8.61 mm; IQR 2.7: P < .001) (4.8 mmHg; IQR 5.7: P < .001) and 10-mL swallows (8.3 mm; IQR 1.6: P < 0.001) (3 mmHg; 4.6: P < .001). Median duration of UES opening was 0.5 s across dry and liquid swallows (P = 0.91). Color contour plots of EndoFLIP(®) data capture novel information regarding pharyngo-esophageal events during swallowing. Conclusions & Inferences  Authors obtained three different types of quantitative data (CSA, IBP, and timing) regarding UES distensibility and UES opening patterns during swallowing in healthy adults using only one device (EndoFLIP(®) ). This new measure of swallowing offers fresh information regarding UES dynamics which may ultimately improve patient

  19. Novel therapeutics for gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Frank; Simon, Mireille

    2012-09-01

    Approximately 20-30% of patients with gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms report inadequate symptom relief while on proton-pump inhibitor therapy. The mechanisms involved are failure of the antireflux barrier (transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations), high proximal extent of the refluxate, esophageal hypersensitivity and impaired mucosal integrity. Persisting acid or nonacid reflux can be demonstrated in 40-50% of cases, suggesting that there is room for antireflux therapy in these patients. New antireflux compounds have been shown to decrease the occurrence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations. The most promising classes of compounds are GABA type B agonists and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonists, which can reduce both reflux episodes and symptoms, but the development of these compounds has been abandoned for either safety issues or lack of efficacy. Esophageal hypersensitivity and impaired mucosal integrity may prove to be relevant therapeutic targets in the future.

  20. A new evaluation of the upper esophageal sphincter using the functional lumen imaging probe: a preliminary report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Regan, J

    2012-03-06

    Objective and reliable evaluation of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening during swallowing based on videofluoroscopy and pharyngeal manometry challenges dysphagia clinicians. The functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) is a portable tool based on impedance planimetry originally designed to measure esophogastric junction compliance. It is hypothesized that FLIP can evaluate UES distensibility, and can provide UES diameter and pressure measurements at rest, during swallowing, and during voluntary maneuvers. Eleven healthy adult subjects consented to FLIP evaluation. The probe was inserted transorally, and the balloon was positioned across the UES. Two 20-mL ramp distensions were completed. Changes in UES diameter and intraballoon pressure were measured during dry and 5-mL liquid swallows, and during voluntary swallow postures and maneuvers employed in clinical practice. The protocol was completed by 10 of 11 healthy subjects. Mean intraballoon pressure increased throughout 5-mL (5.8 mmHg; -4.5-18.6 mmHg), 10-mL (8.7 mmHg; 2.3-28.5 mmHg), 15-mL (17.3 mmHg; 9.5-34.8 mmHg), and 20-mL (31.2 mmHg; 16-46.3 mmHg) balloon volumes. Mean resting UES diameter (4.9 mm) increased during dry swallows (9.2 mm) and 5-mL liquid swallows (7.7 mm). Mean UES diameter increased during 5-mL liquid swallows with head turn to right (8.1 mm) and left (8.3 mm), chin tuck (8.4 mm), effortful swallow (8.5 mm), Mendelsohn maneuver (8.1 mm), and supraglottic swallow (7.8 mm). FLIP was safely inserted and distended in the UES, and provided useful quantitative data regarding UES distensibility and UES diameter changes during swallowing maneuvers. Further research is being conducted to explore the role of FLIP in UES evaluation.

  1. Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy versus Per Oral Endoscopic Myotomy: Evidence-Based Approach to the Treatment of Esophageal Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2018-04-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a rare disorder characterized by a failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax during swallowing, combined with aperistalsis of the esophageal body. Treatment is not curative, but aims to eliminate the outflow resistance caused by the nonrelaxing lower esophageal sphincter. Current evidence suggests that both laparoscopic Heller myotomy and per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) are very effective in the relief of symptoms in patients with achalasia. Specifically, for type III achalasia, POEM may achieve higher success rates. However, POEM is associated to a very high incidence of pathologic reflux, with the risk of exchanging one disease-achalasia-with another-gastroesophageal reflux.

  2. [Effects of peroral endoscopic myotomy on esophageal dynamics in patients with esophageal achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yun-shi; Li, Liang; Zhou, Ping-hong; Xu, Mei-dong; Ren, Zhong; Zhu, Bo-qun; Yao, Li-qing

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the effects of peroral endoscopic myotomy(POEM) on esophageal dynamics in patients with esophageal achalasia. From September 2011 to November 2011, 20 cases with esophageal achalasia received POEM at the Endoscopic Center in the Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University. Pre-operation esophageal dynamics of all the patients were evaluated by high resolution manometry(HRM) system and 3 days after operation the test was repeated. Lower esophagus sphincter resting pressure(LESP), 4-second integrated relaxation pressure(4sIRP), lower esophagus sphincter relax rate(LESRR), lower esophagus sphincter length(LESL), and esophageal manometry were analyzed. After POEM, LESP decreased from(29.1±17.0) mm Hg to(14.6±4.9) mm Hg, and decrease rate was 49.8%(P0.05). Esophageal peristaltic contraction was absent in all the 20 patients preoperatively. After POEM, changes in the esophageal contraction were seen in 7 patients, and peristalsis was noticed but was below normal level. There were no significant changes in peristalsis in the remaining 13 patients. POEM can significantly reduce LESP and 4sIRP in patients with achalasia, but can not affect the contraction of the esophagus.

  3. The Impact of Heller Myotomy on Integrated Relaxation Pressure in Esophageal Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Renato; Savarino, Edoardo; Pesenti, Elisa; Spadotto, Lorenzo; Capovilla, Giovanni; Cavallin, Francesco; Galeazzi, Francesca; Nicoletti, Loredana; Merigliano, Stefano; Costantini, Mario

    2016-01-01

    A new high-resolution manometry (HRM) parameter, the integrated relaxation pressure (IRP), has been proposed for the assessment of esophageal-gastric junction (EGJ) relaxation. Our aim was to assess the effect of Heller myotomy on IRP in achalasia patients. We prospectively collected data on achalasia patients who underwent HRM between 2009-2014. Barium swallow was used to assess esophageal diameter and shape. Manometric diagnoses were performed by using the Chicago Classification v3. All patients with a confirmed diagnosis of achalasia were treated surgically with Heller Myotomy One hundred thirty-nine consecutive achalasia patients (M:F = 72:67) represented the study population. All the patients had 100% simultaneous waves but 11 had an IRP achalasia, and how it changes after surgical treatment. An increased preoperative IRP correlated directly with a more severe dysphagia. The IRP was restored to normal by Heller myotomy.

  4. Manometric assessment of esophageal motor function in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Mehmet; Seven, Gulseren; Idilman, Ramazan; Yakut, Mustafa; Doğanay, Beyza; Kabacam, Gökhan; Ustun, Yusuf; Korkut, Esin; Kalkan, Çağdaş; Sahin, Günay; Cetinkaya, Hulya; Bozkaya, Hakan; Yurdaydin, Cihan; Bahar, Kadir; Cinar, Kubilay; Soykan, Irfan

    2014-03-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is associated with other autoimmune diseases including Sjögren's syndrome, and scleroderma. Esophageal dysmotility is well known in scleroderma, and Sjögren's syndrome. The aim of this study is to investigate whether any esophageal motor dysfunction exists in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The study was performed in 37 patients (36 women, mean age: 56.29 ± 10.01 years) who met diagnostic criteria for primary biliary cirrhosis. Thirty-seven functional dyspepsia patients, were also included as a control group. Patients entering the study were asked to complete a symptom questionnaire. Distal esophageal contraction amplitude, and lower esophageal sphincter resting pressure were assessed. Manometric findings in primary biliary cirrhosis patients vs. controls were as follows: Median lower esophageal sphincter resting pressure (mmHg): (24 vs 20, p=0.033); median esophageal contraction amplitude (mmHg): (71 vs 56, p=0.050); mean lower esophageal sphincter relaxation duration (sc, x ± SD): (6.10 ± 1.18 vs 8.29 ± 1.92, pesophageal sphincter relaxation (%) (96 vs 98, p=0.019); respectively. No significant differences were evident in median peak velocity (sc) (3.20 vs 3.02, p=0.778) between patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and the functional dyspepsia patients. Esophageal dysmotility was found in 17 (45.9%) primary biliary cirrhosis patients (non-specific esophageal motor disorder in ten patients, hypomotility of esophagus in five patients, nutcracker esophagus in one patient and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter in one patient). Esophageal dysmotility was detected in 45.9% of patients. The study suggests that subclinic esophageal dysmotility is frequent in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative effect of the sites of anterior cervical pressure on the geometry of the upper esophageal sphincter high-pressure zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Ling; Jiao, Hongmei; Sharma, Tarun; Dua, Arshish; Sanvanson, Patrick; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R; Shaker, Reza

    2017-11-01

    External cricoid pressure is increasingly used to augment the upper esophageal sphincter (UES). Our objective was to determine the effect of 1) pressures applied to cricoid, supracricoid, and subcricoid regions on the length and amplitude of the UES high-pressure zone (UESHPZ), and 2) the external cricoid pressure on lower esophageal sphincter (LES) tone. Case-control study. We studied 11 patients with supraesophageal reflux (mean age 58 ± 12 years) and 10 healthy volunteers (mean age 47 ± 19 years). We tested 20, 30, and 40 mm Hg pressures to cricoid, 1 cm proximal and 1 cm distal to the cricoid. In an additional 15 healthy volunteers (mean age 46 ± 23 years), we studied the effect of external cricoid pressure on LES tone. UES and LES pressures were determined using high-resolution manometry. There was significant increase of UESHPZ length with application of pressure at all sites. The increase of UESHPZ length was relatively symmetric, more orad, and more caudad when the pressure was applied at the cricoid, supracricoid, and subcricoid levels, respectively. The magnitude of pressure increase was greatest at the middle and orad part of the UESHPZ when the pressure was applied at the cricoid and supracricoid levels, respectively. The corresponding magnitude of increase in the caudad part of the UESHPZ was not observed with pressure at the subcricoid level. There was no change of the LES pressure with application of cricoid pressure. The effect of external pressure on the UESHPZ is site dependent. Subcricoid pressure has the least effect on UESHPZ. External cricoid pressure at 20 to 40 mm Hg has no effect on the LES pressure. 3b. Laryngoscope, 127:2466-2474, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. The Kagoshima consensus on esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Boeckxstaens, G E; Gullo, R; Patti, M G; Pandolfino, J E; Kahrilas, P J; Duranceau, A; Jamieson, G; Zaninotto, G

    2012-05-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by lack of peristalsis and a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax appropriately in response to swallowing. This article summarizes the most salient issues in the diagnosis and management of achalasia as discussed in a symposium that took place in Kagoshima, Japan, in September 2010 under the auspices of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  7. The effects of sleeve gastectomy on gastro-esophageal reflux and gastro-esophageal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Jamal O; Wan, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy is an increasingly performed bariatric procedure associated with low morbidity and good short to medium term effects on weight loss and comorbid conditions. Studies assessing the prevalence of post-operative gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), show sleeve gastrectomy may provoke de novo GERD symptoms or worsening of pre-existing GERD. Pathophysiological mechanisms of GERD after sleeve gastrectomy include a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter, increased gastro-esophageal pressure gradient and intra-thoracic migration of the remnant stomach. A reduction in the compliance of the gastric remnant may provoke an increase in transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations. Time-resolved MRI suggests relative gastric stasis in the proximal remnant and increased emptying from the antrum. A lack of standardisation of technique, along with heterogeneity of studies assessing GERD may explain the wide variability in reported results. Simultaneous and careful repair of an associated hiatus hernia may result in a reduction in the prevalence of post-operative GERD.

  8. Three Gaseous Neurotransmitters, Nitric oxide, Carbon Monoxide, and Hydrogen Sulfide, Are Involved in the Neurogenic Relaxation Responses of the Porcine Internal Anal Sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folasire, Oladayo; Mills, Kylie A; Sellers, Donna J; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2016-01-31

    The internal anal sphincter (IAS) plays an important role in maintaining continence and a number of neurotransmitters are known to regulate IAS tone. The aim of this study was to determine the relative importance of the neurotransmitters involved in the relaxant and contractile responses of the porcine IAS. Responses of isolated strips of IAS to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were obtained in the absence and presence of inhibitors of neurotransmitter systems. Contractile responses of the sphincter to EFS were unaffected by the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine (1 μM), but were almost completely abolished by the adrenergic neuron blocker guanethidine (10 μM). Contractile responses were also reduced (by 45% at 5 Hz, P 40-50% reduction), zinc protoprophyrin IX (10 μM), an inhibitor of carbon monoxide synthesis (20-40% reduction), and also propargylglycine (30 μM) and aminooxyacetic acid (30 μM), inhibitors of hydrogen sulphide synthesis (15-20% reduction). Stimulation of IAS efferent nerves releases excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters: noradrenaline is the predominant contractile transmitter with a smaller component from ATP, whilst 3 gases mediate relaxation responses to EFS, with the combined contributions being nitric oxide > carbon monoxide > hydrogen sulfide.

  9. Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Contributes to Tone Generation in Porcine Lower Esophageal Sphincter Via Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Bai

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Endogenous H2S regulates the LES myogenic tone by maintaining the basal [Ca2+]i via Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. H2S-generating enzymes may be a potential therapeutic target for esophageal motility disorders, such as achalasia.

  10. Novel disposable transnasal endoscopy for assessment of esophageal motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Baeg, Myong-Ki; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2014-01-01

    A novel disposable transnasal endoscopy (DTE) with a portable system has been developed to provide unsedated esophagoscopy by modifying capsule endoscopy. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DTE to evaluate esophageal motor function. Patients with or suspected esophageal motility disorders and healthy volunteers were enrolled. Participants underwent esophageal high-resolution manometry and DTE in random order on different days. Motility was observed with DTE at 1, 8, and 16 cm above the gastroesophageal junction. Twenty healthy volunteers and 20 symptomatic subjects participated (8 achalasia, 5 scleroderma, 3 diffuse esophageal spasm, 1 hypertensive peristalsis, 1 peristaltic dysfunction, and 22 normal esophageal function). The normal findings on DTE were as follows. As the subject swallowed water, swallow-induced relaxation with elevation of the lower esophageal sphincter caused the endoscope to cross the Z-line into the gastric lumen. After the passage of water and air, complete closure of the lower esophageal sphincter occurred, with the return of the endoscope to its previous position. During the resting stage of the esophageal body, an air bubble could be seen in the center of the radially wrinkled and occluded lumen. The endoscopic diagnosis was in agreement with the clinical diagnosis in all but 2. Most of the participants reported acceptable discomfort during DTE and 62.5% of the subjects preferred DTE to manometry. DTE can accurately characterize normal esophageal motor function, allowing the diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders. DTE has potential widespread applications, especially in outpatient clinics.

  11. Classification of esophageal motor findings in gastro-esophageal reflux disease: Conclusions from an international consensus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C P; Roman, S; Bredenoord, A J; Fox, M; Keller, J; Pandolfino, J E; Sifrim, D; Tatum, R; Yadlapati, R; Savarino, E

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has resulted in new revelations regarding the pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The impact of new HRM motor paradigms on reflux burden needs further definition, leading to a modern approach to motor testing in GERD. Focused literature searches were conducted, evaluating pathophysiology of GERD with emphasis on HRM. The results were discussed with an international group of experts to develop a consensus on the role of HRM in GERD. A proposed classification system for esophageal motor abnormalities associated with GERD was generated. Physiologic gastro-esophageal reflux is inherent in all humans, resulting from transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations that allow venting of gastric air in the form of a belch. In pathological gastro-esophageal reflux, transient LES relaxations are accompanied by reflux of gastric contents. Structural disruption of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) barrier, and incomplete clearance of the refluxate can contribute to abnormally high esophageal reflux burden that defines GERD. Esophageal HRM localizes the LES for pH and pH-impedance probe placement, and assesses esophageal body peristaltic performance prior to invasive antireflux therapies and antireflux surgery. Furthermore, HRM can assess EGJ and esophageal body mechanisms contributing to reflux, and exclude conditions that mimic GERD. Structural and motor EGJ and esophageal processes contribute to the pathophysiology of GERD. A classification scheme is proposed incorporating EGJ and esophageal motor findings, and contraction reserve on provocative tests during HRM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Esophageal striated muscle contractions in patients with Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.O. Dantas

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease causes degeneration and reduction of the number of intrinsic neurons of the esophageal myenteric plexus, with consequent absent or partial lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and loss of peristalsis in the esophageal body. The impairment of esophageal motility is seen mainly in the distal smooth muscle region. There is no study about esophageal striated muscle contractions in the disease. In 81 patients with heartburn (44 with esophagitis taken as controls, 51 patients with Chagas' disease (21 with esophageal dilatation and 18 patients with idiopathic achalasia (11 with esophageal dilatation we studied the amplitude, duration and area under the curve of esophageal proximal contractions. Using the manometric method and a continuous perfusion system we measured the esophageal striated muscle contractions 2 to 3 cm below the upper esophageal sphincter after swallows of a 5-ml bolus of water. There was no significant difference in striated muscle contractions between patients with heartburn and esophagitis and patients with heartburn without esophagitis. There was also no significant difference between patients with heartburn younger or older than 50 years or between men and women or in esophageal striated muscle contractions between patients with heartburn and Chagas' disease. The esophageal proximal amplitude of contractions was lower in patients with idiopathic achalasia than in patients with heartburn. In patients with Chagas' disease there was no significant difference between patients with esophageal dilatation and patients with normal esophageal diameter. Esophageal striated muscle contractions in patients with Chagas' disease have the same amplitude and duration as seen in patients with heartburn. Patients with idiopathic achalasia have a lower amplitude of contraction than patients with heartburn.

  13. [Primary esophageal motility disorders; especially about esophageal achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Sakai, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders are classified primary and secondary, and primary esophageal motility disorders are classified esophageal achalasia and other diseases by manometry. An esophageal emptying disorder associated with insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and elimination of peristaltic waves on the esophageal body is the major abnormality of achalasia. Esophagogram, endoscopy, and manometry are used for diagnosis. As pharmacological therapy, administration of a calcium channel blocker or nitrate is useful. The pharmacological therapy is not recommended as long-term basic therapy but as a temporary treatment. At 1st, the balloon dilation method is chosen in treatment of achalasia Surgical treatment is indicated in the following cases: (1) Patients uneffected by balloon dilation, (2) Flask type with grade II to III dilation, and sigmoid type, (3) the gradual progression to the pathophysiological stage, (4) young patients, (5) complicated with esophageal cancer. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure is the most popular surgical procedure, recently. It is somewhat difficult to perform surgical treatment for this functional disease. We should select the most suitable individualized treatment with efficient comprehension of the pathophysiological situation.

  14. Radiofrequency energy delivery to the lower esophageal sphincter improves gastroesophageal reflux patient-reported outcomes in failed laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Mark; Squires, Patrick; Khan, Sulman

    2017-07-01

    Patients with uncontrollable gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) often undergo laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF); however, long-term there are often recurring symptoms and need for continuous medication use. Refractory LNF patients may receive radiofrequency energy delivery to the lower esophageal sphincter (Stretta) to ameliorate symptoms and medication requirements. The aim was to assess and compare long-term patient-reported outcomes of Stretta in refractory patients with and without previous LNF. We prospectively assessed and compared patient-reported outcomes in 18 refractory LNF patients and 81 standard refractory GERD patients that all underwent Stretta during 10-year follow-up. Patient-reported outcomes measured were GERD-HRQL (health-related quality of life), patient satisfaction scores, and daily medication requirements. The refractory LNF subset demonstrated median improvements in GERD-HRQL, satisfaction, and medication use at all follow-up time points ≥6 months to 10 years, which was significant from a baseline of both on- and off-medications (p  0.05) after Stretta. At 10 years, no significant differences were noted between refractory LNF and standard Stretta subsets regarding medication use (p = 0.088), patient satisfaction (p = 0.573), and GERD-HRQL (p = 0.075). Stretta procedures were completed without difficulty or significant intraoperative or long-term adverse events. Within a small cohort of refractory LNF patients, Stretta resulted in sustained improvement over 10 years with equivalent outcomes to non-LNF standard Stretta patients. Refractory LNF patients are a subpopulation that may be safely, effectively, and robustly aided by Stretta with fewer complications compared to redo of Nissen or chronic medication use.

  15. Esophageal achalasia: current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2018-05-27

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder of unknown origin, characterized by lack of peristalsis and by incomplete or absent relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing. The goal of treatment is to eliminate the functional obstruction at the level of the gastroesophageal junction Areas covered: This comprehensive review will evaluate the current literature, illustrating the diagnostic evaluation and providing an evidence-based treatment algorithm for this disease Expert commentary: Today we have three very effective therapeutic modalities to treat patients with achalasia - pneumatic dilatation, per-oral endoscopic myotomy and laparoscopic Heller myotomy with fundoplication. Treatment should be tailored to the individual patient, in centers where a multidisciplinary approach is available. Esophageal resection should be considered as a last resort for patients who have failed prior therapeutic attempts.

  16. Control of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations and reflux by the GABAB agonist baclofen in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q; Lehmann, A; Rigda, R; Dent, J; Holloway, R H

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLOSRs) are the major cause of gastro-oesophageal reflux in normal subjects and in most patients with reflux disease. The gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor type B agonist, baclofen, is a potent inhibitor of TLOSRs in normal subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of baclofen on TLOSRs and postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with reflux disease. Methods: In 20 patients with reflux disease, oesophageal motility and pH were measured, with patients in the sitting position, for three hours after a 3000 kJ mixed nutrient meal. On separate days at least one week apart, 40 mg oral baclofen or placebo was given 90 minutes before the meal. Results: Baclofen reduced the rate of TLOSRs by 40% from 15 (13.8–18.3) to 9 (5.8–13.3) per three hours (preflux episodes by 43% from 7.0 (4.0–12.0) to 4.0 (1.5–9) per three hours (median (interquartile range); preflux disease, the GABAB agonist baclofen significantly inhibits gastro-oesophageal reflux episodes by inhibition of TLOSRs. These findings suggest that GABAB agonists may be useful as therapeutic agents for the management of reflux disease. PMID:11772961

  17. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shoukat H; P, Madhu Vijay; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-30

    Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in patients of primary hypothyroidism using the technique of radionuclide esophageal transit scintigraphy. Thirty-one patients of primary hypothyroidism and 15 euthyroid healthy controls were evaluated for esophageal transit time using 15-20 MBq of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid diluted in 10-15 mL of drinking water. Time activity curve was generated for each study and esophageal transit time was calculated as time taken for clearance of 90% radioactive bolus from the region of interest encompassing the esophagus. Esophageal transit time of more than 10 seconds was considered as prolonged. Patients of primary hypothyroidism had a significantly increased mean esophageal transit time of 19.35 ± 20.02 seconds in comparison to the mean time of 8.25 ± 1.71 seconds in healthy controls ( P < 0.05). Esophageal transit time improved and in some patients even normalized after treatment with thyroxine. A positive correlation ( r = 0.39, P < 0.05) albeit weak existed between the serum thyroid stimulating hormone and the observed esophageal transit time. A significant number of patients with primary hypothyroidism may have subclinical esophageal dysmotility with prolonged esophageal transit time which can be reversible by thyroxine treatment. Prolonged esophageal transit time in primary hypothyroidism may correlate with serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels.

  18. Esophageal Achalasia: Pathophysiology, Clinical Presentation, and Diagnostic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Neto, Rafael M L; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2018-04-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax in response to swallowing. These abnormalities lead to impaired emptying of food from the esophagus into the stomach with resulting food stasis. Most patients experience severe dysphagia, and regurgitation can lead to aspiration and respiratory problems. Consequently, the quality of life of patients affected by achalasia is severely impacted. A thorough evaluation with upper endoscopy, barium swallow, and esophageal manometry is mandatory to establish the diagnosis and plan the optimal treatment. In selected patients, an ambulatory pH monitoring is recommended to distinguish between gastroesophageal reflux disease and achalasia.

  19. Different in vitro and in vivo profiles of substituted 3-aminopropylphosphinate and 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinate GABAB receptor agonists as inhibitors of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, A; Antonsson, M; Aurell-Holmberg, A; Blackshaw, LA; Brändén, L; Elebring, T; Jensen, J; Kärrberg, L; Mattsson, JP; Nilsson, K; Oja, SS; Saransaari, P; von Unge, S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Gastro-oesophageal reflux is predominantly caused by transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation (TLOSR) and GABAB receptor stimulation inhibits TLOSR. Lesogaberan produces fewer CNS side effects than baclofen, which has been attributed to its affinity for the GABA transporter (GAT), the action of which limits stimulation of central GABAB receptors. To understand the structure–activity relationship for analogues of lesogaberan (3-aminopropylphosphinic acids), and corresponding 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinic acids, we have compared representatives of these classes in different in vitro and in vivo models. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The compounds were characterized in terms of GABAB agonism in vitro. Binding to GATs and cellular uptake was done using rat brain membranes and slices respectively. TLOSR was measured in dogs, and CNS side effects were evaluated as hypothermia in mice and rats. KEY RESULTS 3-Aminopropylphosphinic acids inhibited TLOSR with a superior therapeutic index compared to 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinic acids. This difference was most likely due to differential GAT-mediated uptake into brain cells of the former but not latter. In agreement, 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinic acids were much more potent in producing hypothermia in rats even when administered i.c.v. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS An enhanced therapeutic window for 3-aminopropylphosphinic acids compared with 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinic acids with respect to inhibition of TLOSR was observed and is probably mechanistically linked to neural cell uptake of the former but not latter group of compounds. These findings offer a platform for discovery of new GABAB receptor agonists for the treatment of reflux disease and other conditions where selective peripheral GABAB receptor agonism may afford therapeutic effects. PMID:21950457

  20. Experimental esophagitis: evaluation by radionuclide esophagogram (sup(99m)TC-sulfur colloid). Manometric and histopathologic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Devito, M.P.; Lamoureux, C.; Levasseur, A.

    1983-01-01

    The radionuclide esophageal transit time (using sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid) is abnormal in peptic esophagitis. The mechanisms responsible for such results are not fully understood. The hypothesis are multiple. In order to evaluate the effects of acute inflammation of esophageal wall on the radionuclide esophagogram (RE), 12 cats were submitted to manometry, endoscopy and RE before and after esophageal infusion of chlorhydric acid (HCl 0.1 N). Manometry results demonstrated a marked decline of the esophageal contraction waves pressure and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure. There was also an increased esophageal contraction duration and duration of LES relaxation. The radionuclide esophageal transit time was markedly increased. The radiocolloid retention was secondary to adherence of it to the sites of inflamed and ulcerated esophageal wall. The radionuclide adhesion corresponded to the degree of esophagitis. These results confirm that peptic esophagitis can cause esophageal motor dysfunction which can be identified by a sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid esophagogram. The retention of radiocolloid corresponded to the sites inflamed esophageal wall. Thus, the radionuclide retention and transit time, when abnormal, are an index of esophageal disorders [fr

  1. Experimental esophagitis: evaluation by radionuclide esophagogram (sup(99m)TC-sulfur colloid). Manometric and histopathologic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Devito, M.P.; Lamoureux, C.; Levasseur, A. (Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Universite de Montreal (Canada))

    1983-01-01

    The radionuclide esophageal transit time (using sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid) is abnormal in peptic esophagitis. The mechanisms responsible for such results are not fully understood. The hypothesis are multiple. In order to evaluate the effects of acute inflammation of esophageal wall on the radionuclide esophagogram (RE), 12 cats were submitted to manometry, endoscopy and RE before and after esophageal infusion of chlorhydric acid (HCl 0.1 N). Manometry results demonstrated a marked decline of the esophageal contraction waves pressure and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure. There was also an increased esophageal contraction duration and duration of LES relaxation. The radionuclide esophageal transit time was markedly increased. The radiocolloid retention was secondary to adherence of it to the sites of inflamed and ulcerated esophageal wall. The radionuclide adhesion corresponded to the degree of esophagitis. These results confirm that peptic esophagitis can cause esophageal motor dysfunction which can be identified by a sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid esophagogram. The retention of radiocolloid corresponded to the sites of inflamed esophageal wall. Thus, the radionuclide retention and transit time, when abnormal, are an index of esophageal disorders.

  2. Recent developments in esophageal motor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Hanneke; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2007-07-01

    Every year more insight into the pathogenesis and treatment of esophageal motor disorders is obtained. This review highlights some interesting literature published in this area during the last year. Longitudinal and circular muscle contractions act in a well coordinated fashion to allow normal peristalsis. Techniques such as intraluminal impedance, high-resolution manometry and intraluminal ultrasound provide useful additional information on esophageal function both in the normal and abnormal situation. The dynamics of the gastroesophageal junction can be studied with a newly developed probe, and the mechanism behind transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations is still being unravelled. New manometric criteria for nutcracker esophagus have been proposed, whereas further evidence is reported supporting an association between diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease and esophageal dysmotility and spasm, respectively. Finally, several long-term follow-up results of surgical myotomy and pneumodilatation have been reported. Due to the perfection of esophageal measuring techniques, our knowledge of esophageal function continues to increase. The studies reviewed here provide interesting information on the pathogenesis and treatment of several esophageal motor disorders.

  3. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  4. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Presentation of case: We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diver...

  5. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A H; Iorio, N; Schey, R

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus and is a potential cause of dysphagia and food impaction, most commonly affecting young men. Esophageal manometry findings vary from normal motility to aperistalsis, simultaneous contractions, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus or hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (LES). It remains unclear whether esophageal dysmotility plays a significant role in the clinical symptoms of EoE. Our aim is to review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and effect of treatment on esophageal dysmotility in EoE. A literature search utilizing the PubMed database was performed using keywords: eosinophilic esophagitis, esophageal dysmotility, motility, manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagogram, endoscopic ultrasound, and dysphagia. Fifteen studies, totaling 387 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis were identified as keeping in accordance with the aim of this study and included in this review. The occurrence of abnormal esophageal manometry was reported to be between 4 and 87% among patients with EoE. Esophageal motility studies have shown reduced distensibility, abnormal peristalsis, and hypotonicity of the LES in patients with EoE, which may also mimic other esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia or nutcracker esophagus. Studies have shown conflicting results regarding the presence of esophageal dysmotility and symptoms with some reports suggesting a higher rate of food impaction, while others report no correlation between motor function and dysphagia. Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on

  6. Inhaled Beta Agonist Bronchodilator Does Not Affect Trans-diaphragmatic Pressure Gradient but Decreases Lower Esophageal Sphincter Retention Pressure in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Grande, Leonardo M; Herbella, Fernando A M; Bigatao, Amilcar M; Jardim, Jose R; Patti, Marco G

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients have a high incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) whose pathophysiology seems to be linked to an increased trans-diaphragmatic pressure gradient and not to a defective esophagogastric barrier. Inhaled beta agonist bronchodilators are a common therapy used by patients with COPD. This drug knowingly not only leads to a decrease in the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure, favoring GERD, but also may improve ventilatory parameters, therefore preventing GERD. This study aims to evaluate the effect of inhaled beta agonist bronchodilators on the trans-diaphragmatic pressure gradient and the esophagogastric barrier. We studied 21 patients (mean age 67 years, 57 % males) with COPD and GERD. All patients underwent high-resolution manometry and esophageal pH monitoring. Abdominal and thoracic pressure, trans-diaphragmatic pressure gradient (abdominal-thoracic pressure), and the LES retention pressure (LES basal pressure-transdiaphragmatic gradient) were measured before and 5 min after inhaling beta agonist bronchodilators. The administration of inhaled beta agonist bronchodilators leads to the following: (a) a simultaneous increase in abdominal and thoracic pressure not affecting the trans-diaphragmatic pressure gradient and (b) a decrease in the LES resting pressure with a reduction of the LES retention pressure. In conclusion, inhaled beta agonist bronchodilators not only increase the thoracic pressure but also lead to an increased abdominal pressure favoring GERD by affecting the esophagogastric barrier.

  7. Treatment implications of high-resolution manometry findings: options for patients with esophageal dysmotility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkhir, Ahmed; Gyawali, C Prakash

    2014-03-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has significantly impacted diagnosis and management of achalasia in particular, and has improved characterization of other motor disorders. Achalasia, the most profound esophageal motor disorder, is characterized by esophageal outflow obstruction from abnormal relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) during swallowing, and presents with transit symptoms (dysphagia, regurgitation). Esophageal body motor disorders include both inhibitory nerve dysfunction associated with hypermotility or spasm, and hypomotility disorders with poor contraction. The implications of hypermotility disorders are both perceptive and obstructive. On the other hand, hypomotility disorders have reflux implications because of abnormal barrier function at the LES, and abnormal bolus clearance. Esophageal outflow obstruction in achalasia responds favorably to disruption of the LES, and outcome may be predicted by HRM subtyping of achalasia. Identification of dominant (perceptive vs. obstructive) mechanisms of symptom generation help direct therapy of hypermotility disorders, while hypomotility disorders typically require management of concurrent reflux disease.

  8. Effect of peroral esophageal myotomy for achalasia treatment: A Chinese study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng; Hu, Yue; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Shuo; Cai, Li-Jun

    2015-05-14

    To assess the safety and feasibility of peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM) in patients with achalasia. From January 2012 to March 2014, 50 patients (28 men, 22 women; mean age: 42.8 years, range: 14-70 years) underwent POEM. Pre- and postoperative symptoms were quantified using the Eckardt scoring system. Barium swallow and esophagogastroscopy were performed before and after POEM, respectively. Esophageal motility was evaluated in all patients, both preoperatively and one month after POEM treatment, using a high-resolution manometry system. Manometry data, Eckardt scores, lower esophageal sphincter pressure and barium swallow results were used to evaluate the effect of the procedure. POEM was successfully completed for all patients. The mean procedure time was 55.4 ± 17.3 min and the mean total length of myotomy of the circular esophagus was 10.5 ± 2.6 cm. No specific complications occurred, with the exception of two patients that developed asymptomatic pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema. Clinical improvement in symptoms was achieved in all patients. Approximately 77.5% of patients experienced weight gain 6 mo after POEM, with an average of 4.78 kg (range: 2-15 kg). The lower esophageal sphincter resting pressure, four second integrated relaxation pressure and Eckardt scores were all significantly reduced after POEM (Ps achalasia symptoms, improve gastroesophageal junction relaxation and restore esophageal body motility function, but not normal esophageal peristalsis.

  9. Diagnosis and management of esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Parkman, Henry P

    2016-09-13

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder that is usually idiopathic in origin. It is characterized by dysphagia, and patients often have chest pain, regurgitation, weight loss, and an abnormal barium radiograph showing esophageal dilation with narrowing at the gastroesophageal junction. Abnormal or absent esophageal peristalsis and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) are typically seen on esophageal manometry. The advent of high resolution manometry (HRM) has allowed more precise diagnosis of achalasia, subtype designation, and differentiation from other esophageal motor disorders with an initial seminal publication in 2008 followed by further refinements of what has been termed the Chicago classification. Potential treatments include drugs, endoscopic botulinum toxin injection, balloon dilation, traditional surgery (usually laparoscopic Heller myotomy; LHM), and a novel, less invasive, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to Heller myotomy termed peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first human POEM was performed in 2008, with the first publication appearing in 2010 and evidence now rapidly accumulating showing POEM to be comparable to traditional surgery in terms of clinical success and radiologic and manometric post-therapy outcomes. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of achalasia with particular emphasis on the recent developments of HRM and POEM, which arguably represent the most important advances in the field since the advent of laparoscopic Heller myotomy in the 1990s. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: a role for mucosa integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, R

    2013-10-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is very prevalent and has a high burden on health security system costs. Nevertheless, pathophysiology is complex and not well-understood. Several mechanisms have been proposed: decreased salivation, impaired esophageal clearance, decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure resting tone, presence of hiatal hernia, increased number of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs), increased acid, and pepsin secretion, pyloric incompetence provoking duodeno-gastro-esophageal reflux of bile acids and trypsin. Independent of the relevance of each mechanism, the ultimate phenomenon is that mucosal epithelium is exposed for a longer time to agents as acid and pepsin or is in contact to luminal agents not commonly present in gastric refluxate as trypsin or bile acids. This leads to a visible damage of the epithelium (erosive esophagitis -EE) or impairing mucosal integrity without any sign of macroscopic alteration as occurs in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Luminal factors are not the only responsible for such impairment; more recent data indicate that endogenous factors may also play a role. This review will update the most recent findings on the putative pathophysiological mechanisms and specially will focus on the role of esophageal mucosal integrity in GERD. Methodologies used for the evaluation of mucosal integrity, its relevance in EE and NERD, its involvement in symptoms perception and the effect of luminal and endogenous factors will be discussed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Physiology of Normal Esophageal Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Raj K; Chaudhury, Arun

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus consists of two different parts. In humans, the cervical esophagus is composed of striated muscles and the thoracic esophagus is composed of phasic smooth muscles. The striated muscle esophagus is innervated by the lower motor neurons and peristalsis in this segment is due to sequential activation of the motor neurons in the nucleus ambiguus. Both primary and secondary peristaltic contractions are centrally mediated. The smooth muscle of esophagus is phasic in nature and is innervated by intramural inhibitory (nitric oxide releasing) and excitatory (acetylcholine releasing) neurons that receive inputs from separate sets of preganglionic neurons located in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus. The primary peristalsis in this segment involves both central and peripheral mechanisms. The primary peristalsis consist of inhibition (called deglutitive inhibition) followed by excitation. The secondary peristalsis is entirely due to peripheral mechanisms and also involves inhibition followed by excitation. The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is characterized by tonic muscle that is different from the muscle of the esophageal body. The LES, like the esophageal body smooth muscle, is also innervated by the inhibitory and excitatory neurons. The LES maintains tonic closure due to its myogenic property. The LES tone is modulated by the inhibitory and the excitatory nerves. Inhibitory nerves mediate LES relaxation and the excitatory nerves mediate reflex contraction or rebound contraction of the LES. Clinical disorders of esophageal motility can be classified on the basis of disorders of the inhibitory and excitatory innervations and the smooth muscles. PMID:18364578

  12. Avaliação eletromanométrica do esfíncter superior do esôfago em portadores da forma indeterminada da doença de Chagas Manometric evaluation of upper esophageal sphincter in patients with indeterminate form of Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Crema

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar as alterações do esfíncter superior esofágico pela eletromanometria em 37 pacientes portadores da forma clínica indeterminada da doença de Chagas. Foram encontrados 18 (48,6% pacientes portadores de ondas sincrônicas. A média das pressões máximas do esfíncter foi significativamente maior entre os portadores de ondas sincrônicas. Assim, alguns indivíduos portadores da forma indeterminada da doença de Chagas possuem alterações funcionais caracterizadas pelo aumento da pressão do esfíncter superior do esôfago, que podem ser detectadas à eletromanometria.The objective was to study the disorders of upper esophageal sphincter in 37 patients with indeterminate clinical form of Chagas' disease. Eighty (48.6% patients with synchronic waves were found. The average maximum pressure value of the upper esophageal sphincter was significantly higher in the synchronic group. Subjects with indeterminate clinical form of Chagas' disease may have functional disorders demonstrated by an increase in the pressure of the upper esophageal sphincter.

  13. Elevated intrabolus pressure identifies obstructive processes when integrated relaxation pressure is normal on esophageal high-resolution manometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quader, Farhan; Reddy, Chanakyaram; Patel, Amit; Gyawali, C Prakash

    2017-07-01

    Elevated integrated relaxation pressure (IRP) on esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) identifies obstructive processes at the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). Our aim was to determine whether intrabolus pressure (IBP) can identify structural EGJ processes when IRP is normal. In this observational cohort study, adult patients with dysphagia and undergoing HRM were evaluated for endoscopic evidence of structural EGJ processes (strictures, rings, hiatus hernia) in the setting of normal IRP. HRM metrics [IRP, distal contractile integral (DCI), distal latency (DL), IBP, and EGJ contractile integral (EGJ-CI)] were compared among 74 patients with structural EGJ findings (62.8 ± 1.6 yr, 67.6% women), 27 patients with normal EGD (52.9 ± 3.2 yr, 70.3% women), and 21 healthy controls (27.6 ± 0.6 yr, 52.4% women). Findings were validated in 85 consecutive symptomatic patients to address clinical utility. In the primary cohort, mean IBP (18.4 ± 0.9 mmHg) was higher with structural EGJ findings compared with dysphagia with normal EGD (13.5 ± 1.1 mmHg, P = 0.002) and healthy controls (10.9 ± 0.9 mmHg, P 0.05 for each comparison). During multiple rapid swallows, IBP remained higher in the structural findings group compared with controls ( P = 0.02). Similar analysis of the prospective validation cohort confirmed IBP elevation in structural EGJ processes, but correlation with dysphagia could not be demonstrated. We conclude that elevated IBP predicts the presence of structural EGJ processes even when IRP is normal, but correlation with dysphagia is suboptimal. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Integrated relaxation pressure (IRP) above the upper limit of normal defines esophageal outflow obstruction using high-resolution manometry. In patients with normal IRP, elevated intrabolus pressure (IBP) can be a surrogate marker for a structural restrictive or obstructive process at the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). This has the potential to augment the clinical value of

  14. [Laparoscopic Heller myotomy for esophageal achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Luis; Butte, Jean Michel; Pimentel, Fernando; Escalona, Alex; Pérez, Gustavo; Crovari, Fernando; Guzmán, Sergio; Llanos, Osvaldo

    2007-04-01

    Achalasia is characterized by an incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. The best treatment is surgical and the laparoscopic approach may have good results. To assess the results of laparoscopic Heller myotomy among patients with achalasia. Prospective study of patients subjected to a laparoscopic Heller myotomy between 1995 and 2004. Clinical features, early and late operative results were assessed. Twenty seven patients aged 12 to 74 years (12 females) were operated. All had disphagia lasting for a mean of 32 months. Mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure ranged from 18 to 85 mmHg. Eight patients received other treatments prior to surgery but symptoms persisted or reappeared. The preoperative clinical score was 7. No patient died and no procedure had to be converted to open surgery. In a follow up of 21 to 131 months, all patients are satisfied with the surgical results and the postoperative clinical score is 1. Only one patient with a mega esophagus maintained a clinical score of six. In this series of patients, laparoscopic Heller myotomy was an effective and safe treatment for esophageal achalasia.

  15. [Esophageal motor disorders in asymptomatic subjects with Trypanosoma cruzi infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Aguilera, M; Remes-Troche, J M; Roesch-Dietlen, F; Vázquez-Jiménez, J G; De la Cruz-Patiño, E; Grube-Pagola, P; Ruiz-Juárez, I

    2011-01-01

    The indeterminate chronic or "asymptomatic" phase of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' disease) infection is characterized by the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms, and has an estimated duration of 20 to 30 years. However, the intramural denervation that induces dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract is progressive. Recently, epidemiological studies have shown that the seroprevalence for this infection in our area ranges between 2% and 3% of the population. To detect the presence of esophageal motor disorders in asymptomatic individuals chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi using standard esophageal manometry. A cross sectional study in 28 asymptomatic subjects (27 men, age 40.39 ± 10.79) with serological evidence of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi was performed. In all cases demographic characteristics, gastrointestinal symptoms and esophageal motility disorders using conventional manometry were analyzed. In this study 54% (n = 15) of asymptomatic subjects had an esophageal motor disorder: 5 (18%) had nutcracker esophagus, 5 (18%) nonspecific esophageal motor disorders, 3 (11%) hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (LES), 1 (4%) an incomplete relaxation of the LES and 1 (4%) had chagasic achalasia. More than half of patients that course with Chagas' disease in the indeterminate phase and that are apparently asymptomatic have impaired esophageal motility. Presence of hypertensive LES raises the possibility that this alteration represents an early stage in the development of chagasic achalasia.

  16. Causes and treatments of achalasia, and primary disorders of the esophageal body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Valter Nilton; DeVault, Kenneth; Penagini, Roberto; Elvevi, Alessandra; Swanstrom, Lee; Wassenaar, Eelco; Crespin, Oscar M; Pellegrini, Carlos A; Wong, Roy

    2013-10-01

    The following on achalasia and disorders of the esophageal body includes commentaries on controversies regarding whether patients with complete lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation can be considered to exhibit early achalasia; the roles of different mucle components of the LES in achalasia; sensory neural pathways impaired in achalasia; indications for peroral endoscopic myotomy and advantages of the technique over laparoscopic and thorascopic myotomy; factors contributing to the success of surgical therapy for achalasia; modifications to the classification of esophageal body primary motility disorders in the advent of high-resolution manometry (HRM); analysis of the LES in differentiating between achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm (DES); and appropriate treatment for DES, nutcracker esophagus (NE), and hypertensive LES (HTLES). © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Evaluation of esophageal motor function in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyawali, C. P.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Conklin, J. L.; Fox, M.; Pandolfino, J. E.; Peters, J. H.; Roman, S.; Staiano, A.; Vaezi, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal motor function is highly coordinated between central and enteric nervous systems and the esophageal musculature, which consists of proximal skeletal and distal smooth muscle in three functional regions, the upper and lower esophageal sphincters, and the esophageal body. While upper

  18. Esophageal motility after peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Li, Meng; Lu, Bin; Meng, Lina; Fan, Yihong; Bao, Haibiao

    2016-05-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been introduced as a novel endoscopic treatment for achalasia. The aim of this work is to assess the changes in esophageal motility caused by POEM in patients with achalasia. Forty-one patients with achalasia underwent POEM from September 2012 to November 2014. Esophageal motility of all patients was evaluated preoperatively and 1 month after POEM utilizing high-resolution manometry, which was performed with ten water swallows, ten steamed bread swallows, and multiple rapid swallows (MRS). In single swallows, including liquid swallows and bread swallows, all the parameters of lower esophagus sphincter resting pressure (LESP), 4-s integrated relaxation pressure (4sIRP), and intra-bolus pressure (IBP) were decreased between pre- and post-POEM patients (all p 0.05), but increased in subtype I (subtype I: p > 0.05). In liquid swallows, the Eckardt score of subtype II patients decreased with DCI, and distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude after POEM was significantly lower compared with those showing increased values of those two parameters (p achalasia patients. POEM reduces LES pressure in achalasia, and partly restores esophageal motility. POEM displayed varying effect on esophageal motility in patients with different patterns of swallowing. In addition, the changes in parameters associated with esophageal peristalsis correlated with decreases in Eckardt score.

  19. Esophageal achalasia in children — clinical case and literature review

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    Ivantsiv-Griga I.S.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Esophageal achalasia is a primary disorder of the motor function characterized by the increased pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter, impairment of its reflex relaxation and inhibited peristalsis of the esophagus which, in turn, leads to functional obstruction of the distal section of the esophagus. Goal. Improvement of early diagnosis and treatment outcomes of esophageal achalasia in children. Materials and methods. Clinical observation, laboratory and instrumental examination of a 10 year old child with esophageal achalasia. Results. The results of clinical data and laboratory and instrumental examination methods were analized and the diagnosis of esophageal achalasia in a 10 year old male was confirmed. Conclusions. The described clinical case provided an opportunity for a thorough analysis of the clinical aspects of diagnosis and treatment of the given pathology. Esophageal achalasia is a rare pathology in children and has an atypical clinical manifestation; therefore, primary care physicians should study this disorder in detail and make a great effort to diagnose it in a timely manner.

  20. Esophageal achalasia in adolescence - two case reports

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    Inês Vaz Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Achalasia is a rare disorder, particularly in pediatrics, characterized by esophageal aperistalsis and inadequate relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Its etiology remains unclear. Cases: We describe two adolescents with dysphagia for solids and liquids, vomiting, weight loss and nocturnal cough for a few months. Initially it was considered to be an eating disorder, and the diagnosis of achalasia was reached later by esophageal manometry in one case and by intraoperative biopsy in another. The patients were submitted to Heller myotomy with an antireflux procedure, laparoscopically in one case, and by laparotomy in another, both with a favorable outcome. Discussion/Conclusions: We emphasize the rarity and diagnostic challenge of these cases. The nonspecific symptoms often lead to the diagnosis of an eating disorder, delaying the correct treatment. If symptoms persist achalasia must be considered and the esophageal manometry is the diagnostic test of choice. The gold standard in treatment is surgical, and we highlight the effectiveness of the techniques applied.

  1. Esophageal Motility Disorders: Current Concepts of Pathogenesis and Treatment

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    Peter J Kahrilas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Current concepts of esophageal motility disorders are summarized. Primary data sources were located via MEDLINE or cross-citation. No attempt was made to be comprehensive or inclusive of the literature because fewer than 10% of citations are discussed. Instead, emphasis was placed on new developments in diagnosis, therapeutics, and practice patterns. Controlled therapeutic trials and pathophysiological observations are emphasized. Achalasia is a rare disease of failed lower sphincter relaxation and aperistalsis. Diffuse esophageal spasm (DES, an equally rare disease, is defined by non-propagated esophageal contractions. Nonspecific motility disorders, including nutcracker esophagus and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, are identified only by manometry and are ten times as prevalent. Neuromuscular pathology is evident only with achalasia (myenteric plexus neurons destruction. Pharmacological therapies have limited efficacy with achalasia; more limited with DES; and none with the nonspecific motility disorders. More efficacious therapies for the nonspecific disorders are directed at associated reflux disease or psychiatric disorders. Pneumatic dilation is effective therapy for achalasia 72% of instances, but frequently requires repeat dilation and is complicated by a 3% perforation rate. Surgical myotomy is effective in 88% of achalasics; morbidity from thoracotomy has been the major limitation but this has been sharply reduced with a laparoscopic approach. In conclusion, although it has been suggested that esophageal motility disorders are distinct clinical entities, critical review of the literature supports this only in the case of achalasia, a disease of well defined pathophysiology, functional disturbance, and therapies. This clarity diminishes progressively for DES and non-specific esophageal motility disorders.

  2. Esophageal achalasia compressing left atrium diagnosed by echocardiography using a liquid containing carbon dioxide in a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Man Je; Song, Bong Gun; Lee, Hyoun Soo; Kim, Ki Hoon; Ok, Hea Sung; Kim, Byeong Ki; Park, Yong Hwan; Kang, Gu Hyun; Chun, Woo Jung; Oh, Ju Hyeon

    2012-01-01

    Extrinsic compression of the left atrium by the esophagus, the stomach, or both is an uncommon but important cause of hemodynamic compromise. Achalasia is a motility disorder characterized by impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and dilatation of the distal two thirds of the esophagus. Echocardiographic imaging after oral ingestion of liquid containing carbon dioxide allowed for differentiation between a compressive vascular structure and the esophagus. We report a rare case of esophageal achalasia compressing the left atrium diagnosed by echocardiography using a liquid containing carbon dioxide in a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Longitudinal muscle of the esophagus: its role in esophageal health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2013-07-01

    The muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. The function of the longitudinal muscle and its role in bolus propulsion are not clear. The goal of this review is to summarize what is known of the role of the longitudinal muscle in health, as well as in sensory and motor disorders of the esophagus. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging reveal that, during peristalsis, the two muscle layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the contrary, during transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation, longitudinal muscle contracts independent of the circular muscle. Recent studies have provided novel insights into the role of the longitudinal muscle in LES relaxation and descending relaxation of the esophagus. In certain diseases (e.g. some motility disorders of the esophagus), there is discoordination between the two muscle layers, which likely plays an important role in the genesis of dysphagia and delayed esophageal emptying. There is close temporal correlation between prolonged contractions of the longitudinal muscles of the esophagus and esophageal 'angina-like' pain. Novel techniques to record longitudinal muscle contraction are reviewed. Longitudinal muscles of the esophagus play a key role in the physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Neuro-pharmacologic controls of circular and longitudinal muscle are different, which provides an opportunity for the development of novel pharmacological therapies in the treatment of esophageal sensory and motor disorders.

