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Sample records for erythroleukemia cells induce

  1. Kefir induces apoptosis and inhibits cell proliferation in human acute erythroleukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Fatemeh; Sharifi, Mohammadreza; Salehi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Acute erythroleukemia is an uncommon subtype of acute myeloid leukemia which has been considered to be a subtype of AML with a worse prognosis. Intensive chemotherapy is the first line of treatment. In recent years, the effect of kefir on some malignancies has been experimented. Kefir is a kind of beverage, which obtained by incubation of kefir grains with raw milk. Kefir grains are a symbiotic complex of different kinds of yeasts and bacteria, especially lactic acid bacteria which gather in a mostly carbohydrate matrix, named kefiran. We investigated the effect of kefir on acute erythroleukemia cell line (KG-1) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The cell line and PBMCs were treated with different doses of kefir and milk and incubated for three different times. We used Polymixin B to block the lipopolysaccharide and NaOH (1 mol/l) to neutralize the acidic media. Viability was detected by MTT assay. Apoptosis and necrosis were assessed by annexin-propidium iodide staining. Our results showed that kefir induced apoptosis and necrosis in KG-1 cell line. It was revealed that kefir decreased proliferation in erythroleukemia cell line. We did not observe a remarkable effect of kefir on PBMCs. Our study suggested that kefir may have potential to be an effective treatment for erythroleukemia.

  2. Erythroleukemia cells: variants inducible for hemoglobin synthesis without commitment to terminal cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, P A; Chen, Z; Banks, J; Rifkind, R A

    1983-04-01

    Murine erythroleukemia cells (MELC) are virus-transformed erythroid precursors that appear to be blocked at an erythroid precursor stage comparable to the erythroid colony-forming unit (CFU-e). These cells are useful in examining factors regulating terminal differentiation. Induced MELC are characterized by a coordinated program of gene expression, including commitment to terminal cell division, accumulation of globin mRNAs and corresponding hemoglobins, and accumulation of several other proteins, including the chromatin-associated protein H1(0). Two cloned variant cell lines, DR10 and R1, have been developed from inducer-sensitive DS19 cells by selection for inducer resistance. DR10 and R1 cells fail to display commitment to terminal cell division when cultured with dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO), hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), or butyric acid. Both cell lines are induced by all three agents to accumulate H1(0). DR10 cells are resistant to Me2SO-mediated accumulation of hemoglobin but are sensitive to HMBA- or butyric acid-mediated accumulation. R1 cells are resistant to Me2SO- and HMBA-mediated accumulation of hemoglobin but are sensitive to butyric acid-mediated accumulation. Both DR10 and R1 are commitment-negative MELC variants, displaying variable responses to inducers with respect to other features of terminal erythroid cell differentiation.

  3. Ptpmt1 induced by HIF-2α regulates the proliferation and glucose metabolism in erythroleukemia cells

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    Xu, Qin-Qin [High Altitude Medicine of Ministry of Chinese Education and Research Center for High Altitude Medicine, Qinghai University, Xining, 810001 (China); Qinghai Provincial People' s Hospital, Xining (China); Xiao, Feng-Jun; Sun, Hui-Yan [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, 100850 (China); Shi, Xue-Feng [High Altitude Medicine of Ministry of Chinese Education and Research Center for High Altitude Medicine, Qinghai University, Xining, 810001 (China); Qinghai Provincial People' s Hospital, Xining (China); Wang, Hua; Yang, Yue-Feng; Li, Yu-Xiang [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, 100850 (China); Wang, Li-Sheng, E-mail: wangls@bmi.ac.cn [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, 100850 (China); Ge, Ri-Li, E-mail: geriligao@hotmail.com [High Altitude Medicine of Ministry of Chinese Education and Research Center for High Altitude Medicine, Qinghai University, Xining, 810001 (China)

    2016-03-18

    Hypoxia provokes metabolism misbalance, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in both human and animal cells. However, the mechanisms which hypoxia causes mitochondrial dysfunction and energy metabolism misbalance still remain unclear. In this study, we presented evidence that mitochondrial phosphatase Ptpmt1 is a hypoxia response molecule that regulates cell proliferation, survival and glucose metabolism in human erythroleukemia TF-1 cells. Exposure to hypoxia or DFO treatment results in upregulation of HIF1-α, HIF-2α and Ptpmt1. Only inhibition of HIF-2α by shRNA transduction reduces Ptpmt1 expression in TF-1 cells under hypoxia. Ptpmt1 inhibitor suppresses the growth and induces apoptosis of TF-1 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Ptpmt1 inhibition reduces the Glut1 and Glut3 expression and decreases the glucose consumption in TF-1 cells. In additional, Ptpmt1 knockdown also results in the mitochondrial dysfunction determined by JC1 staining. These results delineate a key role for HIF-2α-induced Ptpmt1 upregulation in proliferation, survival and glucose metabolism of erythroleukemia cells. It is indicated that Ptpmt1 plays important roles in hypoxia-induced cell metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction. - Highlights: • Hypoxia induces upregulation of HIF-1α, HIF-2α and Ptpmt1; HIF-2a induces Ptpmt1 upregulation in TF-1 cells. • PTPMT-1 inhibition reduces growth and induces apoptosis of TF-1 cells. • PTPMT1 inhibition downregulates Glut-1, Glut-3 expression and reduces glucose consumption.

  4. Sonic Hedgehog activation is implicated in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation of human erythroleukemia cells.

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    Lamia Ghezali

    Full Text Available Differentiation therapy is a means to treat cancer and is induced by different agents with low toxicity and more specificity than traditional ones. Diosgenin, a plant steroid, is able to induce megakaryocytic differentiation or apoptosis in human HEL erythroleukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the exact mechanism by which diosgenin induces megakaryocytic differentiation has not been elucidated. In this study, we studied the involvement of Sonic Hedgehog in megakaryocytic differentiation induced by diosgenin in HEL cells. First, we showed that different elements of the Hedgehog pathway are expressed in our model by qRT-PCR. Then, we focused our interest on key elements in the Sonic Hedgehog pathway: Smoothened receptor, GLI transcription factor and the ligand Sonic Hedgehog. We showed that Smoothened and Sonic Hedgehog were overexpressed in disogenin-treated cells and that GLI transcription factors were activated. Then, we showed that SMO inhibition using siSMO or the GLI antagonist GANT-61, blocked megakaryocytic differentiation induced by diosgenin in HEL cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Sonic Hedgehog pathway inhibition led to inhibition of ERK1/2 activation, a major physiological pathway involved in megakaryocytic differentiation. In conclusion, our study reports, for the first time, a crucial role for the Sonic Hedgehog pathway in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in HEL cells.

  5. Sonic Hedgehog activation is implicated in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation of human erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezali, Lamia; Liagre, Bertrand; Limami, Youness; Beneytout, Jean-Louis; Leger, David Yannick

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation therapy is a means to treat cancer and is induced by different agents with low toxicity and more specificity than traditional ones. Diosgenin, a plant steroid, is able to induce megakaryocytic differentiation or apoptosis in human HEL erythroleukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the exact mechanism by which diosgenin induces megakaryocytic differentiation has not been elucidated. In this study, we studied the involvement of Sonic Hedgehog in megakaryocytic differentiation induced by diosgenin in HEL cells. First, we showed that different elements of the Hedgehog pathway are expressed in our model by qRT-PCR. Then, we focused our interest on key elements in the Sonic Hedgehog pathway: Smoothened receptor, GLI transcription factor and the ligand Sonic Hedgehog. We showed that Smoothened and Sonic Hedgehog were overexpressed in disogenin-treated cells and that GLI transcription factors were activated. Then, we showed that SMO inhibition using siSMO or the GLI antagonist GANT-61, blocked megakaryocytic differentiation induced by diosgenin in HEL cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Sonic Hedgehog pathway inhibition led to inhibition of ERK1/2 activation, a major physiological pathway involved in megakaryocytic differentiation. In conclusion, our study reports, for the first time, a crucial role for the Sonic Hedgehog pathway in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in HEL cells.

  6. Random small interfering RNA library screen identifies siRNAs that induce human erythroleukemia cell differentiation.

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    Fan, Cuiqing; Xiong, Yuan; Zhu, Ning; Lu, Yabin; Zhang, Jiewen; Wang, Song; Liang, Zicai; Shen, Yan; Chen, Meihong

    2011-03-01

    Cancers are characterized by poor differentiation. Differentiation therapy is a strategy to alleviate malignant phenotypes by inducing cancer cell differentiation. Here we carried out a combinatorial high-throughput screen with a random siRNA library on human erythroleukemia K-562 cell differentiation. Two siRNAs screened from the library were validated to be able to induce erythroid differentiation to varying degrees, determined by CD235 and globin up-regulation, GATA-2 down-regulation, and cell growth inhibition. The screen we performed here is the first trial of screening cancer differentiation-inducing agents from a random siRNA library, demonstrating that a random siRNA library can be considered as a new resource in efforts to seek new therapeutic agents for cancers. As a random siRNA library has a broad coverage for the entire genome, including known/unknown genes and protein coding/non-coding sequences, screening using a random siRNA library can be expected to greatly augment the repertoire of therapeutic siRNAs for cancers.

  7. Caspase-independent apoptosis in Friend's erythroleukemia cells: role of mitochondrial ATP synthesis impairment in relocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelli, Marina; Genero, Nadia; Mavelli, Irene

    2009-02-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as the central components of both caspase-dependent and independent apoptosis signalling pathways through release of different apoptogenic proteins. We previously documented that parental and differentiated Friend's erythroleukemia cells were induced to apoptosis by oligomycin and H(2)O(2) exposure, showing that the energy impairment occurring in both cases as a consequence of a severe mitochondrial F(0)F(1)ATPsynthase inactivation was a common early feature. Here we provide evidence for AIF and Endo G mitochondrio-nuclear relocation in both cases, as a component of caspase-independent apoptosis pathways. No detectable change in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and no variation in mitochondrial levels of Bcl-2 and Bax are observed. These results point to the osmotic rupture of the mitochondrial outer membrane as occurring in response to cell exposure to the two energy-impairing treatments under conditions preserving the mitochondrial inner membrane. A critical role of the mitochondrial F(0)F(1)ATP synthase inhibition in this process is also suggested.

  8. Cholesterol esterification during differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (Friend cells

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    Maria Franca Mulas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is an essential constituent of all mammalian cell membranes, and its availability is therefore a prerequisite for cellular growth and other functions. Several lines of evidence are now indicating an association between alterations of cholesterol homeostasis and cell cycle progression. However, the role of cholesterol in cell differentiation is still largely unknown. To begin to address this issue, in this study we examined changes in cholesterol metabolism and in the mRNA levels of proteins involved in cholesterol import and esterification (multi-drug resistance, MDR-3 and acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT and cholesterol export (caveolin-1 in Friend virus-induced erythroleukemia cells (MELC, in the absence or in the presence of the chemical inducer of differentiation, hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA. FBS-stimulated growth of MELC was accompanied by an immediate elevation of cholesterol synthesis and cholesterol esterification, and by an increase in the levels of MDR-3 and ACAT mRNAs. A decrease in caveolin-1 expression was also observed. However, when MELC were treated with HMBA, the inhibition of DNA synthesis caused by HMBA treatment, was associated with a decrease in cholesterol esterification and in ACAT and MDR-3 mRNA levels and an increase in caveolin-1 mRNA. Detection of cytoplasmic neutral lipids by staining MELC with oil red O, a dye able to evidence CE but not FC, revealed that HMBA-treatment also reduced growth-stimulated accumulation of cholesterol ester to approximately the same extent as the ACAT inhibitor, SaH. Overall, these results indicate for the first time a role of cholesterol esterification and of some related genes in differentiation of erythroid cells.

  9. Erythroleukemia cells acquire an alternative mitophagy capability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Jian; Fang, Yixuan; Yan, Lili; Yuan, Na; Zhang, Suping; Xu, Li; Nie, Meilan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia cells are superior to hematopoietic cells with a normal differentiation potential in buffering cellular stresses, but the underlying mechanisms for this leukemic advantage are not fully understood...

  10. Investigation of Effects and Mechanisms of Total Flavonoids of Astragalus and Calycosin on Human Erythroleukemia Cells

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    Dongqing Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are found in most parts of plants and have been shown to have multiple biological activities such as anticancer, anti-inflammation, antibacteria, antivirus, and immune-stimulation. Existing data showed that the total flavonoids of Astragalus (TFA can provide biological system with resistance to injury and can possess antimutagenic, atherosclerotic inhibition, and other biological effects. This study investigated the effects of TFA and calycosin (a compound isolated from TFA, on apoptosis induction, and cell cycle of human erythroleukemia cell line K562 by an array of techniques, including proliferation (MTT, PI staining, Annexin V/PI double staining, and RT-PCR. The experimental data showed that TFA and calycosin could inhibit the proliferation of K562 cells. The 50% inhibiting concentrations of TFA and calycosin were 98.63 μg/mL and 130.32 μg/mL, respectively. However, TFA and calycosin could not induce apoptosis in K562 cells, but could increase the number of the cells in the G0/G1 phase. The level of cyclin D1 mRNA in K562 cells decreased after the treatment with TFA and calycosin. This study provides new insights into the functional mechanism of total flavonoids of Astragalus and calycosin on human erythroleukemia cells.

  11. Amplification of the E2F1 transcription factor gene in the HEL erythroleukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saito, M; Helin, K; Valentine, M B

    1995-01-01

    The E2F transcription factor plays an important regulatory role in cell proliferation, mediating the expression of genes whose products are essential for inducing resting cells to enter the cell cycle and synthesize DNA. To investigate the possible involvement of E2F in hematopoietic malignancies...... chromosomal locations previously assigned E2F2 and E2F3, two additional members of the E2F family. Although deletions or structural rearrangements of E2F1 were not detected in 14 primary acute leukemia or myelodysplasia samples with structural abnormalities of chromosome 20q11, the gene was amplified...... and overexpressed in HEL erythroleukemia cells and translocated to other chromosomes in several established human leukemia cell lines. This study provides the first evidence of gene amplification involving a member of the E2F family of transcription factors. We propose that E2F1 overexpression in erythroid...

  12. BET bromodomain inhibition rescues erythropoietin differentiation of human erythroleukemia cell line UT7

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    Goupille, Olivier [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Penglong, Tipparat [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Thalassemia Research Center and Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University (Thailand); Lefevre, Carine; Granger, Marine; Kadri, Zahra [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Fucharoen, Suthat [Thalassemia Research Center and Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University (Thailand); Maouche-Chretien, Leila [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Leboulch, Philippe [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Genetics Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chretien, Stany, E-mail: stany.chretien@cea.fr [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UT7 erythroleukemia cells are known to be refractory to differentiate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brief JQ1 treatment initiates the first steps of erythroid differentiation program. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Engaged UT7 cells then maturate in the presence of erythropoietin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustained JQ1 treatment inhibits both proliferation and erythroid differentiation. -- Abstract: Malignant transformation is a multistep process requiring oncogenic activation, promoting cellular proliferation, frequently coupled to inhibition of terminal differentiation. Consequently, forcing the reengagement of terminal differentiation of transformed cells coupled or not with an inhibition of their proliferation is a putative therapeutic approach to counteracting tumorigenicity. UT7 is a human leukemic cell line able to grow in the presence of IL3, GM-CSF and Epo. This cell line has been widely used to study Epo-R/Epo signaling pathways but is a poor model for erythroid differentiation. We used the BET bromodomain inhibition drug JQ1 to target gene expression, including that of c-Myc. We have shown that only 2 days of JQ1 treatment was required to transitory inhibit Epo-induced UT7 proliferation and to restore terminal erythroid differentiation. This study highlights the importance of a cellular erythroid cycle break mediated by c-Myc inhibition before initiation of the erythropoiesis program and describes a new model for BET bromodomain inhibitor drug application.

  13. Initial characterization of a spontaneous interferon secreted during growth and differentiation of Friend erythroleukemia cells

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    Revel, M.F.E.M.; Kimchi, A.

    1982-12-01

    A gradual increase in the level of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase takes place in Friend erythroleukemia cells after a shiftdown in the rate of cell growth. The increase is about 5-fold after entry of cells into the stationary phase of growth, but much higher (25-fold) when reduction in growth accompanies cell differentiation. In the latter case, the enzyme increase is similar to that which can be induced in these cells by exogeneous interferon (IFN). The increase in 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase was shown to be due to a spontaneous secretion of IFN by the cells themselves: it is completely abolished if antiserum to murine type I IFN is added to the culture medium. In attempts to isolate some of this spontaneously secreted IFN, we show that it is stable at pH 2, not neutralized by antiserum to type II IFN, and that it also differs from the known IFN species induced by Sendai virus in Friend cells. The major component of this spontaneously secreted IFN is 20,000 M/sub r/, and differs from the corresponding virus-induced 20,000-M/sub r/ IFN by its lower affinity for antiserum to type I IFN and its antigenic characterization as BETA-murine IFN. The major component of the spontaneous IFN also exhibits a higher ratio of antigrowth to antiviral activity than the Sendai-induced IFNs. The authors suggest that Friend cells produce this specific type of IFN for the regulation of their growth and differentiation.

  14. Induction of erythroid differentiation in human erythroleukemia cells by depletion of malic enzyme 2.

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    Jian-Guo Ren

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Malic enzyme 2 (ME2 is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of malate to pyruvate and CO2 and uses NAD as a cofactor. Higher expression of this enzyme correlates with the degree of cell de-differentiation. We found that ME2 is expressed in K562 erythroleukemia cells, in which a number of agents have been found to induce differentiation either along the erythroid or the myeloid lineage. We found that knockdown of ME2 led to diminished proliferation of tumor cells and increased apoptosis in vitro. These findings were accompanied by differentiation of K562 cells along the erythroid lineage, as confirmed by staining for glycophorin A and hemoglobin production. ME2 knockdown also totally abolished growth of K562 cells in nude mice. Increased ROS levels, likely reflecting increased mitochondrial production, and a decreased NADPH/NADP+ ratio were noted but use of a free radical scavenger to decrease inhibition of ROS levels did not reverse the differentiation or apoptotic phenotype, suggesting that ROS production is not causally involved in the resultant phenotype. As might be expected, depletion of ME2 induced an increase in the NAD+/NADH ratio and ATP levels fell significantly. Inhibition of the malate-aspartate shuttle was insufficient to induce K562 differentiation. We also examined several intracellular signaling pathways and expression of transcription factors and intermediate filament proteins whose expression is known to be modulated during erythroid differentiation in K562 cells. We found that silencing of ME2 leads to phospho-ERK1/2 inhibition, phospho-AKT activation, increased GATA-1 expression and diminished vimentin expression. Metabolomic analysis, conducted to gain insight into intermediary metabolic pathways that ME2 knockdown might affect, showed that ME2 depletion resulted in high orotate levels, suggesting potential impairment of pyrimidine metabolism. Collectively our data point to ME2 as a potentially novel

  15. Studies of cloned Friend erythroleukemia tumor cells. Modulation of the tumor-specific cytologic T lymphocyte response by infectious Friend virus production in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    The HFL/b tumor cell line, induced by Friend erythroleukemia virus in BALB.B mice, was used to study the relation between virus production or nonproduction and the antigens recognized by Friend virus-specific cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL). Analysis of clones and subclones of these tumor cells revealed a high degree of heterogeneity with respect to the production and release into culture fluids of infectious Friend virus in vitro, ranging from high levels to low or undetectable levels of virus...

  16. beta-globin transcript found in induced murine erythroleukemia cells is homologous to the beta h0 and beta h1 genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, B. A.; Padgett, R W; Hardies, S C; Hutchison, C A; Edgell, M H

    1982-01-01

    RNA transcripts complementary to at least one of the four beta-globin homologous genes (beta h) are found in high concentration in the murine erythroleukemic (MEL) cell line GM979 after butyric acid induction. Hybridization data indicate that the gene expressed is Hbb-beta h0 or Hbb-beta h1, or both. The level of beta h0/1 transcripts in the MEL cell is similar to the level of adult transcripts. The Hbb-beta h0/1 transcript is about 800 nucleotides in length. In addition, there is a larger be...

  17. Characterization of a protein tyrosine phosphatase (RIP) expressed at a very early stage of differentiation in both mouse erythroleukemia and embryonal carcinoma cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chida, Dai; Kume, Tsutomu; Mukouyama, Yousuke; Tabata, Satoshi; Nomura, Nobuo; Thomas, Matthew L; Watanabe, Toshio; Oishi, Michio

    1995-01-01

    ... events leading to in vitro differentiation of both mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) and embryonal carcinoma (F9) cells. Among the PTPases, recent experiments suggest that a new PTPase (RIP) plays a c...

  18. Differential gene expression analysis by RNA-seq reveals the importance of actin cytoskeletal proteins in erythroleukemia cells

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    Vanessa Fernández-Calleja

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of drug resistance limits the effectiveness of anticancer treatments. Understanding the molecular mechanisms triggering this event in tumor cells may lead to improved therapeutic strategies. Here we used RNA-seq to compare the transcriptomes of a murine erythroleukemia cell line (MEL and a derived cell line with induced resistance to differentiation (MEL-R. RNA-seq analysis identified a total of 596 genes (Benjamini–Hochberg adjusted p-value < 0.05 that were differentially expressed by more than two-fold, of which 81.5% (486/596 of genes were up-regulated in MEL cells and 110 up-regulated in MEL-R cells. These observations revealed that for some genes the relative expression of mRNA amount in the MEL cell line has decreased as the cells acquired the resistant phenotype. Clustering analysis of a group of genes showing the highest differential expression allowed identification of a sub-group among genes up-regulated in MEL cells. These genes are related to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton network. Moreover, the majority of these genes are preferentially expressed in the hematopoietic lineage and at least three of them, Was (Wiskott Aldrich syndrome, Btk (Bruton’s tyrosine kinase and Rac2, when mutated in humans, give rise to severe hematopoietic deficiencies. Among the group of genes that were up-regulated in MEL-R cells, 16% of genes code for histone proteins, both canonical and variants. A potential implication of these results on the blockade of differentiation in resistant cells is discussed.

  19. Differential gene expression analysis by RNA-seq reveals the importance of actin cytoskeletal proteins in erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calleja, Vanessa; Hernández, Pablo; Schvartzman, Jorge B; García de Lacoba, Mario; Krimer, Dora B

    2017-01-01

    Development of drug resistance limits the effectiveness of anticancer treatments. Understanding the molecular mechanisms triggering this event in tumor cells may lead to improved therapeutic strategies. Here we used RNA-seq to compare the transcriptomes of a murine erythroleukemia cell line (MEL) and a derived cell line with induced resistance to differentiation (MEL-R). RNA-seq analysis identified a total of 596 genes (Benjamini-Hochberg adjusted p-value < 0.05) that were differentially expressed by more than two-fold, of which 81.5% (486/596) of genes were up-regulated in MEL cells and 110 up-regulated in MEL-R cells. These observations revealed that for some genes the relative expression of mRNA amount in the MEL cell line has decreased as the cells acquired the resistant phenotype. Clustering analysis of a group of genes showing the highest differential expression allowed identification of a sub-group among genes up-regulated in MEL cells. These genes are related to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton network. Moreover, the majority of these genes are preferentially expressed in the hematopoietic lineage and at least three of them, Was (Wiskott Aldrich syndrome), Btk (Bruton's tyrosine kinase) and Rac2, when mutated in humans, give rise to severe hematopoietic deficiencies. Among the group of genes that were up-regulated in MEL-R cells, 16% of genes code for histone proteins, both canonical and variants. A potential implication of these results on the blockade of differentiation in resistant cells is discussed.

  20. Specific binding of sup 125 I-rErythropoietin to Friend polycythemia virus-transformed erythroleukemia cells purified by centrifugal elutriation

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    Correa, P.N.; Bard, V.; Axelrad, A.A. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    We have used countercurrent centrifugal elutriation (CCE) to determine the distribution of cells with respect to cell volume and buoyant density for an erythroleukemia cell line (JG6) transformed by the polycythemia strain of Friend virus (FV-P), and to determine the effect of inducing the cells to differentiate with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) on this distribution. CCE made it possible to obtain suspensions of modal JG6 populations virtually free of dead cells and uniform with respect to volume and buoyant density. These modal populations were assayed for specific binding of erythropoietin (Epo). Between 500 and 550 Epo receptors per cell were detected. These belonged to a single class having a dissociation constant of 0.36 nM. DMSO induction of differentiation of the JG6 cells had no effect on the number of Epo receptors expressed.

  1. A balance between self-renewal and commitment in the murine erythroleukemia cells with the transferred c-myc gene; an in vitro stochastic model.

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    Yamamoto, T; Masuko, K; Takada, S; Kume, T U; Obinata, M

    1989-11-01

    When murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells, having the transferred rat c-myc gene under the control of human metallothionein II gene promoter, are induced to differentiate with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the level of differentiation is dependent on the c-myc levels which are modulated by the Zn++ ion. The clonal transformant cell line (38-2) can continuously grow in the presence of both DMSO and Zn++ ion. The proportion of differentiated cells in a population of the continuous culture is strongly affected by the concentration of Zn++ ions. These results suggested that a balance between self-renewal and commitment to differentiation of MEL cells is determined by the c-myc level, and that this cell line may be suitable for studying the stochastic process of growth and differentiation of hemopoietic stem cells.

  2. Cell-cycle kinetics of Friend erythroleukemia cells in a magnetically shielded room and in a low-frequency/low-intensity magnetic field.

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    Eremenko, T; Esposito, C; Pasquarelli, A; Pasquali, E; Volpe, P

    1997-01-01

    This work was undertaken to compare the behavior of Friend erythroleukemia cells in a solenoid, where the magnetic field was 70 microT at 50 Hz (plus 45 microT DC of Earth) with that of the same cells in a magnetically shielded room, where the magnetic field was attenuated to 20 nT DC and 2.5 pT AC. The control laboratory magnetic field corresponded to 45 microT DC and a stray 50 Hz field below 0.2 microT. The culture growth cycle of cells maintained inside the solenoid was slightly accelerated compared with that of cells maintained outside the solenoid (P magnetic field, because, inside the solenoid, the percentage of G1 cells slightly increased during the culture growth cycle, whereas that of S cells slightly decreased. Acceleration of growth was detected soon after exposure of the cultures to the solenoid field, and growth did not change further if the action of this field continued for a long time, accounting for adaptation. The solenoid field also caused a small increase of cell survival without influencing cell volume. By contrast, the culture growth cycle of cells maintained inside the magnetically shielded room was slightly decelerated compared with that of cells maintained outside the room (P field inside the magnetically shielded room also caused a small increase of cell volume, whereas, during the culture growth cycle, the percentage of G1 cells decreased, and that of S cells increased. The majority of these events did not change in cells induced to differentiate hemoglobin through dimethylsulfoxide.

  3. Regulation of the utilization of mRNA for eucaryotic elongation factor Tu in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T R; Slobin, L I

    1987-02-01

    When Friend erythroleukemia cells were allowed to grow to stationary phase (2 X 10(6) to 3 X 10(6) cells per ml), approximately 60% of the mRNA for eucaryotic elongation factor Tu (eEF-Tu) sedimented at less than or equal to 80S, and most of the remaining factor mRNA was associated with small polysomes. Under the same growth conditions, greater than 90% of the mRNA for eucaryotic initiation factor 4A remained associated with polysomes. The association of eEF-Tu mRNA with polysomes changed dramatically when stationary-phase cells were treated with fresh medium. After 1 h in fresh medium, approximately 90% of eEF-Tu mRNA in Friend cells was found in heavy polysomes. Associated with the shift of eEF-Tu mRNA into heavy polysomes, we found at least a 2.6-fold increase in the synthesis of eEF-Tu in vivo as well as a remarkable 40% decrease in the total amount of eEF-Tu mRNA per cell. Our data raise the possibility that eEF-Tu mRNA that has accumulated in ribonucleoprotein particles in stationary-phase cells is degraded rather than reutilized for eEF-Tu synthesis.

  4. The stability of mRNA for eucaryotic elongation factor Tu in Friend erythroleukemia cells varies with growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T R; Slobin, L I

    1988-03-01

    The decay rates of eucaryotic elongation factor Tu (eEF-Tu) mRNA and eucaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF-4A) mRNA in Friend erythroleukemia (FEL) cells were determined under several different growth conditions. In FEL cells which were no longer actively dividing (stationary phase), eEF-Tu mRNA was found to be rather stable, with a t1/2 of about 24 h. In rapidly growing FEL cells eEF-Tu mRNA was considerably less stable, with a t1/2 of about 9 h. In both cases a single rate of mRNA decay was observed. However, when stationary-phase cells resumed growth after treatment with fresh medium, we observed that eEF-Tu mRNA decay followed a biphasic process. The faster of the two decay rates involved approximately 50% of the eEF-Tu mRNA and had a t1/2 of about 1 h. The decay rates for eIF-4A (t1/2 = 2 h) and total poly(A)+ RNA (t1/2 = 3 h) were unaffected by changes in growth conditions. The t1/2 for polysomal eEF-Tu mRNA was found to be about 8 h when stationary FEL cells were treated with fresh medium. Previous work in this laboratory has shown (T. R. Rao and L. I. Slobin, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:687-697, 1987) that when FEL cells are allowed to grow to stationary phase, approximately 60% of the mRNA for eEF-Tu is found in a nontranslating postpolysomal messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle. eEF-Tu mRNP was rapidly cleared from stationary cells after treatment with fresh medium. The data presented in this report indicate that the stability of eEF-Tu mRNP is rapidly altered and the particle is targeted for degradation when stationary FEL cells resume growth.

  5. Translational repression of mRNA for eucaryotic elongation factors in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobin, L I; Jordan, P

    1984-11-15

    Poly(A)-containing mRNA was prepared from polyribosomes and postpolyribosomal messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNP) from Friend erythroleukemic cells. Both mRNA types were translated in vitro and the 35S-labeled translation products examined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Among the most abundant untranslated mRNA species was the mRNA coding for eucaryotic elongation factor Tu (eEF-Tu). In addition, the mRNA for eucaryotic elongation factor Ts was also present in Friend cells in untranslated form. Calculations based on translation assays indicate that eEF-Tu represents about 15% of the translation products of RNP mRNA and that approximately 40% of the eEF-Tu synthesized in vitro is encoded by translationally repressed mRNA. This repressed mRNA can be activated by addition of cycloheximide to cell cultures. At the level of 0.1 micrograms/ml, cycloheximide was found to inhibit cellular protein synthesis by about 50% while augmenting the relative rate of eEF-Tu synthesis 1.6-fold. This result suggested that eEF-Tu mRNA might initiate poorly. However, addition of supersaturating levels of mRNA to a reticulocyte lysate augmented eEF-Tu synthesis about twofold, while generally depressing the synthesis of other proteins by about 40%. Thus the storage of large amounts of eEF-Tu mRNA in vivo is unlikely to be due directly to the ineffectiveness of the mRNA in competing for the initiation machinery of the cell. The results presented in this report suggest that the supply of active eEF-Tu in erythroleukemic cells is controlled, at least in part, by a translational mechanism.

