WorldWideScience

Sample records for esophageal perforation treated

  1. Esophageal perforation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... esophagus into the space around the lungs. Collapsed lung. X-rays taken after you drink a non-harmful dye can help pinpoint the location of the perforation. You may also have chest CT scan look for an abscess in the chest or esophageal cancer.

  2. Esophageal perforation during or after conformal radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haiyan; Ma Xiumei; Ye Ming; Hou Yanli; Xie Huaying; Bai Yongrui

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors and prognosis for patients with esophageal perforation occurring during or after radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 322 patients with esophageal carcinoma. These patients received radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal tumors, residual tumors after operation, or local recurrence. Of these, 12 had radiotherapy to the esophagus before being admitted, 68 patients had concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and 18 patients had esophageal perforation after RT (5.8%). Covered self-expandable metallic stents were placed in 11 patients. Two patients continued RT after stenting and control of infection; one of these suffered a new perforation, and the other had a massive hemorrhage. The median overall survival was 2 months (0-3 months) compared with 17 months in the non-perforation group. In univariate analysis, the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) being ≤ 70, age younger than 60, T4 stage, a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus, extracapsular lymph nodes (LN) involving the esophagus, a total dose > 100 Gy (biologically effective dose -10 ), and CRT were risk factors for perforation. In multivariate analysis, age younger than 60, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, T4 stage, and a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus were risk factors. In conclusion, patients with T4 stage, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, and those receiving a second course of RT should be given particular care to avoid perforation. The prognosis after perforation was poor. (author)

  3. Conservative management of esophageal perforations during pneumatic dilation for idiopathic esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Lerut, Toni; Coosemans, Willy; Vanbeckevoort, Dirk; Blondeau, Kathleen; Boeckxstaens, Guy; Tack, Jan

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal perforation is the most serious adverse event of pneumatic dilation (PD) for achalasia; it is usually managed by surgical repair. We investigated risk factors for esophageal perforation after PD and evaluated safety and long-term outcome of nonsurgical management strategies. We analyzed medical records of patients with achalasia who were treated with PD from 1992-2010 at the University Hospital Gasthuisberg in Leuven, Belgium; all patients with esophageal perforation were contacted to determine long-term outcomes. Achalasia outcomes were assessed by using the Vantrappen criteria. Of 830 PD procedures performed on 372 patients with manometry-confirmed achalasia (57 ± 1 years, 51% male), 16 were complicated by transmural esophageal perforation (4.3% of patients, 1.9% of dilations). Age >65 years was the only significant risk factor for complications (odds ratio, 3.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-10.2). All patients were treated conservatively with broad-spectrum antibiotics and nothing by mouth. In 6 patients (38%) the clinical course was further complicated by a pleural effusion, which required a drain in 4 patients. One patient (6%) died of mediastinal hemorrhage within 12 hours after PD. Patients with complications were discharged after 19 ± 2.3 days, compared with 4 ± 0.2 days for those without complications (P 65 years is a significant risk factor for esophageal perforation after PD. Nonsurgical management of transmural esophageal tears is feasible, with favorable short-term and long-term outcomes, but is not devoid of complications. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Successful Treatment of Septic Shock due to Spontaneous Esophageal Perforation 96 Hours after Onset by Drainage and Enteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risako Yamashita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous esophageal perforation is relatively uncommon, but carries a high mortality rate if diagnosis or treatment is delayed. We report the case of a 68-year-old man with spontaneous esophageal perforation who was successfully treated over 96 h after onset by thoracic drainage and jejunostomy for enteral nutrition. He vomited after drinking alcohol, soon followed by epigastralgia. Heart failure was suspected on admission to another hospital. Spontaneous esophageal perforation was diagnosed 48 h after admission. Chest tube drainage was performed, but his general condition deteriorated and he was transferred to our hospital. Emergent surgery was performed and esophageal perforation combined with pyothorax and mediastinitis was identified on the left side of the lower esophagus. The left thoracic cavity was rinsed and thoracic drainage was performed. Feeding jejunostomy was performed for postoperative enteral nutrition. Effective drainage and sufficient nutrition management appear extremely valuable in treating spontaneous esophageal perforation.

  5. Esophageal Perforation due to Transesophageal Echocardiogram: New Endoscopic Clip Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Robotis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal perforation due to transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE during cardiac surgery is rare. A 72-year-old female underwent TEE during an operation for aortic valve replacement. Further, the patient presented hematemesis. Gastroscopy revealed an esophageal bleeding ulcer. Endoscopic therapy was successful. Although a CT scan excluded perforation, the patient became febrile, and a second gastroscopy revealed a big perforation at the site of ulcer. The patient's clinical condition required endoscopic intervention with a new OTSC® clip (Ovesco Endoscopy, Tübingen, Germany. The perforation was successfully sealed. The patient remained on intravenous antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors and parenteral nutrition for few days, followed by enteral feeding. She was discharged fully recovered 3 months later. We clearly demonstrate an effective, less invasive treatment of an esophageal perforation with a new endoscopic clip.

  6. Management of Esophageal and Pharyngeal Perforation as Complications of Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Moo Sung; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Park, Jeong Yoon; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Jin, Byung Ho; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2017-06-01

    To describe our experience in treating esophageal and pharyngeal perforation after anterior cervical spine surgery. Six patients with esophageal injury and one patient with pharyngeal injury after anterior cervical spinal surgery, managed at our department between 2000 and 2015, were analyzed retrospectively. During the study period, 7 patients (6 male and 1 female; mean age, 45 years) presented with esophageal perforation. The original anterior cervical spinal surgery was performed due to trauma in 2 patients and because of a degenerative cervical disorder in 5. Early esophageal perforation was diagnosed in 2 patients, and delayed esophageal injury due to chronic irritation with the cervical implants was noted in 5. Three of the five delayed perforation cases were related to cervical instrument displacement. Two patients showed no definite signs of infection, whereas 5 patients had various symptoms, including fever, neck pain, odynophagia, neck swelling, and upper extremity weakness. Two patients with a large defect underwent surgical repair and three with minimal perforation due to chronic irritation from the implants underwent instrument removal without direct repair of defect. Two asymptomatic patients received no intervention. Six patients with infection completely recovered from esophageal injury after treatment for a mean duration of 5.2 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks). One patient died because of postoperative pneumonia and sepsis after implant removal. Esophageal and pharyngeal injury after cervical spinal surgery may occur either directly due to spinal trauma and vigorous intraoperative retraction or due to chronic irritation with cervical implants. In cases of perforation associated with infection, various surgical modalities, including primary closure and reinforcement with a flap, could be considered depending on factors such as esophageal defect size, infection severity, and timing of recognition of injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Esophageal perforation associated with cervical spine surgery: Report of two cases and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrouenraets, B. C.; Been, H. D.; Brouwer-Mladin, R.; Bruno, M.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: Esophageal perforation after anterior cervical spine surgery is a rare complication with various clinical presentations and treatments. Methods: Two cases of esophageal perforation after anterior cervical spine surgery are described, one occurring in the immediate postoperative

  8. Esophageal Perforation Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershman, Stuart H; Kunkle, William A; Kelly, Michael P; Buchowski, Jacob M; Ray, Wilson Z; Bumpass, David B; Gum, Jeffrey L; Peters, Colleen M; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Kim, Jin Young; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Rahman, Ra'Kerry K; Isaacs, Robert E; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher; Thompson, Sara E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lord, Elizabeth L; Buser, Zorica; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Multicenter retrospective case series and review of the literature. To determine the rate of esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. As part of an AOSpine series on rare complications, a retrospective cohort study was conducted among 21 high-volume surgical centers to identify esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Staff at each center abstracted data from patients' charts and created case report forms for each event identified. Case report forms were then sent to the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network Methodological Core for data processing and analysis. The records of 9591 patients who underwent anterior cervical spine surgery were reviewed. Two (0.02%) were found to have esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Both cases were detected and treated in the acute postoperative period. One patient was successfully treated with primary repair and debridement. One patient underwent multiple debridement attempts and expired. Esophageal perforation following anterior cervical spine surgery is a relatively rare occurrence. Prompt recognition and treatment of these injuries is critical to minimizing morbidity and mortality.

  9. Covered Biodegradable Stent: New Therapeutic Option for the Management of Esophageal Perforation or Anastomotic Leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Černá, Marie; Köcher, Martin; Válek, Vlastimil; Aujeský, René; Neoral, Čestmír; Andrašina, Tomáš; Pánek, Jiří; Mahathmakanthi, Shankari

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate our experience with the treatment of postoperative anastomotic leaks and benign esophageal perforations with covered biodegradable stents. Materials and Methods: From 2008 to 2010, we treated five men with either an anastomotic leak or benign esophageal perforation by implanting of covered biodegradable Ella-BD stents. The average age of the patients was 60 (range, 38–74) years. Postoperative anastomotic leaks were treated in four patients (1 after esophagectomy, 1 after resection of diverticulum, 2 after gastrectomy). In one patient, perforation occurred as a complication of the treatment of an esophageal rupture (which occurred during a balloon dilatation of benign stenosis) with a metallic stent. Results: Seven covered biodegradable stents were implanted in five patients. Primary technical success was 100%. Clinical success (leak sealing) was achieved in four of the five patients (80%). Stent migration occurred in three patients. In two of these patients, the leak had been sealed by the time of stent migration, therefore no reintervention was necessary. In one patient an additional stent had to be implanted. Conclusion: The use of biodegradable covered stents for the treatment of anastomotic leaks or esophageal perforations is technically feasible and safe. The initial results are promising; however, larger number of patients will be required to evaluate the capability of these biodegradable stents in the future. The use of biodegradable material for coverage of the stent is essential.

  10. Delayed esophageal perforation from stereotactic body radiation therapy for locally recurrent central nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sainathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is a novel form of external beam radiation therapy. It is used to treat early and locally recurrent nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSLC in medically inoperable patients. It uses high dose, hypofractionated radiotherapy, with targeting of the tumor by precise spatial localization, thus minimizing injury to surrounding tissues. It can be safely used to ablate NSLC in both central and peripheral locations. We present two cases of delayed esophageal perforation after SBRT for locally recurrent central NSLC. The perforations occurred several months after the therapy. They were treated with covered esophageal stents, with mortality, due to the perforation in one of the patients. SBRT should be judiciously used to ablate centrally located NSLC and patients who develop episodes of esophagitis during or after SBRT, need to be closely followed with endoscopy to look for esophageal ulcerations. These ulcers should be closely followed for healing as these may degenerate into full thickness perforations several months after SBRT.

  11. Traumatic upper cervical esophageal perforation in childhood with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rae. The next step was an upper gastrointestinal series, in which posterior oropharyngeal and cervical esophageal perforation draining to the posterior mediastinum was detected (Fig. 1). Emergency laryngobronchoscopy and esophagoscopy were performed. The upper and lower airways were normal except mild laryngeal ...

  12. Esophageal perforation following foreign body ingestion in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esophageal perforation following foreign body ingestion in children: report of three cases. O Abdelhadi, AE Ali, O Taha, A Abdalla, F Nugud. Abstract. We report three cases of foreign body esophagus, in two of them the foreign body was a coin, and the third child ingested a disc battery. In all three cases the foreign body ...

  13. Denture Mis-swallowing in the Sliding Esophageal Hiatal Hernia Mimics Esophageal Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Yang Chen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mis-swallowing of a foreign body in the esophagus coexisting with sliding hernia might be misdiagnosed as esophageal perforation with mediastinal abscess. We report an 89-year-old woman, bedridden for a long period in a nursing home after a previous cerebrovascular accident, who was sent to our emergency department in a state of sepsis because she had swallowed a radio-opaque partial denture. The retention of the denture as an esophageal foreign body was complicated with mediastinitis and bilateral pleural effusion. The inability of the patient to give a reliable clinical history delayed the diagnosis. This report highlights the difficulty in precisely locating a partial denture because of conflicting radiologic findings and the coexistence of esophageal sliding hernia, all of which led to a misdiagnosis of possible esophageal perforation. A right posterolateral thoracotomy with gastrostomy was performed to remove the lower esophageal foreign body after esophagoscopy failed. The surgical finding of a coincidental sliding esophageal hiatal hernia correlated well with the clinical presentation. Managing such a complicated esophageal foreign body in this elderly patient was challenging.

  14. A case report of esophageal perforation: Complication of nasogastric tube placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Arda; Firat, Deniz; Peker, Kemal; Sayar, Ilyas; Idiz, Oguz; Soytürk, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 70 Final Diagnosis: Esophageal perforation Symptoms: Abdominal pain • nausea • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Esophageal perforation is a well-defined and severe clinical condition. There are several etiologies of esophagus perforation. Case Report: We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian man who underwent an emergency cholecystectomy due to acute cholecystitis. Two days after surgery, his condition deteriorated. Thorax computerized tomography revealed an esophageal perforation. Conclusions: Esophageal perforation due to nasogastric application is relatively rare but the consequences are potentially serious. The anatomy of the upper gastrointestinal system should be understood by all healthcare professionals involved in the treatment. PMID:24803977

  15. Esophageal Perforation Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hershman, Stuart H.; Kunkle, William A.; Kelly, Michael P.; Buchowski, Jacob M.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Bumpass, David B.; Gum, Jeffrey L.; Peters, Colleen M.; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Kim, Jin Young; Smith, Zachary A.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L.; Rahman, Ra?Kerry K.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Multicenter retrospective case series and review of the literature. Objective: To determine the rate of esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Methods: As part of an AOSpine series on rare complications, a retrospective cohort study was conducted among 21 high-volume surgical centers to identify esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Staff at each center abstracted data from patients? charts and created case report forms fo...

  16. Combined esophageal injury complicated by progression to a second perforation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krieg Andreas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intramural dissection of the esophagus is a rare disorder characterized by a lesion between the submucosa and mucosa dividing the esophagus into a false and true lumen. The etiology of esophageal dissection remains uncertain but it affects predominantly women in their seventies and eighties. Symptoms may include uncharacteristic ones such as retrosternal pain, odynophagia or dysphagia. Conservative management is thought to be adequate and surgery should only be performed if complications such as abscess formation or perforation appear. Here we report the case and surgical management of a combined esophageal perforation and dissection. Case presentation We report the case of a combined esophageal perforation and dissection in a 45-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of relapsing periods of dysphagia since her childhood. The clinical course in this patient was complicated by progression to a second perforation, which made a definitive surgical management by esophagectomy necessary. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a combined esophageal perforation and dissection complicated by progression to a second perforation. This emphasizes that cautious and intensive observation is necessary in patients with esophageal dissection.

  17. Gaseous distention of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus with nasal CPAP: a mimicker of pharyngeal perforation and esophageal atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walor, David; Berdon, Walter; Holt, Peter D.; Fox, Matthew [Columbia University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Children' s Hospital of New York, New York, NY (United States); Anderson, Nicole [Columbia University Medical Center, Department of Neonatology, New York, NY (United States); Children' s Hospital of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been used since 1975 as the initial treatment for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in very premature infants. Gaseous distention of the abdomen (CPAP belly) is a common secondary effect of CPAP. Gaseous distention of the hypopharynx is also common. To determine the incidence of hypopharyngeal distention in infants on CPAP. We performed a retrospective review of the chest radiographs of 57 premature infants treated with CPAP during a 4-week period to find the presence and degree of hypopharyngeal distention. Of the 57 radiographs, 14 (25%) revealed gaseous distention of the hypopharynx and/or cervical esophagus. On occasion, this raised concern for pharyngeal perforation or esophageal atresia. Awareness that CPAP-related hypopharyngeal distention is common should help radiologists avoid erroneous consideration of esophageal atresia or hypopharyngeal perforation. (orig.)

  18. Gaseous distention of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus with nasal CPAP: a mimicker of pharyngeal perforation and esophageal atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walor, David; Berdon, Walter; Holt, Peter D.; Fox, Matthew; Anderson, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been used since 1975 as the initial treatment for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in very premature infants. Gaseous distention of the abdomen (CPAP belly) is a common secondary effect of CPAP. Gaseous distention of the hypopharynx is also common. To determine the incidence of hypopharyngeal distention in infants on CPAP. We performed a retrospective review of the chest radiographs of 57 premature infants treated with CPAP during a 4-week period to find the presence and degree of hypopharyngeal distention. Of the 57 radiographs, 14 (25%) revealed gaseous distention of the hypopharynx and/or cervical esophagus. On occasion, this raised concern for pharyngeal perforation or esophageal atresia. Awareness that CPAP-related hypopharyngeal distention is common should help radiologists avoid erroneous consideration of esophageal atresia or hypopharyngeal perforation. (orig.)

  19. Internal Drainage of an Esophageal Perforation in a Patient with a High Surgical Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsun Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old man presented with a productive cough and fever, and he was diagnosed as having an esophageal perforation and a mediastinal abscess. He had a history of traumatic hemothorax and pleural drainage for empyema in the right chest and was considered unable to tolerate thoracic surgery because of sepsis and progressive aspiration pneumonia. In order to aggressively drain the mediastinal contamination, we performed internal drainage by placing a Levin tube into the mediastinum through the perforation site. This procedure, in conjunction with controlling sepsis and providing sufficient postpyloric nutrition, allowed the esophageal injury to completely heal.

  20. Asymptomatic Esophageal Varices Should Be Endoscopically Treated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nib Soehendra

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic treatment has generally been accepted in the management of bleeding esophageal varices. Both the control of acute variceal bleeding and elective variceal eradication to prevent recurrent bleeding can be achieved via endoscopic methods. In contrast to acute and elective treatment, the role of endoscopic therapy in asymptomatic patients who have never had variceal bleeding remains controversial because of the rather disappointing results obtained from prophylactic sclerotherapy. Most published randomized controlled trials showed that prophylactic sclerotherapy had no effect on survival. In some studies, neither survival rate nor bleeding risk was improved. In this article, the author champions the view that asymptomatic esophageal varices should be endoscopically treated.

  1. Early esophageal carcinoma treated with intracavitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

    1985-01-01

    Five patients with early esophageal carcinoma were treated by 6-12 Gy of intracavitary irradiation following 50-60 Gy of external irradiation as a boost therapy. Surgery was not performed in these cases. None of the patients had local recurrence after radiation therapy, as demonstrated by esophagography and endoscopy. Three patients have been alive for 1-3 years 10 months. Esophageal ulceration induced by intracavitary irradiation has occurred in three of the five patients; however, intracavitary irradiation is still a beneficial treatment because of its efficacy in controlling local lesions and because radiation ulceration can eventually be cured. Intracavitary irradiation is recommended to follow external irradiation as a boost therapy for the treatment of early esophageal carcinoma

  2. Embedded Pork Bone Causing Esophageal Perforation and an Esophagus-Innominate Artery Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Berry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronically embedded foreign bodies can lead to perforations, mediastinitis, and abscess, amongst a host of other complications. A 20-year-old mentally challenged female presented with “something stuck in her throat,” severe dysphagia, and recurrent vomiting. Initial imaging was unremarkable; however, subsequent imaging and esophagogastroduodenoscopy two weeks later revealed an embedded pork bone. Surgery was performed to remove the bone and fix the subsequent esophageal perforation and esophagus-innominate artery fistula. This case helps reinforce the urgency in removing an ingested foreign body and the ramifications that may arise with chronically embedded foreign bodies.

  3. Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenak, Kamil; Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

  4. An analysis of autopsied esophageal carcinomas treated with irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shogo; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1994-01-01

    Ninety-one fresh autopsied esophageal carcinomas treated with a radiation dose of more than 40 Gy were analyzed, because no primary tumor with under 40 Gy was controlled. There were no residual tumors in 6.6% of the patients. Radiation controlled 28.6% of the locoregional tumors. The local control rate was higher in patients with a tumor length under 5 cm. Metastasis was detected in 76.9% of all the patients. Twenty patients (22.0%) had no primary tumor but metastases. The most common sites of metastasis were the lymph node, lung and liver. Multivariate analysis indicated that the primary tumor control correlated directly with the survival period. Some patients with a primary tumor which was easy to control developed lung metastasis more often. Liver metastasis was found more frequently in patients where the primary tumor was located in the lower portion of the esophagus. Patients with a tumor length of more than 10 cm had neck or mediastinal lymph node involvement more often; neck or mediastinal lymph node metastases were not always fatal immediately. Perforations into other organs were observed in 41.8% of the patients. Younger patients, patients with the tumor located in the upper portion of the esophagus, and patients with T4 tumor have a significantly higher risk of perforation. In such a patient, the total radiation dose should be reduced to less than 70 Gy. Nine patients (9.9%) had double cancers. (author)

  5. [Evaluation of stents in treating childhood benign esophageal strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinshagen, K; Kähler, G; Manegold, B C; Waag, K-L

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal stenting is a popular of treatment of esophageal strictures in adults. It has also been described for children with benign strictures who did not respond to standard dilatation therapy. The aim of the study was to evaluate weather esophageal stents could be used safely and effectively in the treatment of benign esophageal strictures in children. From 1993 to 2005 stenting therapy was performed in 12 children with complicated esophageal strictures. Etiologies of the strictures were caustic burns in 9 patients, postoperative strictures due to complicated esophageal atresia in 2 patients and iatrogenic esophageal injury in 1 patient. Esophageal silicon tubi, covered retrievable expandable nitinol and plastic stents were placed endoscopically. The clinical course and the long term follow up were evaluated retrospectively The stents and tubi were placed in all patients without complications and were later removed successfully. 6 patients were treated with a self expanding plastic stent. The plastic stents showed a distinct tendency to migrate but in 5/6 patients esophageal stricture was treated successfully. 3 patients were treated by a covered self expanding nitinol stent. No migration occurred. One patient was asymptomatic after therapy, one required further dilatation therapy and the third had esophageal resection. 3 patients were treated by esophageal tubi. 2 patients required surgery in the follow up, one patient is asymptomatic. The use of stenting devices in children to treat benign esophageal strictures is safe and efficient. The self expanding plastic stents had the best long term results but required high compliance of parents and children due to the tendency of stent migration. Self expanding nitinol stents are more traumatic at the extraction procedure and are useful in patients with low compliance. Recurrence of strictures occurred most often after esophageal tubi possibly due to the lack of radial expansion.

  6. Accuracy of CT chest without oral contrast for ruling out esophageal perforation using fluoroscopic esophagography as reference standard: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Muhammad; Qamar, Saqib; Rehman, Abdul; Baloch, Noor Ul-Ain; Shafqat, Gulnaz

    2018-02-26

    Esophageal perforation has a high mortality rate. Fluoroscopic esophagography (FE) is the procedure of choice for diagnosing esophageal perforation. However, FE can be difficult to perform in seriously ill patients. We retrospectively reviewed charts and scans of all patients who had undergone thoracic CT (TCT) without oral contrast and FE for suspicion of esophageal perforation at our hospital between October, 2010 and December, 2015. Scans were interpreted by a single consultant radiologist having > 5 years of relevant experience. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 20. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of TCT were computed using FE as reference standard. Of 122 subjects, 106 (83%) were male and their median age was 42 [inter-quartile range (IQR) 29-53] years. Esophageal perforation was evident on FE in 15 (8%) cases. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of TCT for detecting esophageal perforation were 100, 54.6, 23.4 and 100%, respectively. When TCT was negative (n = 107), an alternative diagnosis was evident in 65 cases. Thoracic computed tomography (TCT) had 100% sensitivity and negative predictive value for excluding esophageal perforation. FE may be omitted in patients who have no evidence of mediastinal collection, pneumomediastinum or esophageal wall defect on TCT. However, in the presence of any of these features, FE is still necessary to confirm or exclude the presence of an esophageal perforation.

  7. Esophageal stent implantation for the treatment of esophageal strictures: its current situation and research progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Haidong; Guo Jinhe; Teng Gaojun

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal stent implantation has been the most common therapy for the treatment of malignant and benign esophageal stenosis. At present, this technique is widely used in treating advanced esophageal cancerous stricture, refractory esophageal benign stricture and all kinds of esophageal fistulae or perforation. This paper aims to make a comprehensive review of the current situation and research progress of the esophageal stent implantation in clinical practice. (authors)

  8. A case of perforating radiation-induced ulcer of the esophagus, 7 months after radiotherapy for early esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Hajime; Hamabe, Yutaka; Narita, Kouichi

    1997-01-01

    The patient was a 64-year-old man. Early esophageal cancer, slightly depressed type, was diagnosed at the middle part of the intrathoracic esophagus. Radiotherapy was chosen because of severe liver cirrhosis. External and intracavitary irradiation (50 Gy and 12 Gy, respectively) were administered with uracil and futraful (300 mg/day). The result of this therapy was complete response. Six months later, endoscopy showed that the lesion of the tumor had been almost completely healed with normal mucosa, but after 7 months the patient complained of chest pain. A large ulcer with white belag had formed. One month later the ulcer perforated into the right side of the chest, and the patient died of pyothorax. We suspected that the esophageal cancer had recurred, but at autopsy a deep ulcer 4 cm in length was found to have perforated into the right side of the chest. Pathologic findings included severe vasculitis of the esophageal wall. We diagnosed perforation of a radiation-induced esophageal ulcer after radiotherapy. The esophageal cancer did not recur. (author)

  9. Use of 3-dimensional computed tomography to detect a barium-masked fish bone causing esophageal perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiyama, Atsushi; Tagami, Takashi; Kim, Shiei; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is useful for evaluating esophageal foreign bodies and detecting perforation. However, when evaluation is difficult owing to the previous use of barium as a contrast medium, 3-dimensional CT may facilitate accurate diagnosis. A 49-year-old man was transferred to our hospital with the diagnosis of esophageal perforation. Because barium had been used as a contrast medium for an esophagram performed at a previous hospital, horizontal CT and esophageal endoscopy could not be able to identify the foreign body or characterize the lesion. However, 3-dimensional CT clearly revealed an L-shaped foreign body and its anatomical relationships in the mediastinum. Accordingly, we removed the foreign body using an upper gastrointestinal endoscope. The foreign body was the premaxillary bone of a sea bream. The patient was discharged without complications.

  10. Autopsy findings in 40 cases of esophageal cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Michitaka; Shiojima, Kazumi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed local control, lymph node metastases and distant metastases for autopsy cases of esophageal cancer treated with radiation therapy alone. Thirty-eight patients had squamous cell carcinoma, one had adenosquamous carcinoma and one had undifferentiated carcinoma. Sixteen patients received a total dose less than 60 Gy and 24 received 60 Gy or more. The 1-year, 3-year, 5-year overall survival rates by Kaplan-Meier method were 45.8%, 16.7%, 8.3%, respectively. Four patients (10%) were free of tumors, and another six (15%) had no primary tumor but metastases. Thirty patients had persistent or recurrent primary tumors. Local tumor control rates were 25% for all patients and 34% for patients who survived more than 3 months and 33% for patients irradiated with 60 Gy or more. Tumor type, tumor length and survival times were significantly related with tumor control rates. Perforations into neighboring organs were observed in eighteen patients (45%); 12 were perforated into respiratory systems, 4 into vascular systems, 1 into the mediastinum and 1 into the pleural cavity. Thirty-two patients (80%) had lymph node metastases. Twenty-seven patients (68%) had distant metastases; 20 in the lung, 19 in the liver, 10 in the stomach, 8 in the pancreas and the adrenal gland, 7 in the pleura, 6 in the bone and the heart and the diaphragm. Concurrent double cancer was observed at autopsy in six patients; 2 early gastric cancers, 2 latent hepatomas, 1 lung cancer, 1 latent thyroid cancer. Three patients had a history of resection of other cancer before radiation therapy to esophageal cancer; 2 had gastric cancer and 1 had submandibular cancer. One patient who had another esophageal cancer apart from the first esophageal cancer received radiation therapy 12 years ago. In conclusion, the local control rate was 33% for autopsy cases of esophageal cancer treated with radiation therapy of 60 Gy or more. (J.P.N.)

  11. [Cervical abscess by Streptococcus anginosus-milleri after foreign body ingestion and suspicion of esophageal perforation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Rivero, V; Trinidad Ramos, G; González Palomino, A; Pantoja Hernández, C G; Mogollón Cano-Cortés, T; Carrasco Claver, F; Guerra Camacho, M; Blasco Huelva, A

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of cervical abscess after the ingestion of foreign body (chicken bone) secondary to probable esophageal perforation that it was sent to us with suspicion of mediastinal complication. The girl, 17 years-old, nothing else to arrive our hospitalary center required entrance in ICU due to her severe clinical process: High fever, intense neck-thoracic pain, laterocervical diffuse and progressive left inflammation and bad general state. The CT showed the presence of a well defined abscess and abundant aerial component that dissected the cervical muscles that made necessary to perform drainage verifying intraoperatively no mediastinal involvement. The culture of the purulent collection revealed Streptococcus anginosus/milleri resistant to clindamicine but sensible to penicilina and derivatives. We exposed a serie of considerations at respect of such microorganism and its clinical signification.

  12. The potential of photodynamic therapy to treat esophageal candidiasis coexisting with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haixia; Mao, Yongping; Gu, Ying; Zhu, Jianguo; Wang, Ying; Zeng, Jing; Huang, Naiyan; Liu, Qingsen; Yang, Yunsheng

    2014-01-05

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used in recent years to deal with fungal infections because of the prevalence of fungi resistance to drugs. However, PDT for gastrointestinal fungal infection has not been reported. This study was conducted to assess the potential of PDT to deal with esophageal candidiasis. Two male patients with histological evidence of esophageal candidiasis coexisting with esophageal cancer were included in this retrospective study. Both patients were treated with PDT. This treatment was repeated at least 1month after the initial PDT if the patient still had residual cancer or esophageal candidiasis. Short-term efficacy was evaluated on the basis of endoscopy and histology findings. Further follow-up data were obtained from endoscopy results or telephone conversation. The esophageal candidiasis located 21-24cm and 25-28cm from the incisors of case 1 reached complete remission after one and two PDT sessions, respectively. The esophageal cancer coexisting with esophageal candidiasis located 21-24cm from the incisors reached complete remission after two PDT sessions. No recurrence was found at a 14-month follow-up. The esophageal cancer located 30-35cm from the incisors reached partial response after three PDT sessions. Both of the esophageal candidiasis and the coexisting esophageal cancer at 23-26cm from the incisors of case 2 reached complete remission and the esophageal cancer at 34-37cm from the incisors reached complete remission after one PDT session. No recurrence was found at a 24-month follow-up. There were no serious adverse events found in either of the two cases. Results of this preliminary study indicate that PDT may be a potential method to deal with esophageal candidiasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [A Case of Emergency Resection of Esophageal Cancer Which is on the Brink of Perforation after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Atsushi; Yasuda, Takushi; Kimura, Yutaka; Kato, Hiroaki; Hiraki, Yoko; Iwama, Mitsuru; Shiraishi, Osamu; Shinkai, Masayuki; Imano, Motohiro; Imamoto, Haruhiko

    2017-11-01

    According to the Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of Carcinoma of the Esophagus in Japan, the standard treatment of esophageal cancer with cStage II / III is preoperative chemotherapy and radical resection. But when the tumor has deep ulcer, the perforation of it is sometimes occurred due of the anti-tumor effect and we are forced to change the standard treatment. In this time, we report a case of emergency resection of esophageal cancer which is on the brink of perforation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A 62-year-old woman had locally advanced esophageal cancer(cT4N2M0)and performed neoadjuvant chemotherapy(NAC). After 2 courses of NAC, the patient got into critical condition that the esophageal cancer was on the brink of perforation, thus we immediately performed emergency resection of the tumor. Unfortunately, the tumor was not completely resected because of invasion to the Botallo ligament, but we were able to avoid a critical state such as mediastinitis or penetration to the aorta. In multimodality therapy for locally advanced tumor, immediate response to oncologic emergency is significantly required, impacting on the prognosis and quality of life.

  14. Risk factors in patients surgically treated for peptic ulcer perforation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Shah, Kamran; Bendix, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The overall mortality for patients undergoing surgery for perforated peptic ulcer has increased despite improvements in perioperative monitoring and treatment. The objective of this study was to identify and describe perioperative risk factors in order to identify ways of optimizing...... the treatment and to improve the outcome of patients with perforated peptic ulcer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three hundred and ninety-eight patients undergoing emergency surgery in four university hospitals in Denmark were included in the study. Information regarding the pre-, intra- and postoperative phases were...... insufficiency upon admission and insufficient postoperative nutrition have been added to the list of independent risk factors for death within 30 days of surgery in patients with peptic ulcer perforation. Finding that shock upon admission, reduced albumin blood levels upon admission, renal insufficiency upon...

  15. Esophageal cancer treated by low dose irradiation, crescendo cisplatin and bleomycin polyacrylate pasta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishina, Hitoshi; Okuyama, Shinichi; Lim, In-Su; Yamagata, Rin; Taima, Tadashi

    1983-01-01

    Eight patients with esophageal cancer were treated by a new treatment schedule consisting of low dose irradiation, crescendo cisplatin and bleomycin polyacrylate pasta. As monitored endoscopically, therapeutic responses were satisfactory : seven out of 8 patients have survived for a range of 3 to 20 months and still active at work or cancer-free. However, one patient suffered from a second malignancy of adenocarcinoma of the upper esophagus different from the initial squamous cell carcinoma at the lower esophagus which had successfully been treated 3 months before. The present therapeutic design aims at treatment of lymphatic spreads in the adjacent structures as well as the original tumor in the esophagus and submucosal invasions. It is basically a consecutive, multimodal integration of selective concentration of therapeutic effects (extensive radiotherapy, topical application of bleomycin polyacrylate pasta, lymphatic chasing with colloidal bleomycin, and spatial concentration of cisplatin as the result of radiation-induced inflammation), perpetuation of the repairable DNA damage, and biological amplifications (protection against esophageal perforation with polyacrylate coating, and specific cancer cell recruitment). Application of the present theraeputic design is being expanded to the treatment of cancer of other specific sites such as the head and neck tumors and rectal cancer with undeniable prospects. (author)

  16. Esophageal cancer treated by low dose irradiation, crescendo cisplatin and bleomycin polyacrylate pasta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishina, Hitoshi; Okuyama, Shinichi; Lin, In-Su; Yamagata, Rin; Taima, Tadashi

    1982-01-01

    Eight patients with esophageal cancer were treated by a new treatment schedule consisting of low dose irradiation, crescendo cisplatin and bleomycin polyacrylate pasta. As monitored endoscopically, their therapeutic responses were satisfactory, and seven out of the eight survived for a range of 3 to 18 months and still active at work or ''cancer-free''. The seventh of the eight suffers from a second malignancy of adenocarcinoma of the cardia, different from the initial squamous cell carcinoma at the lower esophagus which had successfully been treated 3 months before. The present therapeutic design aims at treatment of lymphatic spreads in the adjacent structures as well as the original tumor in the esophagus and submucosal invasions. It is basically a consecutive, multimodal integration of selective concentration of therapeutic effects (extensive radiotherapy, topical application of bleomycin polyacrylate pasta, lymphatic chasing with colloidal bleomycin, and spatial concentration of cisplatin as the result of radiation-induced inflammations), perpetuation of the repairable DNA damage, and biological amplifications (protection against esophageal perforation with polyacrylate coating, and specific cancer cell recruitment). Application of the present therapeutic design is being expanded to treatment of cancer at other specific sites such as the head and neck tumors and rectal cancer with undeniable prospects. (author)

  17. Curability of esophageal carcinoma treated with irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shogo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hoshi, Akihiko; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1994-01-01

    The curability of 168 squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus treated with more than 60 Gy of irradiation between 1980 and 1987 were discussed. There were 49 autopsied cases. The curability rat was calculated after the conversion of 13 local free or 46 metastasis free patients who had not undergone autopsy into unknown cases in each analysis. Disease free, local free, and metastasis free rates were 11.2, 20.0, and 26.0%, respectively. The curability rate was higher in the superficial type cancer and stage I cases. The local control rate and the metastasis free rate were extremely poor in the infiltrative type cancer. The actuarial survival rate of overall patients was 31.5% at one year, 11.3% at three years, and 7.1% at five years. Reconstructed survival rates: disease free, local free, and metastasis free survival rates, indicated that the survival rates of overall patients might be improved by decreasing the number of intercurrent death in stage I and by elevating the ratio of the local control in stages II and III. The disease free survival rate of cases treated with low dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost was better than that of the conventionally fractionated irradiation alone cases in stages II and III. (author)

  18. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Treating Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Young Hoon; Minami, Hitomi; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is the application of esophageal myotomy to the concept of natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES) by utilizing a submucosal tunneling method. Since the first case of POEM was performed for treating achalasia in Japan in 2008, this procedure is being more widely used by many skillful endosopists all over the world. Currently, POEM is a spotlighted, emerging treatment option for achalasia, and the indications for POEM are expanding to include long-standing, sigmoid shaped esophagus in achalasia, even previously failed endoscopic treatment or surgical myotomy, and other spastic esophageal motility disorders. Accumulating data about POEM demonstrate excellent short-term outcomes with minimal risk of major adverse events, and some existing long-term data show the efficacy of POEM to be long lasting. In this review article, we review the technical details and clinical outcomes of POEM, and discuss some considerations of POEM in special situations. PMID:26717928

  19. Therapeutic evaluation of retrievable esophageal covered stent in treating achalasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuwei; Zhang Fuqiang; Yuan Liang; Li Yunhui; Luo Bin; Yu Li; Sun Dingqiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effect of retrievable esophageal covered metal internal stent in treating patients with achalasia. Methods: Under DSA guidance, peroral 'Z-type' double horn covered metal internal stent implantation was performed in 16 patients with achalasia. Esophagography was carried out about 28 days after the procedure and the stent was retrieved. Results: Of 16 cases, the stent fell off into the stomach two weeks after the operation in one. And the stent was successfully replaced after it was taken out. The placed stent was successfully retrieved in all cases 28 days after the treatment. No serious complications occurred. All the patients were followed up for 3 months to 3 years. During the follow-up period restenosis of the esophagus developed in two cases (at one and 1.5 years respectively), and the restenosis degree was relived after balloon dilation. Clinically, no esophageal symptoms, such as dysphagia, occurred in all patients. Conclusion: As a simple and safe technique, the retrievable esophageal covered metal internal stent implantation is very effective with fewer complications for the treatment of achalasia. Moreover, the technique carries lower restenosis occurrence. (authors)

  20. Analysis of locally controlled esophageal carcinomas treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Yasuo; Yamada, Shogo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hoshi, Akihiko; Ariga, Hisanori; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1996-01-01

    Of 227 esophageal carcinomas treated with a radiation dose of 60 Gy or more, 100 patients had no tumor or ulceration (with or without stenosis) of the esophagus after irradiation. We analyzed local control factors of these 100 patients to determine the need for further treatment. The cumulative local control rate at five years was 40% in all cases, 37% in 21 cases without any stenosis of the esophagus and 40% in 79 cases with stenosis. The presence of stenosis of the esophagus after irradiation was not a critical factor in predicting final local control. Local recurrence of tumors with findings of Borrmann III or Borrmann IV by the pretreatment esophageal barium study, tumors controlled after a total dose of more than 80 Gy, tumors without low dose rate telecobalt therapy (LDRT: 1 Gy/hour, 5 to 7 Gy/day, a total dose of 12 to 15 Gy) as boost therapy, and apparently controlled tumors with a stenotic ratio of 60% or more or with 5 cm or more length of stenosis of the esophagus after irradiation was significantly higher than that of the others (p<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed that findings of pretreatment barium study, total dose, with or without LDRT, and length of stenosis of the esophagus after irradiation were significantly important factors in local control. Members of the high risk group of apparently controlled tumors should undertake surgical treatment or further intensive chemotherapy. (author)

  1. Costs of treating bleeding and perforated peptic ulcers in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leest, Helena; van Dieten, Hiske; van Tulder, Maurits; Lems, Willem F; Dijkmans, Ben A C; Boers, Maarten

    2004-04-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs includes perforations and bleeds. Several preventive strategies are being tested for cost-effectiveness, but little is known about the costs of the complications they are trying to prevent. We estimated the direct costs of hospital treatment of bleeding and perforated ulcers in a university hospital, from data in discharge letters and the hospital management information system. Eligible patients had been treated in the VU University Medical Center between January 1997 and August 2000 for an ulcer bleed or perforation (International Classification of Diseases code 531-4). Resource use comprised hospitalization days and diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Insurance claim prices determined the costs from the payers' perspective. In a secondary analysis we excluded resource use that was clearly related to the treatment of comorbid illness. Fifty-three patients with a bleeding (n = 35) or perforated ulcer (n = 15) or both (n = 3) were studied, including 14 with comorbidity; 22 complications occurred in the stomach, 29 in the duodenum, one in both stomach and duodenum, and one after partial gastrectomy. A simultaneous bleed and perforation was most expensive (26,000 euro), followed by perforation (19,000 euro) and bleeding (12,000 euro). A bleed in the duodenum was more expensive than in the stomach (13,000 euro vs 10,000 euro), while the opposite was seen for perforations (13,000 euro vs 21,000 euro). Comorbidity increased costs substantially: even after correction for procedures unrelated to the ulcer complication, comorbidity more than doubled the costs of treatment. Treatment of complicated ulcers is expensive, especially in patients with comorbid conditions.

  2. Predictors of radiation-induced esophageal toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anurag K.; Lockett, Mary Ann; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and clinical/dosimetric predictors of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 207 consecutive patients with NSCLC who were treated with high-dose, definitive 3D-CRT between March 1991 and December 1998. This population consisted of 107 men and 100 women. The median age was 67 years (range 31-90). The following patient and treatment parameters were studied: age, gender, race, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of subcarinal nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy. All doses are reported without heterogeneity corrections. The median prescription dose to the isocenter in this population was 70 Gy (range 60-74) delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions. All patients were treated once daily. Acute and late esophageal toxicities were graded by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Patient and clinical/dosimetric factors were coded and correlated with acute and late Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Of 207 patients, 16 (8%) developed acute (10 patients) or late (13 patients) Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity. Seven patients had both acute and late Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity. One patient died (Grade 5 esophageal toxicity) of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy, maximal point dose to the esophagus >58 Gy, and a mean dose to the entire esophagus >34 Gy were significantly associated with a risk of Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity on univariate analysis. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus >58 Gy retained significance on multivariate analysis. Of 207 patients

  3. Esophageal leiomyoma in a dog causing esophageal distension and treated by transcardial placement of a self-expanding, covered, nitinol esophageal stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Elisabeth M; Pey, Pascaline B; de Fornel-Thibaud, Pauline; Moissonnier, Pierre H M; Freiche, Valérie

    2018-02-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 10-year-old spayed female Rottweiler was referred for evaluation because of a 2-month history of regurgitation and weight loss, despite no apparent change in appetite. The dog had received antiemetic and antacid treatment, without improvement. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination revealed a low body condition score (2/5), but other findings were unremarkable. Diffuse, global esophageal dilatation was noted on plain thoracic radiographs, and normal motility was confirmed through videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing. Transhepatic ultrasonographic and CT examination revealed a circumferential, intraparietal lesion in the distal portion of the esophagus causing distal esophageal or cardial subobstruction and no metastases. Incisional biopsy of the lesion was performed, and findings of histologic examination supported a diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME In view of numerous possible complications associated with esophageal surgery, the decision was made to palliatively treat the dog by transcardial placement of a self-expanding, covered, nitinol esophageal stent under endoscopic guidance. Two weeks after stent placement, radiography revealed complete migration of the stent into the gastric lumen. Gastrotomy was performed, and the stent was replaced and fixed in place. Twenty-four months after initial stent placement, the dog had a healthy body condition and remained free of previous clinical signs. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Diffuse benign muscular neoplasia should be considered as a differential diagnosis for acquired esophageal dilatation in adult and elderly dogs. In the dog of this report, transcardial stent placement resulted in resolution of the clinical signs, with no apparent adverse effect on digestive function. The described procedure could be beneficial for nonsurgical treatment of benign esophageal tumors in dogs.

  4. Time esophageal pH < 4 overestimates the prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with proton pump inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sloan Sheldon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Stanford University study reported that in asymptomatic GERD patients who were being treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI, 50% had pathologic esophageal acid exposure. Aim We considered the possibility that the high prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux might simply have resulted from calculating acidity as time pH Methods We calculated integrated acidity and time pH Results The prevalence of pathologic 24-hour esophageal reflux in both studies was significantly higher when measured as time pH Conclusion In GERD subjects treated with a PPI, measuring time esophageal pH

  5. Prognosis was not deteriorated by multiple primary cancers in esophageal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Katsuyuki; Tamaki, Yoshio; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal cancer patients are often associated with multiple primary cancers (MPC). The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of MPC on prognosis in esophageal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy. Between 2001 and 2008, esophageal cancer patients treated by definitive radiotherapy at Gunma Cancer Center were retrospectively reviewed. Exclusion criteria were preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy, palliative radiotherapy, follow-up of <6 months, radiation dose of <50 Gy and no information on MPC. We analyzed 167 esophageal cancer patients and 56 (33.5%) were associated with MPC. Gastric cancer was the most frequent tumor (38.2%), followed by head and neck cancer (26.5%). Median follow-up time was 31.5 months (range 6.1-87.3 months). Patients with MPC included more stage I/II esophageal cancer than those without MPC (66.1% vs. 36.9%, P<0.01). The 5-year overall survival rate for esophageal cancer with MPC was relatively better than those without MPC (46.1% vs. 26.7%), although the difference did not reach statistical significance in univariate analysis (P=0.09). Stage I/II esophageal cancer patients had a significantly better overall survival than stage III/IV patients (P<0.01). Among esophageal cancer patients with MPC, there was no difference in overall survival between antecedent and synchronous cancer (P=0.59). Our study indicated that the prognosis of esophageal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy was primarily determined by the clinical stage itself, but not the presence of MPC. (author)

  6. Esophageal Achalasia: An Uncommon Complication during Pregnancy Treated Conservatively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Spiliopoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old Caucasian woman, gravida 3 para 2, was admitted at 29 weeks of gestation because of vomiting, dysphagia for solids and liquids, and loss of weight. An enlargement of the anterior left neck region was noted on the palpation of the thyroid gland. An MRI of the neck showed a marked esophageal dilatation with the presence of food remnants along its length and the displacement of the trachea to the right. The findings of the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and manometry were suggestive of esophageal achalasia. Conservative management with total parenteral nutrition (TPN through a peripheral line proved to be successful. A healthy male baby was born by a cesarean section at 37 weeks. The patient underwent laparoscopic esophageal myotomy and fundoplication seven days postpartum.

  7. CT findings of exophageal perforation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jeong Nam; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Hahm, Chang Kok [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-01

    To determine which CT findings are useful for the early disgnosis of esophageal perforation, and on the basis of these findings, to assess the accuracy of prediction of the perforation site. A review of medical records indicated that between January 1995 and December 2001, 36 patients with esophageal perforation were admitted to our hospital. Thirteen of these [M:F=8:5, age; 28-69 (mean, 52.4) years], who had undergone CT chest scanning, were included in this study. The causes of esophageal perforation were trauma (n=5), infectious diseases (n=4), Boerhaave syndrome (n=1), lung cancer (n=1), esophageal cancer (n=1), and idiopathic. Two chest radiologists unaware of the clinical findings reviewed the CT scans and predicted whether the upper or lower esophagus was perforated. The most common CT finding was extraluminal air at the posterior mediastinum (n=11), while other findings included pulmonary consolidation (n=10), pleural effusion (n=7), discontinuity of the esophageal wall (n=6) and subcutaneous emphysema (n=4), fluid collection around the esophagus (n-4), esophageal wall thickening (n=4), pneumothorax (n=2), and lung abscess (n=2). The perforation site was accurately predicted in 76.9% of cases (10/13). The CT findings which help the diagnosis of esophageal perforation, and prediction of the sites at which it occurs, are extraluminal air of fluid collection, focal defect of the esophageal wall, and esophageal wall thickening.

  8. CT findings of exophageal perforation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Jeong Nam; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Hahm, Chang Kok

    2002-01-01

    To determine which CT findings are useful for the early disgnosis of esophageal perforation, and on the basis of these findings, to assess the accuracy of prediction of the perforation site. A review of medical records indicated that between January 1995 and December 2001, 36 patients with esophageal perforation were admitted to our hospital. Thirteen of these [M:F=8:5, age; 28-69 (mean, 52.4) years], who had undergone CT chest scanning, were included in this study. The causes of esophageal perforation were trauma (n=5), infectious diseases (n=4), Boerhaave syndrome (n=1), lung cancer (n=1), esophageal cancer (n=1), and idiopathic. Two chest radiologists unaware of the clinical findings reviewed the CT scans and predicted whether the upper or lower esophagus was perforated. The most common CT finding was extraluminal air at the posterior mediastinum (n=11), while other findings included pulmonary consolidation (n=10), pleural effusion (n=7), discontinuity of the esophageal wall (n=6) and subcutaneous emphysema (n=4), fluid collection around the esophagus (n-4), esophageal wall thickening (n=4), pneumothorax (n=2), and lung abscess (n=2). The perforation site was accurately predicted in 76.9% of cases (10/13). The CT findings which help the diagnosis of esophageal perforation, and prediction of the sites at which it occurs, are extraluminal air of fluid collection, focal defect of the esophageal wall, and esophageal wall thickening

  9. Mean esophageal radiation dose is predictive of the grade of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients treated with concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozgen, A.; Hayran, M.; Kahraman, F.

    2012-01-01

    The intention of this research was to define the predictive factors for acute esophagitis (AE) in lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The data for 72 lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy between 2008 and 2010 were prospectively evaluated. Mean lung dose, mean dose of esophagus, volume of esophagus irradiated and percentage of esophagus volume treated were analysed according to esophagitis grades. The mean esophageal dose was associated with an increased risk of esophageal toxicity (Kruskal-Wallis test, P<0.001). However, the mean lung dose and the volume of esophagus irradiated were not associated with an increased risk of esophageal toxicity (Kruskal-Wallis test, P=0.50 and P=0.41, respectively). The mean radiation dose received by the esophagus was found to be highly correlated with the duration of Grade 2 esophagitis (Spearman test, r=0.82, P<0.001). The mean dose of esophagus ≥28 Gy showed statistical significance with respect to AE Grade 2 or worse (receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.929-1.014). In conclusion, the mean esophageal dose was significantly associated with a risk of esophageal toxicity in patients with lung cancer treated with concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy. (author)

  10. Balloon dilatation of the esophageal stricture in infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Sung Wook; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kim, Woo Ki; Park, Kwi Won; Han, Man Chung; Lee, Gi Jae; Yu, Pil Mun

    1992-01-01

    Balloon dilatation has been applied in treating of various pathologic narrowing of the hollow viscus. It is now accepted as a very effective modality especially in treating esophageal stenosis obviating surgical procedure. We performed 128 balloon dilatations in 29 patients with the number of dilatations in each patient ranging from once to 12 times. The age distribution of the patients was from 3 weeks to 6 years, with the median age of 3 months. Twenty nine patients consisted of 25 postoperative esophageal strictures (21 esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 congenital esophageal stenosis, 2 tracheobronchial remnant, and 1 congenital esophageal stenosis with esophageal atresia), 2 achalasia, 1 congenital esophageal stenosis, and 1 corrosive esophagitis. We had successful dilatation in 22 patients, who showed subsequent relief of symptoms and improvement in the diameter of stenotic segment. In 14 patients, esophageal perforation occurred during the procedure, one requiring emergency thoracotomy and the other three conservative management. Seven patients had no improvement in stenotic sites after several balloon dilatations. Failed cases were congenital stenosis, achalasia, corrosive esophagitis and four postoperative strictures. We believe that balloon dilatation is the procedure of choice in the treatment of postoperative esophageal stricture in infants and children and is a safe method as the perforation which can complicate the procedure could be managed conservatively

  11. Balloon dilatation of the esophageal stricture in infants and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Sung Wook; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kim, Woo Ki; Park, Kwi Won; Han, Man Chung [Seoul Natioal University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gi Jae [Inje University Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Pil Mun [Dankuk University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-09-15

    Balloon dilatation has been applied in treating of various pathologic narrowing of the hollow viscus. It is now accepted as a very effective modality especially in treating esophageal stenosis obviating surgical procedure. We performed 128 balloon dilatations in 29 patients with the number of dilatations in each patient ranging from once to 12 times. The age distribution of the patients was from 3 weeks to 6 years, with the median age of 3 months. Twenty nine patients consisted of 25 postoperative esophageal strictures (21 esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 congenital esophageal stenosis, 2 tracheobronchial remnant, and 1 congenital esophageal stenosis with esophageal atresia), 2 achalasia, 1 congenital esophageal stenosis, and 1 corrosive esophagitis. We had successful dilatation in 22 patients, who showed subsequent relief of symptoms and improvement in the diameter of stenotic segment. In 14 patients, esophageal perforation occurred during the procedure, one requiring emergency thoracotomy and the other three conservative management. Seven patients had no improvement in stenotic sites after several balloon dilatations. Failed cases were congenital stenosis, achalasia, corrosive esophagitis and four postoperative strictures. We believe that balloon dilatation is the procedure of choice in the treatment of postoperative esophageal stricture in infants and children and is a safe method as the perforation which can complicate the procedure could be managed conservatively.

  12. Body mass index is not associated with reoperation rates in patients with a surgically treated perforated peptic ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Patricia; Møller, Morten Hylander

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present nationwide Danish cohort study was to examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and reoperation in patients who are sur-gically treated for perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). METHODS: This was a nationwide cohort study of all Danish patients who were...

  13. Clinical evaluation of the efficacy and influencing factors for stent placement in treating benign and malignant esophageal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaohua; He Jianrong; Lin Kaiqin; Jin Honglai; Li Maoquan; Zhang Qing

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical effectiveness and influence factors in the treatment of benign and malignant esophageal stenosis by placing esophageal stent. Methods: A series of this research comprised of 29 cases with esophageal cancer, 10 cardiac carcinoma, 5 cardiac achalasia, 6 benign esophageal stricture after operation. The lengths of lesion ranged from 2 to 14 cm in length with mean of 7.3 cm. Fistula were found among malignant esophageal stenosis in 6 cases. According to the dysphagia scores, 12 cases were designated at I grade, 31 with II, and 14 with III. 46 cases of malignancy were undertaken radiation therapy combined with transcatheter arterial chemotherapy from 15 to 30 days after stent placement. Results: 62 stents were placed in 57 cases (52 domestic stents, 10 Boston ultraflex), including 4 cases with 2 stents being once placed, 1 case with second time stent placement because of restenosis 4 month later. All stents were placed successfully without serious complications, such as esophageal perforation, massive hemorrhage. 5 cases of cardiac achalasia and 6 cases of benign esophageal stricture are still alive now. The survival rates of 6, 12, 24 and 36 months in 46 malignant cases, were 67.4%(31/46), 43.5%(20/46), 26.1%(12/46), and 19.6(9/46) respectively. Dysphagia were relieved significantly from 7 to 15 days after stent placement. Conclusions: Esophageal stent placement combined with radiation therapy and transcatheter arterial chemotherapy could improve patient life qualities and survival rates significantly in malignant stricture. The effects on benign esophageal stricture by stent placement are comparable with that of surgical treatment

  14. Fatal hemoptysis in patients with advanced esophageal cancer treated with apatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Wei Wang, Lin Zhang, Yan Xie, Tianchang Zhen, Gongzhang Su, Qi Zang Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Affiliated Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, China Abstract: Targeted therapy is commonly used for treating advanced malignant tumors. Compared with cytotoxic drugs, targeted drugs have the characteristics of good curative results, less adverse effects, and convenient oral administration. Hence, they are especially suitable for patients with cancer who are not able to tolerate chemotherapy. Anti-angiogenic therapy can achieve the objective by inhibiting the formation of new blood vessels in tumors. Apatinib is a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting the intracellular domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. It has been proven to be effective and safe in treating patients with gastric carcinoma and gastroesophageal junction carcinoma. So far, no reports are available on the treatment of esophageal cancer with apatinib. Two patients with advanced esophageal cancer were treated with oral apatinib because of their poor physical condition. After treatment, the dyspnea symptoms disappeared and quality of life significantly improved. Chest computed tomography showed massive necrosis of tumor tissues in each patient. The tumors significantly reduced and a cavity was formed locally in each patient. However, both patients died of massive hemoptysis, probably due to the rupture of the bronchial artery eroded by tumors. The results indicated that apatinib was effective in treating some patients with advanced esophageal cancer, and adverse effects were controllable. However, doctors should choose appropriate candidates according to apatinib’s indications. In addition, the use of apatinib should be carefully controlled for patients with esophageal cancer, especially in those with large vessels and trachea or bronchus eroded by tumor, so as to avoid or reduce the occurrence of fatal hemorrhage. Keywords: angiogenesis

  15. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for treating esophageal motility disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Pneumatic dilatation and Heller myotomy have been thoroughly studied as the most viable treatment options for achalasia. The pendulum, however, is shifting to the minimally invasive approach. Since Inoue et al. published the experience of the first 17 cases of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) in 2010, there have been at least 5,000 cases performed worldwide and the number is increasing exponentially. Experts across the globe have been extending the indications to various esophageal motility disorders, to patients of extremes of age, sigmoidal esophagus and re-operated patients. There are a few variations in technique across different centers in defining the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) and adequacy of myotomy, the optimal length, site of myotomy and whether the full thickness of the muscle wall should be cut. Large case series demonstrated its promising efficacy & reasonable complication profile. Randomized controlled trial in comparison with the gold standard, Heller myotomy, is ongoing. The future application of submucosal tunnelling technique is thrilling with its extension in tumour resection, antropyloromyotomy and other natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). PMID:28616407

  16. Recursive Partitioning Analysis for New Classification of Patients With Esophageal Cancer Treated by Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Motoo; Shitara, Kohei; Kodaira, Takeshi; Kondoh, Chihiro; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Kamata, Minoru; Muro, Kei; Sawada, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system does not include lymph node size in the guidelines for staging patients with esophageal cancer. The objectives of this study were to determine the prognostic impact of the maximum metastatic lymph node diameter (ND) on survival and to develop and validate a new staging system for patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer who were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: Information on 402 patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT at two institutions was reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses of data from one institution were used to assess the impact of clinical factors on survival, and recursive partitioning analysis was performed to develop the new staging classification. To assess its clinical utility, the new classification was validated using data from the second institution. Results: By multivariate analysis, gender, T, N, and ND stages were independently and significantly associated with survival (p < 0.05). The resulting new staging classification was based on the T and ND. The four new stages led to good separation of survival curves in both the developmental and validation datasets (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results showed that lymph node size is a strong independent prognostic factor and that the new staging system, which incorporated lymph node size, provided good prognostic power, and discriminated effectively for patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT.