  4. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease and obesity, where is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, Sara; Rescio, Maria Paola; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cicala, Michele

    2013-10-21

    The confluence between the increased prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) and of obesity has generated great interest in the association between these two conditions. Several studies have addressed the potential relationship between GERD and obesity, but the exact mechanism by which obesity causes reflux disease still remains to be clearly defined. A commonly suggested pathogenetic pathway is the increased abdominal pressure which relaxes the lower esophageal sphincter, thus exposing the esophageal mucosal to gastric content. Apart from the mechanical pressure, visceral fat is metabolically active and it has been strongly associated with serum levels of adipo-cytokines including interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor α, which may play a role in GERD or consequent carcinogenesis. This summary is aimed to explore the potential mechanisms responsible for the association between GERD and obesity, and to better understand the possible role of weight loss as a therapeutic approach for GERD.

  5. Laparoscopic treatment for esophageal achalasia: experience at a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrusa, A; Romano, G; Bonventre, S; Salamone, G; Cocorullo, G; Gulotta, G

    2013-01-01

    Achalasia is a not frequent esophageal disorder characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Its cause is unknown. The aim of treatment is to improve the symptoms. We report the results of the treatment of this condition achieved in one center. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with esophageal achalasia. In the period 2010-2012 we observed 64 patients, of whom 19 were referred for medical treatment. Three of the remaining patients underwent botulinum toxin injection, 17 underwent multiple endoscopic dilation procedures and 25 underwent laparoscopic surgery. There were no complications in the group undergoing endoscopic therapy, but symptom remission was only temporary. Patients undergoing surgery showed a significant improvement in symptoms and no recurrence throughout the follow-up period, that is still ongoing (3 years). There were no major complications in any case and no morbidity or mortality. Surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia with laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication gives the best and longest-lasting results in suitably selected patients. The extension of the myotomy and reduction in LES pressure are the most important parameters to achieve a good result.

  6. Different in vitro and in vivo profiles of substituted 3-aminopropylphosphinate and 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinate GABA(B) receptor agonists as inhibitors of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, A; Antonsson, M; Aurell-Holmberg, A; Blackshaw, L A; Brändén, L; Elebring, T; Jensen, J; Kärrberg, L; Mattsson, J P; Nilsson, K; Oja, S S; Saransaari, P; von Unge, S

    2012-03-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is predominantly caused by transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation (TLOSR) and GABA(B) receptor stimulation inhibits TLOSR. Lesogaberan produces fewer CNS side effects than baclofen, which has been attributed to its affinity for the GABA transporter (GAT), the action of which limits stimulation of central GABA(B) receptors. To understand the structure-activity relationship for analogues of lesogaberan (3-aminopropylphosphinic acids), and corresponding 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinic acids, we have compared representatives of these classes in different in vitro and in vivo models. The compounds were characterized in terms of GABA(B) agonism in vitro. Binding to GATs and cellular uptake was done using rat brain membranes and slices respectively. TLOSR was measured in dogs, and CNS side effects were evaluated as hypothermia in mice and rats. 3-Aminopropylphosphinic acids inhibited TLOSR with a superior therapeutic index compared to 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinic acids. This difference was most likely due to differential GAT-mediated uptake into brain cells of the former but not latter. In agreement, 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinic acids were much more potent in producing hypothermia in rats even when administered i.c.v. An enhanced therapeutic window for 3-aminopropylphosphinic acids compared with 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinic acids with respect to inhibition of TLOSR was observed and is probably mechanistically linked to neural cell uptake of the former but not latter group of compounds. These findings offer a platform for discovery of new GABA(B) receptor agonists for the treatment of reflux disease and other conditions where selective peripheral GABA(B) receptor agonism may afford therapeutic effects. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Esophageal heterotopic gastric mucosa in esophageal atresia

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    Lachlan J.R. Harrison

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM is occasionally found at endoscopy in the proximal esophagus of adults and children, when it manifests as an asymptomatic small island of reddish pink mucosa just below the upper esophageal sphincter. There are few reports of esophageal HGM detected by endoscopy after repair of esophageal atresia (EA with tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF. We report a child with multiple patches of HGM in the proximal and distal esophagus seen at endoscopy after EA/TEF repair. No obvious symptoms were related to the HGM and she remains under endoscopic surveillance. The incidence of esophageal HGM may be increased in patients with EA and its distribution can be more extensive than a simple “inlet patch”. There is evidence to suggest that esophageal HGM increases the risk of developing Barrett's esophagus and has a malignant potential. Heterotopic gastric mucosa extends the spectrum of potential pathologies affecting the esophagus in patients with EA/TEF and supports current international guidelines for endoscopic surveillance of these patients. Keywords: Tracheo-esophageal fistula, Ectopic mucosa, Esophageal malignancy

  8. Esophageal contractions in type 3 achalasia esophagus: simultaneous or peristaltic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Patel, Nirali; Ledgerwood-Lee, Melissa; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-05-01

    Absence of peristalsis and impaired relaxation of lower esophageal sphincter are the hallmarks of achalasia esophagus. Based on the pressurization patterns, achalasia has been subdivided into three subtypes. The goal of our study was to evaluate the esophageal contraction pattern and bolus clearance in type 3 achalasia esophagus. High-resolution manometry (HRM) recordings of all patients diagnosed with achalasia esophagus in our center between the years 2011 and 2013 were reviewed. Recordings of 36 patients with type 3 achalasia were analyzed for the characteristics of swallow-induced "simultaneous esophageal contraction." The HRM impedance recordings of 14 additional patients with type 3 achalasia were analyzed for bolus clearance from the impedance recording. Finally, the HRM impedance along with intraluminal ultrasound imaging was conducted in six patients to further characterize the simultaneous esophageal contractions. Among 187 achalasia patients, 30 were type 1, 121 type 2, and 36 type 3. A total of 434 swallows evaluated in type 3 achalasia patients revealed that 95% of the swallow-induced contractions met criteria for simultaneous esophageal contraction, based on the onset of contraction. Interestingly, the peak and termination of the majority of simultaneous esophageal contractions were sequential. The HRM impedance revealed that 94% of the "simultaneous contractions" were associated with complete bolus clearance. Ultrasound image analysis revealed that baseline muscle thickness of patients in type 3 achalasia is larger than normal but the pattern of axial shortening is similar to that in normal subjects. The majority of esophageal contractions in type 3 achalasia are not true simultaneous contractions because the peak and termination of contraction are sequential and they are associated with complete bolus clearance.

  9. WHAT IS THE REAL IMPAIRMENT ON ESOPHAGEAL MOTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE?

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    Angela FALCÃO

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Impairment of esophageal motility is a common finding in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD as reduced lower esophageal sphincter (LES basal pressure. A very low LES pressure might facilitate the occurrence of more gastroesophageal reflux whereas abnormal esophageal peristalsis may contribute to impaired esophageal clearance after reflux. Objective Evaluate the esophageal motor function of the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal body in the various forms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Methods The manometrics records of 268 patients, who had evaluation of the esophageal motility as part of the diagnostic gastroesophageal reflux disease were split into four groups, as follows: 33 patients who had no esophagitis; 92 patients who had erosive esophagitis; 101 patients who had short Barrett's esophagus and 42 patients who had long Barrett's esophagus. Results The group who had long Barrett's esophagus showed smaller mean LES pressure and higher percentage of marked LES hypotonia; in the distal segment of the esophageal body the this group showed higher percentage of marked hypocontractility of the distal segment (<30 mm Hg; this same group showed higher percentage of esophageal motility disorders. Conclusions The most intense esophageal motility disorders and lower pressure of lower esophageal sphincter were noted in the group with long Barrett's esophagus. Those with reflux esophagitis and short Barrett's esophagus had esophageal motility impairment, intermediate among patients with esophagitis and long Barrett's esophagus. Patients with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux but without esophagitis by endoscopy study showed no impairment of esophageal motility.

  10. What is the real impairment on esophageal motility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Angela; Nasi, Ary; Brandão, Jeovana; Sallum, Rubens; Cecconello, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    Impairment of esophageal motility is a common finding in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as reduced lower esophageal sphincter (LES) basal pressure. A very low LES pressure might facilitate the occurrence of more gastroesophageal reflux whereas abnormal esophageal peristalsis may contribute to impaired esophageal clearance after reflux. Evaluate the esophageal motor function of the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal body in the various forms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The manometrics records of 268 patients, who had evaluation of the esophageal motility as part of the diagnostic gastroesophageal reflux disease were split into four groups, as follows: 33 patients who had no esophagitis; 92 patients who had erosive esophagitis; 101 patients who had short Barrett's esophagus and 42 patients who had long Barrett's esophagus. The group who had long Barrett's esophagus showed smaller mean LES pressure and higher percentage of marked LES hypotonia; in the distal segment of the esophageal body the this group showed higher percentage of marked hypocontractility of the distal segment (disorders. The most intense esophageal motility disorders and lower pressure of lower esophageal sphincter were noted in the group with long Barrett's esophagus. Those with reflux esophagitis and short Barrett's esophagus had esophageal motility impairment, intermediate among patients with esophagitis and long Barrett's esophagus. Patients with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux but without esophagitis by endoscopy study showed no impairment of esophageal motility.

  11. Minimally invasive myotomy for the treatment of esophageal achalasia: evolution of the surgical procedure and the therapeutic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresadola, Vittorio; Feo, Carlo V

    2012-04-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease of the esophagus, characterized by the absence of peristalsis in the esophageal body and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter, which may be hypertensive. The cause of this disease is unknown; therefore, the aim of the therapy is to improve esophageal emptying by eliminating the outflow resistance caused by the lower esophageal sphincter. This goal can be accomplished either by pneumatic dilatation or surgical myotomy, which are the only long-term effective therapies for achalasia. Historically, pneumatic dilatation was preferred over surgical myotomy because of the morbidity associated with a thoracotomy or a laparotomy. However, with the development of minimally invasive techniques, the surgical approach has gained widespread acceptance among patients and gastroenterologists and, consequently, the role of surgery has changed. The aim of this study was to review the changes occurred in the surgical treatment of achalasia over the last 2 decades; specifically, the development of minimally invasive techniques with the evolution from a thoracoscopic approach without an antireflux procedure to a laparoscopic myotomy with a partial fundoplication, the changes in the length of the myotomy, and the modification of the therapeutic algorithm.

  12. Evaluation of Esophageal Functions by Manometry in Iron Deficiency Anemia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilay, Pinar; Doganay, Beyza; Bektas, Mehmet

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether any esophageal motor dysfunction exists in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). The study included 39 patients (34 women, mean age: 44.17 ± 14.21 years) who met WHO diagnostic criteria for IDA. An additional 30 functional dyspepsia patients were also included as a control group. Esophageal motility testing was performed; esophagus contraction amplitude, peak velocity, contraction time, lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure, LES relaxation, and LES relaxation duration were assessed. A majority (76.4%) of patients had at least one IDA symptom, such as reflux, chest pain, or dysphagia. Manometric findings in IDA patients vs. controls were as follows: mean LES resting pressure (mm Hg): 25.41 ± 11.67 vs. 19.96 ± 6.58 (P = 0.025); mean esophageal contraction amplitude (mm Hg): 61.61 ± 24.21 vs. 63.23 ± 18.86 (P = 0.764); mean LES relaxation duration (s, x ± SD): 5.33 ± 1.61 vs. 8.75 ± 1.86 (P = 0.000); mean LES relaxation (%): 93.30 ± 9.88 vs. 95.53 ± 5.81 (P = 0.278); mean peak velocity (cm/s): 12.67 ± 37.95 vs. 3.50 ± 1.63 (P = 0.191). Esophageal dysmotility was found in 11 (28.2%) IDA patients. Non-specific esophageal motor disorder was found in three patients, hypomotility of the esophagus was found in three patients, achalasia was found in two patients, hypertensive LES was found in two patients, and hypotensive LES was found in one patient. LES resting pressure was higher and LES relaxation duration was shorter in patients with IDA. Esophageal dysmotility was present in 28.2% of the patients with IDA A little more than half of patients had dysphagia symptoms. IDA may contribute to esophageal motility dysfunction and esophageal symptoms.

  13. Predictive value of routine esophageal high-resolution manometry for gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeij, F. B.; Smout, A. J.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Using conventional manometry, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) was associated with a reduced lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure and impaired peristalsis. However, with a large overlap between GERD patients and controls, these findings are of limited clinical relevance. It is uncertain

  14. Esophageal Resection for End-Stage Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiolfi, Alberto; Asti, Emanuele; Bonitta, Gianluca; Siboni, Stefano; Bonavina, Luigi

    2018-04-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by impaired lower esophageal sphincter relaxation loss and of peristalsis in the esophageal body. Endoscopic balloon dilation and laparoscopic surgical myotomy have been established as initial treatment modalities. Indications and outcomes of esophagectomy in the management of end-stage achalasia are less defined. A literature search was conducted to identify all reports on esophagectomy for end-stage achalasia between 1987 and 2017. MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases were consulted matching the terms "achalasia," "end-stage achalasia," "esophagectomy," and "esophageal resection." Seventeen articles met the inclusion criteria and 1422 patients were included in this narrative review. Most of the patients had previous multiple endoscopic and/or surgical treatments. Esophagectomy was performed through a transthoracic (74%) or a transhiatal (26%) approach. A thoracoscopic approach was used in a minority of patients and seemed to be safe and effective. In 95 per cent of patients, the stomach was used as an esophageal substitute. The mean postoperative morbidity rate was 27.1 per cent and the mortality rate 2.1 per cent. Symptom resolution was reported in 75 to 100 per cent of patients over a mean follow-up of 43 months. Only five series including 195 patients assessed the long-term follow-up (>5 years) after reconstruction with gastric or colon conduits, and the results seem similar. Esophagectomy for end-stage achalasia is safe and effective in tertiary referral centers. A thoracoscopic approach is a feasible and safe alternative to thoracotomy and may replace the transhiatal route in the future.

  15. Value of preoperative esophageal function studies before laparoscopic antireflux surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Walter W; Haroian, Laura R; Gyawali, C Prakash

    2011-09-01

    The value of esophageal manometry and ambulatory pH monitoring before laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) has been questioned because tailoring the operation to the degree of hypomotility often is not required. This study evaluated a consecutive cohort of patients referred for esophageal function studies in preparation for LARS to determine the rates of findings that would alter surgical decisions. High-resolution manometry (HRM) was performed for each subject using a 21-lumen water-perfused system, and motor function was characterized. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was evident from ambulatory pH monitoring if thresholds for acid exposure time and/or positive symptom association probability were passed. Of 1,081 subjects (age, 48.4 ± 0.4 years; 56.7% female) undergoing preoperative HRM, 723 (66.9%) also had ambulatory pH testing performed. Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) hypotension (38.9%) and nonspecific spastic disorder (NSSD) of the esophageal body (36.1%) were common. Obstructive LES pathophysiology was noted in 2.5% (achalasia in 1%; incomplete LES relaxation in 1.5%), and significant esophageal body hypomotility in 4.5% (aperistalsis in 3.2%; severe hypomotility in 1.3%) of the subjects. Evidence of GERD was absent in 23.9% of the subjects. Spastic disorders were more frequent in the absence of GERD (43.9% vs. 23.1% with GERD; p esophageal function testing that could be used in preoperative counseling and candidate selection. Physiologic testing remains important in the preoperative evaluation of patients being considered for LARS.

  16. Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schima, W.; Pokieser, P.; Schober, E.

    1995-01-01

    Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and the lower esophageal sphincter has gained increased attention in recent years. Videofluoroscopic investigation of esophageal motor function is superior to static film radiography, as repeated analysis of the videotaped recordings is possible. With emphasis on radiological techniques, normal esophagel physiology and motility and a variety of esophageal motor disorders are discussed in this review paper. Radiological evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux and reflux esophagitis is described. Clinical and radiological findings in esophageal motility disorders and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the radiological efficacy compared to that of manometry and pH-metry are discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Evaluation of esophageal motor function in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C P; Bredenoord, A J; Conklin, J L; Fox, M; Pandolfino, J E; Peters, J H; Roman, S; Staiano, A; Vaezi, M F

    2013-02-01

    Esophageal motor function is highly coordinated between central and enteric nervous systems and the esophageal musculature, which consists of proximal skeletal and distal smooth muscle in three functional regions, the upper and lower esophageal sphincters, and the esophageal body. While upper endoscopy is useful in evaluating for structural disorders of the esophagus, barium esophagography, radionuclide transit studies, and esophageal intraluminal impedance evaluate esophageal transit and partially assess motor function. However, esophageal manometry is the test of choice for the evaluation of esophageal motor function. In recent years, high-resolution manometry (HRM) has streamlined the process of acquisition and display of esophageal pressure data, while uncovering hitherto unrecognized esophageal physiologic mechanisms and pathophysiologic patterns. New algorithms have been devised for analysis and reporting of esophageal pressure topography from HRM. The clinical value of HRM extends to the pediatric population, and complements preoperative evaluation prior to foregut surgery. Provocative maneuvers during HRM may add to the assessment of esophageal motor function. The addition of impedance to HRM provides bolus transit data, but impact on clinical management remains unclear. Emerging techniques such as 3-D HRM and impedance planimetry show promise in the assessment of esophageal sphincter function and esophageal biomechanics. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Esophageal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E.; Wuttge-Hannig, A.

    2007-01-01

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [de

  19. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. In this case, the patient's symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Motility abnormalities in esophageal body in GERD: are they truly related to reflux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriza de los Ríos, C; García Menéndez, L; Díez Hernández, A; Fernández Eroles, A L; Vega Fernández, A; Enguix Armada, A

    2005-03-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities have been observed in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The aim of the present study was to determine if esophageal motor disorders in patients with a positive response to the omeprazole test are related to the existence of reflux or they are concomitant findings. A 24-hour pH monitoring and a stationary manometry were performed on 128 patients: 49 of them had normal manometry, 31 hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter, 29 motor disorder in esophageal body, and 19 hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter and motor disorder in esophageal body. We found an association between the presence of abnormal reflux and motor disorder in esophageal body (chi test; P esophageal motility was the disorder most strongly related to reflux, whereas the hypercontractile disorders were not clearly attributed to it. Esophageal manometric abnormalities should be considered cautiously before considering a motor disorder as a consequence of abnormal reflux.

  1. High-resolution Esophageal Manometry Patterns in Children and Adolescents With Rumination Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righini Grunder, Franziska; Aspirot, Ann; Faure, Christophe

    2017-12-01

    Rumination is defined by effortless regurgitation within seconds or minutes of ingested food. The aim of this study was to determine the high-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) pattern in children with rumination syndrome. HREM was evaluated in 15 pediatric patients with rumination syndrome according to the Rome criteria and compared with 15 controls. Primary rumination was defined as a clinical rumination episode associated with a rise of gastric pressure above 30 mmHg. Secondary rumination was defined as a clinical rumination episode associated with a rise of gastric pressure above 30 mmHg during a transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR). Ninety-two episodes of rumination were demonstrated during HREM study in 12 of the 15 patients (80%; 1-29 episodes per patient; median intragastric pressure 49.6 mmHg). Primary rumination occurred in 3 patients and secondary rumination in 5 patients. One patient had primary and secondary rumination episodes. In 3 patients, classification of rumination episodes was not possible due to repetitive swallowing leading to lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. In the control group, no episodes of rumination occurred. The sensitivity and the specificity of the HREM study (association of a clinical rumination episode with a rise in gastric pressure >30 mmHg) to confirm the diagnosis of rumination were 80% and 100%, respectively. HREM allows confirming diagnosis of rumination syndrome and to differentiate between primary and secondary rumination in the presence of objective rumination episodes. Further research is needed to study whether HREM results may influence treatment and outcome of children with rumination syndrome.

  2. Dysphagia among adult patients who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh Trudeau, Valérie; Maynard, Stéphanie; Terzic, Tatjana; Soucy, Geneviève; Bouin, Mickeal

    2015-03-01

    Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and⁄or anatomical anomalies. To determine the motor and anatomical causes of dysphagia. A total of 41 adults, followed at the Esophageal Atresia Clinic at Hôpital Saint-Luc (Montreal, Quebec), were approached to particpate in the present prospective study. Evaluation was completed using upper endoscopy, manometry and barium swallow for the participants who consented. The medical charts of respondents were systematically reviewed from the neonatal period to 18 years of age to assess medical and surgical history. All 41 patients followed at the clinic consented and were included in the study. Dysphagia was present in 73% of patients. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in 32 patients: hiatal hernia was present in 62% (n=20); esophageal diverticulum in 13% (n=4); macroscopic Barrett esophagus in 31% (n=10); and esophagitis in 19% (n=6). Histological esophagitis was present in 20% and intestinal metaplasia in 10%. There were no cases of dysplagia or adenocarcinoma. Esophageal manometry was performed on 56% of the patients (n=23). Manometry revealed hypomotility in 100% of patients and included an insufficient number of peristaltic waves in 96%, nonpropagating peristalsis in 78% and low-wave amplitude in 95%. Complete aperistalsis was present in 78%. The lower esophageal sphincter was abnormal in 12 (52%) patients, with incomplete relaxation the most common anomaly. Of the 41 patients, 29 (71%) consented to a barium swallow, which was abnormal in 13 (45%). The anomalies found were short esophageal dilation in 28%, delay in esophageal emptying in 14%, diverticula in 14% and stenosis in 7

  3. Esophageal blood flow in the cat. Normal distribution and effects of acid perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollwarth, M.E.; Smith, M.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    The radioactive microsphere technique was used to estimate blood flow to different regions of the esophagus and to adjacent regions of the stomach before and after perfusion of the esophagus with hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5) for 5 min. Under resting conditions total blood flow, as well as blood flow to the mucosal-submucosal layer and the muscular layer, to both sphincters was significantly higher than to the esophageal body. Blood flow to the adjacent regions of the stomach was significantly higher than esophageal blood flow. Acid perfusion resulted in a large increase in total blood flow in both sphincters and the lower esophageal body. Gastric blood flow was not altered by acid perfusion. The esophageal hyperemia resulted primarily from an increase in blood flow to the muscular layer; mucosal-submucosal blood flow was increased only in the lower esophageal sphincter. The present study indicates that short periods (5 min) of gastroesophageal reflux may increase esophageal blood flow

  4. Laparoscopic extended cardiomyotomy in children: an effective procedure for the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannuri, Ana Cristina Aoun; Tannuri, Uenis; Velhote, Manoel Carlos Prieto; Romão, Rodrigo Luiz Pinto

    2010-07-01

    Achalasia of the esophagus is characterized by aperistalsis and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing. The objective of the present study is to present the experience of a modified Heller myotomy via a laparoscopic approach for the treatment of children who had this condition. A retrospective review of medical records of all patients who underwent this procedure from 2000 to 2009 was performed. The procedure consisted of an extended esophagomyotomy beginning on the lower part of the lower esophageal sphincter and continuing 5 to 6 cm above on the lower third of the esophagus, and then extended 3 to 4 cm below to the stomach, associated with an anterior 180-degree hemi-fundoplication according to Dor's technique. Fifteen patients were included in the study. There were 8 female and 7 male patients. Mean operating time was 190 minutes with no intraoperative complications and 1 conversion to open surgery because of difficulty in dissecting an inflamed distal esophagus. In a mean follow-up period of 32.3 months, 2 patients had recurrence of mild dysphagia that disappeared spontaneously, and 1 required a single botulinum toxin injection with complete resolution of symptoms. We conclude that the laparoscopic extended Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication is a safe and effective method for the treatment for achalasia in the pediatric population even in advanced cases. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Scintigraphy in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkina, V.V.; Piperkova, E.N.; Okulov, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Esophagoscintigraphy with labelled liquid and solid food was performed in 34 patients disease of the esophagus in the patient history permitting the determination of quantitative and qualitive characteristics of normal motor-evacuatory function of the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter (LES). A total of 46 patients with esophageal cancer and stomach cancer with the envolvement of the esophagus before treatment were examined. In cancer of the esophagus its function depended on a tumor site and stage. In order to raise diagnostic sensitivity dynamic esophagoscintigraphy should be performed using liquid and solid food because during liquid passage a study with a hard bolus of patients with severe esophageal disfunction showed that in 36.9% of the patients the quantitative and qualitative indices were within normal. Radionuclide methods permit the determination of the level of a pathological focus, a degree of esophageal permeability, quantitative characterization of a degree of disorder of esophageal function in order to raise the functional diagnosis of the esophaeous and LES, and the determination of motor disorders at the earliest stages of tumor development

  6. A PICTORIAL PRESENTATION OF ESOPHAGEAL HIGH RESOLUTION MANOMETRY CURRENT PARAMETERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafraia, Fernanda M; Herbella, Fernando A M; Kalluf, Julia R; Patti, Marco G

    2017-01-01

    High resolution manometry is the current technology used to the study of esophageal motility and is replacing conventional manometry in important centers for esophageal motility with parameters used on esophageal motility, following the Chicago Classification. This classification unifies high resolution manometry interpretation and classifies esophageal disorders. This review shows, in a pictorial presentation, the new parameters established by the Chicago Classification, version 3.0, aimed to allow an easy comprehension and interpretation of high resolution manometry. Esophageal manometries performed by the authors were reviewed to select illustrative tracings representing Chicago Classification parameters. The parameters are: Esophagogastric Morphology, that classifies this junction according to its physiology and anatomy; Integrated Relaxation Pressure, that measures the lower esophageal sphincter relaxation; Distal Contractile Integral, that evaluates the contraction vigor of each wave; and, Distal Latency, that measures the peristalsis velocity from the beginning of the swallow to the epiphrenic ampulla. Clinical applications of these new concepts is still under evaluation. Mostrar, de forma pictórica, os novos parâmetros compilados na versão 3.0 da Classificação de Chicago, buscando facilitar a compreensão e interpretação da manometria de alta resolução. Foram revistas as manometrias da casuística dos autores e selecionados os traçados representativos dos parâmetros da Classificação de Chicago. Entre os parâmetros apresentados foram considerados a Morfologia da Transição Gastroesofágica, que classifica o segmento de acordo com sua fisiologia e anatomia; a Integral da Pressão de Relaxamento, que mede o relaxamento do esfíncter esofagiano inferior; a Integral Contrátil Distal, que avalia o vigor contrátil da onda peristáltica; e, a Latência Distal, que mede o tempo da peristalse, desde o início da deglutição até a ampola epifr

  7. Esophageal Stasis on a Timed Barium Esophagogram Predicts Recurrent Symptoms in Patients With Long-Standing Achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O.; Lei, A.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In achalasia, early recognition of the need for retreatment is of crucial importance to reduce morbidity and long-term complications such as esophageal decompensation. In clinical practice, symptoms and parameters of esophageal function including lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease after peroral endoscopic myotomy: Analysis of clinical, procedural and functional factors, associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease and esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familiari, Pietro; Greco, Santi; Gigante, Giovanni; Calì, Anna; Boškoski, Ivo; Onder, Graziano; Perri, Vincenzo; Costamagna, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) does not include any antireflux procedure, resulting in a certain risk of iatrogenic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of iatrogenic GERD after POEM and identify preoperative, perioperative and postoperative factors associated with GERD. All patients treated at a single center who had a complete GERD evaluation after POEM were included in the study. Demographics, preoperative and follow-up data, results of functional studies and procedural data were collected and analyzed. A total of 103 patients (mean age 46.6 years, 47 males) were included. Postoperative altered esophageal acid exposure was attested in 52 patients (50.5%). A total of 19 patients (18.4%) had heartburn and 21 had esophagitis (20.4%). Overall, a clinically relevant GERD (altered esophageal acid exposure, associated with heartburn and/or esophagitis) was diagnosed in 30 patients (29.1%). Correlation between the severity of esophageal acid exposure with heartburn and esophagitis after POEM was found. Patients with heartburn had a lower postoperative 4-second integrated relaxation pressure compared to patients without symptoms (7.6 ± 3.8 mmHg vs 10.01 ± 4.4 mmHg, p<0.05). No correlations were identified with patient sex, age, postoperative body mass index, esophageal shape (sigmoid vs non sigmoid), lower esophageal sphincter pressure, length of myotomy, previous therapies and type of achalasia at high-resolution manometry. Preoperative, perioperative or postoperative factors minimally correlated with GERD after POEM. Clinically relevant GERD was identified in less than one-third of patients, but all patients were well controlled with medical therapy. © 2015 The Authors Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  9. Peroral endoscopic myotomy can improve esophageal motility in patients with achalasia from a large sample self-control research (66 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangzhe Yao

    Full Text Available Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM as a new approach to achalasia attracts broad attention. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the results with esophageal motility after POEM through the first large sample clinical research.We have a self-control research with all patients (205 in total who underwent POEM from 2010 to 2014 at our Digestive Endoscopic Center, 66 patients of which underwent high resolution manometry (HRM before and after POEM in our motility laboratory. Follow-ups last for 5.6 months on average. Outcome variables analyzed included upper esophageal sphincter pressure (UESP, upper esophageal sphincter residual pressure (UESRP, lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP, lower esophageal sphincter residual pressure (LESRP and esophageal body peristalsis. We have a statistical analysis to illustrate how POEM impacts on the change of esophageal motility.The symptoms related to dysphagia were relieved in 95% of patients in recent term after POEM. While HRM showed a statistically significant reduction of URSRP, LESP and LESRP (P0.05 did not occur for these two groups on LESP and LESRP reduction.POEM clearly relieved the symptoms related to dysphagia by lowering the pressure of upper esophageal sphincter (UES and lower esophageal sphincter (LES,and other endoscopic treatment before POEM did not affect the improvement of LES pressure. These results are concluded from our short-term follow-up study, while the long-term efficacy remains to be further illustrated.Chinese Clinical Trial Register ChiCTR-TRC-12002204.

  10. [Effect of nasogastric tube on esophageal mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barinagarrementeria, R; Blancas Valencia, J M; Teramoto Matsubara, O; de la Garza González, S

    1991-01-01

    We studied 30 patients. 20 were males and 10 females. Mean age was 48 year old. Esophageal disease was not present neither gastro-esophageal reflux. Biopsy was taken between 24 hours and 25 days after nasogastric tube (NG) was put into place. Endoscopic findings were: hyperemic mucosa, submucosal hemorrhage, clots, erosions and ulcers near Esophago-gastric junction. Intraepithelial edema, vessel congestion, polymorphonuclear infiltration, fibrin thrombosis of submucosal vessels, ischemia, epithelial regeneration and ulcer were common histologic findings. All endoscopic and histologic alterations were related to the length of time of NG tube contact with the esophageal mucosa. We concluded that NG tube damages the esophageal mucosa by two mechanisms: a) Local irritation that favors b) gastric reflux by decreasing lower esophageal sphincter pressure.

  11. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function

  12. High resolution manometry findings in patients with esophageal epiphrenic diverticula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicentine, Fernando P P; Herbella, Fernando A M; Silva, Luciana C; Patti, Marco G

    2011-12-01

    The pathophysiology of esophageal epiphrenic diverticula is still uncertain even though a concomitant motility disorder is found in the majority of patients in different series. High resolution manometry may allow detection of motor abnormalities in a higher number of patients with esophageal epiphrenic diverticula compared with conventional manometry. This study aims to evaluate the high resolution manometry findings in patients with esophageal epiphrenic diverticula. Nine individuals (mean age 63 ± 10 years, 4 females) with esophageal epiphrenic diverticula underwent high resolution manometry. A single diverticulum was observed in eight patients and multiple diverticula in one. Visual analysis of conventional tracings and color pressure plots for identification of segmental abnormalities was performed by two researchers experienced in high resolution manometry. Upper esophageal sphincter was normal in all patients. Esophageal body was abnormal in eight patients; lower esophageal sphincter was abnormal in seven patients. Named esophageal motility disorders were found in seven patients: achalasia in six, diffuse esophageal spasm in one. In one patient, a segmental hypercontractile zone was noticed with pressure of 196 mm Hg. High resolution manometry demonstrated motor abnormalities in all patients with esophageal epiphrenic diverticula.

  13. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function.

  14. Treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: the new kids to block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeau, K

    2010-08-01

    Refractory gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), defined as persistent symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, is an increasingly prevalent condition and is becoming a major challenge for the clinician. Since non-acidic reflux may be associated with symptoms persisting during PPI treatment, the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the most important barrier protecting against reflux, has become an important target for the treatment of (refractory) GERD. Preclinical research has identified several receptors that are involved in the control of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs), the predominant mechanism of both acid and non-acidic reflux events, and several drugs have now been tested in humans. The GABA(B) agonist baclofen has demonstrated to effectively reduce the rate of TLESRs and the amount of reflux in both GERD patients and healthy volunteers. Nevertheless, the occurrence of central side effects limits its clinical use for the treatment of GERD. Several analogues are being developed to overcome this limitation and have shown promising results. Additionally, metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) receptor antagonists have shown to reduce both acid and non-acidic reflux in GERD patients and several molecules are currently being evaluated. Although CB(1) antagonists have been shown to reduce TLESRs, they are also associated with central side effects, limiting their clinical applicability. Despite the identification of several potentially interesting drugs, the main challenge for the future remains the reduction of central side effects. Moreover, future studies will need to demonstrate the efficacy of these treatments in patients with refractory GERD.

  15. 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase (ABAT: genetic and pharmacological evidence for an involvement in gastro esophageal reflux disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Jirholt

    Full Text Available Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD is partly caused by genetic factors. The underlying susceptibility genes are currently unknown, with the exception of COL3A1. We used three independent GERD patient cohorts to identify GERD susceptibility genes. Thirty-six families, demonstrating dominant transmission of GERD were subjected to whole genome microsatellite genotyping and linkage analysis. Five linked regions were identified. Two families shared a linked region (LOD 3.9 and 2.0 on chromosome 16. We used two additional independent GERD patient cohorts, one consisting of 219 trios (affected child with parents and the other an adult GERD case control cohort consisting of 256 cases and 485 controls, to validate individual genes in the linked region through association analysis. Sixty six single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers distributed over the nine genes present in the linked region were genotyped in the independent GERD trio cohort. Transmission disequilibrium test analysis followed by multiple testing adjustments revealed a significant genetic association for one SNP located in an intron of the gene 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase (ABAT (P(adj = 0.027. This association did not replicate in the adult case-control cohort, possibly due to the differences in ethnicity between the cohorts. Finally, using the selective ABAT inhibitor vigabatrin (γ-vinyl GABA in a dog study, we were able to show a reduction of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs by 57.3 ± 11.4 % (p = 0.007 and the reflux events from 3.1 ± 0.4 to 0.8 ± 0.4 (p = 0.007. Our results demonstrate the direct involvement of ABAT in pathways affecting lower esophageal sphincter (LES control and identifies ABAT as a genetic risk factor for GERD.

  16. 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase (ABAT): genetic and pharmacological evidence for an involvement in gastro esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirholt, Johan; Asling, Bengt; Hammond, Paul; Davidson, Geoffrey; Knutsson, Mikael; Walentinsson, Anna; Jensen, Jörgen M; Lehmann, Anders; Agreus, Lars; Lagerström-Fermer, Maria

    2011-04-28

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is partly caused by genetic factors. The underlying susceptibility genes are currently unknown, with the exception of COL3A1. We used three independent GERD patient cohorts to identify GERD susceptibility genes. Thirty-six families, demonstrating dominant transmission of GERD were subjected to whole genome microsatellite genotyping and linkage analysis. Five linked regions were identified. Two families shared a linked region (LOD 3.9 and 2.0) on chromosome 16. We used two additional independent GERD patient cohorts, one consisting of 219 trios (affected child with parents) and the other an adult GERD case control cohort consisting of 256 cases and 485 controls, to validate individual genes in the linked region through association analysis. Sixty six single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers distributed over the nine genes present in the linked region were genotyped in the independent GERD trio cohort. Transmission disequilibrium test analysis followed by multiple testing adjustments revealed a significant genetic association for one SNP located in an intron of the gene 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase (ABAT) (P(adj) = 0.027). This association did not replicate in the adult case-control cohort, possibly due to the differences in ethnicity between the cohorts. Finally, using the selective ABAT inhibitor vigabatrin (γ-vinyl GABA) in a dog study, we were able to show a reduction of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) by 57.3 ± 11.4 % (p = 0.007) and the reflux events from 3.1 ± 0.4 to 0.8 ± 0.4 (p = 0.007). Our results demonstrate the direct involvement of ABAT in pathways affecting lower esophageal sphincter (LES) control and identifies ABAT as a genetic risk factor for GERD.

  17. Esophageal Dysmotility in Patients following Total Laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Maclean, Julia; Szczesniak, Michal; Bertrand, Paul P; Quon, Harry; Tsang, Raymond K; Wu, Peter I; Graham, Peter; Cook, Ian J

    2018-02-01

    Objectives Dysphagia is common in total laryngectomees, with some symptoms suggesting esophageal dysmotility. Tracheoesophageal (TE) phonation requires effective esophagopharyngeal air passage. Hence, esophageal dysmotility may affect deglutition or TE phonation. This study aimed to determine (1) the characteristics of esophageal dysmotility in laryngectomees, (2) whether clinical history is sensitive in detecting esophageal dysmotility, and (3) the relationship between esophageal dysmotility and TE prosthesis dysfunction. Study Design Multidisciplinary cross-sectional study. Setting Tertiary academic hospital. Subjects and Methods For 31 participants undergone total laryngectomy 1 to 12 years prior, clinical histories were taken by a gastroenterologist and a speech pathologist experienced in managing dysphagia. Esophageal high-resolution manometry was performed and analyzed using Chicago Classification v3.0. Results Interpretable manometric studies were obtained in 23 (1 normal manometry). Esophageal dysmotility patterns included achalasia, esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, diffuse esophageal spasm, and other major (30%) and minor (50%) peristaltic disorders. The sensitivity of predicting any esophageal dysmotility was 28%, but it is noteworthy that patients with achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) were predicted. Two of 4 participants with TE puncture leakage had poor esophageal clearance. Of 20 TE speakers, 12 had voice problems, no correlation between poor voice, and any dysmotility pattern. Conclusions Peristaltic and lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction are common in laryngectomees. Clinical history, while not predictive of minor motor abnormalities, predicted correctly cases with treatable spastic motor disorders. Dysmotility was not associated with poor phonation, although TE puncture leakage might be linked to poor esophageal clearance. Esophageal dysmotility should be considered in the laryngectomees with persisting dysphagia or

  18. Clinical remission following endoscopic placement of retrievable, fully covered metal stents in patients with esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y; Dai, Y-M; Wan, X-J

    2014-01-01

    Metal stents may represent an alternative therapy in the treatment of achalasia. We therefore evaluated the effectiveness of retrievable, fully covered metal stents in patients with achalasia. Fifty-nine patients with achalasia were treated with retrievable, fully covered metal stents. Symptoms using a global symptom score (0-10), lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure, LES relaxation, and simultaneous contraction of the esophagus were analyzed before and 1 week and 1 month after intervention. Complications and treatment outcomes were followed up at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postoperatively. Stent placement was successful, and clinical symptoms resolved (P treatment in patients with achalasia. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  19. Morphofunctional analysis of experimental model of esophageal achalasia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirov, A G; Raginov, I S; Burmistrov, M V; Chelyshev, Y A; Khasanov, R Sh; Moroshek, A A; Grigoriev, P N; Zefirov, A L; Mukhamedyarov, M A

    2010-10-01

    We carried out a detailed analysis of rat model of esophageal achalasia previously developed by us. Manifest morphological and functional disorders were observed in experimental achalasia: hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium, reduced number of nerve fibers, excessive growth of fibrous connective tissue in the esophageal wall, high contractile activity of the lower esophageal sphincter, and reduced motility of the longitudinal muscle layer. Changes in rat esophagus observed in experimental achalasia largely correlate with those in esophageal achalasia in humans. Hence, our experimental model can be used for the development of new methods of disease treatment.

  20. Esophageal Motility and Rikkunshito Treatment for Proton Pump Inhibitor-Refractory Nonerosive Reflux Disease: A Prospective, Uncontrolled, Open-Label Pilot Study Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Odaka, MD, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In the pilot study, patients with PPI-refractory NERD had disorders of esophageal and lower esophageal sphincter motility that were improved by RKT. Further studies examining esophageal motor activity of RKT in PPI-refractory NERD are required. University hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN Clinical Trial Registry identifier: UMIN000003092.

  1. Effect of total laryngectomy on esophageal motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, J.B.; Fisher, S.R.; Meyers, W.C.; Christian, K.C.; Postlethwait, R.W.; Jones, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Total laryngectomy for cancer can result in dysphagia and altered esophageal motility. Manometric changes in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and in proximal and distal esophageal function have been reported. However, most studies have failed to take into account radiation therapy and appropriate controls. We selected ten male patients (54.3 +/- 1.9 yr) for longitudinal manometric evaluation prior to laryngectomy then at two weeks and again six months later. No patient received preoperative radiation therapy, had a previous history of esophageal surgery, or developed a postoperative wound infection or fistula. Seven of ten patients had positive nodes and received 6,000-6,600 rads postoperative radiation therapy. Preoperatively 4 of 10 patients complained of dysphagia which did not significantly change following surgery and radiation. Two of three patients who did not complain of dysphagia preoperatively and received radiation postoperatively developed dysphagia. No patient without dysphagia preoperatively who received no radiation therapy developed symptoms. Our studies show that laryngectomy causes alterations in the UES resting and peak pressures but not in the proximal or distal esophagus, or the lower esophageal sphincter. These data also imply radiation therapy may be associated with progressive alterations in motility and symptomatology. Further study regarding the effects of radiation on esophageal motility and function are urged

  2. The effect of baclofen on gastro-oesophageal reflux, lower oesophageal sphincter function and reflux symptoms in patients with reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, M. A.; Samsom, M.; Rydholm, H.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Baclofen decreases gastro-oesophageal reflux episodes in healthy subjects by reducing the incidence of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations. AIM: To investigate the effect of baclofen on reflux symptoms, oesophageal pH and lower oesophageal sphincter manometry in patients

  3. Internal anal sphincter: Clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lalit; Emmanuel, Anton

    2017-08-01

    To summarise current knowledge of Internal anal sphincter. The internal anal sphincter (IAS) is the involuntary ring of smooth muscle in the anal canal and is the major contributor to the resting pressure in the anus. Structural injury or functional weakness of the muscle results in passive incontinence of faeces and flatus. With advent of new assessment and treatment modalities IAS has become an important topic for surgeons. This review was undertaken to summarise our current knowledge of internal anal sphincter and highlight the areas that need further research. The PubMed database was used to identify relevant studies relating to internal anal sphincter. The available evidence has been summarised and advantages and limitations highlighted for the different diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Our understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of IAS has increased greatly in the last three decades. Additionally, there has been a rise in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques specifically targeting the IAS. Although these are promising, future research is required before these can be incorporated into the management algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Defining sphincter of oddi dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi (SO) dysmotility may give rise to pain. The golden standard for the demonstration of SO dysfunction is endoscopic manometry. A number of abnormalities are observed in patients with postcholecystectomy pain and in patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis. Criteria for defi...

  5. (R)-(3-amino-2-fluoropropyl) phosphinic acid (AZD3355), a novel GABAB receptor agonist, inhibits transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation through a peripheral mode of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Anders; Antonsson, Madeleine; Holmberg, Ann Aurell

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) affects >10% of the Western population. Conventionally, GERD is treated by reducing gastric acid secretion, which is effective in most patients but inadequate in a significant minority. We describe a new therapeutic approach for GERD, based on inhibition...

  6. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography for esophageal motility disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri; Gholamreza Hamsi; Tayeb Ramim

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-resolution manometer (HRM) of the esophagus has become the main diagnostic test in the evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The first step of the Chicago classification described abnormal esophagogastric junction deglutitive relaxation. The latest classification system, proposed...

  7. A study of pathophysiological factors associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease in twins discordant for gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovino, P; Mohammed, I; Anggiansah, A; Anggiansah, R; Cherkas, L F; Spector, T D; Trudgill, N J

    2013-08-01

    Differences in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and peristaltic function and in transient LES relaxations (TLESR) have been described in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, some of these differences may be the result of chronic GERD rather than being an underlying contributory factor. Twins discordant for GERD symptoms, i.e., only one twin had GERD symptoms, underwent standard LES and esophageal body manometry, and then using a sleeve sensor prolonged LES and pH monitoring, 30 min before and 60 min after a 250 mL 1200 kcal lipid meal. Eight monozygotic and 24 dizygotic female twins were studied. Although there was no difference in preprandial LES pressure (symptomatic 13.2 ± 7.1 mmHg vs asymptomatic 15.1 ± 6.2 mmHg, P = 0.4), LES pressure fell further postprandially in symptomatic twins (LES pressure area under the curve 465 ± 126 vs 331 ± 141 mmHg h, P reflux episodes in symptomatic twins occurred due to low LES pressure or deep inspiration/strain and 0/17 in asymptomatic twins (P = 0.01). There was no difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic twins in: peristaltic amplitude, ineffective esophageal body motility, hiatus hernia prevalence, or LES length. There was also no difference in TLESR frequency preprandially (symptomatic median 1(range 0-2) vs asymptomatic 0(0-2), P = 0.08) or postprandially (2.5(1-8) vs 3(1-6), P = 0.81). Twins with GERD symptoms had lower postprandial LES pressure and given the close genetic link between the twins, it is possible that such differences are caused by GERD. Acid reflux episodes associated with a hypotensive LES were seen in symptomatic, but not in asymptomatic twins. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  9. An old dietary regimen as a new lifestyle change for Gastro esophageal reflux disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Mohammad Akram; Mahfouz, Salah Al-Din Mahmoud; Selim, Noor Ahmed; Yar, Taley; Gillessen, Anton

    2015-09-01

    Treatment of gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is becoming a challenge for medical profession. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly recommended but many disadvantages of these drugs are being reported, particularly when used for long term. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are important cause of acid reflux. Gastric distention in upper stomach is the strongest stimulus for generation of TLESRs and is aggravated by intake of food in between meals. In an earlier cases report, two meals a day with intake of only fluids in between was suggested as a remedy for GERD. Present pilot study was conducted on 20 patients with endoscopically proven reflux esophagitis (Los Angles Grade a, b or c), who followed our advice to take meal twice a day with consumption of only soft drinks (fruit juices, tea, coffee, water, etc) in between and no medication for two weeks. On 14th day 15 patients (75%) were free of reflux symptoms, 2 (10%) had partial improvement and 3 (15%) reported no difference. It is concluded that two meals a day with intake of only fluids in between, whenever the patient feels hungry or thirsty, is a useful dietary regimen for the management of GERD. Further investigations are needed to confirm the benefits of this physiological lifestyle change.

  10. Recovery of normal esophageal function in a kitten with diffuse megaesophagus and an occult lower esophageal stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jaycie; Ames, Marisa; DiCicco, Michael; Savage, Mason; Atkins, Clarke; Wood, Michael; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    An 8-week-old male domestic shorthair was presented to the Internal Medicine Service at North Carolina State University for regurgitation. Radiographic diagnosis of generalized esophageal dilation and failure of esophageal peristalsis were compatible with diagnosis of congenital megaesophagus. Endoscopic examination of the esophagus revealed a fibrous stricture just orad to the lower esophageal sphincter. Conservative management to increase the body condition and size of the kitten consisted of feeding through a gastrostomy tube, during which time the esophagus regained normal peristaltic function, the stricture orifice widened in size and successful balloon dilatation of the stricture was performed. Esophageal endoscopy should be considered to rule out a stricture near the lower esophageal sphincter in kittens with radiographic findings suggestive of congenital megaesophagus. Management of such kittens by means of gastrostomy tube feeding may be associated with a return of normal esophageal motility and widening of the esophageal stricture, and facilitate subsequent success of interventional dilation of the esophageal stricture. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  11. Esophageal hypermotility: cause or effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespin, O M; Tatum, R P; Yates, R B; Sahin, M; Coskun, K; Martin, A V; Wright, A; Oelschlager, B K; Pellegrini, C A

    2016-07-01

    Nutcracker esophagus (NE), Jackhammer esophagus (JHE), distal esophageal spasm (DES), and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES) are defined by esophageal manometric findings. Some patients with these esophageal motility disorders also have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. It is unclear to what extent these patients' symptoms are caused by the motility disorder, the acid reflux, or both. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) on esophageal motility disorders, gastroesophageal reflux, and patient symptoms. Between 2007 and 2013, we performed high-resolution esophageal manometry on 3400 patients, and 221 patients were found to have a spastic esophageal motility disorder. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to determine the manometric abnormality, presence of gastroesophageal symptoms, and amount of esophageal acid exposure. In those patients that underwent LNF, we compared pre- and postoperative esophageal motility, gastroesophageal symptom severity, and esophageal acid exposure. Of the 221 patients with spastic motility disorders, 77 had NE, 2 had JHE, 30 had DES, and 112 had HTLES. The most frequently reported primary and secondary symptoms among all patients were: heartburn and/or regurgitation, 69.2%; respiratory, 39.8%; dysphagia, 35.7%; and chest pain, 22.6%. Of the 221 patients, 192 underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 103 demonstrated abnormal distal esophageal acid exposure. Abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring was detected in 62% of patients with heartburn and regurgitation, 49% of patients with respiratory symptoms, 36.8 % of patients with dysphagia, and 32.6% of patients with chest pain. Sixty-six of the 103 patients with abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring underwent LNF. Thirty-eight (13NE, 2JHE, 6 DES, and 17 HTLES) of these 66 patients had a minimum of 6-month postoperative follow-up that included clinical evaluation, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour pH monitoring

  12. Early discharge after external anal sphincter repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe an accelerated-stay program for repair of the external anal sphincter. METHODS: Twenty consecutive patients undergoing overlapping repair of the external anal sphincter were included in the study. Effect parameters were length of hospitalization....... CONCLUSION: We have described a safe accelerated-stay program (24 to 48 hours) for overlapping repair of external anal sphincter....