  6. Friend Spleen Focus-Forming Virus Activates the Tyrosine Kinase sf-Stk and the Transcription Factor PU.1 to Cause a Multi-Stage Erythroleukemia in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Cmarik

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hematological malignancies in humans typically involve two types of genetic changes: those that promote hematopoietic cell proliferation and survival (often the result of activation of tyrosine kinases and those that impair hematopoietic cell differentiation (often the result of changes in transcription factors. The multi-stage erythroleukemia induced in mice by Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV is an excellent animal model for studying the molecular basis for both of these changes. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis for the multi-stage erythroleukemia induced by Friend SFFV. In the first stage of leukemia, the envelope protein encoded by SFFV interacts with and activates the erythropoietin (Epo receptor and the receptor tyrosine kinase sf-Stk in erythroid cells, causing their Epo-independent proliferation, differentiation and survival. In the second stage, SFFV integration into the Sfpi1 locus activates the myeloid transcription factor PU.1, blocking erythroid cell differentiation, and in conjunction with the loss of p53 tumor suppressor activity, results in the outgrowth of malignant cells. In this review, we discuss the current level of understanding of how SFFV alters the growth and differentiation of erythroid cells and results in the development of erythroleukemia. Our knowledge of how SFFV causes erythroleukemia in mice may give us clues as to how the highly related human retrovirus XMRV causes malignancies in humans.

  7. Complete genome of Phenylobacterium zucineum – a novel facultative intracellular bacterium isolated from human erythroleukemia cell line K562

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Jie

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenylobacterium zucineum is a recently identified facultative intracellular species isolated from the human leukemia cell line K562. Unlike the known intracellular pathogens, P. zucineum maintains a stable association with its host cell without affecting the growth and morphology of the latter. Results Here, we report the whole genome sequence of the type strain HLK1T. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (3,996,255 bp and a circular plasmid (382,976 bp. It encodes 3,861 putative proteins, 42 tRNAs, and a 16S-23S-5S rRNA operon. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that it is phylogenetically closest to Caulobacter crescentus, a model species for cell cycle research. Notably, P. zucineum has a gene that is strikingly similar, both structurally and functionally, to the cell cycle master regulator CtrA of C. crescentus, and most of the genes directly regulated by CtrA in the latter have orthologs in the former. Conclusion This work presents the first complete bacterial genome in the genus Phenylobacterium. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that the CtrA regulon is well conserved between C. crescentus and P. zucineum.

  8. Regulation of synthesis and activity of NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) by dexamethasone and phorbol ester in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xun, C.Q.; Ensor, C.M.; Tai, H.H. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

    1991-06-28

    Dexamethasone stimulated 15-PGDH activity in HEL cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. Increase in 15-PGDH activity by dexamethasone was found to be accompanied by an increase in enzyme synthesis as revealed by Western blot and (35S)methionine labeling studies. In addition to dexamethasone, other anti-inflammatory steroids also increased 15-PGDH activity in the order of their glucocorticoid activity. Among sex steroids only progesterone increased significantly 15-PGDH activity. 12-0-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also induced the synthesis of 15-PGDH but inhibited the enzyme activity. It appears that TPA caused a time dependent inactivation of 15-PGDH by a protein kinase C mediated mechanism.

  9. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schreck, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Panozzo, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  10. Artesunate induces necrotic cell death in schwannoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, R W; Lin, F; Ercolano, E; Vincent, J H; Hu, B; Hanemann, C O; Luo, S

    2014-10-16

    Established as a potent anti-malaria medicine, artemisinin-based drugs have been suggested to have anti-tumour activity in some cancers. Although the mechanism is poorly understood, it has been suggested that artemisinin induces apoptotic cell death. Here, we show that the artemisinin analogue artesunate (ART) effectively induces cell death in RT4 schwannoma cells and human primary schwannoma cells. Interestingly, our data indicate for first time that the cell death induced by ART is largely dependent on necroptosis. ART appears to inhibit autophagy, which may also contribute to the cell death. Our data in human schwannoma cells show that ART can be combined with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) to potentiate the cell death. Thus, this study suggests that artemisinin-based drugs may be used in certain tumours where cells are necroptosis competent, and the drugs may act in synergy with apoptosis inducers or autophagy inhibitors to enhance their anti-tumour activity.

  11. Aloin induces apoptosis in Jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenz, Eric J

    2008-03-01

    Aloe is widely used as a dietary supplement. However, there are continuing concerns over the toxicity and the purity of aloe-based products. The primary class of compounds responsible for aloe-induced toxicity are anthraquinones. One of these, aloe-emodin, has been extensively investigated for apoptosis inducing effects. Conversely, the precursor to aloe-emodin, aloin, has been subjected to only minimal investigation of any cytotoxic effects. Jurkat T cells, an established model for the study of compound toxicity, were used to evaluate the effect of aloin on cell viability. Cells were analyzed using flow cytometry and microscopy for cell size and granularity, cell membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell cycle profile. Treatment with aloin resulted in a reduction in cell size, compromised membrane integrity, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, treatment with aloin resulted in alteration of the cell cycle, specifically a block at G2/M phase. Importantly, the loss of cell membrane integrity was preceded by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting a mitochondrial-dependent pathway for aloin-induced apoptosis. These observations provide insight into the potential mechanisms of aloin-induced toxicity and thus, perhaps, aloe preparation-induced toxicity. Furthermore, because of the concern over the safety of aloe-based supplements, this work suggests that aloe supplements not containing aloin may be safer than aloe supplements containing aloin, and that aloin should be considered in addition to concentrations of aloe-emodin.

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junying; Vodyanik, Maxim A; Smuga-Otto, Kim; Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica; Frane, Jennifer L; Tian, Shulan; Nie, Jeff; Jonsdottir, Gudrun A; Ruotti, Victor; Stewart, Ron; Slukvin, Igor I; Thomson, James A

    2007-12-21

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows trans-acting factors present in the mammalian oocyte to reprogram somatic cell nuclei to an undifferentiated state. We show that four factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, and LIN28) are sufficient to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells that exhibit the essential characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells. These induced pluripotent human stem cells have normal karyotypes, express telomerase activity, express cell surface markers and genes that characterize human ES cells, and maintain the developmental potential to differentiate into advanced derivatives of all three primary germ layers. Such induced pluripotent human cell lines should be useful in the production of new disease models and in drug development, as well as for applications in transplantation medicine, once technical limitations (for example, mutation through viral integration) are eliminated.

  13. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schreck, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-06-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Hematopoietic cell differentiation from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are undifferentiated cells that can self-renew and potentially differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature hematopoietic cells in the presence of a suitable culture system. Establishment of pluripotent stem cells provides a comprehensive model to study early hematopoietic development and has emerged as a powerful research tool to explore regenerative medicine. Nowadays, HSC transplantation and hematopoietic cell transfusion have successfully cured some patients, especially in malignant hematological diseases. Owing to a shortage of donors and a limited number of the cells, hematopoietic cell induction from pluripotent stem cells has been regarded as an alternative source of HSCs and mature hematopoietic cells for intended therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells are therefore extensively utilized to facilitate better understanding in hematopoietic development by recapitulating embryonic development in vivo, in which efficient strategies can be easily designed and deployed for the generation of hematopoietic lineages in vitro. We hereby review the current progress of hematopoietic cell induction from embryonic stem/induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23796405

  15. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anuja; Qiu, Zhifang; Farnsworth, Steven L; Hemmi, Jacob J; Li, Miao; Pickering, Alexander V; Hornsby, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells from nonhuman primates (NHPs) have unique roles in cell biology and regenerative medicine. Because of the relatedness of NHPs to humans, NHP iPS cells can serve as a source of differentiated derivatives that can be used to address important questions in the comparative biology of primates. Additionally, when used as a source of cells for regenerative medicine, NHP iPS cells serve an invaluable role in translational experiments in cell therapy. Reprogramming of NHP somatic cells requires the same conditions as previously established for human cells. However, throughout the process, a variety of modifications to the human cell protocols must be made to accommodate significant species differences.

  16. Cisplatin induces differentiation of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Praseetha; Hassiotou, Foteini; Blancafort, Pilar; Filgueira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous including cells with stem cell properties and more differentiated cells. This heterogeneity is reflected into the molecular breast cancer subtypes. Breast cancer stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy, thus recent efforts are focusing on identifying treatments that shift them toward a more differentiated phenotype, making them more susceptible to chemotherapy. We examined whether the drug cisplatin induces differentiation in breast cancer cell lines that represent different breast cancer subtypes. We used three cell lines representing triple-negative breast cancers, BT-549 and MDA-MB-231 (claudin-low), and MDA-MB-468 (basal-like), along with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells (luminal). Cisplatin was applied at 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μM, and cell viability and proliferation were measured using MTS and BrdU assays, respectively. The effect of cisplatin on the cellular hierarchy was examined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment of 10 and 20 μM reduced cell viability by 36-51% and proliferation capacity by 36-67%. Treatment with cisplatin resulted in 12-67% down-regulation of stem cell markers (CD49f, SSEA4) and 10-130% up-regulation of differentiation markers (CK18, SMA, β-tubulin). At the mRNA level, CD49f was down-regulated whilst β-tubulin was up-regulated in the claudin-low cell lines. SSEA4 protein expression decreased upon cisplatin treatment, but SSEA4 mRNA expression increased indicating a differential regulation of cisplatin at the post-transcriptional level. It is concluded that cisplatin reduces breast cancer cell survival and induces differentiation of stem/progenitor cell subpopulations within breast cancer cell lines. These effects indicate the potential of this drug to target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor.

  17. Sodium Valproate Induces Cell Senescence in Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Mei An

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with epigenetic changes, including histone deacetylases (HDACs. Epigenetic modulation by HDAC inhibition is a potentially valuable approach for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. In present study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of sodium valproate (SVP, a known HDAC inhibitor, in human hepatocarcinoma cells. The results showed SVP inhibited the proliferation of Bel-7402 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Low dose SVP treatment caused a large and flat morphology change, positive SA-β-gal staining, and G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest in human hepatocarcinoma cells. Low dose SVP treatment also increased acetylation of histone H3 and H4 on p21 promoter, accompanied by up-regulation of p21 and down-regulation of RB phosphorylation. These observations suggested that a low dose of SVP could induce cell senescence in hepatocarcinoma cells, which might correlate with hyperacetylation of histone H3 and H4, up-regulation of p21, and inhibition of RB phosphorylation. Since the effective concentration inducing cell senescence in hepatocarcinoma cells is clinically available, whether a clinical dose of SVP could induce cell senescence in clinical hepatocarcinoma is worthy of further study.

  18. Chromate-induced epimutations in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Catherine B; Su, Lin; Bowser, Darlene; Leszczynska, Joanna

    2002-10-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing by aberrant DNA methylation of gene promoter regions is a nonmutagenic but heritable epigenetic mechanism that may mistakenly cause the silencing of important cancer-related tumor suppressor genes. Using a transgenic, V79-derived, mammalian cell line (G12) that contains a bacterial gpt reporter gene in its DNA, we can study carcinogen-induced gene inactivation by mutagenic as well as epigenetic DNA methylation mechanisms. Whereas numerous carcinogens have previously been shown to be mutagenic in these cells, a few carcinogens, including nickel, diethylstilbestrol, and X-rays, are also capable of silencing the G12 cell gpt transgene by aberrant DNA methylation. Here we report for the first time that carcinogenic potassium chromate salts can also induce aberrant DNA methylation in this system. In contrast insoluble barium chromate produced significant level of mutations in these cells but did not cause DNA methylation changes associated with transgene expression.

  19. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Knott, Jason G. [Developmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  20. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Bin, E-mail: yanbin@mercyhealth.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Mercy Cancer Center, Mercy Medical Center-North Iowa, Mason City, IA 50401 (United States); Ouyang, Ruoyun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Xinagya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410011 (China); Huang, Chenghui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Department of Oncology, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Xinagya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Liu, Franklin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Neill, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Li, Chuanyuan [Dermatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Dewhirst, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  1. In vitro radiosensitivity of human leukemia cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Greenberger, J.S.; Schmidt, A.; Karpas, A.; Moloney, W.C.; Little, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    The in vitro radiobiologic survival values (anti n, D/sub 0/) of four tumor lines derived from human hematopoietic tumors were studied. These cell lines were HL60 promyelocytic leukemia; K562 erythroleukemia; 45 acute lymphocytic leukemia; and 176 acute monomyelogenous leukemia. More cell lines must be examined before the exact relationship between in vitro radiosensitivity and clinical radiocurability is firmly established.

  2. Menstruum induces changes in mesothelial cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koks, C A; Demir Weusten, A Y; Groothuis, P G; Dunselman, G A; de Goeij, A F; Evers, J L

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that menstrual endometrium preferentially adheres to the subepithelial lining of the peritoneum. It remains to be elucidated, however, whether this damage is preexisting or inflicted by the menstrual tissue itself. We hypothesized that the menstrual tissue itself damages the peritoneum. To investigate this, the viability of menstrual endometrial tissue in peritoneal fluid (PF) was evaluated and the morphologic changes in the mesothelial cells were studied by in vitro cocultures of menstruum with mesothelial cell monolayers. Menstruum was collected with a menstrual cup. Endometrial tissue was isolated from the menstruum, resuspended in culture medium or in the cell-free fraction of PF and cultured for 24, 48 or 72 h. A 3(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was performed to obtain a relative measure of viable adhered endometrial cells. Mesothelial cells isolated from human omental tissue were cultured on Matrigel or uncoated plastic. At confluence, overnight cocultures were performed and scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the morphologic changes. The viability of endometrial fragments was 84% (n = 36, p Menstrual endometrial fragments or menstrual serum added to and cocultured with mesothelial cells induced severe morphologic alterations of the latter, including retraction, shrinking and gap formation. Similar morphologic changes were observed when mesothelial cells were cocultured with menstrual endometrial fragments in PF or in culture inserts. Incubation with conditioned medium from cultured menstrual endometrium induced similar but less pronounced changes in morphology. In conclusion, menstrual endometrial fragments remain viable in PF in vitro for at least 72 h. Antegradely shed menstruum induces changes in mesothelial cell morphology, including retraction and shrinking with exposure of the underlying surface. These findings suggest that menstruum is harmful to the peritoneal

  3. SWCNTs induced autophagic cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jung; Zahari, Nur Elida M; Lee, Eun-Woo; Song, Jaewhan; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being actively introduced in electronics, computer science, aerospace, and other industries. Thus, the urgent need for toxicological studies on CNTs is mounting. In this study, we investigated the alterations in cellular response with morphological changes induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in BEAS-2B cells, a human bronchial epithelial cell line. At 24h after exposure, SWCNTs rapidly decreased ATP production and cell viability as well a slight increase in the number of cells in the subG1 and G1 phases. In addition, SWCNTs increased the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1, but not SOD-2, and the number of cells generating ROS. The concentration of Cu and Zn ions also increased in a dose-dependent manner in cells exposed to SWCNTs. SWCNTs significantly enhanced the release of nitric oxide, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 and up-regulated the expression of chemokine- and cytokine-related genes. Furthermore, the levels of autophagy-related genes, especially the DRAM1 gene, and the autophagosome formation-related proteins, were clearly up-regulated together with an increase of autophagosome-like vacuoles. Based on these results, we suggest that SWCNTs induce autophagic cell death through mitochondrial dysfunction and cytosolic damage in human bronchial epithelial cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. IGF Binding Protein-5 Induces Cell Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiro Sanada

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is the complex process of deterioration that drives the aging of an organism, resulting in the progressive loss of organ function and eventually phenotypic aging. Senescent cells undergo irreversible growth arrest, usually by inducing telomere shortening. Alternatively, senescence may also occur prematurely in response to various stress stimuli, such as oxidative stress, DNA damage, or activated oncogenes. Recently, it has been shown that IGF binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5 with the induction of the tumor suppressor p53 is upregulated during cellular senescence. This mechanism mediates interleukin-6/gp130-induced premature senescence in human fibroblasts, irradiation-induced premature senescence in human endothelial cells (ECs, and replicative senescence in human ECs independent of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I and IGF-II. Additionally, a link between IGFBP-5, hyper-coagulation, and inflammation, which occur with age, has been implicated. Thus, IGFBP-5 seems to play decisive roles in controlling cell senescence and cell inflammation. In this review, we describe the accumulating evidence for this role of IGFBP-5 including our new finding.

  5. Inducible cell death in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2006-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) occurs during vegetative and reproductive plant growth, as typified by autumnal leaf senescence and the terminal differentiation of the endosperm of cereals which provide our major source of food. PCD also occurs in response to environmental stress and pathogen attack......, and these inducible PCD forms are intensively studied due their experimental tractability. In general, evidence exists for plant cell death pathways which have similarities to the apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic forms described in yeast and metazoans. Recent research aiming to understand these pathways...

  6. Adenovirus vectors can induce activation of endothelial cells: CD40 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adenovirus vectors can induce activation of endothelial cells: CD40-CD40L interactions partly participate in the endothelial cells activation induced by adenovirus vectors in an NF-kappaB-dependent manner.

  7. Chromate-induced epimutations in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Catherine B.; Su, Lin; Bowser, Darlene; Leszczynska, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing by aberrant DNA methylation of gene promoter regions is a nonmutagenic but heritable epigenetic mechanism that may mistakenly cause the silencing of important cancer-related tumor suppressor genes. Using a transgenic, V79-derived, mammalian cell line (G12) that contains a bacterial gpt reporter gene in its DNA, we can study carcinogen-induced gene inactivation by mutagenic as well as epigenetic DNA methylation mechanisms. Whereas numerous carcinogens have previously ...

  8. Cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurlaro, Raffaella; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is an organelle with multiple functions. The synthesis of transmembrane proteins and proteins that are to be secreted occurs in this organelle. Many conditions that impose stress on cells, including hypoxia, starvation, infections and changes in secretory needs, challenge the folding capacity of the cell and promote endoplasmic reticulum stress. The cellular response involves the activation of sensors that transduce signaling cascades with the aim of restoring homeostasis. This is known as the unfolded protein response, which also intersects with the integrated stress response that reduces protein synthesis through inactivation of the initiation factor eIF2α. Central to the unfolded protein response are the sensors PERK, IRE1 and ATF6, as well as other signaling nodes such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK) and the downstream transcription factors XBP1, ATF4 and CHOP. These proteins aim to restore homeostasis, but they can also induce cell death, which has been shown to occur by necroptosis and, more commonly, through the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins (Bim, Noxa and Puma) that leads to mitochondrial apoptosis. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum stress and proteotoxic stress have been shown to induce TRAIL receptors and activation of caspase-8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is a common feature in the pathology of numerous diseases because it plays a role in neurodegeneration, stroke, cancer, metabolic diseases and inflammation. Understanding how cells react to endoplasmic reticulum stress can accelerate discovery of drugs against these diseases. © 2015 FEBS.

  9. Chemical -induced apoptotic cell death in tomato cells : involvement of caspase-like proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.J.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Yakimova, E.T.; Maximova, E.; Woltering, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new system to study programmed cell death in plants is described. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were induced to undergo programmed cell death by treatment with known inducers of apoptosis in mammalian cells. This chemical-induced cell death was accompanied by the

  10. Uranium induces apoptosis in lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Sadanandan, Bindu; Thomas, Renard; Wilson, Bobby L. [Texas Southern University, Environmental Toxicology Program, Department of Chemistry, Houston, TX (United States); Ravichandran, Prabakaran; Sharma, Chidananda S.; Ramesh, Vani; Hall, Joseph C.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T. [Norfolk State University, Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sciences, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radioactive material present everywhere in the environment. It is toxic because of its chemical or radioactive properties. Uranium enters environment mainly from mines and industry and cause threat to human health by accumulating in lungs as a result of inhalation. In our previous study, we have shown the effectiveness of antioxidant system response to the oxidative stress induced by uranyl acetate (UA) in rat lung epithelial (LE) cells. As part of our continuing studies; here, we investigated the mechanism underlying when LE cells are exposed to different concentration of UA. Oxidative stress may lead to apoptotic signaling pathways. LE cells treated with 0.25, 0.5 and 1 mM of UA results in dose and time-dependent increase in activity of both caspases-3 and -8. Increase in the concentration of cytochrome-c oxidase in cytosol was seen in LE cells treated with 1 mM UA as a result of mitochondria membrane permeability. The cytochrome-c leakage may trigger the apoptotic pathway. TUNEL assay performed in LE cells treated with 1 mM of UA showed significant incorporation of dNTPs in the nucleus after 24 h. In the presence of the caspase inhibitors, we observed the significant decrease in the activity of caspases-8 and -3 in 0.5 and 1 mM UA-treated LE cells. (orig.)

  11. Oocyte-like cells induced from mouse spermatogonial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During normal development primordial germ cells (PGCs derived from the epiblast are the precursors of spermatogonia and oogonia. In culture, PGCs can be induced to dedifferentiate to pluripotent embryonic germ (EG cells in the presence of various growth factors. Several recent studies have now demonstrated that spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs can also revert back to pluripotency as embryonic stem (ES-like cells under certain culture conditions. However, the potential dedifferentiation of SSCs into PGCs or the potential generation of oocytes from SSCs has not been demonstrated before. Results We report that mouse male SSCs can be converted into oocyte-like cells in culture. These SSCs-derived oocytes (SSC-Oocs were similar in size to normal mouse mature oocytes. They expressed oocyte-specific markers and gave rise to embryos through parthenogenesis. Interestingly, the Y- and X-linked testis-specific genes in these SSC-Oocs were significantly down-regulated or turned off, while oocyte-specific X-linked genes were activated. The gene expression profile appeared to switch to that of the oocyte across the X chromosome. Furthermore, these oocyte-like cells lost paternal imprinting but acquired maternal imprinting. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that SSCs might maintain the potential to be reprogrammed into oocytes with corresponding epigenetic reversals. This study provides not only further evidence for the remarkable plasticity of SSCs but also a potential system for dissecting molecular and epigenetic regulations in germ cell fate determination and imprinting establishment during gametogenesis.

  12. Montelukast Induces Apoptosis-Inducing Factor-Mediated Cell Death of Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Developing novel chemo-prevention techniques and advancing treatment are key elements to beating lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Our previous cohort study showed that cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists, mainly montelukast, decreased the lung cancer risk in asthma patients. In the current study, we conducted in vivo and in vitro experiments to demonstrate the inhibiting effect of montelukast on lung cancer and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Using Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice, we showed that feeding montelukast significantly delayed the tumor growth in mice (p < 0.0001. Montelukast inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation and induced the cell death of lung cancer cells. Further investigation showed the down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, up-regulation of Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF in montelukast-treated lung cancer cells. Montelukast also markedly decreased the phosphorylation of several proteins, such as with no lysine 1 (WNK1, protein kinase B (Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2, MAPK/Erk kinase (MEK, and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40-kDa (PRAS40, which might contribute to cell death. In conclusion, montelukast induced lung cancer cell death via the nuclear translocation of AIF. This study confirmed the chemo-preventive effect of montelukast shown in our previous cohort study. The utility of montelukast in cancer prevention and treatment thus deserves further studies.

  13. Montelukast Induces Apoptosis-Inducing Factor-Mediated Cell Death of Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Chang, Wei-An; Tsai, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Cheng-Ying; Ho, Ya-Wen; Yen, Meng-Chi; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2017-06-24

    Developing novel chemo-prevention techniques and advancing treatment are key elements to beating lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Our previous cohort study showed that cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists, mainly montelukast, decreased the lung cancer risk in asthma patients. In the current study, we conducted in vivo and in vitro experiments to demonstrate the inhibiting effect of montelukast on lung cancer and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Using Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice, we showed that feeding montelukast significantly delayed the tumor growth in mice (p Montelukast inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation and induced the cell death of lung cancer cells. Further investigation showed the down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), up-regulation of Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak), and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) in montelukast-treated lung cancer cells. Montelukast also markedly decreased the phosphorylation of several proteins, such as with no lysine 1 (WNK1), protein kinase B (Akt), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2), MAPK/Erk kinase (MEK), and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40-kDa (PRAS40), which might contribute to cell death. In conclusion, montelukast induced lung cancer cell death via the nuclear translocation of AIF. This study confirmed the chemo-preventive effect of montelukast shown in our previous cohort study. The utility of montelukast in cancer prevention and treatment thus deserves further studies.

  14. Reprogramming T cell Lymphocytes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bared, Kalia

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) provided a novel technology for the study of development and pharmacology and complement embryonic stem cells (ES) for cell therapy applications. Though iPSC are derived from adult tissue they are comparable to ES cells in their behavior; multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal. This makes iPSC research appealing because they can be studied in great detail and expanded in culture broadly. Fibroblasts were the first cell type reprogrammed to an iPSC using a retrovirus vector, since then alternative cell types including lymphocytes have been used to generate iPSC. Different types of vectors have also been developed to enhance iPSC formation and quality. However, specific T lymphocyte subsets have not been shown to reprogram to a pluripotent state to date. Here, we proposed to derive iPSC from peripheral blood effector and central memory T cells, reasoning that the resultant iPSC will maintain the epigenetic memory of a T lymphocyte, including the T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. This epigenetic memory will enable the differentiation and expansion of T cell iPSC into professional T cells containing a specific TCR. These could then be used for cell therapy to target specific antigens, as well as to improve culture techniques to expand T cells in vitro. We studied different gene delivery methods to derive iPSC from different types of T lymphocytes. We assessed the viability of viral transduction using flow cytometry to detect green fluorescent marker contained in the viral construct and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to detect Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc gene expression. Our results demonstrate that the Sendai virus construct is the most feasible platform to reprogram T lymphocytes. We anticipate that this platform will provide an efficient and safe approach to derive iPSC from different T cell subsets, including memory T cells.

  15. Induced Accelerated Aging in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Patients with Parkinson’s Disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Birgitt Schuele CONTRACTING...Aging in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Patients with Parkinson’s Disease 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0003 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...for grant W81XWH-12-1-0003 Title: “Induced accelerated aging in induced pluripotent stem cell lines from patients with

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cells for retinal degenerative diseases: a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-12-31

    Dec 31, 2009 ... Frane J. L., Tian S. et al. 2007 Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human somatic cells. Science 318, 1917–1920. Yu J., Hu K., Smuga-Otto K., Tian S., Stewart R., Slukvin II et al. 2009 Human induced pluripotent stem cells free of vector and transgene sequences. Science 324, 797–801.

  17. Artesunate induces AIF-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen-juan; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of the sesquiterpene artemisinin extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua, exerts a broad spectrum of clinical activity against human cancers. It has been shown that ART induces cancer cells death through apoptosis pathway. This study investigated whether ART treatment induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in the apoptosis fashion in human lung adenocarconoma A549 cell line and the proapoptotic protein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is involved in ART-induced apoptosis. Cells treated with ART exhibited typical apoptotic morphology as chromatin condensation, margination and shrunken nucleus. ART treatment also induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and AIF release from mitochondria. Silencing AIF can remarkable attenuated ART-induced apoptosis. Collectively, ART induces apoptosis by caspase-independent intrinsic pathway in A549 cells.

  18. α-Mangostin Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Ho Kwak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mangosteen has long been used as a traditional medicine and is known to have antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. Although the effects of α-mangostin, a natural compound extracted from the pericarp of mangosteen, have been investigated in many studies, there is limited data on the effects of the compound in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. In this study, α-mangostin was assessed as a potential anticancer agent against human OSCC cells. α-Mangostin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little to no effect on normal human PDLF cells. α-Mangostin treatment clearly showed apoptotic evidences such as nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of annexin V and PI-positive cells on OSCC cells. α-Mangostin treatment also caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and the translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol. The expressions of the mitochondria-related proteins were activated by α-mangostin. Treatment with α-mangostin also induced G1 phase arrest and downregulated cell cycle-related proteins (CDK/cyclin. Hence, α-mangostin specifically induces cell death and inhibits proliferation in OSCC cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, suggesting that α-mangostin may be an effective agent for the treatment of OSCC.

  19. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  20. Functional Cardiomyocytes Derived From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Jianhua; Wilson, Gisela F; Soerens, Andrew G; Koonce, Chad H; Yu, Junying; Palecek, Sean P; Thomson, James A; Kamp, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells hold great promise for cardiovascular research and therapeutic applications, but the ability of human iPS cells to differentiate into functional cardiomyocytes has not yet been demonstrated...

  1. HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schreck, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)][South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Panozzo, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Chang-Liu, C.-M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct`, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {Gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  2. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  3. Induced pluripotent stem cells for retinal degenerative diseases: a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are an innovative technology that turns somatic cells into embryonic stem (ES)-like cells with pluripotent potential via the exogenous expression of several key genes. It can be used as an unlimited source for cell differentiation or tissue engineering, either of which is a promising therapy ...

  4. Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung cancer cells. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... (8-OHdG), and apoptosis based on 3-(4,5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay were evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, namely, H1155, ...

  5. Cadmium-induced programmed cell death signaling in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Woltering, E.J.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a summary of our study on cadmium-induced cell death signaling in a model system of suspension-cultured tomato cells. Exposure of the cells to CdSO4 induced typical for PCD (cytoplasm shrinkage and nuclear condensation) morphological changes of the dead cells. Ethylene and hydrogen

  6. Clozapine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Yin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia have a lower incidence of cancer than the general population, and several antipsychotics have been demonstrated to have cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying these results remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of clozapine, which is often used to treat patients with refractory schizophrenia, on the growth of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines and to examine whether autophagy contributes to its effects. Methods: A549 and H1299 cells were treated with clozapine, and cell cytotoxicity, cell cycle and autophagy were then assessed. The autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and siRNA-targeted Atg7 were used to determine the role of autophagy in the effect of clozapine. Results: Clozapine inhibited A549 and H1299 proliferation and increased p21 and p27 expression levels, leading to cell cycle arrest. Clozapine also induced a high level of autophagy, but not apoptosis, in both cell lines, and the growth inhibitory effect of clozapine was blunted by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or with an siRNA targeting atg7. Conclusions: Clozapine inhibits cell proliferation by inducing autophagic cell death in two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. These findings may provide insights into the relationship between clozapine use and the lower incidence of lung cancer among patients with schizophrenia.

  7. Tangeretin sensitises human lung cancer cells to TRAIL- induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. (H1299 and H1975). Methods: ... Western blotting was performed to assess the expression of death receptors, apoptosis pathway proteins, JNK and ERK1/2. ...... upregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. World J.

  8. Entamoeba histolytica induces cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells via NOX1-derived ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Min, Arim; Bahk, Young Yil; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2013-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans, is able to induce host cell death. However, signaling mechanisms of colon cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling role of NOX in cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica. Incubation of HT29 cells with amoebic trophozoites resulted in DNA fragmentation that is a hallmark of apoptotic cell death. In addition, E. histolytica generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a contact-dependent manner. Inhibition of intracellular ROS level with treatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), decreased Entamoeba-induced ROS generation and cell death in HT29 cells. However, pan-caspase inhibitor did not affect E. histolytica-induced HT29 cell death. In HT29 cells, catalytic subunit NOX1 and regulatory subunit Rac1 for NOX1 activation were highly expressed. We next investigated whether NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-derived ROS is closely associated with HT29 cell death induced by E. histolytica. Suppression of Rac1 by siRNA significantly inhibited Entamoeba-induced cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NOX1 by siRNA, effectively inhibited E. histolytica-triggered DNA fragmentation in HT29 cells. These results suggest that NOX1-derived ROS is required for apoptotic cell death in HT29 colon epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica.