  17. Local control and image diagnosis of cases of esophageal carcinoma treated by external and intracavitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Yoshio; Miura, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Discussions are made on local control of 31 cases of esophageal carcinoma which were treated by external and intracavitary irradiation between May 1980 and March 1983. X-ray and endoscopic findings have been used for the image diagnosis. Before the begining of radiotherapy, types of esophageal carcinoma were determined from X-ray findings according to Borrmann's classification. There were 10 cases of types 1 and 2, and 21 cases of types 3 and 4. After completion of external and intracvitary irradiation, all 10 cases of types 1 and 2 were locally controlled. Of the 21 cases of types 3 and 4, 8 cases which developed stenosis or deep ulcer after external irradiation all failed in local control. The remaining 13 cases of types 3 and 4 were locally controlled except 2 by radiotherapy. (author)

  18. The study on the immunity restoring function of cWPROL in treating experimental radiation esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Li; Shan Baoen; Zhang Li; Lu Fuhe; Guo Xiujuan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the restorative function of compound white peony root oral liquids (cWPROL) in treating rats' experimental acute radiation-induced esophagitis from the aspect of immunodeficiency. Methods: 128 Wistar rats were divided into eight groups. The radiation esophagitis was induced by 43 Gy 60 Co. Then the rats were treated with medicine in different ways. On every experimental point the absolute number and percentage of T lymphocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. The changes of the leukocyte in number and differential count were detected by haemocyte counting instrument. IgG and C3 in rats' serum were analyzed by immunological turbidimetry. Results: Radiation brought on decrease of experimental rats 'leukocyte count, the lymphocyte differential count, absolute count and absolute T lymphocyte subsets in the blood and the content of IgG and C3 with radiation esophagitis. cWPROL could increase the lymphocyte percentage compared that in with the radiated group 2. The preventive (high dose) could increase lymphocyte count while Western medicine decreased rats' leukocyte count, lymphocyte percentage and absolute count (P<0.05). The absolute T lymphocyte subsets in rats' peripheral blood increased in the group infused with cWPROL (high dose) (P<0.001). Compared with the radiated group 2 the absolute T lymphocyte subsets decreased significantly(P<0.001), and the content of complement C3 increased in the group infused with cWPROL (high dose) (P<0.05) but decreased in the group infused with Western medicine (P<0.01). Conclusion: cWPROL plays the role of restoring the cytoimmunity and immunity damaged by radiation in rats with radiation esophagitis. (authors)

  19. Perforation of the Esophagus Secondary to Insertion of Covered Wallstent Endoprostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrugia, Mark; Morgan, Robert A.; Latham, Jennifer A.; Glynos, Michael; Mason, Robert C.; Adam, Andreas

    1997-01-01

    Perforation of the esophagus is a very rare complication of metallic esophageal stent insertion. Two cases are presented in which esophageal perforations were caused by the sharp ends of metallic stents impinging on the esophageal wall. In retrospect, both perforations might have been prevented by additional stent insertion

  20. Costs of treating bleeding and perforated peptic ulcers in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leest, H.T.J.I.; Dieten, H.; van Tulder, M.; Lems, W.F.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Boers, M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gastrointestinal toxicity of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs includes perforations and bleeds. Several preventive strategies are being tested for cost-effectiveness, but little is known about the costs of the complications they are trying to prevent. We estimated the direct costs of

  1. Oesophageal Perforation Treated Non-Operatively in an HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oesophageal perforation is a rare condition that causes significant morbidity and may be fatal. A successful outcome is obtained by prompt recognition of the diagnosis, aggressive resuscitation and institution of conservative measures, before rushing for specific surgical intervention. Oesophageal stricture is one of the ...

  2. Quality-of-care initiative in patients treated surgically for perforated peptic ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M H; Larsson, Heidi Jeanet; Rosenstock, S

    2013-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity are considerable after treatment for perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). Since 2003, a Danish nationwide quality-of-care (QOC) improvement initiative has focused on reducing preoperative delay, and improving perioperative monitoring and care for patients with PPU. The present...... study reports the results of this initiative....

  3. Extensive caustic esophageal stricture in children can be treated by serial dilatations interspersed with silicone-covered nitinol stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent esophageal stenosis secondary to caustic ingestion may be challenging to treat. Self-expandable esophageal stents may be an alternative to repetitive endoscopic esophageal dilatation. We report a case of a 2-year-old male child with an extensive esophageal caustic stricture successfully treated using a combination of endoscopic dilatation and stenting. After 5 months of serial balloon dilatations, three nitinol internal silicone covered self-expandable stents were placed through the patient′s gastrostomy spanning the entire esophagus. The stents were positioned using a combination of both endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure was repeated with only one stent 3 months later. A new stricture in the proximal esophagus needed surgical resection and anastomosis, followed by two pneumatic dilatations with progressively longer asymptomatic intervals. The results are promising with the patient able to use his own esophagus; however, this is a single case and optimal stent standing time is still to be determined.

  4. Case report and review of esophageal lichen planus treated with fluticasone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ynson, Marie Lourdes; Forouhar, Faripour; Vaziri, Haleh

    2013-01-01

    Lichen planus is a fairly common chronic idiopathic disorder of the skin, nails and mucosal surfaces. Esophageal involvement of this disease on the other hand is rare and only about 50 cases have been reported in literature. Given its rarity, it can be difficult to diagnose and may be easily misdiagnosed as reflux esophagitis. Currently, there are no clear recommendations on the optimal management of this disease and little is known about the best treatment approach. Systemic steroids are usually the first line treatment and offer a favorable response. In this report, we would like to present a novel approach in the management of esophageal lichen planus in a middle-aged woman treated successfully with swallowed fluticasone propionate 220 mcg twice a day for 6 wk, as evidenced by objective clinical findings. Based on our review of related literature and experience in this patient, we feel that a trial of swallowed fluticasone may be a prudent approach in the management of these patients since it has a more favorable side effect profile than systemic treatment. PMID:23539434

  5. Clinical features of refractory radiation esophageal ulcer after proton beam therapy and its management in a patient with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisakura, Katsuji; Terashima, Hideo; Nagai, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that proton beam therapy is an effective treatment method for patients with locally confined esophageal cancer. However, there seems to be serious problems related to post-radiotherapy (RT) esophageal ulcers. We treated 7 patients who developed post-RT esophageal ulcers with the earliest symptom of esophageal stenosis, which was observed 7-17 months (median, 10.0) after completion of RT. Five of the patients had unhealed ulcers leading to lethal events such as perforation or penetration. The mean time between the appearance of the earliest symptom and lethal episode was no more than 2 months (mean, 2.1). The first 3 patients who underwent conservative therapies died from severe complications caused by perforation or penetration of post-RT esophageal ulcers. In the case of 2 consecutive patients, we performed surgical treatment as soon as possible since there were indications of penetration in post-RT developed esophageal ulcers. Therefore, they could be cured by a salvage operation which was subtotal esophagectomy using the stomach for esophageal replacement. Through the above-mentioned experience, we discussed surgical management for esophageal ulcers after proton beam therapy. (author)

  6. Results of the patterns of care study for esophageal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomi, Kohtaro; Oguchi, Masahiko; Yamashita Takashi

    2001-01-01

    A Patterns of Care Study examined the records of patients with thoracic esophageal cancer treated with radiotherapy and surgery in 1995 through 1997. Thirty-one percent of patients received preoperative radiotherapy; 61% of these received chemotherapy. Sixty six percent of patients received postoperative radiotherapy. Significant variables for overall survival in multivariate analysis include presence of macroscopic residual tumors (risk ratio=2.66), sex female (0.49), photon energy higher than 4 MV (0.50), Karnofsky performance status greater than 70 (0.55) and the use of chemotherapy (1.64). The value of preoperative concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be tested in a randomized trial. (author)

  7. Lymph Node Failure Pattern and Treatment Results of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Heui Kwan; Kim, Soo Geon

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the failure pattern of the celiac axis, gastric lymph node, and treatment outcome in the upper and mid-esophageal region of cancer patients treated by definitive radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, retrospectively. Materials and Methods: The study constituted the evaluation 108 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer receiving radiotherapy or a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy at Chonbuk National University Hospital from January 1986 to December 2006. In total, 82 patients treated by planned radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, were analysed retrospectively. The study population consisted of 78 men and 2 women (mean age of 63.2 years). In addition, 51 patients received radiotherapy alone, whereas 31 patients received a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The primary cancer sites were located in the upper portion (17 patients), and mid portion (65 patients), respectively. Further, the patients were in various clinical stages including T1N0-1M0 (7 patients), T2N0-1M0 (18 patients), T3N0-1M0 (44 patients) and T4N0-1M0 (13 patients). The mean follow up period was 15 months. Results: The various treatment outcomes included complete response (48 patients), partial response (31 patients) and no response (3 patients). The failure patterns of the lymph node were comprised of the regional lymph node (23 patients) and the distance lymph node which included celiac axis and gastric lymph node (13 patients). However, metastasis was not observed in the regional and distant lymph node in 10 patients, whereas 36 patients were not evaluated. Furthermore, of the 13 patients who developed celiac axis and gastric lymph node metastases, 3 were in stage T1N0-1M0 and 10 were in stage T2-4N0-1M0. A complete response appeared in 12 patients, whereas a partial response appeared in 1 patient. The mean survival time of the

  8. Treatment and prevention of serious complications after arterial perfusion chemotherapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yaoyong; Song Taimin; Guo Hongqiang; Li Naxin; Ma Guizhen; Li Huizhi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cause of severe complications after arterial perfusion for esophageal cancer and the methods of prevention. Methods: 368 cases of esophageal cancer were treated with arterial perfusion of drugs for chemotherapy. The treatment numbers were 909 including 215 males and 153 females with the age ranging from 39 to 86. These patients were verified as esophageal cancers histopathologically. Selective angiography of the relevant esophageal segments and drugs for perfusion chemotherapy were undertaken. Results: The complications included one case of paralysis due to spinal cord injury, two cases with esophageal perforation and three cases of necrotic esophagitis. The case of paralysis died of original disease one month after the treatment. Of the cases of esophageal perforation, one formed the esophagus-trachea fistula and survived for eight months after being esophageal stent implantation and the other formed esophagus-mediastinum fistula and died of massive hemorrhage after six weeks. Three cases of necrotic esophagitis occurred at the normal segments of the esophagus and formed esophgeal perforation. Of these three cases, one formed esophago-bronchial fistula and survived up to now after creating drainage stoma of stomach. Two cases of the esophagus-mediastinum and esophagus-bronchus fistula died of severe infection. Conclusions: Severe complications of esophageal arterial catheterization with drugs for chemotherapy are rare. Less harmful, non-ionization contrast medium, low cellular toxicity drugs for chemotherapy with proper doses and concentrations should be selected together with optimal speed of infusion. Esophageal internal stent placement drainage stoma creation of stomach should be the useful adjunct for severe complications. (authors)

  9. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissouni Soundouss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  10. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissouni, Soundouss; Raissouni, Ferdaous; Rais, Ghizlane; Aitelhaj, Meryem; Lkhoyaali, Siham; Latib, Rachida; Mohtaram, Amina; Rais, Fadoua; Mrabti, Hind; Kabbaj, Nawal; Amrani, Naima; Errihani, Hassan

    2012-08-09

    Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  11. Study on preventive and therapeutic function of compound white peony root oral liquids in treating radiation-induced esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Li; Shan Baoen; Zhang Li; Li Wei; Gong Yanjun; Gao Haixiang

    2007-01-01

    Wistar rats were divided into seven groups: the normal group, the irradiated group, the preventive group treated with the normal dose of compound white peony root oral liquids (cWPROL) (immediately administered on the day after rats were irradiated), the preventive group treated with the high dose of cWPROL (immediately administered on the day after rats were irradiated), the group treated with normal dose of cWPROL (administered on the 7th day after rats were irradiated), the group treated with high dose of cWPROL (administered on the 7th day after rats were irradiated), the group treated with Western medicine administered from the seventh day after irradiation. The radiation esophagitis of rats was induced by single irradiation of 43 Gy gamma ray locally. Then the rats with radiation esophagitis were treated in different ways. The food weight, water volume intaked by the rats and its body weight change were observed; The rats were killed on the 14th day after irradiation and the leucocyte count and DIFF were analyzed and the esophageal pathological sections were made. The pathological change of rats' esophageal mucosa and ultrastructure change of cells were observed for different groups. The results showed all the cWPROL and Western medicine have therapeutic function of treating radiation-induced esophagitis of rats. The ultrastructure of cells of rats in the group treated with normal dose of cWPROL recovered. The food weight and water volume intaked by the rats had increased in the group infused with cWPROL compared with purely irradiated groups, especially in the preventive group treated with high dose of cWPROL. The weight of food, the WBC count, the lymphocyte differential count in the group which was treated with Western medicine decreased compared with the purely irradiated group. Lymphocyte differential count increased in the groups administered cWPROL compared with the purely irradiated group. The compound white peony root oral liquids serves the function

  12. Radiation-induced esophageal structure in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Itoh, Hisao; Kawamura, Masashi

    1989-01-01

    Five out 165 cases (3.0%) which were treated for non-small cell lung cancer with radiotherapy (98 cases were treated with chemoradiotherapy, and the other 67 case, radiotherapy alone) developed esophageal stricture. Their clinical courses, the relationship among radiation dosage, combination with chemotherapy, the length of the irradiated esophagus, and the occurrence of esophageal stricture were reviewed. One of the 5 cases was a case with lung cancer in Bloom's syndrome, which developed an esophageal stricture after receiving only 30.6 Gy (the TDF value was 46.2) to the esophagus. This case suggests the possibility that a patient with Bloom's syndrome is more radiosensitive than normal controls. The other 4 cases were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy. One of the 4 cases was treated with concomitant use of bleomycin (BLM), while the TDF value was not more than 100 (75.4). The concomitant use of BLM was almost certainly the cause of the esophageal stricture. The other 3 cases were treated with chemoradiotherapy, the TDF values of which were more than 100 (108.7, 112.5, and 129.3). The chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and the overdosage were considered to be the cause of the esophageal stricture in these 3 cases. These data suggest that in Bloom's syndrome, radiotherapy should be performed carefully and that BLM should not be used simultaneously with irradiation to the esophagus. It is also believed that a radiation dose over 100 in TDF value to the esophagus should be discouraged when chemotherapy is codmbined. (author)

  13. Acute esophagitis for patients with local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Yi; Brink, Carsten; Knap, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Esophagitis is common in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy for local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship using clinical and dosimetric parameters in patients receiving intensity modulated...... significantly associated with esophagitis. The two models using the relative esophagus volume irradiated above 40Gy (V40, OR=2.18/10% volume) or the length of esophagus irradiated above 40Gy (L40, OR=4.03/5cm) were optimal. The upper part of esophagus was more sensitive and females experienced more toxicity...... than men. CONCLUSION: V40 and L40 were most effective dosimetric predictors of grade ⩾2 esophagitis. The upper part of esophagus was more sensitive....

  14. esophageal cancer: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Maddah Safaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Dysphagia is a common initial presentation in locally advanced esophageal cancer and negatively impacts patient quality of life and treatment compliance. To induce fast relief of dysphagia in patients with potentially operable esophageal cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy was applied prior to definitive radiochemotherapy. Material and methods : In this single arm phase II clinical trial between 2013 to 2014 twenty patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (17 squamous cell and 3 adenocarcinoma were treated with upfront 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy, followed by 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. Results : Tumor response, as measured by endoscopy and/or computed tomography scan, revealed complete remission in 16 and partial response in 4 patients (overall response rate 100%. Improvement of dysphagia was induced by brachytherapy within a few days and maintained up to the end of treatment in 80% of patients. No differences in either response rate or dysphagia resolution were found between squamous cell and adenocarcinoma histology. The grade 2 and 3 acute pancytopenia or bicytopenia reported in 4 patients, while sub-acute adverse effects with painful ulceration was seen in five patients, occurring after a median of 2 months. A perforation developed in one patient during the procedure of brachytherapy that resolved successfully with immediate surgery. Conclusions : Brachytherapy before EBRT was a safe and effective procedure to induce rapid and durable relief from dysphagia, especially when combined with EBRT.

  15. Esophageal Rupture as a Primary Manifestation in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vernon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is a chronic inflammatory process characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and, histologically, by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. In adults, it commonly presents with dysphagia, food impaction, and chest or abdominal pain. Chronic inflammation can lead to diffuse narrowing of the esophageal lumen which may cause food impaction. Endoscopic procedures to relieve food impaction may lead to complications such as esophageal perforation due to the friability of the esophageal mucosa. Spontaneous transmural esophageal rupture, also known as Boerhaave’s syndrome, as a primary manifestation of EoE is rare. In this paper, we present two adult patients who presented with esophageal perforation as the initial manifestation of EoE. This rare complication of EoE has been documented in 13 other reports (11 adults, 2 children and only 1 of the patients had been previously diagnosed with EoE. A history of dysphagia was present in 1 of our patients and in the majority of previously documented patients. Esophageal perforation is a potentially severe complication of EoE. Patients with a history of dysphagia and patients with spontaneous esophageal perforation should warrant an evaluation for EoE.

  16. Long-Term Survivorship of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Radical Intent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Agranovich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the recent trends in definitive management of esophageal cancer, the records of 138 consecutive patients treated with radical intent in a single institution between 1995 and 2003 were reviewed and analyzed. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years (range 1.1 to 10.4 years. Seventy-seven patients were treated with radiation therapy (RT only and 61 with combined regimens (CRT, in which RT was combined with either radical surgery or chemotherapy, or both. The overall survival of the entire cohort was 32% over two years and 20% over five years. The survivorship in the RT group was 17% over two years and 5% over five years. In the CRT group, 51% and 35% survived over two and five years, respectively. From all the potential prognostic factors examined by univariate and multivariate analyses, only male sex and use of CRT were strongly associated with better survivorship. There was no significant difference in the outcomes among the different regimens of CRT. Survivorship was not affected by the location or histology of the tumour, clinical stage, dose of RT or use of endoluminal brachytherapy in addition to external beam RT. There was a greater tendency to use RT only more often in older patients, but patient age did not affect survivorship. The proportion of patients treated with CRT did not change significantly over the last versus the first four years of the observed period. Combined regimens are undoubtedly superior to RT as a single modality. The long-term survivorship of patients in a subgroup of our patients treated with combined modality protocols compared favourably with the previously reported results in the literature and specifically in prospective randomized trials. However, the optimal combined modality regimen is yet to be defined.

  17. The use of endoluminal vacuum (E-Vac) therapy in the management of upper gastrointestinal leaks and perforations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Nathan R; Fleshman, James W; Leeds, Steven G; Burdick, J S

    2016-06-01

    Upper intestinal leaks and perforations are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Despite the growing experience using endoscopically placed stents, the treatment of these leaks and perforations remain a challenge. Endoluminal vacuum (E-Vac) therapy is a novel treatment that has been successfully used in Germany to treat upper gastrointestinal leaks and perforations. There currently are no reports on its use in the USA. E-Vac therapy was used to treat 11 patients with upper gastrointestinal leaks and perforations from September 2013 to September 2014. Five patients with leaks following sleeve gastrectomy were excluded from this study. A total of six patients were treated with E-Vac therapy; these included: (n = 2) iatrogenic esophageal perforations, (n = 1) iatrogenic esophageal and gastric perforations, (n = 1) iatrogenic gastric perforation, (n = 1) gastric staple line leak following a surgical repair of a traumatic gastric perforation, and (n = 1) esophageal perforation due to an invasive fungal infection. Four patients had failed an initial surgical repair prior to starting E-Vac therapy. All six patients (100 %) had complete closure of their perforation or leak after an average of 35.8 days of E-Vac therapy requiring 7.2 different E-Vac changes. No deaths occurred in the 30 days following E-Vac therapy. One patient died following complete closure of his perforation and transfer to an acute care facility due to an unrelated complication. There were no complications directly related to the use of E-Vac therapy. Only one patient had any symptoms of dysphagia. This patient had severe dysphagia from an esophagogastric anastomotic stricture prior to her iatrogenic perforations. Following E-Vac therapy, her dysphagia had actually improved and she could now tolerate a soft diet. E-Vac therapy is a promising new method in the treatment of upper gastrointestinal leaks and perforations. Current successes need to be validated through future

  18. [Esophagobronchial fistula and empyema resulting from esophageal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippo, Y; Kawana, A; Yoshizawa, A; Koshino, T; Toyota, E; Kobayashi, N; Kobori, O; Arai, T; Kudo, K; Kabe, J

    1997-05-01

    A 59-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with a one-month history of hemoptysis, generalized fatigue, and a high fever. A chest X-ray film obtained on admission showed a massive right-sided pleural effusion. Examination of an aspirate showed a high level of amylase, and bacteria that were the same as oral bacteria. Closed drainage yielded ichorous pus and food residues, which led us to the diagnosis of empyema caused by esophageal perforation. Esophagography and fiberoptic esophagoscopy revealed that an esophagobronchial fistula related to an advanced esophageal carcinoma had caused the empyema. Surgical resection was done, and the patient was alive at the time of this writing, 7 months after she was first treated. Esophageal carcinoma is sometimes accompanied by esophagobronchial fistula. Patients with this condition usually have severe respiratory symptoms; those presenting with empyema are rare. Esophageal carcinoma must be carefully ruled out as the cause of empyema.

  19. Conservatively treated perforation of the neovagina in a male to female transsexual patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    An unknown number of patients have had male to female gender transformation. Various surgical techniques have been employed to construct the neovagina. The more traditional techniques include inverted penile grafts and vascular pedicle grafts, but also the small bowel and sigmoid colon have been ...... with contrast through the neovagina showed leakage from the neovaginal top. The patient was treated conservatively with antibiotics and discharged after 7 days....

  20. Multiple primary malignant neoplasms in patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Keishi; Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Mera, Kiyomi; Doi, Toshihiko; Sano, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shigeaki

    2003-01-01

    We reviewed our clinical experiences of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer (EC) in 44 patients with multiple primary malignant neoplasms. Among them, 34 were accompanied with synchronous tumors, 8 were accompanied with antecedent tumors and 8 with subsequent tumors. The sites of primary malignant neoplasms were as follows; stomach 24 (43.6%), head and neck 17 (30.9%), colon and rectum 4 (7.3%). Among the 19 patients with synchronous cancer in the stomach, 6 patients underwent gastrectomy or endoscopic mucosal resection before CRT, and the others received definitive CRT as initial treatment. While 5 patients were alive without recurrence of EC and gastric cancer, more than half of the patients died of EC. Among 11 patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), 9 patients underwent surgery for HNC before CRT, because the clinical stages of the HNC was more progressive than that of EC. Only 3 patients achieved complete cure of both EC and HNC. The number of patients who developed subsequent tumors after CRT for EC was too small for us to draw definitive conclusions from our discussion, so further long-term follow-up and analysis based on large-scale surveys are required. Although CRT has become one of the standard treatments for EC, there is no treatment strategy for patients with both EC and other malignant primary neoplasms. Our results suggest that we should consider the curability of EC by CRT when we treat such patients. (author)

  1. Acute esophagitis for patients with Local-regional Advanced NSCLC treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Y.; Brink, C.; Knap, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Esophagitis are one of the acute treatment related toxicities to definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC. Most current researches about the risk factors for acute esophagitis are based on 3DCRT. The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship between esophagitis...... though multivariable logistic regression. The optimal dose metrics were chosen using Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). All models included one dose position parameter, one dosimetric parameter, gender, and institution. Dose position was defined as the average relative position (zero at start...

  2. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia: long term follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Cheol Yong; Park, Hyun Mee; Kim, So Eun; Lee, Shin Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Chang Joon [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of balloon catheter dilatation in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Seven patients(three males and four females) with esopha-geal achalasia were treated with balloon catheter dilatation. Balloon catheters of variable sizes were used depending on patient's conditions. The patients were followed up over a period of 12-39 months. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia was successful in all patients without esophageal perforation. All patients were relieved from dysphagia. Recurrence was not found in 5 patients on long term follow-up study, but was seen in 2 patients after 18 and 21 months, respectively. Balloon catheter dilatation was a safe and effective method in the treatment of esophageal achalasia with low recurrence rate of 29% on follow-up study.

  3. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia: long term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Cheol Yong; Park, Hyun Mee; Kim, So Eun; Lee, Shin Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Chang Joon

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of balloon catheter dilatation in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Seven patients(three males and four females) with esopha-geal achalasia were treated with balloon catheter dilatation. Balloon catheters of variable sizes were used depending on patient's conditions. The patients were followed up over a period of 12-39 months. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia was successful in all patients without esophageal perforation. All patients were relieved from dysphagia. Recurrence was not found in 5 patients on long term follow-up study, but was seen in 2 patients after 18 and 21 months, respectively. Balloon catheter dilatation was a safe and effective method in the treatment of esophageal achalasia with low recurrence rate of 29% on follow-up study

  4. Preliminary study of clinical staging of moderately advanced and advanced thoracic esophageal carcinoma treated by non-surgical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shuchai; Li Ren; Li Juan; Qiu Rong; Han Chun; Wan Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical staging of moderately advanced and advanced thoracic esophageal carcinoma by evaluating the prognosis and provide criteria for individual treatment. Methods: The authors retrospectively analyzed 500 patients with moderately advanced and advanced thoracic esophageal carcinoma treated by radiotherapy alone. According to the primary lesion length by barium meal X-ray film, the invasion range and the relation between location and the surrounding organs by CT scans the disease category was classified by a 6 stage method and a 4 stage method. With the primary lesion divide into T1, T2a, T2b, T3a, T3b and T4 incorporating the locregional lymph node metastasis, a 6 stage system was obtained, I, IIa , IIb, IIIa, IIIb and IV. The results of this as compared with those of 4 stage system, the following data were finally arrived at. Results: Among the 500 cases, there were T1 23, T2a 111, T2b 157, T3a 84, T3b 82 and T4 43. The survival rates of these six categories showed significant differences (χ 2 =63.32, P 2 =56.29, P 2 =94.29, P 2 =83.48, P<0.05). Conclusions: Both the 6 stage and 4 stage systems are adaptable to predict prognosis of moderately advanced and advanced esophageal carcinoma treated by radiotherapy alone. For simplicity and convenience, the 4 stage classification is recommended. (authors)

  5. Clinical evaluation on cardiac enlargement in patients with esophageal cancer treated by radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasamoto, Ryuta [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    Recent literature on chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer report the comparable survival results as surgery, and suggest the importance of management for the late adverse effect of chemoradiotherapy. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence and risk factors of cardiomegaly after chemoradiotherapy using low dose continuous infusion of 5FU/CDDP+5FU for esophageal cancer. Fifty-one patients with stage I-IVA esophageal cancer who were treated by radiotherapy with more than 50 Gy with or without chemotherapy and followed up for more than 6 months were analyzed. Sixteen patients were treated by radiation alone and 35 patients were treated by chemoradiotherapy. A change of CTR (cardio-thoracic ratio) was defined as the difference between CTR in the pre-treatment X-ray film and CTR in the post-treatment X-ray film with maximum cardiac silhouette. A change of CTR by more than 10% was defined as ''significant cardiomegaly''. In this study cardiac area-dose'', which is the sum of the products of cardiac area within every radiation field and its target dose, was calculated in each patient as a radiation parameter. Significant cardiomegaly was noted in 1 patient (6%) in the radiation alone group, in 8 patients (23%) in the chemoradiotherapy group and in 9 patients (18%) in the total population. In cases with more than 0.4 m{sup 2}{center_dot}Gy in cardiac area-dose, CTR elevation was significantly higher than in cases with less than 0.4m{sup 2}{center_dot}Gy. More than moderate pleural effusion was noted in 5 patients (10%). Chronic pericardial effusion and subsequent cardiac tamponade was considered to be one of the contributing factors for pleural effusion, because increases of pleural effusion coincided with CTR elevations in 3 cases. In addition, the fact that no case had right-sided unilateral pleural effusion suggested the direct effect of radiation to the pleura. Significant cardiomegaly was seen in 18% of 51 patients with

  6. Prognostic significance of anti-p53 and anti-KRas circulating antibodies in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, Pierre; Quero, Laurent; Pacault, Vincent; Schlageter, Marie-Helene; Baruch-Hennequin, Valerie; Hennequin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    P53 mutations are an adverse prognostic factor in esophageal cancer. P53 and KRas mutations are involved in chemo-radioresistance. Circulating anti-p53 or anti-KRas antibodies are associated with gene mutations. We studied whether anti-p53 or anti-KRas auto-antibodies were prognostic factors for response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) or survival in esophageal carcinoma. Serum p53 and KRas antibodies (abs) were measured using an ELISA method in 97 consecutive patients treated at Saint Louis University Hospital between 1999 and 2002 with CRT for esophageal carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma (SCCE) 57 patients, adenocarcinoma (ACE) 27 patients). Patient and tumor characteristics, response to treatment and the follow-up status of 84 patients were retrospectively collected. The association between antibodies and patient characteristics was studied. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were conducted. Twenty-four patients (28%) had anti-p53 abs. Abs were found predominantly in SCCE (p = 0.003). Anti-p53 abs were associated with a shorter overall survival in the univariate analysis (HR 1.8 [1.03-2.9], p = 0.04). In the multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors for overall and progression-free survival were an objective response to CRT, the CRT strategy (alone or combined with surgery [preoperative]) and anti-p53 abs. None of the long-term survivors had p53 abs. KRas abs were found in 19 patients (23%, no difference according to the histological type). There was no significant association between anti-KRas abs and survival neither in the univariate nor in the multivariate analysis. Neither anti-p53 nor anti-KRas abs were associated with response to CRT. Anti-p53 abs are an independent prognostic factor for esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Individualized therapeutic approaches should be evaluated in this population

  7. Prognostic significance of anti-p53 and anti-KRas circulating antibodies in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Pierre; Quero, Laurent; Pacault, Vincent; Schlageter, Marie-Helene; Baruch-Hennequin, Valerie; Hennequin, Christophe

    2012-03-26

    P53 mutations are an adverse prognostic factor in esophageal cancer. P53 and KRas mutations are involved in chemo-radioresistance. Circulating anti-p53 or anti-KRas antibodies are associated with gene mutations. We studied whether anti-p53 or anti-KRas auto-antibodies were prognostic factors for response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) or survival in esophageal carcinoma. Serum p53 and KRas antibodies (abs) were measured using an ELISA method in 97 consecutive patients treated at Saint Louis University Hospital between 1999 and 2002 with CRT for esophageal carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma (SCCE) 57 patients, adenocarcinoma (ACE) 27 patients). Patient and tumor characteristics, response to treatment and the follow-up status of 84 patients were retrospectively collected. The association between antibodies and patient characteristics was studied. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were conducted. Twenty-four patients (28%) had anti-p53 abs. Abs were found predominantly in SCCE (p = 0.003). Anti-p53 abs were associated with a shorter overall survival in the univariate analysis (HR 1.8 [1.03-2.9], p = 0.04). In the multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors for overall and progression-free survival were an objective response to CRT, the CRT strategy (alone or combined with surgery [preoperative]) and anti-p53 abs. None of the long-term survivors had p53 abs. KRas abs were found in 19 patients (23%, no difference according to the histological type). There was no significant association between anti-KRas abs and survival neither in the univariate nor in the multivariate analysis. Neither anti-p53 nor anti-KRas abs were associated with response to CRT. Anti-p53 abs are an independent prognostic factor for esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Individualized therapeutic approaches should be evaluated in this population.

  8. Prognostic significance of anti-p53 and anti-KRas circulating antibodies in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchard Pierre

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P53 mutations are an adverse prognostic factor in esophageal cancer. P53 and KRas mutations are involved in chemo-radioresistance. Circulating anti-p53 or anti-KRas antibodies are associated with gene mutations. We studied whether anti-p53 or anti-KRas auto-antibodies were prognostic factors for response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT or survival in esophageal carcinoma. Methods Serum p53 and KRas antibodies (abs were measured using an ELISA method in 97 consecutive patients treated at Saint Louis University Hospital between 1999 and 2002 with CRT for esophageal carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma (SCCE 57 patients, adenocarcinoma (ACE 27 patients. Patient and tumor characteristics, response to treatment and the follow-up status of 84 patients were retrospectively collected. The association between antibodies and patient characteristics was studied. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were conducted. Results Twenty-four patients (28% had anti-p53 abs. Abs were found predominantly in SCCE (p = 0.003. Anti-p53 abs were associated with a shorter overall survival in the univariate analysis (HR 1.8 [1.03-2.9], p = 0.04. In the multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors for overall and progression-free survival were an objective response to CRT, the CRT strategy (alone or combined with surgery [preoperative] and anti-p53 abs. None of the long-term survivors had p53 abs. KRas abs were found in 19 patients (23%, no difference according to the histological type. There was no significant association between anti-KRas abs and survival neither in the univariate nor in the multivariate analysis. Neither anti-p53 nor anti-KRas abs were associated with response to CRT. Conclusions Anti-p53 abs are an independent prognostic factor for esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Individualized therapeutic approaches should be evaluated in this population.

  9. Improvement of swallowing function in patients with esophageal cancer treated by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, Shinji; Nakajima, Kotaro; Nozawa, Kumiko [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi General Hospital; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Tanaka, Naomi; Fukao, Katashi; Itai, Yuji

    1996-12-01

    This study investigated the impact of radiotherapy on swallowing function in 152 patients with esophageal cancer. Swallowing function was retrospectively assessed in these patients using a swallowing-function scoring system. Total tumor dose ranged from 22.5 Gy in 14 fractions to 104.4 Gy in 50 fractions. Improvement in dysphagia was noted in 62.3% of these patients, with a median time to improvement of 6 weeks. Improvement rate of patients irradiated with 20.0 to 34.9 Gy, 35.0 to 59.9 Gy and 60.0 Gy or more was 23.1%, 58.3% and 71.6%, respectively. Patients with T1-3 showed, a greater improvement rate than patients with T4 cancer (72.2% versus 54.1%). On multivariate analysis, the initial score, total dose and T factor correlated with improvements in swallowing function. Our results suggest that 35.0 Gy or more is necessary to improve swallowing function. The median duration in which patients could swallow soft or solid foods, was 8 months in patients receiving 60.0 Gy or more and 2 months in patients receiving 50.0 to 59.9 Gy, respectively. There was a significant difference between these periods (p<0.01). Regarding duration of palliation, median duration for patients receiving 60.0 Gy or more was 30 weeks, while it was 22 weeks for patients treated with lesser doses (p=0.053). We recommend 60.0 Gy or more as the optimal dosage for improving dysphagia. (author)

  10. Supraclavicular node disease is not an independent prognostic factor for survival of esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeene, Paul M; Versteijne, Eva; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Bergmann, Jacques J G H M; Geijsen, Elisabeth D; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Hulshof, Maarten C C M

    2017-01-01

    The prognostic value of supraclavicular lymph node (SCN) metastases in esophageal cancer is not well established. We analyzed the prognostic value of SCN disease in patients after definitive chemoradiation (dCRT) for esophageal cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 207 patients treated between 2003 and 2013 to identify the prognostic value of metastasis in the SCN on treatment failure and survival. All patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions) combined with weekly concurrent paclitaxel 50 mg/m 2 and carboplatin AUC2. Median follow-up for patients alive was 43.3 months. The median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 17.5 months. OS at one, three and five years was 67%, 36% and 21%, respectively. For patients with metastasis in a SCN, OS was 23.6 months compared to 17.1 months for patients without metastasis in the SCN (p = .51). In multivariate analyses, higher cT status, cN status and adenocarcinoma were found to be prognostically unfavorable, but a positive SCN was not (p = .67). Median OS and median disease-free survival for tumors with SCN involvement and N0/1 disease was 49.0 months and 51.6 months, respectively, compared to 14.2 months and 8.2 months, respectively, in patients with N2/3 disease. In esophageal cancer treated with dCRT, the number of affected lymph nodes is an important independent prognostic factor, whereas involvement of a SCN is not. Supraclavicular lymph nodes should be considered as regional lymph nodes and treated with curative intent if the total number of involved lymph nodes is limited.

  11. Outcomes of nutritional interventions to treat dysphagia in esophageal cancer: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, R M; Mikhail, S; Ciombor, K; Perry, K A; Hinton, A; Stanich, P P; Zhang, C; Conwell, D L; Krishna, S G

    2017-11-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is increasing in prevalence due to rising incidence and improved treatment strategies. Dysphagia is a significant morbidity in patients with EC requiring nutritional intervention. We sought to evaluate outcomes of nutritional interventions for EC patients hospitalized with dysphagia at a population level. The National Inpatient Sample (2002-2012) was utilized to include all adult inpatients (≥18 years of age) with EC and presence of dysphagia and stricture that underwent nutritional interventions including feeding tube (FT) placement, esophageal stenting, or parenteral nutrition (PN). Temporal trends were examined with multivariate analysis performed for mortality, length of stay (LOS), and cost of hospitalization. A total of 509,593 EC patients had 12,205 hospitalizations related to dysphagia. The hospitalization rates doubled over the study period (1.52% vs. 3.28%, p esophageal stenting (13%), and PN (11%). PN was more frequently associated with a diagnosis of sepsis (6.1%, p = 0.023) compared to FT (2.5%) or esophageal stenting (1.8%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated FT and esophageal stenting had comparable mortality (OR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.49, 2.32); however, PN was associated with higher mortality (OR 2.37, 95% CI: 1.22, 4.63), cost of hospitalization ($5,510, 95% CI: 2,262, 8,759), and LOS (2.13 days, 95% CI: 0.72, 3.54). This study shows that hospitalizations for EC with dysphagia and related nutritional interventions are increasing. As a single modality, parenteral nutrition should be avoided. Among our esophageal stent and FT population, further studies are necessary to determine adequate interventions based on disease stage. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Large Epiphrenic Diverticulum with Perforation and Leakage below the Diaphragm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønserud, Majken Munk; Brenøe, Anne-Sofie; Eckardt, Jens

    2015-01-01

    contrast revealed contrast leakage near the minor curvature of the stomach. The following esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated a giant dilatation of the esophagus, as well as a second esophageal lumen originating 25 cm from the incisors. The “false” lumen of the esophagus was located parallel...... to esophagus, ending blindly in a perforation below the diaphragm. The clinical presentation and the patient’s age make it most likely, that it was a long epiphrenic diverticulum of pulsion type. The patient was treated conservatively, discharged after 10 days and has been followed in our outpatient clinic...... for 8 months, until he died of aggressive pulmonary cancer....

  13. Guidewire-induced coronary perforation successfully treated with subcutaneous fat embolisation: A simple technique available to all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sudhakar; Cotton, James; Wrigley, Ben

    2015-12-01

    A 62-year-old man presented with an anterior ST elevation myocardial infarction and underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention to an occluded diagonal artery. Following stenting, a type III distal guidewire-induced coronary perforation of the diagonal branch was recognized with extravasation of contrast into the pericardial space. Prolonged balloon inflations proximal to the site of the perforation were unsuccessful. Subcutaneous fat was therefore harvested from the patients upper thigh under local anesthetic and embolized through an Export catheter into the distal diagonal vessel, resulting in the immediate cessation of leak through the site of perforation. We discuss the technical aspects of this technique as well as alternative methods of distal embolization and the potential complications that must be considered. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Overall Survival of Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated with Nimotuzumab in the Real World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saumell, Yaimarelis; Sanchez, Lizet; González, Sandra; Ortiz, Ramón; Medina, Edadny; Galán, Yaima; Lage, Agustin

    2017-12-01

    Despite improvements in surgical techniques and treatments introduced into clinical practice, the overall survival of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma remains low. Several epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors are being evaluated in the context of clinical trials, but there is little evidence of effectiveness in real-world conditions. This study aimed at assessing the effectiveness of nimotuzumab combined with onco-specific treatment in Cuban real-life patients with locally advanced or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. A comparative and retrospective effectiveness study was performed. The 93 patients treated with nimotuzumab were matched, with use of propensity score matching, with patients who received a diagnosis of locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus in three Cuban provinces reported between 2011 and 2015 to the National Cancer Registry. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate event-time distributions. Log-rank statistics were used for comparisons of overall survival between groups. A two-component mixture model assuming a Weibull distribution was fitted to assess the effect of nimotuzumab on short-term and long-term survival populations. There was an increase in median overall survival in patients treated with nimotuzumab (11.9 months versus 6.5 months without treatment) and an increase in the 1-year survival rate (54.0% versus 21.9% without treatment). The 2-year survival rates were 21.1% for patients treated with nimotuzumab and 0% in the untreated cohort. There were statistically significant differences in survival between groups treated and not treated with nimotuzumab, both in the short-term survival population (6.0 months vs 4.0 months, p = 0.009) and in the long-term survival population (18.0 months vs 11.0 months, p = 0.001). Our study shows that nimotuzumab treatment concurrent with chemoradiotherapy increases the survival of real-world patients with locally advanced

  15. Health-Care Utilization and Complications of Endoscopic Esophageal Dilation in a National Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Goyal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims Esophageal stricture is usually managed with outpatient endoscopic dilation. However, patients with food impaction or failure to thrive undergo inpatient dilation. Esophageal perforation is the most feared complication, and its risk in inpatient setting is unknown. Methods We used National Inpatient Sample (NIS database for 2007–2013. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify patients with esophageal strictures. Logistic regression was used to assess association between hospital/patient characteristics and utilization of esophageal dilation. Results There were 591,187 hospitalizations involving esophageal stricture; 4.2% were malignant. Endoscopic dilation was performed in 28.7% cases. Dilation was more frequently utilized (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; p<0.001, had higher in-hospital mortality (3.1% vs. 1.4%, p<0.001, and resulted in longer hospital stays (5 days vs. 4 days, p=0.01, among cases of malignant strictures. Esophageal perforation was more common in the malignant group (0.9% vs. 0.5%, p=0.007. Patients with malignant compared to benign strictures undergoing dilation were more likely to require percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or jejunostomy (PEG/J tube (14.1% vs. 4.5%, p<0.001. Palliative care services were utilized more frequently in malignant stricture cases not treated with dilation compared to those that were dilated. Conclusions Inpatient endoscopic dilation was utilized in 29% cases of esophageal stricture. Esophageal perforation, although infrequent, is more common in malignant strictures.

  16. Health-Care Utilization and Complications of Endoscopic Esophageal Dilation in a National Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Abhinav; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Yadlapati, Sujani; Singh, Shailender

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal stricture is usually managed with outpatient endoscopic dilation. However, patients with food impaction or failure to thrive undergo inpatient dilation. Esophageal perforation is the most feared complication, and its risk in inpatient setting is unknown. Methods We used National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database for 2007–2013. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify patients with esophageal strictures. Logistic regression was used to assess association between hospital/patient characteristics and utilization of esophageal dilation. Results There were 591,187 hospitalizations involving esophageal stricture; 4.2% were malignant. Endoscopic dilation was performed in 28.7% cases. Dilation was more frequently utilized (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; p<0.001), had higher in-hospital mortality (3.1% vs. 1.4%, p<0.001), and resulted in longer hospital stays (5 days vs. 4 days, p=0.01), among cases of malignant strictures. Esophageal perforation was more common in the malignant group (0.9% vs. 0.5%, p=0.007). Patients with malignant compared to benign strictures undergoing dilation were more likely to require percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or jejunostomy (PEG/J) tube (14.1% vs. 4.5%, p<0.001). Palliative care services were utilized more frequently in malignant stricture cases not treated with dilation compared to those that were dilated. Conclusions Inpatient endoscopic dilation was utilized in 29% cases of esophageal stricture. Esophageal perforation, although infrequent, is more common in malignant strictures. PMID:28301921

  17. Spectrum of Perforation Peritonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakma, Sujit M.; Singh, Rahul L.; Parmekar, Mahadev V.; Singh, K.H. Gojen; Kapa, Buru; Sharatchandra, K.H.; Longkumer, Amenla T.; Rudrappa, Santhosh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Perforation peritonitis mostly results from the perforation of a diseased viscus. Other causes of perforation include abdominal trauma, ingestion of sharp foreign body and iatrogenic perforation. The diagnosis is mainly based on clinical grounds. Plain abdominal X-rays (erect) may reveal dilated and oedematous intestines with pneumoperitoneum. Ultrasound and CT scan may diagnose up to 72% and 82% of perforation respectively. The present study was carried out to study various etiological factors, modes of clinical presentation, morbidity and mortality patterns of perforation peritonitis presented in the RIMS hospital, Imphal, India. Material and Methods: The study was conducted from September 2010 to August 2012 on 490 cases of perforation peritonitis admitted and treated in the Department of Surgery. Initial diagnosis was made on the basis of detailed history, clinical examination and presence of pneumoperitoneum on erect abdominal X-ray. Results: A total of 490 patients of perforation peritonitis were included in the study, with mean age of 48.28 years. 54.29% patients were below 50 years and 45.71% patients were above 50 years. There were 54.29% male patients and 45.71% female patients. Only 30% patients presented within 24 hours of onset of symptoms, 31.43% patients presented between 24 to 72 hours and 38.57% patients presented 72 hours after the onset of symptoms. Mean duration of presentation was 54.7 hours. Overall 469 patients were treated surgically and 21 patients were managed conservatively. Overall morbidity and mortality recorded in this study were 52.24% and 10% respectively. PMID:24392388

  18. Esophageal Cicatricial Pemphigoid as an Isolated Involvement Treated with Mycophenolate Mofetil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Sánchez Prudencio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cicatricial pemphigoid (CP is a rare blistering autoimmune disease. Esophageal involvement occurs in widespread disease and rarely appears as the only affected organ. We report a 67-year-old Caucasian female with esophageal dysphagia and weight loss. Several oral panendoscopies showed multiple exudative ulcerations with fibrin and webs in mid- and proximal esophagus and a peeling mucosa. There were no lesions in other organs. We established the diagnosis performing a direct immunofluorescence (DIF, demonstrating IgG3 and complement deposition along the basement membrane. As initial treatment the patient received prednisone 60 mg and 1 gr twice daily of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF as a steroid-sparing agent due to its lower toxicity and its selective mechanism of action. Six months later there was a significant clinical improvement and the esophageal ulcerations had disappeared, developing cicatricial fibrous rings, although no stenosis was present. Four years later, the patient remains asymptomatic with a low maintenance dose of MMF.

  19. Prognostic value of p53 mutations in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Tomohiro; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Makino, Reiko; Ito, Hiroaki; Konishi, Kazuo; Kurahashi, Toshinori; Kitahara, Tadashi; Mitamura, Keiji [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-05-01

    A significant correlation has been found between p53 mutation and response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. To determine the prognostic value of p53 mutation in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy, p53 mutation was analyzed using the biopsied specimens taken for diagnosis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy was performed for 40 patients with severe dysphagia caused by esophageal squamous cell carcinoma associated with T3 or T4 disease. Chemotherapy consisted of protracted infusion of 5-fluorouracil, combined with an infusion of cisplatinum. Radiation treatment of the mediastinum was administered concomitantly with chemotherapy. The p53 gene mutation was detected by fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) methods. DNA sequences were determined for DNA fragments with shifted peaks by SSCP methods. Of the 40 patients, 15 had T3 disease and 25 had T4 disease; 11 patients had M1 lymph node (LYM) disease. Of the 40 patients, 13 (33%) achieved a complete response. The median survival time was 14 months, and the 2-year survival rate was 20%. Among the 40 tumor samples, p53 mutation was detected in 24 tumors (60%). The survival rate in the 24 patients with p53 mutation did not differ significantly from that in the 16 patients without p53 mutation. In contrast, the 15 patients with T3 disease survived longer than the 25 patients with T4 disease (P=0.016); however, the survival rate in the 11 patients with M1 LYM disease did not differ significantly from that in the 29 patients without M1 LYM disease. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is potentially curative for locally advanced esophageal carcinoma, but p53 genetic abnormality has no impact on prognosis. (author)

  20. Prognostic value of p53 mutations in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tomohiro; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Makino, Reiko; Ito, Hiroaki; Konishi, Kazuo; Kurahashi, Toshinori; Kitahara, Tadashi; Mitamura, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    A significant correlation has been found between p53 mutation and response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. To determine the prognostic value of p53 mutation in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy, p53 mutation was analyzed using the biopsied specimens taken for diagnosis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy was performed for 40 patients with severe dysphagia caused by esophageal squamous cell carcinoma associated with T3 or T4 disease. Chemotherapy consisted of protracted infusion of 5-fluorouracil, combined with an infusion of cisplatinum. Radiation treatment of the mediastinum was administered concomitantly with chemotherapy. The p53 gene mutation was detected by fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) methods. DNA sequences were determined for DNA fragments with shifted peaks by SSCP methods. Of the 40 patients, 15 had T3 disease and 25 had T4 disease; 11 patients had M1 lymph node (LYM) disease. Of the 40 patients, 13 (33%) achieved a complete response. The median survival time was 14 months, and the 2-year survival rate was 20%. Among the 40 tumor samples, p53 mutation was detected in 24 tumors (60%). The survival rate in the 24 patients with p53 mutation did not differ significantly from that in the 16 patients without p53 mutation. In contrast, the 15 patients with T3 disease survived longer than the 25 patients with T4 disease (P=0.016); however, the survival rate in the 11 patients with M1 LYM disease did not differ significantly from that in the 29 patients without M1 LYM disease. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is potentially curative for locally advanced esophageal carcinoma, but p53 genetic abnormality has no impact on prognosis. (author)

  1. The PER (Preoperative Esophagectomy Risk) Score: A Simple Risk Score to Predict Short-Term and Long-Term Outcome in Patients with Surgically Treated Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeh, Matthias; Metze, Johannes; Uzunoglu, Faik G; Nentwich, Michael; Ghadban, Tarik; Wellner, Ullrich; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Kluge, Stefan; Izbicki, Jakob R; Vashist, Yogesh K

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal resection in patients with esophageal cancer (EC) is still associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. We aimed to develop a simple preoperative risk score for the prediction of short-term and long-term outcomes for patients with EC treated by esophageal resection. In total, 498 patients suffering from esophageal carcinoma, who underwent esophageal resection, were included in this retrospective cohort study. Three preoperative esophagectomy risk (PER) groups were defined based on preoperative functional evaluation of different organ systems by validated tools (revised cardiac risk index, model for end-stage liver disease score, and pulmonary function test). Clinicopathological parameters, morbidity, and mortality as well as disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were correlated to the PER score. The PER score significantly predicted the short-term outcome of patients with EC who underwent esophageal resection. PER 2 and PER 3 patients had at least double the risk of morbidity and mortality compared to PER 1 patients. Furthermore, a higher PER score was associated with shorter DFS (P PER score was identified as an independent predictor of tumor recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] 2.1; P PER score allows preoperative objective allocation of patients with EC into different risk categories for morbidity, mortality, and long-term outcomes. Thus, multicenter studies are needed for independent validation of the PER score.

  2. Pattern of relapse in surgical treated patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and its possible impact on target delineation for postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wenjie; Xin Peiling

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a reference for determination of the postoperative radiotherapy target volume for thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Background data: The irradiation target volume is important for effective postoperative treatment of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: One hundred forty patients with recurrent or metastatic thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who had been treated with radical surgery but not with postoperative radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. The information of locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis for these patients was analyzed. Results: The median time to progression in the 140 patients with recurrence or metastasis was 18.3 months (range 15.4-21.1 months). Anastomotic recurrence accounted for 13.6% of treatment failures. The supraclavicular and station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes had high metastasis rates for esophageal squamous cell carcinomas in all locations. The order from highest to lowest metastasis rate for the station 3 and 4 lymph nodes was middle, upper and lower thoracic esophageal regions and the order for upper abdominal lymph nodes was lower, middle, and upper thoracic esophageal regions. Locoregional recurrence was the most common type of recurrence. Conclusions: For upper and middle thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, the anastomosis, supraclavicular, and station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes should be delineated as the postoperative prophylactic irradiation target volume with upper abdominal lymph nodes excluded; for lower thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, anastomosis, supraclavicular, station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes and upper abdominal lymph nodes should be delineated as the postoperative prophylactic irradiation target volume.

  3. Comprehensive swallowing exercises to treat complicated dysphagia caused by esophageal replacement with colon: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Wang, Yujue; Li, Na; Qiu, Weihong; Wu, Huixiang; Huo, Jianshan; Dai, Meng; Yu, Yong; Wan, Guifang; Dou, Zulin; Guo, Weiping

    2017-02-01

    Surgical procedures for colonic replacement of the esophagus are most commonly associated with anastomotic stricture which cause dysphagia. In this report, we describe a rare case of a patient who demonstrated dysphagia resulting from an anastomotic stricture following esophageal replacement with the colon. All the treatments to dilate the anastomotic stricture were ineffective. To investigate the new treatment strategy for a case with complicated dysphagia, clinical dysphagia evaluations, functional oral intake scale (FOIS), videofluoroscopic swallowing study as well as high-resolution manometry were used to evaluate the swallowing function of the patient before and after treatments. Comprehensive swallowing exercises included the protective airway maneuver, tongue pressure resistance feedback exercise, Masako Maneuver swallowing exercise, and the effortful swallowing exercise. Comprehensive swallowing exercises showed good effect in the patient. The FOIS score increased from level 1 to level 7. The videofluoroscopy digital analysis showed that the pharynx constriction rate was 23% and 50%, before and after treatment, respectively. The data from the high-resolution manometry displayed that: the value of the velopharyngeal pressure peak was 82.8 mmHg before treatment and 156.9 mmHg after treatment; the velopharyngeal contraction duration time was 310 milliseconds before treatment and 525 milliseconds after treatment; the value of the hypopharynx pressure peak was 53.7 mmHg before treatment and 103.2 mmHg after treatment; and the hypopharynx contraction duration time was 390 milliseconds before treatment and 1030 milliseconds after treatment. The swallowing visualization illustrated that a bolus could normally pass through the anastomotic stoma, and the bolus leakage was no longer present. The patient was able to eat various consistencies of food independently, and we were able to remove the jejunum nutrient catheter before discharging the patient. For

  4. Esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, O.; Ganem, G.; Denis, F.; Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Pradier, O.; Martin, P.; Mirabel, X.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancers are highly malignant tumours with often a poor prognosis, except for minimal lesions treated with surgery. Radiation therapy, or combined radiation and chemotherapy is the most used therapeutic modality, alone or before oesophagectomy. The delineation of target volumes is now more accurate owing the possibility to use routinely the new imaging techniques (mainly PET). The aim of this work is to precise the radio-anatomical particularities, the pattern of spread of esophageal cancer and the principles of 3D conformal radiotherapy illustrated with a clinical case. (authors)

  5. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan-Wen; Du, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow's relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  6. [Medium-term outcome, follow-up, and quality of life in children treated for type III esophageal atresia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepeytre, C; De Lagausie, P; Merrot, T; Baumstarck, K; Oudyi, M; Dubus, J-C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the medium-term outcome (health status, medical and surgical French National Health Authority-recommended follow-up, and quality of life) of children born with type III esophageal atresia (EA). Previous events (during the perinatal period, associated abnormalities, respiratory and digestive complications) of children treated for type III EA at the Marseille university hospitals between 1999 and 2009 were noted. Parents completed a standardized questionnaire concerning the health of their children during the previous year, and a quality-of-life questionnaire (PedsQL 4.0) was also completed by children aged more than 8 years. Among the 68 children treated, 44 responded to our solicitation (mean age, 7.6 years; range, 3-12.8 years). Previous important events were : pneumonia(s) (65%), asthma before the age of 3 years (66%), hospitalization for a respiratory event (45%), fundoplication (20%), and esophageal dilatation (45%). We noted current chronic cough (16%), asthma (30%), dysphagia (39%), and symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (9%). National guidelines were not respected, except for the surgical indications in children aged less than 6 years. The quality-of-life scores (n=43 children) were similar to healthy controls but were negatively influenced by a gastrostomy procedure (P=0.020), pneumonia (P=0.013), and hospitalization due to a respiratory event (P=0.006) or a digestive event (P=0.010), and also by current asthma (P=0.004). In conclusion, despite recurrent respiratory or digestive symptoms and inadequate recommended follow-up, the quality of life of children treated for type III of EA is good. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  7. External air compression: A rare cause of blunt esophageal injury, managed by a stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muneer

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: High index of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis of esophageal perforation after blunt trauma. Appropriate drainage, antibiotic and temporary endoscopic esophageal stenting may be an optimal approach in selected patients, especially with delayed diagnosis.