  13. [Esophageal motor function of gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Tian, Yuan; Ding, Yan

    2010-08-01

    To study the relationship between esophageal motor functional disorder [decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP)and ineffective motility (IEM)] and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Totally 89 patients with GERD were enrolled in this study. All of them underwent 24-hour pH monitoring with dual-channel probe and stationary esophageal manometry. In addition, 77 of these patients underwent upper endoscopy. IEM and LES, 10 mmHg were common disturbances in patients with GERD (54% and 48%, respectively). The number of the acid reflux events of distal esophagus and prevalence of moderate or severe erosive esophagitis (EE) were significantly higher in patients with low LESP and IEM than patients without low LESP ( Pesophagus was significantly correlated with the severity of esophagitis, distal esophagus amplitude, and LESP, while no such correlation was found between IEM and degree of esophageal acid exposure or esophagitis. The pathophysiology of GERD is probably multifactorial. Lower LESP or IEM is not a independent pathophysiological factor for GERD. However,one single factor is insufficient to explain all the pathogenic mechanism of GERD.

  14. Esophageal motility pattern and gastro-esophageal reflux in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadel, Abil Ali; Mostafa, Mohamed; Younis, Ahmed; Haleem, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    The association of esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms with respiratory symptoms is not well established in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this work is to study the abnormalities of esophageal function in COPD patients and study its relation to smoking index, body mass index and indices of hyperinflation. This study included 40 male COPD patients and 10 healthy controls. The patients and controls were subjected to spirometry, body plethysmography, esophageal manometry and 24hr pH-metry. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms were found in 55% of patients, hypotensive upper esophageal sphincter pressure in 65% of patients and hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter pressure in 52.5% of patients. Pathological acid reflux was found in 35% of patients. The severity of GERD increased with increased age, smoking index and body mass index, pesophageal motility disorders in COPD patients, LESP and UESP were significantly negatively correlated to indices of hyperinflation. There was a high prevalence of GERD in COPD patents especially elderly, severe stage of COPD, high smoking index and high body mass index (BMI).

  15. Esophageal dysmotility in scleroderma: a prospective study of 183 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahcene, M; Oumnia, N; Matougui, N; Boudjella, M; Tebaibia, A; Touchene, B

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of esophageal motor disorders in systemic sclerosis. In 183 consecutive cases of scleroderma, as diagnosed by American College of Rheumatology criteria (1980). Patients' mean age was 40.6+/-13.3 years, the gender ratio was 0.13 and the average duration of disease was 6.8+/-7.5 years. A localized, cutaneous form was observed in 148 patients (81%) and a diffuse form in 35 (19%). All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and standard esophageal manometry. Esophageal symptoms and reflux esophagitis were found in 108 (59%) and 68 (37%) of patients, respectively. Esophageal motor disorders were present in 148 patients (81%), and were associated with a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter in 114 (62%). The presence of these motor abnormalities was not related to age, gender, skin extension or duration of disease. Esophageal motor disorders were present in almost all patients with esophageal symptoms or esophagitis, and were also found in 48 (64%) of the asymptomatic patients. Esophageal motor disorders are frequently seen in scleroderma, especially in cases with clinical symptoms, but are not associated with a specific form of the disease.

  16. Effect of age on proximal esophageal response to swallowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Oliveira Dantas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: It has been demonstrated that the ageing process affects esophageal motility. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of the age on the proximal esophageal response to wet swallows. METHOD: We measured the proximal esophageal response to swallows of a 5 mL bolus of water in 69 healthy volunteers, 20 of them aged 18-30 years (group I, 27 aged 31-50 years (group II, and 22 aged 51-74 years (group III. We used the manometric method with continuous perfusion. The proximal esophageal contractions were recorded 5 cm from a pharyngeal recording site located 1 cm above the upper esophageal sphincter. The time between the onset of the pharyngeal and of the proximal esophageal recording (pharyngeal-esophageal time and the amplitude, duration and area under the curve of the proximal esophageal contraction were measured. RESULTS: The pharyngeal-esophageal time was shorter in group I subjects than in group II and III subjects (P<0.05. The duration of proximal esophageal contractions was longer in group I than in groups II and III (P<0.001. There was no differences between groups in the amplitude or area under the curve of contractions. There were no differences between groups II and III for any of the measurements. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the age may affects the response of the proximal esophagus to wet swallows.

  17. Successful Implantation of Bioengineered, Intrinsically Innervated, Human Internal Anal Sphincter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Shreya; Gilmont, Robert R.; Miyasaka, Eiichi A.; Somara, Sita; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Bitar, Khalil N.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims To restore fecal continence, the weakened pressure of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) must be increased. We bioengineered intrinsically innervated human IAS, to emulate sphincteric physiology, in vitro. Methods We co-cultured human IAS circular smooth muscle with immortomouse fetal enteric neurons. We investigated the ability of bioengineered innervated human IAS, implanted in RAG1−/− mice, to undergo neovascularization and preserve the physiology of the constituent myogenic and neuronal components. Results The implanted IAS was neovascularized in vivo; numerous blood vessels were observed with no signs of inflammation or infection. Real-time force acquisition from implanted and pre-implant IAS showed distinct characteristics of IAS physiology. Features included the development of spontaneous myogenic basal tone; relaxation of 100% of basal tone in response to inhibitory neurotransmitter vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and direct electrical field stimulation of the intrinsic innervation; inhibition of nitrergic and VIPergic EFS-induced relaxation (by antagonizing nitric oxide synthesis or receptor interaction); contraction in response to cholinergic stimulation with acetylcholine; and intact electromechanical coupling (evidenced by direct response to potassium chloride). Implanted, intrinsically innervated bioengineered human IAS tissue preserved the integrity and physiology of myogenic and neuronal components. Conclusion Intrinsically innervated human IAS bioengineered tissue can be successfully implanted in mice. This approach might be used to treat patients with fecal incontinence. PMID:21463628

  18. [Association between acid reflux and esophageal dysmotility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhi-hui; Feng, Li; Wen, Mao-yao; Liu, Jian-rong; Yang, Li

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the association between esophageal motility and acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 94 patients with typical reflux symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation and chest pain, whose score (Sc) of reflux diagnostic questionnaire (RDQ) was greater than or equal to 12 were enrolled in the study. Each participant was evaluated by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, high resolution manometry (HRM) of esophagus and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring. The participants were divided into groups of reflux esophagitis (RE) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) on the basis of endoscopy findings. The 24 h esophageal pH monitoring categorized participants into physiologic reflux (pH) and pathologic reflux (pH+). The characteristics of esophageal motility and acid reflux were compared between the two groups of participants. Lower but non-significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in pressure of lower esophageal sphincter (LESP), length of lower esophageal sphincter (LESL), esophageal contraction amplitude (CA), distal contractile integral (DCI) and effective peristalsis proportion (EPP) in the participants in the RE group compared with those in the NERD group. Participants in the RE group had significantly higher prevalence of reduced LESP (63.0% vs. 31.7%, P 0.05). RE is closely associated with acid reflux and hiatus hernia. Esophageal dysmotility is more likely to appear in patients with pH+. The interaction of acid reflux and esophageal dysmotility may play a role in GERD.

  19. Herpetic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium

  20. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography for esophageal motility disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-resolution manometer (HRM of the esophagus has become the main diagnostic test in the evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The first step of the Chicago classification described abnormal esophagogastric junction deglutitive relaxation. The latest classification system, proposed by Pandolfino et al, includes contraction patterns and peristalsis integrity based on integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4. It can be discriminating the achalasia from non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders. The aim of this study was to assessment of clinical findings in non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders based on the most recent Chicago classification. Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 963 patients that had been referred to manometry department of Gastrointestinal and Liver Research Center, Firozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April, 2012 to April, 2015. They had upper GI disorder (Dysphasia, non-cardiac chest pain, regurgitation, heartburn, vomiting and asthma and weight loss. Data were collected from clinical examinations as well as patient questionnaires. Manometry, water-perfused, was done for all patients. Manometry criteria of the patients who had integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4 ≤ 15 mmHg were studied. Results: Our finding showed that the non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders (58% was more common than the achalasia (18.2%. Heartburn (68.5%, regurgitation (65.4% and non-cardiac chest pain (60.6% were the most common clinical symptoms. Although, vomiting (91.7% and weight loss (63% were the most common symptoms in referring patients but did not discriminate this disorders from each other’s. Borderline motor function (67.2% was the most common, absent peristalsis (97% and the hyper

  1. Esophageal Motility and Rikkunshito Treatment for Proton Pump Inhibitor-Refractory Nonerosive Reflux Disease: A Prospective, Uncontrolled, Open-Label Pilot Study Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, Takeo; Yamato, Shigeru; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Only a few reports focused on esophageal motility in patients with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) and there has been no established strategy for treatment. To clarify the characteristics of esophageal motility in patients with PPI-refractory NERD, we evaluated esophageal function using combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and esophageal manometry (MII-EM). In addition, we evaluated the efficacy of rikkunshito (RKT), which is a gastrointestinal prokinetic agent. Thirty patients with NERD were enrolled and underwent MII-EM. After 8 weeks of RKT (7.5 g/d) treatment, MII-EM was repeated on patients with PPI-refractory NERD. Symptoms were assessed by the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. In patients with PPI-refractory NERD, measures of complete bolus transit, peristaltic contractions, and residual pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter during swallowing deviated from the standard values and esophageal clearance was found to be deteriorated. RKT significantly improved the peristaltic contractions ( P esophageal sphincter ( P disorders of esophageal and lower esophageal sphincter motility that were improved by RKT. Further studies examining esophageal motor activity of RKT in PPI-refractory NERD are required. University hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) Clinical Trial Registry identifier: UMIN000003092.

  2. Pharmacologic influence on esophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunderquist, A.; Owman, T.

    1983-01-01

    Selective catherization of the left gastric vein was performed after percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP) in patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Following the hypothesis that drugs increasing the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure may obstruct the variceal blood flow throught the lower esophagus, the effect of different drugs (i.e., intravenous injection of vasopressin, pentagastrin, domperidone and somatostatin and subcutaneous injection of metacholine) on the variceal blood flow was examined. Vasopressin did not change the variceal blood flow; pentagastrine, with its known effect of increasing the LES pressure produced a total interruption of the flow in four of eight patients; domperiodone, also known to increase the LES pressure obstructed the variceal blood flow in the only patient examined with this drug; somatostatin has no reported action on the LES but blocked the flow in one of two patients; and metacholine, reported to increase the LES pressure did not produce any change in the flow in the three patients examined. LES pressure was recorded before and during vasopressin infusion in seven patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. No reaction on the pressure was found. The patient number in the study is small and the results are nonuniform but still they suggest that drugs increasing the LES tonus might be useful to control variceal blood flow. (orig.)

  3. Anal Sphincter Augmentation Using Biological Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Nasra N; Narang, Sunil K; Köckerling, Ferdinand; Daniels, Ian R; Smart, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the use of biological materials in the augmentation of the anal sphincter either as part of an overlapping sphincter repair (OSR) or anal bulking procedure. A systematic search of PubMed was conducted using the search terms "anal bulking agents," "anal sphincter repair," or "overlapping sphincter repair." Five studies using biological material as part of an overlapping sphincter repair (OSR) or as an anal bulking agent were identified. 122 patients underwent anal bulking with a biological material. Anorectal physiology was conducted in 27 patients and demonstrated deterioration in maximum resting pressure, and no significant change in maximum squeeze increment. Quality of life scores (QoLs) demonstrated improvements at 6 weeks and 6 months, but this had deteriorated at 12 months of follow up. Biological material was used in 23 patients to carry out an anal encirclement procedure. Improvements in QoLs were observed in patients undergoing OSR as well as anal encirclement using biological material. Incontinence episodes decreased to an average of one per week from 8 to 10 preoperatively. Sphincter encirclement with biological material has demonstrated improvements in continence and QoLs in the short term compared to traditional repair alone. Long-term studies are necessary to determine if this effect is sustained. As an anal bulking agent the benefits are short-term.

  4. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Dietary therapy and nutrition management of eosinophilic esophagitis: ... of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract . 2017;5(2): ...

  5. Esophageal manometric characteristics and outcomes for laparoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy, myotomy, and partial fundoplication for epiphrenic diverticula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melman, Lora; Quinlan, Jessica; Robertson, Brian; Brunt, L M; Halpin, Valerie J; Eagon, J C; Frisella, Margaret M; Matthews, Brent D

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the esophageal motor and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) abnormalities associated with epiphrenic esophageal diverticula and analyze outcomes for laparoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy, myotomy, and partial fundoplication. The endoscopic, radiographic, manometric, and perioperative records for patients undergoing laparoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy, anterior esophageal myotomy, and partial fundoplication from 8/99 until 9/06 were reviewed from an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved outcomes database. Data are given as mean +/- standard deviation (SD). An esophageal body motor disorder and/or LES abnormalities were present in 11 patients with epiphrenic diverticula; three patients were characterized as achalasia, one had vigorous achalasia, two had diffuse esophageal spasm, and five had a nonspecific motor disorder. Presenting symptoms included dysphagia (13/13), regurgitation (7/13), and chest pain (4/13). Three patients had previous Botox injections and three patients had esophageal dilatations. Laparoscopic epiphrenic diverticulectomy with an anterior esophageal myotomy was completed in 13 patients (M:F; 3:10) with a mean age of 67.6 +/- 4.2 years, body mass index (BMI) of 28.1 +/- 1.9 kg/m2 and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 2.2 +/- 0.1. Partial fundoplication was performed in 12/13 patients (Dor, n = 2; Toupet, n = 10). Four patients had a type I and one patient had a type III hiatal hernia requiring repair. Mean operative time was 210 +/- 15.1 min and mean length of stay (LOS) was 2.8 +/- 0.4 days. Two grade II or higher complications occurred, including one patient who was readmitted on postoperative day 4 with a leak requiring a thoracotomy. After a mean follow-up of 13.6 +/- 3.0 months (range 3-36 months), two patients complained of mild solid food dysphagia and one patient required proton pump inhibitor (PPI) for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. The majority of patients

  6. Phasic or terminal detrusor overactivity in women: age, urodynamic findings and sphincter behavior relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise A. Valentini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To search for relationships between phasic (P and terminal (T DO with age, urodynamic findings and sphincter behavior during involuntary detrusor contraction in woman. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Urodynamic studies (triple lumen catheter 7F, seated position of 164 successive women referred for LUTS with diagnosis of DO were reviewed. Patients were stratified in 4 sub-groups: pre- (18-44y, peri- (45-54 y, post-menopause (55-74 y and oldest old (≥ 75 y. The urethral sensor was positioned at the level of the maximum urethral closure pressure for sphincter behavior analysis. A variation of at least 5 cmH2O in pressure (detrusor or urethra was chosen to assert DO or sphincter response. Sphincter response was classified as relaxation (re before or during DO, or steady (st. RESULTS: Occurrence of P and TDO was similar: 77 P and 87 T. The PDO group was significantly younger (p = 0.0003. TDO was more frequent in patients with a history of neurological disease. The percentage of PDO remained almost constant in age groups, while that of TDO increased with age from 6.7% to 23.2% (p = 0.0013. Uninhibited contraction occurred at a smaller bladder volume in the P group: 149 ± 95 vs. 221 ± 113 mL (p < 0.0001. Steady sphincter predominated in the TDO subgroup: 45.9% vs. 32.1% and increased significantly in each DO sub-group of ³ 75y. CONCLUSION: Steady sphincter during both P and TDO, and occurrence of TDO appear as specific of aging. The last result could be related to structural changes in the detrusor muscle with aging.

  7. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome.

  8. ANAL SPHINCTER INJURIES (OASIS AT DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Jakopič

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anal incontinence severely impairs quality of life. It affects 4 to 19 % of women and is statistically related to number of vaginal deliveries. It is grossly underreported and most patients that do seek help are referred to gastroenterologists or colorectal surgeons. Incidence of recognized sphincter injuries at time of delivery is 1 to 2 %. However studies with anal ultrasound showed incidence of anal sphincter injuries at 28 to 41 %. Depending on the degree of injury symptoms range from partial to complete inability to control passing of winds, liquid or solid stools. About three thirds of patients are asymp- tomatic in puerperium, however half of them are at risk of developing anal incontinence in later life. Hypoestrogenisem, additional perineal trauma during consequent deliveries and sphincter atrophy can unmask anal sphincter damage years later. Timely recognition and treatment are vital for good long term results and quality of life, if possible immediately after delivery. Good knowledge of perineal anatomy, recognition of risk factors, intense search and appropriate treatment and follow-up are essential to management of anal sphincter injuries. All secondary sphincter repair is less effective. Content: Updated overview of current opinion and guidelines on anal sphincter injuries are pre- sented. Anal sphincter is composed of external anal sphincter (EAS and internal anal sphincter (IAS. Striated EAS is divided into three parts – subcutaneous, superficial, deep, and con- nected to puborectalis muscle posteriorly. Smooth-muscled IAS is a continuation of a cir- cular smooth-muscle layer of rectum. In between there is a thin longitudinal muscle layer. IAS constitutes 70 % of resting tone and is under constant contraction. EAS contributes to 30 % of resting tone and almost all pressure during active contraction. EAS injury leads to insufficient contraction after rectal sampling and filling which causes urgency – patient can

  9. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Weiss

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on patients with EoE.

  10. Successful implantation of physiologically functional bioengineered mouse internal anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Shreya; Miyasaka, Eiichi A; Hashish, Mohamed; Somara, Sita; Gilmont, Robert R; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Bitar, Khalil N

    2010-08-01

    We have previously developed bioengineered three-dimensional internal anal sphincter (IAS) rings from circular smooth muscle cells isolated from rabbit and human IAS. We provide proof of concept that bioengineered mouse IAS rings are neovascularized upon implantation into mice of the same strain and maintain concentric smooth muscle alignment, phenotype, and IAS functionality. Rings were bioengineered by using smooth muscle cells from the IAS of C57BL/6J mice. Bioengineered mouse IAS rings were implanted subcutaneously on the dorsum of C57BL/6J mice along with a microosmotic pump delivering fibroblast growth factor-2. The mice remained healthy during the period of implantation, showing no external signs of rejection. Mice were killed 28 days postsurgery and implanted IAS rings were harvested. IAS rings showed muscle attachment, neovascularization, healthy color, and no external signs of infection or inflammation. Assessment of force generation on harvested IAS rings showed the following: 1) spontaneous basal tone was generated in the absence of external stimulation; 2) basal tone was relaxed by vasoactive intestinal peptide, nitric oxide donor, and nifedipine; 3) acetylcholine and phorbol dibutyrate elicited rapid-rising, dose-dependent, sustained contractions repeatedly over 30 min without signs of muscle fatigue; and 4) magnitudes of potassium chloride-induced contractions were 100% of peak maximal agonist-induced contractions. Our preliminary results confirm the proof of concept that bioengineered rings are neovascularized upon implantation. Harvested rings maintain smooth muscle alignment and phenotype. Our physiological studies confirm that implanted rings maintain 1) overall IAS physiology and develop basal tone, 2) integrity of membrane ionic characteristics, and 3) integrity of membrane associated intracellular signaling transduction pathways for contraction and relaxation by responding to cholinergic, nitrergic, and VIP-ergic stimulation. IAS smooth muscle

  11. Frequency of motor alterations detected through manometry in patients with esophageal symptoms and scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Y López, N; Lugo-Zamudio, G; Barbosa-Cobos, R E; Wong-Lam, A; Torres-López, E

    Scleroderma can present with esophageal involvement causing important morbidity. To describe the manometric findings and clinical characteristics of patients with scleroderma and esophageal symptoms. Patients with scleroderma and esophageal symptoms were evaluated through esophageal manometry within the time frame of one year. Descriptive statistics were carried out and the continuous variables were expressed as means and standard deviation. Frequencies were expressed as percentages. The study included 24 female patients with a mean age of 53.5 years and mean disease progression of 7.84 years. The most frequent findings were short and hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (mean length 1.58cm and mean tone 9.49mmHg) and ineffective esophageal motility (mean non-transmitted waves 92.91%, mean effective primary peristalsis 40.05%, and mean amplitude 13.11mmHg). The most frequent symptom was dysphagia. Scleroderma is associated with lower esophageal sphincter alterations and symptomatic ineffective esophageal motility. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Accuracy of hiatal hernia detection with esophageal high-resolution manometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenborg, P. W.; van Hoeij, F. B.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of a sliding hiatal hernia is classically made with endoscopy or barium esophagogram. Spatial separation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and diaphragm, the hallmark of hiatal hernia, can also be observed on high-resolution manometry (HRM), but the diagnostic accuracy of this

  13. Esophageal microbiome in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kirk Harris

    Full Text Available The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis.In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST. Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease.Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects.Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD.

  14. High resolution vs conventional esophageal manometry in the assessment of esophageal motor disorders in patients with non-cardiac chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsiku, O; Yamasaki, T; Brunner, S; Ganocy, S; Fass, R

    2018-06-01

    High-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) has become a leading tool in the assessment of esophageal motor disorders, replacing conventional manometry. However, there is limited data about the contribution of HREM as compared with conventional manometry to the assessment of esophageal motor disorders in patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). The aim of the study was to compare the distribution of esophageal motor disorders in patients with NCCP using HREM as compared with conventional manometry and to determine if HREM improved diagnosis of these disorders. In this study, we included 300 consecutive patients with NCCP who underwent either HREM or conventional manometry over a period of 10 years. A total of 150 patients had conventional manometry and the other 150 patients HREM. The Chicago 3.0 classification and the Castell and Spechler classification were used to determine the esophageal motor disorder of NCCP patients undergoing HREM and conventional manometry, respectively. In both HREM and the conventional manometry groups, normal esophageal motility was the most frequent finding (47% and 36%; respectively, P = .054). Hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter was the most common motility disorder identified by conventional manometry (27.3%), while ineffective esophageal motility was the most common esophageal motor disorder identified by HREM (25.3%). There is a discrepancy in the type of esophageal motor disorders identified by HREM as compared with conventional manometry in NCCP patients. Hypotensive motility disorders are the most commonly diagnosed by both manometric techniques. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The novel, peripherally restricted GABAB receptor agonist lesogaberan (AZD3355) inhibits acid reflux and reduces esophageal acid exposure as measured with 24-h pHmetry in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändén, Lena; Fredriksson, Anita; Harring, Emelie; Jensen, Jörgen; Lehmann, Anders

    2010-05-25

    While patients with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease generally respond well to proton pump inhibitors, 20-30% continue to experience troublesome symptoms. In such cases, agents that target transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation may be useful as add-on therapy to proton pump inhibitors. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen inhibits transient LES relaxation but it is not an ideal agent due to central nervous system activity. Lesogaberan (AZD3355) is a peripherally restricted GABAB receptor agonist with limited central nervous system activity that inhibits transient LES relaxation in dogs. In the present study, the comparative effects of lesogaberan (7 micromol/kg) and baclofen (2.8 micromol/kg) on reflux were studied in dogs using 24-h pHmetry. Drugs (or vehicle control) were administered orally prior to the first meal of the day, and the number of reflux episodes (pH or = 5 s) and acid exposure time were computed for the 24-h monitoring period. The mean (S.E.M.) number of reflux episodes/24 h was 4.6 (0.4) and 6.4 (0.6) for lesogaberan and baclofen, respectively, versus 10.7 (0.5) for control (PAcid exposure time was 51.2 (4.5) min for control versus 23.6 (3.8) min for lesogaberan (Pacid reflux in dogs, with comparable efficacy to baclofen. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the anorectal sphincter using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, Ehiichi

    1994-01-01

    Until now the evaluation of how to function on the sphincter muscle complex on the imaging study has been done by defecography. The purpose of this paper is to show the normal and abnormal functions of sphincter muscle complex at rest and squeeze using MRI. The subjects were 15 volunteers with informed consent and 13 post operative patients with a history anorectal anomalies. MR images were obtained with a 1.5 T unit. Sagittal and axial planes were evaluated both at rest and squeeze. Squeeze was simulated by insufflating a rectal balloon or enema on the volunteers. Only light stimulation was stressed on the post operative patients by means of balloon insufflation with 50 ml air. Under balloon stimulation, 71% of normal sphincter muscle complexes contracted only transverse dimention. The rest was as is. None revealed significant distension. All patients with continence demonstrated the same transverse contraction. Patients with incontinence showed no significant contraction. Under enema stimulation for normal subjects, sphincter muscle complex distended on both dimensions. Gluteal muscle contracted 50% of volunteers under enema stimulation. All post operative patients with continence demonstrated gluteal muscles contractions. Normal sphincter muscle complex contracts only in transverse dimension under balloon stimulation, which is caused by the muscle. Under enema stimulation, it distends on both dimensions. Gluteal muscle contract only under enema stimulation. In post operative patients, MRI shows different functions of anal sphincter muscle complex between continent and incontinent groups. It may explain causes of incontinence. The gluteal muscle and puborectal muscle seem to have one of the essentials for continence. (author)

  17. Esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, O.; Ganem, G.; Denis, F.; Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Pradier, O.; Martin, P.; Mirabel, X.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancers are highly malignant tumours with often a poor prognosis, except for minimal lesions treated with surgery. Radiation therapy, or combined radiation and chemotherapy is the most used therapeutic modality, alone or before oesophagectomy. The delineation of target volumes is now more accurate owing the possibility to use routinely the new imaging techniques (mainly PET). The aim of this work is to precise the radio-anatomical particularities, the pattern of spread of esophageal cancer and the principles of 3D conformal radiotherapy illustrated with a clinical case. (authors)

  18. Laparoscopic esophageal myotomy versus pneumatic dilation in the treatment of idiopathic achalasia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baniya R

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ramkaji Baniya, Sunil Upadhaya, Jahangir Khan, Suresh Kumar Subedi, Tabrez Shaik Mohammed, Balvant K Ganatra, Ghassan Bachuwa Department of Internal Medicine, Hurley Medical Center, Michigan State University, Flint, MI, USA Background: Achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder of unknown etiology associated with abnormalities in peristalsis and lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. The disease is incurable; however, definitive treatment procedures like pneumatic dilation (PD/balloon dilation and laparoscopic esophageal myotomy (LEM are performed to relieve dysphagia and related symptoms. Currently, there is paucity of data comparing the outcomes of these procedures. The aim of this meta-analysis is to compare the short- and long-term success rates of PD and LEM. Methods: A thorough systematic search of PubMed, Scopus, clinicaltrials.gov, and Cochrane library was conducted for randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing the outcomes of PD versus LEM in the treatment of achalasia. The Mantel-Haenszel method and random effect model were used to analyze the data. RCTs with outcome data at 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year intervals were analyzed. Results: A total of 437,378 and 254 patients at 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year intervals were analyzed for outcome data. At 3 months and 1 year, PD was not as effective as LEM (odds ratio [OR]: 0.50; confidence interval [CI] 0.31–0.82; P = 0.009 and OR: 0.47; CI 0.22–0.99; P = 0.21 but at 5 years, one procedure was non-inferior to the other (OR: 0.62; 0.33–1.19; P = 0.34. Conclusion: PD was as effective as LEM in relieving symptoms of achalasia in the long-term. Keywords: achalasia, balloon dilation, pneumatic dilation, laparoscopic myotomy, Heller’s myotomy

  19. Fiber types in the striated urethral and anal sphincters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Reske-Nielsen, E

    1983-01-01

    Seven normal human striated urethral and anal sphincters obtained by autopsy were examined using histochemical techniques. In both the urethral sphincter and the subcutaneous (s.c.) and superficial part of the anal sphincter a characteristic pattern with two populations of muscle fibers, abundant...

  20. High Resolution Esophageal Manometry in Patients with Chagas Disease: A Cross-Sectional Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Sánchez-Montalvá

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal involvement affects 30-40% of the patients with chronic Chagas disease. Esophageal symptoms appear once the structural damage is established. Little is known about the usefulness of high resolution manometry to early identification of esophageal involvement.We performed a cross-sectional study at the Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain between May 2011 and April 2012. Consecutive patients diagnosed with Chagas disease in the chronic phase were offered to participate. All patients underwent a structured questionnaire about digestive symptoms, a barium esophagogram (Rezende classification and an esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM. A control group of patients with heartburn who underwent an esophageal HRM in our hospital was selected.62 out of 73 patients that were included in the study fulfilled the study protocol. The median age of the Chagas disease group (CG was 37 (IQR 32-45 years, and 42 (67.7% patients were female. Twenty-seven (43.5% patients had esophageal symptoms, heartburn being the most frequent. Esophagogram was abnormal in 5 (8.77%. The esophageal HRM in the CG showed a pathological motility pattern in 14 patients (22.6%. All of them had minor disorders of the peristalsis (13 with ineffective esophageal motility and 1 with fragmented peristalsis. Hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter was found more frequently in the CG than in the control group (21% vs 3.3%; p<0.01. Upper esophageal sphincter was hypertonic in 22 (35.5% and hypotonic in 1 patient. When comparing specific manometric parameters or patterns in the CG according to the presence of symptoms or esophagogram no statistically significant association were seen, except for distal latency.The esophageal involvement measured by HRM in patients with chronic Chagas disease in our cohort is 22.6%. All the patients with esophageal alterations had minor disorders of the peristalsis. Symptoms and esophagogram results did not correlate with the HRM

  1. Esophageal perforation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... esophagus into the space around the lungs. Collapsed lung. X-rays taken after you drink a non-harmful dye can help pinpoint the location of the perforation. You may also have chest CT scan look for an abscess in the chest or esophageal cancer.

  2. Esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas in esophageal cancer (EC) has changed, and focus directed towards tumors of the distal esophagus and the esophagogastric junction. The genetic events leading to EC are not fully clarified, but important risk factors have been...

  3. The prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease and esophageal dysmotility in Chinese patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Hobson, Anthony Robert; Shang, Zhan Min; Pei, Yan Xiang; Gao, Yan; Wang, Jian Xin; Huang, Wan Nong

    2015-02-19

    The cause of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains unknown, yet gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is highly prevalent in this population. GERD prevalence was studied, and esophageal function tests (EFT) were assessed in Chinese IPF patients. We prospectively studied 69 IPF patients who undertook both stationary High Resolution esophageal Manometry/Impedance (HRiM) and 24-hour esophageal Multi-Channel Intraluminal Impedance with pH Recordings (MII/pH). Patients were divided into GERD+ and GERD- groups according to pH results. Controls were HRiM treated healthy volunteers, and patients without IPF received HRiM and MII/pH diagnosed with GERD. 69 IPF patients, 62 healthy volunteers, and 88 IPF negative GERD patients were selected. GERD prevalence in IPF was 43/69 (62.3%), and 58.1% of patients presented with at least one typical symptom. Symptoms had a sensitivity of 58.1%, a specificity of 61.6%, a positive predictive value of 71.4% and a negative predictive of 47.1%. Compared with healthy volunteers, IPF patients had significantly decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP), upper esophageal sphincter pressure (UESP) and complete bolus transit rate (CBTR). By contrast, IPF patients had increased total bolus transit time and prevalence of weak peristalsis. MII/pH showed that one third of IPF patients had abnormal distal and proximal reflux, especially non-acid reflux. Compared with GERD patients without IPF, GERD patients with IPF had significantly decreased CBTR and UESP with increased bolus exposure time. GERD prevalence in IPF was high, but symptoms alone were an unreliable predictor of reflux. IPF patients had lower LESP and UESP, impaired esophageal peristalsis and bolus clearance function with more proximal reflux events.

  4. Incontinence after primary repair of obstetric anal sphincter tears is related to relative length of reconstructed external sphincter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norderval, S; Røssaak, K.; Markskog, A

    2012-01-01

    To determine if anatomic primary repair with end-to-end reconstruction of the external anal sphincter (EAS) in its full length combined with separate repair of coexisting internal anal sphincter (IAS) tear, when present, results in less incontinence and better anal sphincter integrity compared...

  5. Esophageal dysfunction in different stages of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, I; Suttrup, J; Suntrup-Krueger, S; Siemer, M-L; Bauer, J; Hamacher, C; Oelenberg, S; Domagk, D; Dziewas, R; Warnecke, T

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is a clinically relevant symptom in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) leading to pronounced reduction in quality of life and other severe complications. Parkinson's disease-related dysphagia may affect the oral and pharyngeal, as well as the esophageal phase of swallowing. To examine the nature and extend of esophageal dysphagia in different stages of PD and their relation to oropharyngeal dysfunction, we examined 65 PD patients (mean age 66.3±9.7 years, mean disease duration 7.9±5.8 years, mean Hoehn & Yahr [H&Y] stage 2.89±0.91) and divided into three groups (early [H&Y I+II; n=21], intermediate [H&Y III; n=25], and advanced stadium [H&Y IV+V; n=19]), using esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) to detect esophageal motor disorders. Oropharyngeal impairment was assessed using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Major esophageal motor disorders were detected in nearly one third of the PD patients. Minor impairment of the esophageal body was present in 95% of participants and throughout all disease stages with pathological findings especially in peristalsis and intrabolus pressure (IBP). The IBP was found to significantly increase in the advanced stadium. Although dysfunction of the upper and lower esophageal sphincters was observed in individual patients, alterations in these esophageal segments revealed no statistical significance compared with normative data. No clear association was found between the occurrence of oropharyngeal dysphagia and esophageal impairment. Esophageal body impairment in PD is a frequent phenomenon during all disease stages, which possibly reflects α-synucleinopathy in the enteric nervous system. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Bladder-sphincter dysfunction in myelomeningocele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, J. D.; Dik, P.; de Jong, T. P.

    2001-01-01

    Pediatric urodynamics taught us that detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia creates a bladder outlet obstruction in about 50% of any population of children with myelomeningocele. This functional obstruction causes renal damage due to obstructive uropathy, exactly the same way as a congenital anatomical

  7. Surgical treatment analysis of idiopathic esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, José Luis Braga de; Said, Marcelo Manzano; Pereira, Douglas Rizzanti; Amaral, Paula Casals do; Lima, Juliana Carolina Alves; Leandro-Merhi, Vânia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic esophageal achalasia is an inflammatory disease of unknown origin, characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing, with consequent dysphagia. To demonstrate the results of surgical therapy in these patients, evaluating the occurred local and systemic complications. Were studied retrospectively 32 patients, 22 of whom presented non-advanced stage of the disease (Stage I/II) and 10 with advanced disease (Stage III/IV). All of them had the clinical conditions to be submitted to surgery. The diagnoses were done by clinical, endoscopic, cardiological, radiological and esophageal manometry analysis. Pre-surgical evaluation was done with a questionnaire based on the most predisposing factors in the development of the disease and the surgical indication was based on the stage of the disease. The patients with non-advanced stages were submitted to cardiomyotomy with fundoplication, wherein in the post-surgical early assessment, only one (4,4%) presented pulmonary infection, but had a good outcome. In patients with advanced disease, seven were submitted to esophageal mucosectomy preserving the muscular layer, wherein one patient (14,2%) presented dehiscence of gastric cervical esophagus anastomosis as well as pulmonary infection; all of these complications were resolved with proper specific treatment; the other three patients with advanced stage were submitted to transmediastinal esophagectomy; two of them presented hydropneumothorax with good evolution, and one of them also presented fistula of the cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, but with spontaneous healing after conservative treatment and nutritional support. The two patients with fistula of the cervical anastomosis progressed to stenosis, with good results after endoscopic dilations. In the medium and long term assessment done in 23 patients, all of them reported improvement in life quality, with return to swallowing. The

  8. Efficacy of peroral endoscopic myotomy vs other achalasia treatments in improving esophageal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaka, Madhusudhan R; Hayat, Umar; Thota, Prashanthi N; Jegadeesan, Ramprasad; Ray, Monica; Gabbard, Scott L; Wadhwa, Neha; Lopez, Rocio; Baker, Mark E; Murthy, Sudish; Raja, Siva

    2016-05-28

    To assess and compare the esophageal function after peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) vs other conventional treatments in achalasia. Chart review of all achalasia patients who underwent POEM, laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) or pneumatic dilation (PD) at our institution between January 2012 and March 2015 was performed. Patient demographics, type of achalasia, prior treatments, pre- and post-treatment timed barium swallow (TBE) and high-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) findings were compared between the three treatment groups. Patients who had both pre- and 2 mo post-treatment TBE or HREM were included in the final analysis. TBE parameters compared were barium column height, width and volume of barium remaining at 1 and 5 min. HREM parameters compared were basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressures and LES-integrated relaxation pressures (IRP). Data are presented as mean ± SD, median [25(th), 75(th) percentiles] or frequency (percent). Analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis test, Pearsons χ(2) test and Fishers Exact tests were used for analysis. A total of 200 achalasia patients were included of which 36 underwent POEM, 22 underwent PD and 142 underwent LHM. POEM patients were older (55.4 ± 16.8 years vs 46.5 ± 15.7 years, P = 0.013) and had higher BMI than LHM (29.1 ± 5.9 kg/m(2) vs 26 ± 5.1 kg/m(2), P = 0.012). More number of patients in POEM and PD groups had undergone prior treatments compared to LHM group (72.2% vs 68.2% vs 44.3% respectively, P = 0.003). At 2 mo post-treatment, all TBE parameters including barium column height, width and volume remaining at 1 and 5 min improved significantly in all three treatment groups (P = 0.01 to P 0.05). POEM, PD and LHM were all effective in improving esophageal function in achalasia at short-term. There was no difference in efficacy between the three treatments.

  9. Biomimetic artificial sphincter muscles: status and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Vanessa; Fattorini, Elisa; Karapetkova, Maria; Osmani, Bekim; Töpper, Tino; Weiss, Florian; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Fecal incontinence is the involuntary loss of bowel content and affects more than 12% of the adult population, including 45% of retirement home residents. Severe fecal incontinence is often treated by implanting an artificial sphincter. Currently available implants, however, have long-term reoperation rates of 95% and definitive explantation rates of 40%. These statistics show that the implants fail to reproduce the capabilities of the natural sphincter and that the development of an adaptive, biologically inspired implant is required. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are being developed as artificial muscles for a biomimetic sphincter, due to their suitable response time, reaction forces, and energy consumption. However, at present the operation voltage of DEAs is too high for artificial muscles implanted in the human body. To reduce the operating voltage to tens of volts, we are using microfabrication to reduce the thickness of the elastomer layer to the nanometer level. Two microfabrication methods are being investigated: molecular beam deposition and electrospray deposition. This communication covers the current status and a perspective on the way forward, including the long-term prospects of constructing a smart sphincter from low-voltage sensors and actuators based on nanometer-thin dielectric elastomer films. As DEA can also provide sensory feedback, a biomimetic sphincter can be designed in accordance with the geometrical and mechanical parameters of its natural counterpart. The availability of such technology will enable fast pressure adaption comparable to the natural feedback mechanism, so that tissue atrophy and erosion can be avoided while maintaining continence du ring daily activities.

  10. [Significance of roentgen cinematography in the diagnosis of functional disorders of the pharyngo-esophageal junction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustiny, N; wolfensberger, M; Brühlmann, W

    1984-12-01

    Dysfunction of the pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter may escape detection by clinical examination, endoscopy, and routine barium studies. Cineradiographic examination of 300 patients with unexplained dysphagia revealed 57 cases of pharyngo-oesophageal dysfunction. In 25 cases an underlying disorder could be found, and 32 cases were considered idiopathic. Radiologically 3 types of dysfunction may be distinguished, namely late opening, incomplete relaxation, and early contraction of the pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter. Cineradiography was found to be an easy and reliable method of detecting pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter dysfunction.

  11. Differential Activation of Medullary Vagal Nuclei Caused by Stimulation of Different Esophageal Mechanoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ivan M.; Medda, Bidyut K.; Shaker, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal mechanorecptors, i.e. muscular slowly adapting tension receptors and mucosal rapidly adapting touch receptors, mediate different sets of reflexes. The aim of this study was to determine the medullary vagal nuclei involved in the reflex responses to activation of these receptors. Thirty-three cats were anesthetized with alpha-chloralose and the esophagus was stimulated by slow balloon or rapid air distension. The physiological effects of the stimuli (N=4) were identified by recording responses from the pharyngeal, laryngeal, and hyoid muscles, esophagus, and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The effects on the medullary vagal nuclei of the stimuli: slow distension (N=10), rapid distension (N=9), and in control animals (N=10) were identified using the immunohistochemical analysis of c-fos. The experimental groups were stimulated 3 times per minute for 3 hours. After the experiment, the brains were removed and processed for c-fos immunoreactivity or thioinin. We found that slow balloon distension activated the esophago-UES contractile reflex and esophago LES relaxation response, and rapid air injection activated the belch and its component reflexes. Slow balloon distension activated the NTSce, NTSdl, NTSvl, DMNc, DMNr and NAr; and rapid air injection primarily activated AP, NTScd, NTSim, NTSis, NTSdm, NTSvl, NAc and NAr. We concluded that different sets of medullary vagal nuclei mediate different reflexes of the esophagus activated from different sets of mechanoreceptors. The NTScd is the primary NTS subnucleus mediating reflexes from the mucosal rapidly adapting touch receptors, and the NTSce is the primary NTS subnucleus mediating reflexes from the muscular slowly adapting tension receptors. The AP may be involved in mediation of belching. PMID:20971087

  12. Esophageal Mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Boatright

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare invasive fungal infection with high mortality. It usually affects patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or hematological malignancies. Gastroenterologists need to be aware of this rare infection because endoscopy can facilitate early diagnosis and prompt appropriate therapy. Here we describe a case of invasive esophageal mucormycosis that developed in a 63-year-old man with diabetes, acute promyelocytic leukemia, and prolonged leukopenia after chemotherapy. Upper endoscopy showed distal circumferential esophageal wall thickening with devitalization. The mucosa did not bleed after endoscopic biopsy. Histopathology confirmed mucormycosis. He was treated with various antifungal agents including echinocandins, fluconazole, and liposomal amphotericin B. Despite aggressive antifungal therapy and supportive care, the patient died 24 days later.

  13. Evaluation and management of esophageal manifestations in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaxas, Konstantinos; Ladas, Spyros D; Karamanolis, George P

    2018-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystemic autoimmune connective tissue disorder; in the gastrointestinal tract, the esophagus is the most commonly affected organ. Symptoms of esophageal disease are due to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal motor dysfunction. Since the development of high-resolution manometry (HRM), this method has been preferred for the study of SSc patients with esophageal involvement. Using HRM, classic scleroderma esophagus, defined as absent or ineffective peristalsis of the distal esophagus in combination with a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter, was found in as many as 55% of SSc patients. Endoscopy is the appropriate test for evaluating dysphagia and identifying evidence and possible complications of GERD. In the therapeutic area, treatment ranges from general supportive measures to the administration of drugs such as proton pump inhibitors and/or prokinetics. However, as many SSc patients do not respond to existing therapies, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic modalities. Buspirone, a 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor agonist, could be a putative therapeutic option, as it was found to exert a significant beneficial effect in SSc patients with esophageal involvement. This review summarizes our knowledge concerning the evaluation and management of esophageal manifestations in SSc patients, including emerging therapeutic modalities.

  14. Management of esophageal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, L.D.; Mercer, C.D.; McCallum, R.W.; Kozarek, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book integrates gastroenterology and thoracic surgery to detail the comprehensive management of esophageal disease. It describes radiologic and functional evaluation of the esophagus, endoscopy, medical and surgical treatments, and results and also covers gastroesophageal reflux disease, tumors motility, esophageal replacement, intubation, esophageal diverticula, caustic esophageal injury. It presents Dr. Hill's surgical procedures in detail.

  15. Risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter ruptures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jangö, Hanna; Langhoff-Roos, J; Rosthøj, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Jangö H, Langhoff-Roos J, Rosthøj S, Sakse A. Risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter ruptures: a population-based cohort study. BJOG 2012;00:000-000 DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2012.03486.x. Objective  To determine the incidence and risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter...... were used to determine risk factors of recurrent ASR. Main outcome measures  The incidence of recurrent ASR and odds ratios for possible risk factors of recurrent ASR: age, body mass index, grade of ASR, birthweight, head circumference, gestational age, presentation, induction of labour, oxytocin...... augmentation, epidural, episiotomy, vacuum extraction, forceps, shoulder dystocia, delivery interval and year of second delivery. Results  Out of 159 446 women, 7336 (4.6%) experienced an ASR at first delivery, and 521 (7.1%) had a recurrent ASR (OR 5.91). The risk factors of recurrent ASR in the multivariate...

  16. Influence of experimental esophageal acidification on sleep bruxism: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmure, H; Oikawa, K; Kanematsu, K; Saito, Y; Yamamoto, T; Nagahama, H; Tsubouchi, H; Miyawaki, S

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this cross-over, randomized, single-blinded trial was to examine whether intra-esophageal acidification induces sleep bruxism (SB). Polysomnography with electromyogram (EMG) of masseter muscle, audio-video recording, and esophageal pH monitoring were performed in a sleep laboratory. Twelve healthy adult males without SB participated. Intra-esophageal infusions of 5-mL acidic solution (0.1 N HCl) or saline were administered. The frequencies of EMG bursts, rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) episodes, grinding noise, and the RMMA/microarousal ratio were significantly higher in the 20-minute period after acidic infusion than after saline infusion. RMMA episodes including SB were induced by esophageal acidification. This trial is registered with the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry, UMIN000002923. ASDA, American Sleep Disorders Association; EMG, electromyogram; GER, gastroesophageal reflux; LES, lower esophageal sphincter; NREM, non-rapid eye movement; REM, rapid eye movement; RMMA, rhythmic masticatory muscle activity; SB, sleep bruxism; SD, standard deviation; UES, upper esophageal sphincter.

  17. Clinical role of a modified seton technique for the treatment of trans-sphincteric and supra-sphincteric anal fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Yukihiko; Sasaki, Hirokazu; Saito, Tohru

    2013-03-01

    We have devised a modified seton technique that resects the external fistula tract while preserving the anal sphincter muscle. This study assessed the technique when used for the management of complex anal fistulas. Between January 2006 and December 2007, 239 patients (208 males and 31 females, median age: 41 years) underwent surgery for complex anal fistulas using the technique. Of the 239 patients, 198 patients had trans-sphincteric fistula and 41 patients had supra-sphincteric fistula. The durations of the surgeries were 17 min (47, 13) [median (range, interquartile range)] for trans-sphincteric fistulas and 38 (44, 16) for supra-sphincteric fistulas. The durations of the surgeries were significantly (P trans-sphincteric fistula. The hospital stays were 4 (13, 2) days and 5 (14, 3) days, respectively, for trans- and supra-sphincteric fistulas. The durations of seton placement until the spontaneous dropping of the seton were 42 (121, 48) and 141 (171, 55) days respectively. The recurrence rate was 0 % in patients with trans-sphincteric fistulas and 4.9 % (2 of 41) in patients with supra-sphincteric fistulas (P < 0.01). Serious incontinence was not observed. The technique provided favorable results for the treatment of complex anal fistulas and could be safely applied while preserving the sphincter function and conserving fecal continence.

  18. Impaired esophageal motor function in eosinophilic esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilio Santander

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immunoallergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus that represents a major cause of digestive morbidity among the pediatric and young adult populations. Despite the fact that key symptoms in adults include dysphagia and food impaction, many patients lack structural changes in the esophagus to account for their complaints, which suggests the presence of underlying motor disorders and esophageal distensibility impairment. In the last few years the esophageal motility of these patients has been studied using various approaches, most particularly high-resolution manometry, ambulatory manometry, and impedance planimetry. This review focuses on the most relevant findings and scientific evidence regarding esophageal motor disorders in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  19. Impaired esophageal motor function in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Cecilio; Chavarría-Herbozo, Carlos M; Becerro-González, Irene; Burgos-Santamaría, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immunoallergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus that represents a major cause of digestive morbidity among the pediatric and young adult populations. Despite the fact that key symptoms in adults include dysphagia and food impaction, many patients lack structural changes in the esophagus to account for their complaints, which suggests the presence of underlying motor disorders and esophageal distensibility impairment. In the last few years the esophageal motility of these patients has been studied using various approaches, most particularly high-resolution manometry, ambulatory manometry, and impedance planimetry. This review focuses on the most relevant findings and scientific evidence regarding esophageal motor disorders in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  20. Neurophysiology and new techniques to assess esophageal sensory function: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Christina; McCallum, Richard W; Gyawali, C Prakash; Farmer, Adam D; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; McMahon, Barry P; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-09-01

    This review aims to discuss the neurophysiology of the esophagus and new methods to assess esophageal nociception. Pain and other symptoms can be caused by diseases in the mucosa or muscular or sphincter dysfunction, together with abnormal pain processing, either in the peripheral or central nervous systems. Therefore, we present new techniques in the assessment of esophageal function and the potential role of the mucosal barrier in the generation and propagation of pain. We discuss the assessment and role of esophageal sphincters in nociception, as well as imaging and electrophysiological techniques, with examples of their use in understanding the sensory system following noxious stimuli to the esophagus. Additionally, we discuss the mechanisms behind functional diseases of the esophagus. We conclude that the new methods have identified many of the mechanisms behind malfunction of the mucosa, disturbances of muscular and sphincter functions, and the central response to different stimuli. Taken together, this has increased our understanding of esophageal disorders and may lead to new treatment modalities. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. High-Resolution Manometry Evaluation of Pressures at the Pharyngo-upper Esophageal Area in Patients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia Due to Vagal Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Bruno Rezende; Herbella, Fernando A M; de Biase, Noemi; Vaiano, Thays C G; Patti, Marco G

    2017-10-01

    The motility of the pharynx, upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and proximal esophagus in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia is still not entirely understood. High-resolution manometry (HRM) was recently added to the armamentarium for the study of this area. This study aims to describe HRM findings in patients with vagal paralysis. Sixteen patients (mean age 54 years, 69% females) with oropharyngeal dysphagia due to unilateral vagal paralysis were prospectively studied. All patients underwent HRM. Motility of the UES and at the topography of the velopharynx and epiglottis were recorded. (1) UES relaxation is compromised in a minority of patients, (2) epiglottis pressure does not follow a specific pattern, (3) vellum is hypotonic in half of the patients, (4) dysphagia is related to a low pharyngeal pressure, not to a flow obstruction at the level of the UES, and (5) aspiration is related to low pressures at the level of the UES and epiglottis and higher pressures at the level of the vellum. Pharyngeal motility is significantly impaired in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia and unilateral vagal paralysis. In half of the cases, UES resting pressure is preserved due to unilateral innervation and relaxation is normal in most patients. Dysphagia therapy in these patients must be directed toward improvement in the oropharyngeal motility not at the UES.