  9. Alpha-particles induce autophagy in multiple myeloma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelle Marcelle Gaschet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Radiations emitted by the radionuclides in radioimmunotherapy (RIT approaches induce direct killing of the targeted cells as well as indirect killing through bystander effect. Our research group is dedicated to the development of α-RIT, i.e RIT using α-particles especially for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM. γ-irradiation and β-irradiation have been shown to trigger apoptosis in tumor cells. Cell death mode induced by 213Bi α-irradiation appears more controversial. We therefore decided to investigate the effects of 213Bi on MM cell radiobiology, notably cell death mechanisms as well as tumor cell immunogenicity after irradiation.Methods: Murine 5T33 and human LP-1 multiple myeloma (MM cell lines were used to study the effects of such α-particles. We first examined the effects of 213Bi on proliferation rate, double strand DNA breaks, cell cycle and cell death. Then, we investigated autophagy after 213Bi irradiation. Finally, a co-culture of dendritic cells (DC with irradiated tumour cells or their culture media was performed to test whether it would induce DC activation.Results: We showed that 213Bi induces DNA double strand breaks, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in both cell lines but we detected only slight levels of early apoptosis within the 120 hours following irradiation in 5T33 and LP-1. Inhibition of autophagy prevented 213Bi induced inhibition of proliferation in LP-1 suggesting that this mechanism is involved in cell death after irradiation. We then assessed the immunogenicity of irradiated cells and found that irradiated LP-1 can activate DC through the secretion of soluble factor(s, however no increase in membrane or extracellular expression of danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs was observed after irradiation.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that 213Bi induces mainly necrosis in MM cells, low levels of apoptosis and also autophagy that might be involved in tumor cell death.

  10. Chemical Methods to Induce Beta-Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo Vetere

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cell regeneration, for example, by inducing proliferation, remains an important goal in developing effective treatments for diabetes. However, beta cells have mainly been considered quiescent. This “static” view has recently been challenged by observations of relevant physiological conditions in which metabolic stress is compensated by an increase in beta-cell mass. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlining these process could open the possibility of developing novel small molecules to increase beta-cell mass. Several cellular cell-cycle and signaling proteins provide attractive targets for high throughput screening, and recent advances in cell culture have enabled phenotypic screening for small molecule-induced beta-cell proliferation. We present here an overview of the current trends involving small-molecule approaches to induce beta-cell regeneration by proliferation.

  11. Interleukin-35 induces regulatory B cells that suppress autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ren-Xi; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Dambuza, Ivy M; Mahdi, Rashid M; Dolinska, Monika B; Sergeev, Yuri V; Wingfield, Paul T; Kim, Sung-Hye; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing regulatory B (Breg) cells suppress autoimmune disease, and increased numbers of Breg cells prevent host defense to infection and promote tumor growth and metastasis by converting resting CD4(+) T cells to regulatory T (Treg) cells. The mechanisms mediating the induction and development of Breg cells remain unclear. Here we show that IL-35 induces Breg cells and promotes their conversion to a Breg subset that produces IL-35 as well as IL-10. Treatment of mice with IL-35 conferred protection from experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), and mice lacking IL-35 (p35 knockout (KO) mice) or defective in IL-35 signaling (IL-12Rβ2 KO mice) produced less Breg cells endogenously or after treatment with IL-35 and developed severe uveitis. Adoptive transfer of Breg cells induced by recombinant IL-35 suppressed EAU when transferred to mice with established disease, inhibiting pathogenic T helper type 17 (TH17) and TH1 cells while promoting Treg cell expansion. In B cells, IL-35 activates STAT1 and STAT3 through the IL-35 receptor comprising the IL-12Rβ2 and IL-27Rα subunits. As IL-35 also induced the conversion of human B cells into Breg cells, these findings suggest that IL-35 may be used to induce autologous Breg and IL-35(+) Breg cells and treat autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  12. Osteoblasts Protect AML Cells from SDF-1-Induced Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kimberly N.; Dudakovic, Amel; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Philips, Rachael L.; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Karp, Judith E.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Hedin, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The bone marrow provides a protective environment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells that often allows leukemic stem cells to survive standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Targeting these leukemic stem cells within the bone marrow is critical for preventing relapse. We recently demonstrated that SDF-1, a chemokine abundant in the bone marrow, induces apoptosis in AML cell lines and in patient samples expressing high levels of its receptor, CXCR4. Here we show that a subset of osteoblast lineage cells within the bone marrow can protect AML cells from undergoing apoptosis in response to the SDF-1 naturally present in that location. In co-culture systems, osteoblasts at various stages of differentiation protected AML cell lines and patient isolates from SDF-1-induced apoptosis. The differentiation of the osteoblast cell lines, MC3T3 and W-20-17, mediated this protection via a cell contact-independent mechanism. In contrast, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, the precursors of osteoblasts, induced apoptosis in AML cells via a CXCR4-dependent mechanism and failed to protect AML cells from exogenously added SDF-1. These results indicate that osteoblasts in the process of differentiation potently inhibit the SDF-1-driven apoptotic pathway of CXCR4-expressing AML cells residing in the bone marrow. Drugs targeting this protective mechanism could potentially provide a new approach to treating AML by enhancing the SDF-1-induced apoptosis of AML cells residing within the bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:24851270

  13. Polyphosphate induces matrix metalloproteinase-3-mediated proliferation of odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Hase, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Hiyama, Taiki; Kawai, Rie [Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Aichi Gakuin University, 2-11 Suemori-dori, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8651 (Japan); Kondo, Ayami [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, 1-100 Kusumoto, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan); Nakata, Kazuhiko [Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Aichi Gakuin University, 2-11 Suemori-dori, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8651 (Japan); Mogi, Makio, E-mail: makio@dpc.agu.ac.jp [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, 1-100 Kusumoto, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate [Poly(P)] may represent a physiological source of phosphate and has the ability to induce bone differentiation in osteoblasts. We previously reported that cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 accelerates the proliferation of purified odontoblast-like cells. In this study, MMP-3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected into odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate whether MMP-3 activity is induced by Poly(P) and/or is associated with cell proliferation and differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. Treatment with Poly(P) led to an increase in both cell proliferation and additional odontoblastic differentiation. Poly(P)-treated cells showed a small but significant increase in dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) mRNA expression, which are markers of mature odontoblasts. The cells also acquired additional odontoblast-specific properties including adoption of an odontoblastic phenotype typified by high alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and a calcification capacity. In addition, Poly(P) induced expression of MMP-3 mRNA and protein, and increased MMP-3 activity. MMP-3 siRNA-mediated disruption of the expression of these effectors potently suppressed the expression of odontoblastic biomarkers ALP, DSPP, and DMP-1, and blocked calcification. Interestingly, upon siRNA-mediated silencing of MMP-3, we noted a potent and significant decrease in cell proliferation. Using specific siRNAs, we revealed that a unique signaling cascade, Poly(P)→MMP-3→DSPP and/or DMP-1, was intimately involved in the proliferation of odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Polyphosphate increases proliferation of iPS cell-derived odontoblast-like cells. • Polyphosphate-induced MMP-3 results in an increase of cell proliferation. • Induced cell proliferation involves MMP-3, DSPP, and/or DMP-1 sequentially. • Induced MMP-3 also results in an increase of odontoblastic

  14. Chalcones Enhance TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ewelina Szliszka; Zenon P. Czuba; Bogdan Mazur; Lukasz Sedek; Andrzej Paradysz; Wojciech Krol

    2009-01-01

    Chalcones exhibit chemopreventive and antitumor effects. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a naturally occurring anticancer agent that induces apoptosis in cancer cells and is not toxic to normal cells. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of five chalcones in combination with TRAIL on prostate cancer cells. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was determined using flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC. Our study showe...

  15. Continuous cytokine exposure of colonic epithelial cells induces DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2005-01-01

    by inducible nitrogen oxide synthase (iNOS). NO as well as other ROS are potential DNA damaging agents. The aim was to determine the effect of long-term cytokine exposure on NO formation and DNA damage in epithelial cells. METHODS: A colonic cell line (HT29) was stimulated for 1-10 weeks with interferon...... stimulated cells had increased DNA instability (Pcytokine exposure induces an iNOS dependent up-regulation of ROS production and DNA instability. This mechanism...

  16. Cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iurlaro, Raffaella; Muñoz‐Pinedo, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    .... Many conditions that impose stress on cells, including hypoxia, starvation, infections and changes in secretory needs, challenge the folding capacity of the cell and promote endoplasmic reticulum stress...

  17. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin+) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34+CD38-Lin-/low). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 (7μM) and G2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hyperthermia: an effective strategy to induce apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kanwal; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Heat has been used as a medicinal and healing modality throughout human history. The combination of hyperthermia (HT) with radiation and anticancer agents has been used clinically and has shown positive results to a certain extent. However, the clinical results of HT treatment alone have been only partially satisfactory. Cell death following HT treatment is a function of both temperature and treatment duration. HT induces cancer cell death through apoptosis; the degree of apoptosis and the apoptotic pathway vary in different cancer cell types. HT-induced reactive oxygen species production are responsible for apoptosis in various cell types. However, the underlying mechanism of signal transduction and the genes related to this process still need to be elucidated. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induced by HT, enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis, and the genetic network involved in HT-induced apoptosis.

  19. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... block alloactivation, had no inhibitory effect on RPE-mediated T-cell apoptotic responses in MHC class II-specific CD4+ T-cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells express FasL and induce TCR-independent apoptosis in activated human T cells through Fas-FasL interaction. Retinal pigment...

  20. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    block alloactivation, had no inhibitory effect on RPE-mediated T-cell apoptotic responses in MHC class II-specific CD4+ T-cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells express FasL and induce TCR-independent apoptosis in activated human T cells through Fas-FasL interaction. Retinal pigment...... human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...

  1. Cryptotanshinone Induces Apoptosis of HL-60 Cells via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, increased Bax expression, decreased Bcl-2 expression, loss of mitochondria membrane potential .... obtained from HL-60 cells indicated that the. CPT-induced arrest in G0/G1 phase was paralleled by the accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins (Figure 4C). ... cells (MCF-7) and hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  2. Duramycin-induced calcium release in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Laura J; Crow, Chris; Maraveyas, Anthony; Madden, Leigh A

    2016-03-01

    Duramycin, through binding with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), has shown potential to be an effective antitumour agent. However, its mode of action in relation to tumour cells is not fully understood. PE expression on the surface of a panel of cancer cell lines was analysed using duramycin and subsequent antibody labelling, and then analysed by flow cytometry. Cell viability was also assessed by flow cytometry using annexin V and propidium iodide. Calcium ion (Ca) release by tumour cells in response to duramycin was determined by spectrofluorometry following incubation with Fluo-3, AM. Confocal microscopy was performed on the cancer cell line AsPC-1 to assess real-time cell response to duramycin treatment. Duramycin could detect cell surface PE expression on all 15 cancer cell lines screened, which was shown to be duramycin concentration dependent. However, higher concentrations induced necrotic cell death. Duramycin induced calcium ion (Ca) release from the cancer cell lines also in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner. Confocal microscopy showed an influx of propidium iodide into the cells over time and induced morphological changes. Duramycin induces Ca release from cancer cell lines in a time-dependent and concentration-dependent manner.

  3. Hexavalent Chromium Induces Chromosome Instability in Human Urothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie L.; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-01-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of Cr(VI) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer specifically and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer in general. PMID:26908176

  4. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Glycolaldehyde induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in Schwann cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cell injury is caused by diabetic neuropathy. The apoptosis of Schwann cells plays a pivotal role in diabetic nerve dysfunction. Glycolaldehyde is a precursor of advanced glycation end products that contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we examined whether glycolaldehyde induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and apoptosis in rat Schwann cells. Schwann cells treated with 500 μM glycolaldehyde showed morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis. Glycolaldehyde activated apoptotic signals, such as caspase-3 and caspase-8. Furthermore, it induced ER stress response involving RNA-dependent protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK, inositol-requiring ER-to-nucleus signal kinase 1α (IRE1α, and eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α. In addition, glycolaldehyde activated CCAAT/enhancer-binding homologous protein (CHOP, an ER stress response factor crucial to executing apoptosis. Knockdown of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, which is involved in the promotion of cell survival following ER stress, enhanced glycolaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity, indicating that Nrf2 plays a protective role in the cytotoxicity caused by glycolaldehyde. Taken together, these findings indicate that glycolaldehyde is capable of inducing apoptosis and ER stress in Schwann cells. The ER stress induced by glycolaldehyde may trigger the glycolaldehyde-induced apoptosis in Schwann cells. This study demonstrated for the first time that glycolaldehyde induced ER stress.

  6. Inflammation-Induced Cell Proliferation Potentiates DNA Damage-Induced Mutations In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Orsolya; Gong, Guanyu; Olipitz, Werner; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations are a critical driver of cancer initiation. While extensive studies have focused on exposure-induced mutations, few studies have explored the importance of tissue physiology as a modulator of mutation susceptibility in vivo. Of particular interest is inflammation, a known cancer risk factor relevant to chronic inflammatory diseases and pathogen-induced inflammation. Here, we used the fluorescent yellow direct repeat (FYDR) mice that harbor a reporter to detect misalignments during homologous recombination (HR), an important class of mutations. FYDR mice were exposed to cerulein, a potent inducer of pancreatic inflammation. We show that inflammation induces DSBs (γH2AX foci) and that several days later there is an increase in cell proliferation. While isolated bouts of inflammation did not induce HR, overlap between inflammation-induced DNA damage and inflammation-induced cell proliferation induced HR significantly. To study exogenously-induced DNA damage, animals were exposed to methylnitrosourea, a model alkylating agent that creates DNA lesions relevant to both environmental exposures and cancer chemotherapy. We found that exposure to alkylation damage induces HR, and importantly, that inflammation-induced cell proliferation and alkylation induce HR in a synergistic fashion. Taken together, these results show that, during an acute bout of inflammation, there is a kinetic barrier separating DNA damage from cell proliferation that protects against mutations, and that inflammation-induced cell proliferation greatly potentiates exposure-induced mutations. These studies demonstrate a fundamental mechanism by which inflammation can act synergistically with DNA damage to induce mutations that drive cancer and cancer recurrence. PMID:25647331

  7. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  8. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji [Nippi Research Institute of Biomatrix, Toride, Ibaraki 302-0017 (Japan); Tashiro, Shin-ichi [Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Kyoto 603-8072 (Japan); Onodera, Satoshi [Department of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo 194-8543 (Japan); Ikejima, Takashi, E-mail: ikejimat@vip.sina.com [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  9. Levobuipivacaine-Induced Dissemination of A549 Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Shun-Ming; Lin, Bo-Feng; Wong, Chih-Shung; Chuang, Wen-Ting; Chou, Yu-Ting; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2017-08-17

    While anaesthetics are frequently used on cancer patients during surgical procedures, their consequence on cancer progression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we sought to investigate the influence of local anesthetics on lung cancer cell dissemination in vitro and in vivo. A549 human non-small lung cancer cells were treated with various local anaesthetics including ropivacaine, lidocaine, levobupivacaine and bupivacaine. Cell barrier property was assessed using an electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of treated cells was studied by immunofluorescence staining. In vitro and in vivo cancer cell dissemination were investigated.Gene expression microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qrt-PCR) assays were used to identify the genes responsible for levobupivacaine-mediated cancer cell dissemination.The results illustrated that only levobupivacaine induced EMT in the treated cells and also caused the dissemination of cancer cells in vitro. In addition, after intravenous injection, levobupivacaine encouraged cancer cell dissemination in vivo. Gene expression microarray, qrt-PCR and immunoblotting revealed that after levobupivacaine treatment, the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)- 2α gene was upregulated in cancer cells. Our findings suggest that levobupivacaine may induce A549 lung cancer cell dissemination both in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, HIF-2α signaling possibly contributes to levobupivacaine-mediated A549 lung cancer cell dissemination.

  10. Radiation-induced apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, R. E.; Bump, E A; Quartuccio, S. G.; Medeiros, D; Braunhut, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    The response of the microvasculature to ionizing radiation is thought to be an important factor in the overall response of both normal tissues and tumours. It has recently been reported that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a potent mitogen for endothelial cells, protects large vessel endothelial cells from radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro. Microvessel cells are phenotypically distinct from large vessel cells. We studied the apoptotic response of confluent monolayers of capillary en...

  11. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    of apoptosis and cell death in cultured human uterine leiomyosarcoma (SK-UT-1) cells and control human uterine smooth muscle cells (HutSMC). The intracellular levels of the AT2 receptor are low in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells but the receptor is substantially up-regulated in quiescent SK-UT-1 cells with high...... densities in mitochondria. Activation of the cell membrane AT2 receptors by a concomitant treatment with angiotensin II and the AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan, induces apoptosis but does not affect the rate of cell death. We demonstrate for the first time that the high-affinity, non-peptide AT2 receptor...... agonist, Compound 21 (C21) penetrates the cell membrane of quiescent SK-UT-1 cells, activates intracellular AT2 receptors and induces rapid cell death; approximately 70% of cells died within 24 h. The cells, which escaped from the cell death, displayed activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, i...

  12. Modeling familial Alzheimer's disease with induced pluripotent stem cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yagi, Takuya; Ito, Daisuke; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Nihei, Yoshihiro; Yoshizaki, Takahito; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2011-01-01

    ...). Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology can be used to model human disorders and provide novel opportunities to study cellular mechanisms and establish therapeutic strategies against various diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases...

  13. Expression of murine 5-aminolevulinate synthase variants causes protoporphyrin IX accumulation and light-induced mammalian cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica J Fratz

    Full Text Available 5-Aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS; EC 2.3.1.37 catalyzes the first committed step of heme biosynthesis in animals. The erythroid-specific ALAS isozyme (ALAS2 is negatively regulated by heme at the level of mitochondrial import and, in its mature form, certain mutations of the murine ALAS2 active site loop result in increased production of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX, the precursor for heme. Importantly, generation of PPIX is a crucial component in the widely used photodynamic therapies (PDT of cancer and other dysplasias. ALAS2 variants that cause high levels of PPIX accumulation provide a new means of targeted, and potentially enhanced, photosensitization. In order to assess the prospective utility of ALAS2 variants in PPIX production for PDT, K562 human erythroleukemia cells and HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells were transfected with expression plasmids for ALAS2 variants with greater enzymatic activity than the wild-type enzyme. The levels of accumulated PPIX in ALAS2-expressing cells were analyzed using flow cytometry with fluorescence detection. Further, cells expressing ALAS2 variants were subjected to white light treatments (21-22 kLux for 10 minutes after which cell viability was determined. Transfection of HeLa cells with expression plasmids for murine ALAS2 variants, specifically for those with mutated mitochondrial presequences and a mutation in the active site loop, caused significant cellular accumulation of PPIX, particularly in the membrane. Light treatments revealed that ALAS2 expression results in an increase in cell death in comparison to aminolevulinic acid (ALA treatment producing a similar amount of PPIX. The delivery of stable and highly active ALAS2 variants has the potential to expand and improve upon current PDT regimes.

  14. MiR-122 Induces Radiosensitization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debin Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available MiR-122 is a novel tumor suppresser and its expression induces cell cycle arrest, or apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation in multiple cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells. Radioresistance of cancer cell leads to the major drawback of radiotherapy for NSCLC and the induction of radiosensitization could be a useful strategy to fix this problem. The present work investigates the function of miR-122 in inducing radiosensitization in A549 cell, a type of NSCLC cells. MiR-122 induces the radiosensitization of A549 cells. MiR-122 also boosts the inhibitory activity of ionizing radiation (IR on cancer cell anchor-independent growth and invasion. Moreover, miR-122 reduced the expression of its targeted genes related to tumor-survival or cellular stress response. These results indicate that miR-122 would be a novel strategy for NSCLC radiation-therapy.

  15. Islet-cell dysfunction induced by glucocorticoid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Raalte, Daniël H; Kwa, Kelly A A; van Genugten, Renate E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system.......Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system....

  16. How Kidney Cell Death Induces Renal Necroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Kumar, Santhosh V; Lech, Maciej; Desai, Jyaysi; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-05-01

    The nephrons of the kidney are independent functional units harboring cells of a low turnover during homeostasis. As such, physiological renal cell death is a rather rare event and dead cells are flushed away rapidly with the urinary flow. Renal cell necrosis occurs in acute kidney injuries such as thrombotic microangiopathies, necrotizing glomerulonephritis, or tubular necrosis. All of these are associated with intense intrarenal inflammation, which contributes to further renal cell loss, an autoamplifying process referred to as necroinflammation. But how does renal cell necrosis trigger inflammation? Here, we discuss the role of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), mitochondrial (mito)-DAMPs, and alarmins, as well as their respective pattern recognition receptors. The capacity of DAMPs and alarmins to trigger cytokine and chemokine release initiates the recruitment of leukocytes into the kidney that further amplify necroinflammation. Infiltrating neutrophils often undergo neutrophil extracellular trap formation associated with neutrophil death or necroptosis, which implies a release of histones, which act not only as DAMPs but also elicit direct cytotoxic effects on renal cells, namely endothelial cells. Proinflammatory macrophages and eventually cytotoxic T cells further drive kidney cell death and inflammation. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms of necroinflammation may help to identify the best therapeutic targets to limit nephron loss in kidney injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transfection Agent Induced Nanoparticle Cell Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Montet-Abou

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Loading cells with magnetic nanoparticles, and tracking their fate in vivo by high resolution MRI, is an attractive approach for enhancing the efficacy of cell-based therapies including those utilizing hematopoietic stem cells, neuroprogenitor cells, and T cells. The transfection agent (internalization agent assisted loading with the Feridex IV® nanoparticle is an attractive method of loading because of the low cost of materials, and possible low regulatory barriers for eventual clinical use. We therefore explored the interaction between Feridex IV® and three internalization agents protamine (PRO, polylysine (PLL, and lipofectamine (LFA. Feridex reacted with internalization agents to form aggregates, except when either the internalization agent or Feridex was present in large excess. When Jurkat T cells were incubated with Feridex/LFA or Feridex/PRO mixtures, and washed by centrifugation, nanoparticle aggregates co-purified with cells. With C17.2 cells large iron oxide particles adhered to the cell surface. At 30 μg/mL Feridex and 3 μg/mL LFA, internalization was largely mediated by LFA and was largely cytoplasmic. However, we found that the conditions used to label cells with Feridex and transfection agents need to be carefully selected to avoid the problems of surface adsorption and nanoparticle precipitation.

  18. Perforate on CHO cell membranes induced by electromagnetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perforate on CHO cell membranes induced by electromagnetic pulses irradiation observed by atomic force microscopy. ... increased with an increase in applied EMP field intensity and an increase in the number of EMP pulses. EMP induced membrane perforate may play a very important role in EMP biological effects.

  19. Moral complicity in induced pluripotent stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mark T

    2009-03-01

    Direct reprogramming of human skin cells makes available a source of pluripotent stem cells without the perceived evil of embryo destruction, but the advent of such a powerful biotechnology entangles stem cell research in other forms of moral complicity. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research had its origins in human embryonic stem cell research and the projected biomedical applications of iPS cells almost certainly will require more embryonic stem cell research. Policies that inhibit iPSC research in order to avoid moral complicity are themselves complicit in preventable harms to patients. Moral complicity may be unavoidable, but a Blue Ribbon Panel charged with assessing the need for additional embryonic stem cell lines may ease a transition from embryonic stem cell research to clinical applications of iPS cells.

  20. Progesterone induces adult mammary stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Purna A; Jackson, Hartland W; Beristain, Alexander G; Di Grappa, Marco A; Mote, Patricia A; Clarke, Christine L; Stingl, John; Waterhouse, Paul D; Khokha, Rama

    2010-06-10

    Reproductive history is the strongest risk factor for breast cancer after age, genetics and breast density. Increased breast cancer risk is entwined with a greater number of ovarian hormone-dependent reproductive cycles, yet the basis for this predisposition is unknown. Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) are located within a specialized niche in the basal epithelial compartment that is under local and systemic regulation. The emerging role of MaSCs in cancer initiation warrants the study of ovarian hormones in MaSC homeostasis. Here we show that the MaSC pool increases 14-fold during maximal progesterone levels at the luteal dioestrus phase of the mouse. Stem-cell-enriched CD49fhi cells amplify at dioestrus, or with exogenous progesterone, demonstrating a key role for progesterone in propelling this expansion. In aged mice, CD49fhi cells display stasis upon cessation of the reproductive cycle. Progesterone drives a series of events where luminal cells probably provide Wnt4 and RANKL signals to basal cells which in turn respond by upregulating their cognate receptors, transcriptional targets and cell cycle markers. Our findings uncover a dynamic role for progesterone in activating adult MaSCs within the mammary stem cell niche during the reproductive cycle, where MaSCs are putative targets for cell transformation events leading to breast cancer.

  1. Crystalline structure of pulverized dental calculus induces cell death in oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddin, S M; Yoshimura, A; Montenegro Raudales, J L; Ozaki, Y; Higuchi, K; Ukai, T; Kaneko, T; Miyazaki, T; Latz, E; Hara, Y

    2017-11-20

    Dental calculus is a mineralized deposit attached to the tooth surface. We have shown that cellular uptake of dental calculus triggers nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation, leading to the processing of the interleukin-1β precursor into its mature form in mouse and human phagocytes. The activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome also induced a lytic form of programmed cell death, pyroptosis, in these cells. However, the effects of dental calculus on other cell types in periodontal tissue have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental calculus can induce cell death in oral epithelial cells. HSC-2 human oral squamous carcinoma cells, HOMK107 human primary oral epithelial cells and immortalized mouse macrophages were exposed to dental calculus or 1 of its components, hydroxyapatite crystals. For inhibition assays, the cells were exposed to dental calculus in the presence or absence of cytochalasin D (endocytosis inhibitor), z-YVAD-fmk (caspase-1 inhibitor) or glyburide (NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor). Cytotoxicity was determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and staining with propidium iodide. Tumor necrosis factor-α production was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Oral epithelial barrier function was examined by permeability assay. Dental calculus induced cell death in HSC-2 cells, as judged by LDH release and propidium iodide staining. Dental calculus also induced LDH release from HOMK107 cells. Following heat treatment, dental calculus lost its capacity to induce tumor necrosis factor-α in mouse macrophages, but could induce LDH release in HSC-2 cells, indicating a major role of inorganic components in cell death. Hydroxyapatite crystals also induced cell death in both HSC-2 and HOMK107 cells, as judged by LDH release, indicating the capacity of crystal particles to induce cell death. Cell death induced by dental

  2. Lipopolysaccharide induces IFN-γ production in human NK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid M Kanevskiy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells have been shown to play a regulatory role in sepsis. According to the current view, NK cells become activated via macrophages or dendritic cells primed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Recently TLR4 gene expression was detected in human NK cells suggesting the possibility of a direct action of LPS on NK cells. In this study, effects of LPS on NK cell cytokine production and cytotoxicity were studied using highly purified human NK cells. LPS induced IFN-γ production in the presence of IL-2 in cell populations containing >98% CD56+ cells. Surprisingly, in the same experiments LPS decreased NK cell degranulation. No significant expression of markers related to blood dendritic cells, monocytes or T or B lymphocytes in the NK cell preparations was observed; the portions of HLA-DRbright, CD14+, CD3+ and CD20+ cells amounted to less than 0.1% within the cell populations. No more than 0.2% of NK cells were shown to be slightly positive for surface TLR4 in our experimental system, although intracellular staining revealed moderate amounts of TLR4 inside the NK cell population. These cells were negative for surface CD14, the receptor participating in LPS recognition by TLR4. Incubation of NK cells with IL-2 or/and LPS did not lead to an increase in TLR4 surface expression. TLR4–CD56+ NK cells isolated by cell sorting secreted IFN-γ in response to LPS. Antibody to TLR4 did not block the LPS-induced increase in IFN-γ production. We have also shown that Re-form of LPS lacking outer core oligosaccharide and O-antigen induces less cytokine production in NK cells than full length LPS. We speculate that the polysaccharide fragments of LPS molecule may take part in LPS-induced IFN-γ production by NK cells. Collectively our data suggest the existence of a mechanism of LPS direct action on NK cells distinct from established TLR4-mediated signaling.

  3. Chlorpyrifos induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in JEG-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Luciana; Flores-Martín, Jésica; Ridano, Magali E; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M; Genti-Raimondi, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphorous pesticide widely used in agricultural, industrial, and household applications. We have previously shown that JEG-3 cells are able to attenuate the oxidative stress induced by CPF through the adaptive activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Considering that there is a relationship between oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER), herein we investigated whether CPF also induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells. Cells were exposed to 50μM or 100μM CPF during 24h in conditions where cell viability was not altered. Western blot and PCR assays were used to explore the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress biomarkers, respectively. CPF induced an increase of the typical ER stress-related proteins, such as GRP78/BiP and IRE1α, a sensor for the unfolded protein response, as well as in phospho-eIF2α and XBP1 mRNA splicing. Additionally, CPF led to a decrease in p53 protein expression. The downregulation of p53 levels induced by CPF was partially blocked when cells were exposed to CPF in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Altogether, these findings point out that CPF induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells; however these cells are able to attenuate it downregulating the levels of the pro-apoptotic protein p53. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. PDT-apoptotic tumor cells induce macrophage immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei-fan; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) functions as a cancer therapy through two major cell death mechanisms: apoptosis and necrosis. Immunological responses induced by PDT has been mainly associated with necrosis while apoptosis associated immune responses have not fully investigated. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in regulating immune responses. In present study, we studied whether apoptotic tumor cells could induce immune response and how the HSP70 regulates immune response. The endocytosis of tumor cells by the activated macrophages was observed at single cell level by LSM. The TNF-α release of macrophages induced by co-incubated with PDT-apoptotic tumor cells was detected by ELISA. We found that apoptotic tumor cells treated by PDT could activate the macrophages, and the immune effect decreased evidently when HSP70 was blocked. These findings not only show that apoptosis can induce immunological responses, but also show HSP70 may serves as a danger signal for immune cells and induce immune responses to regulate the efficacy of PDT.

  5. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells induce immunosuppressive IL-10-producing Th1 cells via the Notch pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, Katrin; Rudolph, Christine; Neumann, Christian; Janke, Marko; Amsen, Derk; Scheffold, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Under homeostasis, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) shift intrahepatic T-cell responses towards tolerance. However, the role of LSECs in the regulation of T-cell-induced liver inflammation is less clear. Here, we studied the capacity of LSECs to modulate pro-inflammatory Th1-cell

  6. Pseudolaric acid B induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma l929 cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing hua; Liu, Chun yu; Zheng, Gui bin; Zhang, Li Ying; Yan, Ming hui; Zhang, Wen yan; Meng, Xian ying; Yu, Xiao fang

    2013-01-01

    PAB induced various cancer cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence. But in cell line murine fibrosarcoma L929, PAB did not induce apoptosis, but autophagy, therefore it was thought by us as a good model to research the relationship of cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence bypass apoptosis. Inhibitory ratio was assessed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis. Phase contrast microscopy visualized cell morphology. Hoechst 33258 staining for nuclear change, propidium iodode (PI) staining for cell cycle, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining for autophagy, and rodanmine 123 staining for mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured by fluorescence microscopy or flowcytometry. Apoptosis was determined by DNA ladder test. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity was detected by PKC assay kit. SA-β-galactosidase assay was used to detect senescence. Protein expression was examined by western blot. PAB inhibited L929 cell growth in time-and dose-dependent manner. At 12 h, 80 μmol/L PAB induced obvious mitotic arrest; at 24 h, PAB began to induce autophagy; at 36 h, cell-treated with PAB slip into G1 cell cycle; and 3 d PAB induced senescence. In time sequence PAB induced firstly cell cycle arrest, then autophagy, then slippage into G1 phase, lastly senescence. Senescent cells had high level of autophagy, inhibiting autophagy led to apoptosis, and no senescence. PAB activated PKC activity to induce cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence, inhibiting PKC activity suppressed cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence. PAB induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cell through PKC.