  8. MMP-9, uPA and uPAR proteins expression and its prognostic significance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shuchai; Wang Yafei; Su Jingwei; Wang Yuxiang; Shen Wenbin; Li Juan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the the prognostic significance of MMP-9, uPA and uPAR protein expression and its relationship with clinical-pathologic factors in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy. Methods: MMP-9, uPA and uPAR protein expression was measured in 59 esophageal carcinomas and 41 peri-carcinoma tissues with immunohistochemistry. The relationship between the protein expression and the clinical-pathological parameters was analyzed, and the prognostic factors in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy alone was evaluated. Results: The rates of positive expression of MMP-9, uPA and uPAR were 85%, 76% and 78% in esophageal carcinoma and 39%, 49% and 44% in peri-carcinoma tissues (χ 2 =22.54, 8.04 and 12.18; P=0.000,0.005 and 0.000). The rates of positive expression of MMP-9 was 79% and 100% when the depth of tumor invasion was ≤2 cm and >2 cm(P= 0.048), respectively. The expression of uPA was significantly correlated with the status of fat interspace between the esophageal lesion and the vertebra in CT scanning image. When the fat interspace existed and disappeared, the rates of strong positive expression was 44% and 70%, respectively (χ 2 =4.21, P=0.040). The positive expression rate of uPA was significantly correlated with distant metastasis, which was 100% in patients with distant metastasis and 68.89% in those without distant metastasis(χ 2 =4.12, P=0.042). The positive expression rate of MMP-9, uPA and uPAR did not affect the prognosis and the short-term result of esophageal carcinoma treated by radiotherapy alone. Conclusions: The protein expression of MMP-9, uPA and uPAR may correlate with local infiltration and distant metastasis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Protein expression may not influence the prognosis of esophageal carcinoma treated by radio therapy, though long time followed-up is still needed. (authors)

  9. A case of recurrent esophageal cancer treated with salvage lymphadenectomy after definitive chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Kazuki; Sato, Tsutomu; Maezawa, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man admitted with dysphagia was found to have advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, clinical stage 4 (T4N2M0). We initiated definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) with combined 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin chemotherapy (FP therapy) and 50.4 Gy irradiation, followed by boost FP therapy, to which the patient showed confirmed complete response (CR). Local recurrence was detected in the scar of the primary lesion at 4 months after the boost FP therapy. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for this lesion resulted in CR. Thirteen months later, right hilar and right pericardial lymph node metastases were found. The right hilar lymph node metastases were not visible on CT after triweekly docetaxel therapy, but the pericardial lesions remained. The patient underwent salvage lymphadenectomy without further chemotherapy, and at 5 months after surgery, he was alive and recurrence-free. (author)

  10. Pneumatic Dilation of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter Can Now Be Successfully Performed Without Morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Bustamante, Marco; Moraveji, Sharareh; McCallum, Richard W

    2016-11-01

    Patients with dysphagia may be diagnosed with impaired lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and treated with pneumatic dilation (PD), stretching and tearing LES muscle fibers. Esophageal perforation has been reported to be as high as 10%. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the perforation rate of PD when used for impaired relaxation of the LES using current techniques. A chart review was conducted to identify patients referred for esophageal manometry by high-resolution manometry and later received PD from January 2013 to April 2016. The diagnoses of achalasia, gastroesophageal junction outlet obstruction or hypertensive LES with accompanying impaired LES relaxation were based on the Chicago Classification III. Demographic data, clinical findings, treatment approaches and outcomes were explored. A total of 187 patients were referred for dysphagia and had esophageal manometry during this time frame. In all, 62 patients (34 female), mean age of 52 years, met the criteria for incomplete relaxation of the LES and underwent a total of 88 PD procedures. All initial PD procedures used the 30-mm diameter balloon, 18 subsequently required a 35-mm balloon and 8 went on to 40-mm balloon size. No perforations or other complications were documented by esophagogastroduodenoscopy, gastrografin testing immediately postdilation or by subsequent clinical outcome. PD by an experienced gastroenterologist using general anesthesia, fluoroscopic guidance, Rigiflex balloon equipment and a specific repetitive technique can be successfully performed without perforation. Hence, the already known therapeutic efficacy of PD can now be combined with the knowledge that there is essentially no accompanying perforation rate. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A case report of an ampullary tumor presenting with spontaneous perforation of an aberrant bile duct and treated with total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Mehmet

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This case report discusses a patient who presented with bile peritonitis due to spontaneous perforation of an aberrant bile duct that originated in the triangular ligament of the liver. It was associated with an ampullary tumor and treated with total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (TLPD. Case report A 58-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department of Medical Park Gaziantep Hospital in September 2009 with acute abdominal findings. He underwent an urgent laparoscopy, and, interestingly, bile peritonitis due to the rupture of an aberrant bile duct in the triangular ligament was noted. After laparoscopic treatment of the acute conditions, the follow-up examinations of the patient showed the finding of obstructive jaundice. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography revealed a 1-cm polypoid mass located at the ampulla of Vater (duodenal papilla with possible extension to the ampullary sphincter. A stent was inserted for temporary biliary drainage, and subsequent endoscopic biopsy showed the pathological finding of adenocarcinoma. After waiting for a 1-month period for the peritonitis to heal, the patient underwent pylorus-preserving TLPD and was discharged without any major complications on postoperative day 7. Conclusion In patients with bile peritonitis, it should be considered that the localization of the perforation may be in an aberrant bile duct localized at the triangular ligament and the etiology may be associated with an obstructing periampullary tumor. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy is a feasible operative procedure in carefully selected patients. This technique can achieve adequate margins and follows oncological principles. Randomized comparative studies are needed to establish the superiority of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery.

  12. Assessment of long-term quality of life of esophageal carcinoma patients treated with continuous accelerated hyperfractionated and late-course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yang; He Shaoqin; Shi Xuehui; Jiang Kaida; Yao Weiqiang; Wang Ying

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare the long-term quality of life in esophageal carcinoma patients treated with continuous accelerated hyperfractionated (CAHF) and late-course accelerated hyperfractionated (LCAF) radiotherapy. Methods: Subjective and Objective Management Analysis (SOMA) scale, Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) and Life Satisfaction Index A (LSIA) questionnaire were mailed to the long survivors in both CAHF and LCAF groups to assess the long-term quality of life including symptoms, psychological status and life satisfaction. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in the score of quality of life such as late radiation reaction, SCL-90 and LSI-A. Conclusions: 1. It is reasonable to assess the quality of life with these scales for esophageal carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy, 2. Preliminary results demonstrate that there is no significant difference in long-term quality of life between the CAHF and LCAF radiotherapy groups, 3. Methods of evaluating the long-term quality of life for esophageal carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy needs further investigation, preferably involving more patients and setting on control arm

  13. Esophageal Mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Boatright

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare invasive fungal infection with high mortality. It usually affects patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or hematological malignancies. Gastroenterologists need to be aware of this rare infection because endoscopy can facilitate early diagnosis and prompt appropriate therapy. Here we describe a case of invasive esophageal mucormycosis that developed in a 63-year-old man with diabetes, acute promyelocytic leukemia, and prolonged leukopenia after chemotherapy. Upper endoscopy showed distal circumferential esophageal wall thickening with devitalization. The mucosa did not bleed after endoscopic biopsy. Histopathology confirmed mucormycosis. He was treated with various antifungal agents including echinocandins, fluconazole, and liposomal amphotericin B. Despite aggressive antifungal therapy and supportive care, the patient died 24 days later.

  14. Complications related to conventional self-expandable metal stent insertion and internal irradiation stent insertion in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma: an analysis of 32 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xingwen; Di Haiting; Zhu Jun; Shi Jian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the occurrence of complications between conventional self-expandable metal stent and internal irradiation stent insertion in treating patients with advanced esophageal carcinomas. Methods: A total of 32 patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma were randomly divided into irradiation stent group (n=15) and conventional stent group (n=17). Internal irradiation stent loaded with 125 I seeds was employed in patients of irradiation stent group, while conventional self-expandable metal stent was used in patients of conventional stent group. After the treatment, clinical follow-up was regularly conducted. Postoperative complications such as fever, severe chest pain, cough, esophageal perforation, pneumonia, hemorrhage, stent migration and restenosis, etc. were observed. Results: No significant difference in the occurrence of fever, severe chest pain, esophageal perforation and hemorrhage existed between the two groups (P>0.05). The difference in the occurrence of long-term complications such as stent migration or restenosis between the two groups was out statistically significant (P>0.05). However, the restenosis in irradiation stent group occurred obviously much later than that in conventional stent group. Conclusion: For the treatment of advanced esophageal carcinomas, the insertion of internal irradiation esophageal stent is safe. It dose not increase the incidence of postoperative complications. Therefore, it is worth popularizing this technique in clinical practice. (authors)

  15. Analysis of 5 year survival of esophageal cancer treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takegawa, Yoshihiro; Ohgushi, Ikuyo; Hiraki, Yoshio; Honke, Yoshifumi; Matsuki, Tsutomu; Yokoyama, Takashi; Yoshida, Mineo.

    1987-01-01

    Since 1984, a total of 1,419 patients with carcinoma of the esophagus were treated at the Department of Radiology of 17 hospitals in Chugoku-Shikoku province. The five year survival rate was 7.3 % (42/578 cases). Thirty-nine out of the forty-two cases were analyzed according to the tumor extent, localization and types of the X-ray findings. In addition, 95 patients (67 had been reported in other journals and 28 in this report) who have survived more than 5 years after radical radiotherapy were analyzed. (author)

  16. Traumatic oesophageal perforation due to haematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj Larsen, Christian; Brandt, Bodil

    2014-01-01

    . Three explanations postulated to be the cause for late perforation which might be due to esophageal wall ischemia from pressure built up between the hematoma, azygos vein and the lower part of thoracic trachea; or could be an immediate rupture walled-off until the patient became symptomatic......; or the intramural hematoma gradually lysed and causing late perforation. CONCLUSION: Although extremely rare, an oesophageal haematoma and late complications must be considered in patients on anti-coagulant therapy following blunt thoracic trauma and complaining only of chest pain....

  17. Long-term observation of endodontic surgical intervention to treat root perforation and apical periodontitis: a case report of an amalgam-restored tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumachi, Tamotsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2003-10-01

    A case of crestal root perforation and periapical lesion in a maxillary left lateral incisor is reported. Teeth with root perforation present technical difficulties in their clinical management because of their complex defects. In the present case, surgical endodontic treatment was chosen. The apical and lateral pathology was curetted, the tooth root was resected, and a retrograde root restoration of amalgam was placed in a root-end cavity and perforation site. A 10-year follow-up clinical and radiographic examination showed an asymptomatic tooth with osseous healing proceeding.

  18. Nitinol Esophageal Stents: New Designs and Clinical Indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strecker, Ernst-Peter; Boos, Irene; Vetter, Sylvia; Strohm, Michael; Domschke, Sigurd

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical use of covered and noncovered, knitted nitinol stents in patients presenting new stent indications. Methods: Self-expandable, knitted nitinol stents were implanted in four patients for treatment of dysphagia. In two patients who had malignant strictures and had esophago-respiratory fistulae and in one patient with an esophagocutaneous fistula, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents were implanted. One patient received a noncovered stent, but a retrograde approach through a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) fistula had to be chosen for recanalization of an esophageal occlusion. Two patients received stents for treatment of benign strictures. Results: Recanalization of the stricture and stent implantation were performed under fluoroscopic control without any procedure-related morbidity or mortality. Dysphagia improved in all patients and the esophageal fistulae could be sealed off by covered stents. During a maximum follow-up of 18 months, there was no stent migration or esophageal perforation. Complications observed were stent stenosis due to food impaction (1/4) and benign stent stenosis (2/2). Most complications could be treated by the interventional radiologist. Conclusion: Self-expandable, covered Nitinol stents provide an option for the treatment of dysphagia combined with esophageal fistulae. In combination with interventional radiology techniques, even complex strictures are accessible. For benign strictures, the value of stent treatment has not yet been proven

  19. Esophageal achalasia: retrospective analysis of treatment during 2000–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Štupnik

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Esophageal achalasia (EA is a primary esophageal motility disorder of unclear aetiology. Standard treatments of EA are: pneumatic balloon dilation (PBD of the lower esophageal sphyncter (LES and surgical cleaving of the muscle by Heller myotomy. Although the treatment effectively cures dysphagia, the symptoms recur in about a half of the patients. Our point of interest was long-term effectiveness of EA treatment at our department. METHODSWe made a retrospective analysis of EA patients treated at our department of thoracic surgery during the 2000–2010 period.RESULTSIn 11 years we performed 187 PBD and 22 laparoscopic myotomies (LM in 148 patients. Three years after the procedure 65 % of patients after PBD and 90 % of patients after LM showed no signs of disease. The risk of recurrence was 3.56-times greater (p = 0.03 after PBD (in comparison to LM, whereas patients older than 50 years bear 0.51-times lower risk (p = 0.02. The most significant complicatios were esophageal perforation in 3 patients (1.6 % after PBD and gastroesophageal reflux in 3 patients (15 % after LM.CONCLUSIONSPBD is a fast, simple, inexpensive and very efficient method of EA treatment, which can be safely performed in almost every patient. LM is far more expensive and a more complicated method that is more suitable for younger patients, in whom PBD is less effective.

  20. Does race influence survival for esophageal cancers treated on the radiation and chemotherapy arm of RTOG no. 85-01?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, O.E.; Martz, K.L.; Gaspar, L.E.; DelRowe, J.D.; Asbell, S.O.; Salter, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: In reported retrospective and non-randomized trials for esophageal carcinoma, blacks have a lower survival than whites but the patient population, method, quality and time periods of treatment differ. We reviewed the patient database of the combined modality arm of RTOG-8501 esophageal carcinoma protocol to see if there were differences in overall survival between black and white patients receiving the same standard of care. Materials and Methods: The chemotherapy (CT) consisted of Cisplatin, 75 mg/m 2 during the first day of the first radiation treatment (RT) and then the first day of weeks, 5, 8, and 11. In addition, 5-fluorouracil, 1000 mg/m 2 was given also the first day of radiotherapy and over 4 days and this 4 day cycle was repeated weeks 5, 8, and 11. 50 Gy was given to the esophagus as follows: 2 Gy x 5 days/week x 3 weeks (30 Gy), followed by a local boost of 2 Gy x 5 days/week x 2 weeks (20 Gy). 139 patients were entered into the combined modality arm of RT+CT. Nine patients were not evaluated in the analysis because 7 were deemed ineligible and 2 had incomplete data. This left 130 patients analyzable: 61 were initially randomized to the RT+CT arm and 69 were later registered to this arm when the RT only arm was closed due to poor survival (10% RT only vs 36% RT+CT alive at 2 years). Five additional patients were not included because their racial background was classified as 'other' and six patients were scheduled for, but did not receive any chemotherapy, leaving 119 patients, 37 blacks and 82 whites, evaluated in this report. The following pretreatment characteristics were analyzed using the Cox regression model: Race (black vs white); Histology (squamous vs adenocarcinoma; Age ( 5 cm vs 77% for whites. When analyzing dysphagia, only 3% of blacks had unrestricted diets vs 33% of whites. Nearly half (49%) of blacks could tolerate liquids only, whereas only 30% of whites were liquid-restricted. Only 14% of blacks had less than a 10 lb

  1. A study of survival rate of the patients with esophageal carcinoma treated by pre- and/or post-operative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eida, Koichiro

    1986-01-01

    So far there is still considerable disagreement as to the evaluation of the pre- and postoperative irradiation effects on the survival rate of the patients with esophageal carcinoma. From April 1973 to December 1983, 138 cases of thoracic esophageal carcinoma were surgically operated upon at our Department; 68 cases were irradiated and 70 cases were not irradiated prior to the surgical operation. Followup study was done and its result has been reported in this communication. A few cases treated by pre-operative irradiation survived longer than the expected longevity in spite of their low curative operation rates. Prognosis was better in the cases with well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, when marked or good responses to pre-operative irradiation with the calculated total dose of 30 Gy were recorded. There were differences in responsibility in the various histological types of esophageal carcinomas; good response in the group of well differentiated squamous carcinoma, less marked response in the groups of moderately and poorly differentiated squamous carcinomas, minor response in the types of undifferentiated and unclassifed carcinomas. From our observation it seems reasonable to say that prognosis of the patients with pre- and postoperative irradiation was better than that of those who received postoperative irradiation only. (author)

  2. Polymorphism at the 3'-UTR of the thymidylate synthase gene: A potential predictor for outcomes in Caucasian patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with preoperative chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Zhongxing; Liu Hongji; Swisher, Stephen G.; Wang Luo; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Correa, Arlene M.; Roth, Jack A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Wei Qingyi

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that TS3'UTR polymorphisms predict outcomes in 146 Caucasian patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: DNA was extracted from hematoxylin-and-eosin stained histologic slides of normal esophageal or gastric mucosa sections from paraffin blocks of esophagectomy specimens. Genotypes of the TS3'UTR polymorphism were determined by polymerase chain reaction for a 6-bp insertion. The genotype groups (0bp/0bp, 6bp/0bp, and 6bp/6bp) were compared for clinical features and overall survival, recurrence-free-survival, locoregional control (LRC), and distant metastasis control. Multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed to find independent predictors for the stated outcomes. Results: There was a trend of association between 6bp/6bp genotype and a decreased risk of local regional recurrence (hazards ratio = 0.211, 95% confidence interval = 0.041-1.095, p = 0.06) compared with other genotypes. There was a trend that patients with 6bp/6bp genotype had a higher 3-year probability of LRC compared with patients with the other two genotypes combined (p = 0.07); however, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: The null hypotheses were not rejected in this study, probably owing to small sample size or the single gene examined. Prospective studies with adequate statistical power analyzing a family of genes involved in the 5-fluorouracil metabolism are needed to assess genetic determinants of treatment-related outcomes in esophageal adenocarcinoma

  3. Exposure to an atomic bomb explosion is a risk factor for in-hospital death after esophagectomy to treat esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Y; Takeishi, K; Guntani, A; Tsujita, E; Yoshinaga, K; Matsuyama, A; Hamatake, M; Maeda, T; Tsutsui, S; Matsuda, H; Ishida, T

    2015-01-01

    Esophagectomy, one of the most invasive of all gastrointestinal operations, is associated with a high frequency of postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether exposure to the atomic bomb explosion at Hiroshima in 1945 might be a preoperative risk factor for in-hospital mortality after esophagectomy in esophageal cancer patients. We thus reviewed the outcomes of esophagectomy in 31 atomic bomb survivors with esophageal cancer and 96 controls (also with cancer but without atomic bomb exposure). We compared the incidences of postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality. Of the clinicopathological features studied, mean patient age was significantly higher in atomic bomb survivors than in controls. Of the postoperative complications noted, atomic bomb survivors experienced a longer mean period of endotracheal intubation and higher incidences of severe pulmonary complications, severe anastomotic leakage, and surgical site infection. The factors associated with in-hospital mortality were exposure to the atomic bomb explosion, pulmonary comorbidities, and electrocardiographic abnormalities. Multivariate analysis revealed that exposure to the atomic bomb explosion was an independent significant preoperative risk factor for in-hospital mortality. Exposure to the atomic bomb explosion is thus a preoperative risk factor for in-hospital death after esophagectomy to treat esophageal cancer. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  4. Synchronous Supraglottic and Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated with a Monoisocentric Hybrid Intensity-Modulated Radiation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L. Barney

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs of the head and neck (HN and esophagus are similar. As such, synchronous primary tumors in these areas are not entirely uncommon. Definitive chemoradiation (CRT is standard care for locally advanced HNSCC and is a preferred option for inoperable esophageal SCC. Simultaneous treatment of both primaries with CRT can present technical challenges. We report a case of synchronous supraglottic and esophageal SCC primary tumors, highlighting treatment with a monoisocentric hybrid radiation technique and normal tissue toxicity considerations.

  5. Medical image of the week: eosphageal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal J

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 74 year old man with a past medical history of esophageal strictures status post dilatation, coronary artery disease status post CABG, and atrial fibrillation presented to hospital with complaints of severe chest pain that began after the consumption of tortilla chips one hour prior to presentation. Electrocardiogram and cardiac enzymes were not consistent with acute coronary syndrome. Chest X-ray was consistent with a widened mediastinal silhouette. Contrast esophogram was negative for extra luminal extravasation. CT scan of the chest with oral contrast demonstrated thickening of the mid-thoracic esophagus with an extra-luminal focus of gas in the mediastinum along with fluid along the inferior aspect of the esophagus (Figures 1 and 2. These findings were concerning for esophageal perforation. The patient was taken to the operating room for endoscopy which showed micro perforation in mid-esophagus. Esophageal perforation remains a highly morbid condition. Mortality rates are based predominantly on time of ...

  6. Intramural Esophageal Dissection after Endoscopy: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ki Tae; Kim, Song Soo; Kim, Jin Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Intramural esophageal dissection (IED) is an uncommon disorder characterized by a separation between the esophageal mucosa and submucosa with or without perforation. IED is usually related with an abrupt increase in intraesophageal pressure, history of recent instrumentation, and a coagulation disorder. We report a case of IED showing extensive dissection into the wall of the stomach, which successfully subsided by conservative treatment.

  7. Brain Abscess after Esophageal Dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, S; Grand, M; Michelsen, J

    2007-01-01

    Brain abscess formation is a serious disease often seen as a complication to other diseases and to procedures. A rare predisposing condition is dilatation therapy of esophageal strictures. A case of brain abscess formation after esophageal dilatations is presented. A 59-year-old woman was admitted...... with malaise, progressive lethargy, fever, aphasia and hemiparesis. Six days before she had been treated with esophageal dilatation for a stricture caused by accidental ingestion of caustic soda. The brain abscess was treated with surgery and antibiotics. She recovered completely. This clinical case...... illustrates the possible association between therapeutic esophageal dilatation and the risk of brain abscess formation....

  8. Riesgo de perforación en la mucosectomía esofágica con banda: estudio experimental con dos modelos de ligadores Perforation risk in esophageal endoscopic mucosal resection with ligation: an experimental study with two ligator models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Vázquez-Iglesias

    2007-02-01

    used, which were submitted to 23 esophageal resections without previous injection. Ten resections were conducted using the Six Shooter Saeed model, and 13 resections used the Speedband Superview Super 7 model. The technique was also compared by making random cuts either above or below the band. Results: five perforations occurred, all of them using the Speedband model. This represents 38.5% of total in the Speedband model group. No perforation occurred when using the Six Shooter model (p = 0.046. On the contrary, no significant differences were found regarding frequency of perforation when cutting above or below the band. Conclusions: esophageal EMRL using the Speedband model without previous injection leads to perforation in a high percentage of cases in an experimental animal model. Further studies are required to find out whether a previous injection may increase the safety of this technique with this ligator model

  9. High-sensitivity modified Glasgow prognostic score (HS-mGPS) Is superior to the mGPS in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Peng; Fang, Min; Wan, Qiuyan; Zhang, Xuebang; Song, Tao; Wu, Shixiu

    2017-01-01

    The present study compared the prognostic value of the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) and high-sensitivity mGPS (HS-mGPS) in unresectable locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcimona (LAESCC) patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The baseline data of 163 eligible patients were retrospectively collected. Patients with a C-reactive protein (CRP) ≤ 10 mg/l and albumin ≥ 35 g/l were allocated to mGPS-0 group. Patients with only elevated CRP (> 10 mg/l) were a...

  10. Spontaneous external gallbladder perforation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noeldge, G.; Wimmer, B.; Kirchner, R.

    1981-01-01

    Spontaneous perforation of the gallbladder is one complication of cholelithiasis. There is a greater occurence of free perforation in the peritoneal cavity with bilary pertonitis, followed by the perforation into the stomach, small intestine and colon. A single case of the nowadays rare spontaneous perforation in and through the abdominal wall will be reported. Spontaneous gallbladder perforation appears nearly asymptomatic in its clinical course because of absent biliary peritonitis. (orig.) [de

  11. Advanced esophageal cancer and esophageal stenosis endoscopic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piazze, A. E mail: apiazze@hc.edu.uy

    2005-01-01

    Advanced esophageal cancer (AEC) is diagnosed during those stages in which surgery is possible, it is palliative for disphagia, with high morbimortality.In inoperable or irresectable cases, resorting to alternative treatment such as radiotherapy or endoscopy may palliate dsphagia.Endoscopically it is possible to place a transtumoral nasogastric catheter (NGC) for preoperative nutrition or branchial therapy (intratumoral iridium).It is possible to dilate the tumor and place and indwelling plastic or auto expandable prosthesis or to inject absolute intratumoral alcohol.There is and evaluation of results and morbimortality of personal case material through the retrospective study of 54 patients in whom 120 procedures such as those referred to above were carried out.The series includes 41 men and 13 women (3-1), 79.5% of which were of ages between 61 and 90.Optic fiber endoscopes or video endoscopes, coaxial dilators, hydro-pneumatic balloons, metallic guides and non industrial and autoexpandable plastic prosthesis were used; 34.1% of procedures were performed under used; 34.1% of procedures were performed under radioscopy.Eleven patient (8 for nutritional purposes and 3 for brachiotherapy)form part of Groups 1 and 2 of NGC.Group 3 consist of:dilations of radicular stenosis with or without neopasic recurrence, or neoplasic infiltration of esophagus, 6 patient; Group 4: 14 patients for the purpose of dilation of esophageal neoplasm; Group 5:prosthesis, 12 patients; Group 6: 11 patients with anastomotic stenosis.In patients in Group 1-2-3 solution was achieved.In Group 3 there was 1 perforation.In Group 4, out of 14 patient 13 were dilated.In Group 5 it proved impossible to place prosthesis in 2 patient, (3.7%).The conclusion arrived at is that various endoscopic techniques may palliate disphagia in patient with AEC, collaborate with preoperative nutrition through enteral path, with brachioterapy or by treating post surgical stenosis, with low mortality

  12. Esophageal Foreign Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal foreign body aspiration is a common event which can cause serious morbidity and mortality in the children and adult population. For that reason, early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for preventing these life threateining complications. Children most often ingest coins and toys whereas adults commonly tend to have problems with meat and bones. Esophageal foreign bodies are located at the cricopharyngeus muscle level in 70%, the thoracic esophagus in 15% and the gastroesophageal junction in the remaining 15%. Symptoms can vary according to the shape and structure of the ingested object, type of location, patient%u2019s age and complications caused by the foreign body. Delay in treatment, esophageal perforation and an underlying esophageal disease are poor prognostic factors. In treatment, observation, foley catheter, rigid or flexible esophagoscopy and removing the foreign body with a Magill forceps, pushing the foreign body into the stomach, giving intravenous glucagon and surgical treatment methods can be used. Rigid esophagoscopy is an effective and safe procedure for foreign body diagnosis and removal. Improved endoscopic experience and clinical management of thoracic surgeons led to reduced morbidity and mortality in recent years. Most of those emergencies of childhood are preventable. Family education is very important.

  13. Let's perforate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Two discoveries and the increase of reserves in 2002 they are the first results of the new exploratory campaign of the country. After turnaround in contracts, this year they sound with. The potential ascends to 47.000 million barrels. Colombia, after ten years of an uninterrupted fall of its reserves of raw, announced at the beginning of 2002 two new discoveries of hydrocarbons that, together to the results of Guando, they guarantee for the first time from 1992 the country incorporated to its reserves of barrels of raw. These new barrels in surface are the first concrete result of reactivation of the exploratory activity that began two years ago and that it could throw other fruits in next months, when the perforations of the new exploratory map of Colombia are completed and the country finishes picking up the crop that began to sow in the year 2000 with the record in association contracts and that it reinforced later one year with the duplication of the seismic activity

  14. Iatrogen perforation of the rectum following barium enema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggum, R.; Kressner, U.; Haffner, J.

    1998-01-01

    Perforation of the rectum following barium enema is relatively rare, occurring in 1 of 3,000 procedures. Colorectal perforation is a serious condition and early diagnosis is of paramount importance in order to avoid any delay in treating the patient. Direct suture of the perforation, lavage, presacral drainage and stomia are the preferred methods of primary surgical treatment. 10 refs., 1 fig

  15. [Iatrogen perforation of the rectum after colon radiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggum, R; Kressner, U; Haffner, J

    1998-05-10

    Perforation of the rectum following barium enema is relatively rare, occurring in 1 of 3,000 procedures. Colorectal perforation is a serious condition and early diagnosis is of paramount importance in order to avoid any delay in treating the patient. Direct suture of the perforation, lavage, presacral drainage and stomia are the preferred methods of primary surgical treatment.

  16. Does race influence survival for esophageal cancer patients treated on the radiation and chemotherapy arm of RTOG no. 85-01?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, O.E.; Martz, K.L.; Gaspar, L.E.; Delrowe, J.D.; Asbell, S.O.; Salter, M.M.; Roach, Mack

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In reported retrospective non-randomized trials of treatment of esophageal carcinoma, blacks have a lower survival from esophageal cancer than whites. None of these studies has accounted for the extent of disease, or the methods and quality of treatment. We reviewed the data that included only patients treated on the chemoradiation arm of the RTOG-8501 esophageal carcinoma trial to see if there were differences in overall survival between black and white patients receiving the same standard of care. Methods and Materials: One hundred-nineteen patients, 37 blacks and 82 whites were evaluated who met the criteria for receiving chemoradiation of 5000 cGy and four courses of Cisplatin (75 mg/m 2 ) and Fluorouracil (1000 mg/m 2 for 4 days). Results: Blacks had squamous histology only, with 86% of blacks having weight loss of 10 lbs. or more compared to 56% of whites (p = 0.001). In addition, blacks had larger tumors and more difficulty eating (p = 0.010). Overall, there was no difference in the Kaplan-Meier median survival estimate by race (p = 0.2757). Only when we limited the analysis to the 'squamous histology' subgroup, stratified according to age >70 vs. 70 years) did poorly. Because of the dramatic differences in the age and histology distributions between blacks and whites, this issue could not be resolved in the subset of squamous only who received chemoradiation. Conclusions: The increasing incidence of adenocarcinoma among white patients without a corresponding increase of this histology in blacks reflects a difference in diet and or lifestyle compared to blacks that deserves additional study. When treated aggressively with chemoradiation, race did not appear to be a statistically significant factor for overall survival

  17. Texture analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT to predict tumour response and prognosis of patients with esophageal cancer treated by chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajo, Masatoyo; Jinguji, Megumi; Nakabeppu, Yoshiaki; Higashi, Ryutarou; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Yoshiura, Takashi [Kagoshima University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Nakajo, Masayuki [Nanpuh Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima (Japan); Sasaki, Ken; Uchikado, Yasuto; Natsugoe, Shoji [Kagoshima University, Department of Digestive Surgery, Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    This retrospective study was done to examine whether the heterogeneity in primary tumour F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) distribution can predict tumour response and prognosis of patients with esophageal cancer treated by chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The enrolled 52 patients with esophageal cancer underwent {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT studies before CRT. SUVmax, SUVmean, metabolic tumour volume (MTV, SUV ≥ 2.5), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and six heterogeneity parameters assessed by texture analysis were obtained. Patients were classified as responders or non-responders according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic significance was assessed by Cox proportional hazards analysis. Thirty four non-responders showed significantly higher MTV (p = 0.006), TLG (p = 0.007), intensity variability (IV; p = 0.003) and size-zone variability (SZV; p = 0.004) than 18 responders. The positive and negative predictive values for non-responders were 77 % and 69 % in MTV, 76 % and 100 % in TLG, 78 % and 67 % in IV and 78 % and 82 % in SZV, respectively. Although PFS and OS were significantly shorter in patients with high MTV (PFS, p = 0.018; OS, p = 0.014), TLG (PFS, p = 0.009; OS, p = 0.025), IV (PFS, p = 0.013; OS, p = 0.007) and SZV (PFS, p = 0.010; OS, p = 0.007) at univariate analysis, none of them was an independent factor, while lymph node status, stage and tumour response status were independent factors at multivariate analysis. Texture features IV and SZV, and volumetric parameters MTV and TLG can predict tumour response, but all of them have limited value in prediction of prognosis of patients with esophageal cancer treated by CRT. (orig.)

  18. Complication after self expandable metallic stent for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagahama, Takeshi; Maruyama, Michio; Kato, Kiyomi; Shinoura, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kumi; Takashima, Itaru; Ebuchi, Masakazu

    2003-01-01

    Major complications after placement of esophageal stent and airway stent were reviewed and evaluated. Four patients, including two patients with perforations and two patients with fistula formation, developed major complications after placement of a self expandable metallic stent. Two patients underwent additional radiation to improve stricture after stent placement. In one patient, stent placement was selected to improve esophageal stricture that occurred after radical radiation therapy. In one patient, migration of stent into the lesion caused a perforation. It can be concluded that additional radiation after stent placement increases the risk of complication. Stent migration also can lead to the risk of perforation. (author)

  19. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  20. PERFORATED PEPTIC ULCER: A CLINICAL ANALYSIS AND OUTCOME

    OpenAIRE

    Bijit

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of perforated peptic ulcer is approximately 7-10 cases per one lakh population per year. Perforation is seen in about 7% of patients hospitalized for peptic ulcer disease. Peptic ulcer perforation, which can be gastric/duodenal perforation can be a serious life-threatening condition if not detected early and treated urgently. Peptic ulcer disease has decreased considerably worldwide with the advent of potent anti-ulcer medicines, but its complication l...

  1. Clinical outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal diseases: A pooled analysis of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halsema, Emo E; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal strictures and benign esophageal leaks in the literature. METHODS: The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and July 2014. Eight prospective studies were identified that analyzed the outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures. The outcomes of stent placement for benign esophageal leaks, perforations and fistulae were extracted from 20 retrospective studies that were published after the inclusion period of a recent systematic review. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FC SEMS) (n = 85), biodegradable (BD) stents (n = 77) and self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS) (n = 70) were inserted in 232 patients with refractory benign esophageal strictures. The overall clinical success rate was 24.2% and according to stent type 14.1% for FC SEMS, 32.9% for BD stents and 27.1% for SEPS. Stent migration occurred in 24.6% of cases. The overall complication rate was 31.0%, including major (17.7%) and minor (13.4%) complications. A total of 643 patients were treated with self-expandable stents mainly for postsurgical leaks (64.5%), iatrogenic perforations (19.6%), Boerhaave’s syndrome (7.8%) and fistulae (3.7%). FC SEMS and partially covered SEMS were used in the majority of patients. Successful closure of the defect was achieved in 76.8% of patients and according to etiology in 81.4% for postsurgical leaks, 86.0% for perforations and 64.7% for fistulae. The pooled stent migration rate was 16.5%. Stent-related complications occurred in 13.4% of patients, including major (7.8%) and minor (5.5%) complications. CONCLUSION: The outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures were poor. However, randomized trials are needed to put this into perspective. The evidence on successful stent placement for benign

  2. Clinical outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal diseases: A pooled analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halsema, Emo E; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-02-16

    To analyze the outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal strictures and benign esophageal leaks in the literature. The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and July 2014. Eight prospective studies were identified that analyzed the outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures. The outcomes of stent placement for benign esophageal leaks, perforations and fistulae were extracted from 20 retrospective studies that were published after the inclusion period of a recent systematic review. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FC SEMS) (n = 85), biodegradable (BD) stents (n = 77) and self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS) (n = 70) were inserted in 232 patients with refractory benign esophageal strictures. The overall clinical success rate was 24.2% and according to stent type 14.1% for FC SEMS, 32.9% for BD stents and 27.1% for SEPS. Stent migration occurred in 24.6% of cases. The overall complication rate was 31.0%, including major (17.7%) and minor (13.4%) complications. A total of 643 patients were treated with self-expandable stents mainly for postsurgical leaks (64.5%), iatrogenic perforations (19.6%), Boerhaave's syndrome (7.8%) and fistulae (3.7%). FC SEMS and partially covered SEMS were used in the majority of patients. Successful closure of the defect was achieved in 76.8% of patients and according to etiology in 81.4% for postsurgical leaks, 86.0% for perforations and 64.7% for fistulae. The pooled stent migration rate was 16.5%. Stent-related complications occurred in 13.4% of patients, including major (7.8%) and minor (5.5%) complications. The outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures were poor. However, randomized trials are needed to put this into perspective. The evidence on successful stent placement for benign esophageal leaks, perforations and

  3. Pedicled perforator flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirtas, Yener; Ozturk, Nuray; Kelahmetoglu, Osman

    2009-01-01

    Described in this study is a surgical concept that supports the "consider and use a pedicled perforator flap whenever possible and indicated" approach to reconstruct a particular skin defect. The operation is entirely free-style; the only principle is to obtain a pedicled perforator flap...... to reconstruct the defect. The perforators are marked with a hand-held Doppler probe and multiple flaps are designed. The appropriate flap is elevated after identifying the perforator(s). Dissection of the perforator(s) or complete incision of the flap margins are not mandatory if the flap is mobilized...... adequately to cover the defect. Defects measuring 3 x 3 cm up to 20 x 20 cm at diverse locations were successfully reconstructed in 20 of 21 patients with 26 flaps. Pedicled perforator flaps offer us reliable and satisfactory results of reconstruction at different anatomic territories of the body. It sounds...

  4. Reactive perforating collagenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive perforating collagenosis is a rare cutaneous disorder of unknown etiology. We hereby describe a case of acquired reactive perforating collagenosis in a patient of diabetes and chronic renal failure.

  5. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A H; Iorio, N; Schey, R

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus and is a potential cause of dysphagia and food impaction, most commonly affecting young men. Esophageal manometry findings vary from normal motility to aperistalsis, simultaneous contractions, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus or hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (LES). It remains unclear whether esophageal dysmotility plays a significant role in the clinical symptoms of EoE. Our aim is to review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and effect of treatment on esophageal dysmotility in EoE. A literature search utilizing the PubMed database was performed using keywords: eosinophilic esophagitis, esophageal dysmotility, motility, manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagogram, endoscopic ultrasound, and dysphagia. Fifteen studies, totaling 387 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis were identified as keeping in accordance with the aim of this study and included in this review. The occurrence of abnormal esophageal manometry was reported to be between 4 and 87% among patients with EoE. Esophageal motility studies have shown reduced distensibility, abnormal peristalsis, and hypotonicity of the LES in patients with EoE, which may also mimic other esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia or nutcracker esophagus. Studies have shown conflicting results regarding the presence of esophageal dysmotility and symptoms with some reports suggesting a higher rate of food impaction, while others report no correlation between motor function and dysphagia. Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on

  6. Esophageal Foreign Body Causing Direct Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ECS Lam

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies in the esophagus are uncommon causes of esophageal perforation. Many nonperforating cases are successfully managed by flexible gastroscopy. However, complicated foreign bodies such as those that result in esophageal perforation and vascular injury are best managed surgically. Gastroscopy remains the primary method of diagnosis. A case of a 59-year-old woman who developed retrosternal and intrascapular pain, odynophagia and hematemesis after eating fish is reported. Flexible gastroscopy showed arterial bleeding from the midthoracic esophagus. Computed tomography scan localized a 3 cm fish bone perforating the esophagus with surrounding hematoma. An aortogram did not reveal an actively bleeding aortoesophageal fistula. The fish bone was surgically removed and the patient recovered with no postoperative complications. This case illustrates the importance of early consideration for surgical intervention when confronted with a brisk arterial bleed from the esophagus with suggestive history of foreign body ingestion.

  7. Interplay Between Oncoproteins and Antioxidant Enzymes in Esophageal Carcinoma Treated Without and With Chemoradiotherapy: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Tranum; Gupta, Rajesh; Vaiphei, Kim; Kapoor, Rakesh; Gupta, N.M.; Khanduja, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze p53, bcl-2, c-myc, and cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression changes and examine their relationship with various antioxidant enzymes in esophageal carcinoma patients. Methods and Materials: Patients in Group 1 underwent transhiatal esophagectomy and those in Group 2 were administered chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery after 4 weeks of neoadjuvant therapy. Results: The relationship analysis among the various protein markers and antioxidant enzymes showed an inverse correlation between bcl-2 and superoxide dismutase/catalase in tumor tissues, irrespective of the treatment arm followed. An important positive association was observed between bcl-2 and reduced glutathione levels in the tumor tissue of patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy. Another apoptosis-modulating marker, c-myc, in the tumor tissue of Group 2 patients showed similar pattern levels (high and low) as that of superoxide dismutase/catalase. The association of cyclooxygenase-2 and p53 with various antioxidant enzymes showed a significant positive correlation between cyclooxygenase-2 expression and catalase activity and an inverse trend between p53 expression and superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the tumor tissue of patients given neoadjuvant therapy. In addition, patients with overexpressed p53 protein levels had lower glutathione peroxidase enzyme levels and vice versa in the tumor tissue of patients who had undergone surgery as their main mode of treatment. Conclusion: The results of this study broaden the insight into the relationships shared among oncoproteins and the antioxidant defense system, and this could be helpful in the clinical management of esophageal carcinoma

  8. Esophageal bypass after failed chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matono, Satoru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Mori, Naoki; Nagano, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiromasa; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal stenosis and/or fistula often occur after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for unresectable esophageal cancer. In such patients, an esophageal stent can help achieve oral intake. However an esophageal stent cannot be inserted where there is complete stenosis or where the tumor is located. In such cases, esophageal bypass surgery may be necessary. Here, we investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients who underwent esophageal bypass surgery in our institution. We reviewed 10 cases of esophageal bypass surgery (gastric tube in 8 cases, colon in 2 cases) after CRT for unresectable esophageal cancer, between 2001 and 2009. There were 5 of stenosis-only cases, 4 fistula-only cases, and 1 case of stenosis and fistula. There were postoperative complications in 5 cases (50%), and all these were treated conservatively and healed. The median survival from surgery to peroral intake was 20 days (range 9-90 days), and the median survival after starting peroral intake was 130 days (range 48-293 days). Esophageal bypass surgery can achieve good performance status and improve peroral intake. (author)

  9. DETERMINATION OF THE TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION THE PERFORATED FINS UNDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz7 M. Mhamuad

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This work treats the problem of heat transfer for perforated fins under natural convection. The temperature distribution is examined for an array of rectangular fins (15 fins with uniform cross-sectional area (100x270 mm embedded with various vertical body perforations that extend through the fin thickness. The patterns of perforations include 18 circular perforations (holes. Experiments were carried out in an experimental facility that was specifically design and constructed for this purpose. The heat transfer rate and the coefficient of heat transfer increases with perforation diameter increased. 

  10. Herpetic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium

  11. Medicolegal aspects of iatrogenic root perforations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsesis, I; Rosen, E; Bjørndal, L

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively analyze the medico-legal aspects of iatrogenic root perforations (IRP) that occurred during endodontic treatments. METHODOLOGY: A comprehensive search in a professional liability insurance database was conducted to retrospectively identify cases of IRP following root canal...... treatment (p root perforation is a complication of root canal treatment and may result in tooth extraction...... and in legal actions against the treating practitioner. Mandibular molars are more prone to medico-legal claims related to root perforations. The patient should be informed of the risks during RCT and should get information on alternative treatments and their risks and prognosis...

  12. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as fatty or fried foods, tomato sauce, alcohol, chocolate, mint, garlic, onion, and caffeine, may make heartburn ... the waist up. Alternative medicine No alternative medicine therapies have been proved to treat eosinophilic esophagitis. Still, ...

  13. Duodenal perforation: an unusual complication of sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acıpayam, Can; Aldıç, Güliz; Akçora, Bülent; Çelikkaya, Mehmet Emin; Aşkar, Hasan; Dorum, Bayram Ali

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal perforation in childhood is a rare condition with a high mortality rate if not treated surgically. Primary gastroduodenal perforation is frequently associated with peptic ulcer and exhibits a positive family history. Helicobacter pylorus is the most significant agent. Secondary gastroduodenal perforation may be a finding of specific diseases, such as Crohn disease, or more rarely may be associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia. A 14-year-old boy presented with abdominal and back pain. The patient was operated on for acute abdomen and diagnosed with duodenal perforation. Helicobacter pylorus was negative. There was no risk factor to account for duodenal perforation other than sickle cell anemia. Surgical intervention was successful and without significant sequelae. Duodenal perforation is a rare entity described in patients with sickle cell anemia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of duodenal perforation in a patient sickle cell anemia.

  14. Nontraumatic terminal ileal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wani Rauf A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is still confusion and controversy over the diagnosis and optimal surgical treatment of non traumatic terminal ileal perforation-a cause of obscure peritonitis. Methods This study was a prospective study aimed at evaluating the clinical profile, etiology and optimal surgical management of patients with nontraumatic terminal ileal perforation. Results There were 79 cases of nontraumatic terminal ileal perforation; the causes for perforation were enteric fever(62%, nonspecific inflammation(26%, obstruction(6%, tuberculosis(4% and radiation enteritis (1%. Simple closure of the perforation (49% and end to side ileotransverse anastomosis(42% were the mainstay of the surgical management. Conclusion Terminal ileal perforation should be suspected in all cases of peritonitis especially in developing countries and surgical treatment should be optimized taking various accounts like etiology, delay in surgery and operative findings into consideration to reduce the incidence of deadly complications like fecal fistula.

  15. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor for primary esophageal achalasia: outcomes in 173 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Riccardo; Fumagalli Romario, Uberto; Ceolin, Martina; Massaron, Simonetta; Peracchia, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic Heller myotomy combined with anterior (Dor) fundoplication is the most widely-used surgical procedure for treating esophageal achalasia in Europe From November 1992 through May 2010 we performed laparoscopic Heller-Dor on 173 patients Conversion to laparotomy was required in three cases (1.7%) at the beginning of the experience (for mucosal) perforation which was the most frequent intraoperative complication, managed laparoscopically with the increasing experience. Five (2.9%) cases had minor postoperative complications. Clinical results were satisfactory in 99.4% of cases. One patient (0.6%) had severe persistent dysphagia. Mean esophageal diameter decreased from 50 mm ± 12 (range 20- 90) to 25 mm ± 7 (range 15-80). Lower esophageal sphincter pressure decreased from 32 mmHg (median, range 10- 93) pre-operatively to 11 mmHg (median, range 5-21) at one year follow up and residual pressure from 12 mmHg (median, range 3-30) to 4 mmHg (median, range 1-8). Impedance and pH monitoring showed normal levels in 39/47 (83%) patients who agreed to testing. The good outcomes of this experience, in part due to careful adherence to technical aspects of the operation, confirm that the laparoscopic Heller-Dor is the gold standard surgical treatment for esophageal achalasia.

  16. Dosimetric comparison to the heart and cardiac substructure in a large cohort of esophageal cancer patients treated with proton beam therapy or Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yutaka; Xu, Cai; Yang, Jinzhong; Komaki, Ritsuko; Lin, Steven H

    2017-10-01

    To compare heart and cardiac substructure radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with mid- to distal esophageal cancer who received chemoradiation therapy. We identified 727 esophageal cancer patients who received IMRT (n=477) or PBT (n=250) from March 2004 to December 2015. All patients were treated to 50.4Gy with IMRT or to 50.4 cobalt Gray equivalents with PBT. IMRT and PBT dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the whole heart, atria, ventricles, and four coronary arteries were compared. For PBT patients, passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT; n=237) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT; n=13) DVHs were compared. Compared with IMRT, PBT resulted in significantly lower mean heart dose (MHD) and heart V5, V10, V20, V30, and V40as well as lower radiation exposure to the four chambers and four coronary arteries. Compared with PSPT, IMPT resulted in significantly lower heart V20, V30, and V40 but not MHD or heart V5 or V10. IMPT also resulted in significantly lower radiation doses to the left atrium, right atrium, left main coronary artery, and left circumflex artery, but not the left ventricle, right ventricle, left anterior descending artery, or right coronary artery. Factors associated with lower MHD included PBT (Pheart and cardiac substructures than IMRT. Long-term studies are necessary to determine how this cardiac sparing effect impacts the development of coronary artery disease and other cardiac complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Perforations during contrast enema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Steinkamp, U.; Grabbe, E.; Allgemeines Krankenhaus Ochsenzoll, Hamburg

    1983-01-01

    During contrast enema, perforation into the retroperitoneal space can be differentiated from perforation into the peritoneum and perforation into the intestinal wall associated with formation of barium granulomas or submucosal spreading of the contrast medium. Other special forms are perforation with contrast medium embolism of diverticula; of the processus vermiformis; penetration of contrast medium into fistulous systems and from the operated areas. Risk factors are: balloon catheter, intestinal tubes with a hard tip, preternatural anus, excessive enema pressure, contrast medium additions, preceding manipulations, intestinal diseases, advanced age and delegation of manipulations to assistants and unskilled staff. Children are particularly at risk. (orig.) [de

  18. Impact of the use of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) on the quality of life of patients treated with endodontic surgery when a perforation of sinus membrane occurred. A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschieri, S; Corbella, S; Tsesis, I; Del Fabbro, M

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective investigation was to evaluate the postoperative quality of life after endodontic surgery in maxillary molars when a sinus membrane perforation occurred and platelet concentrates were used. Included patients were treated by microsurgical endodontic treatment in molar and premolar maxillary regions between 2007 and 2010. Patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were screened. Data from the quality of life questionnaire were analyzed. The use of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) (test group) was compared with a control group when a Schneiderian membrane perforation occurred during endodontic surgery performed with a modern technique in maxillary molars and premolars. A total of 20 patients (12 in the control group and eight in the test group) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. No differences were evaluated at baseline for clinical parameters. Significantly improved patients' quality of life was observed in the test group considering symptoms as swelling, bad breath or taste, and pain. Functional activities were less impaired in the test group and swelling was significantly higher in the control group. In the test group, pain was significantly lower than the control group during the first 6 days after surgery and also, the consumption of painkillers was lower for patients belonging to the test group even if it was not statistically significant. In general, a small sinus membrane perforation (less than 6 mm) during endodontic surgery did not cause severe complications. The use of platelet concentrates could be effective in reducing the impact on patients' quality of life, decreasing pain and surgery side effects as well as swelling.

  19. Typhoid Intestinal Perforation: 24 Perforations in One Patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intestinal perforation is a common cause of peritonitis necessitating emergency surgical intervention. Perforation ... Mortality rates of typhoid intestinal perforation (TIP) cases are ... may be obscured clinical features with resultant delays in.

  20. Balloon catheter dilation of benign esophageal stenosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Guoping; Yu Juming; Zhong Weixing; Zhu Ming; Wu Yeming; Shi Chengren

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the methods and effect of balloon catheter dilation of benign esophageal stenosis in children. Methods: 9 cases had an anastomotic stenosis after surgical correction of esophageal atresia; 11 cases of esophageal stenosis due to ingestion of caustics; one case had an lower esophageal stenosis after Nissen surgery and one case after gastro-esophagoplasty. Age ranged from 17 days to 7 years. Each case had a barium esophagram before balloon dilation. The balloon size varied from 3 to 10 mm in diameter. Results: 21 cases were successful after dilation of balloon catheter. There were no esophageal perforation and complications. The satisfactory results maintained from six months to thirty months. Conclusions: Balloon catheter dilation is a simple, safe and reliable method for the treatment of benign esophageal strictures in children as the first choice

  1. History of the Use of Esophageal Stent in Management of Dysphagia and Its Improvement Over the Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Kulwinder S

    2017-02-01

    The art and science of using stents to treat dysphagia and seal fistula, leaks and perforations has been evolving. Lessons learnt from the deficiencies of previous models led to several improvements making stent deployment easier, and with some designs, it was also possible to remove the stents if needed. With these improvements, besides malignant dysphagia, newer indications for using stents emerged. Unfortunately, despite several decades of evolution, as yet, there is no perfect stent that "fits all." This article is an overview of how this evolution process happened and where we are currently with using stents to manage patients with dysphagia and with other esophageal disorders.

  2. Use of Proteolytic Enzymes in the Treatment of Proteinaceous Esophageal Food Impaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Christopher R; Wang, Howard; Donahue, Dean M; Garrity, Julie M; Allan, James S

    2016-01-01

    Proteinaceous esophageal food impaction typically requires endoscopic intervention. An alternative approach is the use of proteolytic enzymes. Concerns regarding the use of proteolytic enzymes include the risk of perforation and aspiration pneumonitis. We retrospectively reviewed our series of 69 patients treated with papain to determine the safety and efficacy of proteolytic enzymes. Patients were retrospectively reviewed if treated for an esophageal food impaction from 1999 through 2008. Median age was 56 years (range 19-91 years), with 46 male and 23 female patients. In 27 patients (39%) this was their first presentation, in 14 (20%) it was the second, and 28 (41%) had multiple previous episodes. Meat was the cause in 49 (71%), chicken in 6 (9%), fish in 3 (4%), and unspecified in 11 (16%). All patients presented with dysphagia for solids, 56 (81%) could not tolerate liquids. Papain solution, 1 tsp in 8 oz of water, was given to patients in an unlimited quantity. Papain was successful in relieving the obstruction in 60 patients (87%). The remaining 9 patients (13%) underwent endoscopy with successful retrieval. No patient suffered a perforation, either with papain ingestion or endoscopy. There were no episodes of pneumonitis or pneumonia. We have used proteolytic enzymes with a high success rate and with minimal complication. Further, if proteolytic enzymes fail, endoscopy can be performed safely and effectively. We recommend the use of proteolytic enzymes as the initial management in all patients with proteinaceous food impaction of the esophagus. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Stercoral perforation in a 17-year old.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stercoral perforation is a rare cause of perforation. This is the first reported case where a partial eating disorder (ED) is the primary causative differential. CASE PRESENTATION: We present the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented to her local Emergency Department with a 24-h history of left-sided abdominal pain. She subsequently deteriorated and a computed tomography scan of her abdomen showed gross distension of the large bowel with a sigmoid perforation. She underwent total colectomy with end ileostomy. Histology reported stercoral perforation but normal bowel ganglia. While an inpatient she was reviewed by the Psychiatric team who were concerned she was suffering from a partial ED. CONCLUSION: This case highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in optimally treating patients such as these. Aggressive medical management with involvement of a psychiatric team and dietetics addresses any underlying causative psychiatric issues and helps prevent recurrence.

  4. Stercoral perforation in a 17-year old.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S

    2009-04-02

    INTRODUCTION: Stercoral perforation is a rare cause of perforation. This is the first reported case where a partial eating disorder (ED) is the primary causative differential. CASE PRESENTATION: We present the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented to her local Emergency Department with a 24-h history of left-sided abdominal pain. She subsequently deteriorated and a computed tomography scan of her abdomen showed gross distension of the large bowel with a sigmoid perforation. She underwent total colectomy with end ileostomy. Histology reported stercoral perforation but normal bowel ganglia. While an inpatient she was reviewed by the Psychiatric team who were concerned she was suffering from a partial ED. CONCLUSION: This case highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in optimally treating patients such as these. Aggressive medical management with involvement of a psychiatric team and dietetics addresses any underlying causative psychiatric issues and helps prevent recurrence.

  5. Intraperitoneal lactate/pyruvate ratio and the level of glucose and glycerol concentration differ between patients surgically treated for upper and lower perforations of the gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabroe, Jonas E; Axelsen, Anne R; Ellebæk, Mark B

    2017-01-01

    collected every 4th hour for up to 7 postoperative days. Samples were analysed for concentrations of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol. RESULTS: Microdialysis results showed that patients with upper gastrointestinal tract lesions had significantly higher levels of postoperative intraperitoneal glucose...... and glycerol concentrations, as well as lower lactate/pyruvate ratios and lactate/glucose ratios. In the group with perforation of the lower gastrointestinal tract, those patients with a complicated course showed lower levels of postoperative intraperitoneal glucose concentration and glycerol concentration...... and higher lactate/pyruvate ratios and lactate/glucose ratios than those patients with an uncomplicated course. CONCLUSION: Patients with upper and lower gastrointestinal tract lesions showed differences in postoperative biomarker levels. A difference was also seen between patients with complicated...

  6. Refractory esophageal strictures: what to do when dilation fails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckel, P.G. van; Siersema, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    OPINION STATEMENT: Benign esophageal strictures arise from a diversity of causes, for example esophagogastric reflux, esophageal resection, radiation therapy, ablative therapy, or the ingestion of a corrosive substance. Most strictures can be treated successfully with endoscopic dilation using

  7. Multiple huge epiphrenic esophageal diverticula with motility disease treated with video-assisted thoracoscopic and hand-assisted laparoscopic esophagectomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Higashi, Shigeyoshi; Tanaka, Koji; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamasaki, Makoto; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2017-12-01

    Epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum is a rare condition that is often associated with a concomitant esophageal motor disorder. Some patients have the chief complaints of swallowing difficulty and gastroesophageal reflux; traditionally, such diverticula have been resected via right thoracotomy. Here, we describe a case with huge multiple epiphrenic diverticula with motility disorder, which were successfully resected using a video-assisted thoracic and laparoscopic procedure. A 63-year-old man was admitted due to dysphagia, heartburn, and vomiting. An esophagogram demonstrated an S-shaped lower esophagus with multiple epiphrenic diverticula (75 × 55 mm and 30 × 30 mm) and obstruction by the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Esophageal manometry showed normal peristaltic contractions in the esophageal body, whereas the LES pressure was high (98.6 mmHg). The pressure vector volume of LES was 23,972 mmHg 2  cm. Based on these findings, we diagnosed huge multiple epiphrenic diverticula with a hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter and judged that resection might be required. We performed lower esophagectomy with gastric conduit reconstruction using a video-assisted thoracic and hand-assisted laparoscopic procedure. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the esophagogram demonstrated good passage, with no leakage, stenosis, or diverticula. The most common causes of mid-esophageal and epiphrenic diverticula are motility disorders of the esophageal body; appropriate treatment should be considered based on the morphological and motility findings.

  8. Intra and post-operative complications of esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Luigi; Peri, Andrea; Tinozzi, Francesco Paolo; Zonta, Sandro; di Stefano, Michele; Meloni, Federica; Pietrabissa, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate and discuss all the potential complications affecting morbidity of patients treated with surgery for primary achalasia. A review of the available English literature published to date has been conducted. All articles reporting surgical experience in achalasia were examined and then were selected only those specifically inherent to the topic at issue. Mucosal perforation is the main intra-operative complication while persistence or recurrence of the disease and gastro-esophageal reflux are those mostly affecting patients afterwards, even at long-term follow-up. A few other less common morbidities, as well as the technical considerations useful to minimize and manage each complication mentioned, are reported. Minimally invasive surgery for achalasia consent to treat patients with a low rate of perioperative complications that can be managed with conservative approach in the majority of cases. Risk of esophageal cancer exists in these patients and remains although surgical therapy. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy along with partial fundoplication is a safe and effective procedure that should be considered as the treatment of choice at first evaluation of achalasic patients rather than endoscopic techniques. Robotic technology may add further contribution in diminishing perioperative complications.

  9. Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Liu, Helen; Wei Xiong; Swisher, Stephen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V dose and absolute V dose ), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS dose ). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V dose or VS dose ) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to compare lung volumes, VS5

  10. Laparoscopic Lavage Is Feasible and Safe for the Treatment of Perforated Diverticulitis With Purulent Peritonitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angenete, Eva; Thornell, Anders; Burcharth, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate short-term outcomes of a new treatment for perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis in a randomized controlled trial. BACKGROUND: Perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis (Hinchey III) has traditionally been treated with surgery including colon resection...

  11. Delayed Esophageal Pseudodiverticulum after Anterior Cervical Spine Fixation: Report of 2 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sadrizadeh

    2015-03-01

     Conclusion:  In cases with delayed perforation, fistula, or diverticulum removal of anterior fixation instruments, gentle repair of the esophageal wall without persistence on definitive and optimal perforation closure, wide local drainage, early enteral nutrition via NGT, and antibiotic prescription is suggested.

  12. Duodenal perforation: an unusual complication of sickle cell anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Acıpayam, Can; Aldıç, Güliz; Akçora, Bülent; Çelikkaya, Mehmet Emin; Aşkar, Hasan; Dorum, Bayram Ali

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal perforation in childhood is a rare condition with a high mortality rate if not treated surgically. Primary gastroduodenal perforation is frequently associated with peptic ulcer and exhibits a positive family history. Helicobacter pylorus is the most significant agent. Secondary gastroduodenal perforation may be a finding of specific diseases, such as Crohn disease, or more rarely may be associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia. A 14-year-old boy presente...