  2. [The artificial sphincter: therapy for faecal incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, U

    2012-08-01

    Faecal incontinence (FI) challenges a patient's professional, social and sexual life. Often the patient becomes depressive and socially isolated. If able to break open for therapy the patient should receive as first line a conservative treatment (like dietary measures, pelvic re-education, biofeedback, bulking agents, irrigation). When is the time to implant an artificial anal sphincter? If conservative therapy fails as well as surgical options (like a sphincteroplasty - if indicated a reconstruction of the pelvic floor if insufficient, or a sacral nerve stimulation) an ultimo surgical procedure should be offered to appropriate and compliant patients: an artificial anal sphincter. Worldwide, there are two established devices on the market: the artificial bowel sphincter® (ABS) from A. M. S. (Minnetonka, MN, USA) and the soft anal band® from A. M. I. (Feldkirch, Austria). How to implant the artificial anal sphincter? Both devices consist of a silicon cuff which can be filled with fluid. Under absolute aseptic conditions this cuff is placed in the lithotomy position by perianal incisions around the anal canal below the pelvic floor. A silicon tube connects the anal cuff with a reservoir (containing fluid) which is placed either behind the pubis bone in front of the bladder (ABS) or below the costal arch (anal band). With a pump placed in the scrotum/labia (ABS) or by pressing the balloon (anal band) in both types operated by the patient the fluid is shifted forth and back between the anal cuff and the reservoir closing or opening the anal canal. Both systems are placed completely subcutaneously. Both devices improve significantly the anal continence. Both systems have a high rate of reoperations. However, the causes for the redos are different. The ABS is associated with high infection and anal penetration rates of the cuff leading to an explantation rate to up to 60 % of the implants. This kind of complication seems to be much lower with the anal band. The major

  3. Dynamic esophageal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilley, J.J.; Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.; Applegate, G.; DeVegvar, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Esophageal scintigraphy was developed in order to quantitatively evaluate esophageal transit in patients with a variety of esophageal disorders. The study is performed with orally administered technetium-99m sulfur colloid in water, using a gamma camera on-line to a digital computer. Esophageal transit is expressed as the percent emptying for each of the first 15-sec intervals for 10 min after an initial swallow and at 15-sec intervals after serial swallows. Esophageal transit is significantly decreased in patients with motor disorders of the esophagus, compared to normal controls. In patients with reflux esophagitis, esophageal transit was abnormal when the reflux disease was accompanied by abnormal motor function. The technique we describe is the first quantitative test of esophageal function; it is a useful, sensitive, scintigraphic technique for evaluation of esophageal transit

  4. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for nutritional palliation of upper esophageal cancer unsuitable for esophageal stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Grilo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Esophageal cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis. Most patients with advanced esophageal cancer have significant dysphagia that contributes to weight loss and malnutrition. Esophageal stenting is a widespread palliation approach, but unsuitable for cancers near the upper esophageal sphincter, were stents are poorly tolerated. Generally, guidelines do not support endoscopic gastrostomy in this clinical setting, but it may be the best option for nutritional support. OBJECTIVE: Retrospective evaluation of patients with dysphagia caused advanced esophageal cancer, no expectation of resuming oral intake and with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for comfort palliative nutrition. METHOD: We selected adult patients with unresecable esophageal cancer histological confirmed, in whom stenting was impossible due to proximal location, and chemotherapy or radiotherapy were palliative, using gastrostomy for enteral nutrition. Clinical and nutritional data were evaluated, including success of gastrostomy, procedure complications and survival after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, and evolution of body mass index, albumin, transferrin and cholesterol. RESULTS: Seventeen males with stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 60.9 years. Most of the patients had toxic habits. All underwent palliative chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Gastrostomy was successfully performed in all, but nine required prior dilatation. Most had the gastrostomy within 2 months after diagnosis. There was a buried bumper syndrome treated with tube replacement and four minor complications. There were no cases of implantation metastases or procedure related mortality. Two patients were lost and 12 died. Mean survival of deceased patients was 5.9 months. Three patients are alive 6, 14 and 17 months after the gastrostomy procedure, still increasing the mean survival. Mean body mass index and laboratory

  5. Early discharge after external anal sphincter repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    and complications within 30 days after the operation. Surgery was performed during the period of March 1993 to May 1997. The accelerated-stay program included preoperative information, no premedication, a surgical procedure without colostomy, single-dose prophylactic antibiotics, paracetamol for analgesia, free...... surgery and 5 patients stayed for 48 hours after the operation. There was no 30-day morbidity, and no patient received a colostomy in conjunction with the sphincter repair. Fourteen of 19 patients available for follow-up reported a significantly improved functional result compared with preoperative state...

  6. Invisible Threat In Sport Bag: Esophageal Obstruction Due To Aminoacid Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Dedeoglu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although esophageal foreign bodies are mostly encountered in children, they also continue to constitute a life threatening problem in adults. Because of severe complications possibly to occur, esophageal foreign bodies should be extracted as soon as the diagnosis is made. A 30 year-old male patient who had a sense of blockage in the throat after taking two amino acid tablets and who was admitted to our emergency room and was discussed in this case report. In endoscopy performed with the initial diagnosis of esophageal foreign body, two attached tablets which completely obstruct lower lumen were removed immediately below the upper esophageal sphincter. In recent years, we wanted to share this case in order to express that increasing amino acid tablet usage will lead to serious complications.

  7. Histologic definition of gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasoma, Parakrama T

    2013-07-01

    To review recent data supporting the development of new histology-based definitions of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Three precisely definable columnar epithelial types--cardiac, oxyntocardiac and intestinal--may be interposed between esophageal squamous epithelium and gastric oxyntic (acid secreting) mucosa. This enables definition of a new histologic concept: the squamo-oxyntic gap. The squamo-oxyntic gap is zero or very small in autopsies performed on patients without evidence of GERD. The gap progressively increases in length with the severity of GERD, indicating that the squamo-oxyntic gap is a marker for chronic GERD. The distal part of the gap lines gastric-type rugal folds and, therefore, is distal to the present endoscopic definition of the gastro-esophageal junction. I contend that this distal gap segment (which has esophageal submucosal glands) is actually the dilated distal esophagus; this is the pathologic correlate of destruction of the abdominal segment of the lower esophageal sphincter. The dilated distal esophagus is mistaken for 'gastric cardia' by present endoscopic definitions. I believe that these data support the adoption of novel histologic definitions of GERD as follows: the presence of any squamo-oxyntic gap defines GERD; the length of the gap is a measure of severity of chronic GERD; and the presence of intestinal metaplasia in the gap defines Barrett esophagus and cancer risk.

  8. Esophageal Transit, Contraction and Perception of Transit After Swallows of Two Viscous Boluses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmazo, Jucileia; Aprile, Lilian Rose Otoboni; Dantas, Roberto Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    There have been results showing the influence of bolus viscosities and consistency on esophageal motility and transit. However, there is no description about the influence of two different viscous boluses on esophageal contractions, bolus transit and perception of transit. Our objective in this investigation was to evaluate the esophageal transit and contraction after swallows of two viscous boluses. By impedance and manometric methods, we measured the esophageal transit and contraction after swallows of two viscous boluses of 5 mL volume, 100% barium sulfate and yogurt, swallowed in duplicate in the supine and upright positions. The bolus transit, esophageal contractions and the perception of bolus transit through the esophagus were evaluated in both positions. Impedance and contraction were measured at 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm from the lower esophageal sphincter. After each swallow, the volunteers were asked about the sensation of bolus transit through the esophagus. In supine position, the yogurt had a less frequent complete bolus transit than barium. Also in the supine position, the esophageal transit was longer with yogurt than with barium. Esophageal contractions after swallows were similar between barium and yogurt boluses. There was no difference in perception of transit between the two boluses. Although both 100% barium sulfate and yogurt are viscous boluses and have similar viscosities, the transit through the esophagus is slower with yogurt bolus than with barium bolus, which suggests that viscosity may be not the sole factor to determine transit.

  9. The effects of itopride on oesophageal motility and lower oesophageal sphincter function in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpellini, E; Vos, R; Blondeau, K; Boecxstaens, V; Farré, R; Gasbarrini, A; Tack, J

    2011-01-01

    Itopride is a new prokinetic agent that combines antidopaminergic and cholinesterase inhibitory actions. Previous studies suggested that itopride improves heartburn in functional dyspepsia, and decreases oesophageal acid exposure in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. It remains unclear whether this effect is due to effects of itopride on the lower oesophageal sphincter (LES). To study the effects of itopride on fasting and postprandial LES function in healthy subjects. Twelve healthy volunteers (five men; 32.6 ± 2.0 years) underwent three oesophageal sleeve manometry studies after 3 days premedication with itopride 50 mg, itopride 100 mg or placebo t.d.s. Drug was administered after 30 min and a standardized meal was administered after 90 min, with measurements continuing to 120 min postprandially. Throughout the study, 10 wet swallows were administered at 30-min intervals, and gastrointestinal symptoms were scored on 100 mm visual analogue scales at 15-min intervals. Lower oesophageal sphincter resting pressures, swallow-induced relaxations and the amplitude or duration of peristaltic contractions were not altered by both doses of itopride, at all time points. Itopride pre-treatment inhibited the meal-induced rise of transient LES relaxations (TLESRs). Itopride inhibits TLESRs without significantly affecting oesophageal peristaltic function or LES pressure. These observations support further studies with itopride in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Sphincter Saving Surgery in Low Rectal Carcinoma in a Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgery is the principal modality of treatment of rectal carcinoma in order to achieve cure. Sphincter saving surgery improves the quality of life of patients with low rectal carcinoma. Aim: To report a case of sphincter saving low anterior resection for low rectal cancer with hand sown colorectal anastomosis

  11. The Danish anal sphincter rupture questionnaire: Validity and reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Ottesen, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To revise, validate and test for reliability an anal sphincter rupture questionnaire in relation to construct, content and face validity. Setting and background. Since 1996 women with anal sphincter rupture (ASR) at one of the public university hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark have bee...

  12. Anal sphincter complex: endoanal MR imaging of normal anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussain, S. M.; Stoker, J.; Laméris, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the normal anatomy of the anal sphincter complex on magnetic resonance (MR) images. Ten healthy volunteers (four men, six women; age range, 21-26 years) underwent MR imaging with an endoanal coil. The lower part of the anal canal contained the internal sphincter, the longitudinal muscle

  13. Multiple huge epiphrenic esophageal diverticula with motility disease treated with video-assisted thoracoscopic and hand-assisted laparoscopic esophagectomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Higashi, Shigeyoshi; Tanaka, Koji; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamasaki, Makoto; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2017-12-01

    Epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum is a rare condition that is often associated with a concomitant esophageal motor disorder. Some patients have the chief complaints of swallowing difficulty and gastroesophageal reflux; traditionally, such diverticula have been resected via right thoracotomy. Here, we describe a case with huge multiple epiphrenic diverticula with motility disorder, which were successfully resected using a video-assisted thoracic and laparoscopic procedure. A 63-year-old man was admitted due to dysphagia, heartburn, and vomiting. An esophagogram demonstrated an S-shaped lower esophagus with multiple epiphrenic diverticula (75 × 55 mm and 30 × 30 mm) and obstruction by the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Esophageal manometry showed normal peristaltic contractions in the esophageal body, whereas the LES pressure was high (98.6 mmHg). The pressure vector volume of LES was 23,972 mmHg 2  cm. Based on these findings, we diagnosed huge multiple epiphrenic diverticula with a hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter and judged that resection might be required. We performed lower esophagectomy with gastric conduit reconstruction using a video-assisted thoracic and hand-assisted laparoscopic procedure. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the esophagogram demonstrated good passage, with no leakage, stenosis, or diverticula. The most common causes of mid-esophageal and epiphrenic diverticula are motility disorders of the esophageal body; appropriate treatment should be considered based on the morphological and motility findings.

  14. Predictive value of routine esophageal high-resolution manometry for gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeij, F B; Smout, A J; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-07-01

    Using conventional manometry, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) was associated with a reduced lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure and impaired peristalsis. However, with a large overlap between GERD patients and controls, these findings are of limited clinical relevance. It is uncertain whether the more detailed information of high-resolution manometry (HRM) can discriminate GERD patients. Therefore, we aimed to determine to which extent HRM findings can predict GERD. HRM measurements in 69 patients with GERD and 40 healthy subjects were compared and the predictive value of HRM for the diagnosis of GERD was explored. GERD patients had a significantly lower contraction amplitude (55 vs 64 mmHg; p = 0.045) and basal LES pressure (10 vs 13.2 mmHg; p = 0.034) than healthy controls. GERD patients more often had a hiatal hernia than healthy subjects (30% vs 7%; p = 0.005). Patients with reflux esophagitis had a lower DCI than patients without reflux esophagitis (558 vs 782 mmHg cm s; p = 0.045). No significant difference was seen in contractile front velocity, distal latency, number of peristaltic breaks, residual LES pressure and LES length. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, both esophagogastric junction type I (OR 4.971; 95% CI 1.33-18.59; p = 0.017) and mean wave amplitude (OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.90-0.98; p = 0.013) were found to be independent predictors of GERD. However, the sensitivity and specificity of these findings were low. Hiatal hernia, low contraction amplitude and LES pressure are associated with GERD, but do not predict the disease with sufficient accuracy. Routine esophageal HRM can therefore not be used to distinguish GERD patients from healthy subjects. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Characterization of esophageal physiology using mechanical state analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eduard Leibbrandt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The esophagus functions to transport swallowed fluids and food from the pharynx to the stomach. The esophageal muscles governing bolus transport comprise circular striated muscle of the proximal esophagus and circular smooth muscle of the distal esophagus. Longitudinal smooth muscle contraction provides a mechanical advantage to bolus transit during circular smooth muscle contraction. Esophageal striated muscle is directly controlled by neural circuits originating in the central nervous system, resulting in coordinated contractions. In contrast, the esophageal smooth muscle is controlled by enteric circuits modulated by extrinsic central neural connections resulting in neural relaxation and contraction. The esophageal muscles are modulated by sensory information arising from within the lumen. Contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to identify the ‘mechanical states’ of the circular muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle has been difficult and, as the current interpretation of esophageal motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry, subtle changes in the muscle function during peristalsis can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the esophageal circular muscles and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern esophageal peristalsis. To achieve this we analyzed barium swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the

  16. Characterization of Esophageal Physiology Using Mechanical State Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibbrandt, Richard E; Dinning, Phil G; Costa, Marcello; Cock, Charles; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Wang, Guangsong; Tack, Jan; van Beckevoort, Dirk; Rommel, Nathalie; Omari, Taher I

    2016-01-01

    The esophagus functions to transport swallowed fluids and food from the pharynx to the stomach. The esophageal muscles governing bolus transport comprise circular striated muscle of the proximal esophagus and circular smooth muscle of the distal esophagus. Longitudinal smooth muscle contraction provides a mechanical advantage to bolus transit during circular smooth muscle contraction. Esophageal striated muscle is directly controlled by neural circuits originating in the central nervous system, resulting in coordinated contractions. In contrast, the esophageal smooth muscle is controlled by enteric circuits modulated by extrinsic central neural connections resulting in neural relaxation and contraction. The esophageal muscles are modulated by sensory information arising from within the lumen. Contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to identify the "mechanical states" of the circular muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle has been difficult and as the current interpretation of esophageal motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry), subtle changes in the muscle function during peristalsis can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the esophageal circular muscles and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern esophageal peristalsis. To achieve this we analyzed barium swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter of

  17. [Analyses of the characteristics of esophageal motility in patients with pharyngeal paraesthesia who visit the Department of gastroenterology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjiang; Chen, Yuping; Guo, Tingting

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the influence of the local sensory abnormality in throat while the change of motility in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and lower esophageal sphincter (LES), as well as the change of esophageal body in pharyngeal paraesthesia. From January 2014 to January 2015 there were sixty-four patients who had pharyngeal susceptible syndrome (PSS) but without confirmed organic disease were enrolled as the PSS group, forty healthy volunteers as the control group. High resolution manometry (HRM) was utilized to distinguish esophageal motility patterns of PSS, including the muscular tension of LES and UES, the integrity, adaptability, amplitude, speed and duration of esophageal peristalsis at 10 swallows. The resting LES and UES pressures and the distal contractile integral (DCI) of esophagus in PSS group were lower than that in control group (P 0.05). The average peak pressure was similar in two groups (P > 0.05). Muscle tension around the UES has no obvious change when pharyngeal paraesthesia occurred, but the reduction of esophageal motor function, clearance ability, anti-reflux gastroesophageal junction, causing the abnormal reflux which hurt the pharyngeal surface mucosa maybe one of the most important reasons leading to pharyngeal paresthesia.

  18. Endoscope-guided pneumatic dilation for treatment of esophageal achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Wu, Keng-Liang; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Tai, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chi-Sin

    2010-01-01

    Pneumatic dilation (PD) is considered to be the first line nonsurgical therapy for achalasia. The principle of the procedure is to weaken the lower esophageal sphincter by tearing its muscle fibers by generating radial force. The endoscope-guided procedure is done without fluoroscopic control. Clinicians usually use a low-compliance balloon such as Rigiflex dilator to perform endoscope-guided PD for the treatment of esophageal achalasia. It has the advantage of determining mucosal injury during the dilation process, so that a repeat endoscopy is not needed to assess the mucosal tearing. Previous studies have shown that endoscope-guided PD is an efficient and safe nonsurgical therapy with results that compare well with other treatment modalities. Although the results may be promising, long-term follow-up is required in the near future. PMID:20101764

  19. Optimization of the artificial urinary sphincter: modelling and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti, Florian; Leippold, Thomas; John, Hubert; Blunschi, Nadine; Mueller, Bert

    2006-01-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter should be long enough to prevent strangulation effects of the urethral tissue and short enough to avoid the improper dissection of the surrounding tissue. To optimize the sphincter length, the empirical three-parameter urethra compression model is proposed based on the mechanical properties of the urethra: wall pressure, tissue response rim force and sphincter periphery length. In vitro studies using explanted animal or human urethras and different artificial sphincters demonstrate its applicability. The pressure of the sphincter to close the urethra is shown to be a linear function of the bladder pressure. The force to close the urethra depends on the sphincter length linearly. Human urethras display the same dependences as the urethras of pig, dog, sheep and calf. Quantitatively, however, sow urethras resemble best the human ones. For the human urethras, the mean wall pressure corresponds to (-12.6 ± 0.9) cmH 2 O and (-8.7 ± 1.1) cmH 2 O, the rim length to (3.0 ± 0.3) mm and (5.1 ± 0.3) mm and the rim force to (60 ± 20) mN and (100 ± 20) mN for urethra opening and closing, respectively. Assuming an intravesical pressure of 40 cmH 2 O, and an external pressure on the urethra of 60 cmH 2 O, the model leads to the optimized sphincter length of (17.3 ± 3.8) mm

  20. New insights into esophagogastric junction physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, Robertus Catharina Hortensia

    2004-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis have reported on the elicitation of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in health, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and postfundoplication. The relationship between the esophageal acid exposure time and the underlying manometric

  1. Esophageal motility disorders; Motilitaetsstoerungen des Oesophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Muenchen (Germany); Wuttge-Hannig, A. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [German] Zum Verstaendnis der Motilitaet des Oesophagus sind muskulaere Architektur und Verteilung der quergestreiften und glatten Muskelfasern von Bedeutung. Die Physiologie des Oesophagus wird in soweit kurz dargestellt, als sie fuer das Verstaendnis von peristaltischen Stoerungen notwendig ist. Neben der Erfassung rein morphologischer Kriterien ist bei der Untersuchung der Speiseroehre eine diagnostische Bewertung der Motilitaet erforderlich. Es stehen uns heute strahlungsarme dynamische Aufzeichnungsverfahren (digitale dynamische Aufzeichnung, Videofluoroskopie) mit Bildsequenzen von 4-30 Bildern/s zur Verfuegung. Die Kombination einer funktionellen Methode zur Darstellung der Morphologie und der

  2. Anal sphincter responses after perianal electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ejnar; Klemar, B; Schrøder, H D

    1982-01-01

    By perianal electrical stimulation and EMG recording from the external anal sphincter three responses were found with latencies of 2-8, 13-18 and 30-60 ms, respectively. The two first responses were recorded in most cases. They were characterised by constant latency and uniform pattern, were...... not fatigued by repeated stimulation, were most dependent on placement of stimulating and recording electrodes, and always had a higher threshold than the third response. The third response was constantly present in normal subjects. It had the longest EMG response and the latency decreased with increasing...... stimulation to a minimum of 30-60 ms. This response represented the clinical observable spinal reflex, "the classical anal reflex". The latencies of the two first responses were so short that they probably do not represent spinal reflexes. This was further supported by the effect of epidural anaesthesia which...

  3. [Anal sphincter injury caused by falling off a trampoline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarinen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    A girl of preschool age fell off a trampoline in a sitting position onto an iron bar sticking up from the ground. In addition to a laceration of the terminal portion of the rectum, she was found to have a severe sphincter injury. The sphincters were repaired by a surgeon the next morning. After one month from the surgery the anal canal pressure was found to be symmetrical with good contractile force of the sphincters. No abnormalities were found in a contrast study or in rectoscopy. The protective stoma was closed after three months from the injury and fecal continence was normal after one and a half years.

  4. Esophageal manometry findings and degree of acid exposure in short and long Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helman, Laura; Biccas, Beatriz Nunes; Lemme, Eponina M O; Novais, Paula; Fittipaldi, Viviane

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is characterized by intestinal metaplasia in the distal esophagus and is classified as short-segment (3 cm - LSSBE). It is suggested that LSSBE is associated with more severe esophageal motor abnormalities and increased acid exposure time than SSBE. To evaluate the prevalence of esophageal manometriy abnormalities and acid exposure times in patients with SSBE and LSSBE. Barrett's esophagus patients identified by upper endoscopy and confirmed by histopathology were, retrospectively, reviewed and divided into two groups: SSBE and LSBE. Demographic data, symptom duration, prevalence of hiatal hernia, lower esophagus sphincter basal pressure, prevalence of esophageal body abnormalities and acid exposure times were evaluated. Forty-six patients with SSBE (24 males - 52.2%, mean age of 55.2 years) and 28 patients with LSBE (18 males - 64.3%, mean age of 50.5 years). Mean symptom duration was 9.9 years for SSBE and 12.9 years for LSSBE. Hiatal hernia was present in 84.2% of SSBE, 96.3% of LSBE; average lower esophagus sphincter pressure in SSBE 9.15 mm Hg, in LSBE 6.99 mm Hg; lower esophagus sphincter hypotension in SSBE was 65.9%, in LSSBE 82.1%; aperistalsis in SSBE 6.5%, LSSBE 3.6%; mild/moderate ineffective esophageal motility in SSBE 34.8%, LSBE 46.4%; severe moderate ineffective esophageal motility in SSBE 10.9%, LSBE 7,1%; nutcracker esophagus/segmental nutcracker esophagus in SSBE 8.6%, LSBE 0%; normal body in SSBE 39.1%, in LSBE 42.9%, no statistical difference for any of these values (Pmotor disorders in patients with SSBE and LSSBE. Acid reflux in upright and supine positions was more intense in LSBE.

  5. [Long-term result of total versus partial fundoplication following esophagomyotomy for primary esophageal motor disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zi-jiang; Chen, Long-qi; Duranceau, Andre

    2008-02-15

    To compare the long-term results of total and partial fundoplication on esophagus myotomy. From January 1978 to October 1998, 64 patients with achalasia or diffuse esophageal spasm underwent esophagomyotomy and antireflux operation via left thoracotomy. Twenty-one patients underwent Nissen total fundoplication (Nissen group) and 43 patients underwent Belsey Marker IV partial fundoplication (Belsey group). Clinical, radiologic, radionuclide transit, manometric, 24-hour pH monitoring and endoscopic assessments were performed before and after the operation. There was no operative death and major complications for either group. At over 6 years follow-up and compared to Belsey group, patients in Nissen group revealed a higher frequency of dysphagia (P = 0.025) and more radionuclide material retention (P = 0.044). Both operative procedures reduced the lower esophageal sphincter pressure gradient. However, in Nissen group, the esophageal diameter observed on radiology was significantly increased from 3.9 cm preoperatively to 5.5 cm postoperatively (P = 0.012), while it kept the same for Belsey group (from 5.4 to 5.3 cm, P = 0.695). Reoperation in order to relieve the recurrent dysphagia and esophageal obstruction was performed on 8 patients in Nissen group and 1 in Belsey group (P < 0.01). When treating achalasia or diffuse esophageal spasm by esophageal myotomy and an antireflux operation, a total fundoplication is not appropriate, whereas a partial fundoplication provides proper antireflux effect without significant esophageal emptying difficulty.

  6. Esophageal Manometry with Provocative Testing in Patients with Noncardiac Angina-Like Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Paterson

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available In a five year period 238 of 594 esophageal manometric studies performed in the authors’ laboratory were done on patients whose major reason for referral was noncardiac angina-like chest pain. Standard eophageal manometry was performed followed by an acid-antacid perfusion period (Bernstein test and then subcutaneous bethanechol (80 μg/kg to a maximum of 5 mg was adminstered. Baseline manometry was normal in 38% of patients and was diagnostic of ‘nutcracker’ esophagus, nonspecific esophageal motility disorder, diffuse esophageal spasm and isolated hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter in 24%, 19%, 16% and 3% of patients, respectively. Ninety-six of 238 patients (40% experienced reproduction of their presenting angina-like chest pain during acid perfusion. In 80% of these patients there were associated esophageal motor abnormal ilies induced by the acid perfusion. Thirty-six of 212 (17% experienced pain reproduction following the injection of bethanechol; however, 16 of these had already had their presenting chest pain reproduced during the acid perfusion study. In two-thirds of the patients with pain reproduction following bechanechol there was an associated bethanechol-induced esophageal motility disorder. Overall 49% of patients had their pain reproduced during provocative testing. The acid perfusion test reproduced the pain much more frequently than bethanechol simulation. This study reaffirms the value of esophageal manometry and provocative testing in this group of patients.

  7. Esophagitis dissecans associated with eosinophilic esophagitis in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie-Anne R. Guerra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis are distinct esophageal pathologies with characteristic clinical and histologic findings. Esophagitis dissecans superficialis is a rare finding on endoscopy consisting of the peeling of large fragments of esophageal mucosa. Histology shows sloughing of the epithelium and parakeratosis. Eosinophilic esophagitis is an allergic disease of the esophagus characterized by eosinophilic inflammation of the epithelium and symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. Both of these esophageal processes have been associated with other diseases, but there is no known association between them. We describe a case of esophagitis dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis in an adolescent patient. To our knowledge, this is the first case describing an association between esophageal dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis.

  8. Relaxation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  9. Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders: Esophageal Pressure Topography vs. Conventional Line Tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Dustin A; Ravi, Karthik; Kahrilas, Peter J; Gyawali, C Prakash; Bredenoord, Arjan J; Castell, Donald O; Spechler, Stuart J; Halland, Magnus; Kanuri, Navya; Katzka, David A; Leggett, Cadman L; Roman, Sabine; Saenz, Jose B; Sayuk, Gregory S; Wong, Alan C; Yadlapati, Rena; Ciolino, Jody D; Fox, Mark R; Pandolfino, John E

    2015-07-01

    Enhanced characterization of esophageal peristaltic and sphincter function provided by esophageal pressure topography (EPT) offers a potential diagnostic advantage over conventional line tracings (CLT). However, high-resolution manometry (HRM) and EPT require increased equipment costs over conventional systems and evidence demonstrating a significant diagnostic advantage of EPT over CLT is limited. Our aim was to investigate whether the inter-rater agreement and/or accuracy of esophageal motility diagnosis differed between EPT and CLT. Forty previously completed patient HRM studies were selected for analysis using a customized software program developed to perform blinded independent interpretation in either EPT or CLT (six pressure sensors) format. Six experienced gastroenterologists with a clinical focus in esophageal disease (attendings) and six gastroenterology trainees with minimal manometry experience (fellows) from three academic centers interpreted each of the 40 studies using both EPT and CLT formats. Rater diagnoses were assessed for inter-rater agreement and diagnostic accuracy, both for exact diagnosis and for correct identification of a major esophageal motility disorder. The total group agreement was moderate (κ=0.57; 95% CI: 0.56-0.59) for EPT and fair (κ=0.32; 0.30-0.33) for CLT. Inter-rater agreement between attendings was good (κ=0.68; 0.65-0.71) for EPT and moderate (κ=0.46; 0.43-0.50) for CLT. Inter-rater agreement between fellows was moderate (κ=0.48; 0.45-0.50) for EPT and poor to fair (κ=0.20; 0.17-0.24) for CLT. Among all raters, the odds of an incorrect exact esophageal motility diagnosis were 3.3 times higher with CLT assessment than with EPT (OR: 3.3; 95% CI: 2.4-4.5; PCLT than with EPT (OR: 3.4; 2.4-5.0; PCLT among our selected raters. On the basis of these findings, EPT may be the preferred assessment modality of esophageal motility.

  10. [Clinical significance of detection of internal anal sphincter in children with functional constipation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiang-yu; Wang, Ling-yun; Wang, Wei-lin; Li, Yong; Bai, Yu-zuo

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the structural and functional changes of internal anal sphincter (IAS) in children with functional constipation (FC), and to evaluate the association between the thickness of IAS and the severity of clinical symptoms. A total of 35 children with FC(constipation group,17 with incontinence) between June 2008 and December 2008 at the Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University were evaluated using anal manometry and endosonography. These patients were compared to 23 hospitalized children who were excluded for digestive and endocrinal diseases(control group). A validated symptom score(SS) was used to assess the severity of symptoms. The sum of SS ranged between 0 and 65. Anorectal manometry showed reflex relaxation of IAS in response to distension of rectal balloon in all patients. Rectal perceptional threshold in FC group was significantly higher than that in the controls[(42.4 ± 19.5) ml vs.(29.1 ± 15.6) ml, PIAS was significantly higher than that in the controls [(55.6 ± 31.6) ml vs.(30.5 ±13.8) ml, PIAS was noted in all the patients[(3.8 ± 1.7) mm vs.(2.5 ± 1.0) mm, P0.05]. The median symptom score was 9.3 ± 4.3 in the FC group. The thickness of IAS correlated significantly with total symptom severity score(r=0.407, PIAS and age, sex, or duration of disease(P>0.05). Structural and functional changes of internal anal sphincter exist in children with functional constipation. The thickness of internal anal sphincter correlates significantly with symptom severity.

  11. Esophageal pH monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... Esophageal pH monitoring is used to check how much stomach acid is entering the esophagus. It also checks how well the acid is cleared downward into the ...

  12. Metastatic Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer Presenting Clinically with Esophageal Dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilit Karapetyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intra-abdominal metastases of invasive lobular breast cancer (ILBC may be insidious. We report a case of metastatic ILBC that presented with dysphagia within weeks of a negative mammogram and before the development of intra-abdominal symptoms. Case. A 70-year-old female developed esophageal dysphagia. She underwent EGD which showed a short segment of stricture of the distal esophagus without significant mucosal changes. Biopsy was unremarkable and patient underwent lower esophageal sphincter (LES dilation. Severe progressive dysphagia led to esophageal impaction and three LES dilatations. CT scan showed bilateral pleural effusions, more prominent on right side, and ascites. The pleural effusions were transudative. Repeat EGD with biopsy showed lymphocytic esophagitis, and she was started on swallowed fluticasone. Abdominal ultrasound with Doppler showed that the main portal vein had atypical turbulent flow that was felt to possibly be due to retroperitoneal process. The patient underwent diagnostic laparoscopy which revealed diffuse punctate lesions on the peritoneum. Pathology was consistent with metastatic ILBC. Conclusion. Dysphagia in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis from metastatic ILBC is a rare finding. The case highlights the importance of metastatic ILBC as a differential diagnosis for female patients with progressive dysphagia and associated ascites or pleural effusions.

  13. Radiology of the AS 800 artificial urinary sphincter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, S.; Shetty, M.K.; Flood, H.D.; Grainger, R.

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen adult male patients who had an AS 800 artificial urinary sphincter inserted are reviewed. Five have had malfunction, and in four the causes were diagnosed radiologically. These included: fistula formation, leakage of hydraulic fluid, air in the system, and inadequate deflation of the cuff. Since the sphincter is filled with contrast medium, it is ideally suited to radiological assessment. (author). 5 refs.; 6 figs

  14. Radioisotope esophageal transit test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazono, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kazuo; Toyonaga, Atsushi

    1982-01-01

    A new technique employed sup(99m)Tc-MAA for the study of esophageal dysfunction and its clinical implication were evaluated in the patients with achalasia, progressive systemic sclerosis, reflux esophagitis and 10 normal controls. To investigate esophageal emptying and gastroesophageal reflux, a homogeneous bolus of sup(99m)Tc-MAA in 15ml of water was swallowed in the upright and supine positions under the collimeter of a gamma camera linked to nuclear medicine data analyser (Shimazu Scinti Pack 1200). This radionuclide transit studies made a quantitative evaluation of the esophageal dysfunction possible in all cases. Comparing the conventional esophageal function test procedures, this test is a safe, noninvasive and more physiological and sensitive in detecting abnormal esophageal emptying and gastroesophageal reflux. (author)

  15. Esophageal hypomotility and spastic motor disorders: current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdovinos, Miguel A; Zavala-Solares, Monica R; Coss-Adame, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Esophageal hypomotility (EH) is characterized by abnormal esophageal peristalsis, either from a reduction or absence of contractions, whereas spastic motor disorders (SMD) are characterized by an increase in the vigor and/or propagation velocity of esophageal body contractions. Their pathophysiology is not clearly known. The reduced excitation of the smooth muscle contraction mediated by cholinergic neurons and the impairment of inhibitory ganglion neuronal function mediated by nitric oxide are likely mechanisms of the peristaltic abnormalities seen in EH and SMD, respectively. Dysphagia and chest pain are the most frequent clinical manifestations for both of these dysfunctions, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is commonly associated with these motor disorders. The introduction of high-resolution manometry (HRM) and esophageal pressure topography (EPT) has significantly enhanced the ability to diagnose EH and SMD. Novel EPT metrics in particular the development of the Chicago Classification of esophageal motor disorders has enabled improved characterization of these abnormalities. The first step in the management of EH and SMD is to treat GERD, especially when esophageal testing shows pathologic reflux. Smooth muscle relaxants (nitrates, calcium channel blockers, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors) and pain modulators may be useful in the management of dysphagia or pain in SMD. Endoscopic Botox injection and pneumatic dilation are the second-line therapies. Extended myotomy of the esophageal body or peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may be considered in highly selected cases but lack evidence.

  16. Treatment of esophageal motility disorders based on the chicago classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradey-Romero, Carla; Gabbard, Scott; Fass, Ronnie

    2014-12-01

    The Chicago Classification divides esophageal motor disorders based on the recorded value of the integrated relaxation pressure (IRP). The first group includes those with an elevated mean IRP that is associated with peristaltic abnormalities such as achalasia and esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. The second group includes those with a normal mean IRP that is associated with esophageal hypermotility disorders such as distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus (jackhammer esophagus), and hypertensive peristalsis (nutcracker esophagus). The third group includes those with a normal mean IRP that is associated with esophageal hypomotility peristaltic abnormalities such as absent peristalsis, weak peristalsis with small or large breaks, and frequent failed peristalsis. The therapeutic options vary greatly between the different groups of esophageal motor disorders. In achalasia patients, potential treatment strategies comprise medical therapy (calcium channel blockers, nitrates, and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors), endoscopic procedures (botulinum toxin A injection, pneumatic dilation, or peroral endoscopic myotomy) or surgery (Heller myotomy). Patients with a normal IRP and esophageal hypermotility disorder are candidates for medical therapy (nitrates, calcium channel blockers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, cimetropium/ipratropium bromide, proton pump inhibitors, benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants, trazodone, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), endoscopic procedures (botulinum toxin A injection and peroral endoscopic myotomy), or surgery (Heller myotomy). Lastly, in patients with a normal IRP and esophageal hypomotility disorder, treatment is primarily focused on controlling the presence of gastroesophageal reflux with proton pump inhibitors and lifestyle modifications (soft and liquid diet and eating in the upright position) to address patient's dysphagia.

  17. Esophageal lichen planus

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen ...

  18. Esophageal lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis.

  19. Functional and morphological changes in the pharynx in achalasia and in diffuse esophageal spasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannig, C.; Wuttge-Hannig, A.; Amon, K.; Feussner, H.

    1989-08-01

    Since the pharynx and the esophagus are a functional unit, functional radiodiagnosis has to be directed at pharyngo-esophageal interaction. Among our collective of 73 patients suffering from achalasia or diffuse esophageal spasm, we were able to recognize a substantially increased incidence of morphological or functional pharyngeal disorders by means of cineradiography. The functional alterations in particular were often not revealed by conventional fluoroscopy. High-speed cineradiography, with its high temporal and spatial resolution, turned out to be a valuable tool in analysis of the origin of pharyngeal dysphagia. Manometry correlated very well with the radiologic findings in tubular esophagus, but proved unreliable in the detection of alterations of the upper esophageal sphincter region, because of problems inherent in the method. Furthermore, membranous stenosis (webs), lateral or dorsal diverticula, and asymmetry of the pharynx were observed strikingly often. (orig.).

  20. Novel Neurostimulation of Autonomic Pelvic Nerves Overcomes Bladder-Sphincter Dyssynergia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peh, Wendy Yen Xian; Mogan, Roshini; Thow, Xin Yuan; Chua, Soo Min; Rusly, Astrid; Thakor, Nitish V.; Yen, Shih-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    The disruption of coordination between smooth muscle contraction in the bladder and the relaxation of the external urethral sphincter (EUS) striated muscle is a common issue in dysfunctional bladders. It is a significant challenge to overcome for neuromodulation approaches to restore bladder control. Bladder-sphincter dyssynergia leads to undesirably high bladder pressures, and poor voiding outcomes, which can pose life-threatening secondary complications. Mixed pelvic nerves are potential peripheral targets for stimulation to treat dysfunctional bladders, but typical electrical stimulation of pelvic nerves activates both the parasympathetic efferent pathway to excite the bladder, as well as the sensory afferent pathway that causes unwanted sphincter contractions. Thus, a novel pelvic nerve stimulation paradigm is required. In anesthetized female rats, we combined a low frequency (10 Hz) stimulation to evoke bladder contraction, and a more proximal 20 kHz stimulation of the pelvic nerve to block afferent activation, in order to produce micturition with reduced bladder-sphincter dyssynergia. Increasing the phase width of low frequency stimulation from 150 to 300 μs alone was able to improve voiding outcome significantly. However, low frequency stimulation of pelvic nerves alone evoked short latency (19.9–20.5 ms) dyssynergic EUS responses, which were abolished with a non-reversible proximal central pelvic nerve cut. We demonstrated that a proximal 20 kHz stimulation of pelvic nerves generated brief onset effects at lower current amplitudes, and was able to either partially or fully block the short latency EUS responses depending on the ratio of the blocking to stimulation current. Our results indicate that ratios >10 increased the efficacy of blocking EUS contractions. Importantly, we also demonstrated for the first time that this combined low and high frequency stimulation approach produced graded control of the bladder, while reversibly blocking afferent

  1. Sphincter of Oddi stenosis: diagnosis using hepatobiliary scintigraphy and endoscopic manometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.G.L.; Gregg, J.A.; Koroshetz, A.M.; Hill, T.C.; Clouse, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the role of radionuclide imaging in diagnosing sphincter of Oddi stenosis, 21 patients with symptoms suggesting this disorder underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, cholescintigraphy, and, when possible, endoscopic manometry. Those patients with abnormal hepatobiliary scintigraphy results had a mean basal sphincter pressure of 38.5 mm Hg. Sphincter pressures could not be measured in six patients with sphincters too tight to cannulate. Ten patients who underwent hepatobiliary scanning both before and after sphincter surgery had normal scan results of the repeat study. Hepatobiliary imaging appears useful for diagnosis of sphincter of Oddi stenosis in selected patients in whom manometry cannot be performed and for objective assessment of response to therapy

  2. [The importance of x-ray cinematography of deglutition for indicating the need for myotomy of the pharyngoesophageal sphincter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustiny, N; Schmid, H; Brühlmann, W F

    1987-05-01

    Fourteen patients were examined one to four years after cricopharyngeal myotomy that had been carried out because of dysfunction of the pharyngo-esophageal sphincter. Twelve patients were examined radiologically. Eleven of the 14 patients were clinically improved or cured. In two patients who were not improved, the underlying condition was a polymyositis. The other patients suffered from an idiopathic dysfunction. Because of the small numbers involved, no detailed statistical analysis was carried out. Nevertheless, our results indicate that: Cricopharyngeus myotomy produces marked improvement or cure in patients with idiopathic dysfunction. Weak propulsive peristalsis of the pharyngeal constrictors is a prognostic factor indicating a poor clinical result of surgery. There is little chance of clinical improvement in patients with polymyositis.

  3. Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux disease; Funktionsstoerungen des Oesophagus. Radiologische Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schima, W. [Abt. Roentgen fuer Konservative Faecher, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Pokieser, P. [Abt. Roentgen fuer Chirurgische Faecher, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Schober, E. [Abt. Roentgen fuer Konservative Faecher, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    1995-10-01

    Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and the lower esophageal sphincter has gained increased attention in recent years. Videofluoroscopic investigation of esophageal motor function is superior to static film radiography, as repeated analysis of the videotaped recordings is possible. With emphasis on radiological techniques, normal esophagel physiology and motility and a variety of esophageal motor disorders are discussed in this review paper. Radiological evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux and reflux esophagitis is described. Clinical and radiological findings in esophageal motility disorders and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the radiological efficacy compared to that of manometry and pH-metry are discussed. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die radiologische Untersuchung des Oesophagus kann nicht nur strukturelle Veraenderungen, sondern auch funktionelle Stoerungen mit einer hohen Treffsicherheit nachweisen. Die Videokinematographie ist hierbei der konventionellen Roentgenuntersuchung aufgrund der Moeglichkeit der wiederholten Analyse ueberlegen. Ziel der vorliegenden Uebersicht ist es, prinzipiell das radiologische Erscheinungsbild der normalen Funktion sowie diagnostische Kriterien fuer verschiedene Motilitaetsstoerungen zu demonstrieren. Weiterhin werden auch die verschiedenen Moeglichkeiten der radiologischen Refluxpruefung zur Untersuchung der Funktion des gastrooesophagealen Sphinkters verglichen und deren Wert diskutiert. Die Pruefung der Funktion von Oesophagus und gastrooesophagealem Sphinkter als ein integraler Bestandteil der Roentgenuntersuchung der Speiseroehre verbessert deren Treffsicherheit, wodurch die radiologische Untersuchung die primaere diagnostische Methode bei Patienten mit Schluckstoerungen darstellt. (orig.)

  4. Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin injection therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Shimoda, Ryo; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Iwakiri, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    Botulinum toxin injection is an accepted treatment modality for esophageal achalasia in western countries. This pilot study aimed to clarify the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection for esophageal achalasia in Japanese patients. We enrolled 10 patients diagnosed with esophageal achalasia between 2008 and 2014. A total of 100 U botulinum toxin A was divided into eight aliquots and injected around the esophagogastric junction. We compared the lower esophageal sphincter pressure before and 1 week after treatment. Scores of subjective symptoms for esophageal achalasia were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) before and after 1 week of follow-up of treatment. Barium passage was improved in barium esophagography and passage of contrast agent was also improved. Mean Eckardt score was reduced from 5.5 to 1.6 after treatment (ptreatment (p = 0.002). One week after treatment, mean VAS score was reduced from 10 to 3.9 (pachalasia was safe and effective with few complications. Therefore, botulinum toxin could be used as minimally invasive therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan.

  5. Short-term outcomes using magnetic sphincter augmentation versus Nissen fundoplication for medically resistant gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Brian E; Farivar, Alexander S; Shultz, Dale; Brennan, Christina; Vallières, Eric; Aye, Ralph W

    2014-08-01

    In 2012 the United States Food and Drug Administration approved implantation of a magnetic sphincter to augment the native reflux barrier based on single-series data. We sought to compare our initial experience with magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) with laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF). A retrospective case-control study was performed of consecutive patients undergoing either procedure who had chronic gastrointestinal esophageal disease (GERD) and a hiatal hernia of less than 3 cm. Sixty-six patients underwent operations (34 MSA and 32 LNF). The groups were similar in reflux characteristics and hernia size. Operative time was longer for LNF (118 vs 73 min) and resulted in 1 return to the operating room and 1 readmission. Preoperative symptoms were abolished in both groups. At 6 months or longer postoperatively, scores on the Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Health Related Quality of Life scale improved from 20.6 to 5.0 for MSA vs 22.8 to 5.1 for LNF. Postoperative DeMeester scores (14.2 vs 5.1, p=0.0001) and the percentage of time pH was less than 4 (4.6 vs 1.1; p=0.0001) were normalized in both groups but statistically different. MSA resulted in improved gassy and bloated feelings (1.32 vs 2.36; p=0.59) and enabled belching in 67% compared with none of the LNFs. MSA results in similar objective control of GERD, symptom resolution, and improved quality of life compared with LNF. MSA seems to restore a more physiologic sphincter that allows physiologic reflux, facilitates belching, and creates less bloating and flatulence. This device has the potential to allow individualized treatment of patients with GERD and increase the surgical treatment of GERD. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transoral endoscopic esophageal myotomy based on esophageal function testing in a survival porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perretta, Silvana; Dallemagne, Bernard; Donatelli, Gianfranco; Diemunsch, Pierre; Marescaux, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    The most effective treatment of achalasia is Heller myotomy. To explore a submucosal endoscopic myotomy technique tailored on esophageal physiology testing and to compare it with the open technique. Prospective acute and survival comparative study in pigs (n = 12; 35 kg). University animal research center. Eight acute-4 open and 4 endoscopic-myotomies followed by 4 survival endoscopic procedures. Preoperative and postoperative manometry; esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility before and after selective division of muscular fibers at the EGJ and after the myotomy was prolonged to a standard length by using the EndoFLIP Functional Lumen Imaging Probe (Crospon, Galway, Ireland). All procedures were successful, with no intraoperative and postoperative complications. In the survival group, the animals recovered promptly from surgery. Postoperative manometry demonstrated a 50% drop in mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESp) in the endoscopic group (mean preoperative LESp, 22.2 ± 3.3 mm Hg; mean postoperative LESp, 11.34 ± 2.7 mm Hg; P open procedure group (mean preoperative LESp, 24.2 ± 3.2 mm Hg; mean postoperative LESp, 7.4 ± 4 mm Hg; P myotomy is feasible and safe. The lack of a significant difference in EGJ distensibility between the open and endoscopic procedure is very appealing. Were it to be perfected in a human population, this endoscopic approach could suggest a new strategy in the treatment of selected achalasia patients. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Esophageal trachealization: A feature of eosinophilic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlHussaini, Abdulrahman A; Semaan, Toufic; ElHag, Imad A

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an inflammatory condition characterized by intense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. EE is frequently misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Here, we present a child with EE and a characteristic endoscopic finding, r inged esophagus . An 11-year-old Saudi boy presented with dysphagia for 1 year. He had experienced an intermittent sensation of solid food sticking in his chest, which was relieved by drinking liquids. A barium swallow excluded anatomical causes of dysphagia, but revealed multiple-ringed esophagus. Endoscopy showed a furrowing and trachealizing appearance of the entire esophagus. Hisologically, extensive eosinophilic infiltration was a feature in biopsies obtained from the esophagus. The child responded well to a 2-month course of inhaled fluticasone. Symptoms recurred 3 months after discontinuation of therapy, which necessitated resumption of inhaled fluticasone. The endoscopic appearance of multiple esophageal rings should raise suspicion of EE and be confirmed by esophageal biopsies. (author)

  8. Sphincter-saving procedure for radiation-injuried rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Yoshihiro; Koyama, Yasuo; Hojo, Keiichi

    1982-01-01

    Up to this time the sigmoid colostomy has been widely accepted and conventional treatment for radiation-injured rectum, but patients without residual malignancy strongly desire to live without colostomy. We have tried to remove the involved rectal segments by sphincter-saving procedures. Four patients underwent these procedures, pull-through procedure in three and low anterior resection in one. Among sphincter-saving procedures, pull-through procedure was most adequate. Provided the following five conditions are fulfilled, pull-through procedure should be considered for severe radiation-injured rectum. (1) No recurrence of initial malignancy in the pelvis. (2) More than 2 cm intact rectal segment above dentate line may be preserved. (3) No radiation-injured segment in upper sigmoid. (4) No severe radiation damage in small intestine. (5) Patients under 70 year-old, with normal tonus of anal sphincter. (author)

  9. Intermittent spatial separation of diaphragm and lower esophageal sphincter favors acidic and weakly acidic reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Timmer, Robin; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: In small hiatal hernias, the size of the hernia is variable. Intermittent complete reduction can be observed with high-resolution manometry as a transition from a double-peak (hernia) to a single-peak (reduced) high-pressure zone. The aim of this study was to investigate whether

  10. Premature closure of the upper esophageal sphincter as a cause of severe deglutition disorder in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Husby, Steffen; Kruse-Andersen, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Deglutition disorders in infancy are often associated with birth asphyxia or structural abnormalities in the hypopharynx, the trachea, or the esophagus. Manometry can be crucial for clarifying the dynamics of the swallowing disorder in the infant with deglutition problems and without signs...

  11. Mode of delivery after obstetric anal sphincter injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmarkar, Roopali; Bhide, Alka; Digesu, Alex; Khullar, Vik; Fernando, Ruwan

    2015-11-01

    To assess the effect of vaginal delivery and caesarean section on faecal symptoms and structure and function of anal sphincter in women who sustained obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in their previous pregnancy and were advised about the mode of delivery based on faecal incontinence symptoms, anal manometry and endoanal ultrasound. It is a descriptive study on a cohort of women who had OASIS from 2006 to 2013. They were assessed after OASIS and during subsequent pregnancy with a questionnaire, endoanal ultrasound and anal manometry. Vaginal delivery was recommended to asymptomatic women with normal investigations. Elective caesarean section was recommended to women with faecal symptoms, anal sphincter defects of more than 30° or low resting or incremental anal pressures. All women were reassessed after subsequent delivery. Fifty women who had pregnancies after OASIS, were seen after OASIS, during subsequent pregnancy and after the second delivery. 15 women had faecal symptoms after OASIS. The external, internal and combined anal sphincter defects were seen in 13, 11 and 9 women respectively. Low resting and incremental pressure were seen in 15 and 11 women respectively. Caesarean section was done in 22 women and 28 women delivered vaginally. Worsening of faecal symptoms and reduction in anal pressures were not observed in planned vaginal delivery or elective caesarean section groups. Faecal symptoms were worse with reduced anal pressures in three women from the planned caesarean section group. One of the women had a vaginal delivery and two women had emergency caesarean section at 7cm and 10cm dilatation. There were no new sphincter defects or recurrent OASIS in any of the women in the study group. Decision about the mode of delivery of pregnancy after OASIS based on symptoms, anal manometry and endoanal ultrasound helps in preserving the anal sphincter function and avoiding unnecessary caesarean sections. Further follow-up of these patients is essential

  12. Long-term outcome of internal sphincter myectomy in patients with internal anal sphincter achalasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doodnath, Reshma

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Internal anal sphincter achalasia (IASA) is a condition with presentation similar to Hirschsprung\\'s disease (HD), but with the presence of ganglion cells on rectal suction biopsy (RSB). The diagnosis is made on anorectal manometry (ARM) by the absence of the rectosphincteric reflex on rectal balloon inflation. Internal sphincter myectomy (ISM) is the treatment of choice for patients with IASA. Recently, botulinum toxin has been used to treat IASA patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term bowel function in patients with IASA following ISM. METHODS: The medical records of 24 patients with IASA managed by ISM during 1993-2005 were examined. There were 18 boys and 6 girls, aged 2-12 years. All patients presented with intractable constipation with or without soiling. The diagnosis was made by the demonstration of the absence of the rectosphincteric reflex on ARM. HD was excluded by the presence of ganglion cells and normal acetylcholinesterase activity in RSB. Patients were followed 4-14 years later. RESULTS: Fifteen (62.5%) patients at the time of follow-up had regular bowel motions without the use of laxatives. Six (25%) patients had regular bowel motions, but remained on small doses of laxatives. Two (8.3%) patients who suffered from constipation and soiling required twice weekly enemas to remain clean. One (4.2%) patient required resection of dilated rectosigmoid colon 3 years after myectomy, remains on laxatives, but has normal bowel control. No patients had faecal incontinence following ISM. CONCLUSION: This long-term follow-up study shows that the vast majority of IASA patients have normal bowel control following ISM.