  7. Human placenta-derived adherent cells induce tolerogenic immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Morschauser, Andrew; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Xiaohua; Gleason, Joseph; He, Shuyang; Chen, Hong-Jung; Jankovic, Vladimir; Ye, Qian; Labazzo, Kristen; Herzberg, Uri; Albert, Vivian R; Abbot, Stewart E; Liang, Bitao; Hariri, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Human placenta-derived adherent cells (PDAC cells) are a culture expanded, undifferentiated mesenchymal-like population derived from full-term placental tissue, with immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. PDA-001 (cenplacel-L), an intravenous formulation of PDAC cells, is in clinical development for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the immunoregulatory properties of PDAC cells, we investigated their effects on immune cell populations, including T cells and dendritic cells (DC) in vitro and in vivo. PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation in an OT-II T-cell adoptive transfer model, reduced the severity of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and ameliorated inflammation in a delayed type hypersensitivity response model. In vitro, PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation and inhibited Th1 and Th17 differentiation. Analysis of tissues derived from PDAC cell-treated animals revealed diminished CD86 expression on splenic DC, suggesting that they can also modulate DC populations. Furthermore, PDAC cells modulate the differentiation and maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived DC. Similarly, human DC differentiated from CD14+ monocytes in the presence of PDAC cells acquired a tolerogenic phenotype. These tolerogenic DC failed to induce allogeneic T-cell proliferation and differentiation toward Th1, but skewed T-cell differentiation toward Th2. Inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity resulted in a significant, but not complete, abrogation of PDAC cells' effects on DC phenotype and function, implying a role for prostaglandin E2 in PDAC-mediated immunomodulation. This study identifies modulation of DC differentiation toward immune tolerance as a key mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory activities of PDAC cells. PMID:25505962

  8. Cilastatin attenuates cisplatin-induced proximal tubular cell damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camano, Sonia; Lazaro, Alberto; Moreno-Gordaliza, Estefania; Torres, Ana M; de Lucas, Carmen; Humanes, Blanca; Lazaro, Jose A; Milagros Gomez-Gomez, M; Bosca, Lisardo; Tejedor, Alberto

    2010-08-01

    A major area in cancer therapy is the search for protective strategies against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. We investigated the protective effect of cilastatin on cisplatin-induced injury to renal proximal tubular cells. Cilastatin is a specific inhibitor of renal dehydrodipeptidase I (DHP-I), which prevents hydrolysis of imipenem and its accumulation in the proximal tubule. Primary cultures of proximal cells were treated with cisplatin (1-30 microM) in the presence or absence of cilastatin (200 microg/ml). Apoptosis and mitochondrial injury were assessed by different techniques. Cisplatin uptake and DNA binding were measured by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. HeLa cells were used to control the effect of cilastatin on the tumoricidal activity of cisplatin. Cisplatin increased cell death, apoptotic-like morphology, caspase activation, and mitochondrial injury in proximal tubular cells in a dose- and time-dependent way. Concomitant treatment with cilastatin reduced cisplatin-induced changes. Cilastatin also reduced the DNA-bound platinum but did not modify cisplatin-dependent up-regulation of death receptors (Fas) or ligands (tumor necrosis factor alpha, Fas ligand). In contrast, cilastatin did not show any effects on cisplatin-treated HeLa cells. Renal DHP-I was virtually absent in HeLa cells. Cilastatin attenuates cisplatin-induced cell death in proximal tubular cells without reducing the cytotoxic activity of cisplatin in tumor cells. Our findings suggest that the affinity of cilastatin for renal dipeptidase makes this effect specific for proximal tubular cells and may be related to a reduction in intracellular drug accumulation. Therefore, cilastatin administration might represent a novel strategy in the prevention of cisplatin-induced acute renal injury.

  9. Two Ellagic Acids Isolated from Roots of Sanguisorba officinalis L. Promote Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Megakaryocyte Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Gao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Using a bioassay-directed chromatographic separation, two ellagic acids were obtained from the ethyl acetate extract of the roots of Sanguisorba officinalis L. On the basis of chemical and spectroscopic methods, the two ellagic acids were identified as 3,3',4-tri-O-methylellagic acid-4'-O-β-d-xyloside and 3,3',4-tri-O-methylellagic acid. Stimulation of cell proliferation was assayed in hematopoietic progenitor cells using the Cell Counting kit-8 method. The megakaryocyte differentiation was determined in human erythroleukemia (HEL cells using Giemsa staining and flow cytometry analysis. The ellagic acids significantly stimulated the proliferation of Baf3/Mpl cells. Morphology analysis and megakaryocyte specific-marker CD41 staining confirmed that the ellagic acids induced megakaryocyte differentiation in HEL cells. This is the first time that 3,3',4-tri-O-methylellagic acid or 3,3',4-tri-O-methylellagic acid-4'-O-β-d-xyloside are reported to induce megakaryopoiesis, suggesting a class of small molecules which differ from others non-peptidyl, and appears to have potential for clinical development as a therapeutic agent for patients with blood platelet disorders.

  10. Paclitaxel inhibits the hyper-activation of spleen cells by lipopolysaccharide and induces cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ji; Joo, Hong-Gu

    2016-12-30

    Paclitaxel was isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia, and used as an anticancer agent. Paclitaxel prevents cancer cell division by inhibiting spindle fiber function, inducing cell death. A recent study demonstrated that paclitaxel binds to myeloid differentiation protein-2 of Toll-like receptor 4 and prevents the signal transduction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Paclitaxel converts immune cells hypo-responsive to LPS. In this study, we investigated whether paclitaxel can inhibit the phenotype and function of immune cells. To accomplish this, we used spleen cells, a major type of immune cell, LPS, a representative inflammatory agent and a mitogen for B lymphocytes. LPS profoundly increased the activation and cytokine production of spleen cells. However, paclitaxel significantly inhibited LPS-induced hyper-activation of spleen cells. Furthermore, we found that paclitaxel induced cell death of LPS-treated spleen cells. These results suggest that paclitaxel can inhibit the hyper-immune response of LPS in spleen cells via a variety of mechanisms. These findings suggest that paclitaxel can be used as a modulating agent for diseases induced by hyper-activation of B lymphocytes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that paclitaxel inhibits the function of spleen cells activated by LPS, and further induces cell death.

  11. Type of cell death induced by alpha-trifluoromethyl acyloins in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideo, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Ken; Shimada, Jun; Kawase, Masami; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that alpha-trifluoromethyl acyloins (TFs) induced various types of cell death, depending on the target cancer cell line. We investigated here what type of cell death is induced by a-trifluoromethyl acyloins in two human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HSC-2, HSC-4). TFs produced few TUNEL-positive cells. TFs induced annexin V/PI-double positive HSC-2 cells and annexin V-positive/PI-negative HSC-4 cells, respectively, but failed to activate caspase-3, capase-8 and caspase-9 in both HSC-2 and HSC-4 cells. On the other hand, TFs induced the formation of acidic organelles (detected by acridine orange staining) in both HSC-2 and HSC-4 cells. When HSC-2 and HSC-4 cells that had been transfected with expression vector encording the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) gene fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) were treated with TFs, LC3-GFP fusion protein was accumulated as granular dots in autophagosomes. Pretreatment with 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagy, partially inhibited the cytotoxicity of TFs, the formation of acidic organelles and LC3 accumulation in the autophagosome. These data suggest that alpha-trifluoromethyl acyloins may induce autophagic cell death in HSC-2 and HSC-4 cells following the early stage of necrosis or apoptosis, respectively.

  12. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-09-21

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A₂. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  13. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Jung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  14. Chloroquinone Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research Article. Chloroquinone Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces. Apoptosis in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cell Lines. Xin-Qing Yang, Hao Zheng, Qing Ye, Rui-Yu Li* and Yong Chen. Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Fujian Provincial Clinical College, Fujian Medical University, China.

  15. Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung cancer cells. Jie Huang, Fa-jiu Li, Shi Chen, Yi Shi, Xiao-jiang Wang, Chuan-hai Wang, Qing- ..... method for the determination of green and black tea polyphenols in biomatrices by high-performance liquid chromatography with coulometric array detection.

  16. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from the pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    The value of stem cells has become increasingly evident in recent years with the advent of genetic engineering tools that allow site-specific modifications to the genome. The use of stem cells to induce modifications has several potential benefits for the livestock industry including improving anim...

  17. Modeling neurodegenerative diseases with patient-derived induced pluripotent cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Anna; Zhang, Yu; Chandrasekaran, Abinaya

    2017-01-01

    patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and isogenic controls generated using CRISPR-Cas9 mediated genome editing. The iPSCs are self-renewable and capable of being differentiated into the cell types affected by the diseases. These in vitro models based on patient-derived iPSCs provide...

  18. Langerhans cells are required for UVR-induced immunosuppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Schwarz (Agatha); M. Noordegraaf (Madelon); A. Maeda (Akira); K. Torii (Kan); B.E. Clausen (Bjorn)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPainting of haptens onto UVR-exposed skin does not result in sensitization but induces regulatory T cells (Treg). This was explained by UVR-mediated depletion of Langerhans cells (LCs). Furthermore, migration of UVR-damaged but still viable LCs into lymph nodes appears to be essential to

  19. Palladium induced oxidative stress and cell death in normal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pretreatment of hepatocytes with ROS scavengers and MPT pore sealing agents reduced cell death which explains the role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial pathway of ROS formation in Pd hepatocytes cell toxicity. Overall, the results have distinctly determined the mechanism by which Pd-induced toxicity in the ...

  20. Chloroquinone Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the role of chloroquinone (CQ) in inducing apoptosis in HONE-1 and HNE-1, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines. Methods: Water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST)-1 assay was used for the determination of cell proliferation while an inverted microscope was employed for the analysis of ...

  1. Generation of Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells without Viral Vectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keisuke Okita; Masato Nakagawa; Hong Hyenjong; Tomoko Ichisaka; Shinya Yamanaka

    2008-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been generated from mouse and human somatic cells by introducing Oct3/4 and Sox2 with either Klf4 and c-Myc or Nanog and Lin28 using retroviruses or lentiviruses...

  2. Generation of male germ cells from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangfang Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Germ cells are the only cell type that passes genetic information to the next generation. In most metazoan species, primordial germ cells (PGCs were induced from epiblasts by signals from the neighboring tissues. In vitro derivation of germ cells from the pluripotent stem cells (PSCs such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced PSCs (iPSCs are of great values for the treatment of infertility, for animal breeding, and for studying the mechanism of germ cell development. Although the derivations of male germ cells from PSCs have been previously reported, most of the studies failed to conduct the induction in a well-controlled and highly efficient manner. Here, we report the derivation of induced PGC-like cells (iPGCLCs from mouse iPSCs via induced epiblast-like cells (iEpiLCs as being monitored by the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein gene under the control of the promoter of stimulated by retinoic acid 8 (Stra8-EGFP. The identity of iPGCLCs was characterized by examining the expression of multiple marker genes as well as by the recovery of spermatogenesis after they were transplanted to the testis of infertile W/Wv mice. Furthermore, iPGCLCs were either induced to germline stem cell-like cells (iGSCLCs or reverted back to embryonic germ cell-like cells (iEGCLCs. In conclusion, we have established an efficient procedure for inducing iPSCs into iPGCLCs that can be further expanded and induced to more developed germ cells. This work indicates that the technology of in vitro germ cell induction is becoming more sophisticated and can be further improved.

  3. High hydrostatic pressure induces immunogenic cell death in human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucikova, Jitka; Moserova, Irena; Truxova, Iva; Hermanova, Ivana; Vancurova, Irena; Partlova, Simona; Fialova, Anna; Sojka, Ludek; Cartron, Pierre-Francois; Houska, Milan; Rob, Lukas; Bartunkova, Jirina; Spisek, Radek

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have identified molecular events characteristic of immunogenic cell death (ICD), including surface exposure of calreticulin (CRT), the heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP90, the release of high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) and the release of ATP from dying cells. We investigated the potential of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) to induce ICD in human tumor cells. HHP induced the rapid expression of HSP70, HSP90 and CRT on the cell surface. HHP also induced the release of HMGB1 and ATP. The interaction of dendritic cells (DCs) with HHP-treated tumor cells led to a more rapid rate of DC phagocytosis, upregulation of CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR and the release of interleukin IL-6, IL-12p70 and TNF-α. DCs pulsed with tumor cells killed by HHP induced high numbers of tumor-specific T cells. DCs pulsed with HHP-treated tumor cells also induced the lowest number of regulatory T cells. In addition, we found that the key features of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptotic pathway, such as reactive oxygen species production, phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α and activation of caspase-8, were activated by HHP treatment. Therefore, HHP acts as a reliable and potent inducer of ICD in human tumor cells. © 2014 UICC.

  4. Dimethyl fumarate increases fetal hemoglobin, provides heme detoxification, and corrects anemia in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Pace, Betty; Gupta, Dipti; Sturtevant, Sarah; Li, Biaoru; Makala, Levi; Brittain, Julia; Moore, Nancy; Vieira, Benjamin F; Thullen, Timothy; Stone, Ivan; Li, Huo; Hobbs, William E; Light, David R

    2017-10-19

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) results from a point mutation in the β-globin gene forming hemoglobin S (HbS), which polymerizes in deoxygenated erythrocytes, triggering recurrent painful vaso-occlusive crises and chronic hemolytic anemia. Reactivation of fetal Hb (HbF) expression ameliorates these symptoms of SCD. Nuclear factor (erythroid derived-2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that triggers cytoprotective and antioxidant pathways to limit oxidative damage and inflammation and increases HbF synthesis in CD34+ stem cell-derived erythroid progenitors. We investigated the ability of dimethyl fumarate (DMF), a small-molecule Nrf2 agonist, to activate γ-globin transcription and enhance HbF in tissue culture and in murine and primate models. DMF recruited Nrf2 to the γ-globin promoters and the locus control region of the β-globin locus in erythroleukemia cells, elevated HbF in SCD donor-derived erythroid progenitors, and reduced hypoxia-induced sickling. Chronic DMF administration in SCD mice induced HbF and increased Nrf2-dependent genes to detoxify heme and limit inflammation. This improved hematological parameters, reduced plasma-free Hb, and attenuated inflammatory markers. Chronic DMF administration to nonanemic primates increased γ-globin mRNA in BM and HbF protein in rbc. DMF represents a potential therapy for SCD to induce HbF and augment vasoprotection and heme detoxification.

  5. Human B cells induce dendritic cell maturation and favour Th2 polarization by inducing OX-40 ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, Mohan S.; Sharma, Meenu; Hegde, Pushpa; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Pulendran, Bali; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in immune homeostasis by regulating the functions of various immune cells, including T and B cells. Notably, DCs also undergo education on reciprocal signalling by these immune cells and environmental factors. Various reports demonstrated that B cells have profound regulatory functions, although only few reports have explored the regulation of human DCs by B cells. Here we demonstrate that activated but not resting B cells induce maturation of DCs with distinct features to polarize Th2 cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-5, IL-4 and IL-13. B-cell-induced maturation of DCs is contact dependent and implicates signalling of B-cell activation molecules CD69, B-cell-activating factor receptor, and transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interactor. Mechanistically, differentiation of Th2 cells by B-cell-matured DCs is dependent on OX-40 ligand. Collectively, our results suggest that B cells have the ability to control their own effector functions by enhancing the ability of human DCs to mediate Th2 differentiation. PMID:24910129

  6. Induced Accelerated Aging in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    clones . Western blot analysis will be used to detect the protein expression after selection. 2. Differentiation into oligoprecursor cells (OPCs... monkey and mouse which will be tested in iPSC derived neurons aged with progerin. 13 Key Research Accomplishments: • Milestone 1 (month 1-2...iPSC clones with drug-inducible progerin construct we established the plasmid transfection for iPSC induced neural stem cells, the retroviral

  7. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidjanin, D. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Grdina, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Woloschak, G.E. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  8. Isosorbide delays gentamicin-induced vestibular sensory cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumida, Masaya; Anniko, Matti

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy of isosorbide for protection from vestibular sensory cell damage was investigated. The effects of isosorbide on gentamicin-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were studied by means of the fluorescence indicators 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate and dihydrotetramethylrosamine. The effect on gentamicin-induced vestibular sensory cell damage was examined by using an in vitro LIVE/DEAD system. Isosorbide inhibited the production of both NO and ROS. Isosorbide limited the vestibular sensory cell damage caused by gentamicin. It is, therefore, suggested that isosorbide may help to treat inner ear disorders.

  9. Significant differences in genotoxicity induced by retrovirus integration in human T cells and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weiyan; Wang, Yingjia; Chang, Tammy; Huang, He; Yee, Jiing-Kuan

    2013-04-25

    Retrovirus is frequently used in the genetic modification of mammalian cells and the establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via cell reprogramming. Vector-induced genotoxicity could induce profound effect on the physiology and function of these stem cells and their differentiated progeny. We analyzed retrovirus-induced genotoxicity in somatic cell Jurkat and two iPSC lines. In Jurkat cells, retrovirus frequently activated host gene expression and gene activation was not dependent on the distance between the integration site and the transcription start site of the host gene. In contrast, retrovirus frequently down-regulated host gene expression in iPSCs, possibly due to the action of chromatin silencing that spreads from the provirus to the nearby host gene promoter. Our data raises the issue that some of the phenotypic variability observed among iPSC clones derived from the same parental cell line may be caused by retrovirus-induced gene expression changes rather than by the reprogramming process itself. It also underscores the importance of characterizing retrovirus integration and carrying out risk assessment of iPSCs before they can be applied in basic research and clinics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Diphenylhydantoin-induced pure red cell aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusia, Usha; Malhotra, Purnima; Joshi, Panul

    2006-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon complication of diphenylhydantoin therapy. It has not been reported in Indian literature. Awareness of the entity helps in establishing the cause of anaemia in these patients and alerts the physicians to the need of comprehensive haematological monitoring in these patients. A case of 58-year-old male who developed pure red cell aplasia following three months of diphenylhydantoin therapy is reported here.

  11. Cisplatin-induced Casepase-3 activation in different tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hua; Li, Xiao; Su, Ting; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in normal organism development which is one of the main types of programmed cell death to help tissues maintain homeostasis. Defective apoptosis can result in cell accumulation and therefore effects on tumor pathogenesis, progression and therapy resistance. A family of proteins, known as caspases, is typically activated in the early stages of apoptosis. Therefore, studying the kinetics of activation of caspases induced by antitumor drugs can contribute to antitumor drug discovery and explanation of the molecular mechanisms. This paper detected the Caspase-3 activity induced by cisplatin in human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-M), human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and human epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hela) with stably expressing ECFP-DEVDDsRed (CD3) probe, a fluorescent probe consisting of Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), red fluorescent protein (DsRed) and a linker with a recognition site of Caspase-3, by using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging system. Under the same concentration of cisplatin, ACC-M cells responded the most rapidly, and then HepG2 cells and Hela cells, respectively, in the early 30 hours. Later, HepG2 cells represented acceleration in the Caspase-3 activation speed and reached full activation the earliest comparing to other two cell types. The results demonstrated that ACC-M cell is more sensitive than the other two cell types under the treatment of cisplatin.

  12. Human Alveolar Epithelial Cell Injury Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmider, Beata; Messier, Elise M.; Chu, Hong Wei; Mason, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoke (CS) is a highly complex mixture and many of its components are known carcinogens, mutagens, and other toxic substances. CS induces oxidative stress and cell death, and this cell toxicity plays a key role in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied the effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in human alveolar epithelial type I-like (ATI-like) cells. These are isolated type II cells that are differentiating toward the type I cell phenotype in vitro and have lost many type II cell markers and express type I cell markers. ATI-like cells were more sensitive to CSE than alveolar type II cells, which maintained their differentiated phenotype in vitro. We observed disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis and necrosis that were detected by double staining with acridine orange and ethidium bromide or Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide and TUNEL assay after treatment with CSE. We also detected caspase 3 and caspase 7 activities and lipid peroxidation. CSE induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and increased expression of Nrf2, HO-1, Hsp70 and Fra1. Moreover, we found that Nrf2 knockdown sensitized ATI-like cells to CSE and Nrf2 overexpression provided protection against CSE-induced cell death. We also observed that two antioxidant compounds N-acetylcysteine and trolox protected ATI-like cells against injury by CSE. Conclusions Our study indicates that Nrf2 activation is a major factor in cellular defense of the human alveolar epithelium against CSE-induced toxicity and oxidative stress. Therefore, antioxidant agents that modulate Nrf2 would be expected to restore antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes and to prevent CS-related lung injury and perhaps lessen the development of emphysema. PMID:22163265

  13. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  14. Reduced immunogenicity of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from Sertoli cells.

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    Xiaoying Wang

    Full Text Available Sertoli cells constitute the structural framework in testis and provide an immune-privileged environment for germ cells. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells resemble embryonic stem cells (ES cells and are generated from somatic cells by expression of specific reprogramming transcription factors. Here, we used C57BL/6 (B6 Sertoli cells to generate iPS cells (Ser-iPS cells and compared the immunogenicity of Ser-iPS cells with iPS cells derived from mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF-iPS cells. Ser-iPS cells were injected into syngeneic mice to test for their in vivo immunogenicity in teratoma assay. Teratoma assay allows assessing in vivo immunogenicity of iPS cells and of their differentiated progeny simultaneously. We observed that early-passage Ser-iPS cells formed more teratomas with less immune cell infiltration and tissue damage and necrosis than MEF-iPS cells. Differentiating Ser-iPS cells in embryoid bodies (EBs showed reduced T cell activation potential compared to MEF-iPS cells, which was similar to syngeneic ES cells. However, Ser-iPS cells lost their reduced immunogenicity in vivo after extended passaging in vitro and late-passage Ser-iPS cells exhibited an immunogenicity similar to MEF-iPS cells. These findings indicate that early-passage Ser-iPS cells retain some somatic memory of Sertoli cells that impacts on immunogenicity of iPS cells and iPS cell-derived cells in vivo and in vitro. Our data suggest that immune-privileged Sertoli cells might represent a preferred source for iPS cell generation, if it comes to the use of iPS cell-derived cells for transplantation.

  15. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  16. Prostate cancer cells induce osteoblastic differentiation via semaphorin 3A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuzhou; Shen, Weiwei; Qiu, Hao; Hu, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer metastasis to bone is the second most commonly diagnosed malignant disease among men worldwide. Such metastatic disease is characterized by the presence of osteoblastic bone lesions, and is associated with high rates of mortality. However, the various mechanisms involved in prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic differentiation have not been fully explored. Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A) is a newly identified regulator of bone metabolism which stimulates differentiation of pre-osteoblastic cells under physiological conditions. We investigated in this study whether prostate cancer cells can mediate osteoblastic activity through Sema 3A. We cultured osteoprogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells in prostate cancer-conditioned medium, and analyzed levels of Sema 3A protein in diverse prostate cancer cell lines to identify cell lines in which Sema 3A production showed a positive correlation with osteo-stimulation. C4-2 cells were stably transfected with Sema 3A short hairpin RNA to further determine whether Sema 3A contributes to the ability of C4-2 cells to induce osteoblastic differentiation. Down-regulation of Sema 3A expression decreased indicators of C4-2 CM-induced osteoblastic differentiation, including alkaline phosphatase production and mineralization. Additionally, silencing or neutralizing Sema 3A in C4-2 cells resulted in diminished β-catenin expression in osteogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells. Our results suggest that prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic differentiation is at least partially mediated by Sema 3A, and may be regulated by the β-catenin signalling pathway. Sema 3A may represent a novel target for treatment of prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic lesions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Cells Survive and Mature in the Nonhuman Primate Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina E. Emborg

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs opens up the possibility for personalized cell therapy. Here, we show that transplanted autologous rhesus monkey iPSC-derived neural progenitors survive for up to 6 months and differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and myelinating oligodendrocytes in the brains of MPTP-induced hemiparkinsonian rhesus monkeys with a minimal presence of inflammatory cells and reactive glia. This finding represents a significant step toward personalized regenerative therapies.

  18. Mechanisms of Ethanol-induced Death of Cerebellar Granule Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Maternal ethanol exposure during pregnancy may cause fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation. The most deleterious effect of fetal alcohol exposure is inducing neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Ethanol-induced loss of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) underlies many of the behavioral deficits observed in FASD. The cerebellum is one of the brain areas that is most susceptible to ethanol during development. Ethanol exposure causes a loss of both cerebellar Purkinje cells and granule cells. This review focuses on the toxic effect of ethanol on cerebellar granule cells (CGC) and the underlying mechanisms. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that ethanol induces apoptotic death of CGC. The vulnerability of CGC to ethanol-induced death diminishes over time as neurons mature. Several mechanisms for ethanol-induced apoptosis of CGC have been suggested. These include inhibition of NMDA receptors, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, disturbance of potassium channel currents, thiamine deficiency, and disruption of translational regulation. Cultures of CGC provide an excellent system to investigate cellular/molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced neurodegeneration and to evaluate interventional strategies. This review will also discuss the approaches leading to neuroprotection against ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. PMID:20927663

  19. Oxidative stress in NSC-741909-induced apoptosis of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Peng

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NSC-741909 is a novel anticancer agent that can effectively suppress the growth of several cell lines derived from lung, colon, breast, ovarian, and kidney cancers. We recently showed that NSC-741909-induced antitumor activity is associated with sustained Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activation, resulting from suppression of JNK dephosphorylation associated with decreased protein levels of MAPK phosphatase-1. However, the mechanisms of NSC-741909-induced antitumor activity remain unclear. Because JNK is frequently activated by oxidative stress in cells, we hypothesized that reactive oxygen species (ROS may be involved in the suppression of JNK dephosphorylation and the cytotoxicity of NSC-741909. Methods The generation of ROS was measured by using the cell-permeable nonfluorescent compound H2DCF-DA and flow cytometry analysis. Cell viability was determined by sulforhodamine B assay. Western blot analysis, immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry assays were used to determine apoptosis and molecular changes induced by NSC-741909. Results Treatment with NSC-741909 induced robust ROS generation and marked MAPK phosphatase-1 and -7 clustering in NSC-741909-sensitive, but not resistant cell lines, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The generation of ROS was detectable as early as 30 min and ROS levels were as high as 6- to 8-fold above basal levels after treatment. Moreover, the NSC-741909-induced ROS generation could be blocked by pretreatment with antioxidants, such as nordihydroguaiaretic acid, aesculetin, baicalein, and caffeic acid, which in turn, inhibited the NSC-741909-induced JNK activation and apoptosis. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the increased ROS production was associated with NSC-741909-induced antitumor activity and that ROS generation and subsequent JNK activation is one of the primary mechanisms of NSC-741909-mediated antitumor cell activity.

  20. Breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance are sensitized to cisplatin-induced cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    with parental MCF-7 cells. Our data show that Bcl-2 can protect antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells from cisplatin-induced cell death, indicating that the reduced expression of Bcl-2 in the antiestrogen-resistant cells plays a role in sensitizing the cells to cisplatin treatment....... for future breast cancer treatment. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the chemotherapeutic compound cisplatin using a panel of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cell lines established from the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. We show that the antiestrogen-resistant cells...

  1. Xylodiol from Xylopia langsdorfiana induces apoptosis in HL60 cells

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    Marianna Vieira S. Castello-Branco

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An atisane diterpene was isolated from Xylopia langsdorfiana St. Hilaire & Tulasne, Annonaceae, leaves, ent-atisane-7α,16α-diol (xylodiol. Preliminary study showed that xylodiol was cytotoxic and induced differentiation on human leukemia cell lines. However, the molecular mechanisms of xylodiol-mediated cytotoxicity have not been fully defined. Thus, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of xylodiol in human leukemia HL60 cell line. Xylodiol induced apoptosis and necrosis. HL60 cells treated with xylodiol showed biochemical changes characteristic of apoptosis, including caspases-8, -9 and -3 activation and loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (∆ Ψm. However, there was a condensation rather than swelling of mitochondria. Moreover, the formation of condensed mitochondria and the loss of ∆ Ψm occurred downstream of caspase activation. Cyclosporine A did not protect HL60 cells from the cytotoxic effects of xylodiol, suggesting that the loss of ∆ Ψm is a late event in xylodiol-induced apoptosis. Oxidative stress was involved in xylodiol-induced apoptosis. Thus, we conclude that activated caspases cleave cellular proteins resulting in mitochondrial damage leading to mitochondrial condensation, loss of ∆ Ψm and ROS release from the mitochondria. ROS can further induce and maintain a collapse of ∆ Ψm leading to cellular damage through oxidation of lipids and proteins resulting in apoptotic cell death.

  2. Cell phone-induced ostracism threatens fundamental needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Andrew; Dvir, Maayan; Wesselmann, Eric; Kruger, Daniel J; Finkenauer, Catrin

    2018-02-13

    Cell phones are useful tools with both practical and social benefits. However, using them in the context of face-to-face conversations may be problematic. We consider this behavior a form of ostracism and test its effects on the satisfaction of basic psychological needs for belonging, self-esteem, control, and meaningful existence. In Study 1 participants who recalled a time in which a friend was checking a cell phone during a serious conversation reported feeling more ostracized (ignored and excluded), greater pain and threat to basic needs than participants recalling a conversation without a cell phone interruption or a control event. Study 2 replicated and extended this effect: cell phone-induced ostracism's effects were partially mediated by decreased feelings of relational evaluation, and threatened basic needs both in serious and casual conversation contexts. Findings from both studies also indicated that cell phone-induced ostracism hurts women more so than men.

  3. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Patrick; Wagner, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) are known to form aggregates in the forms of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. Rouleaux formation can be also induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC solution. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly rely on indirect measurements like flow chamber experiments, but on the single cell level data is lacking. Here we present measurements on the dextran induced aggregation of red blood cells by use of atomic force microscopy based single cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs was determined. The results are in good agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and former experimental studies.

  4. Quantification of Depletion-Induced Adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, P.; Verdier, C.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  5. Ionizing radiation induces tumor cell lysyl oxidase secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Colette J; Sharma, Ashish; Vuong, Dinh-Van

    2014-01-01

    metalloproteinases, among others, to promote tumor progression. Lysyl oxidase is known to play an important role in hypoxia-dependent cancer cell dissemination and metastasis. Here, we investigated the effects of IR on the expression and secretion of lysyl oxidase (LOX) from tumor cells. METHODS: LOX-secretion along...... with enzymatic activity was investigated in multiple tumor cell lines in response to irradiation. Transwell migration assays were performed to evaluate invasive capacity of naive tumor cells in response to IR-induced LOX. In vivo studies for confirming IR-enhanced LOX were performed employing...... immunohistochemistry of tumor tissues and ex vivo analysis of murine blood serum derived from locally irradiated A549-derived tumor xenografts. RESULTS: LOX was secreted in a dose dependent way from several tumor cell lines in response to irradiation. IR did not increase LOX-transcription but induced LOX...

  6. Baicalein protects rat insulinoma INS-1 cells from palmitate-induced lipotoxicity by inducing HO-1.

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    Hyun Jeong Kwak

    Full Text Available β-Cell dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D, and the identification of novel approaches to improve β-cell function is essential to treat this disease. Baicalein, a flavonoid originally isolated from the root of Scutellaria Baicalensis, has been shown to have beneficial effects on β-cell function. Here, the authors investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of baicalein against palmitate (PA-induced impaired β-cell function, and placed focus on the role of heme oxygenase (HO-1.Rat pancreatic β-cell line INS-1 cells or mouse pancreatic islets were cultured with PA (500 μM to induce lipotoxicity in the presence or absence of baicalein (50 μM, and the expressions of the ER stress markers, ATF-3, CHOP and GRP78 were detected by Western blotting and/or qPCR. The involvement of HO-1 was evaluated by HO-1 siRNA transfection and using the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP.Baicalein reduced PA-induced ER stress and inflammation and enhanced insulin secretion, and these effects were associated with the induction of HO-1. Furthermore, these protective effects were attenuated by ZnPP and by HO-1 siRNA. Pretreatment of PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor significantly inhibited the protective effects of baicalein and blocked HO-1 induction. On the other hand, CO production by RuCO (a CO donor ameliorated PA-induced ER stress, suggesting that CO production followed by HO-1 induction may contribute to the protective effects of baicalein against PA-induced β-cell dysfunction.Baicalein protects pancreatic β-cells from PA-induced ER stress and inflammation via an ERK-HO-1 dependent pathway. The authors suggest HO-1 induction in pancreatic β-cells appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy for T2D.