  13. Normal tissue complication models for clinically relevant acute esophagitis (≥ grade 2) in patients treated with dose differentiated accelerated radiotherapy (DART-bid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Söhn, Matthias; Exeli, Ann-Katrin; Wurstbauer, Karl; Tröller, Almut; Deutschmann, Heinz; Fastner, Gerd; Fussl, Christoph; Steininger, Philipp; Kranzinger, Manfred; Belka, Claus; Studnicka, Michael; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2015-01-01

    One of the primary dose-limiting toxicities during thoracic irradiation is acute esophagitis (AE). The aim of this study is to investigate dosimetric and clinical predictors for AE grade ≥ 2 in patients treated with accelerated radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 66 NSCLC patients were included in the present analysis: 4 stage II, 44 stage IIIA and 18 stage IIIB. All patients received induction chemotherapy followed by dose differentiated accelerated radiotherapy (DART-bid). Depending on size (mean of three perpendicular diameters) tumors were binned in four dose groups: <2.5 cm 73.8 Gy, 2.5–4.5 cm 79.2 Gy, 4.5–6 cm 84.6 Gy, >6 cm 90 Gy. Patients were treated in 3D target splitting technique. In order to estimate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), two Lyman models and the cutoff-logistic regression model were fitted to the data with AE ≥ grade 2 as statistical endpoint. Inter-model comparison was performed with the corrected Akaike information criterion (AIC c ), which calculates the model’s quality of fit (likelihood value) in relation to its complexity (i.e. number of variables in the model) corrected by the number of patients in the dataset. Toxicity was documented prospectively according to RTOG. The median follow up was 686 days (range 84–2921 days), 23/66 patients (35 %) experienced AE ≥ grade 2. The actuarial local control rates were 72.6 % and 59.4 % at 2 and 3 years, regional control was 91 % at both time points. The Lyman-MED model (D50 = 32.8 Gy, m = 0.48) and the cutoff dose model (D c = 38 Gy) provide the most efficient fit to the current dataset. On multivariate analysis V38 (volume of the esophagus that receives 38 Gy or above, 95 %-CI 28.2–57.3) was the most significant predictor of AE ≥ grade 2 (HR = 1.05, CI 1.01–1.09, p = 0.007). Following high-dose accelerated radiotherapy the rate of AE ≥ grade 2 is slightly lower than reported for concomitant radio-chemotherapy with the

  14. Radiologic Study of Meniscus Perforations in the Temporomandibular Joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kee Duck; Park, Chang Seo

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients (forty-four joints) who had been diagnosed as having meniscus perforation of the temporomandibular joint by inferior joint space arthrography and had been treated by surgical procedures were evaluated retrospectively. Information of clinical findings, arthrotomographic findings and surgical findings was collected on a standardized form and evaluated. The results were as follows: 1. On the 34 patients of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments of the temporomandibular joint, there were 29 females and 5 males (5.8:1). The average age was 36 years (range 17 to 70). 2. The common clinical findings of group that had meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were pain on the affected joint and limitation of mouth opening. In the group showing meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation the common clinical findings were pain and clicking on the affected joint. 3. 32 joints (84.2%) were arthrotomographically anterior meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation, 6 joints (15.8%) showed anterior meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation. 4. Joints categorized arthrotomographically as having meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were less likely to have full translation of the condyle in comparison with the normal or meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation groups (p<0.05) 5. The arthrographic findings of 44 joints having meniscus perforation were compared with surgical findings, there were 6 false positive findings of meniscus perforation, the reliability of arthrographic findings of meniscus perforation was a 86.4% correlation with surgical findings. 6. On the site of perforations of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments, twenty-three of perforations (60.5%) were in location at the junction of the meniscus and posterior attachment, fourteen (36.9%) were

  15. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Dietary therapy and nutrition management of eosinophilic esophagitis: ... of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract . 2017;5(2): ...

  16. The Impact of Tumor Expression of Erythropoietin Receptors and Erythropoietin on Clinical Outcome of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Golke, Helmut; Schild, Steven E.; Kilic, Ergin

    2008-01-01

    Background: To investigate the impact of tumor erythropoietin receptors (Epo-R) and erythropoietin (Epo) expression in 64 patients with Stage III esophageal cancer receiving or not receiving erythropoietin during chemoradiation. Materials and Methods: The impact of tumor Epo-R expression, Epo expression, and 10 additional factors (age, Karnofsky-Performance-Score [KPS], tumor length, T and N stage, histology and grading, hemoglobin during radiotherapy, erythropoietin administration, surgery) on overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LC) was evaluated. Results: Improved OS was associated with low (≤20%) Epo expression (p = 0.049), KPS >80 (p 0.008), T3 stage (p = 0.010), hemoglobin ≥12 g/dL (p < 0.001), and surgery (p = 0.010). Erythropoietin receptor expression showed a trend (p = 0.09). Locoregional control was associated with T stage (p = 0.005) and hemoglobin (p < 0.001), almost with erythropoietin administration (p = 0.06). On multivariate analyses, OS was associated with KPS (p = 0.045) and hemoglobin (p = 0.032), LC with hemoglobin (p < 0.001). Patients having low expression of both Epo-R and Epo had better OS (p = 0.003) and LC (p = 0.043) than others. Two-year OS was nonsignificantly better (p = 0.25) in patients with low Epo-R expression receiving erythropoietin (50%) than in those with higher Epo-R expression receiving erythropoietin (21%), low Epo-R expression/no erythropoietin administration (29%), or higher Epo-R expression/no erythropoietin administration (18%). Two-year LC rates were, respectively, 65%, 31%, 26%, and 29% (p = 0.20). Results for Epo expression were similar. Conclusions: Higher Epo-R expression or Epo expression seemed to be associated with poorer outcomes. Patients with low expression levels receiving erythropoietin seemed to do better than patients with higher expression levels or not receiving erythropoietin. The data need to be confirmed in a larger series of patients

  17. Health-Care Utilization and Complications of Endoscopic Esophageal Dilation in a National Population

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal, Abhinav; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Yadlapati, Sujani; Singh, Shailender

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal stricture is usually managed with outpatient endoscopic dilation. However, patients with food impaction or failure to thrive undergo inpatient dilation. Esophageal perforation is the most feared complication, and its risk in inpatient setting is unknown. Methods We used National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database for 2007?2013. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify patients with esophageal s...

  18. Health-Care Utilization and Complications of Endoscopic Esophageal Dilation in a National Population

    OpenAIRE

    Abhinav Goyal; Kshitij Chatterjee; Sujani Yadlapati; Shailender Singh

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal stricture is usually managed with outpatient endoscopic dilation. However, patients with food impaction or failure to thrive undergo inpatient dilation. Esophageal perforation is the most feared complication, and its risk in inpatient setting is unknown. Methods We used National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database for 2007–2013. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify patients with esophageal s...

  19. Prognostic value of TP53 transcriptional activity on p21 and bax in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinomas treated by definitive chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Pierre; Magois, Karine; Robert, Valerie; Chiron, Anne; Lepessot, Florence; Bodenant, Corinne; Roque, Isabelle; Seng, Sok H.; Frebourg, Thierry; Paillot, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate biologic factors on survival and clinical response after definitive concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods and Materials: TP53 protein hyperexpression (immunochemistry [IHC]) and functional assay (FA) of TP53, measuring the ability of TP53 to transactivate p21 and bax reporter systems, were performed in patients with ESCC treated by CRT. The impact of parameters studied on survival and clinical response to CRT was assessed. Results: Thirty-eight patients with ESCC were included. TP53 alterations were detected in 84.2% of cases with FA. All TP53 mutations abolished the transactivation of p21 and bax reporter systems. After CRT, complete response rate was 55.3%. The median survival of the population was 17.5 months. Serum albumin (p=0.002), weight loss <10% (p=0.005), and response to treatment (p<0.001) were significantly linked with survival. TP53 alteration in FA was not significantly predictive of response to CRT (p=0.132) nor survival (p=0.154). Conclusions: Our results suggest that wild-type TP53 in ESCC could be associated with good response to definitive CRT. However, the small rate of ESCC with wild-type TP53 suggests that systematic determination of TP53 status is not appropriate for the management of the ESCC population

  20. [Frequency and mortality by rebleeding in cirrhotic patients treated for bleeding esophagic varices in two hospitals in Lima Peru during years 2009 to 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichilingue Reto, Catherina; Queirolo Rodriguez, Fiorella Sabrinna; Ruiz Llenque, José Jonathan; Bravo Paredes, Eduar; Guzmán Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos López, Roxana; Corzo Maldonado, Manuel Alejandro; Valdivia Roldán, Mario

    2013-01-01

    During the first 6 weeks after a variceal hemorrhage there is a 30-40% of probability of recurrence and those who rebleed 20- 30% die. Passed this period, the risk of rebleeding is of 60% and reaches a mortality of 60-70% in two years without treatment. Describe the frequency of rebleeding and mortality due to rebleeding in cirrhotic patients treated for variceal hemorrhage at Endoscopic Centers of Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru and Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza, Lima, Peru during the years 2009-2011. The study type is a transversal, periodic and retrospective one in which were included 176 cirrhotic patients older than 14 years who have bleed for esophageal varices and that have received endoscopic therapy. The instruments used were a data sheet with all the information obtained from the clinical chart of each patient, the CHILD score to assess severity of hepatic disease, endoscopic informs and phone calls. The frequency of rebleeding before 6 weeks was 32.20% (56 patients). Also, the frequency of rebleeding after that time was 22.56% (37 patients). There was a mortality rate of 5.70% (10 patients) and a mortality rate due to rebleeding of 13.33% (6 patients). Variceal hemorrhage is an important cause of mobimortality in peruvian people. The frequency of rebleeding and mortality due to rebleeding resulted slightly lower than in other countries.

  1. Perforated peptic ulcer - an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kin Tong; Shelat, Vishalkumar G

    2017-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) affects 4 million people worldwide annually. The incidence of PUD has been estimated at around 1.5% to 3%. Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a serious complication of PUD and patients with PPU often present with acute abdomen that carries high risk for morbidity and mortality. The lifetime prevalence of perforation in patients with PUD is about 5%. PPU carries a mortality ranging from 1.3% to 20%. Thirty-day mortality rate reaching 20% and 90-d mortality rate of up to 30% have been reported. In this review we have summarized the current evidence on PPU to update readers. This literature review includes the most updated information such as common causes, clinical features, diagnostic methods, non-operative and operative management, post-operative complications and different scoring systems of PPU. With the advancement of medical technology, PUD can now be treated with medications instead of elective surgery. The classic triad of sudden onset of abdominal pain, tachycardia and abdominal rigidity is the hallmark of PPU. Erect chest radiograph may miss 15% of cases with air under the diaphragm in patients with bowel perforation. Early diagnosis, prompt resuscitation and urgent surgical intervention are essential to improve outcomes. Exploratory laparotomy and omental patch repair remains the gold standard. Laparoscopic surgery should be considered when expertise is available. Gastrectomy is recommended in patients with large or malignant ulcer. PMID:28138363

  2. Perforated peptic ulcer - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kin Tong; Shelat, Vishalkumar G

    2017-01-27

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) affects 4 million people worldwide annually. The incidence of PUD has been estimated at around 1.5% to 3%. Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a serious complication of PUD and patients with PPU often present with acute abdomen that carries high risk for morbidity and mortality. The lifetime prevalence of perforation in patients with PUD is about 5%. PPU carries a mortality ranging from 1.3% to 20%. Thirty-day mortality rate reaching 20% and 90-d mortality rate of up to 30% have been reported. In this review we have summarized the current evidence on PPU to update readers. This literature review includes the most updated information such as common causes, clinical features, diagnostic methods, non-operative and operative management, post-operative complications and different scoring systems of PPU. With the advancement of medical technology, PUD can now be treated with medications instead of elective surgery. The classic triad of sudden onset of abdominal pain, tachycardia and abdominal rigidity is the hallmark of PPU. Erect chest radiograph may miss 15% of cases with air under the diaphragm in patients with bowel perforation. Early diagnosis, prompt resuscitation and urgent surgical intervention are essential to improve outcomes. Exploratory laparotomy and omental patch repair remains the gold standard. Laparoscopic surgery should be considered when expertise is available. Gastrectomy is recommended in patients with large or malignant ulcer.

  3. [Esophageal motor disorders in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices non-submitted to endoscopic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Priscila Pollo; Lemme, Eponina Maria de Oliveira; Coelho, Henrique Sérgio Moraes

    2005-01-01

    The hepatic cirrhosis has as one of the main morbid-mortality causes, the portal hypertension with the development of esophageal varices, the possibility of a digestive hemorrhage and worsening of hepatic insufficiency. It is important to identify causal predictive or aggravating factors and if possible to prevent them. In the last years, it has been observed the association of esophageal motor disorders and gastro-esophageal reflux in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices. To study the prevalence of the esophageal motility disorders and among them, the ineffective esophageal motility, in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and esophageal varices, without previous endoscopic therapeutic and the predictive factors. Prospectively, it has been evaluate 74 patients suffering from liver cirrhosis and esophagic varices, without previous endoscopic treatment. All of them were submitted to a clinical protocol, esophageal manometry and 55 patients also held the ambulatory esophageal pHmetry. Esophageal motility disorders have been found in 44 patients (60%). The most prevalent was the ineffective esophageal motility, observed in 28%. The abnormal reflux disease was diagnosed through the pHmetry in 35% of the patients. There were no correlation between the manometrical abnormality in general and the ineffective esophageal motility in particular and the esophageal or gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, the abnormal reflux, the disease seriousness, the ascites presence and the gauge of the varices. The majority of cirrhotic patients with non-treated esophageal varices present esophageal motor disorders. No predictive factor was found. The clinical relevance of these findings need more researches in the scope to define the real meaning of theses abnormalities.

  4. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Weiss

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on patients with EoE.

  5. Colonic carcinoma with multiple small bowel perforations mimicking intestinal obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna Rahul

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinoma of the colon may present with perforation proximal to the site of malignancy. Caecum is the commonest site of perforation if the ileocecal valve is patent and the jejunal and ileal perforations are very rare. Case presentation A 35 year male presented with intestinal obstruction. Emergency laparotomy revealed carcinoma of the transverse colon with multiple pinpoint perforations along antimesenteric border of ileum, which were wrapped with omentum, and no peritoneal contamination was present. Extended right hemicolectomy with jejunocolic anastomosis was done. Patient made uneventful recovery in postoperative period and was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusion Patients with colonic carcinoma and incompetent ileocecal valve may present with intestinal perforation. Increased intraluminal pressure and closed loop obstruction may lead to ischemia and perforation of the small bowel.

  6. Perforated gastric and duodenal ulcers in an urban African population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Perforations of the stomach and duodenum are frequent causes of acute generalized peritonitis in our environment. This is a prospective study of 331 cases of gastric and duodenal perforations. Study design: A consecutive series of adult patients admitted and treated for acute generalized peritonitis due to ...

  7. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  8. The Versatile Modiolus Perforator Flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Thomsen, Jorn Bo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perforator flaps are well established, and their usefulness as freestyle island flaps is recognized. The whereabouts of vascular perforators and classification of perforator flaps in the face are a debated subject, despite several anatomical studies showing similar consistency. In our...... experience using freestyle facial perforator flaps, we have located areas where perforators are consistently found. This study is focused on a particular perforator lateral to the angle of the mouth; the modiolus and the versatile modiolus perforator flap. METHODS: A cohort case series of 14 modiolus...... perforator flap reconstructions in 14 patients and a color Doppler ultrasonography localization of the modiolus perforator in 10 volunteers. RESULTS: All 14 flaps were successfully used to reconstruct the defects involved, and the location of the perforator was at the level of the modiolus as predicted...

  9. Multiple huge epiphrenic esophageal diverticula with motility disease treated with video-assisted thoracoscopic and hand-assisted laparoscopic esophagectomy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Higashi, Shigeyoshi; Tanaka, Koji; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamasaki, Makoto; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum is a rare condition that is often associated with a concomitant esophageal motor disorder. Some patients have the chief complaints of swallowing difficulty and gastroesophageal reflux; traditionally, such diverticula have been resected via right thoracotomy. Here, we describe a case with huge multiple epiphrenic diverticula with motility disorder, which were successfully resected using a video-assisted thoracic and laparoscopic procedure. Case pre...

  10. Peptic ulcer perforation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... Peptic ulcer perforation is one of the surgical complications of peptic ulcer ... Treatment can be operative or non-operative followed by proton .... chronic gastritis without evidence of ... inhibits pancreatic bicarbonate secretion.

  11. Bladder perforations in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... Mean recovery time for patients was 15 days. ... fracture.[1,2] Isolated bladder perforations are rare, and they .... PA, perineal injury, pelvic fracture. Trauma .... Lower genitourinary injury and pelvic fractures in pediatric patients.

  12. Perforated peptic ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M

    2015-01-01

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter...... need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research....

  13. Esophageal microbiome in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kirk Harris

    Full Text Available The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis.In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST. Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease.Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects.Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD.

  14. Efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy as a palliative treatment in stage IVB esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Eiji; Kojima, Takashi; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively assess the efficacy and safety of palliative chemoradiotherapy in Stage IVB esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia due to the primary lesion. Forty patients with dysphagia caused by metastatic esophageal cancer, which had been treated between January 2004 and June 2009, were retrospectively investigated. The treatment consisted of two courses of chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) and concurrent irradiation of 40 Gy in 20 fractions to the esophageal primary tumor. The grade of dysphagia was evaluated; nutrition-support-free survival was evaluated using the status of nutritional support of patients. Response to treatment, overall survival, progression-free survival and toxicities were also evaluated. Dysphagia score improved in 75% of the patients. Seventeen of the 20 patients (85%) who had required nutritional support at baseline improved their oral intake to no longer need the support, in a median time of 43 days. The median nutrition-support-free survival was 301 days in the 20 patients who had had adequate oral intake before the treatment. Disease control rate of the primary lesion was 95%, including 12 patients (30%) who achieved a complete response. The overall response rate was 55%. The median survival was 308 days, and the 1-year-survival rate was 45.0%. The median progression-free survival was 139 days. Toxicities were generally well tolerated. Major toxicities (Grade 3 or 4) involved hemoglobin (23%), leukocytes (15%), neutrophils (20%), anorexia (10%), nausea (3%), esophageal perforation (5%) and febrile neutropenia (3%). Two patients (5%) died within 30 days of terminating radiotherapy. Palliative chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil plus cisplatin combined with concurrent 40 Gy irradiation effectively improved the symptom of dysphagia in Stage IVB esophageal cancer with acceptable toxicity and favorable survival. (author)

  15. Iatrogen perforation of the rectum following barium enema; Iatrogen perforasjon av rectum ved roentgen colon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggum, R.; Kressner, U.; Haffner, J. [Buskerud Central Hospital, Drammen (Norway)

    1998-05-01

    Perforation of the rectum following barium enema is relatively rare, occurring in 1 of 3,000 procedures. Colorectal perforation is a serious condition and early diagnosis is of paramount importance in order to avoid any delay in treating the patient. Direct suture of the perforation, lavage, presacral drainage and stomia are the preferred methods of primary surgical treatment. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Esophageal Stenosis Associated With Tumor Regression in Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Frequency and Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atsumi, Kazushige [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Arimura, Hidetaka [Department of Health Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Matsuki, Takaomi [Department of Health Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital at Beppu, Oita (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Results: Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

  17. Dose-response relationship in locoregional control for patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhen; Liao Zhongxing; Jin Jing; Ajani, Jaffer; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melenda; Guerrero, Thomas; Stevens, Craig W.; Swisher, Stephen; Ho, Linus; Yao, James; Allen, Pamela; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between radiation dose and locoregional control (LRC) for patients with Stage II-III unresectable esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Methods and materials: The medical records of 69 consecutive patients with clinical Stage II or III esophageal cancer treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1990 and 1998 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 69 patients, 43 had received ≤51 Gy (lower dose group) and 26 >51 Gy (higher dose group). The median dose in the lower and higher dose groups was 30 Gy (range, 30-51 Gy) and 59.4 Gy (range, 54-64.8 Gy), respectively. Two fractionation schedules were used: rapid fractionation, delivering 30 Gy at 3 Gy/fraction within 2 weeks, and standard fractionation, delivering ≥45 Gy at 1.8-2 Gy/fraction daily. Total doses of 5% (46.2% vs. 23.3%). The lower dose group had more N1 tumors, but the tumor classification and stage grouping were similar in the two groups. The median follow-up time for all patients was 22 months (range, 2-56 months). Patients in the higher dose group had a statistically significant better 3-year local control rate (36% vs. 19%, p = 0.011), disease-free survival rate (25% vs. 10%, p = 0.004), and overall survival rate (13% vs. 3%, p = 0.054). A trend toward a better distant-metastasis-free survival rate was noted in the higher dose group (72% vs. 59%, p = 0.12). The complete clinical response rate was significantly greater in the higher dose group (46% vs. 23%, p = 0.048). In both groups, the most common type of first failure was persistence of the primary tumor. Significantly fewer patients in the higher dose group had tumor persistence after treatment (p = 0.02). No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in the pattern of locoregional or distant failure. The long-term side effects of chemoradiotherapy were similar in the two groups, although

  18. Perforated marginal ulcers after laparoscopic gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Edward L; Kettelle, John; Mobley, Elijah; Swartz, Daniel

    2008-10-01

    Perforated marginal ulcer (PMU) after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is a serious complication, but its incidence and etiology have rarely been investigated. Therefore, a retrospective review of all patients undergoing LRYGB at the authors' center was conducted to determine the incidence of PMU and whether any causative factors were present. A prospectively kept database of all patients at the authors' bariatric center was retrospectively reviewed. The complete records of patients with a PMU were examined individually for accuracy and analyzed for treatment, outcome, and possible underlying causes of the marginal perforation. Between April 1999 and August 2007, 1% of the patients (35/3,430) undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass experienced one or more perforated marginal ulcers 3 to 70 months (median, 18 months) after LRYGB. The patients with and without perforation were not significantly different in terms of mean age (37 vs 41 years), weight (286 vs 287 lb), body mass index (BMI) (46 vs 47), or female gender (89% vs 83%). Of the patients with perforations, 2 (6%) were taking steroids, 10 (29%) were receiving nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) at the time of the perforation, 18 (51%) were actively smoking, and 6 of the smokers also were taking NSAIDs. Eleven of the patients (31%) who perforated did not have at least one of these possible risk factors, but 4 (36%) of the 11 patients in this group had been treated after bypass for a marginal ulcer. Only 7 (20%) of the 35 patients who had laparoscopic bypass, or 7 (0.2%) in the entire group of 3,430 patients, perforated without any warning. There were no deaths, but three patients reperforated. The incidence of a marginal ulcer perforating after LRYGB was significant (>1%) and appeared to be related to smoking or the use of NSAIDs or steroids. Because only 0.2% of all patients acutely perforated without some risk factor or warning, long-term ulcer prophylaxis or treatment may be necessary

  19. Hospital volume and adverse events following esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagiri, Hiroyuki; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Matsui, Shigeru; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Kaise, Mitsuru

    2017-04-01

    Background and study aims  Esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has gradually acquired popularity as a minimally invasive surgery for early cancers not only in Japan, but also in other countries. However, most reported outcomes have been based on relatively small samples of patients from specialized centers. Therefore, the association between hospital volume and the rate of adverse events following esophageal ESD has been poorly understood. Patients and methods  Using a nationwide administrative database in Japan, we identified patients who underwent esophageal ESD between 1 July 2007 and 31 March 2013. Hospital volume was defined as the number of esophageal ESD procedures performed per year at each hospital and was categorized into quartiles. Results  In total, 12 899 esophageal ESD procedures at 699 institutions were identified during the study period. Perforation and perforation-related disorders were observed in 422 patients (3.3 %), and one patient died after perforation. There was a significant association between a lower hospital volume and a higher proportion of adverse events following esophageal ESD. Although not statistically significant, a similar tendency was observed in the occurrence of blood transfusion within 1 week after ESD and all-cause in-hospital death. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that hospitals with very high case volumes were less likely to experience adverse events following esophageal ESD than hospitals with very low volumes. Conclusions  The proportion of perforation and perforation-related disorders following esophageal ESD was permissibly low, and there was a linear association between higher hospital volume and lower rates of adverse events following esophageal ESD. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Conservative Management of an Epicardial Collateral Perforation During Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Christian; Christopoulos, George; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery perforation is a highly feared complication of chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and can lead to pericardial effusion, tamponade, and, rarely, emergent cardiac surgery. Perforation of epicardial collaterals during retrograde CTO-PCI may be particularly challenging to treat, as embolization from both sides of the perforation may be required to control the bleeding. However, conservative measures can occasionally be effective. We present a case of epicardial collateral vessel perforation that was managed conservatively with anticoagulation reversal.

  1. Endoscopic excavation for the treatment of small esophageal subepithelial tumors originating from the muscularis propria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Li-ping; Zhu, Lin-hong; Zhou, Xian-bin; Mao, Xin-li; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic excavation for esophageal subepithelial tumors originating from the muscularis propria. Forty-five patients with esophageal subepithelial tumors originating from the muscularis propria were treated with endoscopic excavation between January 2010 and June 2012. The key steps were: (1) making several dots around the tumor; (2) incising the mucosa along with the marker dots, and then seperating the tumor from the muscularis propria by using a hook knife or an insulated-tip knife; (3) closing the artificial ulcer with clips after the tumor was removed. The mean tumor diameter was 1.1 ± 0.6 cm. Endoscopic excavation was successfully performed in 43 out of 45 cases (95.6%), the other 2 cases were ligated with nylon rope. During the procedure perforation occurred in 4 (8.9%) patients, who recovered after conservative treatment. No massive bleeding or delayed bleeding occurred. Histologic diagnosis was obtained from 43 (95.6%) patients. Pathological diagnoses of these tumors were leiomyomas (38/43) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (5/43). Endoscopic excavation is a safe and effective method for the treatment of small esophageal subepithelial tumors originating from the muscularis propria.

  2. Esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas in esophageal cancer (EC) has changed, and focus directed towards tumors of the distal esophagus and the esophagogastric junction. The genetic events leading to EC are not fully clarified, but important risk factors have been...

  3. Perforated peptic ulcer in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, C Y; Hsu, W M; Chen, Y

    2001-02-01

    We describe a case of perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) in a 9-month-old boy. Abdominal distension was the first clinical sign of PPU. Before he developed abdominal distension, the patient had suffered from an upper respiratory tract infection with fever for about 2 weeks, which was treated intermittently with ibuprofen. A plain abdominal radiograph revealed pneumoperitoneum with a football sign. At laparotomy, a 0.8-cm perforated hole was found over the prepyloric area. Simple closure with omental patching was performed after debridement of the perforation. Pathologic examination showed chronic peptic ulcer with Helicobacter pylori infection. The postoperative course and outcome were satisfactory. The stress of underlying disease, use of ibuprofen, blood type (A), and H. pylori infection might have contributed to the development of PPU in this patient. PPU in infancy is rare and has a high mortality rate; early recognition and prompt surgical intervention are key to successful management.

  4. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshitani, Takashi; Kuwata, Yoichiro; Kano, Kyoko

    1988-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma were treated by high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using specially designed balloon application at Hyogo medical Center for Adults. 32 patients were treated from January 1982 through July 1986. According to the stage of UICC (1978), 10 patients were classified into stage I, 7 into II, 13 into III and 2 into IV. Acturial 5 year survival rate was 17.9 % in all 32 patients and that of 23 patients who received radical radiotherapy was 24 %. Local CR rate was 66 %. However, since 9 (53 %) of 17 CR patients were relapsed, local control rate for 2 years was 25 %. Mild adverse effects were experienced in 9 (47 %) of 19 CR patients. Our balloon applicator was easily fixed, could have an adequate space from esophageal mucosa and clarify the tumor site by filling with 20 % gastrografin. It is concluded that high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation with our balloon applicator is an effective boost therapy and decline a lethal adverse effect in radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. (author)

  5. Development of Therapeutic Modality of Esophageal Cancer Using Ho-166 Stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Kwang Kyun; Lee, Min Geol [Yonsei University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung Bae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    The prognosis of esophageal cancer is poor due absence of serosa which prevent local invasion to the surrounding organs such as aorta, mediastinum, trachea, and bronchi. We developed a Ho-166 Coated Radioactive Self-Expandable Metallic Stent which is a new herapeutic device in the treatment of esophageal cancer and underwent an animal experiment in mongrel dogs. We observed mucosal destruction by 4-6 mCi of Ho-166 without serious complications such as perforation of esophageal wall. Therefore, Ho-166 coated self-expandable stent appears to be an effective therapeutic device in the palliative treatment of esophageal cancer. 17 refs., 4 figs. (author)

  6. Endoscopic Management of Benign Esophageal Strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravich, William J

    2017-08-24

    This paper presents the author's approach to esophageal dilation. It offers a tailored approach to the application of dilation to specific types of esophageal stenotic lesions. In patients with inflammatory stricture, recent studies confirm the importance of treating the underlying inflammatory condition in order to decrease the rate of recurrence. The paper reviews some of the novel techniques that have been suggested for the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures, including incisional therapy, stenting, or the injection steroids or antifibrotic agents. The endoscopist who treats esophageal strictures must be familiar with the tools of the dilation and how they are best applied to specific types of stenotic lesions. If inflammation is present, effective management requires treatment of the inflammatory process in addition to mechanical dilation of the stenotic lesion. Controlled trials of novel approaches to treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures are limited and will be necessary to determine efficacy.

  7. Esophago-pleural fistula with multiple esophageal ulcers in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Soo Hee; Lee, Young Kyung; Choi, Jae Phil; Son, Jin Sung

    2014-01-01

    Esophagitis is a common complication in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Esophagitis in HIV infected patient is caused by candidiasis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, or idiopathic esophagitis with no detectable etiology. Esophagitis in HIV infected patient is occasionally combined with esophageal ulcers. We report chest CT findings and clinical manifestation of esophago-pleural fistula with pneumothorax in a HIV infected patient, who was treated for aspiration pneumonia and esophageal ulcers.

  8. Esophago-pleural fistula with multiple esophageal ulcers in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Soo Hee; Lee, Young Kyung; Choi, Jae Phil; Son, Jin Sung [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Esophagitis is a common complication in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Esophagitis in HIV infected patient is caused by candidiasis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, or idiopathic esophagitis with no detectable etiology. Esophagitis in HIV infected patient is occasionally combined with esophageal ulcers. We report chest CT findings and clinical manifestation of esophago-pleural fistula with pneumothorax in a HIV infected patient, who was treated for aspiration pneumonia and esophageal ulcers.

  9. Long-term outcome of microscopic esophagitis in chronic GERD patients treated with esomeprazole or laparoscopic antireflux surgery in the LOTUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiocca, Roberto; Mastracci, Luca; Engström, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-associated changes in esophageal histology have been reported mainly after short-term medical antireflux therapy, and few individual lesions have been examined. We report detailed histological findings from the LOTUS study, at baseline and at 1...

  10. Esophageal Metastasis from Rectal Cancer Successfully Treated with Fluorouracil-Based Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Watanabe

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal metastasis from colorectal carcinoma is uncommon, and diagnosis of esophageal metastasis is difficult. We report a case of a 54-year-old woman with postoperative recurrence of rectal cancer metastasizing to the esophagus. She underwent rectectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with fluorouracil, leucovorin plus oxaliplatin for stage IIIB rectal cancer. Three years later, she presented with dysphagia and cough. Computed tomography showed thickening of the esophagus wall, enlargement of the lymph nodes in the mediastinum and abdomen, and ground-glass opacities in the right lung. Endoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor of the midthoracic esophagus. Histopathological analysis of the tumor biopsy showed infiltration of adenocarcinoma cells into the stroma of the esophagus; tumor cells were positive for caudal type homeobox 2 and negative for thyroid transcription factor 1. A transbronchial biopsy indicated pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis of rectal adenocarcinoma. Based on those findings, she was diagnosed with recurrent rectal cancer. She received fluorouracil-based chemotherapy plus bevacizumab, which ameliorated her symptoms and induced a durable response without severe adverse events. Diagnosis of esophageal metastasis from rectal cancer can thus be made by repeated biopsy. Furthermore, aggressive systemic treatment with fluorouracil-containing chemotherapy and bevacizumab is a treatment option for colorectal cancer patients with esophageal metastasis.

  11. Tricholithobezoar Causing Gastric Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Santos Valenciano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A bezoar is an intraluminal mass formed by the accumulation of undigested material in the gastrointestinal tract. Trichobezoar is a rare condition seen almost exclusively in young women with trichotillomania and trichotillophagia. When not recognized, the trichobezoar continues to grow, which increases the risk of severe complications such as gastric ulceration and even perforation. Formation of a gallstone within the trichobezoar (tricholithobezoar is an event that has not yet been described. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman admitted to the emergency room with signals and symptoms of an epigastric mass and perforative acute abdomen. Radiological study revealed bilateral pneumoperitoneum. Personal history revealed depressive syndrome, trichotillomania and trichophagia. With a diagnosis of visceral perforation, an urgent exploratory laparotomy was performed. This confirmed the diagnosis of gastric perforation due to a large trichobezoar with the formation of a gastrolith that was removed by anterior gastrotomy. Biochemical study of the gastric stone revealed that it was composed of bile salts. There were no complications. The patient was discharged on the 5th postoperative day and was referred for psychiatric treatment.

  12. Fast track pathway for perforated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazee, Richard; Abernathy, Stephen; Davis, Matthew; Isbell, Travis; Regner, Justin; Smith, Randall

    2017-04-01

    Perforated appendicitis is associated with an increased morbidity and length of stay. "Fast track" protocols have demonstrated success in shortening hospitalization without increasing morbidity for a variety of surgical processes. This study evaluates a fast track pathway for perforated appendicitis. In 2013, a treatment pathway for perforated appendicitis was adopted by the Acute Care Surgery Service for patients having surgical management of perforated appendicitis. Interval appendectomy was excluded. Patients were treated initially with intravenous antibiotics and transitioned to oral antibiotics and dismissed when medically stable and tolerating oral intake. A retrospective review of patients managed on the fast track pathway was undertaken to analyze length of stay, morbidity, and readmissions. Thirty-four males and twenty-one females with an average age of 46.8 years underwent laparoscopic appendectomy for perforated appendicitis between January 2013 and December 2014. Pre-existing comorbidities included hypertension 42%, diabetes mellitus 11%, COPD 5% and heart disease 2%. No patient had conversion to open appendectomy. Average length of stay was 2.67 days and ranged from 1 to 12 days (median 2 days). Postoperative morbidity was 20% and included abscess (6 patients), prolonged ileus (3 patients), pneumonia (1 patient), and congestive heart failure (1 patient). Five patients were readmitted for abscess (3 patients), congestive heart failure (1 patient), and pneumonia (1 patient). A fast track pathway for perforated appendicitis produced shorter length of stay and acceptable postoperative morbidity and readmission. This offers the potential for significant cost savings over current national practice patterns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transmural coil embolization—alternative technique for management of arterial perforation during subintimal angioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan Damodharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subintimal angioplasty of lower limb arterial occlusion carries a relatively higher risk of vessel perforation compared to transluminal angioplasty. Vessel perforation is a potentially life threatening complication which requires prompt recognition and management. They are usually managed by endovascular techniques such as low-pressure balloon tamponade, covered stents, and coil embolization of the ruptured artery. We describe a technique of treating vessel perforation following balloon angioplasty. Patient developed a large perforation of the proximal superficial femoral artery (SFA after balloon inflation during subintimal angioplasty of complete SFA occlusion. Following failure of balloon tamponade in sealing the perforation, we successfully treated it by deploying an embolization coil at the site of perforation through the vessel wall followed by balloon tamponade. Our technique could be a useful relatively inexpensive alternative treatment option in the management of vessel perforation compared to covered stents.

  14. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome.

  15. Comparison of differently viscous iodinated and bariumcontaining contrast agents in the detection of pharyngeal perforation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keberle, M.; Wittenberg, G.; Trusen, A.; Hahn, D.; Baumgartner, W.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: In contrast to esophageal perforations, the more radiopaque barium-suspensions are not as important as iodinated aqueous contrast agents for the detection of pharyngeal perforations. This study was performed to find out whether the highly different viscosities (of iodinated and barium-containing contrast agents with comparable radiopacities) are a reason for this. Methods: Viscosity, subjective difference in contrast, and CT-density of an iodinated aqueous (Telebrix) and a 50 wt/vol% barium-containing contrast agent (Micropaque) were determined. Moreover, to exclude postoperative perforation, 104 patients were prospectively examined by pharyngography using both contrast media. Pharyngographies of patients with perforation were later compared by two independent readers. All patients with perforation were followed up clinically to exclude complications due to barium administration. Results: In-vitro comparison showed comparable radiopacity but the 50 wt/vol% barium-suspension was much more viscous that the iodinated contrast agent. During pharyngography, totally, 14 perforations were clearly delineated with the iodinated aqueous contrast agent. However, two of them were not detected with the barium-suspension. All the other perforations presented equally. Conclusions: Given a sufficient radiopacity, a low viscosity appears to be essential for a contrast agent to detect especially pharyngeal perforations. Thus, we recommend the sole use of an iodinated contrast agent (at suspicion of aspiration as isoosmolar variant) for this purpose. (orig.) [de

  16. A clinical assessment of esophageal scintigraphy in patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Shigeharu; Shibatsuji, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    1987-01-01

    In patients with esophageal cancer who were treated with radiation therapy, esophageal motility was quantitatively analyzed by comparing the findings from esophageal scintigraphy with subjective symptoms and fluoroscopic findings. The subjects of this study were 5 healthy adults and 10 patients with esophageal cancer. Patients with esophageal cancer underwent radiation therapy (exposure to 50 or 60 Gy irradiation). Each subject swallowed 2 mCi of 99m Tc-DTPA, diluted in 20 ml of water, in a sitting position. The upper esophagus, the lower esophagus, the whole esophagus and the cardia were designated as regions of interest (ROI). A time activity curve was obtained for each ROI, followed by calculation of peak transit time (PTT), esophageal emptying time (EET) and gastric peak time (GPT). In healthy adults, PTT, EET and GPT averaged 0.6, 0.6 and 2.9 seconds, respectively. In patients with esophageal cancer, PTT, EET and GPT averaged 1.9, 1.8 and 6.5 seconds, respectively. Thus, mean PTT, EET and GPT were higher in the cancer patients than in the volunteers. In patients who were treated with radiation therapy, the value of the parameters determined by esophageal scintigraphy agreed well with the changes in symptoms. In patients, the smoothness of passage through the esophagus correlated better with the minimum bore of the esophagus than with the length of the narrowed area of the esophageal cancer. The results of this study indicate that esophageal scintigraphy is a useful means of esophageal examination, which allows changes in esophageal motility to be quantitatively assessed easily and physiologically. (author)

  17. Delta neutrophil index: A reliable marker to differentiate perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Hyuk; Cho, Young Suk; Kim, Yoon Sung; Ahn, Hee Cheol; Oh, Young Taeck; Park, Sang O; Won, Moo-Ho; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Young Myeong; Seo, Jeong Yeol; Lee, Young Hwan

    2018-01-01

    Delta neutrophil index (DNI) is a new inflammatory marker and the present study aimed to evaluate the predictive value of the DNI for the presence of a perforation in elderly with acute appendicitis. This retrospective observational study was conducted on 108 consecutive elderly patients (≥65 years old) with acute appendicitis treated over a 24-month period. Sixty-nine of the 108 patients (median, IQR: 72, 67-77 years) were allocated to the perforated appendicitis group (63.9%) and 39 to the non-perforated appendicitis group (36.1%). WBC, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio and DNI were significantly higher in the perforated group. In multiple logistic regression analyses, initial DNI was the only independent marker that can significantly predict the presence of perforation in multiple regression [odds ratio 9.38, 95% confidence interval (2.51-35.00), P=.001]. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed that DNI is a good predictor for the presence of appendiceal perforation at an optimal cut-off for DNI being 1.4% (sensitivity 67.7%, specificity 90.0%, AUC 0.807). Clinicians can reliably differentiate acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis by DNI level of 1.4 or more in elderly patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Management of esophageal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, L.D.; Mercer, C.D.; McCallum, R.W.; Kozarek, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book integrates gastroenterology and thoracic surgery to detail the comprehensive management of esophageal disease. It describes radiologic and functional evaluation of the esophagus, endoscopy, medical and surgical treatments, and results and also covers gastroesophageal reflux disease, tumors motility, esophageal replacement, intubation, esophageal diverticula, caustic esophageal injury. It presents Dr. Hill's surgical procedures in detail.

  19. Multimodal approaches including three-dimensional conformal re-irradiation for recurrent or persistent esophageal cancer. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Shinsaku; Ohguri, Takayuki; Imada, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the toxicity and efficacy of multimodal approaches, including three-dimensional conformal re-irradiation, for patients with recurrent or persistent esophageal cancer after radiotherapy. Thirty-one patients with esophageal cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal re-irradiation were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 31 patients, 27 patients received concurrent chemotherapy, and 14 patients underwent regional hyperthermia during the re-irradiation. We divided the patients into two groups on the basis of their clinical condition: the curative group (n=11) or the palliative group (n=20). Severe toxicities were detected in one patient with Grade 3 esophageal perforation in the curative group, and 5 patients had a Grade 3 or higher toxicity of the esophagus in the palliative group. Advanced T stage at the time of re-irradiation was found to be significantly correlated with Grade 3 or higher toxicity in the esophagus. For the curative group, 10 (91%) of 11 patients had an objective response. For the palliative group, symptom relief was recognized in 8 (57%) of 14 patients with obvious swallowing difficulty. In conclusion, in the curative group with early-stage recurrent or persistent esophageal cancer, the multimodal approaches, including three-dimensional conformal re-irradiation, may be feasible, showing acceptable toxicity and a potential value of promising results, although further evaluations especially for the toxicities of the organs at risk are required. In the palliative group, the benefit of our therapy may be restrictive because severe esophageal toxicities were not uncommon in the patients with advanced T stage at the time of re-irradiation. (author)

  20. Impaired esophageal motor function in eosinophilic esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilio Santander

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immunoallergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus that represents a major cause of digestive morbidity among the pediatric and young adult populations. Despite the fact that key symptoms in adults include dysphagia and food impaction, many patients lack structural changes in the esophagus to account for their complaints, which suggests the presence of underlying motor disorders and esophageal distensibility impairment. In the last few years the esophageal motility of these patients has been studied using various approaches, most particularly high-resolution manometry, ambulatory manometry, and impedance planimetry. This review focuses on the most relevant findings and scientific evidence regarding esophageal motor disorders in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  1. Impaired esophageal motor function in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Cecilio; Chavarría-Herbozo, Carlos M; Becerro-González, Irene; Burgos-Santamaría, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immunoallergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus that represents a major cause of digestive morbidity among the pediatric and young adult populations. Despite the fact that key symptoms in adults include dysphagia and food impaction, many patients lack structural changes in the esophagus to account for their complaints, which suggests the presence of underlying motor disorders and esophageal distensibility impairment. In the last few years the esophageal motility of these patients has been studied using various approaches, most particularly high-resolution manometry, ambulatory manometry, and impedance planimetry. This review focuses on the most relevant findings and scientific evidence regarding esophageal motor disorders in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  2. Esophageal stenting for benign and malignant disease: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaander, Manon C W; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Schumacher, Brigitte; Escorsell, Àngels; Garcia-Pagán, Juan-Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Conio, Massimo; de Ceglie, Antonella; Skowronek, Janusz; Nordsmark, Marianne; Seufferlein, Thomas; Van Gossum, André; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruno, Marco J

    2016-10-01

    recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 ESGE suggests consideration of temporary placement of SEMSs as therapy for refractory benign esophageal strictures (weak recommendation, moderate evidence). Stents should usually be removed at a maximum of 3 months (strong recommendation, weak quality evidence). 3 ESGE suggests that fully covered SEMSs be preferred over partially covered SEMSs for the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures, because of their lack of embedment and ease of removability (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 For the removal of partially covered esophageal SEMSs that are embedded, ESGE recommends the stent-in-stent technique (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends that temporary stent placement can be considered for treating esophageal leaks, fistulas, and perforations. The optimal stenting duration remains unclear and should be individualized. (Strong recommendation, low quality evidence.) 6 ESGE recommends placement of a SEMS for the treatment of esophageal variceal bleeding refractory to medical, endoscopic, and/or radiological therapy, or as initial therapy for patients with massive esophageal variceal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Lymphocytic esophagitis: Report of three cases and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jideh, Bilel; Keegan, Andrew; Weltman, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is a rare condition characterised histologically by high numbers of esophageal intraepithelial lymphocytes without significant granulocytes infiltration, in addition to intercellular edema (“spongiosis”). The clinical significance and natural history of LyE is poorly defined although dysphagia is reportedly the most common symptom. Endoscopic features range from normal appearing esophageal mucosa to features similar to those seen in eosinophilic esophagitis, including esophageal rings, linear furrows, whitish exudates, and esophageal strictures/stenosis. Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease is an inconsistent association. LyE has been associated in paediatric Crohn’s disease, and recently in primary esophageal dysmotility disorder in adults. There are no studies assessing effective treatment strategies for LyE; empirical therapies have included use of proton pump inhibitor and corticosteroids. Esophageal dilatation have been used to manage esophageal strictures. LyE has been reported to run a benign course; however there has been a case of esophageal perforation associated with LyE. Here, we describe the clinical, endoscopic and histopathological features of three patients with lymphocytic esophagitis along with a review of the current literature. PMID:28035315

  4. Perforated peptic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-09-26

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes, demographic differences in age, sex, perforation location, and underlying causes exist between countries, and mortality rates also vary. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation of such methods in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care bundles, and postoperative monitoring need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical applications of the superior epigastric artery perforator (SEAP) flap: anatomical studies and preoperative perforator mapping with multidetector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Moustapha; Van Landuyt, Koenraad; Ulens, Sara; Van Hedent, Eddy; Roche, Nathalie; Monstrey, Stan

    2009-09-01

    Pedicled superior epigastric artery perforator (SEAP) flaps can be raised to cover challenging thoracic defects. We present an anatomical study based on multidetector computerized tomography (MDCT) scan findings of the SEA perforators in addition to the first reported clinical series of SEAP flaps in anterior chest wall reconstruction. (a) In the CT scan study, images of a group of 20 patients who underwent MDCT scan analysis were used to visualise bilaterally the location of musculocutaneous SEAP. X- and Y-axes were used as landmarks to localise the perforators. The X-axis is a horizontal line at the junction of sternum and xyphoid (JCX) and the Y-axis is at the midline. (b) In the clinical study, seven pedicled SEAP flaps were performed in another group of patients. MDCT images revealed totally 157 perforators with a mean of 7.85 perforators per patient. The dominant perforators (137 perforators) were mainly localised in an area between 1.5 and 6.5 cm from the X-axis on both sides and between 3 and 16 cm below the Y-axis. The calibre of these dominant perforators was judged as 'good' to 'very good' in 82.5% of the cases. The average dimension of the flap was 21.7x6.7 cm. All flaps were based on one perforator. Mean harvesting time was 110 min. There were no flap losses. Minor tip necrosis occurred in two flaps. One of them was treated with excision and primary closure. Our clinical experience indicates that the SEAP flap provides a novel and useful approach for reconstruction of anterior chest wall defects. CT-based imaging allows for anatomical assessment of the perforators of the superior epigastric artery (SEA).

  6. Long-term results of laparoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia in children: a multicentric survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Ciro; Riccipetitoni, Giovanna; Chiarenza, Salvatore Fabio; Roberti, Agnese; Vella, Claudio; Alicchio, Francesca; Fava, Giorgio; Escolino, Maria; De Pascale, Teresa; Settimi, Alessandro

    2013-11-01

    This report describes three Italian centers' experience in the treatment of children with esophageal achalasia. Between June 2000 and June 2012, 31 children (13 girls and 18 boys, with a median age of 8.4 years) affected by esophageal achalasia were treated in three different institutions with an esophagomyotomy according to Heller's procedure via laparoscopy associated with a Dor antireflux procedure. Between 2000 and 2005 (for 14 patients) we used mono- or bipolar coagulation to perform myotomy; after 2005 (for 17 patients) we used the new hemostatic devices to perform it. Median length of surgery was 120 minutes. Median hospital stay was 4 days. We recorded eight complications in our series: 3 patients (9.6%) had a mucosal perforation, and 5 children (16.1%) presented dysphagia after surgery. When comparing the data before and after 2005, it seems that the new hemostatic devices statistically shortened the length of surgery (Ptreatment of achalasia in the pediatric population. Intraoperative complications were achalasia have to be treated only at centers with a strong experience in the treatment of this pathology.

  7. [Saphenous perforator flap].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, R; Tajsic, N; Husum, H; Schlageter, M; Hanebuth, G; Hoffmann, R

    2013-04-01

    Replacement of full thickness soft tissue defects in the lower leg and ankle, appropriate to the defect and following the course of blood vessels feeding the skin of a distally hinged fasciocutaneous flap most reliably based on the individual anatomy of distal perforators of the posterior tibial artery. Full thickness soft tissue defects, up to 12 cm in length and up to 8 cm in width. Sufficient vascularization of the foot required, in osteomyelitis, and when joints, fractures, implants and tendons are exposed and when a split skin graft, a local flap, a suralis perforator flap or a free flap is not indicated. For patients, in whom a 1-2 h operation is not possible; necessity of angioplasty; decollement or scars around the distal perforators of the posterior tibial artery; local infection or necrosis of soft tissues and/or bone, which cannot be totally excised. Radical debridement; flap dissection without tourniquet; microdissection; design of the flap on the skin: pivot point ~ 10 cm (6-14 cm) proximal of the tip of the medial malleolus; base ~ 5 cm in width, between the course of the saphenous nerve and of the great saphenous vein and the Achilles tendon; adipofascial pedicle up to 15 cm in length sited over the septum between soleus and flexor digitorum muscles, following the course of the saphenous nerve, with a central skin stripe, which expands into a proximal skin island; skin island is outlined similar to the defect, but larger by 1 to 2 cm, surrounded by an adipofascial border: adjustment of the planning as well as of the elevation of these flaps according to the individual position and the caliber of perforators requires in each case the search for a perforator at the estimated pivot point. Delay of transposition, if the division of more than one perforator proximal to the pivot point obviously diminishes circulation. No "tunnelling "of the pedicle; defects of skin due to the elevation of the flap are replaced by split and meshed skin grafts or temporary

  8. Esophageal diverticula and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbella, F A M; Dubecz, A; Patti, M G

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal diverticula are rare. The association of cancer and diverticula has been described. Some authors adopt a conservative non-surgical approach in selected patients with diverticula whereas others treat the symptoms by diverticulopexy or myotomy only, leaving the diverticulum in situ. However, the risk of malignant degeneration should be may be taken in account if the diverticulum is not resected. The correct evaluation of the possible risk factors for malignancy may help in the decision making process. We performed a literature review of esophageal diverticula and cancer. The incidence of cancer in a diverticulum is 0.3-7, 1.8, and 0.6% for pharyngoesophageal, midesophageal, and epiphrenic diverticula, respectively. Symptoms may mimic those of the diverticulum or underlying motor disorder. Progressive dysphagia, unintentional weight loss, the presence of blood in the regurgitated material, regurgitation of peaces of the tumor, odynophagia, melena, hemathemesis, and hemoptysis are key symptoms. Risk factors for malignancy are old age, male gender, long-standing history, and larger diverticula. A carcinoma may develop in treated diverticula, even after resection. Outcomes are usually quoted as dismal because of a delayed diagnosis but several cases of superficial carcinoma have been described. The treatment follows the same principals as the therapy for esophageal cancer; however, diverticulectomy is enough in cases of superficial carcinomas. Patients must be carefully evaluated before therapy and a long-term follow-up is advisable. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  9. The freestyle pedicle perforator flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Jackson, Ian T; Westvik, Tormod S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perforating vessels are a consistent anatomical finding and well described in the current literature. Any skin flap can be raised on a subcutaneous pedicle as long as it contains at least one supplying perforator. Perforator flaps have been interlinked with microsurgery and generally...... not widely performed by the general plastic surgeons. The aim of this paper is to present the simplicity of pedicled perforator flap reconstruction of moderate-sized defects of the extremities and torso. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 34 patients reconstructed using 34 freestyle pedicled...... perforator flaps for moderate-sized defects of the truncus and extremities. We registered indications, flap size and localization, success rate, and complications. Most importantly, we describe a simple approach to the design of freestyle pedicled perforator flaps and elaborate on technical aspects...

  10. Dynamic esophageal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilley, J.J.; Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.; Applegate, G.; DeVegvar, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Esophageal scintigraphy was developed in order to quantitatively evaluate esophageal transit in patients with a variety of esophageal disorders. The study is performed with orally administered technetium-99m sulfur colloid in water, using a gamma camera on-line to a digital computer. Esophageal transit is expressed as the percent emptying for each of the first 15-sec intervals for 10 min after an initial swallow and at 15-sec intervals after serial swallows. Esophageal transit is significantly decreased in patients with motor disorders of the esophagus, compared to normal controls. In patients with reflux esophagitis, esophageal transit was abnormal when the reflux disease was accompanied by abnormal motor function. The technique we describe is the first quantitative test of esophageal function; it is a useful, sensitive, scintigraphic technique for evaluation of esophageal transit

  11. Distal Esophageal Duplication Cyst with Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease: A Rare Association and a Management Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Iftikhar Ahmad; Al Nuaimi, Asma; Al Hamoudi, Basma; Al Naqbi, Khalid; Bilal, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal duplication cysts are rare congenital abnormalities of the foregut and may be associated with other conditions. Association of esophageal duplication with Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) has not been reported in children. We are reporting a case of a 16 months baby who had antenatal diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia. Postnatal CTchest, however, suggested a distal esophageal duplication cyst and a contrast esophagogram showed grade-IV GER. A thoracoscopy in another hospital excluded esophageal duplication at that time. Later, he presented with hematemesis in our department and was re-evaluated. Repeat CTconfirmed a persistent 2.5 x 1.3 cm cyst in distal esophagus. Upper GI endoscopy suggested grade-II esophagitis with a wide patent gastro-esophageal junction. The child was treated with left thoracotomy, excision of the duplication cyst and thoracic fundoplication. He had an uneventful post-operative recovery and is doing well at 6 months follow-up.

  12. Complications of esophageal stenting after radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorozu, Atsunori; Dokiya, Takushi; Ogita, Mikio; Kutuki, Shoji; Oki, Yosuke [National Second Hospital of Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate safety and complications of stenting after radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Fifteen of 21 patients showed improvement of dysphagia by stenting. But 6 of 21 patients had perforation or massive bleeding relating to stents. The risk for perforation or hemorrhage appears to be even higher in patients who have previously undergone radical radiotherapy and brachytherapy within one month before stenting. Stenting at 6 months or more after radical radiotherapy seems to be an effective and safe method of long-lasting palliation for severe dysphagia with recurrent esophageal cancer. (author)

  13. A case report on esophageal tuberculosis – A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatsal Khanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a rare form of tuberculosis in a patient presenting with dysphagia. Patient was subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, which revealed an ulcerative growth in the distal esophagus. Histopathology revealed esophageal tuberculosis. Patient was managed conservatively with Anti-Tuberculosis Treatment (ATT. Follow up endoscopy after two months revealed resolution of the growth and patient was symptomatically better. In spite of the rare nature of the disease, it can be managed effectively with ATT to avoid complications (fistula, stricture, and esophageal perforation, which might warrant surgery.

  14. Spontaneous perforation of sigmoid colon in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miolski Jelena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Perforation of the sigmoid colon is rare in children and its descriptions in medical literature are infrequent. Case Outline. In a 13-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a ten-month course of chemotherapy was accompanied by many complications: parasitic infestation (Enterobius vermicularis, lung candidiasis, esophageal candidiasis, steroid diabetes, anaphylactoid reaction to L-asparaginase, febrile neutropenia, mucositis, anemia, thrombocytopenia, enterocolitis, and respiratory distress syndrome. During reinduction treatment, consisting of dexamethasone, vincristine, doxorubicin, and crisantaspase, he complained of abdominal pain and, upon radiographic examination, was found to have pneumoperitoneum. Because of suspicion of abdominal hollow organ perforation, he was subjected to explorative laparotomy, which yielded the diagnosis of perforation of the sigmoid colon. Conclusion. After an extensive review of the published reports on sigmoid perforation, all associated conditions that could possibly induce perforation – such as Hirschsprung’s disease or foreign body – were systematically excluded in our patient. Although typhlitis was the first diagnostic hypothesis, this was excluded by intraoperative findings, histopathology, and perforation site. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a spontaneous perforation of the sigmoid colon in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  15. A short-term increase of the postoperative naturally circulating dendritic cells subsets in flurbiprofen-treated patients with esophageal carcinoma undergoing thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Yang, Xin-lu; Chai, Xiao-qing; Shu, Shu-hua; Zhang, Xiao-lin; Xie, Yan-hu; Wei, Xin; Wu, Yu-jing; Wei, Wei

    2016-04-05

    The present study evaluated whether flurbiprofen increased the naturally circulating dendritic cells (DCs) subsets in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) undergoing esophageal resection. Compared to healthy donors (n=20), the significantly depressed percentages of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), CD1c+ myeloid DCs (mDCs), and CD141+ mDCs among ESCC patients (n=60) were confirmed. Flurbiprofen was administered before skin incision and at the end of operation in group F (n=30), as well as placebo in group C (n=30). The postoperative suppressed percentages of pDCs, CD1c+ mDCs, and CD141+ mDCs increased significantly following the perioperative treatment with flurbiprofen. Flurbiprofen also significantly stimulated the postoperative IFN-f and IL-17 production, but inhibited the immunosuppressive IL-10 and TGF-β levels. Furthermore, flurbiprofen exerted a similar analgesic effect and brought a significantly less sufentanil consumption compared to group C. Taken together, flurbiprofen provided a short-term increase of postoperative naturally circulating DCs in ESCC patients.