  13. Laparoscopic cardiomyotomy in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanovic, N; Feussner, H; Stein, H; Siewert, J R

    2000-01-01

    Tu evaluate the usefulness of the laparoscopic approach as the standard procedure in the surgical treatment of achalasia. Among different competing options of the treatment of esophageal achalasia, extramucosal myotomy of the lower esophageal sphincter--usually combined with anterior fundoplasty--is the most effective but also the most invasive approach. Minimally invasive performance of this operation reduces invasivity and should make the operative treatment a more attractive alternative to other procedures, such as pneumatic dilatation or botox injection. From 1991 till 1997, 27 patients underwent laparoscopic Heller Dor operation (16 males, 11 females, mean age 37 years). Diagnosis was established in all of them by an esophagogram and esophageal manometry. The main symptom was dysphagia in all of the patients. No mortality was observed in this series. There were no conversions to laparotomy. The single intraoperative complication was one case of iatrogenic mucosal laceration. Post operative complications were found in one case of wound infection, and two cases of pneumomedistinum. After a mean follow-up of 33 months (3-77), all patients are without dysphagia and without pathological gastroesophageal reflux. The mean value of residual LES pressure could be reduced from 21 +/- 6.4 mmHg to 7.44 +/- 2.7 mmHg. Laparoscopic cardiomyotomy is at lesat as safe, in terms of morbidity and mortality, as open surgery and similarily effective in alleviating dysphagia. Short hospitalisation and convalascent periods have provided an attractive alternative to repeated dilations for many patients.

  14. Diffuse esophageal spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Chen, Y.M.; Hewson, E.G.; Richter, J.E.; Wu, W.C.; Gelfand, D.W.; Castell, D.O.

    1988-01-01

    Radiologic and manometric findings were correlated in 17 patients with diffuse esophageal spasm (DES). All patients initially had chest pain and/or dysphagia and had a manometric diagnosis of DES. Mean percentage of normal peristalsis manometrically was 46% (range, 20%-80%). Based on radiologic examination, an esophageal motor disorder consistent with DES was diagnosed in 12 of 17 patients, and there was one misinterpretation of achalasia. Radiologic detection was not related significantly to the percentage of peristalsis seen on manometric examination. Mean esophageal wall thickness as measured radiographically in patients with DES was 2.6 mm, compared with 2.5 mm in 17 individuals with normal results of manometry

  15. A comparison of the contractile properties of smooth muscle from pig urethra and internal anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Thanesan; Durlu-Kandilci, N Tugba; Brading, Alison F

    2010-09-01

    Smooth muscles from the urethra and internal anal sphincter (IAS) play an essential role in the maintenance of urinary and fecal continence. Any damage in these muscles may cause serious problems. The aim of this study was to directly compare the contractile properties of pig urethra and IAS taken from the same animal. Smooth muscle strips of urethra and IAS dissected from the same pig were transferred to organ baths superfused with Krebs' solution, loaded with 1 g tension and equilibrated for 1 hr. Carbachol and phenylephrine response curves and EFS responses were elicited in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Both tissues developed tone during the 1 hr equilibration period. Carbachol (3 × 10(-6)-10(-3) M) contracted urethra whilst relaxing IAS. Guanethidine (10(-6) M) inhibited the carbachol responses in both tissues. L-NOARG (10(-4) M) decreased carbachol responses in IAS, but not in urethra. Phenylephrine (3 × 10(-6)-10(-2) M) contracted both tissues. EFS (1-40 Hz) induced a contractile response in urethra which was decreased with guanethidine (10(-6) M) and further blocked by atropine (10(-6) M). In the presence of both, a relaxation response was observed that is sensitive to NOS inhibitors especially at low frequencies. EFS induced a relaxation followed by a contraction in IAS strips. This contraction was blocked by guanethidine but not by atropine, and the remaining relaxation at 20 Hz was decreased with L-NOARG and increased with L-arginine. There are differences between urethra and IAS in terms of muscarinic activation and neural innervation, relevant for pharmacotherapy. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Clinical Evaluation of Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Studies using Liquid and Solid Foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook; Hyun, Jin Hai; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-03-15

    The author performed radionuclide esophageal transit studies(RETS) with liquid and solid boluses using the same day protocol in 90 normal controls and 164 patients with various primary esophageal motility disorders who were diagnosed by manometric criteria and clinical courses. The authors calculated mean esophageal transit time(MTT) and mean residual retention(MRR) in each of the liquid and solid studies, and classified time-activity curve(TAC) patterns. The normal criteria of RETS with liquid bolus were MTT<24 sec, MRR<9%, and the TAC pattern that showed rapid declining slope and flat low residual(Type 1). The normal criteria of RETS with solid bolus were MTT<35 sec, MRR<9% and TAC of type 1. With these normal criteria, the sensitivity and the specificity of the liquid study were 62.2% and 97.8%, respectively. The sensitivity increased to 75.4% with the solid study. The author also found that the RETS was highly reproducible. The achalasia typically showed no effective emptying of both liquid and solid boluses during the whole study period, and was well differentiated by its extremely long transit time and high retention from the other motility disorders. The diffuse esophageal spasm(DES) and nonspecific esophageal motility disorder(NEMD) showed intermediate delay in transit time and increased retention. In the groups of hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter(LES), hypotensive LES and nutcracker, there noted no significant difference with the normal control group in terms of MTT and MRR. The DES and NEMD could be more easily identified by solid studies that showed more marked delay in MTT and increased MRR as compared with the liquid study. In conclusion, esophageal scintigraphy is a safe, noninvasive and physiologic method for the evaluation of esophageal emptying.

  17. The Potential Benefits of Applying Recent Advances in Esophageal Motility Testing in Patients with Esophageal Atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Rommel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Infants and children with esophageal atresia commonly present with swallowing dysfunction or dysphagia. Dysphagia can lead to a range of significant consequences such as aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration, and food impaction. To improve oral intake, the clinical diagnosis of dysphagia in patients with esophageal atresia should focus on both the pharynx and the esophagus. To characterize the complex interactions of bolus flow and motor function between mouth, pharynx, and esophagus, a detailed understanding of normal and abnormal deglutition is required through the use of adequate and objective assessment techniques. As clinical symptoms do not correlate well with conventional assessment methods of motor function such as radiology or manometry but do correlate with bolus flow, the current state-of-the-art diagnosis involves high-resolution manometry combined with impedance measurements to characterize the interplay between esophageal motor function and bolus clearance. Using a novel pressure flow analysis (PFA method as an integrated analysis method of manometric and impedance measurements, differentiation of patients with impaired esophago-gastric junction relaxation from patients with bolus outflow disorders is clinically relevant. In this, pressure flow matrix categorizing the quantitative PFA measures may be used to make rational therapeutic decisions in patients with esophageal atresia. Through more advanced diagnostics, improved understanding of pathophysiology may improve our patient care by directly targeting the failed biomechanics of both the pharynx and the esophagus.

  18. The Potential Benefits of Applying Recent Advances in Esophageal Motility Testing in Patients with Esophageal Atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Nathalie; Rayyan, Maissa; Scheerens, Charlotte; Omari, Taher

    2017-01-01

    Infants and children with esophageal atresia commonly present with swallowing dysfunction or dysphagia. Dysphagia can lead to a range of significant consequences such as aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration, and food impaction. To improve oral intake, the clinical diagnosis of dysphagia in patients with esophageal atresia should focus on both the pharynx and the esophagus. To characterize the complex interactions of bolus flow and motor function between mouth, pharynx, and esophagus, a detailed understanding of normal and abnormal deglutition is required through the use of adequate and objective assessment techniques. As clinical symptoms do not correlate well with conventional assessment methods of motor function such as radiology or manometry but do correlate with bolus flow, the current state-of-the-art diagnosis involves high-resolution manometry combined with impedance measurements to characterize the interplay between esophageal motor function and bolus clearance. Using a novel pressure flow analysis (PFA) method as an integrated analysis method of manometric and impedance measurements, differentiation of patients with impaired esophago-gastric junction relaxation from patients with bolus outflow disorders is clinically relevant. In this, pressure flow matrix categorizing the quantitative PFA measures may be used to make rational therapeutic decisions in patients with esophageal atresia. Through more advanced diagnostics, improved understanding of pathophysiology may improve our patient care by directly targeting the failed biomechanics of both the pharynx and the esophagus.

  19. The Potential Benefits of Applying Recent Advances in Esophageal Motility Testing in Patients with Esophageal Atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Nathalie; Rayyan, Maissa; Scheerens, Charlotte; Omari, Taher

    2017-01-01

    Infants and children with esophageal atresia commonly present with swallowing dysfunction or dysphagia. Dysphagia can lead to a range of significant consequences such as aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration, and food impaction. To improve oral intake, the clinical diagnosis of dysphagia in patients with esophageal atresia should focus on both the pharynx and the esophagus. To characterize the complex interactions of bolus flow and motor function between mouth, pharynx, and esophagus, a detailed understanding of normal and abnormal deglutition is required through the use of adequate and objective assessment techniques. As clinical symptoms do not correlate well with conventional assessment methods of motor function such as radiology or manometry but do correlate with bolus flow, the current state-of-the-art diagnosis involves high-resolution manometry combined with impedance measurements to characterize the interplay between esophageal motor function and bolus clearance. Using a novel pressure flow analysis (PFA) method as an integrated analysis method of manometric and impedance measurements, differentiation of patients with impaired esophago-gastric junction relaxation from patients with bolus outflow disorders is clinically relevant. In this, pressure flow matrix categorizing the quantitative PFA measures may be used to make rational therapeutic decisions in patients with esophageal atresia. Through more advanced diagnostics, improved understanding of pathophysiology may improve our patient care by directly targeting the failed biomechanics of both the pharynx and the esophagus. PMID:28680874

  20. Prevalence of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    multiruka1

    Esophageal cancer is one of the common malignancies worldwide, with ... similar changes in the incidence in Kenyan populations, especially .... low socioeconomic status and the cost of investigation ... thus it is difficult to explain its impact on.

  1. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000268.htm Bleeding esophageal varices To use the sharing features on ... veins in the esophagus to balloon outward. Heavy bleeding can occur if the veins break open. Any ...

  2. Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Qasim; Fass, Ronnie; Gyawali, C Prakash; Miwa, Hiroto; Pandolfino, John E; Zerbib, Frank

    2016-02-15

    Functional esophageal disorders consist of a disease category that present with esophageal symptoms (heartburn, chest pain, dysphagia, globus) not explained by mechanical obstruction (stricture, tumor, eosinophilic esophagitis), major motor disorders (achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus), or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While mechanisms responsible are unclear, it is theorized that visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance play an important role in symptom generation, in the context of normal or borderline function. Treatments directed at improving borderline motor dysfunction or reducing reflux burden to sub-normal levels have limited success in symptom improvement. In contrast, strategies focused on modulating peripheral triggering and central perception are mechanistically viable and clinically meaningful. However, outcome data from these treatment options are limited. Future research needs to focus on understanding mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance so that appropriate targets and therapies can be developed. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Esophageal intramural pseudoverticulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.R.; Sanders, M.M.; Turner, M.A.; Liu, C.I.

    1981-01-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIP) is a rare condition of unknown etiology. It is characterized by multiple, small, flaskshaped outpouchings in the esophageal wall. Involvement may be segmental or diffuse. Since this entity was first reported in 1960, there have been 43 cases described in the English literature. These cases are reviewed and six additional cases are reported with emphasis on clinical and radiographic parameters of this entity. (orig.) [de

  4. Functional esophageal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Clouse, R; Richter, J; Heading, R; Janssens, J; Wilson, J

    1999-01-01

    The functional esophageal disorders include globus, rumination syndrome, and symptoms that typify esophageal diseases (chest pain, heartburn, and dysphagia). Factors responsible for symptom production are poorly understood. The criteria for diagnosis rest not only on compatible symptoms but also on exclusion of structural and metabolic disorders that might mimic the functional disorders. Additionally, a functional diagnosis is precluded by the presence of a pathology-based motor disorder or p...

  5. Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    disease of the esophagus that affects at least 4 in 10,000 persons.1 Although symptomatically resembling gastroe - sophageal reflux disease, EE is...clinically defined as esophageal eosinophilia (>_15 intraepithelial eosinophils per high-powered field) in the absence of abnormal acid reflux disease...that distinguish eosin- ophilic esophagitis (EoE) from other inflammatory disorders, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). As the prev

  6. Rectocele and anal sphincter defect – surgical anatomy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    carefully directed translabial ultrasound scan of the rectum and anal sphincters. The ultrasound examination was performed by a radi- ologist with specific understanding of the pathology. Conventional two-dimensional ultrasound imaging was performed using a 4 - 8. MHz curved array probe. The patient was in the left ...

  7. Anal incontinence in women with recurrent obstetric anal sphincter rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgeskov, Reneé; Nickelsen, Carsten Nahne Amtoft; Secher, Niels Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Abstract Objectives: To determine the risk of recurrent anal sphincter rupture (ASR), and compare the risk of anal incontinence (AI) after recurrent ASR, with that seen in women with previous ASR who deliver by caesarean section or vaginally without sustaining a recurrent ASR. METHODS...

  8. Anal sphincter electromyography in patients with Anorectal Dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinchet Soler, Rafael; Hidalgo Marrero, Yanet; Espichicoque Megret, Arianne; Manzano Suarez, Jianeya; Perez Gonzales, Ruth Maite

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the electromyography value of anal sphincter in patients with anorectal dysfunctions. Anorectal dysfunctions are frequent reason of pediatric consultation in children, especially with anal incontinence. A study of series of cases in patient with anorectal dysfunctions was carried out from January 2002 to January of 2006. 65 patients were studied. Anorectal malformations (ARM) represented the predominant affection with 38 patients (58.5%), prevailing the male sex in 25 patients (65.8%). Encopresis and intestinal agagliosis dicrease was observed. Sphincter was found before surgical treatment through electromyography in patients with anorectal malformations and colostomy; in those with definitive operation and open colostomy, it avoided the operation in a patient that did not have muscular activity of the external sphincter. In children already operated and with closed colostomy several electromyography changes were observed in correspondence with different incontinence grades. In encopresis cases the study was useful to rule out sphincter functional alterations. Electromyography was pathological in all the operated patients of intestinal aganglionosis. This procedure was very useful for anal incontinence study that helped to determine and establish the prognosis. (author)

  9. Paradoxical sphincter contraction is rarely indicative of anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voderholzer, W A; Neuhaus, D A; Klauser, A G; Tzavella, K; Müller-Lissner, S A; Schindlbeck, N E

    1997-08-01

    Anismus is thought to be a cause of chronic constipation by producing outlet obstruction. The underlying mechanism is paradoxical contraction of the anal sphincter or puborectalis muscle. However, paradoxical sphincter contraction (PSC) also occurs in healthy controls, so anismus may be diagnosed too often because it may be based on a non-specific finding related to untoward conditions during the anorectal examination. To investigate the pathophysiological importance of PSC found at anorectal manometry in constipated patients and in patients with stool incontinence. Digital rectal examination and anorectal manometry were performed in 102 chronically constipated patients, 102 patients with stool incontinence, and in 18 controls without anorectal disease. In 120 of the 222 subjects defaecography was also performed. Paradoxical sphincter contraction was defined as a sustained increase in sphincter pressure during straining. Anismus was assumed when PSC was present on anorectal manometry and digital rectal examination and the anorectal angle did not widen on defaecography. Manometric PSC occurred about twice as often in constipated patients as in incontinent patients (41.2% versus 25.5%, p anismus is rare.

  10. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  11. Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations--a pharmacological target for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, D. P.; Tytgat, G. N. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2002-01-01

    The oesophago-gastric junction functions as an anti-reflux barrier preventing increased exposure of the oesophageal mucosa to gastric contents. Failure of this anti-reflux barrier results in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and may lead to complications such as oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus

  12. The preoperative manometric pattern predicts the outcome of surgical treatment for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Renato; Costantini, Mario; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Morbin, Tiziana; Rizzetto, Christian; Zanatta, Lisa; Ceolin, Martina; Finotti, Elena; Nicoletti, Loredana; Da Dalt, Gianfranco; Cavallin, Francesco; Ancona, Ermanno

    2010-11-01

    A new manometric classification of esophageal achalasia has recently been proposed that also suggests a correlation with the final outcome of treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate this hypothesis in a large group of achalasia patients undergoing laparoscopic Heller-Dor myotomy. We evaluated 246 consecutive achalasia patients who underwent surgery as their first treatment from 2001 to 2009. Patients with sigmoid-shaped esophagus were excluded. Symptoms were scored and barium swallow X-ray, endoscopy, and esophageal manometry were performed before and again at 6 months after surgery. Patients were divided into three groups: (I) no distal esophageal pressurization (contraction wave amplitude 30 mmHg); and (III) rapidly propagating pressurization attributable to spastic contractions. Treatment failure was defined as a postoperative symptom score greater than the 10th percentile of the preoperative score (i.e., >7). Type III achalasia coincided with a longer overall lower esophageal sphincter (LES) length, a lower symptom score, and a smaller esophageal diameter. Treatment failure rates differed significantly in the three groups: I = 14.6% (14/96), II = 4.7% (6/127), and III = 30.4% (7/23; p = 0.0007). At univariate analysis, the manometric pattern, a low LES resting pressure, and a high chest pain score were the only factors predicting treatment failure. At multivariate analysis, the manometric pattern and a LES resting pressure achalasia subtypes: patients with panesophageal pressurization have the best outcome after laparoscopic Heller-Dor myotomy.

  13. Esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms before and after oral IQoro(R) training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita; Franzén, Thomas

    2015-06-28

    To examine whether muscle training with an oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) improves esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms. A total of 43 adult patients (21 women and 22 men) were consecutively referred to a swallowing center for the treatment and investigation of long-lasting nonstenotic esophageal dysphagia. Hiatal hernia was confirmed by radiologic examination in 21 patients before enrollment in the study (group A; median age 52 years, range: 19-85 years). No hiatal hernia was detected by radiologic examination in the remaining 22 patients (group B; median age 57 years, range: 22-85 years). Before and after training with an oral IQS for 6-8 mo, the patients were evaluated using a symptom questionnaire (esophageal dysphagia and acid chest symptoms; score 0-3), visual analogue scale (ability to swallow food: score 0-100), lip force test (≥ 15 N), velopharyngeal closure test (≥ 10 s), orofacial motor tests, and an oral sensory test. Another twelve patients (median age 53 years, range: 22-68 years) with hiatal hernia were evaluated using oral IQS traction maneuvers with pressure recordings of the upper esophageal sphincter and hiatus canal as assessed by high-resolution manometry. Esophageal dysphagia was present in all 43 patients at entry, and 98% of patients showed improvement after IQS training [mean score (range): 2.5 (1-3) vs 0.9 (0-2), P dysphagia and reflux symptoms in adults, likely due to improved hiatal competence.

  14. The identification of specialized pacemaking cells in the anal sphincters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, Ahmed; El Sibai, Olfat; Ahmed, Ismail

    2006-07-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are claimed to generate the electrical activity in the colon and stomach. As the external (EAS) and internal (IAS) anal sphincters exhibit resting electrical activity, we hypothesized the presence of ICC in these sphincters. This hypothesis was investigated in the current study. Specimens from the EAS and IAS were taken from normal areas of the anorectum which had been surgically excised by abdominoperineal operation for rectal cancer of 28 patients (16 men, 12 women, mean age 42.2+/-4.8 years). The specimens were subjected to c-kit immunohistochemistry. Controls for the specificity of the antisera consisted of tissue incubation with normal rabbit serum substituted for the primary antiserum. Fusiform, c-kit positive, ICC-like cells were detected in the anal sphincters; they had dendritic processes. They were clearly distinguishable from the non-branching, c-kit negative smooth and striated muscle cells of the anal sphincters. The specimens contained also c-kit positive mast cells, but they had a rounded body with no dendritic processes. Immunoreactivity was absent in negative controls in which the primary antibody was omitted. We have identified, for the first time, cells in EAS and IAS with morphological and immunological phenotypes similar to ICCs of the gut. These cells appear to be responsible for initiating the slow waves recorded from the anal sphincters and for controlling their activity. A deficiency or absence of these cells may affect the anal motile activity. Studies are needed to explore the role of these cells in anal motility disorders.

  15. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcohol use, and Barrett esophagus can affect the risk of developing esophageal cancer. Anything that increases the ... tissue gives off less light than normal tissue. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening Key Points Screening tests ...

  16. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specific responses in allergy? » Dietary Therapy and Nutrition Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Work Group Report of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology » Eosinophilic esophagitis can ...

  17. Sintomas do trato digestivo superior e distúrbios motores do esôfago em pacientes portadores da forma indeterminada da doença de Chagas crônica Upper gastrointestinal symptoms and esophageal motility disorders in indeterminate Chagas’ disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela de Liz P. Sanchez-Lermen

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O estudo descreve os sintomas referidos por portadores da forma indeterminada da doença de Chagas crônica e avalia sua associação com alterações da motilidade esofágica. Manometria do esôfago foi realizada em 50 pacientes, medindo-se a extensão e a pressão do esfíncter inferior do esôfago, o peristaltismo e a amplitude de contração do corpo esofágico. Oito (16% pacientes apresentaram relaxamento parcial do esfíncter inferior, 13 (26% apresentaram aperistalse parcial e 20 (40% apresentaram hipocontratilidade no esôfago distal. Sintomas digestivos altos foram referidos por 24 (48% pacientes, sendo mais freqüentes a pirose, a regurgitação e o desconforto intermitente à deglutição. Esses sintomas foram referidos por 17 (51,5% de 33 pacientes com alterações motoras do esôfago e por 7 (41,2% de 17 pacientes com manometria normal, diferença essa não estatisticamente significante (p=0,69. Esses achados sugerem que portadores da FCI apresentam sintomas inespecíficos do trato digestivo superior que podem dificultar a sua classificação com base apenas no exame clínico e radiológico, e que é alta a freqüência de portadores desta forma que apresentam distúrbios motores do esôfago.This study describes the symptoms reported by patients with the indeterminate form of chronic Chagas’ disease and evaluates associations between these symptoms and alterations in esophageal motility. Esophageal manometry was performed on 50 patients, with measurements of the length and pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter, peristaltism and the amplitude of contractions of the esophageal body. Eight (16% patients presented partial relaxation of the lower sphincter, 13 (26% presented partial lack of peristalsis and 20 (40% presented hypocontractility of the distal esophagus. Upper digestive symptoms were reported by 24 (48% patients, and the most frequent of these were heartburn, regurgitation and intermittent discomfort when swallowing

  18. Esophageal Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The most common types of esophageal cancer are adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. These forms of esophageal cancer develop in some parts of the esophagus and are driven by genetic changes. Start here to find information on esophageal cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  19. Bimodal effect of oxidative stress in internal anal sphincter smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Changes in oxidative stress may affect basal tone and relaxation of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle in aging. We examined this issue by investigating the effects of the oxidative stress inducer 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY-83583) in basal as well as U-46619-stimulated tone, and nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxation in rat IAS. LY-83583, which works via generation of reactive oxygen species in living cells, produced a bimodal effect in IAS tone: lower concentrations (0.1 nM to 10 μM) produced a concentration-dependent increase, while higher concentrations (50–100 μM) produced a decrease in IAS tone. An increase in IAS tone by lower concentrations was associated with an increase in RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) activity. This was evident by the increase in RhoA/ROCK in the particulate fractions, in ROCK activity, and in the levels of phosphorylated (p) Thr696-myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 and pThr18/Ser19-20-kDa myosin light chain. Conversely, higher concentrations of LY-83583 produced inhibitory effects on RhoA/ROCK. Interestingly, both the excitatory and inhibitory effects of LY-83583 in the IAS were reversed by superoxide dismutase. The excitatory effects of LY-83583 were found to resemble those with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibition by l-NNA, since it produced a significant increase in the IAS tone and attenuated NANC relaxation. These effects of LY-83583 and l-NNA were reversible by l-arginine. This suggests the role of nNOS inhibition and RhoA/ROCK activation in the increase in IAS tone by LY-83583. These data have important implications in the pathophysiology and therapeutic targeting of rectoanal disorders, especially associated with IAS dysfunction. PMID:26138467

  20. Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment of Esophageal Achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercantini, Paolo; Amodio, Pietro M.; Stipa, Francesco; Corigliano, Nicola; Ziparo, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A minimally invasive approach is considered the treatment of choice for esophageal achalasia. We report the evolution of our experience from thoracoscopic Heller myotomy (THM) to laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM). Our objective is to define the efficacy and safety of these 2 approaches. Methods: Between March 1993 and December 2001, 36 patients underwent minimally invasive surgery for achalasia. Sixteen patients underwent THM without an antireflux procedure, and 20 patients underwent LHM with partial anterior fundoplication (n=13) or closure of the angle of His (n=7). Results: Mean operative time and mean hospital stay were significantly shorter for LHM compared with that of THM (148.3±38.7 vs 222±46.1 min, respectively; P=0.0001) and (2.06±0.65 days vs 5.06±0.85 days, respectively; P=0.0001). Six of 16 patients (37.5%) in the THM group experienced persistent or recurrent dysphagia compared with 1 of 20 patients (5%) in the LHM group (P=0.01). Heartburn developed in 5 patients (31.2%) after THM and in 1 patient (5%) after LHM (P=0.06). Regurgitation developed in 4 patients (25%) after THM and in 2 patients (10%) after LHM (P=0.2). Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) basal pressure decreased significantly from 30.1±5.07 to 15.3±2.1 after THM and from 31.8±6.2 to 10.4±1.7 after LHM (P=0.0001). Mean esophageal diameter was significantly reduced after LHM compared with that after THM (from 53.9±5.9 mm to 27.2±3.3 mm vs 50.8±7.6 mm to 37.2±6.9 mm respectively; P=0.0001). Conclusion: In our experience, LHM is associated with better short-term results and is superior to THM in relieving dysphagia. LHM with partial anterior fundoplication should be considered the treatment of choice for achalasia. PMID:14558709

  1. [Differences between Chicago and traditional classifications in the diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders with high-resolution manometry and topography of esophageal pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Y Abreu, A T; González Sánchez, C B; Villanueva Sáenz, E; Valdovinos Díaz, M A

    2010-01-01

    With the introduction of high resolution manometry (HRM) and esophageal topography a novel classification (Chicago Classification) has been proposed for the diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders (EMD). Clinical differences with the traditional classification are currently under evaluation. To investigate differences between the Chicago (CC) and traditional (TC) classifications in the diagnosis of EMD. Consecutive patients with indication for esophageal manometry were studied. HRM was performed with a 36 sensors solid-state catheter and Manoview software (V2.0).Conventional manometric tracings were analyzed by an investigator blinded to the results of HRM. Diagnosis by CC and CT were compared. Two hundred patients were studied, 106 (53%) of them women (53%) with a mean patient age of 43.4 (range 16 - 84) years. Preoperative evaluation for GERD 152 (76%) was the most frequent indication. Achalasia (8), scleroderma (2) and peristaltic dysfunction (60 vs. 59) were similarly diagnosed by CC and CT. Spastic disorders were more frequently identified by CC: nutcracker esophagus (NC) in 3, spastic NC in3 and segmental NC in 11 patients versus TC: NC 5. Three patients had spasm with CC and 1 with TC. Non specific motor disorder was diagnosed by TC and 2 patients had functional obstruction with CC. Hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter was identified in 63 patients with CC vs.57 with TC. Spastic disorders and functional obstruction were the EMD better identified by HRM and CC.

  2. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Study in the Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    Esophageal motility was evaluated from the analysis of 10 consecutive swallows using liquid bolus containing 0.5 mCi of {sup 99m}Tc tin colloid. We have reviewed our experience of esophageal transit study in the 20 normal volunteers and 55 patients with dysphagia that was not related to mechanical obstruction. The purpose of this study is to measure the esophageal transit in normal subjects and in patients with various esophageal motility disorders. The overall sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide esophageal transit study in detecting esophageal motor abnormality were compared with manometric results as a gold standard, which were 80% and 100% respectively. Radionuclide transit study is a safe, rapid, noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  3. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Study in the Esophageal Motility Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook

    1993-01-01

    Esophageal motility was evaluated from the analysis of 10 consecutive swallows using liquid bolus containing 0.5 mCi of 99m Tc tin colloid. We have reviewed our experience of esophageal transit study in the 20 normal volunteers and 55 patients with dysphagia that was not related to mechanical obstruction. The purpose of this study is to measure the esophageal transit in normal subjects and in patients with various esophageal motility disorders. The overall sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide esophageal transit study in detecting esophageal motor abnormality were compared with manometric results as a gold standard, which were 80% and 100% respectively. Radionuclide transit study is a safe, rapid, noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  4. Sonographic assessment of the anal sphincter after obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI) using transperineal ultrasound (TPUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Vered H; Valsky, Dan V; Yagel, Simcha

    2018-03-24

    Obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI) is the most common cause of anal incontinence and ano-rectal symptoms in women 1 . Reported rates of anal incontinence following primary repair of OASI range between 15-61%, with a mean of 39% 2, 3 . Other possible complications of OASI include perineal pain, dyspareunia, and less commonly, abscess formation, wound breakdown, and rectovaginal fistulae. Symptom onset may occur immediately, several years postpartum, or only late in life when aging of tissues adds to the delivery insult. Having sustained an OASI may impact significantly on women's physical and emotional health. Missed OASI, inadequate repair or lack of follow up are potential sources of litigation 4 . The reported incidence of OASI may be as high as 4-6.6% 4 , averaging 2.9% in the UK 3 . The incidence is higher in primiparae (6.1%) than in multiparae (1.7%) 3 . Recent years are seeing an increased awareness and structured training programs, which appear to have resulted in an increase in the detection rate of OASI 3 . The following risk factors have been identified with varying risk rates reported 3 : Asian ethnicity (OR 2.27, 95% CI 2.14-2.41), nulliparity (relative risk [RR] 6.97, 95% CI 5.40-8.99), birth weight greater than 4 kg (OR 2.27, 95% CI 2.18-2.36), shoulder dystocia (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.72-2.08), occipito-posterior position (RR 2.44, 95% CI 2.07-2.89), prolonged second stage of labor (up to RR 2.02, 95% CI 1.62-2.51 after four hours duration). Instrumental deliveries and episiotomy use have been extensively studied resulting in the following evidence: Vacuum delivery without episiotomy (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.74-2.05); vacuum delivery with episiotomy is protective (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.51-0.63); forceps delivery without episiotomy carries the highest potential risk (OR 6.53, 95% CI 5.57-7.64); and forceps delivery with episiotomy (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.49). Other potential risk factors have been suggested with varying evidence such as advanced maternal age at

  5. Office-based procedures for diagnosis and treatment of esophageal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellenstein, David J; Schutte, Henrieke W; Marres, Henri A M; Honings, Jimmie; Belafsky, Peter C; Postma, Gregory N; Takes, Robert P; van den Broek, Guido B

    2017-09-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic office-based procedures under topical anesthesia are emerging in the daily practice of laryngologists and head and neck surgeons. Since the introduction of the transnasal esophagoscope, office-based procedures for the esophagus are increasingly performed. We conducted a systematic review of literature on office-based procedures under topical anesthesia for the esophagus. Transnasal esophagoscopy is an extensively investigated office-based procedure. This procedure shows better patient tolerability and equivalent accuracy compared to conventional transoral esophagoscopy, as well as time and cost savings. Secondary tracheoesophageal puncture, esophageal dilatation, esophageal sphincter injection, and foreign body removal are less investigated, but show promising results. With the introduction of the transnasal esophagoscope, an increasing number of diagnostic and therapeutic office-based procedures for the esophagus are possible, with multiple advantages. Further investigation must prove the clinical feasibility and effectiveness of the therapeutic office-based procedures. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The Danish anal sphincter rupture questionnaire: Validity and reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Ottesen, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To revise, validate and test for reliability an anal sphincter rupture questionnaire in relation to construct, content and face validity. Setting and background. Since 1996 women with anal sphincter rupture (ASR) at one of the public university hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark have been...... main questions but one. Two questions needed further explanation. Seven women made minor errors. Conclusion. The validated Danish questionnaire has a good construct, content and face validity. It is a well accepted, reliable, simple and clinically relevant screening tool. It reveals physical problems...... offered pelvic floor muscle examination and instruction by a specialist physiotherapist. In relation to that, a non-validated questionnaire about anal and urinary incontinence was to be answered six months after childbirth. Method. The original questionnaire was revised and a pilot test was performed...

  7. Velopharyngeal sphincter pathophysiologic aspects in the in cleft palat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are common congenital abnormalities with typical functional disorders on speech, deglutition and middle ear function. Objective: This article reviews functional labiopalatine disorders through a pathophysiological view. Method: We performed a literature search on line, as well as books and periodicals related to velopharyngeal sphincter. Our sources were LILACS, MEDLINE and SciELO databases, and we applied to the research Keywords of interest on the velopharyngeal pathophysiology, for articles published between 1965 and 2007. Conclusion: Velopharyngeal sphincter plays a central role in speech, swallowing and middle ear physiology in patients with labiopalatine cleft. At the end of our bibliographic review, pursuant to the velopharyngeal physiology in individuals with this disorder in the functional speech, deglutition and otologic function, we observed that although there is a great number of published data discussing this issue, further studies are necessary to completely understand the pathophysiology, due to the fact they have been exploited superficially.

  8. Long-term effect of sphincteric fatigue during bladder neurostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J S; Hassouna, M; Sawan, M; Duval, F; Elhilali, M M

    1995-01-01

    Commercially available stimulators lack several features, including multiple channel capability and flexible stimulation parameters. These factors limit clinical application. A new computerized electrical stimulator system was developed by our team and evaluated for its efficacy in bladder evacuation in an animal model after spinal cord transection. The system can generate a wide range of stimulation characteristics and has the feature of being a programmable multichannel pacemaker. It has enabled us to induce a reversible fatigue to the external sphincter that results in proper bladder emptying on stimulation. Using this new bladder pacemaker, 8 dogs were studied. We applied the concept of fatiguing of the external sphincter via the pudendal nerve to avoid rhizotomy. We determined the optimal stimulation parameters that can reliably empty the dog's bladder for the duration of the experiment, which lasted for 8 months. The new computerized electrical stimulation system achieved the objective of reducing bladder outlet resistance without the need for sacral rhizotomy.

  9. Epiphrenic esophageal diverticula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epiphrenic esophageal diverticula (EED are rare. The estimated incidence is about 1:500,000/year. EED usually result from a combination of esophageal obstruction, functional or mechanical and a point of weakness of the muscularis propria. Most of the symptoms are unspecific, but dysphagia is most common. Chest radiograph, barium esophagogram, endoscopy and manometry are diagnostic tools. The treatment methods are conservative medical therapy, myotomy, diverticulectomy and fundoplication. In addition, endoscopic pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin injection are a good alternative for symptomatic patients with motility disorders who are unfit for or unwilling to undergo surgery.

  10. Esophageal manometry findings and degree of acid exposure in short and long Barrett's esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Helman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Barrett's esophagus (BE is characterized by intestinal metaplasia in the distal esophagus and is classified as short-segment (3 cm - LSSBE. It is suggested that LSSBE is associated with more severe esophageal motor abnormalities and increased acid exposure time than SSBE. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of esophageal manometriy abnormalities and acid exposure times in patients with SSBE and LSSBE. METHODS: Barrett's esophagus patients identified by upper endoscopy and confirmed by histopathology were, retrospectively, reviewed and divided into two groups: SSBE and LSBE. Demographic data, symptom duration, prevalence of hiatal hernia, lower esophagus sphincter basal pressure, prevalence of esophageal body abnormalities and acid exposure times were evaluated. RESULTS: Forty-six patients with SSBE (24 males - 52.2%, mean age of 55.2 years and 28 patients with LSBE (18 males - 64.3%, mean age of 50.5 years. Mean symptom duration was 9.9 years for SSBE and 12.9 years for LSSBE. Hiatal hernia was present in 84.2% of SSBE, 96.3% of LSBE; average lower esophagus sphincter pressure in SSBE 9.15 mm Hg, in LSBE 6.99 mm Hg; lower esophagus sphincter hypotension in SSBE was 65.9%, in LSSBE 82.1%; aperistalsis in SSBE 6.5%, LSSBE 3.6%; mild/moderate ineffective esophageal motility in SSBE 34.8%, LSBE 46.4%; severe moderate ineffective esophageal motility in SSBE 10.9%, LSBE 7,1%; nutcracker esophagus/segmental nutcracker esophagus in SSBE 8.6%, LSBE 0%; normal body in SSBE 39.1%, in LSBE 42.9%, no statistical difference for any of these values (P<0.05. Average % total time pH<4 in SSBE 9.12, LSBE 17.27 (P<0.000; % time pH<4 upright in SSBE 11.91; LSBE 24.29 (P=0.003; % time pH<4 supine in SSBE 10.86, LSBE 33.26 (P = 0.000. CONCLUSION: There was no difference between the prevalence of motor disorders in patients with SSBE and LSSBE. Acid reflux in upright and supine positions was more intense in LSBE.

  11. Esophageal Motor Disorders Are a Strong and Independant Associated Factor of Barrett’s Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Camille; Benezech, Alban; Alessandrini, Marine; Grimaud, Jean-Charles; Vitton, Veronique

    2018-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal motor disorder (EMD) has been shown to be associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, the association of EMD with a Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is controversial. Our objective was to evaluate whether the presence of EMD was an independent factor associated with BE. Methods A retrospective case-control study was conducted in GERD patients who all had oeso-gastroduodenal endoscopy and high-resolution esophageal manometry. The clinical data collected was known or potential risk factors for BE: male gender, smoking and alcohol consumption, age, body mass index, presence of hiatal hernia, frequency, and age of GERD. EMD were classified according to the Chicago classification into: ineffective motor syndrome, fragmented peristalsis and absence of peristalsis, lower esophageal sphincter hypotonia. Results Two hundred and one patients (101 in the GERD + BE group and 100 in the GERD without BE) were included. In univariate analysis, male gender, alcohol consumption, presence of hiatal hernia, and EMD appeared to be associated with the presence of BE. In a multivariate analysis, 3 independent factors were identified: the presence of EMD (odds ratio [OR], 3.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71–9.28; P = 0.001), the presence of hiatal hernia (OR, 5.60; 95% CI, 2.45–12.76; P motor syndrome and lower esophageal sphincter hypotonia) is a strong independent associated factor of BE. Searching systematically for an EMD in patients suffering from GERD could be a new strategy to organize the endoscopic follow-up. PMID:29605977

  12. Esophageal Motor Disorders Are a Strong and Independant Associated Factor of Barrett's Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Camille; Benezech, Alban; Alessandrini, Marine; Grimaud, Jean-Charles; Vitton, Veronique

    2018-04-30

    Esophageal motor disorder (EMD) has been shown to be associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, the association of EMD with a Barrett's esophagus (BE) is controversial. Our objective was to evaluate whether the presence of EMD was an independent factor associated with BE. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in GERD patients who all had oeso-gastroduodenal endoscopy and high-resolution esophageal manometry. The clinical data collected was known or potential risk factors for BE: male gender, smoking and alcohol consumption, age, body mass index, presence of hiatal hernia, frequency, and age of GERD. EMD were classified according to the Chicago classification into: ineffective motor syndrome, fragmented peristalsis and absence of peristalsis, lower esophageal sphincter hypotonia. Two hundred and one patients (101 in the GERD + BE group and 100 in the GERD without BE) were included. In univariate analysis, male gender, alcohol consumption, presence of hiatal hernia, and EMD appeared to be associated with the presence of BE. In a multivariate analysis, 3 independent factors were identified: the presence of EMD (odds ratio [OR], 3.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-9.28; P = 0.001), the presence of hiatal hernia (OR, 5.60; 95% CI, 2.45-12.76; P < 0.001), Helicobacter pylori infection (OR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.84; P = 0.035). The presence of EMD (particularly ineffective motor syndrome and lower esophageal sphincter hypotonia) is a strong independent associated factor of BE. Searching systematically for an EMD in patients suffering from GERD could be a new strategy to organize the endoscopic follow-up.

  13. Association of esophageal inflammation, obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease: from FDG PET/CT perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Wen Wu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is associated with bothersome symptoms and neoplastic progression into Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. We aim to determine the correlation between GERD, esophageal inflammation and obesity with 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT. METHODS: We studied 458 subjects who underwent a comprehensive health check-up, which included an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, FDG PET/CT and complete anthropometric measures. GERD symptoms were evaluated with Reflux Disease Questionnaire. Endoscopically erosive esophagitis was scored using the Los Angeles classification system. Inflammatory activity, represented by standardized uptake values (SUVmax of FDG at pre-determined locations of esophagus, stomach and duodenum, were compared. Association between erosive esophagitis, FDG activity and anthropometric evaluation, including body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes were analyzed. RESULTS: Subjects with erosive esophagitis (n = 178, 38.9% had significantly higher SUVmax at middle esophagus (2.69±0.74 vs. 2.41±0.57, P<.001 and esophagogastric junction (3.10±0.89 vs. 2.38±0.57, P<.001, marginally higher at upper esophageal sphincter (2.29±0.42 vs. 2.21±0.48, P = .062, but not in stomach or duodenum. The severity of erosive esophagitis correlated with SUVmax and subjects with Barrett's esophagus had the highest SUVmax at middle esophagus and esophagogastric junction. Heartburn positively correlated with higher SUVmax at middle oesophagus (r = .262, P = .003. Using multivariate regression analyses, age (P = .027, total cholesterol level (P = .003, alcohol drinking (P = .03, subcutaneous adipose tissue (P<.001, BMI (P<.001 and waist circumference (P<.001 were independently associated with higher SUVmax at respective esophageal locations. CONCLUSIONS: Esophageal

  14. Esophageal Foreign Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal foreign body aspiration is a common event which can cause serious morbidity and mortality in the children and adult population. For that reason, early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for preventing these life threateining complications. Children most often ingest coins and toys whereas adults commonly tend to have problems with meat and bones. Esophageal foreign bodies are located at the cricopharyngeus muscle level in 70%, the thoracic esophagus in 15% and the gastroesophageal junction in the remaining 15%. Symptoms can vary according to the shape and structure of the ingested object, type of location, patient%u2019s age and complications caused by the foreign body. Delay in treatment, esophageal perforation and an underlying esophageal disease are poor prognostic factors. In treatment, observation, foley catheter, rigid or flexible esophagoscopy and removing the foreign body with a Magill forceps, pushing the foreign body into the stomach, giving intravenous glucagon and surgical treatment methods can be used. Rigid esophagoscopy is an effective and safe procedure for foreign body diagnosis and removal. Improved endoscopic experience and clinical management of thoracic surgeons led to reduced morbidity and mortality in recent years. Most of those emergencies of childhood are preventable. Family education is very important.

  15. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, T.A.; Ajani, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings contain 33 papers grouped under the headings of: Heath memorial award lecture; Large bowel cancer; Esophageal cancer; Pancreatic, Endocrime, and Hepatobiliary cancer; Gastric cancer; Joanne Vandenberge hill award and William O. Russell lectureship in anatomic pathology; and Jeffrey A. Gottlieb memorial lecture

  16. Advances in esophageal motor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smout, André Jpm

    2008-07-01

    Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. A number of studies have addressed the issue of heterogeneity in achalasia, the best defined esophageal motility disorder. The spastic esophageal motility disorders nutcracker esophagus and diffuse esophageal spasm may coexist with gastroesophageal reflux disease, which has consequences for the management of patients with these disorders. The entity labelled ineffective esophageal motility is associated with reflux esophagitis, but also with morbid obesity. For the detection of disordered transit caused by ineffective esophageal motility, application of intraluminal impedance monitoring in conjunction with manometry leads to improved diagnosis. New data on the effect of Nissen fundoplication on esophageal motility were published during the last year. Recent knowledge on the heterogeneity of achalasia and the association of spastic esophageal motor disorders and ineffective motility with reflux disease will help the clinician in the management of patients with these disorders.

  17. [Esophageal complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease: consequences or defensive reactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Örs Péter; Bognár, Laura; Papp, András; Vereczkei, András

    2017-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease affects more than 10% of the adult population. Most patients can be effectively treated with lifestyle changes and adequate acid-reducing therapy. However, about 10% of the patients remain symptomatic despite treatment and severe complications may develop. Interestingly, some of these complications seem to be a sort of defensive mechanism that may either alleviate the patient's symptoms or prevent developing further complications. In Barrett's esophagus, which can be unambigously considered as a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease, reflux symptoms ruining the quality of life may significantly improve, since the metaplastic Barrett epithelium is much more resistent to gastric acid, than the normal epithelial lining of the esophagus. Furthermore, the motility disorders (hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, achalasia, cricopharyngeal achalasia) and structural changes (Schatzki's ring, esophageal stricture, subglottic trachea stenosis), which develop as a complication of reflux may help to prevent aspiration that can cause new complaints and may lead to further complications. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(20): 763-769.

  18. Unique case of esophageal rupture after a fall from height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Berge Henegouwen Mark I

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic ruptures of the esophagus are relatively rare. This condition is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Most traumatic ruptures occur after motor vehicle accidents. Case Presentation We describe a unique case of a 23 year old woman that presented at our trauma resuscitation room after a fall from 8 meters. During physical examination there were no clinical signs of life-threatening injuries. She did however have a massive amount of subcutaneous emphysema of the chest and neck and pneumomediastinum. Flexible laryngoscopy revealed a lesion in the upper esophagus just below the level of the upper esophageal sphincter. Despite preventive administration of intravenous antibiotics and nutrition via a nasogastric tube, the patient developed a cervical abscess, which drained spontaneously. Normal diet was gradually resumed after 2.5 weeks and the patient was discharged in a reasonable condition 3 weeks after the accident. Conclusions This case report presents a high cervical esophageal rupture without associated local injuries after a fall from height.

  19. Swallowing and pharyngo-esophageal manometry in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Almeida Moreira da Paz Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Upper airway nerve and muscle damage associated with obstructive sleep apnea may impair the strength and dynamics of pharyngeal and esophageal contractions during swallowing. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presence of alterations in pharyngoesophageal manometry in patients with obstructive sleep apnea with and without oropharyngeal dysphagia. METHODS: This study prospectively evaluated 22 patients with obstructive sleep apnea without spontaneous complaints of dysphagia, using a questionnaire, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, and pharyngoesophageal manometry, including measurement of the upper and lower esophageal sphincter pressures and mean pharyngeal pressures at three levels during swallowing. RESULTS: The dysphagia group consisted of 17 patients (77.3% in whom swallowing abnormalities were detected on fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (n = 15; 68.2% and/or in the questionnaire (n = 7; 31.8%. The five remaining cases comprised a control group without oropharyngeal dysphagia. In all cases of abnormalities on fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, there was premature bolus leakage into the pharynx. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding any of the pharyngoesophageal manometry measurements, age, or severity of obstructive sleep apnea. CONCLUSION: Pharyngoesophageal manometry detected no statistically significant difference between the groups with and without oropharyngeal dysphagia.

  20. Swallowing and pharyngo-esophageal manometry in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luciana Almeida Moreira da Paz; Fontes, Luiz Henrique de Souza; Cahali, Michel Burihan

    2015-01-01

    Upper airway nerve and muscle damage associated with obstructive sleep apnea may impair the strength and dynamics of pharyngeal and esophageal contractions during swallowing. To evaluate the presence of alterations in pharyngoesophageal manometry in patients with obstructive sleep apnea with and without oropharyngeal dysphagia. This study prospectively evaluated 22 patients with obstructive sleep apnea without spontaneous complaints of dysphagia, using a questionnaire, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, and pharyngoesophageal manometry, including measurement of the upper and lower esophageal sphincter pressures and mean pharyngeal pressures at three levels during swallowing. The dysphagia group consisted of 17 patients (77.3%) in whom swallowing abnormalities were detected on fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (n=15; 68.2%) and/or in the questionnaire (n=7; 31.8%). The five remaining cases comprised a control group without oropharyngeal dysphagia. In all cases of abnormalities on fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, there was premature bolus leakage into the pharynx. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding any of the pharyngoesophageal manometry measurements, age, or severity of obstructive sleep apnea. Pharyngoesophageal manometry detected no statistically significant difference between the groups with and without oropharyngeal dysphagia. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor for primary esophageal achalasia: outcomes in 173 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Riccardo; Fumagalli Romario, Uberto; Ceolin, Martina; Massaron, Simonetta; Peracchia, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic Heller myotomy combined with anterior (Dor) fundoplication is the most widely-used surgical procedure for treating esophageal achalasia in Europe From November 1992 through May 2010 we performed laparoscopic Heller-Dor on 173 patients Conversion to laparotomy was required in three cases (1.7%) at the beginning of the experience (for mucosal) perforation which was the most frequent intraoperative complication, managed laparoscopically with the increasing experience. Five (2.9%) cases had minor postoperative complications. Clinical results were satisfactory in 99.4% of cases. One patient (0.6%) had severe persistent dysphagia. Mean esophageal diameter decreased from 50 mm ± 12 (range 20- 90) to 25 mm ± 7 (range 15-80). Lower esophageal sphincter pressure decreased from 32 mmHg (median, range 10- 93) pre-operatively to 11 mmHg (median, range 5-21) at one year follow up and residual pressure from 12 mmHg (median, range 3-30) to 4 mmHg (median, range 1-8). Impedance and pH monitoring showed normal levels in 39/47 (83%) patients who agreed to testing. The good outcomes of this experience, in part due to careful adherence to technical aspects of the operation, confirm that the laparoscopic Heller-Dor is the gold standard surgical treatment for esophageal achalasia.