  7. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focosi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Summary Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises. Significance The aging population in Western countries is causing a progressive reduction of blood donors and a constant increase of blood recipients. Because blood is the main therapeutic option to treat acute hemorrhage, cost-effective alternatives to blood donations are being actively investigated. The enormous replication capability of induced pluripotent stem cells and their promising results in many other fields of medicine could be an apt solution to produce the large numbers of viable cells required in transfusion and usher in a new era in transfusion medicine. The present report describes the potentiality, technological hurdles, and promises of induced pluripotent stem cells to generate red blood cells by redifferentiation. PMID:26819256

  8. Long-term maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells by automated cell culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konagaya, Shuhei; Ando, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Suemori, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-11-17

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are regarded as new sources for cell replacement therapy. These cells can unlimitedly expand under undifferentiated conditions and be differentiated into multiple cell types. Automated culture systems enable the large-scale production of cells. In addition to reducing the time and effort of researchers, an automated culture system improves the reproducibility of cell cultures. In the present study, we newly designed a fully automated cell culture system for human iPS maintenance. Using an automated culture system, hiPS cells maintained their undifferentiated state for 60 days. Automatically prepared hiPS cells had a potency of differentiation into three germ layer cells including dopaminergic neurons and pancreatic cells.

  9. Apoptosis of bladder transitional cell carcinoma T24 cells induced by adenovirus-mediated inducible nitric oxide synthase gene transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jing; Zeng, Qing; Jiang, Xian-Zheng; He, Le-Ye; Wang, Jin-Rong; Yao, Kun; Wang, Chang-Hui

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the effects of adenovirus-mediated inducible nitric oxide synthase gene transfection on bladder transitional cell carcinoma T24 cells, and to provide novel insights and approaches to clinical therapies against bladder transitional cell carcinoma. Firstly, construct recombinant adenovirus vector pAd-iNOS of iNOS, followed by transfection of pAd-iNOS into HECK293 packaging cells. Thirdly, harvest recombinant adenovirus rAd-iNOS after amplification and purification procedures. Finally, transfect the recombinant adenovirus rAd-iNOS into human bladder carcinoma T24 cells and examine the effect of rAd-iNOS transfection on apoptosis of T24 and possible mechanism. As shown by this study, the recombinant adenovirus rAd-iNOS was constructed successfully. The virus titer was 5.8×10(8) PFU/mL and recombinant was verified by PCR analysis. Transfection of adenovirus rAd-iNOS into T24 cells could induce secretion of high NO concentration, P53 protein expression up-regulation, as well as promotion of T24 cell apoptosis. The transfection of human bladder carcinoma T24 cells from recombinant adenovirus rAd-iNOS was confirmed to induce intracellular iNOS over-expression, high production of NO, up-regulation of intracellular P53 expression and promotion of cell apoptosis.

  10. Macrophages overexpressing Aire induce CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jitong; Fu, Haiying; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Wufei; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aire plays an important role in central immune tolerance by regulating the transcription of thousands of genes. However, the role of Aire in the peripheral immune system is poorly understood. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, but the effect of Aire on Treg cells in the peripheral immune system is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of macrophages overexpressing Aire on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells by co-culturing Aire-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells or their supernatant with splenocytes. The results show that macrophages overexpressing Aire enhanced the expression of Foxp3 mRNA and induced different subsets of Treg cells in splenocytes through cell-cell contact or a co-culture supernatants. TGF-β is a key molecule in the increases of CD4+CD45RA+Foxp3hi T cell and activating Treg (aTreg) levels observed following cell‑supernatant co-culturing. Subsets of Treg cells were induced by Aire-overexpressing macrophages, and the manipulation of Treg cells by the targeting of Aire may provide a method for the treatment of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases.

  11. DNA damage responses in human induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Momcilovic

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells have the capability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation into all somatic cell types. Since they can be produced through somatic cell reprogramming, which uses a defined set of transcription factors, iPS cells represent important sources of patient-specific cells for clinical applications. However, before these cells can be used in therapeutic designs, it is essential to understand their genetic stability.Here, we describe DNA damage responses in human iPS cells. We observe hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents resulting in rapid induction of apoptosis after γ-irradiation. Expression of pluripotency factors does not appear to be diminished after irradiation in iPS cells. Following irradiation, iPS cells activate checkpoint signaling, evidenced by phosphorylation of ATM, NBS1, CHEK2, and TP53, localization of ATM to the double strand breaks (DSB, and localization of TP53 to the nucleus of NANOG-positive cells. We demonstrate that iPS cells temporary arrest cell cycle progression in the G(2 phase of the cell cycle, displaying a lack of the G(1/S cell cycle arrest similar to human embryonic stem (ES cells. Furthermore, both cell types remove DSB within six hours of γ-irradiation, form RAD51 foci and exhibit sister chromatid exchanges suggesting homologous recombination repair. Finally, we report elevated expression of genes involved in DNA damage signaling, checkpoint function, and repair of various types of DNA lesions in ES and iPS cells relative to their differentiated counterparts.High degrees of similarity in DNA damage responses between ES and iPS cells were found. Even though reprogramming did not alter checkpoint signaling following DNA damage, dramatic changes in cell cycle structure, including a high percentage of cells in the S phase, increased radiosensitivity and loss of DNA damage-induced G(1/S cell cycle arrest, were observed in stem cells generated by induced pluripotency.

  12. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae-Hee, E-mail: leedneo@gmail.com [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Dong-Wook [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of VA (United States); Jung, Chang-Hwa [Division of Metabolism and Functionality Research, Korea Food Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong J. [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Park, Daeho, E-mail: daehopark@gist.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  13. Damage of yeast cells induced by pulsed light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Kazuko; Shibato, Junko; Sameshima, Takashi; Fukunaga, Sakae; Isobe, Seiichiro; Arihara, Keizo; Itoh, Makoto

    2003-08-15

    DNA damage, such as formation of single strand breaks and pyrimidine dimers was induced in yeast cells after irradiation by pulsed light, which were essentially the same as observed with continuous ultraviolet (UV) light. The UV-induced DNA damage is slightly higher than seen with pulsed light. However, increased concentration of eluted protein and structural change in the irradiated yeast cells were observed only in the case of pulsed light. A difference in the inactivation effect between pulsed light and UV light was found and this suggested cell membrane damage induced by pulsed light irradiation. It is proposed that pulsed light can be used as an effective sterilizing method for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  14. Interleukin-7 and Toll-like receptor 7 induce synergistic B cell and T cell activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Bikker

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the potential synergy of IL-7-driven T cell-dependent and TLR7-mediated B cell activation and to assess the additive effects of monocyte/macrophages in this respect. METHODS: Isolated CD19 B cells and CD4 T cells from healthy donors were co-cultured with TLR7 agonist (TLR7A, Gardiquimod, IL-7, or their combination with or without CD14 monocytes/macrophages (T/B/mono; 1 : 1 : 0,1. Proliferation was measured using 3H-thymidine incorporation and Ki67 expression. Activation marker (CD19, HLA-DR, CD25 expression was measured by FACS analysis. Immunoglobulins were measured by ELISA and release of cytokines was measured by Luminex assay. RESULTS: TLR7-induced B cell activation was not associated with T cell activation. IL-7-induced T cell activation alone and together with TLR7A synergistically increased numbers of both proliferating (Ki67+ B cells and T cells, which was further increased in the presence of monocytes/macrophages. This was associated by up regulation of activation markers on B cells and T cells. Additive or synergistic induction of production of immunoglobulins by TLR7 and IL-7 was associated by synergistic induction of T cell cytokines (IFNγ, IL-17A, IL-22, which was only evident in the presence of monocytes/macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: IL-7-induced CD4 T cell activation and TLR7-induced B cell activation synergistically induce T helper cell cytokine and B cell immunoglobulin production, which is critically dependent on monocytes/macrophages. Our results indicate that previously described increased expression of IL-7 and TLR7 together with increased numbers of macrophages at sites of inflammation in autoimmune diseases like RA and pSS significantly contributes to enhanced lymphocyte activation.

  15. Glucocorticoids induce autophagy in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Fan, J.; Lin, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a widespread clinical complication following glucocorticoid therapy. This irreversible damage to boneforming and resorbing cells is essential in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Autophagy is a physiological process involved in the regulation of cells ...... that in response to glucocorticoid administration, induced autophagy aids to maintain proliferation and prevent apoptosis of BMSCs. Thus, it is hypothesized that autophagy may be a novel target in the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis.......Glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a widespread clinical complication following glucocorticoid therapy. This irreversible damage to boneforming and resorbing cells is essential in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Autophagy is a physiological process involved in the regulation of cells...

  16. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2014-02-01

    The multiphoton FLIM tomograph MPTflex with its flexible scan head, articulated arm, and the tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study cell monolayers and 3D cell clusters. FLIM was performed with 250 ps temporal resolution and submicron special resolution using time-correlated single photon counting. The autofluorescence based on NAD(P)H and flavins/flavoproteins has been measured in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) originated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts and non-proliferative mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

  17. Mitochondrial impairment induces excitotoxic death in cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Antonella; Atlante, Anna; Azzariti, Amalia; Sgaramella, Giuseppe; Calissano, Pietro; Marra, Ersilia

    2004-06-01

    A close relationship links mitochondria to cell death with mitochondrial function-impairment considered a major biochemical event in the process of both apoptosis and necrosis. We have used different inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. mitochondrial respiratory chain and ATP synthesis inhibitors, and an uncoupler to investigate the mode of cell death caused by these compounds in cerebellar granule cells. This study shows that in cultured cerebellar granule cells either oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors or uncoupler induce an excitotoxic-like reaction which is mediated by activation of NMDA receptors and is likely due to the release of glutamate. Consistently, survival may occur if the toxic action of glutamate is prevented.

  18. Radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zargari, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of tinea capitis using radiotherapy was introduced at the beginning of the twentieth century. A variety of cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are seen years after this treatment. Objective: We sought to determine the clinical characteristics of BCCs among irradiated patients. Methods: The clinical records of all patients with BCC in a clinic in north of Iran were reviewed. Results: Of the 58 cases of BCC, 29 had positive history for radiotherapy in their ch...

  19. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from osteoarthritis patient-derived synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Son, Myung Jin; Son, Mi-Young; Seol, Binna; Kim, Janghwan; Park, Jongjin; Kim, Jung Hwa; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Su A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Kang-Sik; Han, Yong-Mahn; Chang, Jae-Suk; Cho, Yee Sook

    2011-10-01

    This study was undertaken to generate and characterize human induced pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and to examine whether these cells can be developed into disease-relevant cell types for use in disease modeling and drug discovery. Human synovial cells isolated from two 71-year-old women with advanced OA were characterized and reprogrammed into induced PSCs by ectopic expression of 4 transcription factors (Oct-4, SOX2, Klf4, and c-Myc). The pluripotency status of each induced PSC line was validated by comparison with human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We found that OA patient-derived human synovial cells had human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like characteristics, as indicated by the expression of specific markers, including CD14-, CD19-, CD34-, CD45-, CD44+, CD51+, CD90+, CD105+, and CD147+. Microarray analysis of human MSCs and human synovial cells further determined their unique and overlapping gene expression patterns. The pluripotency of established human induced PSCs was confirmed by their human ESC-like morphology, expression of pluripotency markers, gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, normal karyotype, and in vitro and in vivo differentiation potential. The potential of human induced PSCs to differentiate into distinct mesenchymal cell lineages, such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes, was further confirmed by positive expression of markers for respective cell types and positive staining with alizarin red S (osteoblasts), oil red O (adipocytes), or Alcian blue (chondrocytes). Functional chondrocyte differentiation of induced PSCs in pellet culture and 3-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffold culture was assessed by chondrocyte self-assembly and histology. Our findings indicate that patient-derived synovial cells are an attractive source of MSCs as well as induced PSCs and have the potential to advance cartilage tissue engineering and cell-based models of cartilage defects. Copyright © 2011 by the

  20. Therapeutic opportunities: Telomere maintenance in inducible pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourronc, Francoise A. [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa (United States); Klingelhutz, Aloysius J., E-mail: al-klingelhutz@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa (United States)

    2012-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that exogenous expression of a combination of transcription factors can reprogram differentiated cells such as fibroblasts and keratinocytes into what have been termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These iPS cells are capable of differentiating into all the tissue lineages when placed in the right environment and, in the case of mouse cells, can generate chimeric mice and be transmitted through the germline. Safer and more efficient methods of reprogramming are rapidly being developed. Clearly, iPS cells present a number of exciting possibilities, including disease modeling and therapy. A major question is whether the nuclei of iPS cells are truly rejuvenated or whether they might retain some of the marks of aging from the cells from which they were derived. One measure of cellular aging is the telomere. In this regard, recent studies have demonstrated that telomeres in iPS cells may be rejuvenated. They are not only elongated by reactivated telomerase but they are also epigenetically modified to be similar but not identical to embryonic stem cells. Upon differentiation, the derivative cells turn down telomerase, the telomeres begin to shorten again, and the telomeres and the genome are returned to an epigenetic state that is similar to normal differentiated somatic cells. While these preliminary telomere findings are promising, the overall genomic integrity of reprogrammed cells may still be problematic and further studies are needed to examine the safety and feasibility of using iPS cells in regenerative medicine applications.

  1. IL-33 induces both regulatory B cells and regulatory T cells in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junfeng; Xu, Ying; Zhu, Chunyu; Zhao, Jian; Meng, Xinrui; Chen, Siyao; Wang, Tianqi; Li, Xue; Zhang, Li; Lu, Changlong; Liu, Hongsheng; Sun, Xun

    2017-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a member of the IL-1 family. Serum levels of IL-33 are increased in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), suggesting that IL-33 is involved in the pathogenesis of IBD, although its role is not clear. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-33 in the regulation of T-helper (Th) cell and B cell responses in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Here, we showed that IL-33-treated mice were susceptible to DSS-induced colitis as compared with PBS-treated mice. The production of spontaneous inflammatory cytokines production by macrophages or dendritic cells (DC) in MLN significantly increased, and the responses of Th2, regulatory T cells (Treg) and regulatory B cells (Breg) were markedly upregulated, while Th1 responses were significantly downregulated in MLN of IL-33-treated mice with DSS-induced colitis. Our results demonstrate that IL-33 contributes to the pathogenesis of DSS-induced colitis in mice by promoting Th2 responses, but suppressing Th1 responses, in MLN. Moreover, IL-33 treatment increased Breg and Treg responses in MLN in mice with DSS-induced colitis. Therefore, modulation of IL-33/ST2 signaling is implicated as a novel biological therapy for inflammatory diseases associated with Th1 responses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid induces pyroptosis cell death in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizato, Nathalia; Luzete, Beatriz Christina; Kiffer, Larissa Fernanda Melo Vasconcelos; Corrêa, Luís Henrique; de Oliveira Santos, Igor; Assumpção, José Antônio Fagundes; Ito, Marina Kiyomi; Magalhães, Kelly Grace

    2018-01-31

    The implication of inflammation in pathophysiology of several type of cancers has been under intense investigation. Omega-3 fatty acids can modulate inflammation and present anticancer effects, promoting cancer cell death. Pyroptosis is an inflammation related cell death and so far, the function of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in pyroptosis cell death has not been described. This study investigated the role of DHA in triggering pyroptosis activation in breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were supplemented with DHA and inflammation cell death was analyzed. DHA-treated breast cancer cells triggered increased caspase-1and gasdermin D activation, enhanced IL-1β secretion, translocated HMGB1 towards the cytoplasm, and membrane pore formation when compared to untreated cells, suggesting DHA induces pyroptosis programmed cell death in breast cancer cells. Moreover, caspase-1 inhibitor (YVAD) could protect breast cancer cells from DHA-induced pyroptotic cell death. In addition, membrane pore formation showed to be a lysosomal damage and ROS formation-depended event in breast cancer cells. DHA triggered pyroptosis cell death in MDA-MB-231by activating several pyroptosis markers in these cells. This is the first study that shows the effect of DHA triggering pyroptosis programmed cell death in breast cancer cells and it could improve the understanding of the omega-3 supplementation during breast cancer treatment.

  3. Autophagy Regulates Colistin-Induced Apoptosis in PC-12 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Yonghao; Ding, Wenjian; Jiang, Guozheng; Lu, Ziyin; Li, Li; Wang, Jinli

    2015-01-01

    Colistin is a cyclic cationic polypeptide antibiotic with activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Our recent study demonstrated that colistin induces apoptosis in primary chick cortex neurons and PC-12 cells. Although apoptosis and autophagy have different impacts on cell fate, there is a complex interaction between them. Autophagy plays an important role as a homeostasis regulator by removing excessive or unnecessary proteins and damaged organelles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the modulation of autophagy and apoptosis regulation in PC-12 cells in response to colistin treatment. PC-12 cells were exposed to colistin (125 to 250 μg/ml), and autophagy was detected by visualization of monodansylcadaverine (MDC)-labeled vacuoles, LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) immunofluorescence microscopic examination, and Western blotting. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33258 staining, and Western blotting. Autophagosomes were observed after treatment with colistin for 12 h, and the levels of LC3-II gene expression were determined; observation and protein levels both indicated that colistin induced a high level of autophagy. Colistin treatment also led to apoptosis in PC-12 cells, and the level of caspase-3 expression increased over the 24-h period. Pretreatment of cells with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) increased colistin toxicity in PC-12 cells remarkably. However, rapamycin treatment significantly increased the expression levels of LC3-II and beclin 1 and decreased the rate of apoptosis of PC-12 cells. Our results demonstrate that colistin induced autophagy and apoptosis in PC-12 cells and that the latter was affected by the regulation of autophagy. It is very likely that autophagy plays a protective role in the reduction of colistin-induced cytotoxicity in neurons. PMID:25645826

  4. Inducible immortality in hTERT-human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Samantha L; Wang, Miqi; Yamamoto, Akira; Malek, Farbod; Luu, Andrew; Kuo, Alfred C; Kim, Hubert T

    2012-12-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are attractive candidates for tissue engineering and cell-based therapy because of their multipotentiality and availability in adult donors. However, in vitro expansion and differentiation of these cells is limited by replicative senescence. The proliferative capacity of hMSCs can be enhanced by ectopic expression of telomerase, allowing for long-term culture. However, hMSCs with constitutive telomerase expression demonstrate unregulated growth and even tumor formation. To address this problem, we used an inducible Tet-On gene expression system to create hMSCs in which ectopic telomerase expression can be induced selectively by the addition of doxycycline (i-hTERT hMSCs). i-hTERT hMSCs have inducible hTERT expression and telomerase activity, and are able to proliferate significantly longer than wild type hMSCs when hTERT expression is induced. They stop proliferating when hTERT expression is turned off and can be rescued when expression is re-induced. They retain multipotentiality in vitro even at an advanced age. We also used a selective inhibitor of telomere elongation to show that the mechanism driving immortalization of hMSCs by hTERT is dependent upon maintenance of telomere length. Thanks to their extended lifespan, preserved multipotentiality and controlled growth, i-hTERT hMSCs may prove to be a useful tool for the development and testing of novel stem cell therapies. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  5. Luteolin Promotes Cell Apoptosis by Inducing Autophagy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

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    Zhijia Cao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the most common primary liver malignancy and is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Luteolin, a flavonoid from traditional Chinese medicine, shows anti-cancer activity in many cancer cells, including HCC. However, the mechanism underlying the action of luteolin in HCC, especially its role in regulating cell autophagy, remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of luteolin in regulating cell autophagy and the role of autophagy in luteolin-induced apoptosis. Methods: The 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay (MTT was used to investigate cell viability. Flow cytometry analysis was used to detect the cell cycle and cell apoptosis. Hoechst 33342 staining was used to detect cell apoptosis. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate autophagy. qRT-PCR and western blotting were used to detect apoptosis- and autophagy-related mRNAs and proteins. Results: Luteolin reduced the viability of SMMC-7721 cells in a time and dose-dependent manner, and induced significant G0/G1-phase arrest. In addition, the results of flow cytometry analysis and Hoechst 33342 staining showed that luteolin treatment increased the number of apoptotic cells obviously, and the results of qRT-PCR and western blotting showed that luteolin treatment increased caspase 8 and decreased bcl-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, luteolin increased the number of intracellular autophagosomes, promoted LC3B-I conversion to LC3B-II, and increased Beclin 1 expression. Finally, co-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine weakened the effects of luteolin on cell apoptosis. Conclusion: Luteolin induced apoptosis in human liver cancer SMMC-7721 cells, partially via autophagy. Thus, luteolin could be used as a regulator of autophagy in HCC treatment.

  6. The physics of photon induced degradation of perovskite solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav H. Joshi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lead-trihalide perovskite solar cells are an important photovoltaic technology. We investigate the effect of light induced degradation on perovskite solar cells. During exposure, the open-circuit voltage (Voc of the device increases, whereas the short-circuit current (Isc shows a decrease. The degradation can be completely recovered using thermal annealing in dark. We develop a model based on light induced generation of ions and migration of these ions inside the material to explain the changes in Isc, Voc, capacitance and dark current upon light exposure and post-exposure recovery. There was no change in defect density in the material upon exposure.

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 prevents smoke induced B-cell infiltrates: a role for regulatory T cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luinge Marjan A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking is the most important cause for the development of COPD. Since not all smokers develop COPD, it is obvious that other factors must be involved in disease development. We hypothesize that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, a protective enzyme against oxidative stress and inflammation, is insufficiently upregulated in COPD. The effects of HO-1 modulation on cigarette smoke induced inflammation and emphysema were tested in a smoking mouse model. Methods Mice were either exposed or sham exposed to cigarette smoke exposure for 20 weeks. Cobalt protoporphyrin or tin protoporphyrin was injected during this period to induce or inhibit HO-1 activity, respectively. Afterwards, emphysema development, levels of inflammatory cells and cytokines, and the presence of B-cell infiltrates in lung tissue were analyzed. Results Smoke exposure induced emphysema and increased the numbers of inflammatory cells and numbers of B-cell infiltrates, as well as the levels of inflammatory cytokines in lung tissue. HO-1 modulation had no effects on smoke induced emphysema development, or the increases in neutrophils and macrophages and inflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, HO-1 induction prevented the development of smoke induced B-cell infiltrates and increased the levels of CD4+CD25+ T cells and Foxp3 positive cells in the lungs. Additionally, the CD4+CD25+ T cells correlated positively with the number of Foxp3 positive cells in lung tissue, indicating that these cells were regulatory T cells. Conclusion These results support the concept that HO-1 expression influences regulatory T cells and indicates that this mechanism is involved in the suppression of smoke induced B-cell infiltrates. The translation of this interaction to human COPD should now be pursued.

  8. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riad, Sandra; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death). Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death). PMID:25685789

  9. Treadmill running induces satellite cell activation in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Asashima, Makoto; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-12-01

    Skeletal muscle-derived stem cells, termed as satellite cells, play essential roles in regeneration after muscle injury in adult skeletal muscle. Diabetes mellitus (DM), one of the most common metabolic diseases, causes impairments of satellite cell function. However, the studies of the countermeasures for the DM-induced dysfunction of satellite cells have been poor. Here, we investigated the effects of chronic running exercise on satellite cell activation in diabetic mice focused on the molecular mechanism including Notch and Wnt signaling, which are contribute to the fate determination of satellite cells. Male C57BL/6 mice 4 weeks of age were injected with streptozotocin and were randomly divided into runner group and control group. Runner group mice were performed treadmill running for 4 weeks. DM attenuated satellite cell activation and the expressions of the components of Notch and Wnt signaling. However, chronic running resulted in activation of satellite cells in diabetic mice and salvaged the inactivity of Wnt signaling but not Notch signaling. Our results suggest that chronic running induces satellite cell activation via upregulation of Wnt signaling in diabetic as well as normal mice.

  10. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Ziko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death. Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death.

  11. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai A

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  12. Human monocytes differentiate into dendritic cells subsets that induce anergic and regulatory T cells in sepsis.

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    Valérie Faivre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a multifactorial pathology with high susceptibility to secondary infections. Innate and adaptive immunity are affected in sepsis, including monocyte deactivation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better understand the effects of alterations in monocytes on the regulation of immune responses during sepsis, we analyzed their differentiation in dendritic cell (DC. Cells from septic patients differentiated overwhelmingly into CD1a-negative DC, a population that was only a minor subset in controls and that is so far poorly characterized. Analysis of T cell responses induced with purified CD1a-negative and CD1a+ DC indicated that (i CD1a-negative DC from both healthy individuals and septic patients fail to induce T cell proliferation, (ii TGFβ and IL-4 were strongly produced in mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR with control CD1a-negative DC; reduced levels were produced with patients DC together with a slight induction of IFNγ, (iii compared to controls, CD1a+ DC derived from septic patients induced 3-fold more Foxp3+ T cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate a strong shift in DC populations derived from septic patients' monocytes with expanded cell subsets that induce either T cell anergy or proliferation of T cells with regulatory potential. Lower regulatory cytokines induction on a per cell basis by CD1a-negative dendritic cells from patients points however to a down regulation of immune suppressive abilities in these cells.

  13. Development of a culture system to induce microglia-like cells from haematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Daisuke; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kazuya; Saika, Reiko; Saga, Ryoko; Yamada, Masahito; Yamamura, Takashi; Miyake, Sachiko

    2014-10-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells in the central nervous system, originating from haematopoietic-derived myeloid cells. A microglial cell is a double-edged sword, which has both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions. Although understanding the role of microglia in pathological conditions has become increasingly important, histopathology has been the only way to investigate microglia in human diseases. To enable the study of microglial cells in vitro, we here establish a culture system to induce microglia-like cells from haematopoietic cells by coculture with astrocytes. The characteristics of microglia-like cells were analysed by flow cytometry and functional assay. We show that triggering receptor expressing on myeloid cells-2-expressing microglia-like cells could be induced from lineage negative cells or monocytes by coculture with astrocytes. Microglia-like cells exhibited lower expression of CD45 and MHC class II than macrophages, a characteristic similar to brain microglia. When introduced into brain slice cultures, these microglia-like cells changed their morphology to a ramified shape on the first day of the culture. Moreover, we demonstrated that microglia-like cells could be induced from human monocytes by coculture with astrocytes. Finally, we showed that interleukin 34 was an important factor in the induction of microglia-like cells from haematopoietic cells in addition to cell-cell contact with astrocytes. Purified microglia-like cells were suitable for further culture and functional analyses. Development of in vitro induction system for microglia will further promote the study of human microglial cells under pathological conditions as well as aid in the screening of drugs to target microglial cells. © 2013 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the British Neuropathological Society.

  14. The calcimimetic R-568 induces apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells

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    Cheng Guangming

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased serum level of parathyroid hormone (PTH was found in metastatic prostate cancers. Calcimimetic R-568 was reported to reduce PTH expression, to suppress cell proliferation and to induce apoptosis in parathyroid cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of R-568 on cellular survival of prostate cancer cells. Methods Prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 were used in this study. Cellular survival was determined with MTT, trypan blue exclusion and fluorescent Live/Death assays. Western blot assay was utilized to assess apoptotic events induced by R-568 treatment. JC-1 staining was used to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potential. Results In cultured prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells, R-568 treatment significantly reduced cellular survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. R-568-induced cell death was an apoptotic event, as evidenced by caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage, as well as JC-1 color change in mitochondria. Knocking down calcium sensing receptor (CaSR significantly reduced R-568-induced cytotoxicity. Enforced expression of Bcl-xL gene abolished R-568-induced cell death, while loss of Bcl-xL expression led to increased cell death in R-568-treated LNCaP cells,. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrated that calcimimetic R-568 triggers an intrinsic mitochondria-related apoptotic pathway, which is dependent on the CaSR and is modulated by Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic pathway.

  15. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in cultured human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Anshu; Kaur, Kiranjeet; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli; Chakraborti, Anuradha; Ghosh, Sujata

    2017-03-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging enteric pathogen causing diarrhoeal diseases in multiple epidemiological and clinical settings. However, understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease caused by this organism is still suboptimal. Studies have indicated that enteric bacteria induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in host intestinal epithelial cells might play a vital role in the pathogenesis caused by these organisms. In this study an attempt was made to assess EAEC-induced apoptosis and cell cycle modulation in human intestinal epithelial cell lines. INT-407 and HCT-15 cells were infected with EAEC-T8 (clinical isolate) as well as plasmid cured variant of EAEC-T8 (EAEC-pT8). Propidium iodide staining was done to select the time of infection and the incubation period of the infected culture. Apoptosis was further assessed in EAEC infected both the cell lines by annexin-V-FLUOS & propidium iodide, cell death detection ELISA, DNA strand breaks and microscopic analysis. Further, the DNA content of the EAEC-infected cells at different phases of cell cycle was also monitored. We have found that EAEC could induce apoptosis in human small intestinal as well as colonic epithelial cell lines, which was assessed by the expression of phosphatidylserine on host cell surface, internucleosomal cleavage of host cell DNA and microscopic analysis of the characteristic apoptotic features of these cells. EAEC was also found to arrest cells at S phase and G2-M phase of the cell cycle. EAEC-T8 could induce maximum apoptosis and cell cycle modulation in both small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. Further, we have observed that the plasmid of this organism had maximum contribution to these processes. The outcome of this study has undoubtedly led to a better understanding of the basic mechanism of pathogenesis caused by EAEC.

  16. Pinhole induced efficiency variation in perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sumanshu; Nair, Pradeep R.

    2017-10-01

    Process induced efficiency variation is a major concern for all thin film solar cells, including the emerging perovskite based solar cells. In this article, we address the effect of pinholes or process induced surface coverage aspects on the efficiency of such solar cells through detailed numerical simulations. Interestingly, we find that the pinhole size distribution affects the short circuit current and open circuit voltage in contrasting manners. Specifically, while the JS C is heavily dependent on the pinhole size distribution, surprisingly, the VO C seems to be only nominally affected by it. Further, our simulations also indicate that, with appropriate interface engineering, it is indeed possible to design a nanostructured device with efficiencies comparable to those of ideal planar structures. Additionally, we propose a simple technique based on terminal I-V characteristics to estimate the surface coverage in perovskite solar cells.

  17. Chalcones Enhance TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szliszka, Ewelina; Czuba, Zenon P; Mazur, Bogdan; Sedek, Lukasz; Paradysz, Andrzej; Krol, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Chalcones exhibit chemopreventive and antitumor effects. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a naturally occurring anticancer agent that induces apoptosis in cancer cells and is not toxic to normal cells. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of five chalcones in combination with TRAIL on prostate cancer cells. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was determined using flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC. Our study showed that all five tested chalcones: chalcone, licochalcone-A, isobavachalcone, xanthohumol, butein markedly augmented TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells and confirmed the significant role of chalcones in chemoprevention of prostate cancer. PMID:20161998

  18. Chalcones Enhance TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Szliszka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Chalcones exhibit chemopreventive and antitumor effects. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a naturally occurring anticancer agent that induces apoptosis in cancer cells and is not toxic to normal cells. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of five chalcones in combination with TRAIL on prostate cancer cells. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was determined using flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC. Our study showed that all five tested chalcones: chalcone, licochalcone-A, isobavachalcone, xanthohumol, butein markedly augmented TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells and confirmed the significant role of chalcones in chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

  19. [Progress and application prospect of pig induced pluripotent stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yi-Bo; Zhang, Yan-Li; Qi, Wei-Wei; Wan, Yong-Jie; Fan, Yi-Xuan; Wang, Feng

    2011-04-01

    Pig has always been the focus of establishing a big ungulate animal ES cell lines because of its convenient source, genetic similarity with humans, and their importance in animal husbandry, but little development is achieved. Induced pluripotent stem cells technology creates a new method of reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotent state. As the pig iPS cells is established and perfected, pig ES cells will be established in the coming years. The pig iPS cells will give a hint on other livestock ES cells. On the other hand, pig iPS cells can be used to improve the efficiency of transgenic cloning pigs to conduct effective breeding and conservation of breeds. It is particularly important that the pig iPS cells can provide new model for human medical research, a new donor cells for human tissue and organ engineering, and have extensive and far-reaching impact on the biomedical field. Here, we briefly review the major progress of iPS cells, and emphasize current state of pig iPS cells and its application prospect in biomedicine and animal husbandry in order to provide a useful reference for researchers working in this area.