  16. Corneal perforation after conductive keratoplasty with previous refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kymionis, George D; Titze, Patrik; Markomanolakis, Marinos M; Aslanides, Ioannis M; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2003-12-01

    A 56-year-old woman had conductive keratoplasty (CK) for residual hyperopia and astigmatism. Three years before the procedure, the patient had arcuate keratotomy, followed by laser in situ keratomileusis 2 years later for high astigmatism correction in both eyes. During CK, a corneal perforation occurred in the right eye; during the postoperative examination, an iris perforation and anterior subcapsule opacification were seen beneath the perforation site. The perforation was managed with a bandage contact lens and an antibiotic-steroid ointment; it had a negative Seidel sign by the third day. The surgery in the left eye was uneventful. Three months after the procedure, the uncorrected visual acuity was 20/32 and the best corrected visual acuity 20/20 in both eyes with a significant improvement in corneal topography. Care must be taken to prevent CK-treated spots from coinciding with areas in the corneal stroma that might have been altered by previous refractive procedures.

  17. Risk factors for reintervention after surgery for perforated gastroduodenal ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselager, R B; Lohse, N; Duch, P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perforated gastroduodenal ulcer carries a high mortality rate. Need for reintervention after surgical repair is associated with worse outcome, but knowledge on risk factors for reintervention is limited. The aim was to identify prognostic risk factors for reintervention after perforated...... gastroduodenal ulcer in a nationwide cohort. METHODS: All patients treated surgically for perforated gastroduodenal ulcer in Denmark between 2003 and 2014 were included using data from the Danish Clinical Register of Emergency Surgery. Potential risk factors for reintervention were assessed, and their crude...... and adjusted associations calculated by the competing risks subdistribution hazards approach. RESULTS: A total of 4086 patients underwent surgery for perforated gastroduodenal ulcer during the study interval. Median age was 71·1 (i.q.r. 59·6-81·0) years and the overall 90-day mortality rate was 30·8 per cent...

  18. Perforated Duodenal Ulcer in a Young Child: An Uncommon Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Prasad Yadav

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal ulcer is an uncommonly diagnosed entity in children. H. pyloriinfection, blood group ‘O’ or secondary to medications like non steroidal anti-infl ammatory drugs (NSAID and corticosteroids or physiological stress in burns, head injury and mucosal ischemia are implicated as risk factors for their causation. The diagnosis is usually overlooked because of vague and variable symptoms and remote index of suspicion accounted for their low incidence in children. Undiagnosed or mistreated perforations may carry high morbidity and mortality. We report a successfully treated 41/2 year old male child who presented with features of perforation peritonitis and was incidentally found to have a perforated duodenal ulcer. Key Words: duodenal ulcer, laparotomy, perforation

  19. Perforated peptic ulcer following gastric bypass for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, A M; Pickens, N E; Thoburn, E K

    1999-03-01

    Peptic ulcer in the excluded segment of a gastric bypass performed in the management of morbid obesity has only rarely been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with the condition in a series of 4300 patients who underwent gastric-restrictive surgery between 1978 and 1997. Eleven patients presented with acute perforation of a peptic ulcer in the excluded gastric segment. Nine ulcers were duodenal, one was gastric, and one patient had both gastric and duodenal perforations. The time between primary gastric-restrictive surgery and ulcer perforation varied from 20 days to 12 years. All patients presented with upper abdominal pain. The classical radiological sign of perforated peptic ulcer, free air under the diaphragm, did not occur in any patient. Nine patients were initially treated by primary closure of the perforation with subsequent definitive ulcer therapy by vagotomy, pyloroplasty, or gastrectomy. One case, initially treated elsewhere, was managed by placement of a Malecot catheter through the duodenal perforation, gastrostomy, and peritoneal drainage. One recent case remains symptom-free on H2 blockers after simple closure. There was no mortality. Six cases were previously reported in the literature with a 33 per cent mortality rate.

  20. Self-expandable covered metallic esophageal stent impregnated with beta-emitting radionuclide: an experimental study in canine esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Je Hwan; Lee, Jong Doo; Wang, Hee Jung; Kim, Gui-Eon; Kim, Bong Wan; Yim, Hyunee; Han, Sang Keon; Park, Chan H.; Joh, Chul Woo; Kim, Kyung-Hwa; Park, Kyung Bae; Shin, Kyong-Min

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: A specially designed self-expandable covered metallic stent impregnated with the β-emitting radioisotope 166 Ho ( 166 Ho, energy: 1.85 and 1.76 MeV, T((1)/(2)): 26.8 h) was developed at our institute for the purpose of intraluminal palliative brachytherapy, as well as for treating malignant esophageal stricture and swallowing difficulty. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tissue response to brachytherapy and the safety of the radioactive metallic stent with regard to the normal canine esophagus before clinical application. Methods and Materials: 166 Ho was impregnated into the polyurethane membrane (50 μ thickness) covering the outer surface of a self-expandable metallic stent (diameter, 18 mm; length, 40 mm). Stents with radioactivity 4.0-7.8 mCi (Group A, n=15), 1.0-1.8 mCi (Group B, n 5), and 0.5-0.7 mCi (Group C, n=5) were placed in the esophagi of 25 healthy beagle dogs, and the stents were tightly anchored surgically to prevent migration. The estimated radiation dose calculated by Monte Carlo simulation was 194-383 Gy in Group A, 48-90 Gy in Group B, and 23-32 Gy in Group C. The dogs were killed 8-12 weeks after insertion of the stents, and histologic examinations of the esophageal walls were performed. Results: In Group A, 3 of 15 dogs died of wound infection, so specimens were obtained from only 12 dogs; all 12 cases showed esophageal stricture with mucosal ulceration. Microscopically, severe fibrosis and degeneration of the muscular propria were found in 3 dogs, complete fibrosis of the entire esophageal wall was found in 7 dogs, and esophageal fibrosis with radiation damage within periesophageal soft tissue was found in 2 dogs. However, esophageal perforation did not develop, despite extremely high radiation doses. In Group B, glandular atrophy and submucosal fibrosis were found, but the muscular layer was intact. In Group C, no histologic change was found in 3 dogs, but submucosal inflammation and glandular atrophy with intact mucosa

  1. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  2. Thyroid Storm Precipitated by Duodenal Ulcer Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Natsuda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  3. Perforated peptic ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M.; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H.; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a frequent emergency condition worldwide with associated mortality up to 30%. A paucity of studies on PPU limits the knowledge base for clinical decision-making, but a few randomised trials are available. While Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are frequent causes of PPU, demographic differences in age, gender, perforation location and aetiology exist between countries, as do mortality rates. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can perhaps be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care-bundles and postoperative monitoring need further evaluation. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed for better evidence. Here we summarize the evidence for PPU management and identify directions for future clinical research. PMID:26460663

  4. Colonic perforation following endoscopic retrograde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She developed severe upper abdominal pain after the ... non-surgical management of pancreatitis and associated complications, colonic perforation should be considered in patients who deteriorate ... To our knowledge this is the first case of a secure pre-operative diagnosis of colonic perforation due to to pancreatitis.

  5. Chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohira, Masaichi; Yamashita, Yoshito; Matsumura, Yumiko; Yamazaki, Masanao; Kubo, Naoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2002-01-01

    The current status and future prospects of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer are reviewed herein. In Western countries, CRT is performed for every stage of esophageal cancer and it has been reported that in definitive CRT series the complete response rate is 30 to 50%, the mean survival rate more than twelve months, and the in 2-year survival rate about 30%, while in neoadjuvant CRT series the pathological response rate is 20 to 50%, the mean survival period more than twenty months, and the 3-year survival 30 to 40%. On the other hand, as esophageal cancer is treated mainly by surgery in Japan, CRT is applied in patients with tumors invading adjacent organs, and a high pathological complete response rate is reported in some neoadjuvant studies. Although both definitive and neoadjuvant CRT increases the response rate and improves local tumor control, CRT is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity, especially in neoadjuvant series. More effective and less toxic CRT regimens, using new chemotherapeutic agents such as nedaplatin and paclitaxel and new irradiation protocol such as accelated hyperfractionation, are needed to improve the prognosis of patients with advanced esophageal cancer. (author)

  6. Association of TGF-β1 and XPD polymorphisms with severe acute radiation-induced esophageal toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Yang Ming; Bi Nan; Ji Wei; Wu Chen; Tan Wen; Zhao Lujun; Yu Dianke; Lin Dongxin; Wang Luhua

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity (RIET) is a dose-limiting toxicity in lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair and the cytokine pathways play essential roles in radiation-induced diseases. Genetic polymorphisms of genes in these pathways may affect gene function and/or gene expression and lead to different treatment-related esophageal toxicity. Materials and methods: This study investigated the association of 21 polymorphisms in 14 genes, with the occurrence of ≥grade 2 acute RIET. Genotypes were analyzed among 213 stage III lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Results: We used Cox proportional hazard model to examine the effects of genotypes on ≥grade 2 acute RIET risk and Kaplan-Meier estimator to compare effects of different genotypes on such risk. Multivariate analysis showed that CT or TT genotype of TGF-β1-509C/T polymorphism was associated with a significantly higher RIET risk (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 2.47; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.17-5.24; P = 0.018, or HR = 3.86; 95% CI = 1.50-9.92; P = 0.005), respectively, compared with the CC genotype. Moreover, Lys/Gln+Gln/Gln genotypes of XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism were also associated with a significantly decreased RIET risk (adjusted HR = 0.55; 95% CI = 0.32-0.96; P = 0.030). Conclusions: This report, for the first time, examined the influence of inherited variation in the DNA repair and the cytokine pathways on RIET.

  7. Esophageal heterotopic gastric mucosa in esophageal atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan J.R. Harrison

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM is occasionally found at endoscopy in the proximal esophagus of adults and children, when it manifests as an asymptomatic small island of reddish pink mucosa just below the upper esophageal sphincter. There are few reports of esophageal HGM detected by endoscopy after repair of esophageal atresia (EA with tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF. We report a child with multiple patches of HGM in the proximal and distal esophagus seen at endoscopy after EA/TEF repair. No obvious symptoms were related to the HGM and she remains under endoscopic surveillance. The incidence of esophageal HGM may be increased in patients with EA and its distribution can be more extensive than a simple “inlet patch”. There is evidence to suggest that esophageal HGM increases the risk of developing Barrett's esophagus and has a malignant potential. Heterotopic gastric mucosa extends the spectrum of potential pathologies affecting the esophagus in patients with EA/TEF and supports current international guidelines for endoscopic surveillance of these patients. Keywords: Tracheo-esophageal fistula, Ectopic mucosa, Esophageal malignancy

  8. Esophageal achalasia: current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2018-05-27

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder of unknown origin, characterized by lack of peristalsis and by incomplete or absent relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing. The goal of treatment is to eliminate the functional obstruction at the level of the gastroesophageal junction Areas covered: This comprehensive review will evaluate the current literature, illustrating the diagnostic evaluation and providing an evidence-based treatment algorithm for this disease Expert commentary: Today we have three very effective therapeutic modalities to treat patients with achalasia - pneumatic dilatation, per-oral endoscopic myotomy and laparoscopic Heller myotomy with fundoplication. Treatment should be tailored to the individual patient, in centers where a multidisciplinary approach is available. Esophageal resection should be considered as a last resort for patients who have failed prior therapeutic attempts.

  9. Esophageal function testing: Billing and coding update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A; Massey, B; Rao, S; Pandolfino, J

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal function testing is being increasingly utilized in diagnosis and management of esophageal disorders. There have been several recent technological advances in the field to allow practitioners the ability to more accurately assess and treat such conditions, but there has been a relative lack of education in the literature regarding the associated Common Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes and methods of reimbursement. This review, commissioned and supported by the American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society Council, aims to summarize each of the CPT codes for esophageal function testing and show the trends of associated reimbursement, as well as recommend coding methods in a practical context. We also aim to encourage many of these codes to be reviewed on a gastrointestinal (GI) societal level, by providing evidence of both discrepancies in coding definitions and inadequate reimbursement in this new era of esophageal function testing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Risk factors of electrocoagulation syndrome after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dae Won; Youn, Young Hoon; Jung, Da Hyun; Park, Jae Jun; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Park, Hyojin

    2018-01-01

    AIM To investigate post endoscopic submucosal dissection electrocoagulation syndrome (PEECS) of the esophagus. METHODS We analyzed 55 consecutive cases with esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal squamous neoplasms at a tertiary referral hospital in South Korea. Esophageal PEECS was defined as “mild” meeting one of the following criteria without any obvious perforation: fever (≥ 37.8 °C), leukocytosis (> 10800 cells/μL), or regional chest pain more than 5/10 points as rated on a numeric pain intensity scale. The grade of PEECS was determined as “severe” when meet two or more of above criteria. RESULTS We included 51 cases without obvious complications in the analysis. The incidence of mild and severe esophageal PEECS was 47.1% and 17.6%, respectively. Risk factor analysis revealed that resected area, procedure time, and muscle layer exposure were significantly associated with PEECS. In multivariate analysis, a resected area larger than 6.0 cm2 (OR = 4.995, 95%CI: 1.110-22.489, P = 0.036) and muscle layer exposure (OR = 5.661, 95%CI: 1.422-22.534, P = 0.014) were independent predictors of esophageal PEECS. All patients with PEECS had favorable outcomes with conservative management approaches, such as intravenous hydration or antibiotics. CONCLUSION Clinicians should consider the possibility of esophageal PEECS when the resected area exceeds 6.0 cm2 or when the muscle layer exposure is noted. PMID:29563758

  11. Radiologic placement of metallic esophageal stents: preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good, S.; Asch, M.R.; Jaffer, N.; Casson, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of covered, self expanding metallic stents for alleviating stricture associated with malignant esophageal lesions. Patients and methods: Self-expanding metallic stents were placed in 10 patients with dysphagia related to stricture caused by malignant esophageal lesions. The stents were placed fluoroscopically with local anesthesia, and patency of the esophageal lumen was assessed by barium study after the procedure. The patients were then followed clinically. Results: In all 10 cases patency of the lumen was renewed after stent placement. After the procedure 9 of the patients could tolerate a normal or near-normal diet; in the other patient esophageal perforation occurred, and clinical deterioration prevented oral intake of food. In one patient, 2 stents were needed because of the length of the stricture. Two patients experienced reflux after placement of the stent across the gastro-esophageal junction. Another patient had asymptomatic aspiration after stent placement in the proximal esophagus. In 2 patients, symptoms associated with tracheoesophageal fistula were relieved after placement of the stents. Six of the 10 patients died; mean survival after the procedure was 12 (range 1 to 56) weeks. The other 4 patients were alive at the time of writing, having survived for a mean of 7.5 (range 2 to 13) weeks; all of these patients tolerated a near-normal diet. Conclusions: The placement of covered, self-expanding metallic stents is a quick, effective method of palliating dysphagia related to stricture caused by malignant esophageal lesions. (author)

  12. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-12-21

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE.

  13. Typhoid ileal perforation: a 13-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poras Chaudhary

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever is endemic in many developing countries with a high rate of complications. Aim of this study is to analyse epidemiological features, clinical presentations, complications and therapeutic outcomes of enteric perforation peritonitis diagnosed and treated in our hospital. Records of total number of 646 patients, who presented with perforation peritonitis due to enteric fever in the surgical emergency unit of Dr Ram Manohar Lohia hospital, New Delhi between January 2001 and December 2013, were reviewed retrospectively. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the data. Out of 646 patients, 62 (9.59% presented in shock. Stomal, peristomal, local and systemic complications were high in these patients. Primary closure was done in 212 (33.12 patients, primary ileostomy was created in 410 (64.06 patients, and resection and anastomosis was done in 24 (3.75 patients. Thirteen patients (2.01% died of typhoid intestinal perforation. To prevent complications of typhoid fever, in addition to control sanitation, it is also important to control quackery and malpractices. Awareness and education about the disease, its nature and complications will also be of great help.

  14. Conservative treatment of perforated upper gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naoi, Daishi; Sano, Wataru; Nakata, Yasuyuki; Yano, Kentaro; Suzuki, Takeshi; Chiku, Tsuyoshi; Tashiro, Tsuguhiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to clarify the validity of indication criteria of the conservative treatment for perforated upper gastrointestinal tract, a retrospective study was carried out. We enrolled 28 patients with perforation of the gastrointestinal tract who were determined to receive conservative treatment at the time of hospitalization from January 2000 to December 2007. When the following criteria were satisfied, we treated the patients by the conservative treatment after informed consent was gained from them and their families: stable condition of vital signs; peritoneal signs localized in the upper abdomen; and no or slight fluid collection at the Douglas' pouch determined by computed tomography. Patients who showed changes for the worse of peritonitis or increased fluid collection during follow-up were promptly converted to surgery. Six patients were converted to surgery, but all of them were discharged very much improved. We compared patient's data of the conservative treatment group and the converted surgery group at the time of consultation. All data were not statistically different between two groups. If all criteria are satisfied, it seemed that we can start conservative treatment for perforated gastrointestinal tract with careful observation and the system of prompt conversion to operation for patients who showed changes for the worse of peritonitis or increased fluid collection. (author)

  15. [Comparison of iodinated and barium-containing contrast media of different viscosity in the detection of pharyngeal perforation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keberle, M; Wittenberg, G; Trusen, A; Baumgartner, W; Hahn, D

    2001-08-01

    In contrast to esophageal perforations, the more radiopaque barium-suspensions are not as important as iodinated aqueous contrast agents for the detection of pharyngeal perforations. This study was performed to find out whether the highly different viscosities (of iodinated and barium-containing contrast agents with comparable radiopacities) are a reason for this. Viscosity, subjective difference in contrast, and CT-density of an iodinated aqueous (Telebrix) and a 50 wt/vol% barium-containing contrast agent (Micropaque) were determined. Moreover, to exclude postoperative perforation, 104 patients were prospectively examined by pharyngography using both contrast media. Pharyngographies of patients with perforation were later compared by two independent readers. All patients with perforation were followed up clinically to exclude complications due to barium administration. In-vitro comparison showed comparable radiopacity but the 50 wt/vol% barium-suspension was much more viscous than the iodinated contrast agent. During pharyngography, totally, 14 perforations were clearly delineated with the iodinated aqueous contrast agent. However, two of them were not detected with the barium-suspension. All the other perforations presented equally. Given a sufficient radiopacity, a low viscosity appears to be essential for a contrast agent to detect especially pharyngeal perforations. Thus, we recommend the sole use of an iodinated contrast agent (at suspicion of aspiration as isoosmolar variant) for this purpose.

  16. Vitrectomy in double-perforation gunshot injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El Alim Mohamed A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Abd El Alim MohamedOphthalmology department, Ain Shams University, Cairo, EgyptObjective: This study sought to evaluate the result of pars plana vitrectomy in patients with gunshot wounds involving double perforation.Methods: This was a retrospective, noncomparative, interventional case series.Results: Eighteen patients (18 eyes with double-perforation gunshot injuries were treated from February 2010 to March 2012. The group included 16 men (88% and two women (11%; the mean age was 24 (15–33 years. In each case, vitrectomy was scheduled 1–6 weeks after repair of the entrance site. Associated retinal detachments were observed in two eyes (11%, retinal incarceration was observed surrounding the exit site in three eyes (16%, and retention of an intraocular foreign body was observed in two cases. After a follow-up period of 8 ± 2 months, two eyes (11% had achieved visual acuity (VA of 0.5, nine eyes (50% had achieved VA between 0.5 and 0.1, and seven eyes (38% had achieved VA between 0.1 and hand movement. The main reasons for functional failure (VA 0.1 to hand movement were macular dragging (due to fibrosis at the exit site near the macula in seven cases (38%, submacular hemorrhage in four cases (22%, and epimacular fibrosis in five cases (27%. All cases developed postoperative exotropia. One case (5% developed postoperative hemorrhage. No cases exhibited signs of postoperative redetachment.Conclusion: The outcome of pars plana vitrectomy in cases with double perforations is variable. Factors including the surgeon's skill level, the time to surgery, and the efficacy of the intraocular tamponade affect the postoperative outcome.Keywords: pars plana vitrectomy, gunshot injury, double perforation

  17. Functional promoter rs2868371 variant of HSPB1 associates with radiation-induced esophageal toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with radio(chemo)therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Wei Qingyi; Yuan Xianglin; Gomez, Daniel; Liu Zhensheng; Zhuang Yan; Yin Ming; Li Minghuan; Wang, Li-E; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1) gene and the risk of radiation-induced esophageal toxicity (RIET) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: The experimental dataset comprised 120 NSCLC patients who were treated with radio(chemo)therapy between 2005 and 2009, when novel radiation techniques were implemented at MD Anderson. The validation dataset comprised 181 NSCLC patients treated between 1998 and 2004. We genotyped two SNPs of the HSPB1 gene (rs2868370 and rs2868371) by TaqMan assay. Results: Univariate and multivariate analyses of the experimental dataset showed that the CG/GG genotypes of HSPB1 rs2868371 were associated with significantly lower risk of grade ⩾3 RIET than the CC genotype (univariate hazard ratio [HR] 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10–0.91; P = 0.033; multivariate HR 0.29; 95% CI, 0.09–0.97; P = 0.045). This difference in risk was replicated in the validation cohort despite the different radiation techniques used during that period. Conclusions: The CG/GG genotypes of HSPB1 rs2868371 were associated with lower risk of RIET, compared with the CC genotype in patients with NSCLC treated with radio(chemo)therapy. This finding should be validated in large multi-institutional prospective trials.

  18. Results after laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation for esophageal achalasia in 100 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation has been the procedure of choice for the treatment of achalasia. However, because the incidence of achalasia is low, reports on the outcome of surgical treatment for achalasia are limited. In this study, the therapeutic results after laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation for achalasia at a single university hospital were evaluated. Between August 1994 and July 2006, 100 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation. The therapeutic results after laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation were assessed based on complications, operation time, blood loss, postoperative hospital stay, and the standardized questionnaire for satisfaction by telephone or outpatient clinic interview. With respect to perioperative complications, lower esophageal mucosal perforation occurred in 14 patients, but all of them could be suture-obliterated laparoscopically. One patient was converted to laparotomy because of uncontrolled bleeding from the short gastric artery. The mean operative time was 169 minutes, and the mean perioperative blood loss was 22 mL. The median postoperative hospital stay was 7 days. Reflux esophagitis, which was seen in five patients, was treated successfully with a proton pump inhibitor. According to the standardized questionnaire for satisfaction, 77 patients rated their recovery as 'excellent', 17 as 'good', 4 as 'fair', and 2 as 'poor'; thus, the overall success rate was 94%. There were no significant differences in surgical outcomes by morphologic type and severity of esophageal dilatation; however, the success rate deteriorated significantly with progression of the morphologic type. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation is a safe and effective surgical treatment for achalasia.

  19. Typhoid fever complicated by intestinal perforation: a persisting fatal disease requiring surgical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, T.; Knight, J.; Nath, S. K.; Speelman, P.; Roy, S. K.; Azad, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    In Bangladesh, clinical records of 323 patients with typhoid fever were reviewed to study the incidence, fatality, and optimal therapy of the complication of intestinal perforation. Fifteen patients (4.6%) developed intestinal perforation. Case-fatality rates were six of nine patients treated

  20. Esophagitis dissecans associated with eosinophilic esophagitis in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie-Anne R. Guerra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis are distinct esophageal pathologies with characteristic clinical and histologic findings. Esophagitis dissecans superficialis is a rare finding on endoscopy consisting of the peeling of large fragments of esophageal mucosa. Histology shows sloughing of the epithelium and parakeratosis. Eosinophilic esophagitis is an allergic disease of the esophagus characterized by eosinophilic inflammation of the epithelium and symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. Both of these esophageal processes have been associated with other diseases, but there is no known association between them. We describe a case of esophagitis dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis in an adolescent patient. To our knowledge, this is the first case describing an association between esophageal dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis.

  1. Objectively Quantifying Radiation Esophagitis With Novel Computed Tomography–Based Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S., E-mail: jsniedzielski@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Yang, Jinzhong [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Stingo, Francesco [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Briere, Tina M. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To study radiation-induced esophageal expansion as an objective measure of radiation esophagitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-five patients had weekly intra-treatment CT imaging and esophagitis scoring according to Common Terminlogy Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0, (24 Grade 0, 45 Grade 2, and 16 Grade 3). Nineteen esophageal expansion metrics based on mean, maximum, spatial length, and volume of expansion were calculated as voxel-based relative volume change, using the Jacobian determinant from deformable image registration between the planning and weekly CTs. An anatomic variability correction method was validated and applied to these metrics to reduce uncertainty. An analysis of expansion metrics and radiation esophagitis grade was conducted using normal tissue complication probability from univariate logistic regression and Spearman rank for grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, as well as the timing of expansion and esophagitis grade. Metrics' performance in classifying esophagitis was tested with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Expansion increased with esophagitis grade. Thirteen of 19 expansion metrics had receiver operating characteristic area under the curve values >0.80 for both grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, with the highest performance from maximum axial expansion (MaxExp1) and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30% (LenExp30%) with area under the curve values of 0.93 and 0.91 for grade 2, 0.90 and 0.90 for grade 3 esophagitis, respectively. Conclusions: Esophageal expansion may be a suitable objective measure of esophagitis, particularly maximum axial esophageal expansion and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30%, with 2.1 Jacobian value and 98.6 mm as the metric value for 50% probability of grade 3 esophagitis. The uncertainty in esophageal Jacobian calculations can be reduced

  2. Objectively Quantifying Radiation Esophagitis With Novel Computed Tomography–Based Metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S.; Yang, Jinzhong; Stingo, Francesco; Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe; Gomez, Daniel R.; Briere, Tina M.; Liao, Zhongxing; Court, Laurence E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study radiation-induced esophageal expansion as an objective measure of radiation esophagitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-five patients had weekly intra-treatment CT imaging and esophagitis scoring according to Common Terminlogy Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0, (24 Grade 0, 45 Grade 2, and 16 Grade 3). Nineteen esophageal expansion metrics based on mean, maximum, spatial length, and volume of expansion were calculated as voxel-based relative volume change, using the Jacobian determinant from deformable image registration between the planning and weekly CTs. An anatomic variability correction method was validated and applied to these metrics to reduce uncertainty. An analysis of expansion metrics and radiation esophagitis grade was conducted using normal tissue complication probability from univariate logistic regression and Spearman rank for grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, as well as the timing of expansion and esophagitis grade. Metrics' performance in classifying esophagitis was tested with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Expansion increased with esophagitis grade. Thirteen of 19 expansion metrics had receiver operating characteristic area under the curve values >0.80 for both grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, with the highest performance from maximum axial expansion (MaxExp1) and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30% (LenExp30%) with area under the curve values of 0.93 and 0.91 for grade 2, 0.90 and 0.90 for grade 3 esophagitis, respectively. Conclusions: Esophageal expansion may be a suitable objective measure of esophagitis, particularly maximum axial esophageal expansion and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30%, with 2.1 Jacobian value and 98.6 mm as the metric value for 50% probability of grade 3 esophagitis. The uncertainty in esophageal Jacobian calculations can be reduced

  3. Perforated Meckel's diverticulum in omphalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Jin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Meckel's diverticulum is a rare condition in neonates with reports of concurrent Meckel's diverticulum and omphalocele being few. Herein, we present a case of omphalocele associated with perforated Meckel's diverticulum.

  4. Perforated Meckel's diverticulum in omphalocele

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Hanna; Han, Ji-Won; Oh, Chaeyoun; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2017-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is a rare condition in neonates with reports of concurrent Meckel's diverticulum and omphalocele being few. Herein, we present a case of omphalocele associated with perforated Meckel's diverticulum.

  5. Glasgow Prognostic Score is a predictor of perioperative and long-term outcome in patients with only surgically treated esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashist, Yogesh K; Loos, Julian; Dedow, Josephine; Tachezy, Michael; Uzunoglu, Guentac; Kutup, Asad; Yekebas, Emre F; Izbicki, Jakob R

    2011-04-01

    Systemic inflammation (SI) plays a pivotal role in cancer. C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin as parameters of SI form the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS). The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential prognostic role of GPS in a homogeneous population of esophageal cancer (EC) patients undergoing only resection. GPS was evaluated on the basis of admission blood sample taken before surgery. Patients with a CRP L and albumin > 35 g/L were allocated to GPS0 group. If only CRP was increased or albumin decreased patients were allocated to the GPS1 and patients in whom CRP was ≥10 mg/L and albumin level ≤35 g/L were classified as GPS2. GPS was correlated to clinicopathological parameters and clinical outcome. Increasing GPS significantly correlated with more aggressive tumor biology in terms of tumor size (P GPS was identified as an independent prognosticator of perioperative morbidity (odds ratio 1.9; P = 0.03). In addition, a gradual decrease in disease-free and overall survival was evident between the three GPS subgroups. Survival differences between the GPS groups remained apparent even after stratification of the study population to underlying tumor type and nodal status. GPS was identified as a strong prognosticator of tumor recurrence (hazard ratio 2.5; P GPS represents a strong prognosticator of perioperative morbidity and long-term outcome in resected EC patients without neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment.

  6. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B Dogra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:peptic ulcers were earlier believed to be caused by dietary factors, gastric acid, and stress. However, in 1983, Warren and Marshall identified the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and peptic ulcers. It is now well established that most of the peptic ulcers occur as a result of H. pylori infection. But the co-relation between perforated peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection is not yet fully established. Aims and objectives : to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated peptic ulcer. Materials and methods: this was a prospective study carried out in all cases of perforated peptic ulcer reporting in surgical wards of a medical college during 2008-2010. A total of 50 cases, presenting as acute perforation of duodenum and stomach during this period, formed the study group. After resuscitation, all the cases were subjected to emergency exploratory laparotomy. The exact site of perforation was identified, biopsy was taken from the ulcer margin from 2-3 sites and the tissue was sent for H. pylori culture and histopathological examination. Simple closure of perforation, omentoplasty, thorough peritoneal lavage and drainage was carried out. Results: out of the 50 cases of perforated peptic ulcer, 38 happened to be males, and only 12 were females. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 70 years. All the patients underwent only emergency laparotomy. As many as 46 cases (92% turned out to be positive for H. pylori and only four cases (8% were negative for this infection. Postoperatively, patients who were found to be positive for H. pylori were put on anti-H. pylori treatment. Conclusion: there was a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

  7. Esophageal pH monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... Esophageal pH monitoring is used to check how much stomach acid is entering the esophagus. It also checks how well the acid is cleared downward into the ...

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Phrenic Nerve Block for Intractable Hiccups following Placement of Esophageal Stent for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsanious, David; Khoury, Spiro; Martinez, Edgar; Nawras, Ali; Filatoff, Gregory; Ajabnoor, Hossam; Darr, Umar; Atallah, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Hiccups are actions consisting of sudden contractions of the diaphragm and intercostals followed by a sudden inspiration and transient closure of the vocal cords. They are generally short lived and benign; however, in extreme and rare cases, such as esophageal carcinoma, they can become persistent or intractable, up to and involving significant pain, dramatically impacting the patient's quality of life. This case involves a 60-year-old man with a known history of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. He was considered to have high surgical risk, and therefore he received palliative care through the use of fully covered metallic esophageal self-expandable stents due to a spontaneous perforated esophagus, after which he developed intractable hiccups and associated mediastinal pain. Conservative treatment, including baclofen, chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, and omeprazole, provided no relief for his symptoms. The patient was referred to pain management from gastroenterology for consultation on pain control. He ultimately received an ultrasound-guided left phrenic nerve block with bupivacaine and depomedrol, and 3 days later underwent the identical procedure on the right phrenic nerve. This led to complete resolution of his hiccups and associated mediastinal pain. At follow-up, 2 and 4 weeks after the left phrenic nerve block, the patient was found to maintain complete alleviation of the hiccups. Esophageal dilatation and/or phrenic or vagal afferent fiber irritation can be suspected in cases of intractable hiccups secondary to esophageal stenting. Regional anesthesia of the phrenic nerve through ultrasound guidance offers a long-term therapeutic option for intractable hiccups and associated mediastinal pain in selected patients with esophageal carcinoma after stent placement. Esophageal stent, esophageal stenting, intractable hiccups, intractable singultus, phrenic nerve block, phrenic nerve, ultrasound, palliative care, esophageal carcinoma.

  9. Radioisotope esophageal transit test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazono, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kazuo; Toyonaga, Atsushi

    1982-01-01

    A new technique employed sup(99m)Tc-MAA for the study of esophageal dysfunction and its clinical implication were evaluated in the patients with achalasia, progressive systemic sclerosis, reflux esophagitis and 10 normal controls. To investigate esophageal emptying and gastroesophageal reflux, a homogeneous bolus of sup(99m)Tc-MAA in 15ml of water was swallowed in the upright and supine positions under the collimeter of a gamma camera linked to nuclear medicine data analyser (Shimazu Scinti Pack 1200). This radionuclide transit studies made a quantitative evaluation of the esophageal dysfunction possible in all cases. Comparing the conventional esophageal function test procedures, this test is a safe, noninvasive and more physiological and sensitive in detecting abnormal esophageal emptying and gastroesophageal reflux. (author)

  10. Esophageal lichen planus

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen ...

  11. Esophageal lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis.

  12. Perforated Duodenal Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessa Baker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 53-year-old male with a history of daily alcohol abuse presented with sudden onset epigastric pain. The pain radiated to the right upper abdominal quadrant and was associated with shortness of breath and nausea. The patient’s vitals were notable for blood pressure of 181/107 and a heart rate of 124. He was in moderate distress and had a firm, distended abdomen with diffuse tenderness to palpation, without rebound or guarding. Significant findings: In the chest radiograph, there was obvious free air under the both the right diaphragm (above the liver and the left diaphragm, consistent with pneumoperitoneum. Discussion: A perforated ulcer is a surgical emergency. Overall mortality has been shown to be approximately 6.2%.1 Rapid diagnosis is essential as prognosis improves if treatment is initiated within the first six hours and worsens after 12 hours.2 The sensitivity for detecting pneumoperitoneum on plain radiography ranges from 50%-80%3-8 with specificity of 53%.7 An upright chest radiograph can detect as little as one to two milliliters of air.9,10 If free air is not seen on a posteroanterior (PA upright chest radiograph, an upright lateral chest radiograph can be obtained, which is more sensitive (98% sensitivity.8,11 About 10%-20% of ruptured ulcers will not present with visible free-air under the diaphragm on plain x-ray.12 In this case, given the free air seen on chest radiograph and peritoneal signs on exam, the patient was taken straight to the operating room for general surgery.

  13. CLINICAL STUDY OF DUODENAL PERFORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasiva Rao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The duodenal injury can pose a formidable challenge to the surgeon and failure to manage it properly may have devastating results. Over the centuries, there was little to offer the patient of acute abdomen beyond cupping, purgation and enemas, all of which did more harm than good. It was not until 1884 that Mikulicz made an attempt to repair a perforation. Recent statistics indicate roughly 10% of population develop gastric or duodenal ulcer in life time. Roughly 1-3% of population above the age of 20 years have some degree of peptic ulcer activity during any annual period. A detailed history with regards to the signs and symptoms of the patient, a meticulous examination, radiological and biochemical investigations help to arrive at a correct preoperative diagnosis. In this study, a sincere effort has been put to understand the demographic patterns, to understand the underlying aetiology and to understand the effectiveness of the standard methods of investigation and treatment in use today. METHODS This is a 24 months prospective study i.e., from September 2011 to September 2013 carried out at Dr. Pinnamaneni Siddhartha Institute of Medical Sciences & Research Foundation. The study included the patients presenting to Dr. Pinnamaneni Siddhartha Institute of Medical Sciences & Research Foundation to emergency ward with signs and symptoms of hollow viscus perforation. The sample size included 30 cases of duodenal perforation. RESULTS Duodenal ulcer perforation commonly occurs in the age group of 30-60 years, but it can occur in any age group. Majority of the patients were male. Smoking and alcohol consumption were risk factors in most cases (53.3% for the causation of duodenal ulcer perforation. Sudden onset of abdominal pain, situated at epigastrium and right hypochondrium was a constant symptom (100%. Vomiting, constipation and fever were not so common. CONCLUSION The emergency surgical management for perforated duodenal ulcer is by

  14. Laparoscopic lavage for perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thornell, Anders; Angenete, Eva; Bisgaard, Thue

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis has traditionally been treated with open colon resection and stoma formation with risk for reoperations, morbidity, and mortality. Laparoscopic lavage alone has been suggested as definitive treatment. Objective: To compare laparoscopic...... lavage with open colon resection and colostomy (Hartmann procedure) for perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis. Design: Randomized, controlled, multicenter, open-label trial. (ISRCTN registry number: ISRCTN82208287) Setting: 9 hospitals in Sweden and Denmark. Patients: Patients who have...... confirmed Hinchey grade III perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis at diagnostic laparoscopy. Intervention: Randomization between laparoscopic lavage and the Hartmann procedure. Measurements: Primary outcome was the percentage of patients having 1 or more reoperations within 12 months. Key...

  15. The research progress of acute small bowel perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Schiessel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the various aetiologies of small bowel perforations and their management. In addition to the well-known aetiologies such as trauma, inflammation and circulatory disorders, several new causes of small bowel perforation have been described in recent years. The spectrum reaches from iatrogenic perforations during laparoscopic surgery or enteroscopies to drug-induced perforations with new anticancer agents. The management of small bowel perforations requires a concept consisting of the safe revision of the leaking bowel and the treatment of the peritonitis. Depending on the local situation and the condition of the patient, several treatment options are available. The surgical management of the bowel leak can range from a simple primary closure to a delayed restoration of bowel continuity. When the condition of the bowel or patient is frail, the risk of a failure of a closure or anastomosis is too high, and the exteriorization of the bowel defect as a primary measure is a safe option. The treatment of the peritonitis is also dependent on the condition of the patient and the local situation. Early stages of peritonitis can be treated by a simple peritoneal lavage, either performed by laparoscopy or laparotomy. Severe forms of peritonitis with multi-organ failure and an abdominal compartment syndrome need repeated peritoneal revisions. In such cases, the abdomen can only be closed temporarily. Different technical options are available in order to overcome the difficult care of these patients.

  16. Changing trend in emergency surgery for perforated duodenal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurteyik, E.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate changes in the emergency surgery of the duodenal ulcer. Subjects and Methods: Hospital records of 523 surgically treated patients, with duodenal ulcer perforation, during the period of 25 years 91975-1999) in the same surgical department, was retrospectively analysed. Changing aspects of emergency surgery of peptic ulcer disease, in the recent period, were determined in respect to number of operations per year and in the choice of operative methods. Results: The average number of patients and emergency operations per year was 21. No significant change was observed during the study period. Elective operations gradually decreased in the last ten years, and none was performed in the last 4 years. On the other hand, 226 emergency interventions for duodenal ulcer perforation were performed in the last ten years and 84 interventions in the last 4 years. Definitive anti-ulcer surgery was performed in 42% of patients between 1985 and 1994. Simple closure of the perforation plus treatment with proton pump inhibitors and with anti-Helicobacter pylori medication was the method in 80% during the last year. Conclusion: Emergency surgery for perforated duodenal ulcer preserves its steady rate despite disappearance of elective operations after tremendous progress in medical control of peptic ulcer disease. There is an obvious return from definitive anti-ulcer surgery to simple closure of the perforation followed by antisecretory and antibacterial medications in the recent years. (author)

  17. Gastric cancer perforation: experience from a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Bishnu Prasad; Singh, Yogendra; Singh, Keshav Prasad; Khakurel, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer perforation can occurs in advanced stage of the disease and is often associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Peritonitis due to perforation needs emergency laparotomy and different surgical procedures can be performed for definitive treatment. Surgical procedures largely depend on the stage of the disease and general condition of the patient. This study was carried out to evaluate the outcome and role of different surgical procedures in gastric cancer perforation. Medical record of patients with gastric perforation, who were treated during ten years period, was reviewed retrospectively. Data regarding clinical presentation, surgical procedures, staging and survival of patients were obtained. Features suggestive of diffuse peritonitis were evident in all cases. The majority of the patients underwent emergency surgery except one who died during resuscitation. The majority of patients were in stage III and stage IV. Surgical procedure includes simple closure and omental patch in five patients, simple closure and gastrojejunostomy in nine patients, gastrectomy in six patients and Devine's antral exclusion in one patient. Surgical site infection was the most common (45.5%) postoperative complication. Four patients died within one month of the surgery. Three patients who underwent gastrectomy survived for one year and one patient survived for five years. Although gastric cancer perforation usually occurs in advanced stage of the disease, curative resection should be considered as far as possible.

  18. Disseminated histoplasmosis presenting with ileal perforation in a renal transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainudin, B M; Kassim, F; Annuar, N M; Lim, C S; Ghazali, A K; Murad, Z

    1992-08-01

    A renal transplant patient presented with ileal perforation due to histoplasmosis 3 years after transplantation. Mesenteric lymph nodes and lungs were also affected by the disease. She was successfully treated with amphotericin B followed by ketoconazole.

  19. MRI of perforated gall bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, B.; Jain, M.; Khandelwal, N.; Singh, P.; Suri, S.

    2002-01-01

    Gall bladder perforation is a dreaded complication of acute cholecystitis that, if not diagnosed early in the course, might have a poor prognosis. Both CT and ultrasonography have been used until now extensively for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, but diagnosis of perforation is always difficult. Magnetic resonance, by its superior soft tissue resolution and multiplanar capability, is a better modality and should fare better than ultrasonography and CT, as demonstrated in our case. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the wall of the gall bladder and defects to a much better advantage and more convincingly. In addition, MR colangiopancreatography images demonstrate the biliary tree better than other modalities. We suggest that in the case of acute cholecystitis, if perforation is suspected and CT and ultrasonography are not conclusive, MR should be the modality of choice. It can be used as a first line of investigation; however, it might not be cost-effective. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. Laparoscopic treatment of perforated appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Heng-Fu; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Lai, I-Rue

    2014-01-01

    The use of laparoscopy has been established in improving perioperative and postoperative outcomes for patients with simple appendicitis. Laparoscopic appendectomy is associated with less wound pain, less wound infection, a shorter hospital stay, and faster overall recovery when compared to the open appendectomy for uncomplicated cases. In the past two decades, the use of laparoscopy for the treatment of perforated appendicitis to take the advantages of minimally invasiveness has increased. This article reviewed the prevalence, approaches, safety disclaimers, perioperative and postoperative outcomes of the laparoscopic appendectomy in the treatment of patients with perforated appendicitis. Special issues including the conversion, interval appendectomy, laparoscopic approach for elderly or obese patient are also discussed to define the role of laparoscopic treatment for patients with perforated appendicitis. PMID:25339821

  1. Esophageal carcinoma: surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lanschot, J. Jan B.; Aleman, Berthe M. P.; Richel, Dick J.

    2002-01-01

    Several new developments in the potentially curative therapy of esophageal cancer have drawn attention over the past year. There is a potential benefit of centralization of esophagectomies in dedicated centers. Early mucosal lesions are increasingly treated by local ablative therapy. Tumors invading

  2. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Presentation of case: We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diver...

  3. Perforated Duodenal Ulcer: Has Anything Changed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskensalo, Selja; Leppäniemi, Ari

    2010-04-01

    To assess the current management and outcome of perforated duodenal peptic ulcer managed with open repair, a focused analysis was conducted, excluding gastric, traumatic and iatrogenic perforations. A retrospective study of a 6-year period identified 61 patients. Mean age was 59 (range 19-87) years and 33 (54%) were male. Medical history included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in 46%, smoking in 30%, atherosclerosis in 26% and excessive alcohol use in 23%. Generalized abdominal tenderness was recorded in 64% of the cases. The mean (SD) C-reactive protein value was 100 (141) g/l and white blood cell count was 12.8 (7.9) E9/l. Plain abdominal X-ray was positive for air in 87% (41/47) and CT scan in 86% (18/21). Four patients (7%) were operated without radiological imaging. There were 31 patients (51%) with a delay of 24 h or more from the start of symptoms to surgery. The mean (SD) delay from admission to surgery was 9 (3) (range 3-12) h. The treatment consisted of open suture repair in 92%, peritoneal lavage in 92%, external drainage in 80% and nasogastric decompression in 92%. The overall hospital mortality and morbidity rates were 11 and 21%, respectively. The duodenal suture leak rate was 7% and intra-abdominal abscess rate was 2%. The majority of patients with perforated duodenal ulcer can be diagnosed with conventional clinical and radiological methods, and treated according to established surgical principles. The mortality and duodenal morbidity rates have remained unchanged for the last decade. Shortening preoperative delay could improve the prognosis.

  4. Duodenal perforation during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Bansal

    2016-06-03

    Jun 3, 2016 ... Calculus;. Duodenum;. Injury;. Paediatric;. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Abstract. Introduction: Colonic perforations are known complications of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). However, to the best of our knowledge, small bowel perforation has rarely been reported.. Observation: We report the ...

  5. A CLINICAL STUDY ON PATIENTS WITH DUODENAL ULCER PERFORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Babu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Perforated duodenal ulcer, the most catastrophic complication was Associated with high mortality in the past due to late presentation of the patients, delay in surgery and lack of antibiotics. Various authors state that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease and perforation has been declining for the past 3 decades. Because of advances in the medical therapy of peptic ulcer with a wide range of drugs the management of peptic ulcer disease has been changing and the role of surgery has been declining. Perforation is usually seen in 3rd and 4th decades with a male preponderance and the epidemiological trend is not the same worldwide. Incidence is slightly declining in western countries. The present study has been done during the period between 2013 and 2014 in S. V. R. R. Government general hospital Tirupati. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES The aim of the present study is to analyze the probable factors for increase in incidence of duodenal ulcer perforation, with particular emphasis on assessment of impact of H2 receptor antagonists and Proton Pump inhibitors on the incidence of perforation. STUDY SETTING S. V. Medical College, Department of General Surgery, Tirupati. STUDY PERIOD Patients attending S. V. Medical College, Department of General Surgery with perforation during the period from November 2013 to October 2014. INCLUSION CRITERIA Patients between age group of more than 14 years presenting with pain abdomen and who are diagnosed to have peritonitis due to duodenal ulcer perforation. EXCLUSION CRITERIA Patients with peritonitis due causes other than duodenal ulcer. STUDY METHOD Prospective Observational study among the selected patients. Total numbers of peptic ulcer cases that were admitted in this hospital and treated either medically or surgically were noted. The details of their clinical history and findings, investigation reports, operative findings, post-operative complications were recorded. Simple closure was performed for all the

  6. Glove Perforations During Interventional Radiological Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leena, R. V.; Shyamkumar, N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Intact surgical gloves are essential to avoid contact with blood and other body fluids. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of glove perforations during interventional radiological procedures. In this study, a total of 758 gloves used in 94 interventional radiological procedures were examined for perforations. Eleven perforations were encountered, only one of which was of occult type. No significant difference in the frequency of glove perforation was found between the categories with varying time duration.

  7. Esophageal trachealization: A feature of eosinophilic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlHussaini, Abdulrahman A; Semaan, Toufic; ElHag, Imad A

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an inflammatory condition characterized by intense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. EE is frequently misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Here, we present a child with EE and a characteristic endoscopic finding, r inged esophagus . An 11-year-old Saudi boy presented with dysphagia for 1 year. He had experienced an intermittent sensation of solid food sticking in his chest, which was relieved by drinking liquids. A barium swallow excluded anatomical causes of dysphagia, but revealed multiple-ringed esophagus. Endoscopy showed a furrowing and trachealizing appearance of the entire esophagus. Hisologically, extensive eosinophilic infiltration was a feature in biopsies obtained from the esophagus. The child responded well to a 2-month course of inhaled fluticasone. Symptoms recurred 3 months after discontinuation of therapy, which necessitated resumption of inhaled fluticasone. The endoscopic appearance of multiple esophageal rings should raise suspicion of EE and be confirmed by esophageal biopsies. (author)

  8. PERFORATION AS A COMPLICATION OF THE DIAGNOSTIC UPPER AND LOWER ENDOSCOPY OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivailo P. Vazharov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this examination is to evaluate the risk of perforation during endoscopy of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract.Patients and methods used: 1210 diagnostic gastroduodenoscopies and 412 colonoscopies of hospitalized patients were performed by two experienced endoscopists for the period March 2007 – March 2012 at MHAT Varna, MMA. The endoscopies were performed without premedication and sedation. The patients were examined for complications of the procedure during and after the endoscopy. One of the most serious complications is the perforation of the oesophagus, stomach or the large intestine.Results: We had no perforations caused by the examination during the 1210 upper endoscopies performed. We had 2 perforations (0,48% from the 412 colonoscopies performed, which were treated successfully surgically.Conclusions: The perforation is a rare but serious complication of the endoscopy of gastrointestinal tract, which can be healed completely.

  9. Radiation therapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Masashi; Matayoshi, Yoshinobu; Masaki, Norie

    1992-01-01

    From 1977 through 1989, 149 patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with external irradiation (EI) with or without high-dose rate intraluminal irradiation (HDRII) using remote afterloading system. Concerning complete response group EI alone showed higher local control rate than EI + HDRII, especially in ulcerative type. Another problem is the EI field. Fourteen of 22 patients who were salvaged by surgery due to local recurrence after EI showed marginal or out-field metastasis of the lymph node. These preliminary results suggest that HDRII is not effective for the local control of the ulcerative lesion as a boost therapy, EI should be given for the entire regional lymph nodes. (author)

  10. Occurrence of chronic esophageal ulcer after high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejima, Toshinori; Hirota, Saeko; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Takada, Yoshiki

    1995-01-01

    Ninety-eight patients with esophageal cancer were treated by high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy at the Department of Radiology of the Hyogo Medical Center for Adults between January 1982 and December 1993. Twenty patients with complete response after intraluminal radiation therapy, who were followed up with esophageal fiberscopy in our institute, were reviewed. The one-year cumulative rate of occurrence of esophageal ulcers was 81%, and in 69% of the cases the ulcers occurred from 4 to 8 months after completion of intraluminal radiation therapy. We graded esophageal ulcer by fiberscopic findings. Grade 0 was defined as no ulcer, grade 1 as superficial ulcer, grade 2 as deep ulcer, grade 3 as circumferencial ulcer, and severe stenosis. Factors related to grade were studied, and shorter distances from the source to the surface of the mucosa and lower surface doses of intraluminal radiation therapy appear to reduce the severity as graded on the above scale, of the esophageal ulcer. Four of the five 2-year recurrence-free patients suffered esophageal ulcers, which were cured from 15 to 22 months after intraluminal radiation therapy. However ulcers recurred in two patients, ong term care was thought to be necessary. (author)

  11. Early Management Experience of Perforation after ERCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Perforation after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP is a rare complication, but it is associated with significant mortality. This study evaluated the early management experience of these perforations. Patients and Methods. Between November 2003 and December 2011, a total of 8504 ERCPs were performed at our regional endoscopy center. Sixteen perforations (0.45% were identified and retrospectively reviewed. Results. Nine of these 16 patients with perforations were periampullary, 3 duodenal, 1 gastric fundus, and 3 patients had a perforation of an afferent limb of a Billroth II anastomosis. All patients with perforations were recognized during ERCP by X-ray and managed immediately. One patient with duodenal perforation and three patients with afferent limb perforation received surgery, others received medical conservative treatment which included suturing lesion, endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD, endoscopic retrograde pancreatic duct drainage (ERPD, gastrointestinal decompression, fasting, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and so on. All patients with perforation recovered successfully. Conclusions. We found that: (1 the diagnosis of perforation during ERCP may be easy, but you must pay attention to it. (2 Most retroperitoneal perforations can recover with only medical conservative treatment in early phase. (3 Most peritoneal perforations need surgery unless you can close the lesion up under endoscopy in early phase.

  12. A perforated diverticulum in Cushing's disease

    OpenAIRE

    de Havenon, Adam; Ehrenkranz, Joel

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of perforated colonic diverticulum in Cushing's disease. Although perforated diverticuli have been described in patients with Cushing's syndrome secondary to exogenous glucocorticoids, this complication has not been described in patients with Cushing's disease. Patients with hypercortisolism, from either exogenous or endogenous sources, should be monitored for diverticular perforation.

  13. Multidisciplinary approach for patients with esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria M Villaflor; Marco E Allaix; Bruce Minsky; Fernando A Herbella; Marco G Patti

    2012-01-01

    Patients with esophageal cancer have a poor prognosis because they often have no symptoms until their disease is advanced.There are no screening recommendations for patients unless they have Barrett's esophagitis or a significant family history of this disease.Often,esophageal cancer is not diagnosed until patients present with dysphagia,odynophagia,anemia or weight loss.When symptoms occur,the stage is often stage Ⅲ or greater.Treatment of patients with very early stage disease is fairly straight forward using only local treatment with surgical resection or endoscopic mucosal resection.The treatment of patients who have locally advanced esophageal cancer is more complex and controversial.Despite multiple trials,treatment recommendations are still unclear due to conflicting data.Sadly,much of our data is difficult to interpret due to many of the trials done have included very heterogeneous groups of patients both histologically as well as anatomically.Additionally,studies have been underpowered or stopped early due to poor accrual.In the United States,concurrent chemoradiotherapy prior to surgical resection has been accepted by many as standard of care in the locally advanced patient.Patients who have metastatic disease are treated palliatively.The aim of this article is to describe the multidisciplinary approach used by an established team at a single high volume center for esophageal cancer,and to review the literature which guides our treatment recommendations.

  14. Challenges in oral drug delivery in patients with esophageal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappelle, Wouter F W; Siersema, Peter D; Bogte, Auke; Vleggaar, Frank P

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a commonly reported symptom with various benign and malignant causes. Esophageal dysphagia can impede intake of oral medication, which often poses a major challenge for both patients and physicians. The best way to address this challenge depends of the cause of dysphagia. The pathophysiology of esophageal dysphagia is discussed, diagnostic tools to determine its cause are reviewed and recent developments in the treatment of esophageal dysphagia are discussed. Alternative options to administer medication in dysphagia are discussed and the appropriateness of them reviewed. Two ways can be followed to allow medication intake in patients with esophageal dysphagia, i.e. altering medication or resolving dysphagia. The latter is generally preferred, since esophageal dysphagia rarely only impedes medication intake. Esophageal resection is possible in more advanced esophageal cancer stages due to advances in neo-adjuvant therapy. Due to recent improvements in intraluminal radiotherapy, it can be expected that this will be the primary treatment in a palliative setting. Temporary self-expandable metal stent placement is a promising new alternative for bougienage in difficult-to-treat benign strictures.

  15. Iatrogenic stomach perforation complicating unrecognized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with traumatic diaphragmatic herniation of the stomach that is misdiagnosed as a hemo-pneumothorax with the resulting insertion of a chest tube causing iatrogenic perforation of the stomach and draining of gastric content into the pleural cavity. An emergency thoracotomy was ...

  16. Stress state in perforated plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visner, J.

    1977-01-01

    The method is described of photoelastic measurement of stress concentration factors (s.c.f) in plates perforated by a square, triangular and diagonal grid of circular holes and loaded by uniaxial or biaxial tensile stress. A loading equipment which was developed and its modifications are described. Stress concentration factors found are compared with theoretical and experimental results given in references. (author)

  17. Perforated Peptic Ulcer: new insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.O.E. Bertleff (Marietta)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMuch has been written on perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) during the last hundred years. In 1500, when necropsies were first allowed, often a small hole was found in the anterior wall of the stomach, giving an explanation for symptoms of acute abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting which often

  18. Association of mortality with out-of-hours admission in patients with perforated peptic ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, N V; Møller, M H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perforated peptic ulcer is a serious emergency surgical condition. The aim of the present nationwide cohort study was to evaluate the association between mortality and out-of-hours admission in patients surgically treated for perforated peptic ulcer. METHODS: All Danish patients...... surgically treated for benign gastric or duodenal perforated peptic ulcer in Denmark between September 1, 2011 and August 31, 2013 were included. Patients were identified through The Danish Clinical Register of Emergency Surgery. The association between 90-day mortality and time and day of admission...... with the primary analysis. The overall 90-day mortality rate was 25.6% (186/726). CONCLUSION: No statistically significant adjusted association between 90-day mortality and out-of-hours admission was found in patients surgically treated for perforated peptic ulcer....

  19. [A treatment to serious esophageal cicatrices stenosi by metal and silica gel dilator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Chen, X; Sun, C; Liu, H

    1999-12-01

    To find an effective method of treating the esophageal cicatricial stenosis. Six cases with esophageal cicatricial stenosis were treated by mental and silica gel dilator. The effects in all six cases were satisfactory and no any complications were finded. The method is safe, effective and of no complications, the treatment time is shorter also.

  20. Refractory benign esophageal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractory benign esophageal stricture (RBES is a frequently encountered problem worldwide. These strictures arise from various causes such as corrosive injury, radiation therapy, peptic origin, ablative therapy, and after surgery. Most strictures can be treated successfully with endoscopic dilatation using bougies or balloons, with only a few complications. Those patients who fail after serial dilatation with bougies or balloons will come to the category of refractory strictures. Dilatation combined with intralesional steroid injections can be considered for peptic strictures, whereas incisional therapy has been demonstrated to be effective for short anastomotic strictures. When these therapeutic options do not resolve the stenosis, stent placement should be considered. Self-bougienage can be proposed to a selected group of patients with a proximal stenosis. Most of the patients of RBES respond to above-mentioned treatment and occasional patient may require surgery as the final treatment option. This review aims to provide a comprehensive approach toward endoscopic management of RBESs based on current literature and personal experience.

  1. Delayed Esophageal Pseudodiverticulum after Anterior Cervical Spine Fixation: Report of 2 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sadrizadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although perforation of the esophagus, in the anterior cervical spine fixation, is well established, cases with delayed onset, especially cases that present pseudodiverticulum, are not common. In addition, management of the perforation in this situation is debated.  Case Report:   Delayed esophageal pseudodiverticulum was managed in two patients with a history of anterior spine fixation. Patients were operated on, the loose plate and screws were extracted, the wall of the diverticulum was excised, the perforation on the nasogastric tube was suboptimally repaired, and a closed suction drain was placed there. The NGT was removed on the 7th day and barium swallow demonstrated no leakage at the operation site; therefore, oral feeding was started without any problem.  Conclusion:  In cases with delayed perforation, fistula, or diverticulum removal of anterior fixation instruments, gentle repair of the esophageal wall without persistence on definitive and optimal perforation closure, wide local drainage, early enteral nutrition via NGT, and antibiotic prescription is suggested.

  2. Diffuse esophageal spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Chen, Y.M.; Hewson, E.G.; Richter, J.E.; Wu, W.C.; Gelfand, D.W.; Castell, D.O.