  2. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia: clinical impact of 28 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hitomi; Isomoto, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Inoue, Haruhiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the efficacy of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia. Twenty-eight esophageal achalasia patients who underwent POEM in our institution between August 2010 and October 2012 were enrolled. Under general anesthesia with tracheal intubation, initial incision was made on the anterior wall of the esophagus after submucosal injection. Submucosal tunnel was created and extended below the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) onto the gastric cardia. Subsequently, myotomy was done using triangle tip knife. After confirmation of smooth passage of scope through the esophagogastric junction, the entry was closed. Esophagogram and manometry study was done before and after the procedure. Also, subjective symptom score and Eckardt score were assessed before and 3 months after POEM. POEM was successfully done in all cases without any severe complications such as perforation and mediastinitis.Mean procedure time was 99.1 min (range 61-160) and mean myotomy length was 14.4 cm (range 10-18). Significant improvement was achieved in both esophagogram and endoscopic findings. Mean LES pressure was 71.2 mmHg (35.8-119.0) and 21.0 mmHg (6.7-41.0) before and after the procedure (P treatment of choice for esophageal achalasia. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  3. Relationship between external anal sphincter atrophy at endoanal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical, functional, and anatomic characteristics in patients with fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, Maaike P.; Deutekom, Marije; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; Engel, Alexander F.; Janssen, Lucas W. M.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E. E.; Dobben, Annette C.; Baeten, Cor G. M. I.; de Priester, Jacobus A.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Stoker, Jaap

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: External anal sphincter atrophy at endoanal magnetic resonance imaging has been associated with poor outcome of anal sphincter repair. We studied the relationship between external anal sphincter atrophy on endoanal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical, functional, and anatomic

  4. Esophageal motor disorders in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moawad, Fouad J; Maydonovitch, Corinne L; Veerappan, Ganesh R; Bassett, John T; Lake, Jason M; Wong, Roy K H

    2011-05-01

    An association between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and esophageal motility disorders has been described in small studies. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of esophageal motor disorders in a large cohort of adults with EoE and examine whether an association exists between esophageal dysmotility and dysphagia. A retrospective review of esophageal manometry studies in adult EoE patients was performed. Tracings were reviewed for abnormalities including nutcracker esophagus and ineffective swallows, defined as low amplitude peristalsis (esophagus was found in three patients. There was no significant difference in eosinophil count among the motility groups: normal 46.5 ± 3.1, mild IEM 56.9 ± 36.9, moderate IEM 45.5 ± 23.7, severe IEM 34.3 ± 12.6 (P = 0.157). In this cohort of EoE patients, the majority had normal esophageal motility studies, although a subset of these patients had some esophageal dysmotility. It is unlikely that esophageal dysmotility is a major contributing factor to dysphagia, although it is reasonable to consider esophageal manometry testing in EoE patients to identify potential abnormalities of the smooth muscle esophagus.

  5. Esophageal bypass after failed chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matono, Satoru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Mori, Naoki; Nagano, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiromasa; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal stenosis and/or fistula often occur after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for unresectable esophageal cancer. In such patients, an esophageal stent can help achieve oral intake. However an esophageal stent cannot be inserted where there is complete stenosis or where the tumor is located. In such cases, esophageal bypass surgery may be necessary. Here, we investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients who underwent esophageal bypass surgery in our institution. We reviewed 10 cases of esophageal bypass surgery (gastric tube in 8 cases, colon in 2 cases) after CRT for unresectable esophageal cancer, between 2001 and 2009. There were 5 of stenosis-only cases, 4 fistula-only cases, and 1 case of stenosis and fistula. There were postoperative complications in 5 cases (50%), and all these were treated conservatively and healed. The median survival from surgery to peroral intake was 20 days (range 9-90 days), and the median survival after starting peroral intake was 130 days (range 48-293 days). Esophageal bypass surgery can achieve good performance status and improve peroral intake. (author)

  6. Esophageal Rupture as a Primary Manifestation in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vernon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is a chronic inflammatory process characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and, histologically, by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. In adults, it commonly presents with dysphagia, food impaction, and chest or abdominal pain. Chronic inflammation can lead to diffuse narrowing of the esophageal lumen which may cause food impaction. Endoscopic procedures to relieve food impaction may lead to complications such as esophageal perforation due to the friability of the esophageal mucosa. Spontaneous transmural esophageal rupture, also known as Boerhaave’s syndrome, as a primary manifestation of EoE is rare. In this paper, we present two adult patients who presented with esophageal perforation as the initial manifestation of EoE. This rare complication of EoE has been documented in 13 other reports (11 adults, 2 children and only 1 of the patients had been previously diagnosed with EoE. A history of dysphagia was present in 1 of our patients and in the majority of previously documented patients. Esophageal perforation is a potentially severe complication of EoE. Patients with a history of dysphagia and patients with spontaneous esophageal perforation should warrant an evaluation for EoE.

  7. Perianal implantation of bioengineered human internal anal sphincter constructs intrinsically innervated with human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Shreya; Miyasaka, Eiichi A; Gilmont, Robert R; Somara, Sita; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Bitar, Khalil N

    2014-04-01

    The internal anal sphincter (IAS) is a major contributing factor to pressure within the anal canal and is required for maintenance of rectoanal continence. IAS damage or weakening results in fecal incontinence. We have demonstrated that bioengineered, intrinsically innervated, human IAS tissue replacements possess key aspects of IAS physiology, such as the generation of spontaneous basal tone and contraction/relaxation in response to neurotransmitters. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of implantation of bioengineered IAS constructs in the perianal region of athymic rats. Human IAS tissue constructs were bioengineered from isolated human IAS circular smooth muscle cells and human enteric neuronal progenitor cells. After maturation of the bioengineered constructs in culture, they were implanted operatively into the perianal region of athymic rats. Platelet-derived growth factor was delivered to the implanted constructs through a microosmotic pump. Implanted constructs were retrieved from the animals 4 weeks postimplantation. Animals tolerated the implantation well, and there were no early postoperative complications. Normal stooling was observed during the implantation period. At harvest, implanted constructs were adherent to the perirectal rat tissue and appeared healthy and pink. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed neovascularization. Implanted smooth muscle cells maintained contractile phenotype. Bioengineered constructs responded in vitro in a tissue chamber to neuronally evoked relaxation in response to electrical field stimulation and vasoactive intestinal peptide, indicating the preservation of neuronal networks. Our results indicate that bioengineered innervated IAS constructs can be used to augment IAS function in an animal model. This is a regenerative medicine based therapy for fecal incontinence that would directly address the dysfunction of the IAS muscle. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Breathing and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Doctor Relaxation is the absence of tension in muscle groups and a minimum or absence ... Drill Meditation Progressive Muscle Relaxation Minimizing Shortness of Breath Visualization This information has been approved by Shelby ...

  9. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Yook; Choi, Woo Suk; Nam, Kyung Jin; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    The authors performed 27 fluoroscopically guided balloon dilatation in 12 patients of esophageal stricture during recent 3 years. The causes of esophageal stricture were corrosive esophagitis (N=2) and congenital narrowing (N=1), including postoperative narrowing in achalasia (N=3), esophageal varix (N=3), lye stricture (N=2) and esophageal cancer (N=1). Successful dilatation of the stricture was achieved during the procedure in 10 patients(83%). Major complication such as esophageal rupture was not found. The authors conclude that fluoroscopically guided esophageal balloon dilatation is a safe and effective method for treatment of symptomatic esophageal strictures.

  10. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Yook; Choi, Woo Suk; Nam, Kyung Jin; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1990-01-01

    The authors performed 27 fluoroscopically guided balloon dilatation in 12 patients of esophageal stricture during recent 3 years. The causes of esophageal stricture were corrosive esophagitis (N=2) and congenital narrowing (N=1), including postoperative narrowing in achalasia (N=3), esophageal varix (N=3), lye stricture (N=2) and esophageal cancer (N=1). Successful dilatation of the stricture was achieved during the procedure in 10 patients(83%). Major complication such as esophageal rupture was not found. The authors conclude that fluoroscopically guided esophageal balloon dilatation is a safe and effective method for treatment of symptomatic esophageal strictures

  11. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-01-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression

  12. Regulation and dysregulation of esophageal peristalsis by the integrated function of circular and longitudinal muscle layers in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-09-01

    Muscularis propria throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract including the esophagus is comprised of circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Based on the studies conducted in the colon and the small intestine, for more than a century, it has been debated whether the two muscle layers contract synchronously or reciprocally during the ascending contraction and descending relaxation of the peristaltic reflex. Recent studies in the esophagus and colon prove that the two muscle layers indeed contract and relax together in almost perfect synchrony during ascending contraction and descending relaxation of the peristaltic reflex, respectively. Studies in patients with various types of esophageal motor disorders reveal temporal disassociation between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers. We suggest that the discoordination between the two muscle layers plays a role in the genesis of esophageal symptoms, i.e., dysphagia and esophageal pain. Certain pathologies may selectively target one and not the other muscle layer, e.g., in eosinophilic esophagitis there is a selective dysfunction of the longitudinal muscle layer. In achalasia esophagus, swallows are accompanied by the strong contraction of the longitudinal muscle without circular muscle contraction. The possibility that the discoordination between two muscle layers plays a role in the genesis of esophageal symptoms, i.e., dysphagia and esophageal pain are discussed. The purpose of this review is to summarize the regulation and dysregulation of peristalsis by the coordinated and discoordinated function of circular and longitudinal muscle layers in health and diseased states.

  13. Brain Abscess after Esophageal Dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, S; Grand, M; Michelsen, J

    2007-01-01

    Brain abscess formation is a serious disease often seen as a complication to other diseases and to procedures. A rare predisposing condition is dilatation therapy of esophageal strictures. A case of brain abscess formation after esophageal dilatations is presented. A 59-year-old woman was admitted...... with malaise, progressive lethargy, fever, aphasia and hemiparesis. Six days before she had been treated with esophageal dilatation for a stricture caused by accidental ingestion of caustic soda. The brain abscess was treated with surgery and antibiotics. She recovered completely. This clinical case...... illustrates the possible association between therapeutic esophageal dilatation and the risk of brain abscess formation....

  14. Endosonographic appearance of the anal sphincters in patients following colostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudol-Szopinska, I.; Jakubowski, W.; Szczepkowski, M.; Panorska, A.

    2002-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to visualize, by anal ultrasound (AUS), the suspected defects of the anal sphincters in the patients after colostomy and to analyze possible factors that could have led to such defects. Patients and methods. AUS, using a 7.0 MHz endorectal probe, was performed in a group of 25 patients with colostomy. The internal anal sphincter (IAS), external anal sphincter (EAS) and puborectalis muscle (PR) were visualized and the defects within them were qualified and quantified. For statistical analysis, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used. Results. The IAS was thin in all but three patients (22 patients; 88 %) with the mean thickness of 1.62 mm. A circular reduction of the thickness along the entire length of the IAS was seen in 20 patients (90.9 %). The echogenicity of the IAS was increased in 15 patients (60 %), and in 10 of them (66.6%), this defect embraced the whole length and circumference of the IAS. The margins of the IAS were not well-defined in 10 patients (40%). A significant correlation was found between the length of the patient's life with the stoma and the IAS echogenicity defect (p-value = 0.0001). No significant correlation was found between the dynamic examination, the IAS thickness and the IAS borders definition. Conclusion. The reduced thickness, increased echogenicity and borders definition defect of the IAS are seen in the patients after colostomy. The only significant correlation was confirmed between the length of the patient's life with the stoma and the IAS echogenicity defect. (author)

  15. The impact of anal sphincter injury on perceived body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, David; Khan, Rabia; Naidoo, Kristina; Kearney, Rohna; Myers, Jenny; Reid, Fiona

    2017-05-01

    Obstetric anal sphincter injury is common but the effect on body image is unreported. The aim of this study was to explore patient perceived changes in body image and other psychological aspects in women attending a perineal follow-up clinic. This retrospective study analysed women's responses to a self-reported questionnaire. Consecutive women with anal sphincter injury who attended a United Kingdom Maternity Hospital perineal follow-up clinic between January 1999 and January 2012 were identified and the records obtained and reviewed. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine variables influencing self-reported change in body image. Questionnaires and operation notes were analysed from 422 women who attended at a median of four months after delivery. 222 (53%) reported a change in body image with 80 (19%) reporting lower self-esteem and 75 (18%) a change in their personality due to the change in body image. 248 (59%) perceived an anatomical change due to the delivery. Factors associated with increased likelihood of reporting a change in body image were reporting a perceived change in anatomy due to the delivery, adjusted OR 6.11 (3.56-10.49), anal incontinence, OR 1.97 (1.16-3.36), and delivery by forceps, OR 2.59 (1.23-5.43). This is the first study to quantify body image changes in women after anal sphincter injury sustained in childbirth. These were found to be very common, affecting up to 50% of women. The study has several limitations but it does highlight the significant psychosocial problems of negative self-esteem and personality changes associated with a perceived change in body image that has not previously been reported. It also outlines the further research questions that need to be addressed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Irritable bowel syndrome and organic diseases: A comparative analysis of esophageal motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaidis, Thomas; Goetz, Martin; Gregor, Sebastian Paul; Hoffman, Arthur; Kouroumalis, Elias; Moehler, Markus; Galle, Peter Robert; Schwarting, Andreas; Kiesslich, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess the esophageal motility in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to compare those with patients with autoimmune disorders. METHODS: 15 patients with IBS, 22 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 19 with systemic sclerosis (SSc) were prospectively selected from a total of 115 patients at a single university centre and esophageal motility was analysed using standard manometry (Mui Scientific PIP-4-8SS). All patients underwent esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy before entering the study so that only patients with normal endoscopic findings were included in the current study. All patients underwent a complete physical, blood biochemistry and urinary examination. The grade of dysphagia was determined for each patient in accordance to the intensity and frequency of the presented esophageal symptoms. Furthermore, disease activity scores (SLEDAI and modified Rodnan score) were obtained for patients with autoimmune diseases. Outcome parameter: A correlation coefficient was calculated between amplitudes, velocity and duration of the peristaltic waves throughout esophagus and patients’ dysphagia for all three groups. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in the standard blood biochemistry and urinary analysis in all three groups. Patients with IBS showed similar pathologic dysphagia scores compared to patients with SLE and SSc. The mean value of dysphagia score was in IBS group 7.3, in SLE group 6.73 and in SSc group 7.56 with a P-value > 0.05. However, the manometric patterns were different. IBS patients showed during esophageal manometry peristaltic amplitudes at the proximal part of esophagus greater than 60 mmHg in 46% of the patients, which was significant higher in comparison to the SLE (11.8%) and SSc-Group (0%, P = 0.003). Furthermore, IBS patients showed lower mean resting pressure of the distal esophagus sphincter (Lower esophageal sphincter, 22 mmHg) when compared with SLE (28 mmHg, P = 0.037) and SSc (26 mmHg, P = 0.052). 23

  17. Two cases of esophageal eosinophilia: eosinophilic esophagitis or gastro-esophageal reflux disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE and gastro-esophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE. Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders. In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts.

  18. Narcolepsy-cataplexy and loss of sphincter control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vgontzas, A. N.; Sollenberger, S. E.; Kales, A.; Bixler, E. O.; Vela-Bueno, A.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the case of a 34-year-old man who presented intermittent faecal incontinence as a manifestation of cataplexy. The patient's sleep history was positive for the full narcoleptic tetrad (sleep attacks, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and hypnagogic hallucinations) while extensive neuropsychiatric work up was negative for any neurologic or psychiatric illness. Repeat polysomnograms (including a polysomnogram with a full seizure montage) were positive for pathologic sleepiness, but there was no evidence of a seizure disorder. The course of the patient's symptomatology and the favourable response of his symptoms to stimulants and imipramine support the theory that his intermittent loss of sphincter control is part of his narcolepsy-cataplexy. PMID:8796217

  19. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshitani, Takashi; Kuwata, Yoichiro; Kano, Kyoko

    1988-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma were treated by high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using specially designed balloon application at Hyogo medical Center for Adults. 32 patients were treated from January 1982 through July 1986. According to the stage of UICC (1978), 10 patients were classified into stage I, 7 into II, 13 into III and 2 into IV. Acturial 5 year survival rate was 17.9 % in all 32 patients and that of 23 patients who received radical radiotherapy was 24 %. Local CR rate was 66 %. However, since 9 (53 %) of 17 CR patients were relapsed, local control rate for 2 years was 25 %. Mild adverse effects were experienced in 9 (47 %) of 19 CR patients. Our balloon applicator was easily fixed, could have an adequate space from esophageal mucosa and clarify the tumor site by filling with 20 % gastrografin. It is concluded that high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation with our balloon applicator is an effective boost therapy and decline a lethal adverse effect in radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. (author)

  20. esophageal cancer: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Maddah Safaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Dysphagia is a common initial presentation in locally advanced esophageal cancer and negatively impacts patient quality of life and treatment compliance. To induce fast relief of dysphagia in patients with potentially operable esophageal cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy was applied prior to definitive radiochemotherapy. Material and methods : In this single arm phase II clinical trial between 2013 to 2014 twenty patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (17 squamous cell and 3 adenocarcinoma were treated with upfront 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy, followed by 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. Results : Tumor response, as measured by endoscopy and/or computed tomography scan, revealed complete remission in 16 and partial response in 4 patients (overall response rate 100%. Improvement of dysphagia was induced by brachytherapy within a few days and maintained up to the end of treatment in 80% of patients. No differences in either response rate or dysphagia resolution were found between squamous cell and adenocarcinoma histology. The grade 2 and 3 acute pancytopenia or bicytopenia reported in 4 patients, while sub-acute adverse effects with painful ulceration was seen in five patients, occurring after a median of 2 months. A perforation developed in one patient during the procedure of brachytherapy that resolved successfully with immediate surgery. Conclusions : Brachytherapy before EBRT was a safe and effective procedure to induce rapid and durable relief from dysphagia, especially when combined with EBRT.

  1. Doxycycline induced Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Karakus Yilmaz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis is a hazardous condition such as acid reflux of esophageal mucosa, infection, systemic diseases, radiation, drugs and trauma. Drug- induced esophagial injury (DIEI is a disease with the use of variety of drugs that caused serious damage and ulcer in the mucosa of the esophagus. The most commonly implicated drugs are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, chloride and especially antibiotics. Thirty-six year-old female patient presented to the emergency department with odynophagia during swallowing and complaining of retrosternal pain. One week before 100 mg doxycycline (2x1 PO for therapeutic abortion were prescribed. It was learned that in the third day of the initiation of medication, the patient\\'s symptoms began and stopped using drug by the fourth day due to advers effect of drugs, but her symptoms didn’t regressed although she didn’t use them. Endoscopy appointment was taken, proton pump inhibitor and antiacid treatment was given, than patient was discharged from the emergency department. In the endoscopy, 20 mm segment esophageal ulcer was seen approximately in the 30.th cm of the esophagius. DIEI is a relatively common, although under-recognized, so this case was presented for remainding DIEI to emergency medicine personals and reweiving its diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

  2. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the anal sphincter using a dedicated endoanal receiver coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSouza, N.M.; Williams, A.D.; Gilderdale, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    The use of a surface coil in MR imaging improves signal-to-noise ratio of adjacent tissues of interest. We therefore devised an endoanal receiver coil for imaging the anal sphincter. The probe is solid and re-usable: it comprises a saddle geometry receiver with integral tuning, matching and decoupling. It is placed in the anal canal and immobilised externally. Both in vitro and in vivo normal anatomy is identified. The mucosa is high signal intensity, the submucosa low signal intensity, the internal sphincter uniformly high signal intensity and the external sphincter low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. In females, the transverse perineal muscle bridges the inferior part of the external sphincter anteriorly. In perianal sepsis, collections and the site of the endoanal opening are identified. In early-onset fecal incontinence following obstetric trauma/surgery, focal sphincter defects are demonstrated; in late-onset fecal incontinence external sphincter atrophy is seen. In fecally incontinent patients with scleroderma, forward deviation of the anterior sphincter musculature with descent of rectal air and feces into the anal canal is noted. The extent of sphincter invasion is assessed in low rectal tumours. In children with congenital anorectal anomalies, abnormalities of the muscle components are defined using smaller-diameter coils. Such information is invaluable in the assessment and surgical planning of patients with a variety of anorectal pathologies. (orig.)

  3. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the anal sphincter using a dedicated endoanal receiver coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSouza, N.M.; Williams, A.D.; Gilderdale, D.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Imperial College School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-04-01

    The use of a surface coil in MR imaging improves signal-to-noise ratio of adjacent tissues of interest. We therefore devised an endoanal receiver coil for imaging the anal sphincter. The probe is solid and re-usable: it comprises a saddle geometry receiver with integral tuning, matching and decoupling. It is placed in the anal canal and immobilised externally. Both in vitro and in vivo normal anatomy is identified. The mucosa is high signal intensity, the submucosa low signal intensity, the internal sphincter uniformly high signal intensity and the external sphincter low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. In females, the transverse perineal muscle bridges the inferior part of the external sphincter anteriorly. In perianal sepsis, collections and the site of the endoanal opening are identified. In early-onset fecal incontinence following obstetric trauma/surgery, focal sphincter defects are demonstrated; in late-onset fecal incontinence external sphincter atrophy is seen. In fecally incontinent patients with scleroderma, forward deviation of the anterior sphincter musculature with descent of rectal air and feces into the anal canal is noted. The extent of sphincter invasion is assessed in low rectal tumours. In children with congenital anorectal anomalies, abnormalities of the muscle components are defined using smaller-diameter coils. Such information is invaluable in the assessment and surgical planning of patients with a variety of anorectal pathologies. (orig.) With 15 figs., 26 refs.

  4. [Design of an artificial sphincter system with bio-feedback function based on MSP430].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-kan; Yan, De-tian

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we advance a new treating method for rectectomy postoperative anus incontinence, which is called "artificial sphincter system with biofeedback-function". The system simulates the function of human's sphincter and has entered into a stage of simulation experiments on animals.

  5. Distribution and effect of galanin on gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi motility in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harling, H; Messell, T; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the occurrence and topographical distribution of galanin-like immunoreactivity (GAL-LI) in the porcine gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi and to investigate the pharmacologic effect of GAL on gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi motility. By radioimmunoassay the c...

  6. Management of achalasia: surgery or pneumatic dilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, Joel E.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2011-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder of unknown cause, characterised by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and impaired lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Patients present at all ages, primarily with dysphagia for solids/liquids and bland regurgitation. The diagnosis is suggested by

  7. The rare presentations of a large polyp and an esophageal carcinoma in heterotropic gastric mucosa: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alagozlu Hakan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM is commonly seen in the upper esophagus during endoscopyand is generally considered a benign disease. A hyperplastic polyp and an adenocarcinoma arising in heterotopic gastric mucosa are quite rare occurences. Case presentations We present two cases: The first is a patient who suffered from dysphagia because of a large hyperplastic polyp that arose from HGM; the polyp was excised endoscopically. Secondly, we report a rare case of adenocarcinoma arising in HGM of the cervical esophagus. Conclusion Morphologic changes or malignant transformation can develop in the inlet patch. Therefore, gastroenterologists should be aware of the possibility of HGM just distal to the upper esophageal sphincter.

  8. The Role of Esophageal Hypersensitivity in Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Ruffle, James K; Aziz, Qasim

    2017-02-01

    The Rome IV diagnostic criteria delineates 5 functional esophageal disorders which include functional chest pain, functional heartburn, reflux hypersensitivity, globus, and functional dysphagia. These are a heterogenous group of disorders which, despite having characteristic symptom profiles attributable to esophageal pathology, fail to demonstrate any structural, motility or inflammatory abnormalities on standard clinical testing. These disorders are associated with a marked reduction in patient quality of life, not least considerable healthcare resources. Furthermore, the pathophysiology of these disorders is incompletely understood. In this narrative review we provide the reader with an introductory primer to the structure and function of esophageal perception, including nociception that forms the basis of the putative mechanisms that may give rise to symptoms in functional esophageal disorders. We also discuss the provocative techniques and outcome measures by which esophageal hypersensitivity can be established.

  9. Hospital variation in sphincter preservation for elderly rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgion, Christopher M; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2014-09-01

    The primary goal of an operation for rectal cancer is to cure cancer and, where possible, preserve continence. A wide range of sphincter preservation rates have been reported. This study evaluated hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE), and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of elderly rectal cancer patients. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked data, we identified 4959 patients older than 65 y with stage I-III rectal cancer diagnosed from 2000-2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly patients with rectal cancer. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which combined explained 31% of procedure variation. Receipt of LE is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Change in cross-sectional area of esophageal muscle does not correlate with the outcome of achalasia after pneumatic balloon dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Dong Hyun; Choi, Yong Sung; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Eun Ran; Son, Hee Jung; Kim, Jae J; Rhee, Jong Chul; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2010-03-01

    Patients with achalasia have a thicker muscularis propria compared to normal patients. Because pneumatic balloon dilatation (PD) is an effective treatment for achalasia, the changes in the esophageal muscles after PD may predict treatment outcomes, if muscular change is of primary importance. In the present study, we aimed to observe the changes in esophageal muscle thickness following PD and assessed whether symptom relapse can be predicted on the basis of the esophageal muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), as measured by high-frequency intraluminal ultrasound (HFIUS). Fifteen patients treated by PD were studied and followed up for a median of 3.6 years. An HFIUS was done before PD and 6 months after PD. The esophageal muscle CSA measured at the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), and 3 and 6 cm above the LES, was used to see whether any association was present between symptom recurrence and the esophageal muscle CSA. A single PD resulted in a 2-year remission rate of 66%. A significance variance in change (-65%-248%) was noticed in the muscle CSA after PD. The predilation muscle CSA, post-dilation muscle CSA, and change in the muscle CSA after PD was not associated with symptom recurrence. Our findings suggest that measuring the muscle CSA does not help to predict treatment outcome. Muscular changes in achalasia might be just reactive changes.

  11. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Mediastinal Tumors Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Pleural Diseases Mesothelioma Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Overview The esophagus (ĕ-sof´ah-gus) is the hollow, muscular tube that moves food and liquid from your mouth to your stomach. If the ...

  12. Esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzinger, M A; Daneman, A

    1983-02-01

    The radiologic appearance of esophageal involvement due to eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 15-year-old boy is presented. The lower two thirds of the esophagus was narrowed and the peristalsis diminished. The mucosa appeared smooth. This is the fourth reported case of esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

  13. Advances in esophageal motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, André Jpm

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. RECENT

  14. Advances in esophageal motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, Andre J. P. M.

    Purpose of review Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. Recent

  15. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G.

    2017-01-01

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esoph...

  16. Mechanical relaxation in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The basic properties of glasses and the characteristics of mechanical relaxation in glasses were briefly reviewed, and then our studies concerned were presented. Experimental methods adopted were viscosity, internal friction, ultrasonic attenuation, and Brillouin scattering measurements. The specimens used were several kinds of inorganic, organic, and metallic glasses. The measurements were mainly carried out from the room temperature up to the glass transition temperature, and the relaxation time was determined as a function of temperature. The 'double relaxation' composed of two Arrhenius-type relaxations was observed in many materials. In both relaxations, the 'compensation effect' showing a correlation of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was observed. These results were explained by considering the 'complex relaxation' due to cooperative motions of atoms or group of atoms. Values of activation energy near the glass transition determined by the various experimental methods were compared with each other

  17. Esophageal scintigraphy: Applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, M.K.; Byrne, P.J.; Keeling, P.; Hennessy, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia, scleroderma, esophageal carcinoma, Barrett esophagus, and reflux esophagitis. We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery. (orig.)

  18. Esophageal scintigraphy: Applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, M.K.; Byrne, P.J.; Keeling, P.; Hennessy, T.P.

    1988-06-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia, scleroderma, esophageal carcinoma, Barrett esophagus, and reflux esophagitis. We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery.

  19. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis

  20. Imaging of Esophageal Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.; Lal, A.; Gulati, M.; Suri, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the various radiological abnormalities in patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis. Material and Methods: The case records of 23 patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis were evaluated retrospectively for various radiological abnormalities. Twenty-two patients had secondary involvement of esophagus in the form of direct extension of mediastinal and pulmonary tuberculosis or spinal tuberculosis. Only 1 patient had primary involvement of the esophagus with no evidence of disease elsewhere. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic and CT-guided biopsy/aspiration cytology in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Diagnosis was made on the basis of surgical biopsy of lymph node and autopsy in 1 patient each. In the remaining 8 patients the diagnosis was based on radiological and endoscopic findings and the response to antituberculous treatment. Results: Chest radiography (CXR) was abnormal in 65% patients. While the findings were non-conclusive for esophageal tuberculosis, characteristic lesions of tuberculosis in lungs or spine were suggestive of tuberculous etiology. In 15 patients, CT of the chest confirmed the corresponding CXR findings and also showed additional findings of mediastinal lymphadenopathy when CXR was normal. Fourteen patients showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy on CT of the chest. In all these patients, more than one group of lymph nodes was involved. The characteristic hypodense center of lymph nodes suggestive of tuberculosis was seen in 12 patients. Radiological abnormalities seen in barium swallow examination were extrinsic compression, traction diverticula, strictures, sinus/fistulous tracts, kinking and pseudotumor mass of esophagus in decreasing order of frequency. The middle third of the esophagus was found to be the most frequent site of involvement

  1. Esophageal diverticula and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbella, F A M; Dubecz, A; Patti, M G

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal diverticula are rare. The association of cancer and diverticula has been described. Some authors adopt a conservative non-surgical approach in selected patients with diverticula whereas others treat the symptoms by diverticulopexy or myotomy only, leaving the diverticulum in situ. However, the risk of malignant degeneration should be may be taken in account if the diverticulum is not resected. The correct evaluation of the possible risk factors for malignancy may help in the decision making process. We performed a literature review of esophageal diverticula and cancer. The incidence of cancer in a diverticulum is 0.3-7, 1.8, and 0.6% for pharyngoesophageal, midesophageal, and epiphrenic diverticula, respectively. Symptoms may mimic those of the diverticulum or underlying motor disorder. Progressive dysphagia, unintentional weight loss, the presence of blood in the regurgitated material, regurgitation of peaces of the tumor, odynophagia, melena, hemathemesis, and hemoptysis are key symptoms. Risk factors for malignancy are old age, male gender, long-standing history, and larger diverticula. A carcinoma may develop in treated diverticula, even after resection. Outcomes are usually quoted as dismal because of a delayed diagnosis but several cases of superficial carcinoma have been described. The treatment follows the same principals as the therapy for esophageal cancer; however, diverticulectomy is enough in cases of superficial carcinomas. Patients must be carefully evaluated before therapy and a long-term follow-up is advisable. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  2. Esophageal stent implantation for the treatment of esophageal strictures: its current situation and research progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Haidong; Guo Jinhe; Teng Gaojun

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal stent implantation has been the most common therapy for the treatment of malignant and benign esophageal stenosis. At present, this technique is widely used in treating advanced esophageal cancerous stricture, refractory esophageal benign stricture and all kinds of esophageal fistulae or perforation. This paper aims to make a comprehensive review of the current situation and research progress of the esophageal stent implantation in clinical practice. (authors)

  3. Relaxation characteristics of hastelloy X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko

    1980-02-01

    Relaxation diagrams of Hastelloy X (relaxation curves, relaxation design diagrams, etc.) were generated from the creep constitutive equation of Hastelloy X, using inelastic stress analysis code TEPICC-J. These data are in good agreement with experimental relaxation data of ORNL-5479. Three typical inelastic stress analyses were performed for various relaxation behaviors of the high-temperature structures. An attempt was also made to predict these relaxation behaviors by the relaxation curves. (author)

  4. Esophageal motor disorders: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Ibrahim; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight literature published during the last year in the context of previous knowledge. A number of novel techniques - high-resolution manometry, esophageal electrical impedance and intra-luminal ultrasound imaging - have improved our understanding of esophageal function in health and disease. Several studies address the function of longitudinal muscle layer of the esophagus in normal subjects and patients with motor disorders of the esophagus. Esophageal electrical impedance recordings reveal abnormal transit in patients with diffuse esophageal spasm, achalasia and patients with normal manometry. Loss of the mammalian Sprouty2 gene leads to enteric neuronal hyperplasia and esophageal achalasia. Several studies showed excellent long-term results of medical and surgical treatment of achalasia of the esophagus. For the first time, mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients are reported. Novel pharmacologic strategies in the treatment of reflux disease are highlighted. Several novel techniques, perfected during recent years, have improved our understanding of esophageal function and dysfunction. A number of important observations, reviewed here, provide important insight into the pathogenesis of esophageal motor disorders and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  5. Combined endoscopic approaches to the cardiac sphincter achalasia treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Klimenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess combined endoscopic approaches to the cardiac sphincter achalasia treatment. Results. There are preliminary results of treatment and methods of carrying out of combined endoscopic pneumocardiodilatation and injections of botulotoxin type A ‘Disport’ at achalasia cardia are described in the article. Aethio-pathogenetic aspects in the development of achalasia cardia, action of botulotoxin type A and balloon pneumocardiodilatation of the esophagus, were described. And modern roentgen-endoscopic classification of achalasia cardia was given. Prognostic estimation scale of possibility to implement further combined endoscopic or surgical treatment is defined and is being in subsequent working out. Conclusion. Described clinical cases most brightly demonstrate variety of clinical achalasia cardia manifestations and also determine of the earlier display of surgical treatment.

  6. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Sphincters Spasms with Botulinum Toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Brisinda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  7. Worldwide Experience with Erosion of the Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicuben, Evan T; Bell, Reginald C W; Jobe, Blair A; Buckley, F P; Daniel Smith, C; Graybeal, Casey J; Lipham, John C

    2018-04-17

    The magnetic sphincter augmentation device continues to become a more common antireflux surgical option with low complication rates. Erosion into the esophagus is an important complication to recognize and is reported to occur at very low incidences (0.1-0.15%). Characterization of this complication remains limited. We aim to describe the worldwide experience with erosion of the magnetic sphincter augmentation device including presentation, techniques for removal, and possible risk factors. We reviewed data obtained from the device manufacturer Torax Medical, Inc., as well as the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database. The study period was from February 2007 through July 2017 and included all devices placed worldwide. In total, 9453 devices were placed and there were 29 reported cases of erosions. The median time to presentation of an erosion was 26 months with most occurring between 1 and 4 years after placement. The risk of erosion was 0.3% at 4 years after device implantation. Most patients experienced new-onset dysphagia prompting evaluation. Devices were successfully removed in all patients most commonly via an endoscopic removal of the eroded portion followed by a delayed laparoscopic removal of the remaining beads. At a median follow-up of 58 days post-removal, there were no complications and 24 patients have returned to baseline. Four patients reported ongoing mild dysphagia. Erosion of the LINX device is an important but rare complication to recognize that has been safely managed via minimally invasive approaches without long-term consequences.

  8. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jundt K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12% to after childbirth (21 and 28% in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women.

  9. Sphincter preservation with preoperative radiation therapy and coloanal anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minsky, Bruce D; Cohen, Alfred M; Enker, Warren E; Paty, Philip

    1995-02-01

    Purpose: To determine if preoperative radiation therapy allows sphincter preservation in the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with the diagnosis of invasive, resectable, primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum limited to the pelvis were enrolled on a Phase I/II trial of preoperative radiation therapy plus low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. By preoperative assessment, all patients had invasive tumors (2: T2, 28: T3) involving the distal half of the rectum and required an abdominoperineal resection. The median tumor size was 4 cm (range: 1.5-6 cm) and the median distance from the anal verge was 4 cm (range: 3-7 cm). The whole pelvis received 46.8 Gy followed by a 3.60 Gy boost to the primary tumor bed. The median follow-up was 43 months (range: 6-82 months). Results: Of the 29 patients who underwent resection, 3 (10%) had a complete pathologic response and 24 (83%) were able to successfully undergo a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. The incidence of local failure was crude: 17% and 4-year actuarial: 23%. The 4-year actuarial survival was 75%. One patient developed a partial disruption of the anastomosis and two developed rectal stenosis. Analysis of sphincter function using a previously published scale was performed at the time of last follow-up in 22 of the 24 patients who underwent a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. Function was good or excellent in 77%. The median number of bowel movements/day was two (range: 1-6). Conclusions: This technique may be an alternative to an abdominoperineal resection in selected patients. Continued follow-up is needed to determine if this approach ultimately has similar local control and survival rates as an abdominoperineal resection.

  10. Sphincter preservation with preoperative radiation therapy and coloanal anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Enker, Warren E.; Paty, Philip

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if preoperative radiation therapy allows sphincter preservation in the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with the diagnosis of invasive, resectable, primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum limited to the pelvis were enrolled on a Phase I/II trial of preoperative radiation therapy plus low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. By preoperative assessment, all patients had invasive tumors (2: T2, 28: T3) involving the distal half of the rectum and required an abdominoperineal resection. The median tumor size was 4 cm (range: 1.5-6 cm) and the median distance from the anal verge was 4 cm (range: 3-7 cm). The whole pelvis received 46.8 Gy followed by a 3.60 Gy boost to the primary tumor bed. The median follow-up was 43 months (range: 6-82 months). Results: Of the 29 patients who underwent resection, 3 (10%) had a complete pathologic response and 24 (83%) were able to successfully undergo a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. The incidence of local failure was crude: 17% and 4-year actuarial: 23%. The 4-year actuarial survival was 75%. One patient developed a partial disruption of the anastomosis and two developed rectal stenosis. Analysis of sphincter function using a previously published scale was performed at the time of last follow-up in 22 of the 24 patients who underwent a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. Function was good or excellent in 77%. The median number of bowel movements/day was two (range: 1-6). Conclusions: This technique may be an alternative to an abdominoperineal resection in selected patients. Continued follow-up is needed to determine if this approach ultimately has similar local control and survival rates as an abdominoperineal resection

  11. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  12. Relaxation of Anisotropic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deubener, Joachim; Martin, Birgit; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2004-01-01

    . When the load was removed at room temperature a permanent optical anisotropy (birefringence) was observed only perpendicular to cylinder axis and the pressure direction indicating complete elimination of thermal stresses. Relaxation of structural anisotropy was studied from reheating experiments using...... the energy release, thermo-mechanical and optical relaxation behaviour are drawn....

  13. Relaxation techniques for stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... raise your heart rate. This is called the stress response. Relaxation techniques can help your body relax and lower your blood pressure ... also many other types of breathing techniques you can learn. In many cases, you do not need much ... including those that cause stress. Meditation has been practiced for thousands of years, ...

  14. Postpartum two- and three-dimensional ultrasound evaluation of anal sphincter complex in women with obstetric anal sphincter injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, C; Martínez-Franco, E; Wozniak, M M; Cassado, J; Santoro, G A; Elías, N; López, M; Palacio, M; Wieczorek, A P; Espuña-Pons, M

    2017-04-01

    To compare the sensitivity and specificity of two- (2D) and three- (3D) dimensional transperineal ultrasound (TPUS) and 3D endovaginal ultrasound (EVUS) with the gold standard 3D endoanal ultrasound (EAUS) in detecting residual defects after primary repair of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS). External (EAS) and internal (IAS) anal sphincters were evaluated by the four ultrasound modalities in women with repaired OASIS. 2D-TPUS was evaluated in real-time, whereas 3D-TPUS, 3D-EVUS and 3D-EAUS volumes were evaluated offline by six blinded readers. The presence/absence of any tear in EAS or IAS was recorded and defects were scored according to the Starck system. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated, using 3D-EAUS as reference standard. Inter- and intraobserver analyses were performed for all 3D imaging modalities. Association between patients' symptoms (Wexner score) and ultrasound findings (Starck score) was calculated. Images from 55 patients were analyzed. Compared with findings on 3D-EAUS, the agreement for EAS evaluation was poor for 3D-EVUS (κ = 0.01), fair for 2D-TPUS (κ = 0.30) and good for 3D-TPUS (κ = 0.73). The agreement for IAS evaluation was moderate for both 3D-EVUS (κ = 0.41) and 2D-TPUS (κ = 0.52) and good for 3D-TPUS (κ = 0.66). Good intraobserver (3D-EAUS, κ = 0.73; 3D-TPUS, κ = 0.78) and interobserver (3D-EAUS, κ = 0.68; 3D-TPUS, κ = 0.60) agreement was reported. Significant association between Starck and Wexner scores was found only for 3D-EAUS (Spearman's rho = 0.277, P = 0.04). 2D-TPUS and 3D-EVUS are not accurate modalities for the assessment of anal sphincters after repair of OASIS. 3D-TPUS shows good agreement with the gold standard 3D-EAUS and a high sensitivity in detecting residual defects. It, thus, has potential as a screening tool after primary repair of OASIS. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG

  15. Radiation induced esophageal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Endo, Mitsuo; Yamazaki, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was referred to us on Dec. 22, 1986 because of dysphagia and esophageal ulcer. She had a previous history of left radical mastectomy for breast cancer, followed by postoperative 60 Co irradiation to parasternal and supraclavicular regions with 50 Gy about 15 years before. UGIs and endoscopy showed a small ulcer surrounded by submucosal tumor-like protrusion in the esophagus at the thoracic inlet. Examination one month later revealed the ulcer which became larger despite medical treatment, now measuring 1 cm in diameter. Severe dysphagia continued. Right thoractomy and subtotal esophagectomy were performed on Jan 13, 1987. Histological examination revealed nonspecific ulcer, 5 cm in diameter, surrounded by fibrous granulation tissue. Proliferation of dilated capillary vessels was also seen in the bottom of the ulcer, the surrounding wall of which was free from remarkable infiltration of inflammatory cells. Based on these findings and previous medical history, the patient was diagnosed as having a postirradiation ulcer which appeared 15 years after irradiation. Dysphagia was considered due to esophageal dysfunction caused by severe fibrosis of the proper muscle layer. (author)

  16. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  17. [Surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia--20 years experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaramov, N; Sokolov, M; Angelov, K; Toshev, S; Petrov, B

    2009-01-01

    Achalasia comes from a Greek word that means "failure to relax." Cardiospasm and achalasia refer to the same condition. This report addresses esophageal achalasia--its history, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options. We report our experience in treating this disorder surgically using modified Heller myotomy combined or not with partial gastric fundoplication. 47 patients with achalasia surgically operated in 20-years period are reported by authors. These features make it reasonable to reasses the relative indications for surgery and nonsurgical therapy in achalasia of the esophagus.

  18. Esophageal dilations in eosinophilic esophagitis: A single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ukleja, Andrew; Shiroky, Jennifer; Agarwal, Amitesh; Allende, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To diagnose the clinical and histologic features that may be associated with or predictive of the need for dilation and dilation related complications; examine the safety of dilation in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE).

  19. Indications and interpretation of esophageal function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C Prakash; de Bortoli, Nicola; Clarke, John; Marinelli, Carla; Tolone, Salvatore; Roman, Sabine; Savarino, Edoardo

    2018-05-12

    Esophageal symptoms are common, and can arise from mucosal, motor, functional, and neoplastic processes, among others. Judicious use of diagnostic testing can help define the etiology of symptoms and can direct management. Endoscopy, esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM), ambulatory pH or pH-impedance manometry, and barium radiography are commonly used for esophageal function testing; functional lumen imaging probe is an emerging option. Recent consensus guidelines have provided direction in using test findings toward defining mechanisms of esophageal symptoms. The Chicago Classification describes hierarchical steps in diagnosing esophageal motility disorders. The Lyon Consensus characterizes conclusive evidence on esophageal testing for a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and establishes a motor classification of GERD. Taking these recent advances into consideration, our discussion focuses primarily on the indications, technique, equipment, and interpretation of esophageal HRM and ambulatory reflux monitoring in the evaluation of esophageal symptoms, and describes indications for alternative esophageal tests. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  20. Esophageal tissue engineering: a new approach for esophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-12-21

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds

  1. Nitrergic neuromuscular transmission in the mouse internal anal sphincter is accomplished by multiple pathways and postjunctional effector cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotherton, A. G.; Peri, L. E.; Sanders, K. M.; Ward, S. M.; Keef, K. D.

    2014-01-01

    The effector cells and second messengers participating in nitrergic neuromuscular transmission (NMT) were investigated in the mouse internal anal sphincter (IAS). Protein expression of guanylate cyclase (GCα, GCβ) and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase I (cGKI) were examined in cryostat sections with dual-labeling immunohistochemical techniques in PDGFRα+ cells, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), and smooth muscle cells (SMC). Gene expression levels were determined with quantitative PCR of dispersed cells from Pdgfrαegfp/+, KitcopGFP/+, and smMHCCre-egfp mice sorted with FACS. The relative gene and protein expression levels of GCα and GCβ were PDGFRα+ cells > ICC ≫ SMC. In contrast, cGKI gene expression sequence was SMC = ICC > PDGFRα+ cells whereas cGKI protein expression sequence was neurons > SMC ≫ ICC = PDGFRα+ cells. The functional role of cGKI was investigated in cGKI−/− mice. Relaxation with 8-bromo (8-Br)-cGMP was greatly reduced in cGKI−/− mice whereas responses to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were partially reduced and forskolin responses were unchanged. A nitrergic relaxation occurred with nerve stimulation (NS, 5 Hz, 60 s) in cGKI+/+ and cGKI−/− mice although there was a small reduction in the cGKI−/− mouse. Nω-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA) abolished responses during the first 20–30 s of NS in both animals. The GC inhibitor ODQ greatly reduced or abolished SNP and nitrergic NS responses in both animals. These data confirm an essential role for GC in NO-induced relaxation in the IAS. However, the expression of GC and cGKI by all three cell types suggests that each may participate in coordinating muscular responses to NO. The persistence of nitrergic NMT in the cGKI−/− mouse suggests the presence of a significant GC-dependent, cGKI-independent pathway. PMID:25301187

  2. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... excluded usually include dairy, egg, wheat, soy, peanut, tree nuts and fish/shellfish. These diets have been ... minorities » IgE ab to minor milk proteins may identify the proteins that are relevant to eosinophilic esophagitis » ...

  3. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Prevention of Esophageal Variceal Rebleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin-Ho Lo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate of rebleeding of esophageal varices remains high after cessation of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage. Many measures have been developed to prevent the occurrence of rebleeding. When considering their effectiveness in reduction of rebleeding, the associated complications cannot be neglected. Due to unavoidable high incidence of complications, shunt surgery and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy are now rarely used. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt was developed to replace shunt operation but is now reserved for rescue therapy. Nonselective beta-blockers alone or in combination with isosorbide mononitrate and endoscopic variceal ligation are currently the first choices in the prevention of variceal rebleeding. The combination of nonselective beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal ligation appear to enhance the efficacy. With the advent of newly developed measures, esophageal variceal rebleeding could be greatly reduced and the survival of cirrhotics with bleeding esophageal varices could thereby be prolonged.

  5. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. (Children University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium))

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  6. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to GERD medication Failure to thrive (poor growth, malnutrition and weight loss) When to see a doctor ... Originally, eosinophilic esophagitis was thought to be a childhood disease, but now it is known to be ...

  7. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as fatty or fried foods, tomato sauce, alcohol, chocolate, mint, garlic, onion, and caffeine, may make heartburn ... the waist up. Alternative medicine No alternative medicine therapies have been proved to treat eosinophilic esophagitis. Still, ...

  8. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2017-06-30

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus, absent contractility) and minor disorders of peristalsis (ineffective esophageal motility, fragmented peristalsis). The aim of this study was to review the current diagnosis and management of esophageal motility disorders other than achalasia.

  9. Understanding the sensory irregularities of esophageal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gregersen, Hans; Khan, Sheeba; Lelic, Dina; Lottrup, Christian; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms relating to esophageal sensory abnormalities can be encountered in the clinical environment. Such sensory abnormalities may be present in demonstrable disease, such as erosive esophagitis, and in the ostensibly normal esophagus, such as non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain. In this review, the authors discuss esophageal sensation and the esophageal pain system. In addition, the authors provide a primer concerning the techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of esophageal sensory function. Such technological advances, whilst not readily available in the clinic may facilitate the stratification and individualization of therapy in disorders of esophageal sensation in the future.

  10. Assessment of esophageal involvement in systemic sclerosis and morphea (localized scleroderma) by clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pH metric features: a prospective comparative hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Tasleem; Masood, Qazi; Singh, Jaswinder; Hassan, Iffat

    2015-02-15

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a generalized disorder of unknown etiology affecting the connective tissue of the body. It affects the skin and various internal organs. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is seen in almost 90% of the patients. Esophagus is the most frequently affected part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal motility disturbance classically manifests as a reduced lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and loss of distal esophageal body peristalsis. Consequently, SSc patients may be complicated by erosive esophagitis and eventually by Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Morphea, also known as localized scleroderma, is characterized by predominant skin involvement, with occasional involvement of subjacent muscles and usually sparing the internal organs. The involvement of esophagus in morphea has been studied very scarcely. The proposed study will investigate the esophageal involvement in the two forms of scleroderma (systemic and localized), compare the same and address any need of upper gastrointestinal evaluation in morphea (localized scleroderma) patients. 56 and 31 newly and already diagnosed cases of SSc and morphea respectively were taken up for the study. All the patients were inquired about the dyspeptic symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation and/or dysphagia). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring were done in 52, 47 and 41 patients of SSc; and 28, 25 and 20 patients of morphea respectively. Esophageal symptoms were present in 39 cases (69.6%) of SSc which were mild in 22 (39.3%), moderate in 14 (25%), severe in three (5.3%); while only four cases (7.1%) of morphea had esophageal symptoms all of which were mild in severity. Reflux esophagitis was seen in 17 cases (32.7%) of SSc and only two cases (7.14%) of morphea. Manometric abnormalities were seen in 32 cases (68.1%) of SSc and none in morphea. Ambulatory 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring documented abnormal reflux in

  11. The relaxation time approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gairola, R.P.; Indu, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    A plausible approximation has been made to estimate the relaxation time from a knowledge of the transition probability of phonons from one state (r vector, q vector) to other state (r' vector, q' vector), as a result of collision. The relaxation time, thus obtained, shows a strong dependence on temperature and weak dependence on the wave vector. In view of this dependence, relaxation time has been expressed in terms of a temperature Taylor's series in the first Brillouin zone. Consequently, a simple model for estimating the thermal conductivity is suggested. the calculations become much easier than the Callaway model. (author). 14 refs

  12. Overdiagnosis and rising rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS): time for reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioutis, D; Thakar, R; Sultan, A H

    2017-11-01

    To determine the accuracy of clinical diagnosis of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) using three-dimensional (3D) endoanal ultrasound (EA-US) and to compare symptoms and anal manometry measurements between women with anal sphincters adequately repaired and those with persistent anal sphincter defects. The EA-US images of women with clinically diagnosed and repaired OASIS, defined as third- or fourth-degree perineal tear, who attended the perineal clinic at Croydon University Hospital over a 10-year period (2003-2013) were reanalyzed by a single expert blind to symptoms and the results of clinical examination. St Mark's Incontinence Scores (SMIS) and anal manometry measurements were obtained and compared between women with an intact anal sphincter and those with an anal sphincter scar and between those with an intact anal sphincter and those with a defect. Anal manometry measurements were compared between women with an external anal sphincter (EAS) defect and those with an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. The images of 908 women were reanalyzed. No evidence of OASIS was found in 64 (7.0%) women, an EAS scar alone was detected in 520 (57.3%) and an anal sphincter defect in 324 (35.7%). Of the 324 women with a defect, 112 had an EAS defect, 90 had an IAS defect and 122 had a combined IAS and EAS defect. SMIS results were significantly higher in women with an anal sphincter defect compared with those with no evidence of OASIS (P = 0.018), but there was no significant difference in scores between women with an intact sphincter and those with an EAS scar only. Women with a defect had a significantly lower maximum resting pressure (median (range), 44 (8-106) vs 55 (29-86) mmHg; P 40) vs 25 (10-40) mm; P = 0.003). Seven percent of women with a clinical diagnosis of OASIS were wrongly diagnosed. We believe that this rate may differ from that of other units but training methods and competency assessment tools for the diagnosis and repair of OASIS need

  13. Genetics of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottyan, L C; Rothenberg, M E

    2017-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, allergic disease associated with marked mucosal eosinophil accumulation. EoE disease risk is multifactorial and includes environmental and genetic factors. This review will focus on the contribution of genetic variation to EoE risk, as well as the experimental tools and statistical methodology used to identify EoE risk loci. Specific disease-risk loci that are shared between EoE and other allergic diseases (TSLP, LRRC32) or unique to EoE (CAPN14), as well as Mendellian Disorders associated with EoE, will be reviewed in the context of the insight that they provide into the molecular pathoetiology of EoE. We will also discuss the clinical opportunities that genetic analyses provide in the form of decision support tools, molecular diagnostics, and novel therapeutic approaches.