  20. [Establishment of hemophilia A patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells with urine cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiqing; Hu, Xuyun; Pang, Jialun; Wang, Xiaolin; Lin Peng, Siyuan; Li, Zhuo; Wu, Yong; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To generate hemophilia A (HA) patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induce endothelial differentiation. METHODS Tubular epithelial cells were isolated and cultured from the urine of HA patients. The iPSCs were generated by forced expression of Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4) using retroviruses and characterized by cell morphology, pluripotent marker staining and in vivo differentiation through teratoma formation. Induced endothelial differentiation of the iPSCs was achieved with the OP9 cell co-culture method. RESULTS Patient-specific iPSCs were generated from urine cells of the HA patients, which could be identified by cell morphology, pluripotent stem cell surface marker staining and in vivo differentiation of three germ layers. The teratoma experiment has confirmed that such cells could differentiate into endothelial cells expressing the endothelial-specific markers CD144, CD31 and vWF. CONCLUSION HA patient-specific iPSCs could be generated from urine cells and can differentiate into endothelial cells. This has provided a new HA disease modeling approach and may serve as an applicable autologous cell source for gene correction and cell therapy studies for HA.

  1. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

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    Hu, Xiaolan, E-mail: huxiaolan1998@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xianqi [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Qiu, Shuifeng [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin [Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  2. Chlamydia pneumoniae induces aponecrosis in human aortic smooth muscle cells

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    Walch Michael

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intracellular bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae is suspected to play a role in formation and progression of atherosclerosis. Many studies investigated cell death initiation versus inhibition by Chlamydia pneumoniae in established cell lines but nothing is known in primary human aortic smooth muscle cells, a cell type among others known to be involved in the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque. Type of cell death was analyzed by various methods in primary aortic smooth muscle cells after infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae to investigate a possible pathogenic link in atherosclerosis. Results Chlamydiae were found to be localized up to 72 h post infection in aortic smooth muscle cells either as single bacteria or inside of large inclusions. Quantification of host cell death by lactate dehydrogenase release assay revealed strictly dose and time dependent lysis for all tested isolates of Chlamydia pneumoniae. Phosphatidylserine exposure was detected by flow cytometry in Chlamydia pneumoniae infected cells. Ultrastructure of Chlamydia pneumoniae infected human aortic smooth muscle cells showed extensive membrane- and organelle damage, chromatin condensation but no nuclear fragmentation. DNA fragmentation as well as cell membrane permeability was analyzed by TUNEL and NHS-biotin staining and occurred exclusively in cells carrying Chlamydia pneumoniae spots but not in smooth muscle cells with inclusions. These morphological features of cell death were not accompanied by an activation of caspase-3 as revealed by analysis of enzyme activity but involved mitochondrial membrane depolarization as shown by TMRE uptake and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Conclusion This study provides evidence that Chlamydia pneumoniae induce a spot like infection in human aortic smooth muscle cells, which results in a chimeric cell death with both apoptotic and necrotic characteristics. This aponecrotic cell death may assist chronic

  3. Cathepsin G, a Neutrophil Protease, Induces Compact Cell-Cell Adhesion in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

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    Tomoya Kudo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin G is a serine protease secreted by activated neutrophils that play a role in the inflammatory response. Because neutrophils are known to be invading leukocytes in various tumors, their products may influence the characteristics of tumor cells such as the growth state, motility, and the adhesiveness between cells or the extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate that cathepsin G induces cell-cell adhesion of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells resulting from the contact inhibition of cell movement on fibronectin but not on type IV collagen. Cathepsin G subsequently induced cell condensation, a very compact cell colony, resulting due to the increased strength of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cathepsin G action is protease activity-dependent and was inhibited by the presence of serine protease inhibitors. Cathepsin G promotes E-cadherin/catenin complex formation and Rap1 activation in MCF-7 cells, which reportedly regulates E-cadherin-based cell-cell junctions. Cathepsin G also promotes E-cadherin/protein kinase D1 (PKD1 complex formation, and Go6976, the selective PKD1 inhibitor, suppressed the cathepsin G-induced cell condensation. Our findings provide the first evidence that cathepsin G regulates E-cadherin function, suggesting that cathepsin G has a novel modulatory role against tumor cell-cell adhesion.

  4. A green-light inducible lytic system for cyanobacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kotone; Abe, Koichi; Ferri, Stefano; Nakajima, Mitsuharu; Nakamura, Mayumi; Yoshida, Wataru; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Sode, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an attractive candidate for the production of biofuel because of their ability to capture carbon dioxide by photosynthesis and grow on non-arable land. However, because huge quantities of water are required for cultivation, strict water management is one of the greatest issues in algae- and cyanobacteria-based biofuel production. In this study, we aim to construct a lytic cyanobacterium that can be regulated by a physical signal (green-light illumination) for future use in the recovery of biofuel related compounds. We introduced T4 bacteriophage-derived lysis genes encoding holin and endolysin under the control of the green-light regulated cpcG2 promoter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. When cells harboring the lysis genes were illuminated with both red and green light, we observed a considerable decrease in growth rate, a significant increase in cellular phycocyanin released in the medium, and a considerable fraction of dead cells. These effects were not observed when these cells were illuminated with only red light, or when cells not containing the lysis genes were grown under either red light or red and green light. These results indicate that our constructed green-light inducible lytic system was clearly induced by green-light illumination, resulting in lytic cells that released intracellular phycocyanin into the culture supernatant. This property suggests a future possibility to construct photosynthetic genetically modified organisms that are unable to survive under sunlight exposure. Expression of the self-lysis system with green-light illumination was also found to greatly increase the fragility of the cell membrane, as determined by subjecting the induced cells to detergent, osmotic-shock, and freeze-thaw treatments. A green-light inducible lytic system was constructed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered lytic cyanobacterial cells should be beneficial for the recovery of biofuels and related compounds from cells with minimal effort

  5. Lysophosphatidate induces chemo-resistance by releasing breast cancer cells from taxol-induced mitotic arrest.

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    Nasser Samadi

    Full Text Available Taxol is a microtubule stabilizing agent that arrests cells in mitosis leading to cell death. Taxol is widely used to treat breast cancer, but resistance occurs in 25-69% of patients and it is vital to understand how Taxol resistance develops to improve chemotherapy. The effects of chemotherapeutic agents are overcome by survival signals that cancer cells receive. We focused our studies on autotaxin, which is a secreted protein that increases tumor growth, aggressiveness, angiogenesis and metastasis. We discovered that autotaxin strongly antagonizes the Taxol-induced killing of breast cancer and melanoma cells by converting the abundant extra-cellular lipid, lysophosphatidylcholine, into lysophosphatidate. This lipid stimulates specific G-protein coupled receptors that activate survival signals.In this study we determined the basis of these antagonistic actions of lysophosphatidate towards Taxol-induced G2/M arrest and cell death using cultured breast cancer cells. Lysophosphatidate does not antagonize Taxol action in MCF-7 cells by increasing Taxol metabolism or its expulsion through multi-drug resistance transporters. Lysophosphatidate does not lower the percentage of cells accumulating in G2/M by decreasing exit from S-phase or selective stimulation of cell death in G2/M. Instead, LPA had an unexpected and remarkable action in enabling MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cells, which had been arrested in G2/M by Taxol, to normalize spindle structure and divide, thus avoiding cell death. This action involves displacement of Taxol from the tubulin polymer fraction, which based on inhibitor studies, depends on activation of LPA receptors and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.This work demonstrates a previously unknown consequence of lysophosphatidate action that explains why autotaxin and lysophosphatidate protect against Taxol-induced cell death and promote resistance to the action of this important therapeutic agent.

  6. Characterization of T-regulatory cells, induced by immature dendritic cells, which inhibit enteroantigen-reactive colitis-inducing T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Kristensen, Nanna N; Kury, Evelyn

    2004-01-01

    -injected into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with colitis-inducing CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells. Both unfractionated CD4(+) and purified CD25(+) Treg cells fully protected the recipients against the development of colitis. In contrast, co-transfer of fractionated CD25(-) T cells offered no protection against...

  7. Rhein Induces Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells

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    Ching-Yao Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human breast cancers cells overexpressing HER2/neu are more aggressive tumors with poor prognosis, and resistance to chemotherapy. This study investigates antiproliferation effects of anthraquinone derivatives of rhubarb root on human breast cancer cells. Of 7 anthraquinone derivatives, only rhein showed antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on both HER2-overexpressing MCF-7 (MCF-7/HER2 and control vector MCF-7 (MCF-7/VEC cells. Rhein induced dose- and time-dependent manners increase in caspase-9-mediated apoptosis correlating with activation of ROS-mediated activation of NF-κB- and p53-signaling pathways in both cell types. Therefore, this study highlighted rhein as processing anti-proliferative activity against HER2 overexpression or HER2-basal expression in breast cancer cells and playing important roles in apoptotic induction of human breast cancer cells.

  8. Dexamethasone Enhances ATP-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The purinergic nucleotide ATP is released from stressed cells and is implicated in vascular inflammation. Glucocorticoids are essential to stress responses and are used therapeutically, yet little information is available that describes the effects of glucocorticoids on ATP-induced inflammation. In a human microvascular endothelial cell line, extracellular ATP-induced interleukin (IL)-6 secretion in a dose- and time-dependent manner. When cells were pretreated with dexamethasone, a prototypic glucocorticoid, ATP-induced IL-6 production was enhanced in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, blocked these effects. ATP-induced IL-6 release was significantly inhibited by a phospholipase C inhibitor [1-[6-[((17β)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5[10]-trien-17-yl)amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)] (63.2 ± 3%, p dexamethasone induced mRNA expression of the purinergic P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) 1.8- ± 0.1-fold and, when stimulated with ATP, enhanced Ca2+ release and augmented IL-6 mRNA expression. Silencing of the P2Y2R by its small interfering RNA decreased ATP-induced IL-6 production by 81 ± 1% (p Dexamethasone enhanced the transcription rate of P2Y2R mRNA and induced a dose-related increase in the activity of the P2Y2R promoter. Furthermore, dexamethasone-enhanced ATP induction of adhesion molecule transcription and augmented the release of IL-8. Dexamethasone leads to an unanticipated enhancement of endothelial inflammatory mediator production by extracellular ATP via a P2Y2R-dependent mechanism. These data define a novel positive feedback loop of glucocorticoids and ATP-induced endothelial inflammation. PMID:20826566

  9. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells

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    Tobias Roider

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antithymocyte globulin (ATG is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon® on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC. ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  10. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roider, Tobias; Katzfuß, Michael; Matos, Carina; Singer, Katrin; Renner, Kathrin; Oefner, Peter J; Dettmer-Wilde, Katja; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst; Kreutz, Marina; Peter, Katrin

    2016-12-11

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon(®)) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  11. Genistein suppresses aerobic glycolysis and induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sainan; Li, Jingjing; Dai, Weiqi; Zhang, Qinghui; Feng, Jiao; Wu, Liwei; Liu, Tong; Yu, Qiang; Xu, Shizan; Wang, Wenwen; Lu, Xiya; Chen, Kan; Xia, Yujing; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Fan, Xiaoming; Mo, Wenhui; Xu, Ling; Guo, Chuanyong

    2017-11-07

    Genistein is a natural isoflavone with many health benefits, including antitumour effects. Increased hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α (HIF-1α) levels and glycolysis in tumour cells are associated with an increased risk of mortality, cancer progression, and resistance to therapy. However, the effect of genistein on HIF-1α and glycolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still unclear. Cell viability, apoptosis rate, lactate production, and glucose uptake were measured in HCC cell lines with genistein incubation. Lentivirus-expressed glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) or/and hexokinase 2 (HK2) and siRNA of HIF-1α were used to test the direct target of genistein. Subcutaneous xenograft mouse models were used to measure in vivo efficacy of genistein and its combination with sorafenib. Genistein inhibited aerobic glycolysis and induced mitochondrial apoptosis in HCC cells. Neither inhibitors nor overexpression of HK2 or GLUTs enhance or alleviate this effect. Although stabiliser of HIF-1α reversed the effect of genistein, genistein no longer has effects on HIF-1α siRNA knockdown HCC cells. In addition, genistein enhanced the antitumour effect of sorafenib in sorafenib-resistant HCC cells and HCC-bearing mice. Genistein sensitised aerobic glycolytic HCC cells to apoptosis by directly downregulating HIF-1α, therefore inactivating GLUT1 and HK2 to suppress aerobic glycolysis. The inhibitory effect of genistein on tumour cell growth and glycolysis may help identify effective treatments for HCC patients at advanced stages.

  12. The effect of hydroxybenzoate calcium compounds in inducing cell death in epithelial breast cancer cells

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    Nada M Merghani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxybenzoate (HB compounds have shown their significance in inducing apoptosis in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and cancer cell lines, including HT-1080. The current study focuses on assessing the effects of 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoate calcium (HBCa compounds on MCF-10A, MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 epithelial breast cell lines. The HBCa-treated cells were examined using annexin V, to measure apoptosis in the three epithelial breast cell lines, after 48 h of treatment. The results indicated that 0.5 and 2.5 mmol/L of HBCa induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The induction of cell death in normal MCF-10A cells was found to be significantly less (p = 0.0003–0.0068, in comparison to the malignant cell lines (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7. HBCa compounds were also found to cause cell cycle arrest in the epithelial breast cells at G1/G0. Furthermore, HBCa compounds induced the upregulation of apoptotic proteins (p53, p21, Bax and caspase-3, as well as the downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, which may suggest that apoptosis is induced via the intrinsic pathway.

  13. Radiation-induced adaptive response in fish cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lorna A; Seymour, Colin B; O'Neill-Mehlenbacher, Alicia; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2008-04-01

    There is considerable interest at present in low-dose radiation effects in non-human species. In this study gamma radiation-induced adaptive response, a low-dose radiation effect, was examined in three fish cell lines, (CHSE-214 (Chinook salmon), RTG-2 (rainbow trout) and ZEB-2J (zebrafish)). Cell survival after exposure to direct radiation with or without a 0.1 Gy priming dose, was determined using the colony forming assay for each cell line. Additionally, the occurrence of a bystander effect was examined by measuring the effect of irradiated cell culture medium from the fish cell lines on unexposed reporter cells. A non-linear dose response was observed for all cell lines. ZEB-2J cells were very sensitive to low doses and a hyper-radiosensitive (HRS) response was observed for doses fish cell lines tested. Rather, it was found that pre-exposure of these cells to 0.1 Gy radiation sensitized the cells to subsequent high doses. In CHSE-214 cells, increased sensitivity to subsequent high doses of radiation was observed when the priming and challenge doses were separated by 4 h; however, this sensitizing effect was no longer present when the interval between doses was greater than 8 h. Additionally, a "protective" bystander response was observed in these cell lines; exposure to irradiated medium from fish cells caused increased cloning efficiency in unirradiated reporter cells. The data confirm previous conclusions for mammalian cells that the adaptive response and bystander effect are inversely correlated and contrary to expectations probably have different underlying mechanisms.

  14. Trolox induces inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Guang Yang; Xiang-An Tian; Xiao-Yan Li; Jian-Guo Huang; Nai-Qing Liu; Qin-Li Sun

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of trolox on human colon cancer cell lines was investigated. The results revealed that trolox treatment caused inhibition of cell growth in T84 and HCT-15 colon cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was significant at 50 µM of trolox after 48 hours in both cell lines. Trolox treatment promoted expression of p38 and inhibited expression of survivin and Akt. It also induced cleavage of PARP and caspase-3 and ultimately induced apoptosis in...

  15. HIV-1 induces DCIR expression in CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A Lambert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin receptor DCIR, which has been shown very recently to act as an attachment factor for HIV-1 in dendritic cells, is expressed predominantly on antigen-presenting cells. However, this concept was recently challenged by the discovery that DCIR can also be detected in CD4(+ T cells found in the synovial tissue from rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Given that RA and HIV-1 infections share common features such as a chronic inflammatory condition and polyclonal immune hyperactivation status, we hypothesized that HIV-1 could promote DCIR expression in CD4(+ T cells. We report here that HIV-1 drives DCIR expression in human primary CD4(+ T cells isolated from patients (from both aviremic/treated and viremic/treatment naive persons and cells acutely infected in vitro (seen in both virus-infected and uninfected cells. Soluble factors produced by virus-infected cells are responsible for the noticed DCIR up-regulation on uninfected cells. Infection studies with Vpr- or Nef-deleted viruses revealed that these two viral genes are not contributing to the mechanism of DCIR induction that is seen following acute infection of CD4(+ T cells with HIV-1. Moreover, we report that DCIR is linked to caspase-dependent (induced by a mitochondria-mediated generation of free radicals and -independent intrinsic apoptotic pathways (involving the death effector AIF. Finally, we demonstrate that the higher surface expression of DCIR in CD4(+ T cells is accompanied by an enhancement of virus attachment/entry, replication and transfer. This study shows for the first time that HIV-1 induces DCIR membrane expression in CD4(+ T cells, a process that might promote virus dissemination throughout the infected organism.

  16. HIV-1 Induces DCIR Expression in CD4+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Alexandra A.; Imbeault, Michaël; Gilbert, Caroline; Tremblay, Michel J.

    2010-01-01

    The C-type lectin receptor DCIR, which has been shown very recently to act as an attachment factor for HIV-1 in dendritic cells, is expressed predominantly on antigen-presenting cells. However, this concept was recently challenged by the discovery that DCIR can also be detected in CD4+ T cells found in the synovial tissue from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Given that RA and HIV-1 infections share common features such as a chronic inflammatory condition and polyclonal immune hyperactivation status, we hypothesized that HIV-1 could promote DCIR expression in CD4+ T cells. We report here that HIV-1 drives DCIR expression in human primary CD4+ T cells isolated from patients (from both aviremic/treated and viremic/treatment naive persons) and cells acutely infected in vitro (seen in both virus-infected and uninfected cells). Soluble factors produced by virus-infected cells are responsible for the noticed DCIR up-regulation on uninfected cells. Infection studies with Vpr- or Nef-deleted viruses revealed that these two viral genes are not contributing to the mechanism of DCIR induction that is seen following acute infection of CD4+ T cells with HIV-1. Moreover, we report that DCIR is linked to caspase-dependent (induced by a mitochondria-mediated generation of free radicals) and -independent intrinsic apoptotic pathways (involving the death effector AIF). Finally, we demonstrate that the higher surface expression of DCIR in CD4+ T cells is accompanied by an enhancement of virus attachment/entry, replication and transfer. This study shows for the first time that HIV-1 induces DCIR membrane expression in CD4+ T cells, a process that might promote virus dissemination throughout the infected organism. PMID:21085612

  17. Gastrokine 1 inhibits gastrin-induced cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Olga; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Choi, Won Suk; Ashktorab, Hassan; Smoot, Duane T; Nam, Suk Woo; Lee, Jung Young; Park, Won Sang

    2016-04-01

    Gastrokine 1 (GKN1) acts as a gastric tumor suppressor. Here, we investigated whether GKN1 contributes to the maintenance of gastric mucosal homeostasis by regulating gastrin-induced gastric epithelial cell growth. We assessed the effects of gastrin and GKN1 on cell proliferation in stable AGS(GKN1) and MKN1(GKN1) gastric cancer cell lines and HFE-145 nonneoplastic epithelial cells. Cell viability and proliferation were analyzed by MTT and BrdU incorporation assays, respectively. Cell cycle and expression of growth factor receptors were examined by flow cytometry and Western blot analyses. Gastrin treatment stimulated a significant time-dependent increase in cell viability and proliferation in AGS(mock) and MKN1(mock), but not in HFE-145, AGS(GKN1), and MKN1(GKN1), cells, which stably expressed GKN1. Additionally, gastrin markedly increased the S-phase cell population, whereas GKN1 significantly inhibited the effect of gastrin by regulating the expression of G1/S cell-cycle regulators. Furthermore, gastrin induced activation of the NF-kB and β-catenin signaling pathways and increased the expression of CCKBR, EGFR, and c-Met in AGS and MKN1 cells. However, GKN1 completely suppressed these effects of gastrin via downregulation of gastrin/CCKBR/growth factor receptor expression. Moreover, GKN1 reduced gastrin and CCKBR mRNA expression in AGS and MKN1 cells, and there was an inverse correlation between GKN1 and gastrin, as well as between GKN1 and CCKBR mRNA expression in noncancerous gastric mucosae. These data suggest that GKN1 may contribute to the maintenance of gastric epithelial homeostasis and inhibit gastric carcinogenesis by downregulating the gastrin-CCKBR signaling pathway.

  18. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells.

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    Hercules R Freitas

    Full Text Available Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1-10 mM showed that 5-10 mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells, while neurons responded to 50 mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells. BBG 100 nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70 μM and MK-801 20 μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG at 5 mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit.

  19. Contribution of dendritic cells to measles virus induced immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Melissa M; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2013-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) remains an important pathogen in children worldwide. The morbidity and mortality of MV is associated with severe immune suppression. Dendritic cells (DCs) were identified as initial target cells in vivo, and DCs were efficiently infected by MV in vitro. MV infection of DCs likely contributes to functional deficiency in these cells; therefore playing a role in MV-induced immunosuppression. DCs appeared to mature phenotypically; however, the ability of infected cells to stimulate T cells was compromised. Phenotypic maturation of infected immature DCs was partially controlled by IFN production; however, infected DCs also maintained markers of an immature phenotype such as the continued uptake of antigen and lack of expression of chemokine receptor CCR7. Furthermore, mature DCs did not appear to maintain phenotypic maturation following infection demonstrated by decreased MHC and co-stimulatory molecule expression. Several mechanisms of MV-induced DC dysfunction have been suggested, each likely contributing to the immunosuppressive effect of MV-infected DCs. Infected DCs responded aberrantly to secondary maturation stimuli such as CD40L or TLR4 stimulation. MV infection resulted in apoptosis in DC/T-cell cocultures, which may contribute to a reduced T-cell response. Additionally, the immunological synapse between infected DCs and T cells was compromised resulting in reduced T-cell interaction times and activation signaling. The mechanisms of MV contribution to DC dysfunction appear multifaceted and central to MV-induced immunosuppression. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paro, Rita [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy); Tiboni, Gian Mario [Department of Medicine and Aging, Section of Reproductive Sciences, University “G. D' Annunzio”, Chieti-Pescara (Italy); Buccione, Roberto [Tumor Cell Invasion Laboratory, Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, Chieti (Italy); Rossi, Gianna; Cellini, Valerio [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy); Canipari, Rita [Department of Anatomy, Histology, Forensic Medicine and Orthopedics, Section of Histology and Embryology, School of Pharmacy and Medicine, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Cecconi, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.cecconi@cc.univaq.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant. Highlights: ► The fungicide mancozeb affects oocyte spindle morphology and fertilization rate. ► We investigated the toxic effects of mancozeb on mouse and human granulosa cells. ► Granulosa cells modify their morphology and expression level of p53. ► Mancozeb induces a premalignant-like status in exposed cells.

  1. Generation of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Protein-Deficient Blood Cells From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xuan; Braunstein, Evan M.; Ye, Zhaohui; Liu, Cyndi F; Chen, Guibin; Zou, Jizhong; Cheng, Linzhao; Brodsky, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Using PIG-A gene targeting and an inducible PIG-A expression system, this study established a conditional PIG-A knockout model in human induced pluripotent stem cells that allowed for the production of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP)-deficient blood cells. This conditional PIG-A knockout model should be a valuable tool for studying the importance of GPI-APs in hematopoiesis and human development.

  2. Moringa oleifera: An apoptosis inducer in cancer cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    *For correspondence: Email: hasniarsad@usm.my. Sent for review: 15 May 2015 ... Bcl2 proteins which leads to inactivation or reduction in cancer cell apoptosis, hence, agents that are capable of inducing apoptosis in ... quercetin, and kampferol. These compounds act by activating pro-apoptotic protein such as caspases,.

  3. Induced pluripotent stem cells for post myocardial infarction repair

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Fernández, Eduardo de la

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to study translational aspects of induced pluripotent stem cell technology in cardiac repair after myocardial infarction. This will be achieved by illustrating the current state of the art of this technology and, furthermore, by evaluating the limitations for clinical traslation.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in proteoglycan induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, J. F.; de Roock, S.; Hofhuis, F. M.; Rozemuller, H.; van den Broek, T.; Moerer, P.; Broere, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/264075323; van Wijk, F.; Kuis, W.; Prakken, B. J.; Martens, a.c.m|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375286063; Wulffraat, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the immunosuppressive effect and mechanism of action of intraperitoneal (ip) and intra-articular (ia) mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injection in proteoglycan induced arthritis (PGIA). Methods: MSC were administered ip or ia after establishment of arthritis. We used serial

  5. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Capecitabine treatment of. HCT-15 cells caused condensation of DNA and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent ... Conclusion: Capecitabine treatment causes inhibition of colon cancer growth via the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Thus ... extraction of distant metastases from various organs such as liver ...

  6. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway. Mingli Li1*, Na Zhang2 and Mingxuan Li3. 1Biology and Medicine, 2Pharmaceutics, Shandong University, Shandong 250100, 3Department of Nursing, Affiliated Hospital of. Jining Medical University, Jining, Shandong ...

  7. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Erika

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p 6 cells, and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to SP (5 μM further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD pathogenesis.

  8. Okadaic acid inhibits cell multiplication and induces apoptosis in a549 cells, a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Renjun; Lv, Lili; Zhao, Yunfeng; Yang, Nana

    2014-01-01

    This essay aims to research the effect of okadaic acid (OA) on A549 cell multiplication, and cell apoptosis induced by OA was observed by cell morphology. MTT assay, trypan blue exclusion test (TBET), Giemsa staining method and acridine orange (AO) fluorescence staining assay were applied. The results of cell survival evaluated by TBET and colorimetric assay with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) showed: The number of A549 cells was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Cytomorphology observation of okadaic acid-treated cells showed that cells became shrinkage and turned round, some cells floated in the nutrient medium with nucleus agglutination broken, resulting in apoptotic bodies. Above-mentioned results indicated that OA exerted significantly inhibitory effect on A549 cell multiplication due to the apoptosis induced by OA.

  9. Myxoma virus induces apoptosis in cultured feline carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeill, A L; Moldenhauer, T; Doty, R; Mann, T

    2012-10-01

    There is growing interest in utilizing replicating oncolytic viruses as cancer therapeutics agents. The effectiveness of myxoma virus-induced oncolysis was evaluated in two feline cancer cell cultures. Although myxoma virus is a rabbit-specific pathogen, protein expression driven by myxoma virus and production of infectious viral particles were detected. Cell death occurred in primary feline cancer cells within 48 h of inoculation with myxoma virus. Future studies to determine if other feline neoplasms are susceptible to myxoma virus infection are warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cells: Challenges and opportunities for cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patty eSachamitr

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in cancer treatment over the past 30 years, therapeutic options remain limited and do not always offer a cure for malignancy. Given that tumour associated antigens (TAA are, by definition, self-proteins, the need to productively engage autoreactive T cells remains at the heart of strategies for cancer immunotherapy. These have traditionally focussed on the administration of autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC pulsed with TAA, or the ex vivo expansion and adoptive transfer of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL as a source of TAA-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL. Although such approaches have shown some efficacy, success has been limited by the poor capacity of moDC to cross-present exogenous TAA to the CD8+ T cell repertoire and the potential for exhaustion of CTL expanded ex vivo. Recent advances in induced pluripotency offer opportunities to generate patient-specific stem cell lines with the potential to differentiate in vitro into cell types whose properties may help address these issues. Here we review recent success in the differentiation of NK cells from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells as well as minor subsets of DC with therapeutic potential, including CD141+XCR1+ DC, capable of cross-presenting TAA to naïve CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, we review recent progress in the use of TIL as the starting material for the derivation of iPSC lines, thereby capturing their antigen specificity in a self-renewing stem cell line, from which potentially unlimited numbers of naïve TAA-specific T cells may be differentiated, free of the risks of exhaustion.

  11. Generating a non-integrating human induced pluripotent stem cell bank from urine-derived cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanting Xue

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS cell holds great potential for applications in regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and disease modeling. We describe here a practical method to generate human iPS cells from urine-derived cells (UCs under feeder-free, virus-free, serum-free condition and without oncogene c-MYC. We showed that this approach could be applied in a large population with different genetic backgrounds. UCs are easily accessible and exhibit high reprogramming efficiency, offering advantages over other cell types used for the purpose of iPS generation. Using the approach described in this study, we have generated 93 iPS cell lines from 20 donors with diverse genetic backgrounds. The non-viral iPS cell bank with these cell lines provides a valuable resource for iPS cells research, facilitating future applications of human iPS cells.

  12. Spiramine derivatives induce apoptosis of Bax(-/-)/Bak(-/-) cell and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chen; Huang, Li; Liu, Hong-Chun; Chen, Duo-Zhi; Liu, Hai-Yang; Li, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Yu; Geng, Mei-Yu; Chen, Quan; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2014-04-15

    Spiramine C-D, the atisine-type diterpenoid alkaloids isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Spiraea japonica complex, are shown to have anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. In this study, we report that spiramine derivatives of spiramine C-D bearing α,β-unsaturated ketone induce apoptosis of Bax(-/-)/Bak(-/-) MEFs cell, which is positively corresponding their cytotoxicity of tumor cell lines including multidrug resistance MCF-7/ADR. The results indicated that oxazolidine ring is necessary, and derivatives bearing double 'Michael reaction acceptor' group would significantly increased activities both of inducing apoptosis of Bax(-/-)/Bak(-/-) cells and cytotoxicity of tumor cells. The result indicated that spiramine derivative with α,β-unsaturated ketone group is a new anti-cancer agent with a capability of inducing apoptosis of cancer cells in Bax/Bak-independent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Two-step differentiation of mast cells from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Tanaka, Satoshi; Katayama, Sumie; Ishida, Waka; Fukuda, Ken; Fukushima, Atsuki; Araki, Ryoko; Abe, Masumi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Kenji

    2013-03-01

    Mast cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. They are generally classified into 2 phenotypically distinct populations: connective tissue-type mast cells (CTMCs) and mucosal-type mast cells (MMCs). The number of mast cells that can be obtained from tissues is limited, making it difficult to study the function of mast cells. Here, we report the generation and characterization of CTMC-like mast cells derived from mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. iPS cell-derived mast cells (iPSMCs) were generated by the OP9 coculture method or embryoid body formation method. The number of Safranin O-positive cells, expression levels of CD81 protein and histidine decarboxylase mRNA, and protease activities were elevated in the iPSMCs differentiated by both methods as compared with those in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Electron microscopic analysis revealed that iPSMCs contained more granules than BMMCs. Degranulation was induced in iPSMCs after stimulation with cationic secretagogues or vancomycin. In addition, iPSMCs had the ability to respond to stimulation with the IgE/antigen complex in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, when iPSMCs generated on OP9 cells were cocultured with Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, protease activities as maturation index were more elevated, demonstrating that mature mast cells were differentiated from iPS cells. iPSMCs can be used as an in vitro model of CTMCs to investigate their functions.