    1988-01-01

    Radiologic and manometric findings were correlated in 17 patients with diffuse esophageal spasm (DES). All patients initially had chest pain and/or dysphagia and had a manometric diagnosis of DES. Mean percentage of normal peristalsis manometrically was 46% (range, 20%-80%). Based on radiologic examination, an esophageal motor disorder consistent with DES was diagnosed in 12 of 17 patients, and there was one misinterpretation of achalasia. Radiologic detection was not related significantly to the percentage of peristalsis seen on manometric examination. Mean esophageal wall thickness as measured radiographically in patients with DES was 2.6 mm, compared with 2.5 mm in 17 individuals with normal results of manometry

  3. Perforation with and without vinegar injection as a mitigation strategy against two invasive tunicates, Ciona intestinalis and Styela clava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne PARENT

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ciona intestinalis and Styela clava, two nuisance species for Prince Edward Island’s blue mussel industry, were treated with individual perforations using nails or hypodermic needles. Other treatments using the same species included simultaneous perforations using perforation devices with low, medium and high needle density, either with or without vinegar injections. Mortality levels estimated for all ranges of individual perforations were significantly higher than mortality levels estimated in control groups during treatments conducted at laboratory facilities. Mortality of C. intestinalis reached 100% for 60 individual perforations or injection of 0.05 mL of vinegar. In S. clava, 100 individual perforations resulted in 100% mortality. Two applications of the high-density perforation device resulted in 80% mortality of C. intestinalis. During field testing, two applications of the same high-density needle device did not significantly decrease C. intestinalis wet weight, regardless of the addition of vinegar. The field applicability of perforation upon tunicates fouling mussel socks was at least in part limited by the uneven surface created by the mussels and the possible inhibition of bacterial growth caused by low water temperatures. Perforation and vinegar injection showed to be successful in laboratory trials and should be further studied with different perforation devices under field conditions.

  4. Esophageal circumferential en bloc endoscopic submucosal dissection: assessment of a new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Pratico, Carlos Alberto; Beuvon, Frédéric; Mangialavori, Luigi; Chryssostalis, Ariane; Camus, Marine; Chaussade, Stanislas; Prat, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Endoscopic esophageal piecemeal mucosectomy for high-grade dysplasia on Barrett's esophagus leads to suboptimal histologic evaluation, as well as recurrence on remaining mucosa. Circumferential en bloc mucosal resection would significantly improve the management of dysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Our aim was to describe a new method of esophageal circumferential endoscopic en bloc submucosal dissection (CESD) in a swine model. After submucosal injection, circumferential incision was performed at each end of the esophageal segment to be removed. Mechanical submucosal dissection was performed from the proximal to the distal incision, using a mucosectomy cap over the endoscope. The removed mucosal ring was retrieved. Clinical, endoscopic, and histologic data were prospectively collected. Esophageal CESD was conducted on 5 pigs. A median mucosal length of 6.5 cm (range, 4 to 8 cm) was removed in the lower third of the esophagus. The mean duration of the procedure was 36 minutes (range, 17 to 80 min). No procedure-related complication, including perforation, was observed. All animals exhibited a mild esophageal stricture at day 7, and a severe symptomatic stricture at day 14. Necropsy confirmed endoscopic findings with cicatricial fibrotic strictures. On histologic examination, an inflammatory cell infiltrate, diffuse fibrosis reaching the muscular layer, and incomplete reepithelialization were observed. CESD enables expeditious resection and thorough examination of large segments of esophageal mucosa in safe procedural conditions, but esophageal strictures occur in the majority of the cases. Efficient methods for stricture prevention are needed for this technique to be developed in humans.

  5. Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Diagnostic Complexity and Management Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos G. Markakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the esophagus are rare. Case Presentation. This is a case of a 50-year-old male patient who was referred to our department complaining of atypical chest pain. A chest computed tomographic scan and endoscopic ultrasound revealed a submucosal esophageal tumor measuring 5 cm in its largest diameter. Suspecting a leiomyoma, we performed enucleation via right thoracotomy. The pathology report yielded a diagnosis of an esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The patient has shown no evidence of recurrence one year postoperatively. Conclusions. This report illustrates the complexity and dilemmas inherent in diagnosing and treating esophageal GISTs.

  6. Small bowel perforation without tumor recurrence after radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma: report of seven cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Tago, Masao; Igaki, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Kenshirou; Nakamura, Naoki; Sasano, Nakashi; Yamakawa, Sen; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2006-04-01

    We describe the clinical presentation, evaluation, management and outcome of patients experiencing small bowel perforation following radiation therapy for cervical cancer. A database consisting of 95 Japanese women with stage 0-4 A cervix cancer treated between 1991 and 2004 contained seven patients (7.4%) with small bowel perforation. The median age at the time of perforation was 72.5 years (range 62-78). The median time from completion of radiotherapy to perforation was 6 months (range 2-58). Surgery (one small bowel resection and anastomosis with diversion; six small bowel resection and anastomosis) was performed immediately in all seven patients. One of seven patients died of small bowel perforation (i.e. mortality rate was 14%). Bowel adhesion was detected during the operation in only three cases (43%). Signs of peritonitis were absent in six cases (86%). Severe abdominal pain was seen in all seven patients. The perforation site was ileum in all seven cases. In all patients, pathological changes were compatible with postirradiation injury of the gastrointestinal tract. The presenting complaints of patients with bowel perforation following radiotherapy vary, and signs of peritonitis may be absent. Emergency physicians must be alert for these complications in patients who have been treated with radiotherapy.

  7. Management of a Small Paracentral Corneal Perforation Using Iatrogenic Iris Incarceration and Tissue Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Kobayashi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical intervention for corneal perforation is indicated when the anterior chamber does not reform within a short period of time. Herein, we report the successful management of a small paracentral corneal perforation using autologous iris incarceration and tissue adhesive. Case: A 41-year-old man developed a small paracentral corneal perforation (0.5 mm in size in the right eye, while the treating physician attempted to remove the residual rust ring after removal of a piece of metallic foreign body. Observations: The eye was initially managed with a bandage soft contact lens to ameliorate the aqueous leakage; however, without success. Iatrogenic iris incarceration of the wound was first induced, followed by application of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive to the perforated site. As a result, the anterior chamber was immediately reformed and maintained. Complete corneal epithelialization of the perforation was achieved in 2 months without visual compromises. Conclusions: Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive with iatrogenic incarceration of the autologous iris was effective in treating this type of small corneal perforation. This technique is simple and potentially useful for small paracentral corneal perforations outside the visual axis and without good apposition.

  8. Two-year results of the randomized clinical trial DILALA comparing laparoscopic lavage with resection as treatment for perforated diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohl, A; Rosenberg, J; Bock, D

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditionally, perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis was treated with resection and colostomy (Hartmann's procedure), with inherent complications and risk of a permanent stoma. The DILALA (DIverticulitis - LAparoscopic LAvage versus resection (Hartmann's procedure...... in the Hartmann's group had a colostomy at 24 months. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic lavage is a better option for perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis than open resection and colostomy....

  9. Prevalence of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    multiruka1

    Esophageal cancer is one of the common malignancies worldwide, with ... similar changes in the incidence in Kenyan populations, especially .... low socioeconomic status and the cost of investigation ... thus it is difficult to explain its impact on.

  10. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000268.htm Bleeding esophageal varices To use the sharing features on ... veins in the esophagus to balloon outward. Heavy bleeding can occur if the veins break open. Any ...

  11. Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Qasim; Fass, Ronnie; Gyawali, C Prakash; Miwa, Hiroto; Pandolfino, John E; Zerbib, Frank

    2016-02-15

    Functional esophageal disorders consist of a disease category that present with esophageal symptoms (heartburn, chest pain, dysphagia, globus) not explained by mechanical obstruction (stricture, tumor, eosinophilic esophagitis), major motor disorders (achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus), or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While mechanisms responsible are unclear, it is theorized that visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance play an important role in symptom generation, in the context of normal or borderline function. Treatments directed at improving borderline motor dysfunction or reducing reflux burden to sub-normal levels have limited success in symptom improvement. In contrast, strategies focused on modulating peripheral triggering and central perception are mechanistically viable and clinically meaningful. However, outcome data from these treatment options are limited. Future research needs to focus on understanding mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance so that appropriate targets and therapies can be developed. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Planning a Pedicled Perforator Flap for Pressure Sores in the Gluteal Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-June; Lee, Kyeong-Tae; Jeon, Byung-Joon; Woo, Kyong-Je

    2018-04-01

    Pedicled perforator flaps (PPFs) have been widely used to treat pressure sores in the gluteal region. Selection of a reliable perforator is crucial for successful surgical treatment of pressure sores using PPFs. In this study, we evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in planning PPF reconstruction of pressure sores in the gluteal region. A retrospective chart review was performed in patients who had undergone these PPF reconstructions and who had received preoperative MRI. Preoperatively, the extent of infection and necrotic tissue was evaluated using MRI, and a reliable perforator was identified, considering the perforator location in relation to the defect, perforator size, and perforator courses. Intraoperatively, the targeted perforator was marked on the skin at the locations measured on the MRI images, and the marked location was confirmed using intraoperative handheld Doppler. Superior gluteal artery, inferior gluteal artery, or parasacral perforators were used for the PPFs. Surgical outcomes were evaluated. A total of 12 PPFs were performed in 12 patients. Superior gluteal artery perforator flaps were performed in 7 patients, inferior gluteal artery perforator flaps were performed in 3 patients, and parasacral perforator flaps were performed in 2 patients. We could identify a reliable perforator on MRI, and it was found at the predicted locations in all cases. There was only one case of partial flap necrosis. There was no recurrence of the pressure sores during the mean follow-up period of 6.7 months (range = 3-15 months). In selected patients with gluteal pressure sores, MRI is a suitable means for not only providing information about disease extent and comorbidities but also for evaluating perforators for PPF reconstructions.

  13. Crizotinib-induced Rectal Perforation with Abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Asako; Hayama, Noriko; Amano, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Makoto; Hirano, Satoshi; Nakamura, Sukeyuki; Tabeta, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    An 86-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma. The patient was treated with crizotinib after echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement was detected from his pleural effusion. He subsequently developed abdominal pain and rebound tenderness in the right lower abdomen. Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT showed a low-density area in the abdominal cavity. The size of the abscess was decreased by drainage and the administration of antibiotics. Fistulography revealed a fistula from the rectum to the abscess, and a diagnosis of lower intestinal tract perforation with abscess formation was made. Crizotinib was discontinued and treatment with alectinib was initiated. The patient remains under treatment as an outpatient at our department without adverse effects.

  14. Esophageal Motility Disorders: Current Concepts of Pathogenesis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Kahrilas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Current concepts of esophageal motility disorders are summarized. Primary data sources were located via MEDLINE or cross-citation. No attempt was made to be comprehensive or inclusive of the literature because fewer than 10% of citations are discussed. Instead, emphasis was placed on new developments in diagnosis, therapeutics, and practice patterns. Controlled therapeutic trials and pathophysiological observations are emphasized. Achalasia is a rare disease of failed lower sphincter relaxation and aperistalsis. Diffuse esophageal spasm (DES, an equally rare disease, is defined by non-propagated esophageal contractions. Nonspecific motility disorders, including nutcracker esophagus and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, are identified only by manometry and are ten times as prevalent. Neuromuscular pathology is evident only with achalasia (myenteric plexus neurons destruction. Pharmacological therapies have limited efficacy with achalasia; more limited with DES; and none with the nonspecific motility disorders. More efficacious therapies for the nonspecific disorders are directed at associated reflux disease or psychiatric disorders. Pneumatic dilation is effective therapy for achalasia 72% of instances, but frequently requires repeat dilation and is complicated by a 3% perforation rate. Surgical myotomy is effective in 88% of achalasics; morbidity from thoracotomy has been the major limitation but this has been sharply reduced with a laparoscopic approach. In conclusion, although it has been suggested that esophageal motility disorders are distinct clinical entities, critical review of the literature supports this only in the case of achalasia, a disease of well defined pathophysiology, functional disturbance, and therapies. This clarity diminishes progressively for DES and non-specific esophageal motility disorders.

  15. Esophageal hiatus surgery: video laparoscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Fernandez, G.; Gatti, A.; Balboa, O.

    2003-01-01

    Since the early nineties,surgery of esophageal hiatus(treatment of disease due to gastroesophageal reflux,gastric denervation surgery in treatment of duodenal chronic ulcer)through video laparoscopic approach,has gained broad dissemination and acceptance at world level.This phenomenon is explained by the excellent exposure and visualization of an anatomic region which is deeply situated in the upper hemi abdomen, added to the advantages of an approach which, while minimally invasive, attains short and medium term results comparable to those of conventional surgery.The describes the initial experience of the authors with this type of surgery as well as a review of literature, with special emphasis on the surgical technique employed.Case material covers 23 patient: fourteen had Nissen Rossetti fun duplication, 4 suffered from miotomies associated with fun duplications of varying type and 5 were gastric denervation surgeries by reason of duodenal ulcer.There were 2 conversions, both due to esophageal perforation.There were no major postoperative complications and mortality was nil. while functional results were highly satisfactory.The authors therefore conclude that since results which they obtained were coincidental with those of international bibliography, work along these lines should continue

  16. Esophageal intramural pseudoverticulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.R.; Sanders, M.M.; Turner, M.A.; Liu, C.I.

    1981-01-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIP) is a rare condition of unknown etiology. It is characterized by multiple, small, flaskshaped outpouchings in the esophageal wall. Involvement may be segmental or diffuse. Since this entity was first reported in 1960, there have been 43 cases described in the English literature. These cases are reviewed and six additional cases are reported with emphasis on clinical and radiographic parameters of this entity. (orig.) [de

  17. Functional esophageal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Clouse, R; Richter, J; Heading, R; Janssens, J; Wilson, J

    1999-01-01

    The functional esophageal disorders include globus, rumination syndrome, and symptoms that typify esophageal diseases (chest pain, heartburn, and dysphagia). Factors responsible for symptom production are poorly understood. The criteria for diagnosis rest not only on compatible symptoms but also on exclusion of structural and metabolic disorders that might mimic the functional disorders. Additionally, a functional diagnosis is precluded by the presence of a pathology-based motor disorder or p...

  18. Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    disease of the esophagus that affects at least 4 in 10,000 persons.1 Although symptomatically resembling gastroe - sophageal reflux disease, EE is...clinically defined as esophageal eosinophilia (>_15 intraepithelial eosinophils per high-powered field) in the absence of abnormal acid reflux disease...that distinguish eosin- ophilic esophagitis (EoE) from other inflammatory disorders, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). As the prev

  19. Esophageal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E.; Wuttge-Hannig, A.

    2007-01-01

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [de

  20. Predictive factors of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiation therapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to clarify the predictive factors correlated with esophageal stenosis within three months after radiation therapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer. We enrolled 47 patients with advanced esophageal cancer with T2-4 and stage II-III who were treated with definitive radiation therapy and achieving complete response of primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2005. Esophagography was performed for all patients before treatment and within three months after completion of the radiation therapy, the esophageal stenotic ratio was evaluated. The stenotic ratio was used to define four levels of stenosis: stenosis level 1, stenotic ratio of 0-25%; 2, 25-50%; 3, 50-75%; 4, 75-100%. We then estimated the correlation between the esophageal stenosis level after radiation therapy and each of numerous factors. The numbers and total percentages of patients at each stenosis level were as follows: level 1: n=14 (30%); level 2: 8 (17%); level 3: 14 (30%); and level 4: 11 (23%). Esophageal stenosis in the case of full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. The extent of involved circumference and wall thickness of tumor region were significantly correlated with esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiation therapy (p=0.0006, p=0.005). For predicting the possibility of esophageal stenosis with tumor regression within three months in radiation therapy, the extent of involved circumference and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region may be useful. (author)

  1. Triple-Tube-Ostomy: A Novel Technique for the Surgical Treatment of Iatrogenic Duodenal Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Fujikuni

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although duodenal perforation is currently an infrequent complication of medical procedures, its incidence in the future predictably will increase as endoscopic treatment of duodenal neoplasms becomes more frequently used. In some cases, duodenal perforation is difficult to treat even surgically. We report here a novel technique called ‘triple-tube-ostomy’ for the treatment of iatrogenic duodenal perforation. Since November 2009, there have been three cases of iatrogenic perforation of the duodenum, due to various causes, which we have treated with our novel technique. The main principles of the technique are biliary diversion, decompression of the duodenum, and early enteral nutrition. All patients who underwent the triple-tube-ostomy procedure had good postoperative courses, with few complications. The novel surgical technique we describe in this report is safe, reliable, easy to learn and perform, and led to a good postoperative course in all cases where we performed it.

  2. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PRIMARY REPAIR VERSUS RESECTION AND ANASTOMOSIS IN JEJUNOILEAL PERFORATIONS IN SOUTHERN ODISHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charan Panda

    2017-11-01

    complicated for large size perforations. Perforations proximal to ileocaecal valve are better treated by primary closure than resection and anastomosis.

  3. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early esophageal neoplasms using the stag beetle knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwai, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Toshiki; Imagawa, Hiroki; Miura, Ryoichi; Sumida, Yuki; Takasago, Takeshi; Miyasako, Yuki; Nishimura, Tomoyuki; Iio, Sumio; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Kouno, Hirotaka; Kohno, Hiroshi; Ishaq, Sauid

    2018-04-21

    To determine short- and long-term outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) using the stag beetle (SB) knife, a scissor-shaped device. Seventy consecutive patients with 96 early esophageal neoplasms, who underwent ESD using a SB knife at Kure Medical Center and Chugoku Cancer Center, Japan, between April 2010 and August 2016, were retrospectively evaluated. Clinicopathological characteristics of lesions and procedural adverse events were assessed. Therapeutic success was evaluated on the basis of en bloc , histologically complete, and curative or non-curative resection rates. Overall and tumor-specific survival, local or distant recurrence, and 3- and 5-year cumulative overall metachronous cancer rates were also assessed. Eligible patients had dysplasia/intraepithelial neoplasia (22%) or early cancers (squamous cell carcinoma, 78%). The median procedural time was 60 min and on average, the lesions measured 24 mm in diameter, yielding 33-mm tissue defects. The en bloc resection rate was 100%, with 95% and 81% of dissections deemed histologically complete and curative, respectively. All procedures were completed without accidental incisions/perforations or delayed bleeding. During follow-up (mean, 35 ± 23 mo), no local recurrences or metastases were observed. The 3- and 5-year survival rates were 83% and 70%, respectively, with corresponding rates of 85% and 75% for curative resections and 74% and 49% for non-curative resections. The 3- and 5-year cumulative rates of metachronous cancer in the patients with curative resections were 14% and 26%, respectively. ESD procedures using the SB knife are feasible, safe, and effective for treating early esophageal neoplasms, yielding favorable short- and long-term outcomes.

  4. Colorectal cancer complicated by perforation. Specific features of surgical tactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Shchaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the immediate results of surgical interventions for colorectal cancer complicated by perforation.Materials and methods. The immediate results of surgical treatment were retrospectively analyzed in 56 patients with colorectal cancer complicated by perforated colon cancer, who had been treated at Smolensk surgical hospitals in 2001 to 2013. Patients with diastatic perforation of the colon in the presence of decompensated obturation intestinal obstruction of tumor genesis were not included into this investigation.Results. The immediate results of uni- and multistage surgical interventions were analyzed in relation to the extent of peritonitis and the stage of colon cancer. More satisfactory immediate results were observed after multistage surgical treatment. Following these interventions, a fatal outcome of disseminated peritonitis in the presence of performed colorectal cancer was recorded in 8 (53.3 % cases whereas after symptomatic surgery there were 11 (67.8 % deaths. A fatal outcome was noted in 1 case (7.7 % after multistage surgery.Discussion. The results of surgical treatment in the patients with perforated colorectal cancer are directly related to the degree of peritonitis and the choice of surgical tactics.

  5. Percutaneous drainage in conservative therapy for perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oida, Takatsugu; Kano, Hisao; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kuboi, Youichi; Fukino, Nobutada; Kida, Kazutoshi; Amano, Sadao

    2012-01-01

    The management of peptic ulcers has dramatically changed and the incidence of elective surgery for gastroduodenal peptic ulcers has markedly decreased; hence, the incidence of emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcers has slightly increased. In select cases, conservative therapy can be used as an alternative for treating perforated gastroduodenal ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of percutaneous abdominal drainage for the conservative treatment of perforated gastroduodenal ulcers. We retrospectively studied 51 patients who had undergone conservative therapy for perforated gastroduodenal ulcers. These patients were divided into 2 groups on the basis of the initial treatment with conservative therapy with or without percutaneous drainage: group PD included patients who had undergone percutaneous drainage and group NPD, patients who had undergone non-percutaneous drainage. In the PD group, 14.3% (n=3) of the patients did not respond to conservative therapy, while this value was 43.3% (n=13) in the NPD group. The 2 groups differed significantly with respect to conversion from conservative therapy to surgery (pperforated gastroduodenal ulcers should be performed only in the case of patients meeting the required criteria; its combination with percutaneous intraperitoneal drainage is effective as initial conservative therapy.

  6. Combining rhinoplasty with septal perforation repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T; Magdy, Emad A

    2006-11-01

    A combined septal perforation repair and rhinoplasty was performed in 80 patients presenting with septal perforations (size 1 to 5 cm) and external nasal deformities. The external rhinoplasty approach was used for all cases and the perforation was repaired using bilateral intranasal mucosal advancement flaps with a connective tissue interposition graft in between. Complete closure of the perforation was achieved in 90% of perforations of size up to 3.5 cm and in only 70% of perforations that were larger than 3.5 cm. Cosmetically, 95% were very satisfied with their aesthetic result. The external rhinoplasty approach proved to be very helpful in the process of septal perforation repair especially in large and posteriorly located perforations and in cases where the caudal septal cartilage was previously resected. Our results show that septal perforation repair can be safely combined with rhinoplasty and that some of the routine rhinoplasty maneuvers, such as medial osteotomies and dorsal lowering, could even facilitate the process of septal perforation repair.

  7. CT in acute perforated sigmoid diverticulitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrmann, Christian; Ghanem, Nadir; Pache, Gregor; Makowiec, Frank; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias

    2005-01-01

    Background: To assess the value of computed tomography (CT) in patients with acute perforated sigmoid diverticulitis in correlation with the Hinchey classification of perforated diverticular disease. Methods: Thirty patients with acute perforated sigmoid diverticulitis underwent computed tomography prior to surgery. Computed tomography scans were compared with the surgical and histopathological reports, utilizing the Hinchey classification. Results: In 28 of the 30 (93%) patients examined, the Hinchey stage was correctly determined by means of computed tomography. One patient with Hinchey stage IV was falsely classified as Hinchey stage III, and one patient with Hinchey stage III as Hinchey stage II. Computed tomography revealed 12 out of 14 (86%) patients with perforation sites and 3 out of 3 (100%) patients with contained perforation. In one of 17 (6%) patients with surgically or histopathologically proven perforation or contained perforation, a bowel wall discontinuity was revealed by computed tomography. In 6 of the 17 (35%) patients with surgical or histopathological perforation or contained perforation, extraluminal contrast material was detected by computed tomography. Conclusions: Computed tomography is a valuable imaging tool for determining the degree of acute perforated sigmoid diverticulitis, by means of which patients can be stratified according to the severity of the disease; furthermore, this tool is of assistance in surgical planning

  8. THE CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND COURSE OF DUODENAL ULCER DISEASE AFTER PERFORATED ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Lyubskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare clinical manifestations, course, mental status in duodenal ulcer (DU patients with a history of perforated ulcer and its uncomplicated course.Subjects and methods. One hundred and thirteen patents with DU were examined. Group 1 included 61 patients with uncomplicated DUand Group 2 comprised 52 patients with a history of perforated ulcer. A comparison group consisted of 20 patients who had undergone laparotomy. Physical and mental status examinations, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS, and 24-hour pH-metry were performed.Results. Classical pain syndrome was observed in 75 % of the patients with uncomplicated DU. Prior to perforation, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes were distinguished only by a significantly lower degree in Group 2; following perforation, the pain syndrome was recorded more frequently, it was more extensive, meal-unrelated, and similar to that in the patients who had undergone laparotomy and had diminished appetite (36.5 %. EGDS showed that the complicated course was accompanied by the significantly higher incidence of erosive esophagitis (21.2 %, gastritis (51.9 %, duodenitis (25.0 %, multiple ulcers (28.8 %, and larger ulcers. 24-hour pH-metry indicated that the level of hyperacidity in Group 2 was higher and the circadian intragastric pH variations were less marked than those in uncomplicated DU. The patients with a history of perforated ulcer showed a high rate of anxiety and depressive changes. Conclusion. In complicated DU, marked monotonic hyperacidity causes common erosive-ulcerative lesions in the gastroduodenal area in relatively mild pain syndrome, late referrals, and long-term ulcer healing. After perforation followed by wound closure, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes become more pronounced, which is associated with anxiety and depressive changes in the mental status, as well as with early referrals and less healing time.

  9. Perforations and how to manage: The coronary interventionalist and peripheral interventionalist working together for a solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Richard R

    2018-02-01

    Perforations can occur in both peripheral and coronary interventional procedures potentially resulting in severe morbidity A readily available therapeutic option to treat perforations should be present in every cath lab that does coronary and peripheral procedures The use of a coagulated thrombus injection can be an effective treatment option, but if a major vessel is affected that must remain patent, one viable option is to administer the patients' own clotted blood to recanalize the vessel without permanent sequelae. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Nonoperative management for perforated peptic ulcer: Who can benefit?

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Feng; Li, Jia; Li, Ang; Fang, Yu; Ya-jun Wang, Ya-jun Wang; Li, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although nonoperative management for perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) has been used for several decades, the indication is still unclear. A clinicoradiological score was sought to predict who can benefit from it. Methods: A clinicoradiological protocol for the assessment of patients presenting with PPU was used. A logistic regression model was applied to identify determinant variables and construct a clinical score that would identify patients who can be successfully treated with ...

  11. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcohol use, and Barrett esophagus can affect the risk of developing esophageal cancer. Anything that increases the ... tissue gives off less light than normal tissue. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening Key Points Screening tests ...

  12. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specific responses in allergy? » Dietary Therapy and Nutrition Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Work Group Report of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology » Eosinophilic esophagitis can ...

  13. Esophageal hypomotility and spastic motor disorders: current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdovinos, Miguel A; Zavala-Solares, Monica R; Coss-Adame, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Esophageal hypomotility (EH) is characterized by abnormal esophageal peristalsis, either from a reduction or absence of contractions, whereas spastic motor disorders (SMD) are characterized by an increase in the vigor and/or propagation velocity of esophageal body contractions. Their pathophysiology is not clearly known. The reduced excitation of the smooth muscle contraction mediated by cholinergic neurons and the impairment of inhibitory ganglion neuronal function mediated by nitric oxide are likely mechanisms of the peristaltic abnormalities seen in EH and SMD, respectively. Dysphagia and chest pain are the most frequent clinical manifestations for both of these dysfunctions, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is commonly associated with these motor disorders. The introduction of high-resolution manometry (HRM) and esophageal pressure topography (EPT) has significantly enhanced the ability to diagnose EH and SMD. Novel EPT metrics in particular the development of the Chicago Classification of esophageal motor disorders has enabled improved characterization of these abnormalities. The first step in the management of EH and SMD is to treat GERD, especially when esophageal testing shows pathologic reflux. Smooth muscle relaxants (nitrates, calcium channel blockers, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors) and pain modulators may be useful in the management of dysphagia or pain in SMD. Endoscopic Botox injection and pneumatic dilation are the second-line therapies. Extended myotomy of the esophageal body or peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may be considered in highly selected cases but lack evidence.

  14. Mucosal perforation during laparoscopic surgery for achalasia: impact of preoperative pneumatic balloon dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souma, Yoshihito; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Taniguchi, Eiji; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamasaki, Makoto; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Hamada, Tetsuhiro; Yasuda, Jun; Yumiba, Takeyoshi; Ohashi, Shuichi; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2017-03-01

    Controversy remains whether preoperative pneumatic balloon dilation (PBD) influences the surgical outcome of laparoscopic esophagocardiomyotomy in patients with esophageal achalasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether preoperative PBD represents a risk factor for surgical complications and affects the symptomatic and/or functional outcomes of laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication (LHD). A retrospective chart review was conducted on a prospectively compiled surgical database of 103 consecutive patients with esophageal achalasia who underwent LHD from November 1994 to September 2014. The following data were compared between the patients with preoperative PBD (PBD group; n = 26) and without PBD (non-PBD group; n = 77): (1) patients' demographics: age, gender, body mass index, duration of symptoms, maximum transverse diameter of esophagus; (2) operative findings: operating time, blood loss, intraoperative complications; (3) postoperative course: complications, clinical symptoms, postoperative treatment; and (4) esophageal functional tests: preoperative and postoperative manometric data and postoperative profile of 24-h esophageal pH monitoring. (1) No significant differences were observed in the patients' demographics. (2) Operative findings were similar between the two groups; however, the incidence of mucosal perforation was significantly higher in the PBD group (n = 8; 30.7 %) compared to the non-PBD group (n = 6; 7.7 %) (p = 0.005). (3) Postoperative complications were not encountered in either group. The differences were not significant for postoperative clinical symptoms, the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease, or necessity of postoperative treatments. (4) Lower esophageal sphincter pressure was effectively reduced in both groups, and no differences were observed in manometric data or 24-h pH monitoring profiles between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that preoperative PBD and the

  15. Esophageal Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The most common types of esophageal cancer are adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. These forms of esophageal cancer develop in some parts of the esophagus and are driven by genetic changes. Start here to find information on esophageal cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  16. Spontaneous ileal perforation complicating low anorectal malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TiJesuni Olatunji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorectal malformation is a common anomaly in neonates. Although colorectal perforations have been reported as a complication, ileal perforation is rarely encountered. This is a report of a 2-day-old boy presenting with a low anorectal malformation, complicated with ileal perforation, necessitating laparotomy and ileal repair. Anoplasty was done for the low anomaly. Early presentation and prompt treatment of anorectal malformations is important to prevent such potential life threatening complication.

  17. Congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula: clinical and radiologic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Kim, Woo Sun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Shin, Su-Mi; Kim, In-One; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yoo, So-Young [Seoul National University College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Park, Kwi-Won; Jung, Sung-Eun [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) can be associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF). Because there are a variety of degrees of obstruction and symptoms of CES, it is frequently difficult to make a pre- and post-operative diagnosis of the distal CES associated with EA/TEF. To evaluate the clinical and radiologic features of congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula. We retrospectively reviewed postoperative esophagograms and medical records of 187 children (107 boys, 80 girls) who had primary repair of EA/TEF from 1992 to 2009 at our institution. We evaluated the incidence of CES, clinical findings, radiologic features and management of CES in these children. CES was diagnosed in 22 of 187 EA/TEF children (12%); one child had double CES lesions, for a total of 23 lesions. Ten of those 22 children (45%) had presented with significant symptoms of esophageal obstruction. The diagnosis of CES was delayed in 10 children (45%) until 1-10 years of age. On esophagogram, CES (n = 23) was located in the distal esophagus (n = 20, 87%) or mid-esophagus (n = 3, 13%). The degree of stenosis was severe (n = 6, 26%), moderate (n = 10, 43%), or mild (n = 7, 30%). Eight children, including two with unsuccessful esophageal balloon dilatation of CES, were treated surgically. Histologic examination revealed tracheobronchial remnant (n = 7) or fibromuscular hyperplasia (n = 1). One child with surgically treated CES developed achalasia at the age of 3 years 9 months. Esophagography after EA/TEF repair should be performed with a high index of suspicion for the presence of distal CES, because the diagnosis and adequate management of CES can often be delayed. (orig.)

  18. Perforated Sigmoid Diverticular Disease: a Management Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Thajammul

    2008-01-01

    Background: To develop an evidence-based protocol for the management of perforated sigmoid diverticular disease. Methods: A search of the literature was undertaken. All publications pertaining to perforated sigmoid diverticular disease were analyzed and then categorized according to their level of evidence. Recommendations were then made on the basis of this. Results: Multiple case reports suggest that primary closure of perforation of sigmoid diverticula is safe in the absence of peritoneal contamination. Conclusions: A 2-stage laparoscopic approach incorporating the principles of damage limitation surgery may be a safe strategy in the management of perforated diverticular disease. PMID:18435896

  19. Management of biliary perforation in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Bilal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study the aetiology, management and outcome of biliary perforations in paediatric age group. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective study, the records of patients presented with biliary peritonitis due to biliary perforations, managed from March 2006 to July 2009, are reviewed. Results: Eight male patients with biliary peritonitis due to biliary perforation were managed. These patients were divided in two groups, A and B. Group A, (n = 3 patients, had common bile duct (CBD perforation, and Group B (n=5 patients had gallbladder perforation. The presenting features were abdominal pain, fever, abdominal distension, vomiting, constipation, jaundice and signs of peritonism. The management of CBD perforations in Group A was by draining the site of perforation and biliary diversion (tube cholecystostomy. In Group B, the gallbladder perforations were managed by tube cholecystostomy in four patients and cholecystectomy in one patient, however, one patient had to be re-explored and cholecystectomy performed due to complete necrosis of gall bladder. There was no mortality in our series. All patients were asymptomatic on regular follow-up. Conclusion: Early optimal management of biliary perforations remarkably improved the very high mortality and morbidity that characterised this condition in the past.

  20. Isolated jejunal perforation following blunt abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Pergel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Isolated perforation of the jejunum, following blunt abdominaltrauma, is extremely rare. These injuries aredifficult to diagnose because initial clinical signs are frequentlynonspecific and a delay in treatment increasesmortality and morbidity of the patients. Conventional radiogramsare often inadequate for diagnosing this subsetof trauma. For an accurate and timely diagnosis, thepossibility of bowel perforation and the need for repeatedexaminations should be kept in mind. Herein, we presenta 28-year-old man with isolated jejunal perforation followingblunt abdominal trauma.Key words: Blunt abdominal trauma, isolated jejunal perforation,early diagnosis

  1. Scintigraphy in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkina, V.V.; Piperkova, E.N.; Okulov, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Esophagoscintigraphy with labelled liquid and solid food was performed in 34 patients disease of the esophagus in the patient history permitting the determination of quantitative and qualitive characteristics of normal motor-evacuatory function of the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter (LES). A total of 46 patients with esophageal cancer and stomach cancer with the envolvement of the esophagus before treatment were examined. In cancer of the esophagus its function depended on a tumor site and stage. In order to raise diagnostic sensitivity dynamic esophagoscintigraphy should be performed using liquid and solid food because during liquid passage a study with a hard bolus of patients with severe esophageal disfunction showed that in 36.9% of the patients the quantitative and qualitative indices were within normal. Radionuclide methods permit the determination of the level of a pathological focus, a degree of esophageal permeability, quantitative characterization of a degree of disorder of esophageal function in order to raise the functional diagnosis of the esophaeous and LES, and the determination of motor disorders at the earliest stages of tumor development

  2. [Reconstruction of ankle and foot with combination of free perforator flaps and skin graft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lu; Gong, Ketong; Yin, Zhonggang; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Jianhua

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of free perforator flaps combined with skin graft for reconstruction of ankle and foot soft tissue defects. Between June 2014 and October 2015, 20 cases of ankle and foot soft tissue defects were treated. There were 16 males and 4 females, aged from 19 to 61 years (mean, 43.3 years). Injury was caused by traffic accident in 7 cases, by crashing in 9 cases, and machine twist in 4 cases. The locations were the ankle in 6 cases, the heel in 3 cases, the dorsum pedis in 4 cases, and the plantar forefoot in 7 cases of avulsion injury after toes amputation. The size of wound ranged from 15 cm×10 cm to 27 cm×18 cm. The time from injury to treatment was from 11 to 52 days (mean, 27 days). The anterolateral thigh perforator flap was used in 11 cases, thoracodorsal antery perforator flap in 3 cases, medial sural artery perforator flap in 4 cases, deep inferior epigastric perforator flap in 1 case, and anteromedial thigh perforator flap in 1 case, including 5 chimeric perforator flaps, 5 polyfoliate perforator flaps, 3 flow-through perforator flaps, and 3 conjoined perforator flaps. The size of the perforator flap ranged from 10.0 cm×6.5 cm to 36.0 cm×8.0 cm, the size of skin graft from 5 cm×3 cm to 18 cm×12 cm. Venous crisis occurred in 2 flaps which survived after symptomatic treatment; 18 flaps survived successfully and skin grafting healed well. The follow-up time ranged 4-18 months (mean, 8.3 months). The flaps had good appearance, texture and color, without infection. The patients could walk normally and do daily activities. Only linear scars were observed at the donor sites. Free perforator flap can be used to reconstruct defects in the ankle and foot, especially in the weight-bearing area of the plantar forefoot. A combination of free perforator flap and skin graft is ideal in reconstruction of great soft tissue defects in the ankle and foot.

  3. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Study in the Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    Esophageal motility was evaluated from the analysis of 10 consecutive swallows using liquid bolus containing 0.5 mCi of {sup 99m}Tc tin colloid. We have reviewed our experience of esophageal transit study in the 20 normal volunteers and 55 patients with dysphagia that was not related to mechanical obstruction. The purpose of this study is to measure the esophageal transit in normal subjects and in patients with various esophageal motility disorders. The overall sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide esophageal transit study in detecting esophageal motor abnormality were compared with manometric results as a gold standard, which were 80% and 100% respectively. Radionuclide transit study is a safe, rapid, noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  4. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Study in the Esophageal Motility Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook

    1993-01-01

    Esophageal motility was evaluated from the analysis of 10 consecutive swallows using liquid bolus containing 0.5 mCi of 99m Tc tin colloid. We have reviewed our experience of esophageal transit study in the 20 normal volunteers and 55 patients with dysphagia that was not related to mechanical obstruction. The purpose of this study is to measure the esophageal transit in normal subjects and in patients with various esophageal motility disorders. The overall sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide esophageal transit study in detecting esophageal motor abnormality were compared with manometric results as a gold standard, which were 80% and 100% respectively. Radionuclide transit study is a safe, rapid, noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  5. Stents in patients with esophageal cancer before chemoradiotherapy: high risk of complications and no impact on the nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mão-de-Ferro, S; Serrano, M; Ferreira, S; Rosa, I; Lage, P; Alexandre, D P; Freire, J; Mirones, L; Casaca, R; Bettencourt, A; Pereira, A D

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for locally advanced esophageal cancer, causing persistent deterioration in the nutritional status. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of esophageal double-covered self-expandable metal stents in patients with esophageal cancer before chemoradiotherapy. The nutritional status and dysphagia were prospectively recorded. Eleven patients were included: eight were moderate and three were severely malnourished. After stent placement, dysphagia improved in all patients. With regard to complications, one patient developed an esophageal perforation that required urgent esophagectomy. Four patients presented stent migration. Three of these patients required enteral nutrition and none was submitted to surgery because of poor nutritional status. Of the other six patients, only four were operated upon. Stent placement presented a high complication rate and did not prevent weight loss or malnutrition. Other alternatives, including naso-gastric tube placement or endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy or jejunostomy, should be considered.

  6. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for nutritional palliation of upper esophageal cancer unsuitable for esophageal stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Grilo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Esophageal cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis. Most patients with advanced esophageal cancer have significant dysphagia that contributes to weight loss and malnutrition. Esophageal stenting is a widespread palliation approach, but unsuitable for cancers near the upper esophageal sphincter, were stents are poorly tolerated. Generally, guidelines do not support endoscopic gastrostomy in this clinical setting, but it may be the best option for nutritional support. OBJECTIVE: Retrospective evaluation of patients with dysphagia caused advanced esophageal cancer, no expectation of resuming oral intake and with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for comfort palliative nutrition. METHOD: We selected adult patients with unresecable esophageal cancer histological confirmed, in whom stenting was impossible due to proximal location, and chemotherapy or radiotherapy were palliative, using gastrostomy for enteral nutrition. Clinical and nutritional data were evaluated, including success of gastrostomy, procedure complications and survival after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, and evolution of body mass index, albumin, transferrin and cholesterol. RESULTS: Seventeen males with stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 60.9 years. Most of the patients had toxic habits. All underwent palliative chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Gastrostomy was successfully performed in all, but nine required prior dilatation. Most had the gastrostomy within 2 months after diagnosis. There was a buried bumper syndrome treated with tube replacement and four minor complications. There were no cases of implantation metastases or procedure related mortality. Two patients were lost and 12 died. Mean survival of deceased patients was 5.9 months. Three patients are alive 6, 14 and 17 months after the gastrostomy procedure, still increasing the mean survival. Mean body mass index and laboratory

  7. Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement for the Palliation of Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kun Yung; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Song, Ho Young; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Park, Jung Hoon

    2017-07-01

    Esophageal stents have been used to palliate patients with dysphagia caused by esophageal cancer. Early rigid plastic prostheses have been associated with a high risk of complications. However, with the development of self-expanding stents, it has developed into a widely accepted method for treating malignant esophageal strictures and esophagorespiratory fistulas (ERFs). The present review covers various aspects of self-expanding metallic stent placement for palliating esophageal cancer, including its types, placement procedures, indications, contraindications, complications, and some of innovations that will become available in the future. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  8. Anatomical study of the popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap and its clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Tadanobu; Shimizu, Takamasa; Omokawa, Shohei; Sananpanich, Kanit; Kido, Akira; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2018-05-30

    There is lack of anatomical information regarding cutaneous perforator of the popliteal artery and its connections with the descending branch of the inferior gluteal and profunda femoris arteries. We aimed to evaluate the anatomical basis of popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap from the posterior thigh region and to demonstrate our experience utilizing this flap. Ten fresh cadaveric lower extremities were dissected following injection of a silicone compound into the femoral artery. We investigated the number, location, length, and diameter of cutaneous perforators of the popliteal artery. Based on the results, we treated three cases with a large soft tissue defect around the knee using popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap. We found a mean of 1.9 cutaneous perforators arising from the popliteal artery with a mean pedicle length of 6 cm and a mean arterial internal diameter of 0.9 mm, which were located at an average of 4 cm proximal to the bicondylar line. The most distal perforator consistently arose along the small saphenous vein and connected proximally with concomitant artery of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve, forming a connection with perforating arteries of the profunda femoris artery. A mean of 4.5 cutaneous perforators branched from the arterial connection sites. All clinical cases healed without any complications. The popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap is reliable for reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the knee. The flap should include the deep fascia and concomitant artery along with the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve for maintaining the blood supply.

  9. Pneumoperitoneum without Intestinal Perforation in a Neonate: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhavathi Gummalla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumoperitoneum in a preterm neonate usually indicates perforation of the intestine and is considered a surgical emergency. However, there are cases of pneumoperitoneum with no evidence of rupture of the intestine reported in the literature. We report a case of pneumoperitoneum with no intestinal perforation in a preterm neonate with respiratory distress syndrome who was on high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV. He developed bilateral pulmonary interstitial emphysema with localized cystic lesion, likely localized pulmonary interstitial emphysema, and recurrent pneumothoraces. He was treated with dexamethasone to wean from the ventilator. Pneumoperitoneum developed in association with left sided pneumothorax following mechanical ventilation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Pneumoperitoneum resolved after the pneumothorax was resolved with chest tube drainage. He died from acute cardiorespiratory failure. At autopsy, there was no evidence of intestinal perforation. This case highlights the fact that pneumoperitoneum can develop secondary to pneumothorax and does not always indicate intestinal perforation or require exploratory laparotomy.

  10. Candidiasis, A Rare Cause of Gastric Perforation: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukekwe, F I; Nwajiobi, C; Agbo, M O; Ebede, S O; Eni, A O

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are unusually rare causes of gastric perforation, with most cases of gastric perforation occurring as complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and gastric neoplasms. Here, we report the case of a 70-year-old Nigerian male who presented with severe epigastric pain, with no associated history of PUD, NSAIDs use or gastric neoplasm. An emergency exploratory laparotomy was performed and a gastric perforation was discovered and repaired. Histopathological examination of the gastric perforation edge biopsy revealed an intense Candida growth consisting of numerous fungal spores and hyphae invading and destroying the gastric wall. He was subsequently treated with fluconazole antifungal and discharged home after an uneventful postoperative period.

  11. Case Report: Rectal perforation during CT colonography [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Zukiwskyj

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Computer tomography colonoscopy (CTC is an increasingly prevalent procedure for the investigation of colorectal symptoms, or as a component of colorectal cancer screening.  It is considered a low risk procedure, however colonic perforation is a recognized significant complication.   Case Report We report the case of an 81-year-old female patient who underwent CTC after failed optical colonoscopy as part of routine colorectal cancer screening.  Perforation of the rectum with surrounding pararectal air was confirmed on CTC.  The patient had minimal symptoms and was treated successful non-operatively with bowel rest and antibiotics.   Conclusion Perforation sustained during CTC is an uncommon complication.  The incidence of perforation during CTC is still lower than that during optical colonoscopy.  In the absence of significant abdominal signs and symptoms, this rare complication may be successfully managed non-operatively.

  12. Epiphrenic esophageal diverticula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epiphrenic esophageal diverticula (EED are rare. The estimated incidence is about 1:500,000/year. EED usually result from a combination of esophageal obstruction, functional or mechanical and a point of weakness of the muscularis propria. Most of the symptoms are unspecific, but dysphagia is most common. Chest radiograph, barium esophagogram, endoscopy and manometry are diagnostic tools. The treatment methods are conservative medical therapy, myotomy, diverticulectomy and fundoplication. In addition, endoscopic pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin injection are a good alternative for symptomatic patients with motility disorders who are unfit for or unwilling to undergo surgery.

  13. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for the treatment of esophageal achalasia: systematic review and pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, K; Abbassi-Ghadi, N; Markar, S; Kumar, S; Jethwa, P; Zaninotto, G

    2016-10-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a novel approach to performing esophageal myotomy for the treatment of achalasia. This review aims to assess subjective and objective metrics of achalasia treatment efficacy, perioperative adverse events and the incidence of postoperative gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients treated with POEM. Secondary aims include a pooled analysis comparison of the clinical outcomes and procedural safety of POEM versus laparoscopic Heller's myotomy (LHM). A systematic review of the literature, up to and including January 15, 2015, was conducted for studies reporting POEM outcomes. Studies comparing POEM to LHM were also included for the purpose of pooled analysis. Outcomes from 1122 POEM patients, from 22 studies, are reported in this systematic review. Minor operative adverse events included capno/pneumo-peritoneum (30.6%), capno/pneumo-thorax (11.0%) and subcutaneous emphysema (31.6%). Major operative adverse events included mediastinal leak (0.3%), postoperative bleeding (1.1%) and a single mortality (0.09%). There was an improvement in lower esophageal sphincter pressure and timed barium esophagram column height of 66% and 80% post-POEM, respectively. Symptom improvement was demonstrated with a pre- and post-POEM Eckardt score ± standard deviation of 6.8 ± 1.0 and 1.2 ± 0.6, respectively. Pre- and post-POEM endoscopy showed esophagitis in 0% and 19% of patients, respectively. The median (interquartile range) points scored for study quality was 15 (14-16) out of total of 32. Pooled analysis of three comparative studies between LHM and POEM showed similar results for adverse events, perforation rate, operative time and a nonsignificant trend toward a reduced length of hospital stay in the POEM group. In conclusion, POEM is a safe and effective treatment for achalasia, showing significant improvements in objective metrics and achalasia-related symptoms. Randomized comparative studies of LHM and POEM are required to determine the

  14. Neurodevelopmental outcome after neonatal perforator stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; van der Haer, Marit; Smit, Liesbeth S; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Lequin, Maarten; de Jonge, Rogier C J; Govaert, Paul; Dudink, Jeroen

    AIM: To assess outcome after neonatal perforator stroke in the largest cohort to date. METHOD: Survivors from a cohort of children diagnosed with neonatal perforator stroke using cranial ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging were eligible for inclusion. Recovery and Recurrence Questionnaire

  15. Hyperbilirubinemia as a predictor for appendiceal perforation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, J; Pommergaard, H C; Rosenberg, J

    2013-01-01

    Delayed or wrong diagnosis in patients with appendicitis can result in perforation and consequently increased morbidity and mortality. Serum bilirubin may be a useful marker for appendiceal perforation. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate studies investigating elevated serum...

  16. Investigation on the Acoustic Absorption of Flexible Micro-Perforated Panel with Ultra-Micro Perforations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoxin; Tang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Qian, Y. J.; Kong, Deyi

    2017-11-01

    Flexible micro-perforated panel has unique advantages in noise reduction due to its good flexibility compared with traditional rigid micro-perforated panel. In this paper, flexible micro-perforated panel was prepared by computer numerical control (CNC) milling machine. Three kinds of plastics including polyvinylchloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyimide (PI) were taken as the matrix materials to prepare flexible micro-perforated panel. It has been found that flexible micro-perforated panel made of PET possessing good porosity and proper density, elastic modulus and poisson ratio exhibited the best acoustic absorption properties. The effects of various structural parameters including perforation diameter, perforation ratio, thickness and air gap have also been investigated, which would be helpful to the optimization of acoustic absorption properties.

  17. Laparoscopic pyloroplasty for perforated peptic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grišin, Edvard; Mikalauskas, Saulius; Poškus, Tomas; Jotautas, Valdemaras; Strupas, Kęstutis

    2017-09-01

    Peptic ulcer is a common disease affecting millions of people every year. Despite improved understanding and treatment of the disease, the number of patients admitted with duodenal peptic ulcer perforation has not decreased. Deaths from peptic ulcer disease overcome other common emergency situations. Laparoscopic repair of the perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is the gold standard approach for simple perforation. However, in patients with large perforated chronic ulcers laparotomy with pyloroplasty is the standard treatment. It is generally accepted to perform open surgery in PPU emergencies because of the greater knowledge and experience gathered over the past decades and less potential harm for the patient or surgical complications. We present a case of successful laparoscopic pyloroplasty of a perforated duodenal ulcer with stenosis.

  18. Use of Computed Tomography to Determine Perforation in Patients With Acute Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Cameron E; Simianu, Vlad V; Carnell, Jonathan; Hippe, Daniel S; Bhargava, Puneet; Flum, David R; Davidson, Giana H

    Urgent appendectomy has long been the standard of care for acute appendicitis. Six randomized trials have demonstrated that antibiotics can safely treat appendicitis, but approximately 1 in 4 of these patients eventually requires appendectomy. Overall treatment success may be limited by complex disease including perforation. Patients׳ success on antibiotic therapy may depend on preoperative identification of complex disease on imaging. However, the effectiveness of computed tomography (CT) in differentiating complex disease including perforated from nonperforated appendicitis remains to be determined. The purpose of this study was to assess the preoperative diagnostic accuracy of CT in determining appendiceal perforation in patients operated for acute appendicitis. We performed a retrospective review of pathology and radiology reports from consecutive patients who presented to the emergency department with suspicion for acute appendicitis between January 2012 and May 2015. CT scans were re-reviewed by abdominal imaging fellowship-trained radiologists using standardized criteria, and the radiologists were blinded to pathology and surgical findings. Radiologists specifically noted presence or absence of periappendiceal gas, abscess, appendicolith, fat stranding, and bowel wall thickening. The overall radiologic impression as well as these specific imaging findings was compared to results of pathology and operative reports. Pathology reports were considered the standard for diagnostic accuracy. Eighty-nine patients (65% male, average age of 34 years) presenting with right lower quadrant pain underwent CT imaging and prompt appendectomy. Final pathology reported perforation in 48% (n = 43) of cases. Radiologic diagnosis of perforation was reported in 9% (n = 8), correctly identifying perforation in 37.5% (n = 3), and incorrectly reporting perforation in 62.5% of nonperforated cases per pathology. Radiology missed 93% (n = 40) of perforations postoperatively diagnosed

  19. Optimization of geometrical characteristics of perforated plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radisavljevic, Igor; Balos, Sebastian; Nikacevic, Milutin; Sidjanin, Leposava

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Perforated plate are tested against 12.7 mm API projectile. ► Perforations similar to the projectile diameter offer more efficient core fracture. ► Larger perforations gave a more efficient core fragmentation. ► SEM microscopy analysis has shown a ductile fracture mode at impact point. - Abstract: In this paper, an attempt was made to design effective non-homogenous armor in form of perforated plate mounted at close distance from basic armor plate. Perforated plate with three perforation diameters: 9, 10 and 11 mm, two ligaments length: 3.5 and 4.5 mm ligaments, set at 0° and 28° angles, were combined to 13 mm basic plate and tested against 12.7 mm API ammunition. It has been shown that larger perforations gave a more efficient core fragmentation, while angled specimens were the only ones that offer full protection against five API shots when the perforated plate was placed at 100 mm from the basic plate. Perforations that are similar in size to the penetrating core diameter offer a more efficient core fracture, leading to a faster fragment separation. This may enable a smaller distance between the add-on perforated and basic plate to be used. Scanning electron microscopy analysis has shown a ductile fracture mode at impact point, with hardness values on plate basic level. On the other hand, a brittle fracture mode with a rise in local hardness measured near impact point is a result of intensive high speed plastic deformation produced by bending stresses. A drop in local hardness measured near impact point, may be the result of intensive cracking that occur due to repeated projectile impact

  20. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, T.A.; Ajani, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings contain 33 papers grouped under the headings of: Heath memorial award lecture; Large bowel cancer; Esophageal cancer; Pancreatic, Endocrime, and Hepatobiliary cancer; Gastric cancer; Joanne Vandenberge hill award and William O. Russell lectureship in anatomic pathology; and Jeffrey A. Gottlieb memorial lecture

  1. Advances in esophageal motor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smout, André Jpm

    2008-07-01

    Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. A number of studies have addressed the issue of heterogeneity in achalasia, the best defined esophageal motility disorder. The spastic esophageal motility disorders nutcracker esophagus and diffuse esophageal spasm may coexist with gastroesophageal reflux disease, which has consequences for the management of patients with these disorders. The entity labelled ineffective esophageal motility is associated with reflux esophagitis, but also with morbid obesity. For the detection of disordered transit caused by ineffective esophageal motility, application of intraluminal impedance monitoring in conjunction with manometry leads to improved diagnosis. New data on the effect of Nissen fundoplication on esophageal motility were published during the last year. Recent knowledge on the heterogeneity of achalasia and the association of spastic esophageal motor disorders and ineffective motility with reflux disease will help the clinician in the management of patients with these disorders.

  2. Protective Effect of ECQ on Rat Reflux Esophagitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyeon-Soon; Han, Jeong Hoon; Jeong, Jun Yeong; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2012-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the protective effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba extracts containing quercetin-3-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (ECQ) on experimental reflux esophagitis. Reflux esophagitis was induced by surgical procedure. The rats were divided into seven groups, namely normal group, control group, ECQ (1, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg) group and omeprazole (30 mg/kg) group. ECQ and omeprazole groups received intraduodenal administration. The Rats were starved for 24 hours before the experiments, but were freely allowed to drink water. ECQ group attenuated the gross esophagitis significantly compared to that treated with omeprazole in a dose-dependent manner. ECQ decreased the volume of gastric juice and increased the gastric pH, which are similar to those of omeprazole group. In addition, ECQ inhibited the acid output effectively in reflux esophagitis. Significantly increased amounts of malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the mucosal depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) were observed in the reflux esophagitis. ECQ administration attenuated the decrement of the GSH levels and affected the MDA levels and MPO activity. These results suggest that the ECQ has a protective effect which may be attributed to its multiple effects including anti-secretory, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory actions on reflux esophagitis in rats.

  3. Treatment of esophageal achalasia in children: Today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldaro, Tamara; Familiari, Pietro; Romeo, Erminia Francesca; Gigante, Giovanni; Marchese, Michele; Contini, Anna Chiara Iolanda; Federici di Abriola, Giovanni; Cucchiara, Salvatore; De Angelis, Paola; Torroni, Filippo; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Costamagna, Guido

    2015-05-01

    Esophageal achalasia (EA) is a rare esophageal motility disorder in children. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) represents the treatment of choice in young patients. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is becoming an alternative to LHM. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness, safety, and outcomes of POEM vs LHM in treatment of children with EA. Data of pediatric patients with EA, who underwent LHM and POEM from February 2009 to December 2013 in two centers, were collected. Eighteen patients (9 male, mean age: 11.6 years; range: 2-17 years) were included. Nine patients (6 male, mean age: 10.7 years; range: 2-16 years) underwent LHM, and the other 9 (3 males, mean age: 12.2 years; range: 6-17 years) underwent POEM procedure. Mean operation time was shorter in POEM group compared with LHM group (62/149 minutes). Myotomy was longer in POEM group than in LHM group (11/7 cm). One major complication occurred after LHM (esophageal perforation). No clinical and manometric differences were observed between LHM and POEM in follow-up. The incidence of iatrogenic gastroesophageal reflux disease was low (1 patient in both groups). Results of a midterm follow-up show that LHM and POEM are safe and effective treatments also in children. Besides, POEM is a mini-invasive technique with an inferior execution timing compared to LHM. A skilled endoscopic team is mandatory to perform this procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rectal perforation by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Jin

    2017-07-01

    As the use of compressed air in industrial work has increased, so has the risk of associated pneumatic injury from its improper use. However, damage of large intestine caused by compressed air is uncommon. Herein a case of pneumatic rupture of the rectum is described. The patient was admitted to the Emergency Room complaining of abdominal pain and distension. His colleague triggered a compressed air nozzle over his buttock. On arrival, vital signs were stable but physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and marked distension of the abdomen. Computed tomography showed a large volume of air in the peritoneal cavity and subcutaneous emphysema at the perineum. A rectal perforation was found at laparotomy and the Hartmann procedure was performed.