  14. Hereditary vacuolar internal anal sphincter myopathy causing proctalgia fugax and constipation: a new case contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Portilla, Fernando; Borrero, Juan José; Rafel, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Hereditary anal sphincter myopathy is rare. We present a family with one affected member with proctalgia fugax, constipation and internal anal sphincter hypertrophy. Ultrastructural findings show vacuolization of smooth muscle cells without the characteristic polyglucosan inclusion. Further relief of symptoms was obtained using an oral calcium antagonist. Based on clinical presentation, endosonography and morphological findings, we consider our case is a histological variant of the vacuolar myopathy originally described.

  15. Distribution and Effect of Galanin on Gallbladder and Sphincter of Oddi Motility in the Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Harling

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the occurrence and topographical distribution of galanin-like immunoreactivity (GAL-LI in the porcine gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi and to investigate the pharmacologic effect of GAL on gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi motility. By radioimmunoassay the concentration of GAL-LI in the gallbladder was 2.75 ± 0.23, 9.73 ± 1.33 in the common bile duct and 5.10 ± 0.37 in the sphincter of Oddi (pmol/g ± SE. By immunohistochemistry GAL-LI was found exclusively in ganglionic cells and in nerve fibers among the smooth muscle bundles. Gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi pressures were recorded before and during 5-minute local intraarterial infusion of 4, 8, 19, 39, 78 and 194 ng GAL-Kg-1-min-1 in 12 anaesthetized pigs. GAL in doses ≥ 39 ng.kg-1.min-1 significantly reduced sphincter of Oddi phasic wave frequency (4.8 ± 0.4 vs. 2.1 ± 0.5; p = 0.004 and sphincter of Oddi motility index (70.2 ± 6.02 vs. 27.7 ± 8.3; p = 0.002 but did not affect gallbladder pressure. We conclude that the distribution of GAL-LI in the sphincter of Oddi and the effect that a pharmacologic dose of GAL has on sphincter of Oddi motor activity, suggests that GAL may be involved in the physiologic control of bile flow in the pig.

  16. NMR imaging of the anal levator and sphincter muscles in anorectal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hideyo; Maie, Masahiko; Ohnuma, Naomi; Etoh, Takao; Iwai, Jun

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the anal levater and sphincter muscles was obtained on 4 normal volunteers and 11 patients with postoperative anorectal malformations (including 8 supra-levator type and 3 low type). Balloon catheter were inserted into the rectum and marked it as the center of a anal canal. Four normal subjects revealed the levater and sphincter muscles were thick and well developed in all sections (Sagittal, Transevse, Coronal). In most of the supra-levator type of anorectal malformations, thin levator and sphincter muscles were observed by Sagittal and Coronal scans. Transeverse scan revealed that the neorectum was not effectively pull-throughed into the puborectal muscle in one patient. Coronal scan showed the dameged external sphincter muscle. In three low types of anorectal malformations, the levator and the sphincter muscles were all well developed, but in one patient the external sphincter muscle existed at the posterior part of the anal canal. These observations were usefull in managing the postoperative care of anorectal malformations. (author)

  17. Significance of the thickness of the anal sphincters with age and its relevance in faecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachrysostomou, M; Pye, S D; Wild, S R; Smith, A N

    1994-08-01

    Ultrasonographic studies in healthy volunteers showed that the external anal sphincter (EAS) and internal anal sphincter (IAS) thicknesses were inversely related at rest. The functional importance of the two sphincters in continence control was demonstrated in the relationship between the sum of the thicknesses of the two sphincters and the anal canal resting pressure. The aims of the present study were to assess the morphometric appearance of the anal sphincters by endosonography in faecally incontinent patients and to contrast this with that of older healthy subjects. Twenty-eight female patients with neurogenic faecal incontinence (FI) were studied. An older group of 7 healthy women, aged 41-75 years, and a young group of 11 nulliparous healthy women, aged 20-23 years, served as control groups. Anal endosonography was performed with a radial rotating endoprobe, with the subject in the left lateral position. Conventional anal manometry was performed in all subjects. The EAS in the FI group was thicker than the EAS in the old (p IAS thickness in the FI group did not differ from that in the older group. In both these groups the IAS was thicker than in the young women (p IAS in the FI group does not seem to compensate for function and results in a failure of the sphincter mechanism to maintain continence, whereas in healthy elderly subjects the increased IAS thickness appears to be compensatory and important for continence control.

  18. Frequency of operative trauma to anal sphincters: evaluation with endoanal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatiadis, Apostolos; Konstantinou, Evangelos; Theodosopoulou, Eleni; Mamoura, Konstantinia

    2002-01-01

    Sphincter trauma after anorectal surgery is usually asymptomatic. Frequency of trauma cannot be established with the clinical examination only. The frequency of operative sphincter defects and their correlation with disorders of continence was evaluated with the endoanal ultrasound. This study includes 123 subjects who had undergone anorectal surgery in the past and were examined with endoanal ultrasound for various indications such as continence disorders, recurrent fistula, idiopathic perineal pain, or simple postoperative follow-up. No subjects had isolated external anal sphincter defects. Nineteen of 123 patients (15%) had minor or major continence disorders, 55 patients (45%) had no sphincter defects, 42 (34%) had only internal anal sphincter (IAS) defects, and 26 (21%) had simultaneously external and internal anal sphincter (EAS) defects. The incidence of IAS and EAS trauma after Milligan-Morgan hemorrhoidectomy was 1/18 (5.5%) and 0/18 respectively; after fistula repair, 24/42 (57%) and 12/42 (29%); and after anal dilatation, 13/17 (76%) and 4/17 (24%). Sixteen of 26 patients (62%) with EAS trauma and 51/68 patients (75%) with IAS trauma did not report any disorders of continence. In patients with two or more operations, the frequency of IAS trauma was 74%, 30% for EAS trauma, and 26% for continence disorders.

  19. The diagnostic accuracy of endovaginal and transperineal ultrasound for detecting anal sphincter defects: The PREDICT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, A.-M., E-mail: annemarie.roos@gmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mayday University Hospital, Croydon (United Kingdom); Abdool, Z. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Sultan, A.H.; Thakar, R. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mayday University Hospital, Croydon (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Aim: To determine the accuracy and predictive value of transperineal (TPU) and endovaginal ultrasound (EVU) in the detection of anal sphincter defects in women with obstetric anal sphincter injuries and/or postpartum symptoms of faecal incontinence. Materials and methods: One hundred and sixty-five women were recruited, four women were excluded as they were seen years after their last delivery. TPU and EVU, followed by endonanal ultrasound (EAU), were performed using the B and K Viking 2400 scanner. Sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values with 95% confidence intervals, for detecting anal sphincter defects were calculated for EVU and TPU, using EAU as the reference standard. Results: On EAU a defect was found in 42 (26%) women: 39 (93%) had an external (EAS) and 23 (55%) an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. Analysable images of one level of the EAS combined with an analysable IAS were available in 140 (87%) women for EVU and in 131 (81%) for TPU. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of any defect was 48% (30-67%) and 85% (77-91%) for EVU and 64% (44-81%) and 85% (77-91%) for TPU, respectively. Conclusion: Although EAU using a rotating endoprobe is the validated reference standard in the identification of anal sphincter defects, it is not universally available. However while TPU and/or EVU with conventional ultrasound probes can be useful in identifying normality, for clinical purposes they are not sensitive enough to identify an underlying sphincter defect.

  20. The diagnostic accuracy of endovaginal and transperineal ultrasound for detecting anal sphincter defects: The PREDICT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, A.-M.; Abdool, Z.; Sultan, A.H.; Thakar, R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the accuracy and predictive value of transperineal (TPU) and endovaginal ultrasound (EVU) in the detection of anal sphincter defects in women with obstetric anal sphincter injuries and/or postpartum symptoms of faecal incontinence. Materials and methods: One hundred and sixty-five women were recruited, four women were excluded as they were seen years after their last delivery. TPU and EVU, followed by endonanal ultrasound (EAU), were performed using the B and K Viking 2400 scanner. Sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values with 95% confidence intervals, for detecting anal sphincter defects were calculated for EVU and TPU, using EAU as the reference standard. Results: On EAU a defect was found in 42 (26%) women: 39 (93%) had an external (EAS) and 23 (55%) an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. Analysable images of one level of the EAS combined with an analysable IAS were available in 140 (87%) women for EVU and in 131 (81%) for TPU. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of any defect was 48% (30-67%) and 85% (77-91%) for EVU and 64% (44-81%) and 85% (77-91%) for TPU, respectively. Conclusion: Although EAU using a rotating endoprobe is the validated reference standard in the identification of anal sphincter defects, it is not universally available. However while TPU and/or EVU with conventional ultrasound probes can be useful in identifying normality, for clinical purposes they are not sensitive enough to identify an underlying sphincter defect.

  1. Sphincter saving anorectoplasty (SSARP for the reconstruction of Anorectal malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paudel Bishnu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This report describes a new technique of sphincter saving anorectoplasty (SSARP for the repair of anorectal malformations (ARM. Methods Twenty six males with high ARM were treated with SSARP. Preoperative localization of the center of the muscle complex is facilitated using real time sonography and computed tomography. A soft guide wire is inserted under image control which serves as the route for final pull through of bowel. The operative technique consists of a subcoccygeal approach to dissect the blind rectal pouch. The separation of the rectum from the fistulous communication followed by pull through of the bowel is performed through the same incision. The skin or the levators in the midline posteriorly are not divided. Postoperative anorectal function as assessed by clinical Wingspread scoring was judged as excellent, good, fair and poor. Older patients were examined for sensations of touch, pain, heat and cold in the circumanal skin and the perineum. Electromyography (EMG was done to assess preoperative and postoperative integrity of external anal sphincter (EAS. Results The patients were separated in 2 groups. The first group, Group I (n = 10, were newborns in whom SSARP was performed as a primary procedure. The second group, Group II (n = 16, were children who underwent an initial colostomy followed by delayed SSARP. There were no operative complications. The follow up ranged from 4 months to 18 months. Group I patients have symmetric anal contraction to stimulation and strong squeeze on digital rectal examination with an average number of bowel movements per day was 3–5. In group II the rate of excellent and good scores was 81% (13/16. All patients have an appropriate size anus and regular bowel actions. There has been no rectal prolapse, or anal stricture. EAS activity and perineal proprioception were preserved postoperatively. Follow up computed tomogram showed central placement the pull through bowel in between

  2. Endoscopic Assessment of Children with Esophageal Atresia: Lack of Relationship of Esophagitis and Esophageal Metaplasia to Symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Castilloux

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Late complications of esophageal atresia (EA, particularly esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus, are increasingly being recognized. With the exception of patients with dysphagia associated with esophageal stricture, it is unknown whether patient symptomatology can predict endoscopic findings.

  3. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal ... What symptoms are displayed by a child with GERD? While GER and EER in children often cause ...

  4. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Esophagitis (EoE) (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology) Also in Spanish Latest News Eosinophilic Esophagitis May ... Pediatric and Adolescent Patients (American College of Gastroenterology) Topic Image Related Health Topics Eosinophilic Disorders Esophagus Disorders ...

  5. Esophageal Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of esophageal cancer has risen in recent decades, coinciding with a shift in histologic type and primary tumor location. Find evidence-based information on esophageal cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  6. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class II...

  7. Histopathologic profile of esophageal atresia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dUMAss Memorial Pathology, UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, ..... 2 Yokoi A, Nishijima E. Long-term complications of esophageal atresia. Nihon ... long upper esophageal pouch and short gap, associated with left congenital.

  8. Esophageal perforation during or after conformal radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haiyan; Ma Xiumei; Ye Ming; Hou Yanli; Xie Huaying; Bai Yongrui

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors and prognosis for patients with esophageal perforation occurring during or after radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 322 patients with esophageal carcinoma. These patients received radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal tumors, residual tumors after operation, or local recurrence. Of these, 12 had radiotherapy to the esophagus before being admitted, 68 patients had concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and 18 patients had esophageal perforation after RT (5.8%). Covered self-expandable metallic stents were placed in 11 patients. Two patients continued RT after stenting and control of infection; one of these suffered a new perforation, and the other had a massive hemorrhage. The median overall survival was 2 months (0-3 months) compared with 17 months in the non-perforation group. In univariate analysis, the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) being ≤ 70, age younger than 60, T4 stage, a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus, extracapsular lymph nodes (LN) involving the esophagus, a total dose > 100 Gy (biologically effective dose -10 ), and CRT were risk factors for perforation. In multivariate analysis, age younger than 60, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, T4 stage, and a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus were risk factors. In conclusion, patients with T4 stage, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, and those receiving a second course of RT should be given particular care to avoid perforation. The prognosis after perforation was poor. (author)

  9. Investigating Esophageal Stent-Placement Outcomes in Patients with Inoperable Non-Cervical Esophageal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Forootan, Mojgan; Tabatabaeefar, Morteza; Mosaffa, Nariman; Ashkalak, Hormat Rahimzadeh; Darvishi, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Background: Esophageal stent insertion in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer is usually accompanied with relatively high adverse symptoms and even mortality. The current study aims at investigating the outcomes of esophageal stenting in patients with inoperable non-cervical esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: The current descriptive-analytical research evaluates 25 patients with esophageal cancer. The stent was placed in esophagus based upon endoscopy analysis with or without fl...

  10. Sacral neuromodulation effects on periurethral sensation and urethral sphincter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Jonathan L; Kenton, Kimberly; Greer, W Jerod; Ramm, Olga; Szychowski, Jeff M; Wilson, Tracey; Richter, Holly E

    2013-06-01

    To characterize the effect of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) on urethral neuromuscular function. Following IRB approval, women with refractory overactive bladder (OAB) underwent standardized urethral testing prior to and after Stage 1 SNM implantation. Periurethral sensation was measured using current perception thresholds (CPT). Striated urethral sphincter activity was quantified using concentric needle electromyography (CNE) and Multi-Motor Unit Action Potential (MUP) analysis software. Nonparametric analyses were used to characterize pre/post changes with intervention. Baseline CPT and CNE findings were compared between SNM responders and non-responders. Twenty-seven women were enrolled in this pilot study with a mean age of 61 ± 13 years. Twenty of 26 women (76.9%) responded to SNM and went to Stage 2 permanent implantation. Four (14.8%) withdrew after Stage 1 implantation; three of the four withdrawals had not had therapeutic responses to SNM. CPT and CNE parameters did not significantly differ from baseline 2 weeks after SNM. Pre-SNM urethral sensation was not significantly different between responders and non-responders. However, responders had larger amplitude, longer duration and more turns and phases at baseline approaching significance, reflecting more successful urethral reinnervation, than non-responders. SNM does not alter urethral neuromuscular function 2 weeks post Stage 1 implantation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Rumination syndrome: when the lower oesophageal sphincter rises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourcerol, Guillaume; Dechelotte, Pierre; Ducrotte, Philippe; Leroi, Anne Marie

    2011-07-01

    Rumination syndrome is an uncommon condition characterised by the self-induced regurgitation from the stomach to the mouth of recently ingested meal that is chewed and reswallowed. Rumination is caused by a voluntary rise in intra-abdominal and intra-gastric pressure leading to the reflux of the gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the precise mechanisms preventing reflux at the gastro-oesophageal junction during the rise in intra-gastric pressure remains unknown. In 5 patients, rumination episodes were monitored using combined multiple intra-luminal impedance monitoring, high resolution manometry, and video-fluoroscopic recording. We showed that the gastro-oesophageal junction moved from the abdominal cavity into the thorax creating a "pseudo-hernia". This occurred at a range of 1.4 ± 0.3 s before the rise in intra-oesophageal pressure and the gastro-oesophageal reflux. This displacement of the gastro-oesophageal junction into thorax, rather than a lower oesophageal sphincter opening, explains the mechanism of voluntary regurgitations occurring during rumination syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope is a nonpowered device that is inserted into a patient's esophagus to...

  13. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F.

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis

  14. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. (Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  15. Management of congenital esophageal stenosis associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim The aim of this work was to study the incidence, management of congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) associated with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), and its impact on esophageal stricture (ES) after primary repair. Patients and methods From January 2006 to December 2014, ...

  16. Congenital esophageal atresia with tracheo-esophageal fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Chung Sik

    1970-01-01

    Three cases of esophageal atresia with tracheo-esophageal fistula. 1). Case 1: A female infant birth Wt. 1.95 kg , Apgar Score 10, Skeletal anomalies, was delivered after a pregnancy compeicated by hydroamnious on Aug. 17, 1970. The family history was not contributory. 2) Case 2: A male infant birth Wt. 2.8 kg , Apgar Score 8, was forcep delivered after a pregnancy on Feb. 8, 1970. This infant is twin. The family history was not contributory. 3) Case 3: A female infant birth Wt. 2.22 kg , Apgar Score 10, was C-section after a pregnancy on May, 16. 1970. The family history was not contributory. All cases: After 24 hours 5% glucose solution was given and immediately vomited and some of it regurgitating through the nose and mouth with associated cyanosis and dyspnea. A catheter was inserted through the nose into the esophagus under diagnosis of the esophageal atresia

  17. Esophageal Motor Abnormalities in Patients With Scleroderma: Heterogeneity, Risk Factors, and Effects on Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Michael D; Umar, Sarah B; Griffing, W Leroy; DiBaise, John K; Lacy, Brian E; Vela, Marcelo F

    2017-02-01

    Systemic scleroderma (SSc) is associated with esophageal aperistalsis and hypotensive esophagogastric junction pressure, although there could be a gradation in esophageal motor dysfunction. We characterized esophageal motor function by high-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) and assessed associations between SSc severity, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and HRM findings in patients. We performed a prospective study of 200 patients with SSc and 102 patients without SSc (controls) who underwent HRM at Mayo Clinic Arizona from May 2006 through January 2015. We used data on integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, and distal latency to classify esophageal motility disorders according to the Chicago Classification v 3.0. A subset of subjects (n = 122) completed SSc-specific gastrointestinal symptom and HRQOL questionnaires. HRM findings, symptoms, and HRQOL data were compared among diffuse SSc, limited SSc, and control subjects. Categorical variables were compared by using the χ 2 or Fisher exact test; continuous variables were compared by using Mann-Whitney or Kruskal-Wallis test. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between severity of esophageal dysmotility and baseline clinical factors. Among patients with SSc, 83 had diffuse SSc (42%), and 117 had limited SSc (58%). Absent contractility was more frequent in patients with SSc than in controls (56% vs 13%; P esophagus (esophagogastric junction pressure with absent contractility) was only observed in 33% of patients (34% with diffuse SSc vs 32% limited SSc) (P = .880). Severe esophageal dysmotility was associated with disease duration, interstitial lung disease, and higher gastrointestinal symptom scores (P esophagus in only one-third of patients with SSc. Esophageal motor function appears to be heterogeneous in SSc. Esophageal dysmotility reduces HRQOL in patients with SSc. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Avi Lemberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE is an emerging disease characterised by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf, lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with TGF-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE.

  19. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavioli, Margherita; Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible

  20. Current Therapeutic Options for Esophageal Motor Disorders as Defined by the Chicago Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Frank; Roman, Sabine

    2015-07-01

    With the development of high-resolution manometry and specific metrics to characterize esophageal motility, the Chicago Classification has become the gold standard for the diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders. Major and significant disorders, that is, never observed in healthy subjects, are achalasia, esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, distal esophageal spasm, absent peristalsis, and hypercontractile (Jackhammer) esophagus. Achalasia subtyping is relevant to predict the response to endoscopic and surgical therapies as several studies suggest that, pneumatic dilation is less effective than Heller myotomy, in type III achalasia. Peroral endoscopic myotomy, initially developed in expert centers, is a promising technique for the treatment of achalasia. The medical therapeutic options for distal esophageal spasm and hypercontractile esophagus are smooth muscle relaxants and pain modulators. Intraesophageal injection of botulinum toxin might be an interesting option for treatment of these disorders but further studies are required to determine the optimal injection protocol and the best candidates based on manometric patterns. The treatment of hypotensive motility disorders is disappointing and relies mainly on dietary and lifestyle changes as no effective esophageal prokinetic is currently available.

  1. A fully resolved fluid-structure-muscle-activation model for esophageal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Wenjun; Bhalla, Amneet P. S.; Griffith, Boyce E.; Johnson, Mark; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2013-11-01

    Esophageal transport is a mechanical and physiological process that transfers the ingested food bolus from the pharynx to the stomach through a multi-layered esophageal tube. The process involves interactions between the bolus, esophageal wall composed of mucosal, circular muscle (CM) and longitudinal muscle (LM) layers, and neurally coordinated muscle activation including CM contraction and LM shortening. In this work, we present a 3D fully-resolved model of esophageal transport based on the immersed boundary method. The model describes the bolus as a Newtonian fluid, the esophageal wall as a multi-layered elastic tube represented by springs and beams, and the muscle activation as a traveling wave of sequential actuation/relaxation of muscle fibers, represented by springs with dynamic rest lengths. Results on intraluminal pressure profile and bolus shape will be shown, which are qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. Effects of activating CM contraction only, LM shortening only or both, for the bolus transport, are studied. A comparison among them can help to identify the role of each type of muscle activation. The support of grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902 from NIH is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgia Totonelli; Panagiotis Maghsoudlou; Jonathan M Fishman; Giuseppe Orlando; Tahera Ansari; Paul Sibbons; Martin A Birchall

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement.Various surgical techniques,such as gastric and colonic interposition,are standards of treatment,but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems.Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function.We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering,discuss its implications,compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future.Medline,Embase,the Cochrane Library,National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms:stem cell and esophagus,esophageal replacement,esophageal tissue engineering,esophageal substitution.Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information.All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed.Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation.When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality.Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration,whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit.Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds,but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution.Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds prior to implantation is a

  3. Refractory benign esophageal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractory benign esophageal stricture (RBES is a frequently encountered problem worldwide. These strictures arise from various causes such as corrosive injury, radiation therapy, peptic origin, ablative therapy, and after surgery. Most strictures can be treated successfully with endoscopic dilatation using bougies or balloons, with only a few complications. Those patients who fail after serial dilatation with bougies or balloons will come to the category of refractory strictures. Dilatation combined with intralesional steroid injections can be considered for peptic strictures, whereas incisional therapy has been demonstrated to be effective for short anastomotic strictures. When these therapeutic options do not resolve the stenosis, stent placement should be considered. Self-bougienage can be proposed to a selected group of patients with a proximal stenosis. Most of the patients of RBES respond to above-mentioned treatment and occasional patient may require surgery as the final treatment option. This review aims to provide a comprehensive approach toward endoscopic management of RBESs based on current literature and personal experience.

  4. Esophageal cancer in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samawi, Abdullah S; Aulaqi, Saleh M

    2014-03-01

    To document the age and gender distribution, histopathologic type as well as grading characteristics of Esophageal Cancer (EC) in Yemen. A case series. Department of Pathology, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Yemen, from January 2005 to December 2011. Three hundred twenty five cases of EC were included for review. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and the cases were categorized into Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC). Out of the 325 EC cases, 163 (50%) were SCC (females 67%, males 33%) and 158 (49%) were ADC (females 30%, males 70%). The rest of the cases were 2 adenosquamous carcinoma and 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The mean age, for SCC was 60 years while the mean age for ADC was 65 years. The peak incidence for SCC was found in the age groups of fifth and sixth decades for females and in fifth and seventh decades for males. The maximum number of patients with ADC was seen in sixth and seventh decades for both gender. Well-differentiated histological grading accounted for 247 (77%) for both genders and types. The moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated accounted, for 17% and 6% respectively. The EC in Yemen had a predominance of SCC in female patients and predominance of ADC in male patients which was usually of a well-differentiated grade.

  5. Esophageal cancer in yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samawi, A.S.A.; Aulaqi, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    To document the age and gender distribution, histopathologic type as well as grading characteristics of Esophageal Cancer (EC) in Yemen. Study Design: A case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Yemen, from January 2005 to December 2011. Methodology: Three hundred twenty five cases of EC were included for review. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and the cases were categorized into Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC). Results: Out of the 325 EC cases, 163 (50%) were SCC (females 67%, males 33%) and 158 (49%) were ADC (females 30%, males 70%). The rest of the cases were 2 adenosquamous carcinoma and 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The mean age, for SCC was 60 years while the mean age for ADC was 65 years. The peak incidence for SCC was found in the age groups of fifth and sixth decades for females and in fifth and seventh decades for males. The maximum number of patients with ADC was seen in sixth and seventh decades for both gender. Well-differentiated histological grading accounted for 247 (77%) for both genders and types. The moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated accounted, for 17% and 6% respectively. Conclusion: The EC in Yemen had a predominance of SCC in female patients and predominance of ADC in male patients which was usually of a well-differentiated grade. (author)

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux after esophageal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Osamu; Yokoi, Hideki; Maebeya, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    By means of esophageal transit scintigram using 99m Tc-DTPA, 15 patients (13 esophageal carcinomas and 2 cardia carcinomas) were studied, in whom esophagogastric anastomosis was done according to the posterior invagination anastomosis technique we had devised. In all 8 patients with anastomosis at cervical region, gastroesophageal reflux was not seen on both scintigrams before and after meals, and the average pressure gradient of high pressure zone at anastomosis was 39.8 cmH 2 O. In 2 of 7 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, the scintigram before meals showed severe reflux. and the endoscopic findings showed diffuse and moderate erosion in the esophageal mucosa. The average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 6.5 cmH 2 O. In these 2 patients, the new fornix with a sharp angle of His was not formed. In the remaining 5 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, reflux was not seen on the scintigram before meals. However, in 2 of them, the scintigram after meal and endoscopic examination revealed mild reflux and mild esophagitis respectively. Furthermore in one patient very mild reflux was observed only on the scintigram after meals but the endoscopic findings showed the normal esophageal mucosa. In these 5 patients, the average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 17.0 cmH 2 O, which was significantly higher (p<0.01) than that in 2 patients with severe reflux and was significantly lower (p<0.01) than the mean value of high pressure zone in 8 patients with cervical anastomosis. In conclusion, it is presumed that the formation of a large fornix enough to store food and a sharp angle of His are important factors in maintaining an anti-reflux mechanism. The esophageal transit scintigram was proved to be an excellent technique in detecting and evaluating quantitatively gastroesophageal reflux. (author)

  7. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De

    1990-01-01

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used

  8. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-04-15

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used.

  9. The Aerospace Medical Panel Symposium on Motion Sickness: Mechanisms, Prediction, Prevention, and Treatment Held at Williamsburg, Virginia on 3-4 May 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    esophageal reflux , "wet burping", and sensations of heartburn and stomach discomfort in some subjects. The behavior of the abdominal organs and of food...buoyant forces on &as bubbles could conceivably result in a tendency for gas bubbles to remain trapped in the itomach, and for burping to produce gastro ...antagonist known to increase the amplitud~e of gastric contractions and tbe tone of the esophageal sphincter$ relax the pyloric sphincter, and increase

  10. The impact of incontinence etiology on artificial urinary sphincter outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R. Miller

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the impact of incontinence etiology on artificial urinary sphincter (AUS device outcomes. Materials and Methods: We identified 925 patients who underwent primary AUS placement from 1983 to 2011. The etiology of incontinence was categorized as radical prostatectomy alone, radical prostatectomy with radiation, benign prostate resection, and those with cryotherapy as a salvage prostate cancer treatment. Hazard regression and competing risk analyses were used to determine the association of the etiology of incontinence with device outcomes. Results: The distribution of the 4 etiologies of incontinence included: 598 patients (64.6% treated with prostatectomy alone, 206 (22.2% with prostatectomy and pelvic radiation therapy, 104 (11.2% with benign prostate resection, and 17 (1.8% with prior cryotherapy. With a median follow-up of 4.9 years (interquartile range, 1.2–8.8 years, there was significant difference in the cumulative incidence of device infection/urethral erosion events between the four etiologies (p=0.003. On multivariable analysis, prior cryotherapy (reference prostatectomy alone; hazard ratio [HR], 3.44; p=0.01, older age (HR, 1.07; p=0.0009 and history of a transient ischemic attack (HR, 2.57; p=0.04 were associated with an increased risk of device infection or erosion. Notably, pelvic radiation therapy with prostatectomy was not associated with an increased risk of device infection or erosion (reference prostatectomy alone, p=0.30. Conclusions: Compared to prostatectomy alone, prior treatment with salvage cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer was associated with an increased risk of AUS infection/erosion, whereas radiation (in addition to prostatectomy was not.

  11. Substance P stimulates the opossum sphincter of Oddi in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, J E; Cho, N; Zenilman, M E; Barteau, J A; Soper, N J; Becker, J M

    1990-09-01

    We have previously shown that substance P (SP) regulates sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility in vivo. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Our aim was to develop an in vitro model to measure spikeburst (SB) an contractile frequency (CMC) of the SO and to characterize further SP effects. In 16 opossums, SO rings were excised, mounted within a Kreb's tissue bath with bipolar electrodes and force transducers, allowed to equilibrate, and exposed to increasing SP concentrations with washout between each test solution. Spikeburst and CMC frequencies were recorded on a polygraph, quantitated, expressed as differences before and during SP, and statistically analyzed with Student's test. Although SP induced a significant concentration-dependent increase in phasic SB frequency and CMC, the amplitude of concentrations was not affected by SP. A close correlation was found between basal and SP-stimulated SB and CMC, suggesting myoelectric and mechanical coupling. Previous exposure of SO to SP antagonist [D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11]-SP significantly decreased the response to SP. Tetrodotoxin (TTX), did not affect the delta CMC response to SP. In conclusion an in vitro preparation was developed to study the effect of SP on the SO. Substance P increased SB and CMC of the SO in a concentration-dependent fashion, thus acting as a stimulatory peptide. Perfusion of SO rings with SP antagonist had no effect on basal CMC but significantly inhibited the action of SP in a competitive manner. The effect of SP was not altered by TTX. These data suggest that the action of SP on the SO is primarily myogenic.

  12. Radiation Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, W. Y.; Suh, C. O.; Kim, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    63 patients who were irradiated with a goal of long term control among 101 patients with esophageal cancer seen during an 11 years period between Jan, 1970 and Dec, 1980 at Yonsei Cancer Center in Seoul, Korea have retrospectively analysed. 52(82.5%) among the 63 patients were confirmed to have epidermoid carcinoma in the histology. The actuarial 3 and 5 years survival rates of 17 cased of T1, esophageal cancer were 24.7% and 20.8%. Statistically, there was no significant difference in survival rate according to tumor location (p>0.05)

  13. Reflux esophagitis revisited: Prospective analysis of radiologic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    A prospective radiologic-endoscopic study of the esophagogastric region in 266 patients, including 206 normals and 60 with esophagitis, is reported. The endoscopic classification grading severity of esophagitis was grade 1-normal; grades 2. 3. and 4-mild, moderate, and severe esophagitis, respectively. Radiology detected 22% of patient with mild esophagitis, 83% with moderate esophagitis, and 95% with severe esophagitis. Although hiatal hernia was present in 40% of normals and 89% with esophagitis, absence of radiographic hiatal hernia excluded esophagitis with 95% accuracy. The implications of this study regarding the role of radiology in evaluating patient with suspected reflux esophagitis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  14. Factors Determining the Inter-observer Variability and Diagnostic Accuracy of High-resolution Manometry for Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sung Eun; Cho, Yu Kyung; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Park, Moo In; Hwang, Jin Won; Jang, Jae-Sik; Oh, Minkyung

    2018-01-30

    Although high-resolution manometry (HRM) has the advantage of visual intuitiveness, its diagnostic validity remains under debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of HRM for esophageal motility disorders. Six staff members and 8 trainees were recruited for the study. In total, 40 patients enrolled in manometry studies at 3 institutes were selected. Captured images of 10 representative swallows and a single swallow in analyzing mode in both high-resolution pressure topography (HRPT) and conventional line tracing formats were provided with calculated metrics. Assessments of esophageal motility disorders showed fair agreement for HRPT and moderate agreement for conventional line tracing (κ = 0.40 and 0.58, respectively). With the HRPT format, the k value was higher in category A (esophagogastric junction [EGJ] relaxation abnormality) than in categories B (major body peristalsis abnormalities with intact EGJ relaxation) and C (minor body peristalsis abnormalities or normal body peristalsis with intact EGJ relaxation). The overall exact diagnostic accuracy for the HRPT format was 58.8% and rater's position was an independent factor for exact diagnostic accuracy. The diagnostic accuracy for major disorders was 63.4% with the HRPT format. The frequency of major discrepancies was higher for category B disorders than for category A disorders (38.4% vs 15.4%; P < 0.001). The interpreter's experience significantly affected the exact diagnostic accuracy of HRM for esophageal motility disorders. The diagnostic accuracy for major disorders was higher for achalasia than distal esophageal spasm and jackhammer esophagus.

  15. Hereditary internal anal sphincter myopathy causing proctalgia fugax and constipation. A newly identified condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, M A; Hoyle, C H; Burleigh, D E; Law, P J; Swash, M; Martin, J E; Nicholls, R J; Northover, J M

    1991-03-01

    A newly identified myopathy of the internal anal sphincter is described. In the affected family, at least one member from each of five generations had severe proctalgia fugax; onset was usually in the third to fifth decades of life. Three members of the family have been studied in detail. Each had severe pain intermittently during the day and hourly during the night. Constipation was an associated symptom, in particular difficulty with rectal evacuation. Clinically the internal anal sphincter was thickened and of decreased compliance. The maximum anal canal pressure was usually increased with marked ultraslow wave activity. Anal endosonography confirmed a grossly thickened internal anal sphincter. Two patients were treated by internal anal sphincter strip myectomy; one showed marked improvement and one was relieved of the constipation but had only slight improvement of the pain. The hypertrophied muscle in two of the patients showed unique myopathic changes, consisting of vacuolar changes with periodic acid-Schiff-positive polyglycosan bodies in the smooth muscle fibers and increased endomysial fibrosis. In vitro organ-bath studies showed insensitivity of the muscle to noradrenaline, isoprenaline, carbachol, dimethylpiperazinium, and electrical-field stimulation. Immunohistochemical studies for substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, galanin, neuropeptide Y, and vasoactive intestinal peptide showed staining in a similar distribution to that in control tissue. A specific autosomal-dominant inherited myopathy of the internal anal sphincter that causes anal pain and constipation has been identified and characterized.

  16. Multidisciplinary training in perineal care during labor and delivery for the reduction of anal sphincter injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jonathan; Gundry, Rowan; Young, Helen; Naguib, Adel

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether the introduction of a multidisciplinary intrapartum perineal-care training program reduced the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in patients undergoing vaginal deliveries. A prospective observational cohort study enrolled women undergoing vaginal deliveries at a district general hospital maternity unit in the United Kingdom between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2014. All women experiencing obstetric anal sphincter injuries during the study period were identified and the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries before (2012-2013) a multidisciplinary training program was implemented was compared with the rate after (2013-2014) implementation using logistic regression analysis. The study enrolled 4920 patients. Following the implementation of the training program, the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries decreased from 4.8% to 3.1% of vaginal deliveries (odds ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.493-0.899; P = 0.008). The integration of intrapartum perineal-care training into mandatory annual staff training was associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cultured smooth muscle cells of the human vesical sphincter are more sensitive to histamine than are detrusor smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Jochen; Oberbach, Andreas; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe

    2006-05-01

    To compare histamine receptor expression in cultured smooth muscle cells from the human detrusor and internal sphincter using receptor-specific agonists. Smooth muscle cells from the bladder dome and internal sphincter were cultured from 5 male patients undergoing cystectomy for bladder cancer therapy. Calcium transients in cells stimulated with carbachol, histamine, histamine receptor 1 (H1R)-specific heptanecarboxamide (HTMT), dimaprit (H2R), and R-(alpha)-methylhistamine (H3R) were measured by calcium imaging. Histamine receptor proteins were detected by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. H1R, H2R, and H3R expression was found in tissue and cultured cells. Carbachol stimulated equal numbers of detrusor and sphincter cells (60% and 51%, respectively). Histamine stimulated significantly more cells than carbachol in detrusor (100%) and sphincter (99.34%) cells. Calcium responses to carbachol in detrusor and sphincter cells were comparable and did not differ from those to histamine in detrusor cells. However, histamine and specific agonists stimulated more sphincter cells than did carbachol (P <0.001), and the calcium increase was greater in sphincter cells than in detrusor cells. Single cell analysis revealed comparable H2R responses in detrusor and sphincter cells, but H1R and H3R-mediated calcium reactions were significantly greater in sphincter cells. Histamine very effectively induces calcium release in smooth muscle cells. In sphincter cells, histamine is even more effective than carbachol regarding the number of reacting cells and the intracellular calcium increase. Some of the variability in the outcome of antihistaminic interstitial cystitis therapies might be caused by the ineffectiveness of the chosen antihistaminic or unintentional weakening of sphincteric function.

  18. Esophageal Replacement for Long-Gap Esophageal Atresia in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    humility to know when to consider a replacement procedure (3). To replace the esophagus of a baby is a major decision in many pediatric surgical units world over. Fortunately, the need for this procedure has decreased in the recent years due to the increase in the variety of techniques of lengthening the upper esophageal ...

  19. Relaxed Binaural LCMV Beamforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutrouvelis, A.; Hendriks, R.C.; Heusdens, R.; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new binaural beamforming technique, which can be seen as a relaxation of the linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) framework. The proposed method can achieve simultaneous noise reduction and exact binaural cue preservation of the target source, similar to the

  20. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-12-21

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE.

  1. Incontinence after primary repair of obstetric anal sphincter tears is related to relative length of reconstructed external sphincter: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norderval, S; Røssaak, K; Markskog, A; Vonen, B

    2012-08-01

    To determine if anatomic primary repair with end-to-end reconstruction of the external anal sphincter (EAS) in its full length combined with separate repair of coexisting internal anal sphincter (IAS) tear, when present, results in less incontinence and better anal sphincter integrity compared with conventional primary end-to-end repair in which the IAS is not actively reconstructed. Women who sustained third- or fourth-degree obstetric tears were included prospectively in the study following anatomic primary repair. Women treated with conventional primary repair prior to the study period comprised the control group. Three-dimensional endoanal ultrasonography (3D-EAUS) images were classified according to the EAUS defect score, and incontinence according to St Mark's score. Sixty-three women were included in the study group and 61 in the control group, with mean follow-up times of 11 and 21 months, respectively. Among women who had not delivered vaginally prior to the tear, St Mark's score ≥ 3 was reported by 9.6% (5/52) in the study group and 37.5% (15/40) in the control group at follow-up (P = 0.002). The corresponding numbers among women who had previously delivered vaginally were 36.4% (4/11) and 42.9% (9/21), respectively (non-significant). St Mark's score correlated with the EAUS defect score (P = 0.017). An EAS defect exceeding 50% of the sphincter length was significantly less common in the study group, and in a multivariable logistic regression model, mode of repair (anatomic vs conventional) was the only factor explaining the difference in EAS sphincter length between the two groups (P = 0.007). Improved continence status after anatomic primary repair was associated with a better longitudinal reconstruction of the EAS, while the integrity of the IAS did not differ between the groups. Women with a history of vaginal delivery prior to the sphincter tear had an inferior outcome regardless of mode of repair. Copyright © 2012 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley

  2. Esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction is often associated with coexistent abnormal esophageal body motility and abnormal bolus transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, E; Gideon, R M; Sloan, J; Katz, P O

    2017-10-01

    Currently, the diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders is in part based upon a hierarchical algorithm in which abnormalities of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) is prioritized. An important metric in evaluating the EGJ is the integrated relaxation pressure (IRP). Patients who do not have achalasia but are found to have an elevated IRP are diagnosed with EGJ outflow obstruction. It has been our observation that a subset of these patients also has a second named motility disorder and may also have abnormal bolus transit. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of abnormal body motility and or abnormal bolus movement in patients with EGJ outflow obstruction. Further, in an effort to evaluate the potential clinical value in measuring bolus transit as a complement to esophageal manometry, specifically in patients with EGJ outflow obstruction, we analyzed the presenting symptoms of these patients. A total of 807 patients with a mean age of 53 years completed esophageal function testing with impedance monitoring and high-resolution manometry between January 2012 and October 2016. There were 74 patients with achalasia who were excluded from the study. Of the remaining 733 patients, 138 (19%) had an elevated IRP and were given a diagnosis of EGJ outflow obstruction. Among these patients, 56 (40%) were diagnosed with an abnormal motility pattern to liquids (ineffective esophageal motility = 28, distal esophageal spasm = 19, Jackhammer = 6), of which 44 (76%) had abnormal bolus transit to liquids, viscous, or both. In contrast, there were 82 patients with EGJ outflow obstruction and normal esophageal motility, of which 33 (40%) had abnormal bolus transit. Patients with preserved esophageal motility and EGJ outflow obstruction were then evaluated. Of the 733 patients, 299 (40%) had intact esophageal motility. Of the 299 patients with normal esophageal motility, 56 patients had an elevated IRP, of which 16 (28%) had abnormal bolus transit. There were 243 (33

  3. Disorders of the pelvic floor and anal sphincters; a gastroenterologist’s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn M.M. Quigley, MD FRCP FACP FACG FRCPI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The integration and coordination of the musculature of the pelvic floor and the anal sphincters is critical to two important physiological functions: defecation and continence. Consequently, disorders affecting the pelvic floor muscles, the anal sphincters, their innervation or their precise coordination will, depending on their nature, result either in obstructed defecation or fecal incontinence. Both of these disorders are much more common in females and the latter, in particular, is linked with parity. While the symptomatology, presentation and optimal mode of investigation of fecal incontinence are well standardized, considerable debate and controversy continues to surround the contributions of pelvic floor and anal sphincter dysfunction to chronic constipation and the optimal clinical approach to their investigation remains to be defined. In appropriately chosen cases surgical intervention may provide the best outcome for sufferers from incontinence; biofeedback approaches may be of value in both incontinence and obstructed defecation and surgery has little role to play in the latter.

  4. Teaching the pharyngeal flap and sphincter pharyngoplasty: The sticky note method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jake J; Jabbour, Noel

    2015-11-01

    To demonstrate a cost-effective, quick, and easily reproducible three-dimensional sticky note model to enhance the understanding and conceptualization of the geometry and steps of the pharyngeal flap and sphincter pharyngoplasty. The method involves making specified incisions and rearrangements of readily available components, including disposable clear plastic cups, yellow and pink sticky notes, and white paper. Once assembly is complete, further incisions and remodeling are performed to simulate a pharyngeal flap or sphincter pharyngoplasty. The cost of the materials to make one model was $0.94. Average construction time was less than 10 min. This three-dimensional model is an efficient, interactive, and simple visual aid to teach surgical trainees the geometry and steps of the pharyngeal flap and sphincter pharyngoplasty. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Idiopathic detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in neurologically normal patients with voiding abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, T M; Djurhuus, J C; Schrøder, H D

    1982-01-01

    Symptomatology and clinical manifestations of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia are described in 23 patients without neurological disease. Their cardinal symptoms were recurrent cystitis, enuresis, frequent voiding, back pain during voiding and anal discomfort. The major objective finding was vesico......Symptomatology and clinical manifestations of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia are described in 23 patients without neurological disease. Their cardinal symptoms were recurrent cystitis, enuresis, frequent voiding, back pain during voiding and anal discomfort. The major objective finding...... was vesicoureteral reflux in 11 cases with kidney scarring in 10. Bladder trabeculation was found in 13 patients, bladder hyperreflexia in 8, and significant residual urine in 16 patients. The etiology of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in non-neurological patients is discussed. By means of exclusion it is most...

  6. Esophageal transit scintigraphy and structured questionnaire in patients with systemic sclerosis with endoscopically proven reflux esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Inaki, Anri; Hiramatsu, Takashi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Kinuya, Seigo

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal complications are common in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms and dysmotility was examined in endoscopically confirmed patients suspected of having reflux esophagitis. A total of 32 patients with limited and diffuse type SSc (lSSc, dSSc) were examined based on a structured questionnaire score (QS) of GER symptoms, retention fraction of esophageal scintigraphy at 90 s (R 90 ) and gastric emptying time. The QS was significantly higher in the reflux esophagitis group than in the non-esophagitis group (5.4±3.5, 1.4±2.9, P=0.003). When the non-esophagitis group was further divided into lSSc and dSSc groups, R 90 was higher in the reflux esophagitis group (31±18%) and the non-esophagitis group with dSSc (34±32%) than in the non-esophagitis group with lSSc (8±3%, P=0.02). Both high R 90 ≥15% and QS≥4 indicated reflux esophagitis. Conversely, both normal R 90 and QS indicated no reflux esophagitis. A combination of esophageal scintigraphy and structured questionnaire demonstrated different aspects of esophageal dysfunction, namely dysmotility and GER. Patients with high QS and dysmotility may be indicated for further evaluation including endoscopic examination and medical treatment.(author)

  7. Long-term outcome of peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia in patients with previous Heller myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Helle Ø; Kirkegård, Jakob; Kjær, Daniel Willy; Mortensen, Frank Viborg; Kunda, Rastislav; Bjerregaard, Niels Christian

    2017-06-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an emerging procedure in the treatment of esophageal achalasia, a primary motility disorder. However, the long-term outcome of POEM in patients, who have previously undergone a Heller myotomy, is unknown. Using a local database, we identified patients with esophageal achalasia, who underwent POEM. We compared patients with a previous Heller myotomy to those, who had received none or only non-surgical therapy prior to the POEM procedure. We conducted follow-up examinations at 3, 12, and 24 months following the procedure. We included 66 consecutive patients undergoing POEM for achalasia, of which 14 (21.2 %) had undergone a prior Heller myotomy. In both groups, the preoperative Eckardt score was 7. Postoperatively, the non-Heller group experienced a more pronounced symptom relief at both 3-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up compared with the Heller group, and there was a tendency for the effect of POEM to reduce over time. We suggest that there is a correlation between preoperative measurements of gastroesophageal sphincter pressures and the chance of a successful POEM. POEM has a place in the treatment of esophageal achalasia in patients with a prior Heller myotomy and persistent symptoms as it is a safe procedure with acceptable long-term results.

  8. Alginate antacid (Gaviscon DA) chewable tablets reduce esophageal acid exposure in Chinese patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and heartburn symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yao Zong; Fang, Jing Yuan; Zou, Duo Wu; Levinson, Nigel; Jenner, Bartosz; Wilkinson, Joanne

    2016-11-01

    To assess the efficacy of Gaviscon Double Action (DA) alginate antacid chewable tablets for reducing esophageal acid exposure in Chinese patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Altogether 44 patients reporting moderate to severe heartburn symptoms underwent two pH monitoring visits. The treatment sequence was randomized to patients received DA alginate antacid or placebo at one visit and the alternate treatment 7 days later. After a standardized reflux-provoking meal, patients took four tablets of DA alginate antacid or placebo. Esophageal pH was measured for 4 h post-dosing using an electrode positioned 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. The primary end-point was the percentage of 4-h post-dosing period with pH acid reflux episodes (pH reflux time and DeMeester scores. All 44 patients completed the study and provided data for analysis. With DA alginate antacid, the mean percentage time with pH acid exposure without serious clinically relevant health risks. These findings suggest DA alginate antacid tablets are appropriate for treating acid reflux in Chinese GERD patients with heartburn symptoms. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohira, Masaichi; Yamashita, Yoshito; Matsumura, Yumiko; Yamazaki, Masanao; Kubo, Naoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2002-01-01

    The current status and future prospects of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer are reviewed herein. In Western countries, CRT is performed for every stage of esophageal cancer and it has been reported that in definitive CRT series the complete response rate is 30 to 50%, the mean survival rate more than twelve months, and the in 2-year survival rate about 30%, while in neoadjuvant CRT series the pathological response rate is 20 to 50%, the mean survival period more than twenty months, and the 3-year survival 30 to 40%. On the other hand, as esophageal cancer is treated mainly by surgery in Japan, CRT is applied in patients with tumors invading adjacent organs, and a high pathological complete response rate is reported in some neoadjuvant studies. Although both definitive and neoadjuvant CRT increases the response rate and improves local tumor control, CRT is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity, especially in neoadjuvant series. More effective and less toxic CRT regimens, using new chemotherapeutic agents such as nedaplatin and paclitaxel and new irradiation protocol such as accelated hyperfractionation, are needed to improve the prognosis of patients with advanced esophageal cancer. (author)

  10. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  11. Esophageal manifestations of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucendo, A J

    2011-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may often be associated with various motor disorders affecting the different segments of the digestive tract, including the esophagus. Although it has not been universally reported, some available evidences indicate that pediatric and adult celiac patients could manifest a higher frequency of esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptoms compared to nonceliac patients. In addition, several published studies have consistently shown the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in rapidly controlling esophageal symptoms and in preventing their recurrence. Since the participation of gluten in the esophageal symptoms of CD seems clear, its intimate mechanisms have yet to be elucidated, and several hypothesis have been proposed, including the specific immune alterations characterizing CD, the reduction in nutrient absorption determining the arrival of intact gluten to distal gastrointestinal segments, and various dysregulations in the function of gastrointestinal hormones and peptides. Recent studies have suggested the existence of a possible relationship between CD and eosinophilic esophagitis, which should be more deeply investigated. © 2011 Copyright the Author. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  12. Influence of preoperative (hyperthermic) radiochemotherapy on manometric anal sphincter function in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzmann, J.; Huenerbein, M.; Slisow, W.; Rau, B.; Gellermann, J.; Wust, P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) followed by curative surgery is a well-accepted therapeutic option in the treatment of advanced rectal cancer. Usually, the anal sphincter is located in the irradiation area of a preoperative RCT regime. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of preoperative RCT on anal sphincter function. Patients and methods: between 1994 and 2000, 102 patients with rectal cancer stage uT3/uT4 were analyzed. All patients underwent radiotherapy with 45 Gy (5 x 1.8 Gy) including two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (folinic acid) chemotherapy. 46 patients were treated additionally with up to five sessions of locoregional hyperthermia. The sphincter function was analyzed by perfusion manometry before preoperative therapy and 4 weeks after pretreatment had been finished. For statistics, the Wilcoxon signed rank test and mann-whitney U-test were used (SPSS 9.0 for Windows trademark). Results: the mean value of all 102 patients showed a significant reduction of the mean maximum resting pressure from 97 to 89 mmHg (p = 0.02). For the mean maximal squeeze pressure no significant difference could be shown (178 vs. 176 mmHg). For patients with distal (≤ 7.5 cm from anal verge) tumors the difference was highly significant (92 vs. 79 mmHg). Locoregional hyperthermia had no additional influence on sphincter function. Conclusion: preoperative RCT impairs sphincter function especially in patients with distal tumors. In addition, RCT could have a negative influence on the continence of patients who received sphincter-preserving surgery. (orig.) [de

  13. Smooth muscle enfoldment internal sphincter construction after intersphincteric resection for rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiying Jin

    Full Text Available To assess smooth muscle enfoldment and internal sphincter construction (SMESC for improvement of continence after intersphincteric resection (ISR for rectal cancer.Twenty-four Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into a conventional ISR group and experimental SMESC group, with 12 pigs in each group. The proximal sigmoid colon was anastomosed directly to the anus in the ISR group. In the SMESC group, internal sphincter construction was performed. At 12 weeks before and after surgery, rectal resting pressure and anal canal length were assessed. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to determine the thickness of the internal sphincter. After the animals were sacrificed, the rectum and anus were resected and pathological examinations were performed to evaluate the differences in sphincter thickness and muscle fibers.All 24 animals in the SMESC group and the ISR group survived the surgery. Twelve weeks post-surgery, the rectal resting pressure, length of the anal high-pressure zone and the postoperative internal sphincter thickness for the ISR group were significantly lower than for the SMESC group. There was a thickened area (about 2 cm above the anastomotic stoma among animals from the SMESC group; in addition, the smooth muscles were significantly enlarged and enfolded when compared to the ISR group.This animal model study shows that the SMESC procedure achieved acceptable reconstruction of the internal anal neo-sphincter (IAN/S, without increasing surgical risk. However, the findings in this experimental animal model must be confirmed by clinical trials to determine the safety and efficacy of this procedure in clinical practice.