  14. Streptococcus induces circulating CLA(+) memory T-cell-dependent epidermal cell activation in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, Marta; Galván, Ana B; Rincón, Catalina; Romeu, Ester R; Sacrista, Marc; Barboza, Erika; Giménez-Arnau, Ana; Celada, Antonio; Pujol, Ramon M; Santamaria-Babí, Luis F

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcal throat infection is associated with a specific variant of psoriasis and with HLA-Cw6 expression. In this study, activation of circulating psoriatic cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA)(+) memory T cells cultured together with epidermal cells occurred only when streptococcal throat extracts were added. This triggered the production of Th1, Th17, and Th22 cytokines, as well as epidermal cell mediators (CXCL8, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11). Streptococcal extracts (SEs) did not induce any activation with either CLA(-) cells or memory T cells cultured together with epidermal cells from healthy subjects. Intradermal injection of activated culture supernatants into mouse skin induced epidermal hyperplasia. SEs also induced activation when we used epidermal cells from nonlesional skin of psoriatic patients with CLA(+) memory T cells. Significant correlations were found between SE induced upregulation of mRNA expression for ifn-γ, il-17, il-22, ip-10, and serum level of antistreptolysin O in psoriatic patients. This study demonstrates the direct involvement of streptococcal infection in pathological mechanisms of psoriasis, such as IL-17 production and epidermal cell activation.

  15. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Lopez, Mariana; Perez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Instituto Canario de Investigacion del Cancer, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Leon, Francisco [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Avda. Astrofisico F. Sanchez 3, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Estevez, Francisco, E-mail: festevez@dbbf.ulpgc.es [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  16. Clinical Studies Applying Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells for the Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara E. Jäkel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC seems to be resistant to conventional chemo- and radiotherapy and the general treatment regimen of cytokine therapy produces only modest responses while inducing severe side effects. Nowadays standard of care is the treatment with VEGF-inhibiting agents or mTOR inhibition; nevertheless, immunotherapy can induce complete remissions and long-term survival in selected patients. Among different adoptive lymphocyte therapies, cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells have a particularly advantageous profile as these cells are easily available, have a high proliferative rate, and exhibit a high antitumor activity. Here, we reviewed clinical studies applying CIK cells, either alone or with standard therapies, for the treatment of RCC. The adverse events in all studies were mild, transient, and easily controllable. In vitro studies revealed an increased antitumor activity of peripheral lymphocytes of participants after CIK cell treatment and CIK cell therapy was able to induce complete clinical responses in RCC patients. The combination of CIK cell therapy and standard therapy was superior to standard therapy alone. These studies suggest that CIK cell immunotherapy is a safe and competent treatment strategy for RCC patients and further studies should investigate different treatment combinations and schedules for optimal application of CIK cells.

  17. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  18. PDT-treated apoptotic cells induce macrophage synthesis NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, S.; Xing, D.; Zhou, F. F.; Chen, W. R.

    2009-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biologically active molecule which has multi-functional in different species. As a second messenger and neurotransmitter, NO is not only an important regulatory factor between cells' information transmission, but also an important messenger in cell-mediated immunity and cytotoxicity. On the other side, NO is involving in some diseases' pathological process. In pathological conditions, the macrophages are activated to produce a large quantity of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which can use L-arginine to produce an excessive amount of NO, thereby killing bacteria, viruses, parasites, fungi, tumor cells, as well as in other series of the immune process. In this paper, photofrin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) was used to treat EMT6 mammary tumors in vitro to induce apoptotic cells, and then co-incubation both apoptotic cells and macrophages, which could activate macrophage to induce a series of cytotoxic factors, especially NO. This, in turn, utilizes macrophages to activate a cytotoxic response towards neighboring tumor cells. These results provided a new idea for us to further study the immunological mechanism involved in damaging effects of PDT, also revealed the important function of the immune effect of apoptotic cells in PDT.

  19. GAS1 induces cell death through an intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarco, Natanael; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; González, Rosa O; Segovia, José

    2012-06-01

    Growth Arrest Specific 1 (GAS1) is a protein expressed when cells are arrested and during development. When ectopically expressed, GAS1 induces cell arrest and apoptosis of different cell lines, and we have previously demonstrated that the apoptotic process set off by GAS1 is caused by its capacity inhibiting the GDNF-mediated intracellular survival signaling. In the present work, we have dissected the molecular pathway leading to cell death. We employed the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line that expresses GAS1 when deprived of serum. We observed, as we have previously described, that the presence of GAS1 reduces RET phosphorylation and inhibits the activation of AKT. We have now determined that the presence of GAS1 also triggers the dephosphorylation of BAD, which, in turn, provokes the release of Cytochrome-c from the mitochondria to the cytosol activating caspase-9, prompting the activity of caspase-3 and resulting in apoptosis of the cells. The apoptotic process is intrinsic, because there is no activation of caspase-8, thus this is consistent with apoptosis induced by the lack of trophic support. Interestingly, in cells where GAS1 has been silenced there is a significant delay in the onset of apoptosis.

  20. Tiotropium attenuates IL-13-induced goblet cell metaplasia of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistemaker, Loes E M; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Bos, I Sophie T; Bouwman, Susanne; van den Berge, Maarten; Hylkema, Machteld N; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A M; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-07-01

    It has been shown that acetylcholine is both a neurotransmitter and acts as a local mediator, produced by airway cells including epithelial cells. In vivo studies have demonstrated an indirect role for acetylcholine in epithelial cell differentiation. Here, we aimed to investigate direct effects of endogenous non-neuronal acetylcholine on epithelial cell differentiation. Human airway epithelial cells from healthy donors were cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI). Cells were exposed to the muscarinic antagonist tiotropium (10 nM), interleukin (IL)-13 (1, 2 and 5 ng/mL), or a combination of IL-13 and tiotropium, during or after differentiation at the ALI. Human airway epithelial cells expressed all components of the non-neuronal cholinergic system, suggesting acetylcholine production. Tiotropium had no effects on epithelial cell differentiation after air exposure. Differentiation into goblet cells was barely induced after air exposure. Therefore, IL-13 (1 ng/mL) was used to induce goblet cell metaplasia. IL-13 induced MUC5AC-positive cells (5-fold) and goblet cells (14-fold), as assessed by histochemistry, and MUC5AC gene expression (105-fold). These effects were partly prevented by tiotropium (47-92%). Goblet cell metaplasia was induced by IL-13 in a dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited by tiotropium. In addition, tiotropium reversed goblet cell metaplasia induced by 2 weeks of IL-13 exposure. IL-13 decreased forkhead box protein A2 (FoxA2) expression (1.6-fold) and increased FoxA3 (3.6-fold) and SAM-pointed domain-containing ETS transcription factor (SPDEF) (5.2-fold) expression. Tiotropium prevented the effects on FoxA2 and FoxA3, but not on SPDEF. We demonstrate that tiotropium has no effects on epithelial cell differentiation after air exposure, but inhibits and reverses IL-13-induced goblet cell metaplasia, possibly via FoxA2 and FoxA3. This indicates that non-neuronal acetylcholine contributes to goblet cell differentiation by a direct effect

  1. Heat stress induces ferroptosis-like cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distéfano, Ayelén Mariana; Martin, María Victoria; Córdoba, Juan Pablo; Bellido, Andrés Martín; D'Ippólito, Sebastián; Colman, Silvana Lorena; Soto, Débora; Roldán, Juan Alfredo; Bartoli, Carlos Guillermo; Zabaleta, Eduardo Julián; Fiol, Diego Fernando; Stockwell, Brent R; Dixon, Scott J; Pagnussat, Gabriela Carolina

    2017-02-01

    In plants, regulated cell death (RCD) plays critical roles during development and is essential for plant-specific responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, oxidative, nonapoptotic form of cell death recently described in animal cells. In animal cells, this process can be triggered by depletion of glutathione (GSH) and accumulation of lipid reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigated whether a similar process could be relevant to cell death in plants. Remarkably, heat shock (HS)-induced RCD, but not reproductive or vascular development, was found to involve a ferroptosis-like cell death process. In root cells, HS triggered an iron-dependent cell death pathway that was characterized by depletion of GSH and ascorbic acid and accumulation of cytosolic and lipid ROS. These results suggest a physiological role for this lethal pathway in response to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana The similarity of ferroptosis in animal cells and ferroptosis-like death in plants suggests that oxidative, iron-dependent cell death programs may be evolutionarily ancient. © 2017 Distéfano et al.

  2. Cholesterol induces proliferation of chicken primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongyang; Chen, Meijuan; Lu, Zhenping; Yang, Mengmeng; Xie, Long; Zhang, Wenxin; Xu, Huiyan; Lu, Kehuan; Lu, Yangqing

    2016-08-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the precursors of sperm and eggs and may serve as suitable cells for use in research in developmental biology and transgenic animals. However, the long-term propagation of PGCs in vitro has so far been plagued by the loss of their germ cell characteristics. This is largely because of the scarcity of knowledge concerning cell division and proliferation in these cells and the poor optimization of the culture medium. The sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway is involved in proliferation of many types of cells, but little is known about its role in chicken PGCs. The results of the current study indicate that the proliferation of chicken PGCs increases significantly when cholesterol, a molecule that facilitates the trafficking of HH ligands, is supplemented in the culture medium. This effect was attenuated when an SHH antagonist, cyclopamine was added, suggesting the involvement of SHH signaling in this process. The characterization of PGCs treated with cholesterol has shown that these cells express germ-cell-related markers and retain their capability to colonize the embryonic gonad after re-introduction to vasculature of stage-15 HH embryos, indicating that proliferation of PGCs induced by cholesterol does not alter the germ cell characteristics of these cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ecotropic murine leukemia virus-induced fusion of murine cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinter, A.; Chen, T.; Lowy, A.; Cortez, N.G.; Silagi, S.

    1986-03-01

    Extensive fusion occurs upon cocultivation of murine fibroblasts producing ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) with a large variety of murine cell lines in the presence of the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B, the active component of the antifungal agent Fungizone. The resulting polykaryocytes contain nuclei from both infected and uninfected cells, as evidenced by autoradiographic labeling experiments in which one or the other parent cell type was separately labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine and fused with an unlabeled parent. This cell fusion specifically requires the presence of an ecotropic MuLV-producing parent and is not observed for cells producing xenotropic, amphotropic, or dualtropic viruses. Mouse cells infected with nonecotropic viruses retain their sensitivity toward fusion, whereas infection with ecotropic viruses abrogates the fusion of these cells upon cocultivation with other ecotropic MuLV-producing cells. Nonmurine cells lacking the ecotropic gp70 receptor are not fused under similar conditions. Fusion is effectively inhibited by monospecific antisera to gp70, but not by antisera to p15(E), and studies with monoclonal antibodies identify distinct amino- and carboxy-terminal gp70 regions which play a role in the fusion reaction. The enhanced fusion which occurs in the presence of amphotericin B provides a rapid and sensitive assay for the expression of ecotropic MuLVs and should facilitate further mechanistic studies of MuLV-induced fusion of murine cells.

  4. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  5. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  6. Turkish propolis supresses MCF-7 cell death induced by homocysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartik, Musa; Darendelioglu, Ekrem; Aykutoglu, Gurkan; Baydas, Giyasettin

    2016-08-01

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) level is a most important risk factor for various vascular diseases including coronary, cerebral and peripheral arterial and venous thrombosis. Propolis is produced by honeybee from various oils, pollens and wax materials. Therefore, it has various biological properties including antioxidant, antitumor and antimicrobial activities. This study investigated the effects of propolis and Hcy on apoptosis in cancer cells. According to our findings, Hcy induced apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells by regulating numerous genes and proteins involved in the apoptotic signal transduction pathway. In contrast, treatment with propolis inhibited caspase- 3 and -9 induced by Hcy in MCF-7 cells. It can be concluded that Hcy may augment the activity of anticancer agents that induce excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptosis in their target cells. In contrast to the previous studies herein we found that propolis in low doses protected cancer cells inhibiting cellular apoptosis mediated by intracellular ROS-dependent mitochondrial pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Cationic nanoparticles induce nanoscale disruption in living cell plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiumei; Hessler, Jessica A; Putchakayala, Krishna; Panama, Brian K; Khan, Damian P; Hong, Seungpyo; Mullen, Douglas G; Dimaggio, Stassi C; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N; Lopatin, Anatoli N; Baker, James R; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Orr, Bradford G

    2009-08-13

    It has long been recognized that cationic nanoparticles induce cell membrane permeability. Recently, it has been found that cationic nanoparticles induce the formation and/or growth of nanoscale holes in supported lipid bilayers. In this paper, we show that noncytotoxic concentrations of cationic nanoparticles induce 30-2000 pA currents in 293A (human embryonic kidney) and KB (human epidermoid carcinoma) cells, consistent with a nanoscale defect such as a single hole or group of holes in the cell membrane ranging from 1 to 350 nm(2) in total area. Other forms of nanoscale defects, including the nanoparticle porating agents adsorbing onto or intercalating into the lipid bilayer, are also consistent; although the size of the defect must increase to account for any reduction in ion conduction, as compared to a water channel. An individual defect forming event takes 1-100 ms, while membrane resealing may occur over tens of seconds. Patch-clamp data provide direct evidence for the formation of nanoscale defects in living cell membranes. The cationic polymer data are compared and contrasted with patch-clamp data obtained for an amphiphilic phenylene ethynylene antimicrobial oligomer (AMO-3), a small molecule that is proposed to make well-defined 3.4 nm holes in lipid bilayers. Here, we observe data that are consistent with AMO-3 making approximately 3 nm holes in living cell membranes.

  8. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A.; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)—the cause of multiple human diseases—have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential. PMID:25775519

  9. Dragon (RGMb) induces oxaliplatin resistance in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ying; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Chen, Guo-Bin; Wang, Ying; Zhi, Qiang; Liu, Yuan-Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Li-Fen; Yang, Bing; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Xing, Hui-Qin; Ren, Jian-Lin; Xia, Yin; Guleng, Bayasi

    2016-07-26

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and a major cause of cancer mortality. Chemotherapy resistance remains a major challenge for treating advanced CRC. Therefore, the identification of targets that induce drug resistance is a priority for the development of novel agents to overcome resistance. Dragon (also known as RGMb) is a member of the repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) family. We previously showed that Dragon expression increases with CRC progression in human patients. In the present study, we found that Dragon inhibited apoptosis and increased viability of CMT93 and HCT116 cells in the presence of oxaliplatin. Dragon induced resistance of xenograft tumor to oxaliplatinin treatment in mice. Mechanistically, Dragon inhibited oxaliplatin-induced JNK and p38 MAPK activation, and caspase-3 and PARP cleavages. Our results indicate that Dragon may be a novel target that induces drug resistance in CRC.

  10. Morphological Analysis of Live Undifferentiated Cells Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Yukihiko; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Ohno, Setsuyo; Ohno, Eiji

    2017-12-05

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells possess pluripotency and self-renewal ability. Therefore, iPS cells are expected to be useful in regenerative medicine. However, iPS cells form malignant immature teratomas after transplantation into animals, even after differentiation induction. It has been suggested that undifferentiated cells expressing Nanog that remain after differentiation induction are responsible for teratoma formation. Various methods of removing these undifferentiated cells have therefore been investigated, but few methods involve morphological approaches, which may induce less cell damage. In addition, for cells derived from iPS cells to be applied in regenerative medicine, they must be alive. However, detailed morphological analysis of live undifferentiated cells has not been performed. For the above reasons, we assessed the morphological features of live undifferentiated cells remaining after differentiation induction as a basic investigation into the clinical application of iPS cells. As a result, live undifferentiated cells remaining after differentiation induction exhibited a round or oval cytoplasm about 12 μm in diameter and a nucleus. They exhibited nucleo-cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio of about 60% and eccentric nuclei, and they possessed partially granule-like structures in the cytoplasm and prominent nucleoli. Although they were similar to iPS cells, they were smaller than live iPS cells. Furthermore, very small cells were present among undifferentiated cells after differentiation induction. These results suggest that the removal of undifferentiated cells may be possible using the morphological features of live iPS cells and undifferentiated cells after differentiation induction. In addition, this study supports safe regenerative medicine using iPS cells.

  11. Depletion induced clustering of red blood cells in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Brust, Mathias; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou

    2012-11-01

    The flow properties of blood are determined by the physical properties of its main constituents, the red blood cells (RBC's). At low shear rates RBC's form aggregates, so called rouleaux. Higher shear rates can break them up and the viscosity of blood shows a shear thinning behavior. The physical origin of the rouleaux formation is not yet fully resolved and there are two competing models available. One predicts that the adhesion is induced by bridging of the plasma (macromolecular) proteins in-between two RBC's. The other is based on the depletion effect and thus predicts the absence of macromolecules in-between the cells of a rouleaux. Recent single cell force measurements by use of an AFM support strongly the depletion model. By varying the concentration of Dextran at different molecular weights we can control the adhesions strength. Measurements at low hematocrit in a microfluidic channel show that the number of size of clusters is determined by the depletion induced adhesion strength.

  12. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chen-Ming [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shih-Wei [Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzong-Huei [Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Wen-Pei [Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Che-Jen [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shih-Chia [Department of Orthopaedics, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tang, Chih-Hsin, E-mail: chtang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  13. Eclalbasaponin II induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in human ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jin Cho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Triterpenoids echinocystic acid and its glycosides, isolated from several Eclipta prostrata, have been reported to possess various biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-diabetic activity. However, the cytotoxicity of the triterpenoids in human cancer cells and their molecular mechanism of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we found that eclalbasaponin II with one glucose moiety has potent cytotoxicity in three ovarian cancer cells and two endometrial cancer cells compared to an aglycone echinocystic acid and eclalbasaponin I with two glucose moiety. Eclalbasaponin II treatment dose-dependently increased sub G1 population. Annexin V staining revealed that eclalbasaponin II induced apoptosis in SKOV3 and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. In addition, eclalbasaponin II-induced cell death was associated with characteristics of autophagy; an increase in acidic vesicular organelle content and elevation of the levels of LC3-II. Interestingly, autophagy inhibitor BaF1 suppressed the eclalbasaponin II-induced apoptosis. Moreover, eclalbasaponin II activated JNK and p38 signaling and inhibited the mTOR signaling. We further demonstrated that pre-treatment with a JNK and p38 inhibitor and mTOR activator attenuated the eclalbasaponin II-induced autophagy. This suggests that eclalbasaponin II induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death through the regulation of JNK, p38, and mTOR signaling in human ovarian cancer cells.

  14. Natural and induced T regulatory cells in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis O Adeegbe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available CD4+Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg cells control many facets of immune responses ranging from autoimmune diseases, to inflammatory conditions, and cancer in an attempt to maintain immune homeostasis. Natural Treg (nTreg cells develop in the thymus and constitute a critical arm of active mechanisms of peripheral tolerance particularly to self-antigens. A growing body of knowledge now supports the existence of induced Treg (iTreg cells which may derive from a population of conventional CD4+ T cells. The fork-head transcription factor (Foxp3 typically is expressed by natural CD4+ Treg cells, and thus serves as a marker to definitively identify these cells. On the contrary, there is less consensus on what constitutes iTreg cells as their precise definition has been somewhat elusive. This is in part due to their distinct phenotypes which are shaped by exposure to certain inflammatory or assault signals stemming from the underlying immune disorder. The policing activity of Treg cells tends to be uni-directional in several pathological conditions. On one end of the spectrum, Treg-cell suppressive activity is beneficial by curtailing T cell response against self-antigens and allergens thus preventing autoimmune diseases and allergies. On the other end however, their inhibitory roles in limiting immune response against pseudo-self antigens as in tumors often culminates into negative outcomes. In this review, we focus on this latter aspect of Treg-cell immunobiology by highlighting the involvement of nTreg cells in various animal models and human tumors. We further discuss iTreg cells, relationship with their natural counterpart, and potential co-operation between the two in modulating immune response against tumors. Lastly, we discuss studies focusing on these cells as targets for improving anti-tumor immunity.

  15. Efficient generation of rat induced pluripotent stem cells using a non-viral inducible vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Merkl

    Full Text Available Current methods of generating rat induced pluripotent stem cells are based on viral transduction of pluripotency inducing genes (Oct4, Sox2, c-myc and Klf4 into somatic cells. These activate endogenous pluripotency genes and reprogram the identity of the cell to an undifferentiated state. Epigenetic silencing of exogenous genes has to occur to allow normal iPS cell differentiation. To gain more control over the expression of exogenous reprogramming factors, we used a novel doxycycline-inducible plasmid vector encoding Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. To ensure efficient and controlled generation of iPS cells by plasmid transfection we equipped the reprogramming vector with a bacteriophage φC31 attB site and used a φC31 integrase expression vector to enhance vector integration. A series of doxycycline-independent rat iPS cell lines were established. These were characterized by immunocytochemical detection of Oct4, SSEA1 and SSEA4, alkaline phosphatase staining, methylation analysis of the endogenous Oct4 promoter and RT-PCR analysis of endogenous rat pluripotency genes. We also determined the number of vector integrations and the extent to which reprogramming factor gene expression was controlled. Protocols were developed to generate embryoid bodies and rat iPS cells demonstrated as pluripotent by generating derivatives of all three embryonic germ layers in vitro, and teratoma formation in vivo. All data suggest that our rat iPS cells, generated by plasmid based reprogramming, are similar to rat ES cells. Methods of DNA transfection, protein transduction and feeder-free monolayer culture of rat iPS cells were established to enable future applications.

  16. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide-induced multinuclear cells: Increased internalization of polystyrene beads and possible signals for cell fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi, E-mail: nakanim@iwate-med.ac.jp; Yano, Shio; Futai, Masamitsu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPS induces multinuclear cells from murine macrophage-derived RAW264.7 cells. •Large beads are internalized by cells actively fusing to become multinuclear. •The multinuclear cell formation is inhibited by anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL10. •Signal transduction for cell fusion is different from that for inflammation. -- Abstract: A murine macrophage-derived line, RAW264.7, becomes multinuclear on stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an outer membrane component of Gram-negative bacteria. These multinuclear cells internalized more polystyrene beads than mononuclear cells or osteoclasts (Nakanishi-Matsui, M., Yano, S., Matsumoto, N., and Futai, M., 2012). In this study, we analyzed the time courses of cell fusion in the presence of large beads. They were internalized into cells actively fusing to become multinuclear. However, the multinuclear cells once formed showed only low phagocytosis activity. These results suggest that formation of the multinuclear cells and bead internalization took place simultaneously. The formation of multinuclear cells was blocked by inhibitors for phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phospholipase C, calcineurin, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. In addition, interleukin 6 and 10 also exhibited inhibitory effects. These signaling molecules and cytokines may play a crucial role in the LPS-induced multinuclear cell formation.

  18. Lovastatin induces G1-phase synchronization of HEC-1-A cells and JEC cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Shen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Our study investigated lovastatin-induced G1 phase synchronization of HEC-1-A cells and JEC cells and the cell cycle progression after desynchronization of these cells. HEC-1-A cells and JEC cells were treated with by lovastatin and the proportion of cells in G1 phase was detected. Both cell types were incubated with lovastatin and the synchronization was determined. The cell cycle progression of both cell types was investigated. The proportion of Both cell types in G1 phase was 87.87 ± 0.70% and 85.00 ± 0.79%, respectively. At 20 h and 16 h after G1-phase desynchronization, the proportion of cells in S phase reached a maximal level and that in G1 phase was at the minimal level for HEC-1-A cells and JEC cells, respectively. Thus, at 20 h and 16 h after desynchronization, the proportion of cells in S phase was the highest and that in G1 phase the lowest for HEC-1-A cells and JEC cells, respectively.

  19. The roles of mitochondria in radiation-induced autophagic cell death in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zongyan; Wang, Benli; Yu, Feifei; Chen, Qiao; Tian, Yuxi; Ma, Shumei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria as the critical powerhouse of eukaryotic cells play important roles in regulating cell survival or cell death. Under numerous stimuli, impaired mitochondria will generate massive reactive oxygen species (ROS) which participate in the regulation of vital signals and could even determine the fate of cancer cells. While the roles of mitochondria in radiation-induced autophagic cell death still need to be elucidated. Human cervical cancer cell line, Hela, was used, and the SOD2 silencing model (SOD2-Ri) was established by gene engineering. Cell viability was detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays, MitoTracker Green staining was used to detect mitochondrial mass, Western blot was used to detect protein expression, and the level of ROS, autophagy, and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Ionizing radiation (IR) could induce the increase of MAPLC3-II/MAPLC3-I ratio, Beclin1 expression, and ROS generation but decrease the MMP in a time-dependent manner. After SOD2 silencing, the IR-induced changes of ROS and the MMP were significantly enhanced. Moreover, both the radio sensitivity and autophagy increased in SOD2-Ri cells. Whereas, compared with SOD2-Ri, the opposite results were obtained by NAC, an antioxidant. After the treatment with the inhibitor of mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), the rate of autophagy, ROS, and the total cell death induced by IR increased. In addition, the decrease of MMP was more obvious. However, these results were reversed by cyclosporine A (CsA). IR could induce ROS generation and mitochondrial damage which lead to autophagic cell death in Hela cells.

  20. Doxorubicin-induced cell death requires cathepsin B in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, S; Rimmbach, C; Neumann, H; Niessen, J; Reimer, E; Ritter, C A; Rosskopf, D; Cinatl, J; Michaelis, M; Schroeder, H W S; Kroemer, H K

    2010-11-15

    The cysteine protease cathepsin B acts as a key player in apoptosis. Cathepsin B-mediated cell death is induced by various stimuli such as ischemia, bile acids or TNFα. Whether cathepsin B can be influenced by anticancer drugs, however, has not been studied in detail. Here, we describe the modulation of doxorubicin-induced cell death by silencing of cathepsin B expression. Previously, it was shown that doxorubicin, in contrast to other drugs, selectively regulates expression and activity of cathepsin B. Selective silencing of cathepsin B by siRNA or the cathepsin B specific inhibitor CA074Me modified doxorubicin-mediated cell death in Hela tumor cells. Both Caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage were significantly reduced in cells lacking cathepsin B. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization as well as the release of cytochrome C and AIF from mitochondria into cytosol induced by doxorubicin were significantly diminished in cathepsin B suppressed cells. In addition, doxorubicin associated down-regulation of XIAP was not observed in cathepsin B silenced cells. Lack of cathepsin B significantly modified cell cycle regulatory proteins such as cdk1, Wee1 and p21 without significant changes in G(1), S or G(2)M cell cycle phases maybe indicating further cell cycle independent actions of these proteins. Consequently, cell viability following doxorubicin was significantly elevated in cells with cathepsin B silencing. In summary, our data strongly suggest a role of cathepsin B in doxorubicin-induced cell death. Therefore, increased expression of cathepsin B in various types of cancer can modify susceptibility towards doxorubicin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Attenuating Age-Related Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation towards the bone forming osteoblastic lineage decreases as a function of age and may contribute to age-related...problem of age-related reduced availability of MSC we propose to examine the bone anabolic potential of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) derived MSC

  2. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Hair Follicle Bulge Neural Crest Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Czepiel, Marcin; Krause, Tina; Schaefer, Karl-Herbert; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are promising candidates for the study of disease models as well as for tissue engineering purposes. Part of a strategy to develop safe reprogramming technique is reducing the number of exogenous reprogramming factors. Some cells types are more prone to

  3. Live free or die: cell-cell adhesion regulates sensitivity to trail-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Lisa L; Brugge, Joan S

    2014-07-14

    The ability of the death ligand TRAIL to induce tumor cell apoptosis has led to the development of TRAIL-based cancer therapies. Reporting recently in Molecular Cell, Lu et al. (2014) show that the basis for differential TRAIL responses involves clustering of death receptor complexes by E-cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. N-Desmethyldauricine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Apoptosis-Defective Cells via Ca(2+) Mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Betty Y K; Mok, Simon W F; Chen, Juan; Michelangeli, Francesco; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Han, Yu; Qu, Yuan Q; Qiu, Alena C L; Xu, Su-Wei; Xue, Wei-Wei; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Gao, Jia Y; Javed, Masood-Ul-Hassan; Coghi, Paolo; Liu, Liang; Wong, Vincent K W

    2017-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy remains a significant problem in oncology. Mechanisms regulating programmed cell death, including apoptosis, autophagy or necrosis, in the treatment of cancers have been extensively investigated over the last few decades. Autophagy is now emerging as an important pathway in regulating cell death or survival in cancer therapy. Recent studies demonstrated variety of natural small-molecules could induce autophagic cell death in apoptosis-resistant cancer cells, therefore, discovery of novel autophagic enhancers from natural products could be a promising strategy for treatment of chemotherapy-resistant cancer. By computational virtual docking analysis, biochemical assays, and advanced live-cell imaging techniques, we have identified N-desmethyldauricine (LP-4), isolated from rhizoma of Menispermum dauricum DC as a novel inducer of autophagy. LP-4 was shown to induce autophagy via the Ulk-1-PERK and Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)-AMPK-mTOR signaling cascades, via mobilizing calcium release through inhibition of SERCA, and importantly, lead to autophagic cell death in a panel of cancer cells, apoptosis-defective and apoptosis-resistant cells. Taken together, this study provides detailed insights into the cytotoxic mechanism of a novel autophagic compound that targeting the apoptosis resistant cancer cells, and new implication on drug discovery from natural products for drug resistant cancer therapy.

  5. TSLP-activated dendritic cells induce human T follicular helper cell differentiation through OX40-ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattarini, Lucia; Trichot, Coline; Bogiatzi, Sofia; Grandclaudon, Maximilien; Meller, Stephan; Keuylian, Zela; Durand, Melanie; Volpe, Elisabetta; Madonna, Stefania; Cavani, Andrea; Chiricozzi, Andrea; Romanelli, Marco; Hori, Toshiyuki; Hovnanian, Alain; Homey, Bernhard; Soumelis, Vassili

    2017-05-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh) are important regulators of humoral responses. Human Tfh polarization pathways have been thus far associated with Th1 and Th17 polarization pathways. How human Tfh cells differentiate in Th2-skewed environments is unknown. We show that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP)-activated dendritic cells (DCs) promote human Tfh differentiation from naive CD4 T cells. We identified a novel population, distinct from Th2 cells, expressing IL-21 and TNF, suggestive of inflammatory cells. TSLP-induced T cells expressed CXCR5, CXCL13, ICOS, PD1, BCL6, BTLA, and SAP, among other Tfh markers. Functionally, TSLP-DC-polarized T cells induced IgE secretion by memory B cells, and this depended on IL-4Rα. TSLP-activated DCs stimulated circulating memory Tfh cells to produce IL-21 and CXCL13. Mechanistically, TSLP-induced Tfh differentiation depended on OX40-ligand, but not on ICOS-ligand. Our results delineate a pathway of human Tfh differentiation in Th2 environments. © 2017 Pattarini et al.