  5. The implantation of esophageal stent with radioactive 125I particles for advanced esophageal carcinomas: observation of therapeutic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Peng; Cui Hongkai; Yang Ruimin; Zhang Xizhong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effect of the implantation of esophageal stent with radioactive 125 I particles in treating advanced esophageal carcinomas in aged patients. Methods: During the period from Sep. 2009 to Dec. 2010, implantation of esophageal stent was used to treat 43 aged patients with advanced esophageal cancer. Based on the patient's free will, the patients were divided into study group (n=18) receiving stent with 125 I particles and control group (n=25) receiving ordinary stent without 125 I particles. No significant difference in the age, the lesion length, the degree of stenosis and the disease stage existed between the study group and the control group. The technical success rate, the remission rate of dysphagia, the occurrence of complications and the mean survival time were calculated and analyzed. The results were compared between the two groups. Results: The technical success rate was 100% in both groups. The short-term remission rate of dysphagia was also 100% in both groups. The mean survival time in the study group and in the control group was 9.8 months and 4.8 months respectively, the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P 0.05). Conclusion: This results of study indicate that for the treatment of advanced esophageal carcinomas the implantation of esophageal stent with radioactive 125 I particles can surely and markedly prolong the patient's survival time and relive the symptom of dysphagia. This technique is safe, feasible and effective in clinical practice. The use of the stent with radioactive 125 I particles is superior to the use of the traditional stent in treating patients with advanced esophageal cancer. (authors)

  6. A single center 26-year experience with treatment of esophageal achalasia: is there an optimal method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Aimee C; Mills, Jessica; Marcon, Margaret A; Himidan, Sharifa; Kim, Peter C W

    2009-07-01

    Treatment modalities for achalasia are evolving and remain controversial. Herein, we report the relative efficacy and outcomes after dilatation or myotomy in children with achalasia. A retrospective analysis of all children treated for achalasia at a tertiary center from 1981 to 2007 was performed (n = 40). Demographics, presenting symptoms, perioperative parameters, and outcomes were analyzed using t tests and chi(2) statistics. Thirty patients were initially treated by esophageal dilatation (ED), whereas 10 were treated by laparoscopic or open Heller myotomy (HM). Both groups were similar with respect to age (10.6 vs 12.4 years; P = .19). There were 18 males and 12 females in the ED group, compared to 5 males and 5 females in the HM group (P = .72). Mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis, including dysphagia, vomiting, food sticking, chest pain, and weight loss, was 15.9 months for ED and 10.7 months for HM (P = .41). Mean time from diagnosis to initial intervention was 76 days in ED vs 86 days in HM (P = .78). Subsequent interventions by myotomy or both dilatation and myotomy were required in 9 (30%) of 30 patients in the ED group and 2 (20%) of 10 patients in the HM group (P = .70). A clear transition from open to laparoscopic approach occurred between 1995 and 2001. Mean operating times were comparable (186.3 vs 156.0 minutes; P = .48). Of 14 laparoscopic myotomies, 11 (79%) had fundoplication, and 2 (18%) of the 11 were converted to open procedure. Intraoperative mucosal perforation rates were similar between open and laparoscopic groups (17% vs 18%). At follow-up, 32% of ED patients vs 43% HM had complete symptom relief (mean follow-up duration, 75.2 months; SD, 196.5). Both dilatation and myotomy are effective immediate treatment of achalasia. A clear transition to and preference for laparoscopic approach has occurred in the treatment of achalasia in children.

  7. Utility of esophageal gastroduodenoscopy at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scalea Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The utility of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD performed at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is unclear. We examined whether EGD at time of PEG yielded clinically useful information important in patient care. We also reviewed the outcome and complication rates of EGD-PEG performed by trauma surgeons. Methods Retrospective review of all trauma patients undergoing EGD with PEG at a level I trauma center from 1/01–6/03. Results 210 patients underwent combined EGD with PEG by the trauma team. A total of 37% of patients had unsuspected upper gastrointestinal lesions seen on EGD. Of these, 35% had traumatic brain injury, 10% suffered multisystem injury, and 47% had spinal cord injury. These included 15 esophageal, 61 gastric, and six duodenal lesions, mucosal or hemorrhagic findings on EGD. This finding led to a change in therapy in 90% of patients; either resumption/continuation of H2 -blockers or conversion to proton-pump inhibitors. One patient suffered an upper gastrointestinal bleed while on H2-blocker. It was treated endoscopically. Complication rates were low. There were no iatrogenic visceral perforations seen. Three PEGs were inadvertently removed by the patient (1.5%; one was replaced with a Foley, one replaced endoscopically, and one patient underwent gastric repair and open jejunostomy tube. One PEG leak was repaired during exploration for unrelated hemorrhage. Six patients had significant site infections (3%; four treated with local drainage and antibiotics, one requiring operative debridement and later closure, and one with antibiotics alone. Conclusion EGD at the time of PEG may add clinically useful data in the management of trauma patients. Only one patient treated with acid suppression therapy for EGD diagnosed lesions suffered delayed gastrointestinal bleeding. Trauma surgeons can perform EGD and PEG with acceptable outcomes and complication rates.

  8. Esophageal motor disorders in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moawad, Fouad J; Maydonovitch, Corinne L; Veerappan, Ganesh R; Bassett, John T; Lake, Jason M; Wong, Roy K H

    2011-05-01

    An association between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and esophageal motility disorders has been described in small studies. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of esophageal motor disorders in a large cohort of adults with EoE and examine whether an association exists between esophageal dysmotility and dysphagia. A retrospective review of esophageal manometry studies in adult EoE patients was performed. Tracings were reviewed for abnormalities including nutcracker esophagus and ineffective swallows, defined as low amplitude peristalsis (esophagus was found in three patients. There was no significant difference in eosinophil count among the motility groups: normal 46.5 ± 3.1, mild IEM 56.9 ± 36.9, moderate IEM 45.5 ± 23.7, severe IEM 34.3 ± 12.6 (P = 0.157). In this cohort of EoE patients, the majority had normal esophageal motility studies, although a subset of these patients had some esophageal dysmotility. It is unlikely that esophageal dysmotility is a major contributing factor to dysphagia, although it is reasonable to consider esophageal manometry testing in EoE patients to identify potential abnormalities of the smooth muscle esophagus.

  9. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. In this case, the patient's symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Bladder perforation in a peritoneal dialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ounissi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dysfunction of the catheter in peritoneal dialysis (PD is a frequent compli-cation. However, perforation of organs are rare, particularly that of the urinary bladder. This re-quires an early diagnosis and prompt treatment of patients. We report here the case of a 38-year-old woman having end-stage renal disease due to autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease treated by PD since November 2000. Three years later, she was treated for Staphylococcal peritonitis. Four months later, she presented with a severe urge to urinate at the time of the fluid exchanges. The biochemical analysis of the fluid from the bladder showed that it was dialysis fluid. Injection of contrast through the catheter demonstrated the presence of a fistula between the bladder and the peritoneal cavity. She underwent cystoscopic closure of the fistulous tract and the PD catheter was removed. Subsequently, the patient was treated by hemodialysis. One month later, a second catheter was implanted surgically after confirming the closure of the fistula. Ten days later, she presented with pain at the catheter site and along the tunnel, which was found to be swollen along its track. The injection of contrast produced swelling of the subcutaneous tunnel but without extravasation of the dye. PD was withdrawn and the patient was put back on hemodialysis. Bladder fistula is a rare complication in PD and diagnosis should be suspected when patient complains of an urge to pass urine during the exchanges, which can be confirmed by contrast study showing presence of dye in the bladder. PD may be possible after the closure of the fistula, but recurrence may occur.

  11. Surgical management of esophageal achalasia: Evolution of an institutional approach to minimally invasive repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Mikael; Khalafallah, Adham M; Guzzetta, Phillip C; Sandler, Anthony D; Darbari, Anil; Kane, Timothy D

    2016-10-01

    Surgical management of esophageal achalasia (EA) in children has transitioned over the past 2 decades to predominantly involve laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) or minimally invasive surgery (MIS). More recently, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been utilized to treat achalasia in children. Since the overall experience with surgical management of EA is contingent upon disease incidence and surgeon experience, the aim of this study is to report a single institutional contemporary experience for outcomes of surgical treatment of EA by LHM and POEM, with regards to other comparable series in children. An IRB approved retrospective review of all patients with EA who underwent treatment by a surgical approach at a tertiary US children's hospital from 2006 to 2015. Data including demographics, operative approach, Eckardt scores pre- and postoperatively, complications, outcomes, and follow-up were analyzed. A total of 33 patients underwent 35 operative procedures to treat achalasia. Of these operations; 25 patients underwent laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) with Dor fundoplication; 4 patients underwent LHM alone; 2 patients underwent LHM with Thal fundoplication; 2 patients underwent primary POEM; 2 patients who had had LHM with Dor fundoplication underwent redo LHM with takedown of Dor fundoplication. Intraoperative complications included 2 mucosal perforations (6%), 1 aspiration, 1 pneumothorax (1 POEM patient). Follow ranged from 8months to 7years (8-84months). There were no deaths and no conversions to open operations. Five patients required intervention after surgical treatment of achalasia for recurrent dysphagia including 3 who underwent between 1 and 3 pneumatic dilations; and 2 who had redo LHM with takedown of Dor fundoplication with all patients achieving complete resolution of symptoms. Esophageal achalasia in children occurs at a much lower incidence than in adults as documented by published series describing the surgical treatment in children. We

  12. Intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolodi, Gabriel Cleve; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda F. S.; de Castro, Francisco Gomes; Miller, Wagner Peitl; de Lima, Raphael Rodrigues; Tazima, Leandro; Geraldo, Jamylle

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the computed tomography findings suggestive of intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study of four cases of surgically proven intestinal perforation by a foreign body, comparing the computed tomography findings with those described in the literature. Results None of the patients reported having ingested a foreign body, all were over 60 years of age, three of the four patients used a dental prosthesis, and all of the foreign bodies were elongated and sharp. In all four patients, there were findings indicative of acute abdomen. None of the foreign bodies were identified on conventional X-rays. The computed tomography findings suggestive of perforation were thickening of the intestinal walls (in all four cases), increased density of mesenteric fat (in all four cases), identification of the foreign body passing through the intestinal wall (in three cases), and gas in the peritoneal cavity (in one case). Conclusion In cases of foreign body ingestion, intestinal perforation is more common when the foreign body is elongated and sharp. Although patients typically do not report having ingested such foreign bodies, the scenario should be suspected in elderly individuals who use dental prostheses. A computed tomography scan can detect foreign bodies, locate perforations, and guide treatment. The findings that suggest perforation are thickening of the intestinal walls, increased mesenteric fat density, and, less frequently, gas in the peritoneal cavity, often restricted to the point of perforation. PMID:27818542

  13. Intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolodi, Gabriel Cleve; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda F.S.; Castro, Francisco Gomes de; Miller, Wagner Peitl; Lima, Raphael Rodrigues de; Tazima, Leandro; Geraldo, Jamylle

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the computed tomography findings suggestive of intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of four cases of surgically proven intestinal perforation by a foreign body, comparing the computed tomography findings with those described in the literature. Results: None of the patients reported having ingested a foreign body, all were over 60 years of age, three of the four patients used a dental prosthesis, and all of the foreign bodies were elongated and sharp. In all four patients, there were findings indicative of acute abdomen. None of the foreign bodies were identified on conventional X-rays. The computed tomography findings suggestive of perforation were thickening of the intestinal walls (in all four cases), increased density of mesenteric fat (in all four cases), identification of the foreign body passing through the intestinal wall (in three cases), and gas in the peritoneal cavity (in one case). Conclusion: In cases of foreign body ingestion, intestinal perforation is more common when the foreign body is elongated and sharp. Although patients typically do not report having ingested such foreign bodies, the scenario should be suspected in elderly individuals who use dental prostheses. A computed tomography scan can detect foreign bodies, locate perforations, and guide treatment. The findings that suggest perforation are thickening of the intestinal walls, increased mesenteric fat density, and, less frequently, gas in the peritoneal cavity, often restricted to the point of perforation. (author)

  14. Intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolodi, Gabriel Cleve; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda F S; de Castro, Francisco Gomes; Miller, Wagner Peitl; de Lima, Raphael Rodrigues; Tazima, Leandro; Geraldo, Jamylle

    2016-01-01

    To identify the computed tomography findings suggestive of intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body. This was a retrospective study of four cases of surgically proven intestinal perforation by a foreign body, comparing the computed tomography findings with those described in the literature. None of the patients reported having ingested a foreign body, all were over 60 years of age, three of the four patients used a dental prosthesis, and all of the foreign bodies were elongated and sharp. In all four patients, there were findings indicative of acute abdomen. None of the foreign bodies were identified on conventional X-rays. The computed tomography findings suggestive of perforation were thickening of the intestinal walls (in all four cases), increased density of mesenteric fat (in all four cases), identification of the foreign body passing through the intestinal wall (in three cases), and gas in the peritoneal cavity (in one case). In cases of foreign body ingestion, intestinal perforation is more common when the foreign body is elongated and sharp. Although patients typically do not report having ingested such foreign bodies, the scenario should be suspected in elderly individuals who use dental prostheses. A computed tomography scan can detect foreign bodies, locate perforations, and guide treatment. The findings that suggest perforation are thickening of the intestinal walls, increased mesenteric fat density, and, less frequently, gas in the peritoneal cavity, often restricted to the point of perforation.

  15. Intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolodi, Gabriel Cleve; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda F.S.; Castro, Francisco Gomes de; Miller, Wagner Peitl; Lima, Raphael Rodrigues de; Tazima, Leandro; Geraldo, Jamylle, E-mail: gabrielnicolodi@gmail.com [Hospital Sao Vicente - Funef, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Objective: To identify the computed tomography findings suggestive of intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of four cases of surgically proven intestinal perforation by a foreign body, comparing the computed tomography findings with those described in the literature. Results: None of the patients reported having ingested a foreign body, all were over 60 years of age, three of the four patients used a dental prosthesis, and all of the foreign bodies were elongated and sharp. In all four patients, there were findings indicative of acute abdomen. None of the foreign bodies were identified on conventional X-rays. The computed tomography findings suggestive of perforation were thickening of the intestinal walls (in all four cases), increased density of mesenteric fat (in all four cases), identification of the foreign body passing through the intestinal wall (in three cases), and gas in the peritoneal cavity (in one case). Conclusion: In cases of foreign body ingestion, intestinal perforation is more common when the foreign body is elongated and sharp. Although patients typically do not report having ingested such foreign bodies, the scenario should be suspected in elderly individuals who use dental prostheses. A computed tomography scan can detect foreign bodies, locate perforations, and guide treatment. The findings that suggest perforation are thickening of the intestinal walls, increased mesenteric fat density, and, less frequently, gas in the peritoneal cavity, often restricted to the point of perforation. (author)

  16. Intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Cleve Nicolodi

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To identify the computed tomography findings suggestive of intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of four cases of surgically proven intestinal perforation by a foreign body, comparing the computed tomography findings with those described in the literature. Results: None of the patients reported having ingested a foreign body, all were over 60 years of age, three of the four patients used a dental prosthesis, and all of the foreign bodies were elongated and sharp. In all four patients, there were findings indicative of acute abdomen. None of the foreign bodies were identified on conventional X-rays. The computed tomography findings suggestive of perforation were thickening of the intestinal walls (in all four cases, increased density of mesenteric fat (in all four cases, identification of the foreign body passing through the intestinal wall (in three cases, and gas in the peritoneal cavity (in one case. Conclusion: In cases of foreign body ingestion, intestinal perforation is more common when the foreign body is elongated and sharp. Although patients typically do not report having ingested such foreign bodies, the scenario should be suspected in elderly individuals who use dental prostheses. A computed tomography scan can detect foreign bodies, locate perforations, and guide treatment. The findings that suggest perforation are thickening of the intestinal walls, increased mesenteric fat density, and, less frequently, gas in the peritoneal cavity, often restricted to the point of perforation.

  17. Respiratory distress and chest pain: a perforated peptic ulcer with an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, David I; Gustafson, Corey

    2011-06-22

    Dyspnea and chest pain are common presenting complaints to the ED, and coupled together can present a challenging diagnostic dilemma in patients in extremis. A thoughtful evaluation is required, giving due diligence to the immediate life threats as well as multiple etiologies which can cause serious morbidity. A perforated peptic ulcer is one such possibility and requires rapid diagnosis and prompt intervention to avoid the associated high risk of morbidity and mortality. We present a case report of a 54 year old man with respiratory distress and chest pain as the initial Emergency Department presentation of a perforated duodenal ulcer. We discuss an unusual presentation of a perforated duodenal ulcer that was recognized in the emergency department and treated promptly. The patient was surgically treated immediately, had a prolonged and complicated post-operative course, but is ultimately doing well. We also provide a brief literature review of the risk factors, imaging choices, and management decision required to treat a perforated ulcer. Perforated ulcers can have highly varied presentations and are occasionally difficult to diagnose in a complicated patient. Knowledge of the risk factors and a thorough history and physical can point to the diagnosis, but timely and appropriate imaging is often required because delays in diagnosis and treatment lead to poor outcomes. Early administration of antibiotics and immediate surgical repair are necessary to limit morbidity and mortality.

  18. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface MM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Megan M Boniface,1 Sachin B Wani,2 Tracey E Schefter,3 Phillip J Koo,4 Cheryl Meguid,1 Stephen Leong,5 Jeffrey B Kaplan,6 Lisa J Wingrove,7 Martin D McCarter1 1Section of Surgical Oncology, Division of GI, Tumor and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Therapeutic and Interventional Endoscopy, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, 4Division of Radiology-Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, 5Division of Medical Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Denver, 7Department of Food and Nutrition Services, University of Colorado Hospital Cancer Center, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical, and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Keywords: tumor board, upper gastrointestinal malignancies, patient centered

  19. Colorectal cancer with intestinal perforation - a retrospective analysis of treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Woda, Łukasz; Tojek, Krzysztof; Jarmocik, Paweł; Jawień, Arkadiusz

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading cause of death in European population. It progresses without any symptoms in the early stages or those clinical symptoms are very discrete. The aim of this study was a retrospective analysis of treatment outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer complicated with intestinal perforation. A retrospective analysis of patients urgently operated upon in our Division of General Surgery, because of large intestine perforation, from February 1993 to February 2013 has been made. Results were compared with a group of patients undergoing the elective surgery for colorectal cancer in the same time and Division. Intestinal perforation occurred more often in males (6.52% vs. 6.03%), patients with mucous component in histopathological examination (9.09% vs. 6.01%) and with clinicaly advanced CRC. Patients treated because of perforation had a five-fold higher 30 day mortality rate (9.09% vs. 1.83%), however long-term survival did not differ significantly in both groups. After resectional surgery in 874 patients an intestinal anastomosis was made. Anastomotic leakage was present in 23 (2.6%) patients. This complication occurred six-fold more frequently in a group of patients operated upon because of intestinal perforation (12.20% vs. 2.16%). In patients with CRC complicated with perforation of the colon in a 30-day observation significantly higher rate of complications and mortality was shown, whereas there was no difference in distant survival rates.

  20. Early appendectomy shortens antibiotic course and hospital stay in children with early perforated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yu; Chao, Hsun-Chin; Yu, Wan-Ju

    2017-10-01

    The optimal management of perforated appendicitis in the pediatric population has been controversial. This study aimed to compare the therapeutic efficacy between conservative treatment (CS) and early appendectomy (EA) in pediatric perforated appendicitis, and to determine whether surgical intervention is an optimal treatment modality for early perforated appendicitis in children. Patients treated between January 2012 and April 2014, aged 0-18 years, with an imaging-based diagnosis of perforated appendicitis were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified into nonabscess and abscess groups by image findings, and were further categorized into CS and EA groups by treatment modality. Early perforated appendicitis was defined as having duration of symptoms≤7 days, C-reactive protein level≤200 mg/L, maximum abscess diameter≤5 cm, and absence of general peritonitis, and unstable vital signs. The clinical features and therapeutic outcomes were compared between CS and EA in each group. A total of 326 patients had confirmed appendicitis, including 116 patients with an image diagnosis of perforation. The CS group had a significantly longer duration of symptoms, larger abscesses, and higher serum C-reactive protein levels at presentation (all pappendicitis, the CS and EA groups showed no difference in baseline disease severity. Patients in the EA group also had a shorter antibiotic course and length of hospitalization than those in the CS group (pappendicitis, even in the presence of small abscesses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Endoscope-assisted laparoscopic repair of perforated peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Hua; Chang, Hung-Chi; Lo, Chong-Jeh

    2004-04-01

    Laparoscopic repairs for perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) are likely to fail in patients with shock, gastric outlet obstruction, or large perforations. This prospective study was performed to evaluate a revised approach of laparoscopic repair with endoscopic assistance to treat these patients. Between April 2001 and February 2002, 30 consecutive patients with PPU were enrolled in this study. The mean age was 43.1 +/- 12.2 years. Male to female ratio was 27:2. One patient was excluded from laparoscopic repair due to a gastric outlet obstruction. The other 29 patients were managed according to a protocol of preoperative upper endoscopy and laparoscopic intracorporeal suture repair with an omental patch. The average operative time was 58.1 +/- 13.5 minutes (range, 36-96 min). The average diameter of perforation was 4.2 +/- 2.0 mm (range, 1-12 mm). The average time to resume oral fluids was 3.2 +/- 0.8 days (range, 2-8 days). The average hospital stay was 4.7 +/- 1.1 days (range, 3-10 days). There was no leakage or mortality. Most patients did not receive parenteral analgesics postoperatively. We conclude that endoscope-assisted laparoscopic repair for PPU is safe and effective. This revised technique allows surgeons to exclude patients who are likely to fail the laparoscopic repair.

  2. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Yook; Choi, Woo Suk; Nam, Kyung Jin; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    The authors performed 27 fluoroscopically guided balloon dilatation in 12 patients of esophageal stricture during recent 3 years. The causes of esophageal stricture were corrosive esophagitis (N=2) and congenital narrowing (N=1), including postoperative narrowing in achalasia (N=3), esophageal varix (N=3), lye stricture (N=2) and esophageal cancer (N=1). Successful dilatation of the stricture was achieved during the procedure in 10 patients(83%). Major complication such as esophageal rupture was not found. The authors conclude that fluoroscopically guided esophageal balloon dilatation is a safe and effective method for treatment of symptomatic esophageal strictures.

  3. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Yook; Choi, Woo Suk; Nam, Kyung Jin; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1990-01-01

    The authors performed 27 fluoroscopically guided balloon dilatation in 12 patients of esophageal stricture during recent 3 years. The causes of esophageal stricture were corrosive esophagitis (N=2) and congenital narrowing (N=1), including postoperative narrowing in achalasia (N=3), esophageal varix (N=3), lye stricture (N=2) and esophageal cancer (N=1). Successful dilatation of the stricture was achieved during the procedure in 10 patients(83%). Major complication such as esophageal rupture was not found. The authors conclude that fluoroscopically guided esophageal balloon dilatation is a safe and effective method for treatment of symptomatic esophageal strictures

  4. [Impact of postoperative pathological features of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma on the prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Yin; Sun, Haibo; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Zongfei; Chen, Xiankai

    2017-12-25

    Esophageal cancer is located in the 8th position of the incidence of malignant tumors and the 6th most common cause of cancer-related mortality in the world, while China has the highest incidence and mortality of esophageal cancer. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the predominant histologic type of esophageal cancer in China, accounts for about 90%. Despite recent improvement of surgical techniques and philosophy, however, the prognosis of ESCC patients treated with surgery is still poor, and 5-year survival remains unsatisfactorily low. So far, the pathogenesis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is still unclear, and effective prevention is also out of the question. To find the main factors affecting the prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and to improve the survival of patients, are the main directions of all scholars. Postoperative pathology of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is considered to be one of the most important predictors of prognosis. Currently, the evaluation of postoperative esophageal prognosis mainly depends on TNM staging, but some criteria of its specific content and staging remains controversial. In this paper recent domestic and foreign related researches and clinical trials reports are collected, and the postoperative pathological features affecting esophageal squamous cell carcinoma prognosis were reviewed.

  5. Surgical therapies for corneal perforations: 10 years of cases in a tertiary referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokogawa H

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hideaki Yokogawa, Akira Kobayashi, Natsuko Yamazaki, Toshinori Masaki, Kazuhisa Sugiyama Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, JapanPurpose: To report surgical therapies for corneal perforations in a tertiary referral hospital.Methods: Thirty-one eyes of 31 patients (aged 62.4±18.3 years with surgically treated corneal perforations from January 2002 to July 2013 were included in this study. Demographic data such as cause of corneal perforation, surgical procedures, and visual outcomes were retrospectively analyzed.Results: The causes of corneal perforation (n=31 were divided into infectious (n=8, 26% and noninfectious (n=23, 74% categories. Infectious causes included fungal ulcer, herpetic stromal necrotizing keratitis, and bacterial ulcer. The causes of noninfectious keratopathy included corneal melting after removal of a metal foreign body, severe dry eye, lagophthalmos, canaliculitis, the oral anticancer drug S-1, keratoconus, rheumatoid arthritis, neurotrophic ulcer, atopic keratoconjunctivitis, and unknown causes. Initial surgical procedures included central large corneal graft (n=17, small corneal graft (n=7, and amniotic membrane transplantation (n=7. In two cases the perforation could not be sealed during the first surgical treatment and required subsequent procedures. All infectious keratitis required central large penetrating keratoplasty to obtain anatomical cure. In contrast, several surgical options were used for the treatment of noninfectious keratitis. After surgical treatment, anatomical cure was obtained in all cases. Mean postoperative best corrected visual acuity was better at 6 months (logMAR 1.3 than preoperatively (logMAR 1.8.Conclusion: Surgical therapies for corneal perforations in our hospital included central large lamellar/penetrating keratoplasty, small peripheral patch graft, and amniotic membrane transplantation. All treatments were effective. Corneal

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell-laden hybrid scaffold for regenerating subacute tympanic membrane perforation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Chul Ho, E-mail: chulsavio@hanmail.net [Department of Otolaryngology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, SeungHyun [Department of Biomechatronic Engineering, College of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Whi; Lee, Byeong Ha [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyeongjin [Department of Biomechatronic Engineering, College of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, GeunHyung, E-mail: gkimbme@skku.edu [Department of Biomechatronic Engineering, College of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-01

    Tympanic membrane (TM) perforation is one of the most common otology complications. To date, there has not been reported TM regeneration using bioprinted scaffold. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of bioprinted polycaprolactone/collagen/alginate-mesenchymal stem cell (PCAMSC) scaffolds for the regeneration of subacute TM perforation. Sprague-Dawley rats were used in an animal model of subacute TM perforation. In the experimental group (n = 7), bioprinted 3D PCAMSC scaffold was placed on the perforation. The control group (n = 7) were treated with polycaprolactone/collagen/alginate (PCA) scaffold. Healing time, acoustic-mechanical properties, and morphological analysis were performed by otoendoscopy, auditory brainstem response (ABR), single-point laser doppler vibrometer (LDV), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and light microscopic evaluation. The closure of the TM perforation was achieved in 100% of the experimental group vs. 72% of the control group, and this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The ABR threshold at all frequencies of the experimental group was recovered to the normal level compared to the control group. TM vibration velocity in the experimental group recovered similar to the normal control level. The difference are very small and they are not statistically significant below 1 kHz (p = 0.074). By OCT and light microscopic examination, regenerated TM of the experimental group showed thickened fibrous and mucosal layer. In contrast, the control group showed well regenerated but less thickened than experimental group. From these results, the cell-laden PCAMSC scaffold offers a significant advantage in the TM regeneration in a rat subacute TM perforation model. It may offer attractive opportunities in the conservative clinical treatment. - Highlights: • MSCs-laden scaffold was fabricated using a centrifugal spinning and cell-printing process. • The cell-laden scaffold showed the outstanding

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell-laden hybrid scaffold for regenerating subacute tympanic membrane perforation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Chul Ho; Ahn, SeungHyun; Lee, Jae Whi; Lee, Byeong Ha; Lee, Hyeongjin; Kim, GeunHyung

    2017-01-01

    Tympanic membrane (TM) perforation is one of the most common otology complications. To date, there has not been reported TM regeneration using bioprinted scaffold. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of bioprinted polycaprolactone/collagen/alginate-mesenchymal stem cell (PCAMSC) scaffolds for the regeneration of subacute TM perforation. Sprague-Dawley rats were used in an animal model of subacute TM perforation. In the experimental group (n = 7), bioprinted 3D PCAMSC scaffold was placed on the perforation. The control group (n = 7) were treated with polycaprolactone/collagen/alginate (PCA) scaffold. Healing time, acoustic-mechanical properties, and morphological analysis were performed by otoendoscopy, auditory brainstem response (ABR), single-point laser doppler vibrometer (LDV), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and light microscopic evaluation. The closure of the TM perforation was achieved in 100% of the experimental group vs. 72% of the control group, and this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The ABR threshold at all frequencies of the experimental group was recovered to the normal level compared to the control group. TM vibration velocity in the experimental group recovered similar to the normal control level. The difference are very small and they are not statistically significant below 1 kHz (p = 0.074). By OCT and light microscopic examination, regenerated TM of the experimental group showed thickened fibrous and mucosal layer. In contrast, the control group showed well regenerated but less thickened than experimental group. From these results, the cell-laden PCAMSC scaffold offers a significant advantage in the TM regeneration in a rat subacute TM perforation model. It may offer attractive opportunities in the conservative clinical treatment. - Highlights: • MSCs-laden scaffold was fabricated using a centrifugal spinning and cell-printing process. • The cell-laden scaffold showed the outstanding

  8. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-01-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression

  9. Nasal Septum Perforation due to Methamphetamine abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bakhshaee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spontaneous Perforation of the nasal septum is an uncommon condition. Nasal inhalation of substances such as cocaine has long been linked to this Perforation. Case Report: This report describes the case of a 46-year-old woman who was addicted to methamphetamine and who presented with perforation of the nasal septum.This is the first reported case of nasal septal necrosis linked to nasal inhalation of methamphetamine. Conclusions: Patient history and assurance regardingillegal drug consumption and abuse is a key point for fast and accurate diagnosis. The pathophysiology of drug-induced sinunasal disease and a review of the literature are also presented.

  10. Ileal perforation induced by acute radiation injury under gefitinib treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraoka, Takayuki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    Enteritis is one of the side effects of radiotherapy to the abdominal cavity. Radiation enteritis involves damage to mucous membranes in the acute phase and to stromal tissues in the late phase. Perforation of the intestine tends to occur in the late phase, and rarely in the acute phase. However, we describe here a case of intestinal perforation occurring in the acute phase after irradiation in a patient who received gefitinib treatment. Gefitinib, one of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), is widely used to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, but is simultaneously known to inhibit wound healing. We suspect that gefitinib may affect regeneration of the small intestinal mucosa injured by irradiation. A 76-year-old woman had NSCLC with metastases to the 5th lumbar, sacral, and right iliac bones. To control the pain from bone metastasis, anterior-posterior opposing portal irradiation (total 35 Gy) was started, and was completed over 22 days. On day 25 after starting radiotherapy, the patient began to take gefitinib. On day 35, she presented with acute peritonitis, and an emergency laparotomy was performed. The terminal ileum was affected by radiation enteritis and there were two pin-hole perforations. In the surgical specimen, no cancerous lesions were detected, and immunohistochemical staining of phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR) was negative. pEGFR has an important role in mucous membrane repair after irradiation. Intestinal perforation in the acute phase of radiation enteritis may be associated with impaired mucosal repair mechanisms due to the use of an EGFR-TKI such as gefitinib, as evidenced by the absence of pEGFR. (author)

  11. Spectrum of perforation peritonitis in delhi: 77 cases experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dinesh; Garg, Puneet K

    2013-04-01

    Perforation peritonitis is the most common surgical emergency encountered by surgeons all over the world as well in India. The spectrum of etiology of perforation peritonitis in tropical countries continues to differ from its western counterpart. This study was conducted at Hindu Rao Hospital, Municipal Corporation of Delhi, New Delhi, India, designed to highlight the spectrum of perforation peritonitis in the eastern countries and to improve its outcome. This prospective study included 77 consecutive patients of perforation peritonitis studied in terms of clinical presentations, causes, site of perforation, surgical treatment, postoperative complications, and mortality at Hindu Rao Hospital, Delhi, from March 1, 2011 to December 1, 2011, over a period of 8 months. All patients were resuscitated and underwent emergency exploratory laparotomy. On laparotomy cause of perforation peritonitis was found and controlled. The most common cause of perforation peritonitis noticed in our series was perforated duodenal ulcer (26.4 %) and ileal typhoid perforation (26.4 %), each followed by small bowel tuberculosis (10.3 %) and stomach perforation (9.2 %), perforation due to acute appendicitis (5 %). The highest number of perforations was seen in ileum (39.1 %), duodenum (26.4 %), stomach (11.5 %), appendix (3.5 %), jejunum (4.6 %), and colon (3.5 %). Overall mortality was 13 %. The spectrum of perforation peritonitis in India continuously differs from western countries. The highest number of perforations was noticed in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract as compared to the western countries where the perforations seen mostly in the distal part. The most common cause of perforation peritonitis was perforated duodenal ulcer and small bowel typhoid perforation followed by typhoid perforation. Large bowel perforations and malignant perforations were least common in our setup.

  12. The use of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF-Endoret) in the treatment of a severe mal perforant ulcer in the foot of a person with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcajo, Beatriz; Muruzabal, Francisco; Isasmendi, María Concepción; Gutierrez, Nerea; Sánchez, Mikel; Orive, Gorka; Anitua, Eduardo

    2011-08-01

    A 71 year old person with diabetes with a severe mal perforant ulcer in the right foot was treated twice with autologous plasma-rich in growth factors (PRGF) obtained from her own blood. After PRGF treatment the severe mal perforant ulcer completely healed in 10 weeks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Two cases of esophageal eosinophilia: eosinophilic esophagitis or gastro-esophageal reflux disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE and gastro-esophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE. Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders. In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts.

  14. Salmonella intestinal perforation: (27 perforations in one patient, 14 perforations in another Are the goal posts changing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeniran J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathology of salmonellosis after a faeco-oral transmission was first clearly described by Jenner in 1850. Over the years, the pathological manifestations in different tissues of the body have been described. The ileum is however mostly involved leading to enlarged Peyer′s patches, ulceration, and sometimes bleeding and perforation. Efforts at control have largely been improvement in public water supply, safe disposal of waste, and general public health measures. Despite these measures, intestinal perforation from salmonellosis remains the commonest cause of emergency operation in children above 3 years. The incidence continues to rise, so also the mortality, despite new antibiotics and improvement in facilities in the hospitals. Even more disturbing is that we now see more perforations per patient, and more involvement of the colon. Three recently managed patients with multiple ileal/colonic perforations were reviewed. Presenting problems, delay in referral, choice of antibiotics and postoperative complications were noted. One patient had 27 perforations and another 14 perforations. Both survived. Is salmonella changing? Are our patients changing? Is the environment changing? Are the goal posts changing? This article details our recent experience with this dreadful disease, reviews the new literature and makes suggestions for the way forwards.

  15. Self-expandable metallic stents for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Boku, Narikazu; Yoshida, Shigeaki [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East; Miyata, Yoshinori; Shioyama, Yasukazu

    2001-06-01

    Recent advances in chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma have resulted in improved survival rates. However, there are few options for recurrent dysphagia due to refractory carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma where definitive chemoradiotherapy has failed. Thirteen consecutive patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, in whom self-expandable metallic stents were placed after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy, were studied retrospectively. All patients had esophageal obstruction or malignant fistula. The oral alimentation status of nine of 13 patients (69%) improved after successful placement of the stent. Following placement of the stent, fever (>38 deg C) and severe chest pain occurred in 85% (11/13) of the patients. In all patients examined, C-reactive protein was elevated within 1 week of the operation. Esophageal perforation occurred in three patients. Stent-related mediastinitis and pneumonia developed in six (46%) and three (23%) patients, respectively. Seven of the 13 patients (54%) died of stent-related pulmonary complications. Although the placement of a self-expandable metallic stent for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of chemoradiotherapy improved their oral alimentation status, we found that this treatment increases the risk of life-threatening pulmonary complications. (author)

  16. Self-expandable metallic stents for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Boku, Narikazu; Yoshida, Shigeaki; Miyata, Yoshinori; Shioyama, Yasukazu

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma have resulted in improved survival rates. However, there are few options for recurrent dysphagia due to refractory carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma where definitive chemoradiotherapy has failed. Thirteen consecutive patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, in whom self-expandable metallic stents were placed after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy, were studied retrospectively. All patients had esophageal obstruction or malignant fistula. The oral alimentation status of nine of 13 patients (69%) improved after successful placement of the stent. Following placement of the stent, fever (>38 deg C) and severe chest pain occurred in 85% (11/13) of the patients. In all patients examined, C-reactive protein was elevated within 1 week of the operation. Esophageal perforation occurred in three patients. Stent-related mediastinitis and pneumonia developed in six (46%) and three (23%) patients, respectively. Seven of the 13 patients (54%) died of stent-related pulmonary complications. Although the placement of a self-expandable metallic stent for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of chemoradiotherapy improved their oral alimentation status, we found that this treatment increases the risk of life-threatening pulmonary complications. (author)

  17. Acute Abdomen Secondary to a Spontaneous Perforation of the Biliary Tract, a Rare Complication of Choledocholithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Gómez-Torres

    Full Text Available Introduction: The spontaneous perforation of the biliary tract (SPBT is an extremely rare cause of peritonitis, which was first described by Freeland in 1982, to date only around 70 cases have been reported. Here we present a case of spontaneous perforation of the biliary tract, in a patient with choledocholithiasis, which was treated with ultrasound-guided drainage and ERCP. Case report: A 51-year-old male was admitted to the emergency room for 15-day evolution jaundice, localized pain in the right flank and hypochondrium of 3 days. He had a history of cholecystectomy 15 years ago and 4 episodes of cholangitis, the last one in 2015. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed, that showed evidence of choledocholithiasis, in addition to a possible biliary leakage. The patient was treated with ultrasound-guided drainage and ERCP successfully. Discussion: Spontaneous perforation of the biliary tract is a disease entity in which wall of the extrahepatic or intrahepatic duct is perforated without any traumatic or iatrogenic injury. The clinical presentation varies from nonspecific abdominal pain to biliary peritonitis, in most of the cases forming bilomas. Universal management involves decompression of the biliary tree and repair of the leak site. Conclusion: The spontaneous perforation of the biliary tract is a disease that represents a diagnostic challenge. The treatment in the patients with SPBT is not well established and has to be individualized for each case, depending on the history of the patient, the site of perforation, the time of evolution, the suspicion of infection, and the patient status. Keywords: Acute abdomen, Spontaneous perforation biliary tract, Biloma, Complication choledocholithiasis, Case report

  18. Spontaneous neonatal gastrointestinal perforation: surgical or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... cases of spontaneous gastrointestinal perforation in neonates at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City. The perinatal stress factors were caesarian delivery, prematurity and fetal distress due to prolonged obstructed labour.

  19. Perforated peptic ulcer: How to improve outcome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Adamsen, Sven; Wøjdemann, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Despite the introduction of histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists, proton-pump inhibitors and the discovery of Helicobacter pylori, both the incidence of emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer and the mortality rate for patients undergoing surgery for peptic ulcer perforation have increased...... with an emphasis on risks that are preventable. A systematic review including randomized studies was carried out. There are a limited number of studies of patients with peptic ulcer perforation. Most of these studies are of low evidential status. Only a few randomized, controlled trials have been published...... to improve the outcome of patients with peptic ulcer perforation, sepsis needs to be factored into the existing knowledge and treatment Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/27...

  20. Diagnosis and management of iatrogenic endoscopic perforations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paspatis, Gregorios A; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Barthet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This Position Paper is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the diagnosis and management of iatrogenic perforation occurring during diagnostic or therapeutic digestive endoscopic procedures. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends that ea...

  1. Doxycycline induced Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Karakus Yilmaz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis is a hazardous condition such as acid reflux of esophageal mucosa, infection, systemic diseases, radiation, drugs and trauma. Drug- induced esophagial injury (DIEI is a disease with the use of variety of drugs that caused serious damage and ulcer in the mucosa of the esophagus. The most commonly implicated drugs are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, chloride and especially antibiotics. Thirty-six year-old female patient presented to the emergency department with odynophagia during swallowing and complaining of retrosternal pain. One week before 100 mg doxycycline (2x1 PO for therapeutic abortion were prescribed. It was learned that in the third day of the initiation of medication, the patient\\'s symptoms began and stopped using drug by the fourth day due to advers effect of drugs, but her symptoms didn’t regressed although she didn’t use them. Endoscopy appointment was taken, proton pump inhibitor and antiacid treatment was given, than patient was discharged from the emergency department. In the endoscopy, 20 mm segment esophageal ulcer was seen approximately in the 30.th cm of the esophagius. DIEI is a relatively common, although under-recognized, so this case was presented for remainding DIEI to emergency medicine personals and reweiving its diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

  2. Current management of peptic ulcer perforations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menakuru, S.R.

    2004-01-01

    Perforation is a life-threatening complication of peptic ulcer disease. Smoking and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are important risk factors for perforation. Diagnosis is made clinically and confirmed by the presence of pneumoperitoneum on radiographs. Nonoperative management is successful in patients identified to have a spontaneously sealed perforation proven by water-soluble contrast gastroduodenogram. Operative management consists of the time-honoured practice of mental patch closure, but now this can be done by laparoscopic methods. The practice of addition of acid-reducing procedures is currently being debated though it continues to be recommended in good-risk patients. Laparoscopic approaches to closure of duodenal perforation are now being applied widely and may become the gold standard in the future especially in patients with < 10 mm perforation size presenting within the first 24 hours of onset of pain. The role of Helicobacter pylori in duodenal ulcer perforation is controversial and more studies are needed to answer this question though recent indirect evidence suggests that eradicating H pylori may reduce the necessity for adding acid reducing procedures and the associated morbidity. Perforation is a life-threatening complication of peptic ulcer disease. The management of peptic ulcer disease has evolved over the decades, due to advances in operative techniques, bacteriology and pharmacology. While the recognition of the role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in peptic ulceration has resulted in a paradigm shift in the management of uncomplicated peptic ulcers, debate continues about the appropriate management of perforated duodenal bulb and prepyloric ulcers. A new dimension has been added to this controversy by the advent of laparoscopic techniques for closing the perforation. A Medline search of all articles dealing with the management of peptic ulcer perforation published after 1985 was undertaken. The short listed articles were

  3. Perforated pyloroduodenal peptic ulcer and sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmich, Siarhei; Harvey, Chris J; Fascia, Daniel T M; Kuzmich, Tatsiana; Neriman, Deena; Basit, Rizwan; Tan, Kai Lee

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate the spectrum of sonographic findings in perforated pyloroduodenal peptic ulcer and discuss the potential role of sonography in the diagnosis. Although sonography is not the first-line investigation of choice in suspected perforated peptic ulcer, understanding of the characteristic appearances seen during general abdominal sonography may aid the reader in the diagnosis of this important and sometimes overlooked cause of nonspecific abdominal pain. This may shorten time to the diagnosis and ultimate surgical management.

  4. Frequency and Clinical Characteristics of Tympanic Membrane Perforation Outpatients at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital in 2011–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Ratih

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tympanic membrane perforation is a hearing problem that has become a health problem in the society. In Indonesia, there are only a few studies regarding tympanic membrane perforation. This study was aimed to observe the frequency and clinical characteristics of tympanic membrane perforation patients. Methods: This was a descriptive study performed from August to September 2014. The data was taken retrospectively from medical records of tympanic membrane perforation patients at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital from January 2011 to December 2013. Results: Of 579 tympanic perforation patients, there were only 214 medical records met the inclusion criteria. The frequency of tympanic membrane perforation patients increased in 2011 it was 28%, in 2013 it was 37.6%. The number of male patients (53.3% was higher than female patients’. Most patients were in productive age (83.2%. Most patients came with the chief complaint of discharge from ear (36.4% and the most common etiology was infection (84.1%. Otological examination showed that most patients had unilateral perforation (73.8%. Based on the size of perforation, central perforation (52.3% was the most common otological finding. From audiogram, most patients had conductive hearing loss (41.5% with moderate degree of hearing loss (30.4%. Most patients were treated by medications (64.5%. Conclusions: The frequency of tympanic membrane steadily increases with clinical characteristic mostly in male patients in productive age admitted with chieft complain of discharge of ear. The most common etiology is infection. Majority of patients have unilateral central perforation that cause conductive hearing lost.

  5. A rare case of familial reactive perforating collagenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4 year old boy presented with history of itchy raised lesions on body of 2 years duration. Though parental consanguinity was not present, his elder brother had similar complaints. Dermatological examination revealed multiple hyperpigmented papules with a central keratotic plug distributed mainly over face and extensors of upper and lower extremities. Koebnerisation was present. Skin biopsy revealed perforating collagen bundles in the upper dermis and epidermis which was confirmed by Van Gieson staining. Patient was being treated with topical retinoids and intralesional corticosteroids with minimal relief.

  6. Esophageal button battery ingestion in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şencan, Arzu; Genişol, İncinur; Hoşgör, Münevver

    2017-07-01

    Button battery lodged in the esophagus carries a high risk of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to present cases of patients with esophageal button battery ingestion treated at our clinic and to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and treatment. Records of patients admitted to our hospital for foreign body ingestion between January 2010 and May 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Cases with button battery lodged in the esophagus were included in the study. Patient data regarding age, sex, length of time after ingestion until admission, presenting clinical symptoms, type and localization of the battery, management, and prognosis were analyzed. Among 1891 foreign body ingestions, 71 were localized in the esophagus, and 8 of those (11.2%) were cases of button battery ingestion. Mean age was 1.7 years. Admission was within 6 hours of ingestion in 5 cases, after 24 hours had elapsed in 2, and 1 month after ingestion in 1 case. All patients but 1 knew the history of ingestion. Prompt endoscopic removal was performed for all patients. Three patients developed esophageal stricture, which responded to dilatation. Early recognition and timely endoscopic removal is mandatory in esophageal button battery ingestion. It should be suspected in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  7. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepanshu Jain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs. SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed.

  8. Fluoroscopic extraction of esophageal foreign body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chon, Su Bin; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Sohn, Myung Hee; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul; Song, Young Ho; Choi, Yeon Wha

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report our 5 year experience with fluoroscopic removal of blunt esophageal foreign body or impacted food in 15 consecutive patients who were referred by endoscopists because they couln't remove it endoscopically. The foreign body or impacted food was a piece of meat, a bean, a badug stone or a beef bone. Thirteen patients had underlying disease (11 of corrosive stricture, 2 of postopertive stricture) but 2 patient did not. We removed the object using one of the following 4 techniques: Basket extraction technique. Foley catheter technique, single balloon technique (dilatation of stenosis for passing the food into the stomach and for the treatment of the stricture as well), double balloon technique (removal of the foregin body by trapping it with two valvuloplasty balloons). Removal was successful in all patients. Esophageal performation occurred in one patient using the sibgle balloon technique, who treated nonoperatively by means of fasting, antibiotics and parenteral alimentation. No procedure related death occurred in these series. In conclusion, fliuroscopic removal of blunt esophageal foreign bodies of impacted food with various techniques is promising alternative to esophagoscopic removal

  9. The Role of Esophageal Hypersensitivity in Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Ruffle, James K; Aziz, Qasim

    2017-02-01

    The Rome IV diagnostic criteria delineates 5 functional esophageal disorders which include functional chest pain, functional heartburn, reflux hypersensitivity, globus, and functional dysphagia. These are a heterogenous group of disorders which, despite having characteristic symptom profiles attributable to esophageal pathology, fail to demonstrate any structural, motility or inflammatory abnormalities on standard clinical testing. These disorders are associated with a marked reduction in patient quality of life, not least considerable healthcare resources. Furthermore, the pathophysiology of these disorders is incompletely understood. In this narrative review we provide the reader with an introductory primer to the structure and function of esophageal perception, including nociception that forms the basis of the putative mechanisms that may give rise to symptoms in functional esophageal disorders. We also discuss the provocative techniques and outcome measures by which esophageal hypersensitivity can be established.

  10. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Mediastinal Tumors Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Pleural Diseases Mesothelioma Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Overview The esophagus (ĕ-sof´ah-gus) is the hollow, muscular tube that moves food and liquid from your mouth to your stomach. If the ...

  11. Esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzinger, M A; Daneman, A

    1983-02-01

    The radiologic appearance of esophageal involvement due to eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 15-year-old boy is presented. The lower two thirds of the esophagus was narrowed and the peristalsis diminished. The mucosa appeared smooth. This is the fourth reported case of esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

  12. Advances in esophageal motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, André Jpm

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. RECENT

  13. Advances in esophageal motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, Andre J. P. M.

    Purpose of review Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. Recent

  14. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G.

    2017-01-01

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esoph...

  15. Spectrum of perforation peritonitis in Pakistan: 300 cases Eastern experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ur-Rahman Shafiq

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perforation peritonitis is the most common surgical emergency encountered by the surgeons all over the world as well in Pakistan. The spectrum of etiology of perforation peritonitis in tropical countries continues to differ from its western counter part. This study was conducted at Dow University of health sciences and Civil Hospital Karachi (DUHS & CHK Pakistan, designed to highlight the spectrum of perforation peritonitis in the East and to improve its outcome. Methods A prospective study includes three hundred consecutive patients of perforation peritonitis studied in terms of clinical presentations, Causes, site of perforation, surgical treatment, post operative complications and mortality, at (DUHS&CHK Pakistan, from 1st September 2005 – 1st March 2008, over a period of two and half years. All patients were resuscitated underwent emergency exploratory laparotomy. On laparotomy cause of perforation peritonitis was found and controlled. Results The most common cause of perforation peritonitis noticed in our series was acid peptic disease 45%, perforated duodenal ulcer (43.6% and gastric ulcer 1.3%. followed by small bowel tuberculosis (21% and typhoid (17%. large bowel perforation due to tuberculosis 5%, malignancy 2.6% and volvulus 0.3%. Perforation due to acute appendicitis (5%. Highest number of perforations has seen in the duodenum 43.6%, ileum37.6%, and colon 8%, appendix 5%, jejunum 3.3%, and stomach 2.3%. Overall mortality was (10.6%. Conclusion The spectrum of perforation peritonitis in Pakistan continuously differs from western country. Highest number of perforations noticed in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract as compared to the western countries where the perforations seen mostly in the distal part. Most common cause of perforation peritonitis is perforated duodenal ulcer, followed by small bowel tuberculosis and typhoid perforation. Majority of the large bowel perforations are also tubercular

  16. Spectrum of perforation peritonitis in Pakistan: 300 cases Eastern experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Shahida Parveen; Malik, Faiza; Ur-Rahman, Shafiq; Shamim, Shahid; Samo, Khursheed A

    2008-11-08

    Perforation peritonitis is the most common surgical emergency encountered by the surgeons all over the world as well in Pakistan. The spectrum of etiology of perforation peritonitis in tropical countries continues to differ from its western counter part. This study was conducted at Dow University of health sciences and Civil Hospital Karachi (DUHS & CHK) Pakistan, designed to highlight the spectrum of perforation peritonitis in the East and to improve its outcome. A prospective study includes three hundred consecutive patients of perforation peritonitis studied in terms of clinical presentations, Causes, site of perforation, surgical treatment, post operative complications and mortality, at (DUHS&CHK) Pakistan, from 1st September 2005 - 1st March 2008, over a period of two and half years. All patients were resuscitated underwent emergency exploratory laparotomy. On laparotomy cause of perforation peritonitis was found and controlled. The most common cause of perforation peritonitis noticed in our series was acid peptic disease 45%, perforated duodenal ulcer (43.6%) and gastric ulcer 1.3%. followed by small bowel tuberculosis (21%) and typhoid (17%). large bowel perforation due to tuberculosis 5%, malignancy 2.6% and volvulus 0.3%. Perforation due to acute appendicitis (5%). Highest number of perforations has seen in the duodenum 43.6%, ileum37.6%, and colon 8%, appendix 5%, jejunum 3.3%, and stomach 2.3%. Overall mortality was (10.6%). The spectrum of perforation peritonitis in Pakistan continuously differs from western country. Highest number of perforations noticed in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract as compared to the western countries where the perforations seen mostly in the distal part. Most common cause of perforation peritonitis is perforated duodenal ulcer, followed by small bowel tuberculosis and typhoid perforation. Majority of the large bowel perforations are also tubercular. Malignant perforations are least common in our setup.

  17. Calcium Channel Blockers and Esophageal Sclerosis: Should We Expect Exacerbation of Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Seretis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal sclerosis is the most common visceral manifestation of systemic sclerosis, resulting in impaired esophageal clearance and retention of ingested food; in addition, co-existence of lung fibrosis with esophageal scleroderma is not uncommon. Both the progression of generalized connective tissue disorders and the damaging effect of chronic aspiration due to esophageal dysmotility appear to be involved in this procedure of interstitial fibrosis. Nifedipine is a widely prescribed calcium antagonist in a significant percentage of rheumatologic patients suffering from Raynaud syndrome, in order to inhibit peripheral vasospasm. Nevertheless, blocking calcium channels has proven to contribute to exacerbation of gastroesophageal reflux, which consequently can lead to chronic aspiration. We describe the case of severe exacerbation of interstitial lung disease in a 76-year-old female with esophageal sclerosis who was treated with oral nifedipine for Raynaud syndrome.

  18. Esophageal cancer; Cancer de l'oesophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, O.; Ganem, G.; Denis, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, clinique Victor-Hugo, 72 - Le Mans (France); Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y. [Clinique d' oncologie radiotherapie, Centre Henry S. Kaplan, CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Pradier, O. [Departement de radiotherapie, CHU de Morvan, 29 - Brest (France); Martin, P. [Centre Bourgogne, 59 - Lille (France); Mirabel, X. [Departement universitaire de radiotherapie, centre Oscar-Lambret, 59 - Lille (France)

    2010-07-01

    Esophageal cancers are highly malignant tumours with often a poor prognosis, except for minimal lesions treated with surgery. Radiation therapy, or combined radiation and chemotherapy is the most used therapeutic modality, alone or before oesophagectomy. The delineation of target volumes is now more accurate owing the possibility to use routinely the new imaging techniques (mainly PET). The aim of this work is to precise the radio-anatomical particularities, the pattern of spread of esophageal cancer and the principles of 3D conformal radiotherapy illustrated with a clinical case. (authors)

  19. Cytoprotective effects of hydrogen sulfide in novel rat models of non-erosive esophagitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Zayachkivska

    Full Text Available Non-erosive esophagitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the esophagus and is a form of gastroesophageal reflux disease. There are limited treatment options for non-erosive esophagitis, and it often progresses to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal carcinoma. Hydrogen sulfide has been demonstrated to be a critical mediator of gastric and intestinal mucosal protection and repair. However, roles for H2S in esophageal mucosal defence, inflammation and responses to injury have not been reported. We therefore examined the effects of endogenous and exogenous H2S in rat models of non-erosive esophagitis. Mild- and moderate-severity non-erosive esophagitis was induced in rats through supplementation of drinking water with fructose, plus or minus exposure to water-immersion stress. The effects of inhibitors of H2S synthesis or of an H2S donor on severity of esophagitis was then examined, along with changes in serum levels of a pro- and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-17 and IL-10, respectively. Exposure to water-immersion stress after consumption of the fructose-supplemented water for 28 days resulted in submucosal esophageal edema and neutrophil infiltration and the development of lesions in the muscular lamina and basal cell hyperplasia. Inhibition of H2S synthesis resulted in significant exacerbation of inflammation and injury. Serum levels of IL-17 were significantly elevated, while serum IL-10 levels were reduced. Treatment with an H2S donor significantly reduced the severity of esophageal injury and inflammation and normalized the serum cytokine levels. The rat models used in this study provide novel tools for studying non-erosive esophagitis with a range of severity. H2S contributes significantly to mucosal defence in the esophagus, and H2S donors may have therapeutic value in treating esophageal inflammation and injury.

  20. Differentiation of Acute Perforated from Non-Perforated Appendicitis: Usefulness of High-Resolution Ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Gyu Chang [Dept. of Radiology, Gumi Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of high-resolution ultrasonography (US) for the differentiation of acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis. The high-resolution US features in 96 patients (49 males, 47 females; mean age, 33.8 years; age range, 4-80 years) with pathologically proven acute appendicitis were evaluated. The following US findings were evaluated for differentiation of acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis: circumferential loss of the echogenic submucosal layer, periappendiceal fluid collection, disruption of the serosal layer, asymmetrical wall thickening, maximum overall diameter > 10.5 mm, and the presence of appendicoliths. The sensitivity and specificity of the US features in the diagnosis of acute perforated appendicitis were calculated. All of the US findings, except for appendicoliths, were significantly more common in the acute perforated appendicitis group (p < 0.001). The sensitivity of circumferential loss of the echogenic submucosal layer, periappendiceal fluid collection, disruption of the serosal layer, asymmetrical wall thickening, maximum overall diameter > 10.5 mm, and the presence of appendicoliths was 85.4, 73.2, 68.3, 70.7, 80.5, and 36.6%, respectively, while the specificity was 65.5, 89.1, 96.4, 98.2, 81.8, and 80.0%, respectively. High-resolution US was found to be useful for differentiating acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis.

  1. A newborn with duodenal atresia and a gastric perforation | Akçora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... postoperative day. This complicated disease can be treated by early diagnosis and surgical intervention. We choose one-stage operation because of the clean peritoneal cavity. However, generalized peritonitis may require two-stage operation in delayed cases. Key words: Duodenal atresia, gastric perforation, newborn ...

  2. Non-traumatic perforation of the small bowel | Eid | African Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... medical records of four patients who have presented with non-traumatic perforation of the small bowel and were treated at Al-Ain Hospital during the last 5 years were studied retrospectively. Results: The presenting symptoms of all patients were similar. Erect chest X-ray has shown free air under diaphragm in 3 patients.

  3. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G.; Kovanlikaya, Arzu; Askin, Gulce; Beneck, Debra M.

    2017-01-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  4. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G; Askin, Gulce; Beneck, Debra M; Kovanlikaya, Arzu

    2017-10-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  5. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G.; Kovanlikaya, Arzu [New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Division of Pediatric Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Askin, Gulce [Weill Cornell Medical College, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, New York, NY (United States); Beneck, Debra M. [New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-10-15

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  6. Esophageal scintigraphy: Applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, M.K.; Byrne, P.J.; Keeling, P.; Hennessy, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia, scleroderma, esophageal carcinoma, Barrett esophagus, and reflux esophagitis. We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery. (orig.)

  7. Esophageal scintigraphy: Applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, M.K.; Byrne, P.J.; Keeling, P.; Hennessy, T.P.

    1988-06-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia, scleroderma, esophageal carcinoma, Barrett esophagus, and reflux esophagitis. We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery.