  14. Smooth muscle enfoldment internal sphincter construction after intersphincteric resection for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Heiying; Zhang, Bei; Yao, Hang; Du, Yonghong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Leng, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    To assess smooth muscle enfoldment and internal sphincter construction (SMESC) for improvement of continence after intersphincteric resection (ISR) for rectal cancer. Twenty-four Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into a conventional ISR group and experimental SMESC group, with 12 pigs in each group. The proximal sigmoid colon was anastomosed directly to the anus in the ISR group. In the SMESC group, internal sphincter construction was performed. At 12 weeks before and after surgery, rectal resting pressure and anal canal length were assessed. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to determine the thickness of the internal sphincter. After the animals were sacrificed, the rectum and anus were resected and pathological examinations were performed to evaluate the differences in sphincter thickness and muscle fibers. All 24 animals in the SMESC group and the ISR group survived the surgery. Twelve weeks post-surgery, the rectal resting pressure, length of the anal high-pressure zone and the postoperative internal sphincter thickness for the ISR group were significantly lower than for the SMESC group. There was a thickened area (about 2 cm) above the anastomotic stoma among animals from the SMESC group; in addition, the smooth muscles were significantly enlarged and enfolded when compared to the ISR group. This animal model study shows that the SMESC procedure achieved acceptable reconstruction of the internal anal neo-sphincter (IAN/S), without increasing surgical risk. However, the findings in this experimental animal model must be confirmed by clinical trials to determine the safety and efficacy of this procedure in clinical practice.

  15. The diagnostic accuracy of endovaginal and transperineal ultrasound for detecting anal sphincter defects: The PREDICT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, A-M; Abdool, Z; Sultan, A H; Thakar, R

    2011-07-01

    To determine the accuracy and predictive value of transperineal (TPU) and endovaginal ultrasound (EVU) in the detection of anal sphincter defects in women with obstetric anal sphincter injuries and/or postpartum symptoms of faecal incontinence. One hundred and sixty-five women were recruited, four women were excluded as they were seen years after their last delivery. TPU and EVU, followed by endonanal ultrasound (EAU), were performed using the B&K Viking 2400 scanner. Sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values with 95% confidence intervals, for detecting anal sphincter defects were calculated for EVU and TPU, using EAU as the reference standard. On EAU a defect was found in 42 (26%) women: 39 (93%) had an external (EAS) and 23 (55%) an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. Analysable images of one level of the EAS combined with an analysable IAS were available in 140 (87%) women for EVU and in 131 (81%) for TPU. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of any defect was 48% (30-67%) and 85% (77-91%) for EVU and 64% (44-81%) and 85% (77-91%) for TPU, respectively. Although EAU using a rotating endoprobe is the validated reference standard in the identification of anal sphincter defects, it is not universally available. However while TPU and/or EVU with conventional ultrasound probes can be useful in identifying normality, for clinical purposes they are not sensitive enough to identify an underlying sphincter defect. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Artificial urethral sphincters: Value of plain film radiography in evaluation of prosthesis malfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.C.; Hansen, M.E.; Webster, G.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    Case records were reviewed to determine the diagnostic efficacy of plain radiographs in the evaluation of inflatable artificial urethral sphincters. Of 84 patients with prostheses, 21 (25%) developed complications. Fluid leaks were found in 16 patients who presented with recurrent incontinence; plain radiographs demonstrated an interval decrease in balloon reservoir diameter. Kinked tubing, which was evident on plain films, caused acute urinary retention in three patients. However, plain radiographs failed to detect evidence of prosthesis erosion into the urethra in either of two patients with this complication. Although urethroscopy is needed to detect urethral erosion, plain radiographs are inexpensive and reliable in the initial evaluation of artifical sphincter malfunction

  17. An assessment of the complications of the Brantley Scott artificial sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, P S; Galloway, N T; Lewis, D C; Stephenson, T P

    1987-08-01

    A Brantley Scott artificial sphincter has been inserted into 95 patients since 1981; more than half of the patients had lower urinary tract neuropathy and most of the others post-TUR incontinence. The main problem with the device has been cuff failure (12), which should be resolved by the new "dipped" cuffs. The major surgical complication has been erosion (10), usually associated with infection. Twenty-four patients had variable degrees of incontinence but the artificial sphincter remains the cornerstone of continence control when other methods have failed or are inappropriate.

  18. Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy for Non-Dilated Esophageal Achalasia in Children with Intraoperative Stepped Dilation Under Image Guidance: Attempting Complete Myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Go; Miyake, Hiromu; Koyama, Mariko; Morita, Keiichi; Kaneshiro, Masakatsu; Nouso, Hiroshi; Yamoto, Masaya; Fukumoto, Koji; Urushihara, Naoto

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a modified surgical approach to laparoscopic myotomy for achalasia using stepped dilation with a Rigiflex balloon and contrast medium under image guidance. A 10-year-old boy with persistent dysphagia and vomiting had ingested only liquids for 3 months, losing >10 kg in body weight. Barium swallow and esophageal manometry diagnosed esophageal achalasia with mild esophageal dilatation. After failed pneumatic dilatation, laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication was performed. Prior to surgery, a Rigiflex balloon dilator was placed within the esophagus near the diaphragmatic hiatus. A four-port technique was used, and mobilization of the esophagus was limited to the anterior aspect. A 5-cm Heller myotomy was performed, extending another 2 cm onto the anterior gastric wall. During myotomy, the Rigiflex balloon was serially dilated from 30 to 50 mL, and filled with contrast medium under fluoroscopic image guidance in order to maintain appropriate tension on the esophagus to facilitate myotomy, and to confirm adequate myotomy with sufficient release of lower esophageal sphincter by resecting residual circular muscle fibers. Residual circular muscle fibers can be simultaneously visualized under both fluoroscopic image guidance and direct observation through the laparoscope, and they were cut precisely until the residual notch fully disappeared. Dor fundoplication was completed. The operative time was 180 minutes, and oral intake was started after esophagography on postoperative day 1. As of the 12-month follow-up, the patient has not shown any symptoms, and his postoperative course appeared satisfactory.

  19. Video manometry of the sphincter of Oddi: a new aid for interpreting manometric tracings and excluding manometric artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madácsy, L; Middelfart, H V; Matzen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    was to develop a new method sphincter of Oddi video manometry-based on simultaneous ESOM and real-time endoscopic image analysis, and to investigate the usefulness of video manometry for detecting manometric artefacts during ESOM. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seven consecutive patients who had undergone cholecystectomy...... and were referred with a suspicion of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction were investigated. Sphincter of Oddi pressure and endoscopic images (20 frames/s) were recorded simultaneously on a Synectics PC Polygraf computer system with a time-correlated basis, and then compared. RESULTS: On ESOM, 69 sphincter......, or retching, were also easily recognized using simultaneous ESOM and real-time endoscopic image analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Video manometry of the sphincter of Oddi is a promising new method for improving the analysis and documentation of ESOM tracings. It has several advantages over the conventional technique...

  20. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  1. Chicago classification criteria of esophageal motility disorders defined in high resolution esophageal pressure topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Fox, M.; Kahrilas, P. J.; Pandolfino, J. E.; Schwizer, W.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Conklin, Jeffrey L.; Cook, Ian J.; Gyawali, C. Prakash; Hebbard, Geoffrey; Holloway, Richard H.; Ke, Meiyun; Keller, Jutta; Mittal, Ravinder K.; Peters, Jeff; Richter, Joel; Roman, Sabine; Rommel, Nathalie; Sifrim, Daniel; Tutuian, Radu; Valdovinos, Miguel; Vela, Marcelo F.; Zerbib, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Background The Chicago Classification of esophageal motility was developed to facilitate the interpretation of clinical high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) studies, concurrent with the widespread adoption of this technology into clinical practice. The Chicago Classification has been

  2. Experiments in paramagnetic relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lijphart, E.E.

    1976-01-01

    This thesis presents two attempts to improve the resolving power of the relaxation measurement technique. The first attempt reconsiders the old technique of steady state saturation. When used in conjunction with the pulse technique, it offers the possibility of obtaining additional information about the system in which all-time derivatives are zero; in addition, non-linear effects may be distinguished from each other. The second attempt involved a systematic study of only one system: Cu in the Tutton salts (K and Rb). The systematic approach, the high accuracy of the measurement and the sheer amount of experimental data for varying temperature, magnetic field and concentration made it possible in this case to separate the prevailing relaxation mechanisms reliably

  3. [Esophageal motor disorders in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices non-submitted to endoscopic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Priscila Pollo; Lemme, Eponina Maria de Oliveira; Coelho, Henrique Sérgio Moraes

    2005-01-01

    The hepatic cirrhosis has as one of the main morbid-mortality causes, the portal hypertension with the development of esophageal varices, the possibility of a digestive hemorrhage and worsening of hepatic insufficiency. It is important to identify causal predictive or aggravating factors and if possible to prevent them. In the last years, it has been observed the association of esophageal motor disorders and gastro-esophageal reflux in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices. To study the prevalence of the esophageal motility disorders and among them, the ineffective esophageal motility, in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and esophageal varices, without previous endoscopic therapeutic and the predictive factors. Prospectively, it has been evaluate 74 patients suffering from liver cirrhosis and esophagic varices, without previous endoscopic treatment. All of them were submitted to a clinical protocol, esophageal manometry and 55 patients also held the ambulatory esophageal pHmetry. Esophageal motility disorders have been found in 44 patients (60%). The most prevalent was the ineffective esophageal motility, observed in 28%. The abnormal reflux disease was diagnosed through the pHmetry in 35% of the patients. There were no correlation between the manometrical abnormality in general and the ineffective esophageal motility in particular and the esophageal or gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, the abnormal reflux, the disease seriousness, the ascites presence and the gauge of the varices. The majority of cirrhotic patients with non-treated esophageal varices present esophageal motor disorders. No predictive factor was found. The clinical relevance of these findings need more researches in the scope to define the real meaning of theses abnormalities.

  4. The Role of Esophageal PH-metri Test on Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Setyawati, Katharina; Abdullah, Murdani; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Fauzi, Achmad; Makmun, Dadang; Simadibrata, Marcellus; Manan, Chudahman; Rani, Abdul Aziz

    2008-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a pathological condition of esophagus which is caused by gastric content reflux into esophagus. There is an increased prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The roles of esophageal pH-metry in clinical application include looking for abnormal acid exposure on esophagus with no abnormality found in endoscopy; evaluating patients following the anti-reflux surgery who are being suspected for abnormal esophageal reflux; evaluating patients with normal ...

  5. Relaxation from particle production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a “Relaxion” solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  6. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse...... or longitudinal relaxation function depending on the sign of the axial anisotropy....

  7. Momentum constraint relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marronetti, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Full relativistic simulations in three dimensions invariably develop runaway modes that grow exponentially and are accompanied by violations of the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints. Recently, we introduced a numerical method (Hamiltonian relaxation) that greatly reduces the Hamiltonian constraint violation and helps improve the quality of the numerical model. We present here a method that controls the violation of the momentum constraint. The method is based on the addition of a longitudinal component to the traceless extrinsic curvature A ij -tilde, generated by a vector potential w i , as outlined by York. The components of w i are relaxed to solve approximately the momentum constraint equations, slowly pushing the evolution towards the space of solutions of the constraint equations. We test this method with simulations of binary neutron stars in circular orbits and show that it effectively controls the growth of the aforementioned violations. We also show that a full numerical enforcement of the constraints, as opposed to the gentle correction of the momentum relaxation scheme, results in the development of instabilities that stop the runs shortly

  8. OCCULT ANAL SPHINCTER INJURIES (OASIS IN DEPARTMENT OF PERINATOLOGY IN LJUBLJANA – INCIDENCE AND RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Jakopič

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vaginal delivery is the most important risk factors for development of faecal incontinence, which significantly affects quality of life. Foreign studies show OASIS occur at 20 to 40 % of vaginal deliveries. In Slovenia we recognize sphincter injuries at 1.7 % of deliveries, while true incidence of OASIS in our population remains unknown. Caesarean section prevents anal sphincter injuries. Known risk factors in foreign studies include prolonged second stage of labour, fetal weight > 3500 g, malpresentation, forceps delivery, maternal age more than 35 years at the time of first delivery, first delivery. Few women complain about defecatory problems in puerperium unless they are directly asked about them, so true incidence of such injuries is grossly underestimated. Previously compensated anal sphincter dysfunction can clinically manifest as late as in menopause. The most probable cause is atrophy of muscle and fibrous tissue of pelvic floor and anal sphincter due to lack of estrogen support in this period. With anal ultrasound we tried to determine the incidence of occult damage to anal sphincter in primiparas after vaginal delivery and the relation of injury to symptoms 6 weeks after delivery and identify possible risk factors in our population. We also tried to find out how many patients with anal sphincter injury become symptomatic immediately after deliv- ery. Methods: From January to June 2009 we examined 26 primiparas after vaginal delivery in the Ljubljana Maternity Hospital with anal ultrasound and compared various data about the delivery from our national delivery form. We excluded all patients with caesarean section, recognized anal sphincter injury at the time of the delivery or previous anorectal surgery, history of irritable bowel syndrome or pre-existing inflammatory bowel disease. All patients completed a bowel-function questionnaire, which included questions about faecal urgency and involuntary passing of gas, liquid or

  9. Opportunistic esophagitis in AIDS: Radiographic diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.S.; Woldenberg, R.; Herlinger, H.; Laufer, I.

    1987-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1986, 35 of 90 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had double-contrast esophagograms to rule out opportunistic esophagitis. The radiographs were reviewed without knowledge of the clinical or endoscopic findings. Candida esophagitis was diagnosed radiographically in 17 patients who had varying degrees of plaque formation and viral esophagitis in three who had discrete ulcers without plaques. All three patients with viral esophagitis (herpes in 2 and cytomegalo virus in one) and 15 of 17 with Candida esophagitis had endoscopic and/or clinical corroboration of the radiographic diagnosis. Thus, the authors' experience suggests that fungal and viral esophagitis can often be differentiated on double-contrast esophagography, so that appropriate antifungal or antiviral therapy can be instituted without need for endoscopic intervention

  10. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Melhado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction.

  11. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melhado, Rachel E., E-mail: raye732001@yahoo.co.uk; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga [Academic Department of Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-28

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction.

  12. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melhado, Rachel E.; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction

  13. Status of epigenetic chromatin modification enzymes and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk in northeast Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Virendra; Singh, Laishram C; Singh, Avninder P; Sharma, Jagannath; Borthakur, Bibhuti B; Debnath, Arundhati; Rai, Avdhesh K; Phukan, Rup K; Mahanta, Jagadish; Kataki, Amal C; Kapur, Sujala; Saxena, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer incidence is reported in high frequency in northeast India. The etiology is different from other population at India due to wide variations in dietary habits or nutritional factors, tobacco/betel quid chewing and alcohol habits. Since DNA methylation, histone modification and miRNA-mediated epigenetic processes alter the gene expression, the involvement of these processes might be useful to find out epigenetic markers of esophageal cancer risk in northeast Indian population. The present investigation was aimed to carryout differential expression profiling of chromatin modification enzymes in tumor and normal tissue collected from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. Differential mRNA expression profiling and their validation was done by quantitative real time PCR and tissue microarray respectively. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the epidemiological data. mRNA expression data was analyzed by Student t-test. Fisher exact test was used for tissue microarray data analysis. Higher expression of enzymes regulating methylation (DOT1L and PRMT1) and acetylation (KAT7, KAT8, KAT2A and KAT6A) of histone was found associated with ESCC risk. Tissue microarray done in independent cohort of 75 patients revealed higher nuclear protein expression of KAT8 and PRMT1 in tumor similar to mRNA expression. Expression status of PRMT1 and KAT8 was found declined as we move from low grade to high grade tumor. Betel nut chewing, alcohol drinking and dried fish intake were significantly associated with increased risk of esophageal cancer among the study subject. Study suggests the association of PRMT1 and KAT8 with esophageal cancer risk and its involvement in the transition process of low to high grade tumor formation. The study exposes the differential status of chromatin modification enzymes between tumor and normal tissue and points out that relaxed state of chromatin facilitates more transcriptionally active

  14. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeij, Froukje B.; Bredenoord, Albert J.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new

  15. Intramural esophageal pseudodiverticulosis: report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnero, M.; Martinez, M.I.; Sanchez, D.; Sanjurjo, E.

    1997-01-01

    Intramural esophageal pseudodiverticulosis (IEP)is a very uncommon disorder, with only a hundred or so cases reported in the literature. It is characterized by the distension of the esophageal mucous glands. This results in the development of a great number of saccular structures, distributed segmentally or diffusely throughout the esophageal wall. We present a case of this lesion, describing the radiological findings. (Author) 4 refs

  16. Esophageal Sensorimotor Function and Psychological Factors Each Contribute to Symptom Severity in Globus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Nathalie; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Arts, Joris; Caenepeel, Philip; Tack, Jan; Pauwels, Ans

    2016-10-01

    Altered upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and esophageal body (EB) sensorimotor function and psychosocial factors may both be involved in symptom generation in globus, but their common impact is not yet assessed. The aim of the study is (1) to compare UES and EB sensitivity and compliance of globus patients with healthy controls (HC); (2) to study the association of globus symptom severity (GSS) with UES and EB sensitivity and compliance, UES motor function and psychosocial factors. In 58 globus patients, GSS, somatization, and anxiety disorders were determined using validated questionnaires. In 26 HC and 42/58 patients, UES and EB sensitivity and compliance were assessed twice using barostat measurements. UES function of 27 globus patients was evaluated using high-resolution manometry. Bivariate correlations and a general linear model tested the association of these factors with GSS. UES and EB compliance did not differ between globus patients and HC. Upon repeated distension, UES habituation was seen in both groups, whereas EB sensitization (23.3±1.3 vs. 19.5±1.5 mm Hg, Pdisorder (t=3.04, P=0.004), and post-traumatic stress severity (ρ=0.40, P=0.005) were associated with GSS. UES compliance and somatization were independently associated with GSS. A trend (P=0.061) was found for the association of GSS with change in EB compliance. UES compliance, change in EB compliance, and somatization explain 40% of the variance in GSS. This indicates that globus is a complex disorder of the brain-gut axis rather than a "psychosomatic" disorder or a peripheral esophageal disorder.

  17. Laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya Venugopalan Nair

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of esophageal cancer is rapidly increasing especially in developing countries. The major risk factors include unhealthy lifestyle practices such as alcohol consumption, smoking, and chewing tobacco to name a few. Diagnosis at an advanced stage and poor prognosis make esophageal cancer one of the most lethal diseases. These factors have urged further research in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. Animal models not only aid in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of esophageal cancer but also help in developing therapeutic interventions for the disease. This review throws light on the various recent laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer.

  18. Pediatric esophageal scintigraphy. Results of 200 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.; Wynchank, S.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Ducassou, D.; Blanquet, P.

    1983-01-01

    Esophageal transit of a small volume of watery liquid has been observed scintigraphically in 200 studies performed on patients aged between 6 days and 16 years. Qualitative information concerning esophageal morphology and function in the various phases of deglutition, and scintigraphic features of achalasia, stenosis, and other pathologies are described. Measured esophageal transit time and its normal variation, its relevance to the diagnosis of esophagitis, and the monitoring of treatment are discussed. This technique observing distinct deglutitions has proven a useful diagnostic tool. Its advantages and limitations are discussed in comparison with other methods

  19. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved. PMID:27957030

  20. Pediatric esophageal scintigraphy. Results of 200 studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillet, J.; Wynchank, S.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Ducassou, D.; Blanquet, P.

    1983-09-01

    Esophageal transit of a small volume of watery liquid has been observed scintigraphically in 200 studies performed on patients aged between 6 days and 16 years. Qualitative information concerning esophageal morphology and function in the various phases of deglutition, and scintigraphic features of achalasia, stenosis, and other pathologies are described. Measured esophageal transit time and its normal variation, its relevance to the diagnosis of esophagitis, and the monitoring of treatment are discussed. This technique observing distinct deglutitions has proven a useful diagnostic tool. Its advantages and limitations are discussed in comparison with other methods.

  1. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  2. External anal sphincter atrophy on endoanal magnetic resonance imaging adversely affects continence after sphincteroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briel, J. W.; Stoker, J.; Rociu, E.; Laméris, J. S.; Hop, W. C.; Schouten, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    There is still considerable debate about the value of preoperative anorectal physiological parameters in predicting the clinical outcome after sphincteroplasty. Recently it has been reported that atrophy of the external anal sphincter can be clearly shown with endoanal magnetic resonance imaging

  3. Location of bladder and urethral sphincter motoneurons in the male guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R; Izhar, Z; Gerrits, PO; Miner, W; Holstege, G; Gerrits, Peter O.

    2004-01-01

    Although the guinea pig is used widely in experimental medical research, including in studies on micturition control, the spinal origin of preganglionic parasympathetic bladder and somatic external urethral sphincter motoneurons is not known. In the male, guinea pig using wheat germ

  4. Relation between flexor spasms, uninhibited detrusor contractions and anal sphincter activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, E; Petersen, T; Schrøder, H D

    1986-01-01

    The time relation between flexor spasms, detrusor contractions and anal sphincter activity was recorded in a consecutive series of 111 patients with hyperreflexic bladder and flexor spasms. In 76 of the patients flexor spasms were preceded by detrusor contractions. The opposite pattern, namely de...

  5. Artificial urinary sphincter erosion: the role of corticosteroids in an unusual presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Yap, Stanley A.; Stone, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroid use has proven beneficial for the management of many medical conditions. Unfortunately its anti-inflammatory properties also profoundly affect many aspects of wound healing. We present a case of an unusual presentation of an artificial urinary sphincter erosion in a patient treated with chronic high-dose steroids.

  6. Acid-secreting rectal duplication cyst with associated peptic ulcer eroding through the anal sphincters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R J; Charlton, F G; Jaffray, B

    2002-11-01

    A rectal duplication cyst with heterotopic gastric mucosa that resulted in a trans-sphincteric peptic ulcer on the opposite wall of the anus of a child is described. The management and outcome and a review of the literature is presented. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  7. Sphincter preservation in distal CT2N0 rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserberg, Nir; Kundel, Yulia; Purim, Ofer; Keidar, Andrei; Kashtan, Hanoch; Sadot, Eran; Fenig, Eyal; Brenner, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is usually not indicated for cT2N0 rectal cancer. Abdominoperineal resection is the standard treatment for distal rectal tumors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the actual sphincter-preservation rate in patients with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer given neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Data were retrospectively collected for all patients who were diagnosed with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer at a tertiary medical center in 2000–2008 and received chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery (5–7 weeks later). Thirty-three patients (22 male) of median age 65 years (range, 32–88) were identified. Tumor distance from the anal verge ranged from 0 to 5 cm. R0 resection with sphincter preservation was accomplished in 22 patients (66%), with a 22% pathological complete response rate. Median follow-up time was 62 months (range 7–120). There were no local failures. Crude disease-free and overall survival were 82% and 86%, respectively. Factors associated with sphincter preservation were tumor location (OR = 0.58, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.37-0.91) and pathological downstaging (OR = 7.8, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 1.35-45.85). Chemoradiotherapy was well tolerated. High rates of sphincter preservation can be achieved after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for distal cT2N0 rectal cancer, with tolerable toxicity, without compromising oncological outcome

  8. Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Low Rectal Cancers: Incidence and Risk Factors for Permanent Stoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Joanna Chung Kiu; Foo, Dominic Chi Chung; Wei, Rockson; Law, Wai Lun

    2017-11-01

    Advances in surgical techniques and paradigm changes in rectal cancer treatment have led to a drastic decline in the abdominoperineal resection rate, and sphincter-preserving operation is possible in distal rectal cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term incidence of permanent stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for low rectal cancer and its corresponding risk factors. From 2000 to 2014, patients who underwent sphincter-preserving low anterior resection for low rectal cancer (within 5 cm from the anal verge) were included. The occurrence of permanent stoma over time and its risk factors were investigated by using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. This study included 194 patients who underwent ultra-low anterior resection for distal rectal cancer, and the median follow-up period was 77 months for the surviving patients. Forty-six (23.7%) patients required a permanent stoma eventfully. Anastomotic-related complications and disease progression were the main reasons for permanent stoma. Clinical anastomotic leakage (HR 5.72; 95% CI 2.31-14.12; p consideration when contemplating sphincter-preserving surgery.

  9. Endosonographic and manometric assessment of the anal sphincters after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudol-Szopinska, I.; Jakubowski, W.; Ciesielski, A.; Bielecki, K.; Baczuk, L.; Tarnowski, W.

    2003-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to compare endosonography and manometry of the anal sphincters in patients after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). Patients and methods. Ten patients aged between 23 and 50 years with IPAA performed for ulcerative colitis were examined with anal endosonography (AES) and manometry. Results. AES visualised abnormal image of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) in 9 patients (90%). Defects of the external anal sphincter (EAS) and puborectalis muscle (PR) were shown in 4 patients (40%). In 5 patients (50%) correlation between endosonographic and manometric assessment for the all analysed muscles: IAS, EAS and PR was found. In 4 cases (40%) both methods correlated with the evaluation of the EAS only and in 1 patient (10%) no correlation was found. Correlation between both methods for the IAS was found in half of the patients (50%) while in the evaluation of the EAS and PR dynamic activity, it was found in 9 cases (90%). Conclusions. Anal endosonography and manometry allow us to assess the morphology as well as the function of the anal sphincters in patients with IPAA. The methods mentioned above show high correlation in the assessment of the EAS function (9 cases; 90%) whereas in the case of IAS, manometry frequently (5 patients; 50%) does not confirm endosonografically detected defects. (author)

  10. Muscle-Derived Cells for Treatment of Iatrogenic Sphincter Damage and Urinary Incontinence in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gerullis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of injection of autologous muscle-derived cells into the urinary sphincter for treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence in men and to characterize the injected cells prior to transplantation. Methods. 222 male patients with stress urinary incontinence and sphincter damage after uroloical procedures were treated with transurethral injection of autologous muscle-derived cells. The transplanted cells were investigated after cultivation and prior to application by immunocytochemistry using different markers of myogenic differentiation. Feasibility and functionality assessment was achieved with a follow-up of at least 12 months. Results. Follow-up was at least 12 months. Of the 222 treated patients, 120 responded to therapy of whom 26 patients (12% were continent, and 94 patients (42% showed improvement. In 102 (46% patients, the therapy was ineffective. Clinical improvement was observed on average 4.7 months after transplantation and continued in all improved patients. The cells injected into the sphincter were at least ~50% of myogenic origin and representative for early stages of muscle cell differentiation. Conclusions. Transurethral injection of muscle-derived cells into the damaged urethral sphincter of male patients is a safe procedure. Transplanted cells represent different phases of myogenic differentiation.

  11. Le sphincter artificiel urinaire chez l'homme a propos de 23 cas The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Routine investigations included urine analysis, assessment of a possible concomitant inflammation or infection, urethroscopy and a urodynamic work-up. Pelvic floor training was done in all cases, while macroplastique was administered in 15 cases only. Finally, an artificial sphincter was placed in periurethral position in all ...

  12. Endoanal MRI of the anal sphincter complex: correlation with cross-sectional anatomy and histology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussain, S. M.; Stoker, J.; Zwamborn, A. W.; den Hollander, J. C.; Kuiper, J. W.; Entius, C. A.; Laméris, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate the in vivo endoanal MRI findings of the anal sphincter with the cross-sectional anatomy and histology. Fourteen patients with rectal tumours were examined with a rigid endoanal MR coil before undergoing abdominoperineal resection. In addition, 12 cadavers

  13. Endoanal MRI of the anal sphincter complex: correlation with cross-sectional anatomy and histology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Hussain (Shahid); J. Stoker (Jacob); A.W. Zwamborn; J.C. den Hollander (Jan); J.-W. Kuiper (Jan-Willem); C.A. Entius; J.S. Lameris

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to correlate the in vivo endoanal MRI findings of the anal sphincter with the cross-sectional anatomy and histology. Fourteen patients with rectal tumours were examined with a rigid endoanal MR coil before undergoing

  14. Esophageal Stenosis Associated With Tumor Regression in Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Frequency and Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atsumi, Kazushige [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Arimura, Hidetaka [Department of Health Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Matsuki, Takaomi [Department of Health Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital at Beppu, Oita (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Results: Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

  15. Enhanced recovery after esophageal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorwald, Peter; Bruna Esteban, Marcos; Ortega Lucea, Sonia; Ramírez Rodríguez, Jose Manuel

    2018-03-21

    ERAS is a multimodal perioperative care program which replaces traditional practices concerning analgesia, intravenous fluids, nutrition, mobilization as well as a number of other perioperative items, whose implementation is supported by evidence-based best practices. According to the RICA guidelines published in 2015, a review of the literature and the consensus established at a multidisciplinary meeting in 2015, we present a protocol that contains the basic procedures of an ERAS pathway for resective esophageal surgery. The measures involved in this ERAS pathway are structured into 3areas: preoperative, perioperative and postoperative. The consensus document integrates all the analyzed items in a unique time chart. ERAS programs in esophageal resection surgery can reduce postoperative morbidity, mortality, hospitalization and hospital costs. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. 2011 update on esophageal achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Keng-Liang; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Tai, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chi-Sin

    2012-01-01

    There have been some breakthroughs in the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal achalasia in the past few years. First, the introduction of high-resolution manometry with pressure topography plotting as a new diagnostic tool has made it possible to classify achalasia into three subtypes. The most favorable outcome is predicted for patients receiving treatment for type II achalasia (achalasia with compression). Patients with typeI(classic achalasia) and type III achalasia (spastic achalasia) e...

  17. Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Sameer; Prakash, Mahesh; Kaman, Lileshwar; Bhardwaj, Nidhi; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula (EPF) is a rare entity. We describe a case in a middle-aged female who presented with severe retrosternal chest pain and shortness of breadth. Chest computed tomography showed right EPF and hydropneumothorax. She was managed conservatively keeping the chest tube drainage and performing feeding jejunostomy. A brief review of the imaging finding and management of EPF is discussed.

  18. Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Sameer; Prakash, Mahesh; Kaman, Lileshwar; Bhardwaj, Nidhi; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2011-10-01

    Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula (EPF) is a rare entity. We describe a case in a middle-aged female who presented with severe retrosternal chest pain and shortness of breadth. Chest computed tomography showed right EPF and hydropneumothorax. She was managed conservatively keeping the chest tube drainage and performing feeding jejunostomy. A brief review of the imaging finding and management of EPF is discussed.

  19. Vitiligo associated with esophageal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asilian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is a disease that results in depigmented areas in the skin. It may develop at any age but the average age at onset is 20 years. Association of vitiligo and melanoma has been commonly reported, but malignancies other than melanoma have been rarely associated with vitiligo. We report a 73-year-old patient with new onset vitiligo who developed esophageal adenocarcinoma in the following years.

  20. Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Vyas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula (EPF is a rare entity. We describe a case in a middle-aged female who presented with severe retrosternal chest pain and shortness of breadth. Chest computed tomography showed right EPF and hydropneumothorax. She was managed conservatively keeping the chest tube drainage and performing feeding jejunostomy. A brief review of the imaging finding and management of EPF is discussed.

  1. Orthognathic Consequences of Sphincter Pharyngoplasty in Cleft Patients: A 2-Institutional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikane, Frances; Lai, Li Han; Hui, Brian K.; Martins, Deborah B.; Farias-Eisner, Gina; Mandelbaum, Rachel S.; Hoang, Han; Bradley, James P.; Wilson, Libby

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding long-term sequelae of cleft treatment is paramount in the refinement of treatment algorithms to accomplish optimized immediate and long-term outcomes. In this study, we reviewed sphincter pharyngoplasties as a method of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) treatment in relationship to orthognathic surgery. Methods: Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients, 15 years of age and older, were reviewed for demographics, VPI surgery, revisions, and subsequent orthognathic surgery at 2 institutions. Chi-square test, Student’s t test, and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: In 214 patients reviewed (mean age, 19.5 years), 61.7% were male, 18.2% had isolated cleft palate, 61.2% had unilateral cleft lip and palate, and 20.6% had bilateral cleft lip and palate. A total of 33.6% were diagnosed with VPI and received a sphincter pharyngoplasty (mean age, 11.9 years). When subsequent orthognathic surgery was examined, sphincter pharyngoplasty was not associated with maxillary advancement (P = 0.59) but did correlate with an increase in mandibular surgery from 2.8% to 11.1% (P = 0.02). The indications for mandibular surgery in the pharyngoplasty population were related to congenital micrognathia. When cephalometric analyses were evaluated, sphincter pharyngoplasty resulted in a decreased sella-to-nasion-to-B point angle (mean, 79.0–76.3 degrees, P = 0.02) and a higher incidence of normal to class II maxillomandibular relationships as defined by A point-to-nasion-to-B point angles >0.5 (P = 0.02). Conclusions: Sphincter pharyngoplasty decreases anterior mandibular growth and the discrepancy between maxillomandibular skeletal relationships because of the frequent predisposition of cleft patients to maxillary hypoplasia. In patients with congenital mandibular micrognathia, a small increase in mandibular surgeries may occur. PMID:27200238

  2. Three-Dimensional Endoanal Ultrasound Features of the Anal Sphincter in Asian Primigravidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Dakshitha Praneeth; Senaratne, Supun; Senanayake, Hemantha; Samarasekera, Dharmabandu Nandadeva

    2018-04-17

    The normal parameters of 3-dimensional endoanal ultrasound (3DEAUS) of the anal sphincter have not been reported for primigravidae or pregnant women at present. 3DEAUS parameters in Asian primigravidae were assessed in this study. We analyzed 3DEAUS data of 101 consecutives Asian primigravidae, assessed in the early third trimester. The assessment was performed with a rigid ultrasonic probe (Olympus ® RU 12M-R1 probe and EU-ME1 ultrasound system (Olympus Corp., Shinjuku, Japan). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to detect the differences in pressure in different quadrants. The participants had a mean age of 24.7 (standard deviation [SD], 5.1) years. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all participants. The anal sphincter complex had 3 characteristic segments that were identifiable: upper, middle and lower. The puborectalis muscle was identified as a striated "V"-shaped sling, and its mean thickness was 7.44 (SD, 1.41) mm. The mean thickness of internal (IAS) and external (EAS) sphincters at the mid-sphincter level were 1.78 (SD, 0.59) and 5.49 (SD, 1.21) mm, respectively. The EAS measured 6.02 (SD, 1.07) mm at the lower sphincter level. The statistically significant differences seen in the in quadrants were: the IAS was thicker anteriorly (Z = -2.642; P = .008), the EAS at both midsphincter level (Z = -3.70; P IAS was thicker at the 9 o'clock position (Z = -2.081; P = .037). Good symmetry at all 3 levels was seen in the EAS (including the puborectalis muscle). Normal values of 3DEAUS for primigravidae have been identified and may serve as reference values for other laboratories. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Morphologic changes of the anal sphincter musculature during and after temporary stool deviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, M; Fein, M; Fuchs, K H; Bussen, D; Grun, C; Thiede, A

    2001-04-01

    Temporary stool deviation, using a stoma, is a well-known surgical principle to protect low colorectal or coloanal anastomoses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate any morphologic changes with regard to the anal sphincter muscles during and after temporary ileostomy. Forty-four patients with rectal carcinomas were studied prospectively. All patients underwent low anterior resection. Reconstruction was performed using either a coloanal pouch or a straight end-to-end anastomosis. A protective stoma was fashioned in all 44 patients (ileostomy n=41; colostomy n=3). Stoma closure was carried out after a median of 85 days (41-330 days). Using a standard protocol, anal-sphincter thickness [m. puborectalis, external anal sphincter (EAS) and internal anal (IAS) sphincter] was assessed by means of endoanal ultrasonography preoperatively, at the time of stoma closure, and every 3 months thereafter for 1 year. The diameter of the puborectal muscle decreased from a median preoperative value of 6.3 mm to 5.7 mm at the time of stoma closure (P=0.03). After 3 months, 6.2 mm was measured. This value remained stable for the complete follow-up period. Similar results were recorded for the EAS. The IAS thickness remained stable throughout the study period, measuring between 2.1 mm and 2.4 mm. Temporary stool deviation does lead to morphologic changes of the anal sphincter. While the smooth muscle remains unchanged, the striated counterpart undergoes atrophic transformation. However, after passage reconstruction, i.e., stoma closure, a rapid regeneration of the voluntary muscles is observed.

  4. Glycomic Expression in Esophageal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Mohanty

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is among the most common post translation modifications of proteins in humans. Decades of research have demonstrated that aberrant glycosylation can lead to malignant degeneration. Glycoproteomic studies in the past several years have identified techniques that can successfully characterize a glycan or glycan profile associated with a high-grade dysplastic or malignant state. This review summarizes the current glycomic and glycoproteomic literature with specific reference to esophageal cancer. Esophageal adenocarcinoma represents a highly morbid and mortal cancer with a defined progression from metaplasia (Barrett's esophagus to dysplasia to neoplasia. This disease is highlighted because (1 differences in glycan profiles between the stages of disease progression have been described in the glycoproteomic literature; (2 a glycan biomarker that identifies a given stage may be used as a predictor of disease progression and thus may have significant influence over clinical management; and (3 the differences in glycan profiles between disease and disease-free states in esophageal cancer are more dramatic than in other cancers.

  5. Radionuclide transit in esophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, S.H.; Wang, S.J.; Wu, L.C.; Liu, R.S.; Tsai, Y.T.; Chiang, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    This study assessed esophageal motility in patients with esophageal varices by radionuclide transit studies. Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position above a low-energy all-purpose collimator of a gamma camera. The condensed image (CI) superimposed with a centroid curve was also produced in each case. Twenty-five normal subjects (N) and 32 patients (pts) with esophageal varices by endoscopy (large varices in Grades IV and V in 8 and small varices in Grade III or less in 24) were studied. TMTT, RTT, RF, and RI were all significantly increased in pts as compared to N. Especially, the transit time for the middle third (6.7 +- 2.6 sec vs 3.5 +- 0.9 sec in N, rho < 0.005) had the optimal sensitivy and specificity of 88% each at the cutoff value of 4.2 sec as determined by ROC analysis. In summary, radionuclide transit disorders occur in the majority of pts with esopageal varices. The middle RTT and CI are both optimal in sensitivity and specificity for detecting the abnormalities

  6. Novel device to sample the esophageal microbiome--the esophageal string test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie A Fillon

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies implicate the microbiome in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. Previous work has shown that adults with esophagitis related to gastroesophageal reflux disease have altered esophageal microbiota compared to those who do not have esophagitis. In these studies, sampling of the esophageal microbiome was accomplished by isolating DNA from esophageal biopsies obtained at the time of upper endoscopy. The aim of the current study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in pediatric individuals with normal esophageal mucosa using a minimally invasive, capsule-based string technology, the Enterotest™. We used the proximal segment of the Enterotest string to sample the esophagus, and term this the "Esophageal String Test" (EST. We hypothesized that the less invasive EST would capture mucosal adherent bacteria present in the esophagus in a similar fashion as mucosal biopsy. EST samples and mucosal biopsies were collected from children with no esophageal inflammation (n = 15 and their microbiome composition determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbiota from esophageal biopsies and ESTs produced nearly identical profiles of bacterial genera and were different from the bacterial contents of samples collected from the nasal and oral cavity. We conclude that the minimally invasive EST can serve as a useful device for study of the esophageal microbiome.

  7. Variational formulation of relaxed and multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, R. L.; Yoshida, Z.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Hudson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    > Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor relaxation model for formation of macroscopically self-organized plasma equilibrium states, all these constraints are relaxed save for the global magnetic fluxes and helicity. A Lagrangian variational principle is presented that leads to a new, fully dynamical, relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (RxMHD), such that all static solutions are Taylor states but also allows state with flow. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) is developed.

  8. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-31

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately.

  9. Dynamics of relaxed inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangarife, Walter; Tobioka, Kohsaku; Ubaldi, Lorenzo; Volansky, Tomer

    2018-02-01

    The cosmological relaxation of the electroweak scale has been proposed as a mechanism to address the hierarchy problem of the Standard Model. A field, the relaxion, rolls down its potential and, in doing so, scans the squared mass parameter of the Higgs, relaxing it to a parametrically small value. In this work, we promote the relaxion to an inflaton. We couple it to Abelian gauge bosons, thereby introducing the necessary dissipation mechanism which slows down the field in the last stages. We describe a novel reheating mechanism, which relies on the gauge-boson production leading to strong electro-magnetic fields, and proceeds via the vacuum production of electron-positron pairs through the Schwinger effect. We refer to this mechanism as Schwinger reheating. We discuss the cosmological dynamics of the model and the phenomenological constraints from CMB and other experiments. We find that a cutoff close to the Planck scale may be achieved. In its minimal form, the model does not generate sufficient curvature perturbations and additional ingredients, such as a curvaton field, are needed.

  10. Palliation of Dysphagia from Esophageal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.Y.V. Homs (Marjolein)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe prognosis of esophageal cancer is poor with a 5-year survival of 10-15%. In addition, over 50% of patients with esophageal cancer already have an inoperable disease at presentation. The majority of these patients require palliative treatment to relieve progressive dysphagia. Metal

  11. PET-CT manifestation of Candida esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee [Sung-Ae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); O, Joo Hyun [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic University Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Candida esophagitis (moniliasis) is the most common infection of the gullet and has generally been attributed to as a complication of immune suppressed state. However, as the current case. Holt found the disease to occur in 3 of his 13 patients without predisposing condition. Predisposing factors other than immune deficient conditions include aplastic anemia, alcoholism and Parkinson's disease and age, diabetes mellitus, and disruption of mucosal integrity. Growing prevalence of Candida esophagitis in recent years is accounted for by an increase in the number of patients with organ transplantation, malignancy and AIDS as well as populrization of endoscopy. Microorganisms that reached the esophagus in oral secretions are rarely cultured from the esophageal surface. Of many species C. albicans is the most common offender although C. tropicalis has also been isolated with high prevalence, particularly in the patients with cancer and disseminated candidiasis. Clinically, the patients with Candida esophagitis seek medical care for esophageal or retrosternal pain, dysphagia or distress. Candida esophagitis may be the extension from oropharyngeal infection but in the majority the esophagus is the sole site of infection. The middle and lower thirds of the esophagus are more typically affected than the upper third. Diagnosis can be indicated by double contrast esophagography or endoscopy and confirmed by potassium hydroxide (KOH) stain or biopsy. It is to be noted that the more presence of Candida in smear or cultured specimen cannot indict Candida as definitive offender. Differential diagnosis includes herpes simplex infection, cytomegalovirus infection, reflux esophagitis or radiation esophagitis.

  12. Esophageal cancer awareness in Bomet district, Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Background: Esophageal cancer is the most common malignancy in Western ... 47% did not think that family history is a risk factor. ... 40% thought that herbal therapy is the optimal treatment for esophageal cancer. ... 2643 patients presenting to this hospital with cancer ..... they approach screening and treatment of this.

  13. PET-CT manifestation of Candida esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Yong Whee; O, Joo Hyun

    2007-01-01

    Candida esophagitis (moniliasis) is the most common infection of the gullet and has generally been attributed to as a complication of immune suppressed state. However, as the current case. Holt found the disease to occur in 3 of his 13 patients without predisposing condition. Predisposing factors other than immune deficient conditions include aplastic anemia, alcoholism and Parkinson's disease and age, diabetes mellitus, and disruption of mucosal integrity. Growing prevalence of Candida esophagitis in recent years is accounted for by an increase in the number of patients with organ transplantation, malignancy and AIDS as well as populrization of endoscopy. Microorganisms that reached the esophagus in oral secretions are rarely cultured from the esophageal surface. Of many species C. albicans is the most common offender although C. tropicalis has also been isolated with high prevalence, particularly in the patients with cancer and disseminated candidiasis. Clinically, the patients with Candida esophagitis seek medical care for esophageal or retrosternal pain, dysphagia or distress. Candida esophagitis may be the extension from oropharyngeal infection but in the majority the esophagus is the sole site of infection. The middle and lower thirds of the esophagus are more typically affected than the upper third. Diagnosis can be indicated by double contrast esophagography or endoscopy and confirmed by potassium hydroxide (KOH) stain or biopsy. It is to be noted that the more presence of Candida in smear or cultured specimen cannot indict Candida as definitive offender. Differential diagnosis includes herpes simplex infection, cytomegalovirus infection, reflux esophagitis or radiation esophagitis

  14. Feeding Difficulties in Children with Esophageal Atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Lisa; Rosen, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    The current available literature evaluating feeding difficulties in children with esophageal atresia was reviewed. The published literature was searched through PubMed using a pre-defined search strategy. Feeding difficulties are commonly encountered in children and adults with repaired esophageal atresia [EA]. The mechanism for abnormal feeding includes both esophageal and oropharyngeal dysphagia. Esophageal dysphagia is commonly reported in patients with EA and causes include dysmotility, anatomic lesions, esophageal outlet obstruction and esophageal inflammation. Endoscopic evaluation, esophageal manometry and esophograms can be useful studies to evaluate for causes of esophageal dysphagia. Oropharyngeal dysfunction and aspiration are also important mechanisms for feeding difficulties in patients with EA. These patients often present with respiratory symptoms. Videofluoroscopic swallow study, salivagram, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and high-resolution manometry can all be helpful tools to identify aspiration. Once diagnosed, management goals include reduction of aspiration during swallowing, reducing full column reflux into the oropharynx and continuation of oral feeding to maintain skills. We review specific strategies which can be used to reduce aspiration of gastric contents, including thickening feeds, changing feeding schedule, switching formula, trialing transpyloric feeds and fundoplication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Esophageal diverticula in Parma wallabies (Macropus parma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Danelle M; Esterline, Meredith L; Coke, Rob L

    2009-03-01

    Four adult, wild caught Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) presented with intermittent, postprandial, midcervical swellings. Esophageal diverticula were discovered in the four animals. One of two wallabies was managed successfully with surgery. A third animal died of other causes. The fourth animal died with possible complications from the diverticulum. This is the first published report of esophageal diverticula in macropods.

  16. Candidial esophagitis - A marker for HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kumar

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of AIDS manifested as candidial esophagitis. In addition , he had genital herpes, frequent diarrhoea, loss of weight and generalized lymphadenopathy. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopy. The patient died in 3 months due to unremitting diarrhoea. This importance of candidial esophagitis in a person at risk for developing AIDS is highlighted.

  17. Three cases of radiation esophagitis controlled with proton pump inhibitor

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    Murakami, Ryuji; Saito, Ryuichi; Miyazaki, Toshiyuki [Kumamoto Red Cross Hospital (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    Radiation esophagitis sometimes interrupts the radiation therapy due to swallowing pain and dysplasia. We experienced three cases of radiation-induced esophagitis controlled with proton pump inhibitor (PPI). These cases suggested etiologic relationship radiation esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We should consider PPI as treatment option for radiation esophagitis. (author)

  18. Endoscopic Management of Benign Esophageal Strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravich, William J

    2017-08-24

    This paper presents the author's approach to esophageal dilation. It offers a tailored approach to the application of dilation to specific types of esophageal stenotic lesions. In patients with inflammatory stricture, recent studies confirm the importance of treating the underlying inflammatory condition in order to decrease the rate of recurrence. The paper reviews some of the novel techniques that have been suggested for the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures, including incisional therapy, stenting, or the injection steroids or antifibrotic agents. The endoscopist who treats esophageal strictures must be familiar with the tools of the dilation and how they are best applied to specific types of stenotic lesions. If inflammation is present, effective management requires treatment of the inflammatory process in addition to mechanical dilation of the stenotic lesion. Controlled trials of novel approaches to treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures are limited and will be necessary to determine efficacy.

  19. Gastro-Esophageal Reflux in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rybak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER is common in infants and children and has a varied clinical presentation: from infants with innocent regurgitation to infants and children with severe esophageal and extra-esophageal complications that define pathological gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD. Although the pathophysiology is similar to that of adults, symptoms of GERD in infants and children are often distinct from classic ones such as heartburn. The passage of gastric contents into the esophagus is a normal phenomenon occurring many times a day both in adults and children, but, in infants, several factors contribute to exacerbate this phenomenon, including a liquid milk-based diet, recumbent position and both structural and functional immaturity of the gastro-esophageal junction. This article focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of GERD that occurs in infants and children, based on available and current guidelines.

  20. Gastro-Esophageal Reflux in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybak, Anna; Pesce, Marcella; Thapar, Nikhil; Borrelli, Osvaldo

    2017-08-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) is common in infants and children and has a varied clinical presentation: from infants with innocent regurgitation to infants and children with severe esophageal and extra-esophageal complications that define pathological gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Although the pathophysiology is similar to that of adults, symptoms of GERD in infants and children are often distinct from classic ones such as heartburn. The passage of gastric contents into the esophagus is a normal phenomenon occurring many times a day both in adults and children, but, in infants, several factors contribute to exacerbate this phenomenon, including a liquid milk-based diet, recumbent position and both structural and functional immaturity of the gastro-esophageal junction. This article focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of GERD that occurs in infants and children, based on available and current guidelines.