  8. [Primary esophageal motility disorders; especially about esophageal achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Sakai, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders are classified primary and secondary, and primary esophageal motility disorders are classified esophageal achalasia and other diseases by manometry. An esophageal emptying disorder associated with insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and elimination of peristaltic waves on the esophageal body is the major abnormality of achalasia. Esophagogram, endoscopy, and manometry are used for diagnosis. As pharmacological therapy, administration of a calcium channel blocker or nitrate is useful. The pharmacological therapy is not recommended as long-term basic therapy but as a temporary treatment. At 1st, the balloon dilation method is chosen in treatment of achalasia Surgical treatment is indicated in the following cases: (1) Patients uneffected by balloon dilation, (2) Flask type with grade II to III dilation, and sigmoid type, (3) the gradual progression to the pathophysiological stage, (4) young patients, (5) complicated with esophageal cancer. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure is the most popular surgical procedure, recently. It is somewhat difficult to perform surgical treatment for this functional disease. We should select the most suitable individualized treatment with efficient comprehension of the pathophysiological situation.

  9. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and esophageal motor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joachim H; Küper, Markus A; Königsrainer, Alfred; Brücher, Björn L D M

    2010-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is caused by transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in healthy individuals and in most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Refluxate is normally propelled by pharyngeally induced swallowing events, but TLESRs may also be accompanied by retrograde esophageal motor responses (EMRs). These contractions have not previously been investigated and their effect on esophageal clearance is not known. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of EMRs after TLESR in healthy individuals and GERD patients and to develop an animal model for further investigation of EMRs. The frequency of TLESRs and esophageal body contractions after TLESRs was assessed using ambulatory manometry in five healthy individuals and five GERD patients. An animal model was developed for reproducible provocation of TLESRs and subsequent EMRs. Patients with GERD have significantly more TLESRs than healthy individuals. However, post-TLESR EMRs were not more frequent in the GERD group. All post-TLESR EMRs presented as simultaneous contractions of the esophagus. The feline model allowed reproducible initiation of the esophageal motor response after TLESR, showing that EMRs can be induced by external mechanoreceptor stimulation simultaneously with LES relaxation. This experimental design imitates the conditions after fundoplication in humans. The study demonstrated that GERD patients have significantly more TLESRs in comparison with healthy individuals, but these were only incidental to EMRs. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of esophageal motility disorders. The animal model presented offers a feasible tool for investigating TLESR-induced esophageal motility.

  10. The prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease and esophageal dysmotility in Chinese patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Hobson, Anthony Robert; Shang, Zhan Min; Pei, Yan Xiang; Gao, Yan; Wang, Jian Xin; Huang, Wan Nong

    2015-02-19

    The cause of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains unknown, yet gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is highly prevalent in this population. GERD prevalence was studied, and esophageal function tests (EFT) were assessed in Chinese IPF patients. We prospectively studied 69 IPF patients who undertook both stationary High Resolution esophageal Manometry/Impedance (HRiM) and 24-hour esophageal Multi-Channel Intraluminal Impedance with pH Recordings (MII/pH). Patients were divided into GERD+ and GERD- groups according to pH results. Controls were HRiM treated healthy volunteers, and patients without IPF received HRiM and MII/pH diagnosed with GERD. 69 IPF patients, 62 healthy volunteers, and 88 IPF negative GERD patients were selected. GERD prevalence in IPF was 43/69 (62.3%), and 58.1% of patients presented with at least one typical symptom. Symptoms had a sensitivity of 58.1%, a specificity of 61.6%, a positive predictive value of 71.4% and a negative predictive of 47.1%. Compared with healthy volunteers, IPF patients had significantly decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP), upper esophageal sphincter pressure (UESP) and complete bolus transit rate (CBTR). By contrast, IPF patients had increased total bolus transit time and prevalence of weak peristalsis. MII/pH showed that one third of IPF patients had abnormal distal and proximal reflux, especially non-acid reflux. Compared with GERD patients without IPF, GERD patients with IPF had significantly decreased CBTR and UESP with increased bolus exposure time. GERD prevalence in IPF was high, but symptoms alone were an unreliable predictor of reflux. IPF patients had lower LESP and UESP, impaired esophageal peristalsis and bolus clearance function with more proximal reflux events.

  11. Role of Esophageal Metal Stents Placement and Combination Therapy in Inoperable Esophageal Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Andrew; Lipka, Seth; Kumar, Ambuj; Sethi, Sajiv; Bromberg, David; Li, Nanxing; Shen, Huafeng; Stefaniwsky, Lilia; Brady, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    More than 50% of patients with esophageal cancer already have inoperable disease at the time of diagnosis. Controversy surrounds the outcomes of patients with advanced esophageal cancer who receive palliative care by either stent alone or stent plus an additional modality. We set out to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing the use of metal stents as treatment options for symptomatic improvement, survival, and adverse events. We searched Embase, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) from inception until January 14, 2016, as well as other databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing esophageal stent versus either esophageal stent plus brachytherapy, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy. For quality assurance purposes throughout the systematic review, multiple independent extractions were performed, and the process was executed as per the standards of the Cochrane collaboration. Primary outcomes were mean change in dysphagia score, overall survival, and quality of life. Secondary outcomes were adverse events including fever, severe pain, aspiration, fistula, stent migration, perforation, and restenosis. Eight RCTs enrolling 732 patients were included with three distinct comparisons: stents combination therapy vs stents alone (5 studies, n = 417), stents alone versus brachytherapy alone (2 studies, n = 274), and stents + brachytherapy vs brachytherapy alone (1 study, n = 41). Stents combination therapy was defined as stents plus radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or both. Mean change in dysphagia scores favored stents combination therapy versus stents alone, and the effect was seen in patients surviving longer than 3 months. Stents combination therapy was also associated with a more favorable overall survival. The risks of stent migration, aspiration pneumonia, and restenosis were lower in the stents combination group compared to stents alone, while the risks of severe pain, hemorrhage, and

  12. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis

  13. 18F-FDG PET-CT after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients to Optimize Surgical Decision Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderegg, Maarten C. J.; de Groof, Elisabeth J.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; Bennink, Roel J.; Lagarde, Sjoerd M.; Klinkenbijl, Jean H. G.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of esophageal cancer patients can be significantly improved by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT). Given the aggressive nature of esophageal tumors, it is conceivable that in a significant portion of patients treated with nCRT, dissemination already becomes manifest during the period of

  14. Imaging of Esophageal Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.; Lal, A.; Gulati, M.; Suri, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the various radiological abnormalities in patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis. Material and Methods: The case records of 23 patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis were evaluated retrospectively for various radiological abnormalities. Twenty-two patients had secondary involvement of esophagus in the form of direct extension of mediastinal and pulmonary tuberculosis or spinal tuberculosis. Only 1 patient had primary involvement of the esophagus with no evidence of disease elsewhere. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic and CT-guided biopsy/aspiration cytology in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Diagnosis was made on the basis of surgical biopsy of lymph node and autopsy in 1 patient each. In the remaining 8 patients the diagnosis was based on radiological and endoscopic findings and the response to antituberculous treatment. Results: Chest radiography (CXR) was abnormal in 65% patients. While the findings were non-conclusive for esophageal tuberculosis, characteristic lesions of tuberculosis in lungs or spine were suggestive of tuberculous etiology. In 15 patients, CT of the chest confirmed the corresponding CXR findings and also showed additional findings of mediastinal lymphadenopathy when CXR was normal. Fourteen patients showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy on CT of the chest. In all these patients, more than one group of lymph nodes was involved. The characteristic hypodense center of lymph nodes suggestive of tuberculosis was seen in 12 patients. Radiological abnormalities seen in barium swallow examination were extrinsic compression, traction diverticula, strictures, sinus/fistulous tracts, kinking and pseudotumor mass of esophagus in decreasing order of frequency. The middle third of the esophagus was found to be the most frequent site of involvement

  15. Silane surface modification for improved bioadhesion of esophageal stents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoy, Mert; Gultepe, Evin; Pandey, Shivendra; Khashab, Mouen A.; Gracias, David H.

    2014-08-01

    Stent migration occurs in 10-40% of patients who undergo placement of esophageal stents, with higher migration rates seen in those treated for benign esophageal disorders. This remains a major drawback of esophageal stent therapy. In this paper, we propose a new surface modification method to increase the adhesion between self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) and tissue while preserving their removability. Taking advantage of the well-known affinity between epoxide and amine terminated silane coupling agents with amine and carboxyl groups that are abundant in proteins and related molecules in the human body; we modified the surfaces of silicone coated esophageal SEMS with these adhesive self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). We utilized vapor phase silanization to modify the surfaces of different substrates including PDMS strips and SEMS, and measured the force required to slide these substrates on a tissue piece. Our results suggest that surface modification of esophageal SEMS via covalent attachment of protein-binding coupling agents improves adhesion to tissue and could offer a solution to reduce SEMS migration while preserving their removability.

  16. A Rare Case of Mycosis Fungoides in the Oral Cavity and Small Intestine Complicated by Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Arthur Emge

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Extracutaneous involvement in mycosis fungoides (MF carries a poor prognosis. Oral and gastrointestinal (GI tract lesions are both rare locations of disease. We describe the clinical findings of one case with oral and GI MF complicated by perforation after systemic antineoplastic treatment, and review the relevant literature. The patient had a 1-year history of MF before development of tongue and palate tumors. He was treated with local electron beam radiation, but re-presented to the hospital after what was found to be small intestine perforation following systemic antineoplastic therapy. The case reveals key insights into the progression and complications of lymphomas with GI tract involvement.

  17. Accuracy of clinical prediction rules in peptic ulcer perforation: an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buck, David Levarett; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Møller, Morten Hylander

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of four clinical prediction rules to predict adverse outcome in perforated peptic ulcer (PPU): the Boey score, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation...... and breastfeeding women, non-surgically treated patients, patients with malignant ulcers, and patients with perforation of other organs were excluded. Primary outcome measure: 30-day mortality rate. Statistical analysis: the ability of four clinical prediction rules to distinguish survivors from non...

  18. Cyclosporine in the Management of Esophageal Lichen Planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Chaklader

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus (LP is an uncommon disorder of unknown etiology, mostly affecting patients in their fifth and sixth decade of life. It is believed to be an autoimmune process involving T cells directed against basal keratinocytes. It affects the skin, nails, oral pharynx and genitals. Esophageal involvement is quite rare and can cause strictures, ulcerations and squamous cell cancer. The present article describes the case of a 54-year-old woman who was referred for assessment of dysphagia that initially occurred with solids, which then progressed to soft foods but spared liquids. The patient reported a weight loss of 9.1 kg. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed and she was subsequently diagnosed with pill esophagitis. At the same time, she was also diagnosed with oral LP, with no involvement of the esophagus. She was treated with a proton pump inhibitor that resolved her gastrointestinal symptoms. The symptoms returned one year later and a repeat esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed white plaques due to LP. She was treated with intermittent glucocorticoids. Diagnosis of esophageal LP is crucial for the proper treatment. Some patients may require systemic immunosuppression and mechanical dilation to prevent weight loss. Surveillance endoscopies should be performed to monitor for squamous cell cancer. Cyclosporine has been used for genital and oral LP, but the present case is the first in which it has been used successfully to treat esophageal LP.

  19. Root perforations treatment using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Neto, José Dias da; Brito, Rafael Horácio de; Schnaider, Taylor Brandão; Gragnani, Alfredo; Engelman, Mírian; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2010-12-01

    Clinical, radiological and histological evaluation of root perforations treated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or Portland cements, and calcium sulfate barrier. One molar and 11 premolar teeth of a male mongrel dog received endodontic treatment and furcations were perforated with a high-speed round bur and treated with a calcium sulfate barrier. MTA, Portland cement type II (PCII) and type V (PCV), and white Portland cement (WPC) were used as obturation materials. The teeth were restored with composite resin and periapical radiographs were taken. The animal was euthanized 120 days post-surgery for treatment evaluation. Right lower first premolar (MTA), right lower third premolar (PCV), left lower second premolar (MTA), and right lower second premolar (WPC): clinically normal, slightly radio-transparent area on the furcation, little inflammatory infiltrate, and new-bone formation. Left lower third premolar (PCII), right upper first premolar (WPC), right upper third premolar (PCII), and left upper first molar (PCV): clinically normal, radiopaque area on the furcation, and new-bone formation. Right upper second premolar (MTA), left upper second premolar (WPC), left upper third premolar (PCII): presence of furcation lesion, large radiolucent area, and intense inflammatory infiltrate. All obturation materials used in this study induced new-bone formation.

  20. Acquired perforating dermatosis in a patient with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Karen de Almeida Pinto; Lima, Lourenço de Azevedo; Guedes, Juliana Chaves Ruiz; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; D'Acri, Antônio Macedo; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Perforating dermatoses are a group of skin diseases characterized by transepidermal elimination of dermal material. The disease is divided into two groups: the primary group and the secondary group. The classical or primary perforating dermatoses are subdivided into four types according to the eliminated dermal materials: Kyrle disease, perforating reactive collagenosis, elastosis perforans serpiginosa, and perforating folliculitis. The secondary form is known as acquired perforating dermatosis. The term was proposed in 1989 by Rapini to designate the perforating dermatoses affecting adult patients with systemic disease, regardless of the dermal materials eliminated. This report describes a case of the disease with elimination of collagen and elastic fibers in a patient with chronic renal failure.

  1. Experimental perforation of tubing with a hydraulic sand jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, Yu V

    1970-01-01

    A series of field tests has shown that perforation with a hydraulic sand jet improves the quality of well completion. The sand jet does not crack the cement sheath or the casing, and the perforations are larger and deeper than perforations formed by explosive charges. Fluid circulation during sand jet perforation can safely be stopped for at least 10 min. Water containing a surfactant can be used as a sand carrier. Sand jet perforation allows successful completion of wells cased by 2 tubing strings. Sand jet perforation can be used to clean the borehole well and to remove foreign objects from the well.

  2. American brachytherapy society (ABS) guidelines for brachytherapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Gaspar, Laurie; Herskovic, Arnold; Mantravadi, Prasad; Speiser, Burton

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: There is wide variation in the indications, techniques, treatment regimens and dosimetry being used to treat cancer of the esophagus and no guidelines exist for optimal therapy. Methods: The Clinical Research Committee of the ABS met to formulate consensus guidelines for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. Results: Good candidates for brachytherapy include patients with unifocal disease, with thoracic tumor 10 cm primary regional lymph adenopathy or tumor located in the gastro-esophageal junction or cervical esophagus. Contraindications include tracheo-esophageal fistula or stenosis that cannot be by-passed. The esophageal or nasogastric tube inserted should have a diameter of 6-10 mm whenever possible. If 5FU-based chemotherapy and 50 Gy external beam (EBRT) are used, it is suggested that the low dose rate brachytherapy (LDR) dose be 20 Gy at 0.4-1 Gy/hr, prescribed at 1 cm from the source. If high dose rate (HDR) is used, the dose recommended is 10 Gy in 2 weekly fractions of 5 Gy each, given after EBRT. Chemotherapy is not usually given concurrently with brachytherapy, and when it is, the brachytherapy dose is reduced. The length of esophagus treated by brachytherapy includes the post-EBRT involved area and a 1-2 cm margin proximally and distally. Supportive care, given during EBRT includes an antifungal agent (e.g., diflucan) and carafate. Gradual dilatation of the esophagus is required post-treatment for esophageal strictures. Conclusion: Guidelines were developed for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. As more clinical data becomes available, these guidelines will be updated by the ABS

  3. Rapidly Growing Esophageal Carcinosarcoma Reduced by Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naotaka Ogasawara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal carcinosarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm consisting of both carcinomatous and sarcomatous components. It is generally treated by surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy according to the protocols used for other esophageal cancers. However, the treatment of esophageal carcinosarcoma by radiotherapy alone before surgery has not been previously described. We report a patient with a rapidly growing esophageal carcinosarcoma that was efficiently reduced by neoadjuvant radiotherapy alone. A previously healthy 69-year-old man was admitted with dysphagia. Initial esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD revealed a small nodular polypoid lesion of about 10 mm in the middle esophagus. A second EGD 1 month later showed that the tumor had expanded into a huge mass. A biopsy specimen revealed that the tumor comprised squamous cell carcinoma with spindle cell components, and the tumor was diagnosed as carcinosarcoma which was diagnosed as stage I (T1bN0M0. Due to renal dysfunction, the patient was treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy (40 Gy without chemotherapy. A third EGD 1 month later revealed remarkable tumor reduction. He then underwent total esophagectomy with regional lymph node dissection (pStage 0, pT1aN0M0. After surgical operation, the patient was followed up without adjuvant therapy. Whole body computed tomography revealed lung metastasis 14 months after surgery, and the patient died 2 months later. The neoadjuvant radiotherapy for esophageal carcinosarcoma was considered to have contributed to the subsequent surgery and his prolonged survival time. Thus, radiotherapy alone might be a suitable neoadjuvant therapy for esophageal carcinosarcomas.

  4. Contact lens rehabilitation following repaired corneal perforations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titiyal, Jeewan S; Sinha, Rajesh; Sharma, Namrata; Sreenivas, V; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2006-01-01

    Background Visual outcome following repair of post-traumatic corneal perforation may not be optimal due to presence of irregular keratometric astigmatism. We performed a study to evaluate and compare rigid gas permeable contact lens and spectacles in visual rehabilitation following perforating corneal injuries. Method Eyes that had undergone repair for corneal perforating injuries with or without lens aspiration were fitted rigid gas permeable contact lenses. The fitting pattern and the improvement in visual acuity by contact lens over spectacle correction were noted. Results Forty eyes of 40 patients that had undergone surgical repair of posttraumatic corneal perforations were fitted rigid gas permeable contact lenses for visual rehabilitation. Twenty-four eyes (60%) required aphakic contact lenses. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of ≥ 6/18 in the snellen's acuity chart was seen in 10 (25%) eyes with spectacle correction and 37 (92.5%) eyes with the use of contact lens (p < 0.001). The best-corrected visual acuity with spectacles was 0.20 ± 0.13 while the same with contact lens was 0.58 ± 0.26. All the patients showed an improvement of ≥ 2 lines over spectacles in the snellen's acuity chart with contact lens. Conclusion Rigid gas permeable contact lenses are better means of rehabilitation in eyes that have an irregular cornea due to scars caused by perforating corneal injuries. PMID:16536877

  5. Esophageal hypermotility: cause or effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespin, O M; Tatum, R P; Yates, R B; Sahin, M; Coskun, K; Martin, A V; Wright, A; Oelschlager, B K; Pellegrini, C A

    2016-07-01

    Nutcracker esophagus (NE), Jackhammer esophagus (JHE), distal esophageal spasm (DES), and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES) are defined by esophageal manometric findings. Some patients with these esophageal motility disorders also have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. It is unclear to what extent these patients' symptoms are caused by the motility disorder, the acid reflux, or both. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) on esophageal motility disorders, gastroesophageal reflux, and patient symptoms. Between 2007 and 2013, we performed high-resolution esophageal manometry on 3400 patients, and 221 patients were found to have a spastic esophageal motility disorder. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to determine the manometric abnormality, presence of gastroesophageal symptoms, and amount of esophageal acid exposure. In those patients that underwent LNF, we compared pre- and postoperative esophageal motility, gastroesophageal symptom severity, and esophageal acid exposure. Of the 221 patients with spastic motility disorders, 77 had NE, 2 had JHE, 30 had DES, and 112 had HTLES. The most frequently reported primary and secondary symptoms among all patients were: heartburn and/or regurgitation, 69.2%; respiratory, 39.8%; dysphagia, 35.7%; and chest pain, 22.6%. Of the 221 patients, 192 underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 103 demonstrated abnormal distal esophageal acid exposure. Abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring was detected in 62% of patients with heartburn and regurgitation, 49% of patients with respiratory symptoms, 36.8 % of patients with dysphagia, and 32.6% of patients with chest pain. Sixty-six of the 103 patients with abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring underwent LNF. Thirty-eight (13NE, 2JHE, 6 DES, and 17 HTLES) of these 66 patients had a minimum of 6-month postoperative follow-up that included clinical evaluation, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour pH monitoring

  6. Esophageal motor disorders: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Ibrahim; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight literature published during the last year in the context of previous knowledge. A number of novel techniques - high-resolution manometry, esophageal electrical impedance and intra-luminal ultrasound imaging - have improved our understanding of esophageal function in health and disease. Several studies address the function of longitudinal muscle layer of the esophagus in normal subjects and patients with motor disorders of the esophagus. Esophageal electrical impedance recordings reveal abnormal transit in patients with diffuse esophageal spasm, achalasia and patients with normal manometry. Loss of the mammalian Sprouty2 gene leads to enteric neuronal hyperplasia and esophageal achalasia. Several studies showed excellent long-term results of medical and surgical treatment of achalasia of the esophagus. For the first time, mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients are reported. Novel pharmacologic strategies in the treatment of reflux disease are highlighted. Several novel techniques, perfected during recent years, have improved our understanding of esophageal function and dysfunction. A number of important observations, reviewed here, provide important insight into the pathogenesis of esophageal motor disorders and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  7. Effect of Esophageal Cancer Surgeon Volume on Management and Mortality From Emergency Upper Gastrointestinal Conditions: Population-based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markar, Sheraz R; Mackenzie, Hugh; Askari, Alan; Faiz, Omar; Hanna, George B

    2017-11-01

    To study the influence of esophageal cancer surgeon volume upon mortality from upper gastrointestinal emergencies. Volume-outcome relationships led to the centralization of esophageal cancer surgery. Hospital Episode Statistics data were used to identify patients admitted to hospitals within England (1997-2012). The influence of esophageal high-volume (HV) cancer surgeon status (≥5 resections per year) upon 30-day and 90-day mortality from esophageal perforation (EP), paraesophageal hernia causing obstruction or gangrene (PEH) and perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) was analyzed, independent of HV esophageal cancer center status and patient and disease-specific confounding factors. A total of 3707, 12,411, and 57,164 patients with EP, PEH, and PPU, respectively, were included. The observed 90-day mortality was 36.5%, 11.5%, and 29.0% for EP, PEH, and PPU, respectively.Management by HV cancer surgeon was independently associated with significant reductions in 30-day and 90-day mortality from EP (odds ratio, OR 0.51, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.40-0.66), PEH (OR=0.70, 95% CI 0.53-0.91), and PPU (OR=0.85, 95% CI 0.7-0.95). Subset analysis of those patients receiving primary surgery as treatment showed no change in mortality when performed by HV cancer surgeons.However HV cancer surgeons performed surgery as primary treatment more commonly for EP (OR=2.38, 95% CI 1.87-3.04) and PEH (OR=2.12, 95% CI 1.79-2.51). Furthermore surgery was independently associated with reduced mortality for all 3 conditions. The complex elective workload of HV esophageal cancer surgeons appears to lower the threshold for surgical intervention in specific upper gastrointestinal emergencies such as EP and PEH, which in turn reduces mortality.

  8. Ileum perforation due to accidental chicken bone ingestion a rare cause of the acute abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doklestić Krstina S.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ingestion of foreign bodies is not an uncommon occurrence, but most of them will pass through the gastrointestinal tract without consequences. Complication such as perforation is rare. We present a case of small bowel perforation secondary to the accidental ingestion of a chicken bone. The patient presented with abdominal pain, constipation and vomiting. Clinical examination confirmed generalized abdominal tenderness and rebound tenderness. Abdominal radiography showed multiple dilated loops of small bowel, and abdominal ultrasound (US showed inflammatory changes on small bowel loops, with free fluid and fluid collection around intestinal loops. The patient underwent an emergency laparotomy. Intra operative findings revealed diffuse fibro purulent peritonitis with abscess between central small bowels loops. At about 60 cm from Bauchini valve we found a perforation of ileum at the anti-mesenteric site caused by a sharp chicken wishbone. The patient was treated with resection of the ileum segment (10 cm and primary end-to-end anastomosis. Even that intestinal perforation by a foreign body is rare, physicians should consider possibility of intestinal perforation by a foreign body in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen in patients presenting with abdominal pain.

  9. Uterine perforation – 5-year experience in 3-D image guided gynaecological brachytherapy at Institute of Oncology Ljubljana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segedin, Barbara; Gugic, Jasenka; Petric, Primoz

    2013-01-01

    Accurate applicator placement is a precondition for the success of gynaecological brachytherapy (BT). Unrecognized uterine perforation can lead to bleeding, infection, high doses to pelvic organs and underdosage of the target volume, resulting in acute morbidity, long-term complications and reduced chance of cure. We aimed to assess the incidence and clinical characteristics of our cases with uterine perforation, review their management and impact on the treatment course. In all patients, treated with utero-vaginal image guided BT for gynaecological cancer between January 2006 and December 2011, the CT/MR images with the applicator in place were reviewed. The incidence of uterine perforations was recorded. Clinical factors that may have predisposed to increased risk of perforation were recorded. Management of perforations and their impact on treatment course was assessed. 219 patients (428 applications) were suitable for analysis. Uterine perforation was found in 13 (3.0%) applications in 10 (4.6%) patients. The most frequent perforation site was posterior uterine wall (n = 9), followed by anterior wall (n = 2) and fundus (n = 2). All cases were managed conservatively, without complications. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered in 8 cases. In 4 patients, abdominal and/or transrectal ultrasound (US) guidance was used on subsequent applications for applicator insertion; adequate applicator placement was achieved and treatment completed as planned in all cases. 3D imaging for BT planning enables accurate identification of uterine perforations. The incidence of perforations at our department is one of the lowest reported in the literature. US guidance of applicator insertion is useful and feasible, allowing to complete the planned treatment even in challenging cases

  10. 2011 update on esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Keng-Liang; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Tai, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chi-Sin

    2012-04-14

    There have been some breakthroughs in the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal achalasia in the past few years. First, the introduction of high-resolution manometry with pressure topography plotting as a new diagnostic tool has made it possible to classify achalasia into three subtypes. The most favorable outcome is predicted for patients receiving treatment for type II achalasia (achalasia with compression). Patients with type I(classic achalasia) and type III achalasia (spastic achalasia) experience a less favorable outcome. Second, the first multicenter randomized controlled trial published by the European Achalasia Trial group reported 2-year follow-up results indicating that laparoscopic Heller myotomy was not superior to endoscopic pneumatic dilation (PD). Although the follow-up period was not long enough to reach a convincing conclusion, it merits the continued use of PD as a generally available technique in gastroenterology. Third, the novel endoscopic technique peroral endoscopic myotomy is a promising option for treating achalasia, but it requires increased experience and cautious evaluation. Despite all this good news, the bottom line is a real breakthrough from the basic studies to identify the actual cause of achalasia that may impede treatment success is still anticipated.

  11. Radiation induced esophageal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Endo, Mitsuo; Yamazaki, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was referred to us on Dec. 22, 1986 because of dysphagia and esophageal ulcer. She had a previous history of left radical mastectomy for breast cancer, followed by postoperative 60 Co irradiation to parasternal and supraclavicular regions with 50 Gy about 15 years before. UGIs and endoscopy showed a small ulcer surrounded by submucosal tumor-like protrusion in the esophagus at the thoracic inlet. Examination one month later revealed the ulcer which became larger despite medical treatment, now measuring 1 cm in diameter. Severe dysphagia continued. Right thoractomy and subtotal esophagectomy were performed on Jan 13, 1987. Histological examination revealed nonspecific ulcer, 5 cm in diameter, surrounded by fibrous granulation tissue. Proliferation of dilated capillary vessels was also seen in the bottom of the ulcer, the surrounding wall of which was free from remarkable infiltration of inflammatory cells. Based on these findings and previous medical history, the patient was diagnosed as having a postirradiation ulcer which appeared 15 years after irradiation. Dysphagia was considered due to esophageal dysfunction caused by severe fibrosis of the proper muscle layer. (author)

  12. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  13. Oriented cluster perforating technology and its application in horizontal wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huabin Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An oriented cluster perforating technology, which integrates both advantages of cluster and oriented perforating, will help solve a series of technical complexities in horizontal well drilling. For realizing its better application in oil and gas development, a series of technologies were developed including perforator self-weight eccentricity, matching of the electronic selective module codes with the surface program control, axial centralized contact signal transmission, and post-perforation intercluster sealing insulation. In this way, the following functions could be realized, such as cable-transmission horizontal well perforator self-weight orientation, dynamic signal transmission, reliable addressing & selective perforation and post-perforation intercluster sealing. The combined perforation and bridge plug or the multi-cluster perforation can be fulfilled in one trip of perforation string. As a result, the horizontal-well oriented cluster perforating technology based on cable conveying was developed. This technology was successfully applied in unconventional gas reservoir exploitation, such as shale gas and coalbed methane, with accurate orientation, reliable selective perforation and satisfactory inter-cluster sealing. The horizontal-well oriented cluster perforating technology benefits the orientation of horizontal well drilling with a definite target and direction, which provides a powerful support for the subsequent reservoir stimulation. It also promotes the fracturing fluid to sweep the principal pay zones to the maximum extent. Moreover, it is conductive to the formation of complex fracture networks in the reservoirs, making quality and efficient development of unconventional gas reservoirs possible.

  14. Arrangement for formation perforating and fracturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, B M; Vitsenii, E M; Zheltov, Yu P; Nikolaev, S I

    1962-03-06

    An arrangement for perforating and hydraulic fracturing, to be lowered on a wire line, consists of a chamber with a shaped charge, a head and a nozzle. This arrangement enables carrying out, simultaneously, the operations of perforating and fracturing. The device may be equipped with separate sections with shaped charges and a powder chamber in which powder charges are placed, designed to be ignited in sequence by slow- acting electric igniters. For controlling the gas pressure and strengthening the arrangement in the zone of perforation, the device is equipped with rubber seals which release the ring elements under pressure of explosive gas. Between the walls of the casing and the rubber seals is an annular space through the gas escapes.

  15. Gastric Perforation by Ingested Rabbit Bone Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Gambaracci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of accidentally ingested foreign bodies is excreted from the gastrointestinal (GI tract without any complications. Sometimes sharp foreign bodies – like chicken and fish bones – can lead to intestinal perforation and may present insidiously with a wide range of symptoms and, consequently, different diagnoses. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman presenting with fever and a 1-month history of vague abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT showed the presence of a hyperdense linear image close to the gastric antrum surrounded by a fluid collection and free peritoneal air. At laparotomy, a 4-cm rabbit bone fragment covered in inflamed tissue was detected next to a gastric wall perforation. Rabbit bone fragment ingestion, even if rarely reported, should not be underestimated as a possible cause of GI tract perforation.

  16. Esophageal dilations in eosinophilic esophagitis: A single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ukleja, Andrew; Shiroky, Jennifer; Agarwal, Amitesh; Allende, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To diagnose the clinical and histologic features that may be associated with or predictive of the need for dilation and dilation related complications; examine the safety of dilation in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE).

  17. Safety and efficacy of endoscopic submucosal dissection using IT knife nano with clip traction method for early esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yoshiyasu; Suzuki, Takuto; Hara, Taro; Yamaguchi, Taketo

    2018-01-01

    Although endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an accepted and established treatment for early esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (EESCC), it is technically difficult, time consuming, and less safe than endoscopic mucosal resection. To perform ESD safely and more efficiently, we proposed a new technique of esophageal ESD using an IT knife nano with the clip traction method. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ESD using this new technique. We retrospectively reviewed all consecutive cases of esophageal ESD performed using an IT knife nano with the clip traction method at our hospital between March 2013 and January 2017. Therapeutic efficacy and safety were also assessed. A total of 103 patients underwent esophageal ESD using the IT knife nano with the clip traction method. In all cases, we performed en bloc resection. Complete resection was achieved in 100 cases (97.1%). The median operating time was 40 (range 13-230) min. No cases of perforation or delayed bleeding occurred. Although two cases (2.0%) of mediastinal emphysema occurred without visible perforation at endoscopy, all were successfully managed conservatively. The new technique of esophageal ESD using the IT knife nano with the clip traction method appears to be feasible, effective, and safe for EESCC treatment.

  18. Indications and interpretation of esophageal function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C Prakash; de Bortoli, Nicola; Clarke, John; Marinelli, Carla; Tolone, Salvatore; Roman, Sabine; Savarino, Edoardo

    2018-05-12

    Esophageal symptoms are common, and can arise from mucosal, motor, functional, and neoplastic processes, among others. Judicious use of diagnostic testing can help define the etiology of symptoms and can direct management. Endoscopy, esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM), ambulatory pH or pH-impedance manometry, and barium radiography are commonly used for esophageal function testing; functional lumen imaging probe is an emerging option. Recent consensus guidelines have provided direction in using test findings toward defining mechanisms of esophageal symptoms. The Chicago Classification describes hierarchical steps in diagnosing esophageal motility disorders. The Lyon Consensus characterizes conclusive evidence on esophageal testing for a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and establishes a motor classification of GERD. Taking these recent advances into consideration, our discussion focuses primarily on the indications, technique, equipment, and interpretation of esophageal HRM and ambulatory reflux monitoring in the evaluation of esophageal symptoms, and describes indications for alternative esophageal tests. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography for esophageal motility disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri; Gholamreza Hamsi; Tayeb Ramim

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-resolution manometer (HRM) of the esophagus has become the main diagnostic test in the evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The first step of the Chicago classification described abnormal esophagogastric junction deglutitive relaxation. The latest classification system, proposed...

  20. Esophageal tissue engineering: a new approach for esophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-12-21

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds

  1. A newborn with duodenal atresia and a gastric perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcora Bulent

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital duodenal atresia complicated by gastric perforation (GP is a very rare and a very mortal condition. Only three newborns could be cured in the reported 13 cases. We report a successfully treated newborn with this complicated disease. A 2-day-old male was hospitalized with prediagnosis of duodenal obstruction. Twelve hours later, significant abdominal distention occurred promptly. At laparotomy, GP and preampullary duodenal atresia were detected. Gastrorrhaphy and duodenoduodenostomy were performed in the same operation. The patient was discharged on the 15th postoperative day. This complicated disease can be treated by early diagnosis and surgical intervention. We choose one-stage operation because of the clean peritoneal cavity. However, generalized peritonitis may require two-stage operation in delayed cases.

  2. Duodenal perforation precipitated by scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Rajat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is an acute febrile illness usually presenting with fever, myalgia, headache, and a pathognomonic eschar. Severe infection may lead to multiple organ failure and death. Gastrointestinal tract involvement in the form of gastric mucosal erosions and ulcerations owing to vasculitis resulting in gastrointestinal bleeding is common. This process may worsen a pre-existent asymptomatic peptic ulcer, causing duodenal perforation, and present as an acute abdomen requiring surgical exploration. We report the case of a patient with no previous symptoms or risk factors for a duodenal ulcer, who presented with an acute duodenal perforation, probably precipitated by scrub typhus infection.

  3. Surgical management of perforated peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, K J; Faolain, M O; Gannon, D; Gorey, T F; Kerin, M J

    2006-01-01

    Surgery for perforated peptic ulcer disease is one of the most common emergency procedures carried out in the western world. The role of postoperative empiric Helicobacter Pylori eradication therapy is controversial. The clinical, operative and postoperative surveillance details of 84 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for perforated peptic ulcer were reviewed. All patients underwent omentopexy +/- simple closure followed by proton pump therapy. Patients were followed-up for an average of 44 +/- 19 months. Females were older than male patients (59 +/- 20 vs. 46 + 17 years; pperforated peptic ulcer is associated with a significant perioperative mortality rate. Elderly female patients are particularly at risk.

  4. [Laparoscopic surgery for perforated peptic ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Kitano, Seigo

    2004-03-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become the treatment of choice for the management of perforated peptic ulcer. The advantages of laparoscopic repair for perforated peptic ulcer include less pain, a short hospital stay, and an early return to normal activity. Although the operation time of laparoscopic surgery is significantly longer than that of open surgery, laparoscopic technique is safe, feasible, and with morbidity and mortality comparable to that of the conventional open technique. To benefit from the advantages offered by minimally invasive laparoscopic technique, further study will need to determine whether laparoscopic surgery is safe in patients with generalized peritonitis or sepsis.

  5. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures in children and an infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kim, In One

    1986-01-01

    Severe postoperative strictures in two children and an infant and mild postoperative stricture in a child were treated with balloon catheter. A child with post-fundoplication stricture showed symptomatic improvement. Anastomotic strictures after esophageal atresia repair in an infant and a child were successfully dilated with improved luminal diameter and symptoms. In a child with mild postoperative stricture, balloon dilatation was performed to prevent stricture of the anastomotic site. Radiological esophageal dilatation using balloon catheters is a safe effective method for dilating symptomatic esophageal strictures which obviates surgery and allows subsequent standard bougienage.

  6. Primary Closure versus Gastric Resection for Perforated Gastric

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perforated gastric ulcer is one of the most life‑threatening complications of peptic ulcer disease with high .... tubes were removed and oral nutrition resumed. The .... surgical approach for perforated gastric cancer: One‑stage vs. two‑stage ...

  7. A rare manifestation of perforated diverticulitis: parastomal subcutaneous abscess.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.H.; Bleichrodt, R.P.; Goor, H. van

    2003-01-01

    Perforation is a serious complication of diverticular disease. The sigmoid is the main affected anatomic site of perforated diverticulitis and sigmoid resection followed either by Hartmann procedure or primary anastomosis are the standard surgical approaches. Surgery, however, does not cure

  8. A Novel Perforator Flap Training Model Using a Chicken Leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Ignacio J; Yañez, Ricardo A; Salisbury, Maria C; Rodriguez, José R; Varas, Julian E; Dagnino, Bruno L

    2016-04-01

    Living animal models are frequently used for perforator flap dissection training, but no ex vivo models have been described. The aim of this study is to present a novel nonliving model for perforator flap training based on a constant perforator in the chicken leg. A total of 15 chicken legs were used in this study. Anatomical dissection of the perforator was performed after its identification using ink injection, and in four of these specimens a perforator-based flap was raised. The anatomical dissection revealed a constant intramuscular perforator with a median length of 5.7 cm. Median proximal and distal vessel diameters were 0.93 and 0.4 mm, respectively. The median dissection time was 77.5 minutes. This study introduces a novel, affordable, and reproducible model for the intramuscular dissection of a perforator-based flap using an ex vivo animal model. Its consistent perforator and appropriate-sized vessels make it useful for training.

  9. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... excluded usually include dairy, egg, wheat, soy, peanut, tree nuts and fish/shellfish. These diets have been ... minorities » IgE ab to minor milk proteins may identify the proteins that are relevant to eosinophilic esophagitis » ...

  10. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Prevention of Esophageal Variceal Rebleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin-Ho Lo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate of rebleeding of esophageal varices remains high after cessation of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage. Many measures have been developed to prevent the occurrence of rebleeding. When considering their effectiveness in reduction of rebleeding, the associated complications cannot be neglected. Due to unavoidable high incidence of complications, shunt surgery and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy are now rarely used. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt was developed to replace shunt operation but is now reserved for rescue therapy. Nonselective beta-blockers alone or in combination with isosorbide mononitrate and endoscopic variceal ligation are currently the first choices in the prevention of variceal rebleeding. The combination of nonselective beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal ligation appear to enhance the efficacy. With the advent of newly developed measures, esophageal variceal rebleeding could be greatly reduced and the survival of cirrhotics with bleeding esophageal varices could thereby be prolonged.

  12. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. (Children University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium))

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  13. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to GERD medication Failure to thrive (poor growth, malnutrition and weight loss) When to see a doctor ... Originally, eosinophilic esophagitis was thought to be a childhood disease, but now it is known to be ...

  14. Balloon dilatation in esophageal strictures in epidermolysis bullosa and the role of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollu, Gulnur; Ergun, Ergun; Ates, Ufuk; Can, Ozlem S; Dindar, Huseyin

    2017-02-01

    Esophageal involvement, which causes stricture, is a complication in epidermolysis bullosa. This causes dysphagia and malnutrition and leads to deterioration of skin lesions in these patients. The charts of 11 patients with epidermolysis bullosa and esophageal stricture who were included into dilatation program between 2003 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Seven of the patients were female and four were male. The median age was 14 (2-32) years. The mean body weight of patients was 27.8 (9-51) kg. The location and number of strictured parts of the esophagus were previously evaluated with upper gastrointestinal contrast study and after that flexible endoscopy was used for dilatation. Eight patients had middle esophageal, three patients had proximal esophageal and one of them had both proximal and middle esophageal strictures. The strictures were dilated 56 times in total (mean 5 times). One patient underwent gastrostomy and was medically followed-up after a perforation occurrence during the dilatation procedure. In a 32-year-old female patient, colon interposition was performed after four dilatations since optimal nutritional and developmental status could not be achieved. The dilatation program of nine patients is still in progress. Seven of them can easily swallow solid food but two of them have some difficulties in swallowing between dilatations. One patient rejected the program and quitted, while one patient refused colon interposition and died because of complications related to amyloidosis during the dilatation program. After resolution of the swallowing problem, skin lesions were observed to heal quickly. Epidermolysis bullosa is a rare cause of dysphagia. Esophageal balloon dilatation with flexible endoscopy is a safe and efficient method in patients with this condition. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  15. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2017-06-30

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus, absent contractility) and minor disorders of peristalsis (ineffective esophageal motility, fragmented peristalsis). The aim of this study was to review the current diagnosis and management of esophageal motility disorders other than achalasia.

  16. Understanding the sensory irregularities of esophageal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gregersen, Hans; Khan, Sheeba; Lelic, Dina; Lottrup, Christian; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms relating to esophageal sensory abnormalities can be encountered in the clinical environment. Such sensory abnormalities may be present in demonstrable disease, such as erosive esophagitis, and in the ostensibly normal esophagus, such as non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain. In this review, the authors discuss esophageal sensation and the esophageal pain system. In addition, the authors provide a primer concerning the techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of esophageal sensory function. Such technological advances, whilst not readily available in the clinic may facilitate the stratification and individualization of therapy in disorders of esophageal sensation in the future.

  17. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia: clinical impact of 28 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hitomi; Isomoto, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Inoue, Haruhiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the efficacy of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia. Twenty-eight esophageal achalasia patients who underwent POEM in our institution between August 2010 and October 2012 were enrolled. Under general anesthesia with tracheal intubation, initial incision was made on the anterior wall of the esophagus after submucosal injection. Submucosal tunnel was created and extended below the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) onto the gastric cardia. Subsequently, myotomy was done using triangle tip knife. After confirmation of smooth passage of scope through the esophagogastric junction, the entry was closed. Esophagogram and manometry study was done before and after the procedure. Also, subjective symptom score and Eckardt score were assessed before and 3 months after POEM. POEM was successfully done in all cases without any severe complications such as perforation and mediastinitis.Mean procedure time was 99.1 min (range 61-160) and mean myotomy length was 14.4 cm (range 10-18). Significant improvement was achieved in both esophagogram and endoscopic findings. Mean LES pressure was 71.2 mmHg (35.8-119.0) and 21.0 mmHg (6.7-41.0) before and after the procedure (P treatment of choice for esophageal achalasia. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  18. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography for esophageal motility disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-resolution manometer (HRM of the esophagus has become the main diagnostic test in the evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The first step of the Chicago classification described abnormal esophagogastric junction deglutitive relaxation. The latest classification system, proposed by Pandolfino et al, includes contraction patterns and peristalsis integrity based on integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4. It can be discriminating the achalasia from non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders. The aim of this study was to assessment of clinical findings in non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders based on the most recent Chicago classification. Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 963 patients that had been referred to manometry department of Gastrointestinal and Liver Research Center, Firozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April, 2012 to April, 2015. They had upper GI disorder (Dysphasia, non-cardiac chest pain, regurgitation, heartburn, vomiting and asthma and weight loss. Data were collected from clinical examinations as well as patient questionnaires. Manometry, water-perfused, was done for all patients. Manometry criteria of the patients who had integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4 ≤ 15 mmHg were studied. Results: Our finding showed that the non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders (58% was more common than the achalasia (18.2%. Heartburn (68.5%, regurgitation (65.4% and non-cardiac chest pain (60.6% were the most common clinical symptoms. Although, vomiting (91.7% and weight loss (63% were the most common symptoms in referring patients but did not discriminate this disorders from each other’s. Borderline motor function (67.2% was the most common, absent peristalsis (97% and the hyper

  19. Idiopathic gastric perforation in an asplenic infant | Olsen | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The cause of idiopathic gastric perforations in neonates remains unknown. Perforations of the abdominal oesophagus, stomach and duodenum in infants and children are the rarest type of intestinal perforations. There are 21 reported cases of an idiopathic gastric rupture in nonneonates. Case Report: A ...

  20. Common Bile Duct Perforation Due to Tuberculosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razman Jarmin

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A young man with HIV presented with biliary peritonitis secondary to spontaneous common bile duct perforation. Investigation revealed that the perforation was due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tuberculosis of the bile duct is uncommon and usually presents with obstructive jaundice due to stricture. Bile duct perforation due to tuberculosis is extremely rare. Its management is discussed.

  1. Common Bile Duct Perforation Due to Tuberculosis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Razman Jarmin; Shaharin Shaharuddin

    2004-01-01

    A young man with HIV presented with biliary peritonitis secondary to spontaneous common bile duct perforation. Investigation revealed that the perforation was due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tuberculosis of the bile duct is uncommon and usually presents with obstructive jaundice due to stricture. Bile duct perforation due to tuberculosis is extremely rare. Its management is discussed.

  2. Perforated duodenal ulcer: an unusual complication of gastroenteritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, J M; Darby, C R

    1990-01-01

    A 7 year old boy was admitted to hospital with gastroenteritis, which was complicated by an acute perforated duodenal ulcer. After oversewing of the perforation he made an uncomplicated recovery. Peptic ulceration is under-diagnosed in childhood and this leads to delay in diagnosis and appropriate management. Ulceration is associated with severe illness and viral infections, but perforation is rare.

  3. Survival after adjuvant chemoradiotherapy or surgery alone in resectable adenocarcinoma at the gastro-esophageal junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen Christian; Muhic, A; Jensen, Lene Bæksgaard

    2012-01-01

    Longterm survival after curative resection for adenocarcinoma at the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) range between 18% and 50%. In the pivotal Intergroup-0116 Phase III trial by Macdonald et all, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy improved both disease-free and overall survival in curatively resected pa...... patients with mainly gastric adenocarcinoma. We compared survival data for curatively resected patients with adeno-carcinoma solely at the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ), treated with surgery alone or surgery and adjuvant chemoradio-therapy....

  4. Results of radiotherapy with and without chemotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Yoshihiro

    1986-01-01

    From 1975 to 1983, a total of 51 cases of esophageal cancer with T2 ∼ T3 in TNM classification, were treated by radiotherapy alone or combined chemotherapy. All 51 patients received total dose of 60 ∼ 70 GY for 6 ∼ 8 weeks and 20 out of 51 were treated by radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (5FU or UFT and/or bleomycin or pepleomycin). The 2-year-survival rate was slightly better in patients treated by radiotherapy plus chemotherapy than in patients treated by radiotherapy alone, but this difference was not significant. (author)

  5. Genetics of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottyan, L C; Rothenberg, M E

    2017-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, allergic disease associated with marked mucosal eosinophil accumulation. EoE disease risk is multifactorial and includes environmental and genetic factors. This review will focus on the contribution of genetic variation to EoE risk, as well as the experimental tools and statistical methodology used to identify EoE risk loci. Specific disease-risk loci that are shared between EoE and other allergic diseases (TSLP, LRRC32) or unique to EoE (CAPN14), as well as Mendellian Disorders associated with EoE, will be reviewed in the context of the insight that they provide into the molecular pathoetiology of EoE. We will also discuss the clinical opportunities that genetic analyses provide in the form of decision support tools, molecular diagnostics, and novel therapeutic approaches.

  6. Radiation-Induced Esophagitis is Mitigated by Soy Isoflavones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Fountain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy present with acute esophagitis and chronic fibrosis, as a result of radiation injury to esophageal tissues. We have shown that soy isoflavones alleviate pneumonitis and fibrosis caused by radiation toxicity to normal lung. The effect of soy isoflavones on esophagitis histopathological changes induced by radiation was investigated. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 Gy or 25 Gy single thoracic irradiation and soy isoflavones for up to 16 weeks. Damage to esophageal tissues was assessed by H&E, Masson’s Trichrome and Ki-67 staining at 1, 4, 10, 16 weeks after radiation. The effects on smooth muscle cells and leukocyte infiltration were determined by immunohistochemistry using anti-αSMA and anti-CD45 respectively. Results: Radiation caused thickening of esophageal tissue layers that was significantly reduced by soy isoflavones. Major radiation alterations included hypertrophy of basal cells in mucosal epithelium and damage to smooth muscle cells in muscularis mucosae as well as disruption of collagen fibers in lamina propria connective tissue with leukocyte infiltration. These effects were observed as early as one week after radiation and were more pronounced with a higher dose of 25 Gy. Soy isoflavones limited the extent of tissue damage induced by radiation both at 10 and 25 Gy.Conclusions: Soy isoflavones have a radioprotective effect on the esophagus, mitigating the early and late effects of radiation injury in several esophagus tissue layers. Soy could be administered with radiotherapy to decrease the incidence and severity of esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving thoracic radiation therapy.

  7. Distribution of Esophageal Motor Disorders in Diabetic Patients With Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Nina S; Rangan, Vikram; Geng, Zhuo; Khan, Freeha; Kichler, Adam; Gabbard, Scott; Ganocy, Stephen; Fass, Ronnie

    Diabetes mellitus can cause various gastrointestinal symptoms. Assessment of esophageal dysmotility in diabetic patients has been scarcely studied. The aim of this study was to determine the esophageal motor characteristics of diabetic versus nondiabetic patients who present with dysphagia. High-resolution esophageal manometries (HREMs) of 83 diabetic patients and 83 age and gender-matched nondiabetic patients with dysphagia from 2 medical centers were included in this study. Demographic information, medical comorbidities, and medication usage were recorded for each patient in a single registry. HREM of each patient was evaluated and the different functional parameters were recorded. Overall, 46% of diabetic patients were found to have an esophageal motor disorder. Diabetic patients with dysphagia were more likely to have failed swallows on HREM (50.6% vs. 33.7%; P=0.03) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Among diabetic patients, those being treated with insulin were more likely to have failed (69.0% vs. 40.7%; P=0.01) and weak (65.5% vs. 33.3%; P=0.005) swallows as compared with diabetic patients not on insulin. Among diabetic patients, those with abnormal manometry were more likely to demonstrate diabetic retinopathy (27.0% vs. 8.7%; P=0.04). There was a trend toward increased incidence of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction in diabetic patients (10.8% vs. 2.4%; P=0.057) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Nearly half of diabetic patients with dysphagia have some type of an esophageal motility disorder. Diabetic retinopathy and the use of insulin are predictive of esophageal motor abnormalities among diabetic patients.

  8. Peritoneal drainage for newborn intestinal perforation: primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: intestinal perforation in newborn, necrotizing enterocolitis, primary peritoneal drainage. Department of Surgery, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University. HSC, El Paso, Texas, USA. Correspondence to Donald E. Meier, MD, Department of Surgery, Paul L. Foster. School of Medicine, Texas Tech ...

  9. Spontaneous cecal perforation secondary to acute fulminant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, frequent occurrence of diarrhea has been often misinterpreted as gastroenteritis, and this has made early diagnosis a challenge, especially in children [3]. Chang et al. [3] reported a mean lag of 6.19 days between the onset of symptoms and the diagnosis of colon perforation in their series, which highlights the ...

  10. Traumatic tympanic membrane perforations: characteristics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To characterize traumatic tympanic membrane perforation (TTMP) in terms of distribution, mechanisms, and outcome of treatment. To assess the factors influencing such outcome. Study design: Prospective analytical study, assessing outcomes post-injuries. Setting: Clinical department of a tertiary referral hospital.

  11. Acute Perforated Schistosomal Appendicitis: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appendicitis is occasionally the first clinical manifestation of schistosomal infestation which may require treatment. A rare case of perforated schistosomal appendicitis in a 12 –year old Nigerian boy diagnosed on the basis of histological evaluation of the appendectomy specimen is reported to highlight the clinical ...

  12. Pneumoperitoneum: an unusual presenting finding of perforated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here, we present a case of a 2-year-old boy with perforated appendicitis ... it will result in the patient's immediate surgical exploration and cure. ... abdominal pain, vomiting, and anorexia that had gone ... consistent with the study of Kumar et al.

  13. Fetal extraperitoneal rectal perforation: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Buttock swelling from a perineal hernia through a levator ani defect has been reported previously [12]. There have also been similar presentations due to rupture of rectal diverticular duplications [6]. Apart from the embryological causes, rectal perforation has been also reported because of rectal thermometers or probes and ...

  14. Perforated membrane-type acoustic metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, F.; Kemsies, H.; Gleine, W.; Estorff, O. von

    2017-01-01

    This letter introduces a modified design of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials (MAMs) with a ring mass and a perforation so that an airflow through the membrane is enabled. Simplified analytical investigations of the perforated MAM (PMAM) indicate that the perforation introduces a second anti-resonance, where the effective surface mass density of the PMAM is much higher than the static value. The theoretical results are validated using impedance tube measurements, indicating good agreement between the theoretical predictions and the measured data. The anti-resonances yield high low-frequency sound transmission loss values with peak values over 25 dB higher than the corresponding mass-law. - Highlights: • A new membrane-type acoustic metamaterial exhibiting negative density is presented. • The metamaterial design contains a ring mass with a perforation through the membrane. • The sound transmission loss exhibits narrow-band peaks much higher than the mass-law. • The emergence of the peaks is explained using a simple theoretical model. • Impedance tube measurements are used to validate the theoretical predictions.

  15. Jejunal Diverticular Perforation due to Enterolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Nonose

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare entity with variable clinical and anatomical presentations. Although there is no consensus on the management of asymptomatic jejunal diverticular disease, some complications are potentially life-threatening and require early surgical treatment. Small bowel perforation secondary to jejunal diverticulitis by enteroliths is rare. The aim of this study was to report a case of small intestinal perforation caused by a large jejunal enterolith. An 86-year-old woman was admitted with signs of diffuse peritonitis. After initial fluid recovery the patient underwent emergency laparotomy. The surgery showed that she had small bowel diverticular disease, mainly localized in the proximal jejunum. The peritonitis was due to intestinal perforation caused by an enterolith 12 cm in length, localized inside one of these diverticula. The intestinal segment containing the perforated diverticulum with the enterolith was removed and an end-to-end anastomosis was done to reconstruct the intestinal transit. The patient recovered well and was discharged from hospital on the 5th postoperative day. There were no signs of abdominal pain 1 year after the surgical procedure. Although jejunal diverticular disease with its complications, such as formation of enteroliths, is difficult to suspect in patients with peritonitis, it should be considered as a possible source of abdominal infection in the elderly patient when more common diagnoses have been excluded.

  16. Perforated membrane-type acoustic metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langfeldt, F., E-mail: Felix.Langfeldt@haw-hamburg.de [Department of Automotive and Aeronautical Engineering, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Berliner Tor 9, D-20099 Hamburg (Germany); Kemsies, H., E-mail: Hannes.Kemsies@haw-hamburg.de [Department of Automotive and Aeronautical Engineering, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Berliner Tor 9, D-20099 Hamburg (Germany); Gleine, W., E-mail: Wolfgang.Gleine@haw-hamburg.de [Department of Automotive and Aeronautical Engineering, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Berliner Tor 9, D-20099 Hamburg (Germany); Estorff, O. von, E-mail: estorff@tu-harburg.de [Institute of Modelling and Computation, Hamburg University of Technology, Denickestr. 17, D-21073 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-04-25

    This letter introduces a modified design of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials (MAMs) with a ring mass and a perforation so that an airflow through the membrane is enabled. Simplified analytical investigations of the perforated MAM (PMAM) indicate that the perforation introduces a second anti-resonance, where the effective surface mass density of the PMAM is much higher than the static value. The theoretical results are validated using impedance tube measurements, indicating good agreement between the theoretical predictions and the measured data. The anti-resonances yield high low-frequency sound transmission loss values with peak values over 25 dB higher than the corresponding mass-law. - Highlights: • A new membrane-type acoustic metamaterial exhibiting negative density is presented. • The metamaterial design contains a ring mass with a perforation through the membrane. • The sound transmission loss exhibits narrow-band peaks much higher than the mass-law. • The emergence of the peaks is explained using a simple theoretical model. • Impedance tube measurements are used to validate the theoretical predictions.

  17. Intestinal perforation caused by multiple magnet ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergul Corduk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple magnet ingestion is rare, but can cause serious gastrointestinal complications. We report a case of 7-year-old girl with multiple intestinal perforations caused by multiple magnet ingestion. The aim of this report is to draw attention to magnetic toys, results of magnet ingestion and the importance of timing of operation.

  18. Sonographic templates of newborn perforator stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Lyanne; Lequin, Maarten; Govaert, Paul

    2006-07-01

    Many paediatric strokes occur in the perinatal period. Improvement in neuroimaging has increased detection in newborns with neurological symptoms. To define sonographic templates of neonatal stroke in the territory of perforators of the anterior choroidal artery (AChA) and the anterior (ACA), middle (MCA) and posterior (PCA) cerebral arteries. In 24 neonates with perforator stroke, we retrospectively studied antenatal and perinatal events. Brain sonography was performed with an 8.5-MHz probe. Only hyperechoic lesions in the thalamus and/or striatum and/or centrum semiovale were included. MRI was obtained using a 1.5-T machine. We detected 28 perforator strokes in 24 infants (6 preterm): 5 MCA medial striate, 8 MCA lateral striate, 3 MCA centrum semiovale, 4 ACA Heubner's, 5 PCA thalamic arteries, 1 AChA, and 2 hypothalamic perforators. We attributed clinical seizures to stroke in two infants only. Catheter-related embolism (certain in three, possible in six others) and birth trauma (two) were probable causes. Specific conditions were found in six others. Only one infant (in nine evaluated) had an increased prothrombotic risk (fII mutation). In describing the lesions, we focused on the templates of infarction as seen in a parasagittal US sweep. Infarcts were confirmed by MRI in 21 patients. Our study showed that infarct topography can be evaluated reliably with brain sonography. This is important given the asymptomatic character of most lesions.

  19. Discriminating between simple and perforated appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bröker, Mirelle E. E.; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; van der Elst, Maarten; Stassen, Laurents P. S.; Schepers, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have been performed in order to diagnose an acute appendicitis using history taking and laboratory investigations. The aim of this study was to create a model for the identification of a perforated appendicitis. All consecutive patients who have undergone an appendectomy in the

  20. Infantile perforated appendicitis: A forgotten diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine W. Gonzalez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis in the infant is a rare surgical diagnosis despite its frequency in older patients. The clinical presentation is often vague and can be misleading. We present the successful diagnosis and treatment of a 3 month old female with perforated appendicitis.