  6. Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Induced Cell Apoptosis and S Phase Arrest in Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of human adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs on the viability and apoptosis of human bladder cancer cells. EJ and T24 cells were cocultured with ADSCs or cultured with conditioned medium of ADSCs (ADSC-CM, respectively. The cell counting and colony formation assay showed ADSCs inhibited the proliferation of EJ and T24 cells. Cell viability assessment revealed that the secretions of ADSCs, in the form of conditioned medium, were able to decrease cancer cell viability. Wound-healing assay suggested ADSC-CM suppressed migration of T24 and EJ cells. Moreover, the results of the flow cytometry indicated that ADSC-CM was capable of inducing apoptosis of T24 cells and inducing S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot revealed ADSC-CM increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, indicating that ADSC-CM induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent way. PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins were involved in the mechanism of this reaction. Our study indicated that ADSCs may provide a promising and practicable manner for bladder tumor therapy.

  7. ETOPOSIDE INDUCES CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN SPERMATOCYTES AND SPERMATOGONIAL STEM CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, F; Pearson, F S; Bishop, J B; Wyrobek, A J

    2005-07-15

    Etoposide (ET) is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used in the treatment of leukemia, lymphomas and many solid tumors, such as testicular and ovarian cancers, that affect patients in their reproductive years. The purpose of the study was to use sperm FISH analyses to characterize the long-term effects of ET on male germ cells. We used a mouse model to characterize the induction of chromosomal aberrations (partial duplications and deletions) and whole chromosomal aneuploidies in sperm of mice treated with a clinical dose of ET. Semen samples were collected at 25 and 49 days after dosing to investigate the effects of ET on meiotic pachytene cells and spermatogonial stem-cells, respectively. ET treatment resulted in major increases in the frequencies of sperm carrying chromosomal aberrations in both meiotic pachytene (27- to 578-fold) and spermatogonial stem-cells (8- to 16-fold), but aneuploid sperm were induced only after treatment of meiotic cells (27-fold) with no persistent effects in stem cells. These results demonstrate that male meiotic germ cells are considerably more sensitive to ET than spermatogonial stem-cell and that increased frequencies of sperm with structural aberrations persist after spermatogonial stem-cell treatment. These findings predict that patients who undergo chemotherapy with ET may have transient elevations in the frequencies of aneuploid sperm, but more importantly, may have persistent elevations in the frequencies of sperm with chromosomal aberrations, placing them at higher risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes long after the end of their chemotherapy.

  8. A minimum number of autoimmune T cells to induce autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Angela J T; Bolinger, Beatrice; Keck, Simone; Stepanek, Ondrej; Ozga, Aleksandra J; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Stein, Jens V; Palmer, Ed

    2017-06-01

    While autoimmune T cells are present in most individuals, only a minority of the population suffers from an autoimmune disease. To better appreciate the limits of T cell tolerance, we carried out experiments to determine how many autoimmune T cells are required to initiate an experimental autoimmune disease. Variable numbers of autoimmune OT-I T cells were transferred into RIP-OVA mice, which were injected with antigen-loaded DCs in a single footpad; this restricted T cell priming to a few OT-I T cells that are present in the draining popliteal lymph node. Using selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) we counted the number of OT-I T cells present in the popliteal lymph node at the time of priming. Analysis of our data suggests that a single autoimmune T cell cannot induce an experimental autoimmune disease, but a "quorum" of 2-5 autoimmune T cells clearly has this capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbamazepine induces mitotic arrest in mammalian Vero cells

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    Perez Martin, J.M.; Fernandez Freire, P.; Labrador, V. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Hazen, M.J. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: mariajose.hazen@uam.es

    2008-01-01

    We reported recently that the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine, at supratherapeutic concentrations, exerts antiproliferative effects in mammalian Vero cells, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. This motivates us to examine rigorously whether growth arrest was associated with structural changes in cellular organization during mitosis. In the present work, we found that exposure of the cells to carbamazepine led to an increase in mitotic index, mainly due to the sustained block at the metaphase/anaphase boundary, with the consequent inhibition of cell proliferation. Indirect immunofluorescence, using antibodies directed against spindle apparatus proteins, revealed that mitotic arrest was associated with formation of monopolar spindles, caused by impairment of centrosome separation. The final consequence of the spindle defects induced by carbamazepine, depended on the duration of cell cycle arrest. Following the time course of accumulation of metaphase and apoptotic cells during carbamazepine treatments, we observed a causative relationship between mitotic arrest and induction of cell death. Conversely, cells released from the block of metaphase by removal of the drug, continued to progress through mitosis and resume normal proliferation. Our results show that carbamazepine shares a common antiproliferative mechanism with spindle-targeted drugs and contribute to a better understanding of the cytostatic activity previously described in Vero cells. Additional studies are in progress to extend these initial findings that define a novel mode of action of carbamazepine in cultured mammalian cells.

  10. Mitochondrial Remodeling in Chicken Induced Pluripotent Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Woo; Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Sol; Ju Hong, Yean; Byun, Sung June; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-03-15

    Chicken pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), such as embryonic stem cells and blastoderm cells, have been used to study development and differentiation in chicken. However, chicken PSCs are not widely used because they are hard to maintain in long-term culture. Recent reports suggest that chicken somatic cells can be reprogrammed to pluripotent state by defined factors to form induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These chicken iPSCs showed pluripotent differentiation potential and could be maintained in long-term culture. However, intracytoplasmic remodeling during reprogramming of chicken cells remains largely unknown. In this study, we generated chicken iPS-like cells (ciPSLCs) from chicken embryonic fibroblasts using a retroviral expression system encoding human reprogramming factors. These ciPSLCs could be maintained for more than 10 passages and expressed the endogenous chicken pluripotency markers, cNonog and cSox2. Moreover, the ciPSLCs showed higher nucleus to cytoplasm ratio and contained globular mitochondria with immature cristae. This morphology was similar to that of mammalian PSCs, but different from that of avian somatic cells, which showed lower nucleus to cytoplasm ratio and mature mitochondria. These results suggest that intracytoplasmic organelles in differentiated somatic cells could be successfully remodeled into the pluripotent state during reprogramming in chicken.

  11. Low immunogenicity of mouse induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Go; Ozaki, Masahiro; Nagoshi, Narihito; Kawabata, Soya; Nishiyama, Yuichiro; Sugai, Keiko; Iida, Tsuyoshi; Kashiwagi, Rei; Ookubo, Toshiki; Yastake, Kaori; Matsubayashi, Kohei; Kohyama, Jun; Iwanami, Akio; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-10-11

    Resolving the immunogenicity of cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) remains an important challenge for cell transplant strategies that use banked allogeneic cells. Thus, we evaluated the immunogenicity of mouse fetal neural stem/progenitor cells (fetus-NSPCs) and iPSC-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (iPSC-NSPCs) both in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry revealed the low expression of immunological surface antigens, and these cells survived in all mice when transplanted syngeneically into subcutaneous tissue and the spinal cord. In contrast, an allogeneic transplantation into subcutaneous tissue was rejected in all mice, and allogeneic cells transplanted into intact and injured spinal cords survived for 3 months in approximately 20% of mice. In addition, cell survival was increased after co-treatment with an immunosuppressive agent. Thus, the immunogenicity and post-transplantation immunological dynamics of iPSC-NSPCs resemble those of fetus-NSPCs.

  12. Fluorescent tagged episomals for stoichiometric induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christopher E; Morales, Blanca M; Schmitz, Ellen M H; Hawkins, John S; Lizama, Carlos O; Zape, Joan P; Hsiao, Edward C; Zovein, Ann C

    2017-06-05

    Non-integrating episomal vectors have become an important tool for induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming. The episomal vectors carrying the "Yamanaka reprogramming factors" (Oct4, Klf, Sox2, and L-Myc + Lin28) are critical tools for non-integrating reprogramming of cells to a pluripotent state. However, the reprogramming process remains highly stochastic, and is hampered by an inability to easily identify clones that carry the episomal vectors. We modified the original set of vectors to express spectrally separable fluorescent proteins to allow for enrichment of transfected cells. The vectors were then tested against the standard original vectors for reprogramming efficiency and for the ability to enrich for stoichiometric ratios of factors. The reengineered vectors allow for cell sorting based on reprogramming factor expression. We show that these vectors can assist in tracking episomal expression in individual cells and can select the reprogramming factor dosage. Together, these modified vectors are a useful tool for understanding the reprogramming process and improving induced pluripotent stem cell isolation efficiency.

  13. Generation of functional podocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells

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    Osele Ciampi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Generating human podocytes in vitro could offer a unique opportunity to study human diseases. Here, we describe a simple and efficient protocol for obtaining functional podocytes in vitro from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Cells were exposed to a three-step protocol, which induced their differentiation into intermediate mesoderm, then into nephron progenitors and, finally, into mature podocytes. After differentiation, cells expressed the main podocyte markers, such as synaptopodin, WT1, α-Actinin-4, P-cadherin and nephrin at the protein and mRNA level, and showed the low proliferation rate typical of mature podocytes. Exposure to Angiotensin II significantly decreased the expression of podocyte genes and cells underwent cytoskeleton rearrangement. Cells were able to internalize albumin and self-assembled into chimeric 3D structures in combination with dissociated embryonic mouse kidney cells. Overall, these findings demonstrate the establishment of a robust protocol that, mimicking developmental stages, makes it possible to derive functional podocytes in vitro.

  14. Deletion of the mitochondrial flavoprotein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF induces beta-cell apoptosis and impairs beta-cell mass.

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    Fabienne T Schulthess

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is a hallmark of beta-cell death in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Understanding how apoptosis contributes to beta-cell turnover may lead to strategies to prevent progression of diabetes. A key mediator of apoptosis, mitochondrial function, and cell survival is apoptosis inducing factor (AIF. In the present study, we investigated the role of AIF on beta-cell mass and survival using the Harlequin (Hq mutant mice, which are hypomorphic for AIF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistochemical evaluation of pancreata from Hq mutant mice displayed much smaller islets compared to wild-type mice (WT. Analysis of beta-cell mass in these mice revealed a greater than 4-fold reduction in beta-cell mass together with an 8-fold increase in beta-cell apoptosis. Analysis of cell cycle dynamics, using BrdU pulse as a marker for cells in S-phase, did not detect significant differences in the frequency of beta-cells in S-phase. In contrast, double staining for phosphorylated Histone H3 and insulin showed a 3-fold increase in beta-cells in the G2 phase in Hq mutant mice, but no differences in M-phase compared to WT mice. This suggests that the beta-cells from Hq mutant mice are arrested in the G2 phase and are unlikely to complete the cell cycle. beta-cells from Hq mutant mice display increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis, which was confirmed in human islets in which AIF was depleted by siRNA. AIF deficiency had no effect on glucose stimulated insulin secretion, but the impaired effect of hydrogen peroxide on beta-cell function was potentiated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that AIF is essential for maintaining beta-cell mass and for oxidative stress response. A decrease in the oxidative phosphorylation capacity may counteract the development of diabetes, despite its deleterious effects on beta-cell survival.

  15. HEXIM1 induces differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells.

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    Vanessa Ding

    Full Text Available Hexamethylene bisacetamide inducible protein 1 (HEXIM1 is best known as the inhibitor of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb, which is composed of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9/cyclin T1. P-TEFb is an essential regulator for the transcriptional elongation by RNA polymerase II. A genome-wide study using human embryonic stem cells shows that most mRNA synthesis is regulated at the stage of transcription elongation, suggesting a possible role for P-TEFb/HEXIM1 in the gene regulation of stem cells. In this report, we detected a marked increase in HEXIM1 protein levels in the differentiated human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs induced by LY294002 treatment. Since no changes in CDK9 and cyclin T1 were observed in the LY294002-treated cells, increased levels of HEXIM1 might lead to inhibition of P-TEFb activity. However, treatment with a potent P-TEFb inhibiting compound, flavopiridol, failed to induce hPSC differentiation, ruling out the possible requirement for P-TEFb kinase activity in hPSC differentiation. Conversely, differentiation was observed when hPSCs were incubated with hexamethylene bisacetamide, a HEXIM1 inducing reagent. The involvement of HEXIM1 in the regulation of hPSCs was further supported when overexpression of HEXIM1 concomitantly induced hPSC differentiation. Collectively, our study demonstrates a novel role of HEXIM1 in regulating hPSC fate through a P-TEFb-independent pathway.

  16. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J; Park, Daeho

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Imiquimod induces apoptosis of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells via regulation of A20.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Cheol Sohn

    Full Text Available Imiquimod, a nucleoside analogue of the imidazoquinoline family, is being used to treat various cutaneous cancers including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Imiquimod activates anti-tumor immunity via Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7 in macrophage and other immune cells. Imiquimod can also affect tumor cells directly, regardless of its impact on immune system. In this study, we demonstrated that imiquimod induced apoptosis of SCC cells (SCC12 and A20 was involved in this process. When A20 was overexpressed, imiquimod-induced apoptosis was markedly inhibited. Conversely, knockdown of A20 potentiated imiquimod-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, A20 counteracted activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, suggesting that A20-regulated JNK activity was possible mechanism underlying imiquimod-induced apoptosis of SCC12 cells. Finally, imiquimod-induced apoptosis of SCC12 cells was taken place in a TLR7-independent manner. Our data provide new insight into the mechanism underlying imiquimod effect in cutaneous cancer treatment.

  18. Tangeretin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through upregulation of PTEN expression in glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Li; Wang, Da-Wei; Yu, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Yan-Ling

    2016-07-01

    Tangeretin (TANG), present in peel of citrus fruits, has been shown to various medicinal properties such as chemopreventive and neuroprotective. However, the chemopreventive effect of TANG on glioblastoma cells has not been examined. The present study was designed to explore the anticancer potential of TANG in glioblastoma cells and to investigate the related mechanism. Human glioblastoma U-87MG and LN-18 cells were treated with 45μM concentration of TANG and cell growth was measured by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution and cell death were measured by flow cytometry. The expression of cell cycle and apoptosis related genes were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot. The cells treated with TANG were significantly increased cell growth suppression and cell death effects than vehicle treated cells. Further, TANG treatment increases G2/M arrest and apoptosis by modulating PTEN and cell-cycle regulated genes such as cyclin-D and cdc-2 mRNA and protein expressions. Moreover, the ability of TANG to decrease cell growth and to induce cell death was compromised when PTEN was knockdown by siRNA. Taken together, the chemopreventive effect of TANG is associated with regulation of cell-cycle and apoptosis in glioblastoma, thereby attenuating glioblastoma cell growth. Hence, the present findings suggest that TANG may be a therapeutic agent for glioblastoma treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death.

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    Lilibeth Lanceta

    Full Text Available Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by "loose" (probably intralysosomal iron because cytotoxic effects of heme are lessened by pre-incubation of HO-1 deficient cells with desferrioxamine (which localizes preferentially in the lysosomal compartment. Desferrioxamine also decreases lysosomal rupture promoted by intracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide. Supporting the importance of endogenous oxidant production, both chemical and siRNA inhibition of catalase activity predisposes HO-1 deficient cells to heme-mediated killing. Importantly, it appears that HO-1 deficiency somehow blocks the induction of ferritin; control cells exposed to heme show ~10-fold increases in ferritin heavy chain expression whereas in heme-exposed HO-1 deficient cells ferritin expression is unchanged. Finally, overexpression of ferritin H chain in HO-1 deficient cells completely prevents heme-induced cytotoxicity. Although two other products of HO-1 activity--CO and bilirubin--have been invoked to explain HO-1-mediated cytoprotection, we conclude that, at least in this experimental system, HO-1 activity triggers the induction of ferritin and the latter is actually responsible for the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 activity.

  20. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

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    Lefevre, Sophie [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); ED515 UPMC, 4 place Jussieu 75005 Paris (France); Sliwa, Dominika [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Rustin, Pierre [Inserm, U676, Physiopathology and Therapy of Mitochondrial Disease Laboratory, 75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Faculte de Medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Camadro, Jean-Michel [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Santos, Renata, E-mail: santos.renata@ijm.univ-paris-diderot.fr [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  1. Salidroside inhibits endogenous hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingyu; Jin, Lianhai; Shen, Nan; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Zhengli

    2013-01-01

    Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., shows potent antioxidant property. Herein, we investigated the protective effects of salidroside against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in human endothelial cells (EVC-304). EVC-304 cells were incubated in the presence or absence of low steady states of H2O2 (3-4 µM) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX) with or without salidroside. 3(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) assays were performed, together with Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometric analysis using Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) label. The results indicated that salidroside pretreatment attenuated endogenous H2O2 induced apoptotic cell death in EVC-304 cells in a dose-dependent pattern. Furthermore, Western blot data revealed that salidroside inhibited activation of caspase-3, 9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) induced by endogenous H2O2. It also decreased the expression of Bax and rescued the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. All these results demonstrated that salidroside may present a potential therapy for oxidative stress in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

  2. Sensing lymphoma cells based on a cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptide probe

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    Sugawara, Kazuharu, E-mail: kzsuga@maebashi-it.ac.jp [Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma 371-0816 (Japan); Shinohara, Hiroki; Kadoya, Toshihiko [Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma 371-0816 (Japan); Kuramitz, Hideki [Department of Environmental Biology and Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2016-06-14

    To electrochemically sense lymphoma cells (U937), we fabricated a multifunctional peptide probe that consists of cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptides. Electron-transfer peptides derive from cysteine residue combined with the C-terminals of four tyrosine residues (Y{sub 4}). A peptide whereby Y{sub 4}C is bound to the C-terminals of protegrin 1 (RGGRLCYCRRRFCVCVGR-NH{sub 2}) is known to be an apoptosis-inducing agent against U937 cells, and is referred to as a peptide-1 probe. An oxidation response of the peptide-1 probe has been observed due to a phenolic hydroxyl group, and this response is decreased by the uptake of the peptide probe into the cells. To improve the cell membrane permeability against U937 cells, the RGGR at the N-terminals of the peptide-1 probe was replaced by RRRR (peptide-2 probe). In contrast, RNRCKGTDVQAWY{sub 4}C (peptide-3 probe), which recognizes ovalbumin, was constructed as a control. Compared with the other probes, the change in the peak current of the peptide-2 probe was the greatest at low concentrations and occurred in a short amount of time. Therefore, the cell membrane permeability of the peptide-2 probe was increased based on the arginine residues and the apoptosis-inducing peptides. The peak current was linear and ranged from 100 to 1000 cells/ml. The relative standard deviation of 600 cells/ml was 5.0% (n = 5). Furthermore, the membrane permeability of the peptide probes was confirmed using fluorescent dye. - Highlights: • We constructed a multifunctional peptide probe for the electrochemical sensing of lymphoma cells. • The peptide probe consists of cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptides. • The electrode response of the peptide probe changes due to selective uptake into the cells.

  3. Generation of Induced Progenitor-like Cells from Mature Epithelial Cells Using Interrupted Reprogramming

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    Li Guo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A suitable source of progenitor cells is required to attenuate disease or affect cure. We present an “interrupted reprogramming” strategy to generate “induced progenitor-like (iPL cells” using carefully timed expression of induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc; OSKM from non-proliferative Club cells. Interrupted reprogramming allowed controlled expansion yet preservation of lineage commitment. Under clonogenic conditions, iPL cells expanded and functioned as a bronchiolar progenitor-like population to generate mature Club cells, mucin-producing goblet cells, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR-expressing ciliated epithelium. In vivo, iPL cells can repopulate CFTR-deficient epithelium. This interrupted reprogramming process could be metronomically applied to achieve controlled progenitor-like proliferation. By carefully controlling the duration of expression of OSKM, iPL cells do not become pluripotent, and they maintain their memory of origin and retain their ability to efficiently return to their original phenotype. A generic technique to produce highly specified populations may have significant implications for regenerative medicine. : In this article Waddell, Nagy, and colleagues present an “interrupted reprogramming” strategy to produce highly specified functional “induced progenitor-like cells” from mature quiescent cells. They propose that careful control of the duration of transient expression of iPSC reprogramming factors (OSKM allows controlled expansion yet preservation of parental lineage without traversing the pluripotent state. Keywords: generation of induced progenitor-like cells

  4. Adipose-derived stromal cells inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation inducing apoptosis

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    Takahara, Kiyoshi [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Ii, Masaaki, E-mail: masaii@art.osaka-med.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Inamoto, Teruo; Komura, Kazumasa; Ibuki, Naokazu; Minami, Koichiro; Uehara, Hirofumi; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kiyama, Satoshi [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Asahi, Michio [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Azuma, Haruhito [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • AdSC transplantation exhibits inhibitory effect on tumor progressions of PCa cells. • AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway. • High expression of the TGF-β1 gene in AdSCs. - Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Adipose-derived stromal cells (AdSCs) are known to exhibit extensive proliferation potential and can undergo multilineage differentiation, sharing similar characteristics to bone marrow-derived MSCs. However, as the effect of AdSCs on tumor growth has not been studied sufficiently, we assessed the degree to which AdSCs affect the proliferation of prostate cancer (PCa) cell. Human AdSCs exerted an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of androgen-responsive (LNCaP) and androgen-nonresponsive (PC3) human PCa cells, while normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) did not, and in fact promoted PCa cell proliferation to a degree. Moreover, AdSCs induced apoptosis of LNCaP cells and PC3 cells, activating the caspase3/7 signaling pathway. cDNA microarray analysis suggested that AdSC-induced apoptosis in both LNCaP and PC3 cells was related to the TGF-β signaling pathway. Consistent with our in vitro observations, local transplantation of AdSCs delayed the growth of tumors derived from both LNCaP- and PC3-xenografts in immunodeficient mice. This is the first preclinical study to have directly demonstrated that AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway, irrespective of androgen-responsiveness. Since autologous AdSCs can be easily isolated from adipose tissue without any ethical concerns, we suggest that therapy with these cells could be a novel approach for patients with PCa.

  5. Induced melanin reduces mutations and cell killing in mouse melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Hill, H Z

    1997-03-01

    When melanin absorbs light energy, it can produce potentially damaging active oxygen species. There is little doubt that constitutive pigment in dark-skinned individuals is photoprotective against skin cancer, but induced pigment-as in tanning-may not be. The first step in cancer induction is mutation in DNA. The most suitable systems for evaluating the role of melanin are those in which pigment can be varied and mutations can be measured. Several cell lines from Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma can be induced to form large quantities of melanin pigment after treatment with a number of different agents enabling comparison of mutant yields in the same cells differing principally in pigment concentration. In these studies, melanin was induced with synthetic alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and with isobutyl methyl xanthine in the cell line S91/mel. The former inducer produced about 50% more pigment than the latter. Survival and mutation induction at the Na+/K(+)-ATPase locus were studied using ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS), a standard mutagen and five UV lamps emitting near monochromatic and polychromatic UV light in the three wave-length ranges of UV. There was greater protection against killing and mutation induction in the more heavily pigmented cells after exposure to EMS and after irradiation with monochromatic UVC and UVB. There was significant protection against killing by polychromatic UVB + UVA (FS20), but the small degree of protection against mutation was not significant. No significant change in killing and mutation using the same protocol was seen in S91/amel, a related cell line that does not respond to these inducers. No mutants were produced by either monochromatic or polychromatic UVA at doses that killed 50% of the cells. Our results show that induced pigment-shown earlier to be eumelanin (K. A. Cieszka et al., Exp. Dermatol. 4, 192-198, 1995)-is photo- and chemoprotective, but it is less effective in protection against mutagenesis by polychromatic

  6. Cardiac Glycoside Glucoevatromonoside Induces Cancer Type-Specific Cell Death

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    Naira F. Z. Schneider

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides (CGs are natural compounds used traditionally to treat congestive heart diseases. Recent investigations repositioned CGs as potential anticancer agents. To discover novel cytotoxic CG scaffolds, we selected the cardenolide glucoevatromonoside (GEV out of 46 CGs for its low nanomolar anti-lung cancer activity. GEV presented reduced toxicity toward non-cancerous cell types (lung MRC-5 and PBMC and high-affinity binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase α subunit, assessed by computational docking. GEV-induced cell death was caspase-independent, as investigated by a multiparametric approach, and culminates in severe morphological alterations in A549 cells, monitored by transmission electron microscopy, live cell imaging and flow cytometry. This non-canonical cell death was not preceded or accompanied by exacerbation of autophagy. In the presence of GEV, markers of autophagic flux (e.g. LC3I-II conversion were impacted, even in presence of bafilomycin A1. Cell death induction remained unaffected by calpain, cathepsin, parthanatos, or necroptosis inhibitors. Interestingly, GEV triggered caspase-dependent apoptosis in U937 acute myeloid leukemia cells, witnessing cancer-type specific cell death induction. Differential cell cycle modulation by this CG led to a G2/M arrest, cyclin B1 and p53 downregulation in A549, but not in U937 cells. We further extended the anti-cancer potential of GEV to 3D cell culture using clonogenic and spheroid formation assays and validated our findings in vivo by zebrafish xenografts. Altogether, GEV shows an interesting anticancer profile with the ability to exert cytotoxic effects via induction of different cell death modalities.

  7. New Castanospermine Glycoside Analogues Inhibit Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Induce Apoptosis without Affecting Normal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Ghada; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima; Sanchez-Fernandez, Elena M.; Risquez-Cuadro, Rocío; Fernandez, José M. Garcia; Ortiz-Mellet, Carmen; Ahidouch, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    sp2-Iminosugar-type castanospermine analogues have been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity. However, their effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis and the molecular mechanism at play are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the effect of two representatives, namely the pseudo-S- and C-octyl glycoside 2-oxa-3-oxocastanospermine derivatives SO-OCS and CO-OCS, on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and MCF-10A mammary normal cell lines. We found that SO-OCS and CO-OCS inhibited breast cancer cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This effect is specific to breast cancer cells as both molecules had no impact on normal MCF-10A cell proliferation. Both drugs induced a cell cycle arrest. CO-OCS arrested cell cycle at G1 and G2/M in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells respectively. In MCF-7 cells, the G1 arrest is associated with a reduction of CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4), cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, pRb phosphorylation, and an overexpression of p21Waf1/Cip1. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CO-OCS reduced CDK1 but not cyclin B1 expression. SO-OCS accumulated cells in G2/M in both cell lines and this blockade was accompanied by a decrease of CDK1, but not cyclin B1 expression. Furthermore, both drugs induced apoptosis as demonstrated by the increased percentage of annexin V positive cells and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Interestingly, in normal MCF-10A cells the two drugs failed to modify cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cyclins, or CDKs expression. These results demonstrate that the effect of CO-OCS and SO-OCS is triggered by both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting that these castanospermine analogues may constitute potential anti-cancer agents against breast cancer. PMID:24124558

  8. Generation of stratified squamous epithelial progenitor cells from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yoshida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Application of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells in regenerative medicine will bypass ethical issues associated with use of embryonic stem cells. In addition, patient-specific IPS cells can be useful to elucidate the pathophysiology of genetic disorders, drug screening, and tailor-made medicine. However, in order to apply iPS cells to mitotic tissue, induction of tissue stem cells that give rise to progeny of the target organ is required. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We induced stratified epithelial cells from mouse iPS cells by co-culture with PA6 feeder cells (SDIA-method with use of BMP4. Clusters of cells positive for the differentiation markers KRT1 or KRT12 were observed in KRT14-positive colonies. We successfully cloned KRT14 and p63 double-positive stratified epithelial progenitor cells from iPS-derived epithelial cells, which formed stratified epithelial sheets consisting of five- to six-polarized epithelial cells in vitro. When these clonal cells were cultured on denuded mouse corneas, a robust stratified epithelial layer was observed with physiological cell polarity including high levels of E-cadherin, p63 and K15 expression in the basal layer and ZO-1 in the superficial layer, recapitulating the apico-basal polarity of the epithelium in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that KRT14 and p63 double-positive epithelial progenitor cells can be cloned from iPS cells in order to produce polarized multilayer epithelial cell sheets.

  9. Generation of Stratified Squamous Epithelial Progenitor Cells from Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Satoru; Yasuda, Miyuki; Miyashita, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Yoko; Yoshida, Tetsu; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Tsubota, Kazuo; Okano, Hideyuki; Shimmura, Shigeto

    2011-01-01

    Background Application of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in regenerative medicine will bypass ethical issues associated with use of embryonic stem cells. In addition, patient-specific IPS cells can be useful to elucidate the pathophysiology of genetic disorders, drug screening, and tailor-made medicine. However, in order to apply iPS cells to mitotic tissue, induction of tissue stem cells that give rise to progeny of the target organ is required. Methodology/Principal Findings We induced stratified epithelial cells from mouse iPS cells by co-culture with PA6 feeder cells (SDIA-method) with use of BMP4. Clusters of cells positive for the differentiation markers KRT1 or KRT12 were observed in KRT14-positive colonies. We successfully cloned KRT14 and p63 double-positive stratified epithelial progenitor cells from iPS-derived epithelial cells, which formed stratified epithelial sheets consisting of five- to six-polarized epithelial cells in vitro. When these clonal cells were cultured on denuded mouse corneas, a robust stratified epithelial layer was observed with physiological cell polarity including high levels of E-cadherin, p63 and K15 expression in the basal layer and ZO-1 in the superficial layer, recapitulating the apico-basal polarity of the epithelium in vivo. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that KRT14 and p63 double-positive epithelial progenitor cells can be cloned from iPS cells in order to produce polarized multilayer epithelial cell sheets. PMID:22174914

  10. New castanospermine glycoside analogues inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis without affecting normal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Allan

    Full Text Available sp²-Iminosugar-type castanospermine analogues have been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity. However, their effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis and the molecular mechanism at play are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the effect of two representatives, namely the pseudo-S- and C-octyl glycoside 2-oxa-3-oxocastanospermine derivatives SO-OCS and CO-OCS, on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and MCF-10A mammary normal cell lines. We found that SO-OCS and CO-OCS inhibited breast cancer cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This effect is specific to breast cancer cells as both molecules had no impact on normal MCF-10A cell proliferation. Both drugs induced a cell cycle arrest. CO-OCS arrested cell cycle at G1 and G2/M in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells respectively. In MCF-7 cells, the G1 arrest is associated with a reduction of CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4, cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, pRb phosphorylation, and an overexpression of p21(Waf1/Cip1. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CO-OCS reduced CDK1 but not cyclin B1 expression. SO-OCS accumulated cells in G2/M in both cell lines and this blockade was accompanied by a decrease of CDK1, but not cyclin B1 expression. Furthermore, both drugs induced apoptosis as demonstrated by the increased percentage of annexin V positive cells and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Interestingly, in normal MCF-10A cells the two drugs failed to modify cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cyclins, or CDKs expression. These results demonstrate that the effect of CO-OCS and SO-OCS is triggered by both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting that these castanospermine analogues may constitute potential anti-cancer agents against breast cancer.

  11. Taraxerol Induces Cell Apoptosis through A Mitochondria-Mediated Pathway in HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Xiangyang; Lu, Binyu; Lü, Chaotian; Bai, Qin; Yan, Dazhong; Xu, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Taraxerol acetate has potent anti-cancer effects via the induction of apoptosis, autophagy, cell cycle arrest, and inhibition of cell migration. However, whether taraxerol induced apoptosis and its underlying mechanisms of action is not clear. In the present study, we assess the effects of taraxerol on the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and determine the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and activation of caspases. In this experimental study, we mainly investigated the effect of taraxerol on HeLa cells. We tested cell viability by the MTT assay and morphologic changes, analyzed apoptosis by DAPI staining and flow cytometry. We also determined reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) using a Microplate Reader. In addition, the apoptotic proteins were tested by Western blot. Taraxerol enhanced ROS levels and attenuated the MMP (Δψm) in HeLa cells. Taraxerol induced apoptosis mainly via the mitochondrial pathway including the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and activation of caspases 9 and 3, and anti-poly (ADPribose) polymerase (PARP). Taraxerol could induce the down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein Bax. It suppressed the PI3K/ Akt signaling pathway. These results demonstrated that taraxerol induced cell apoptosis through a mitochondria-mediated pathway in HeLa cells. Thus, taraxerol might be a potential anticervical cancer candidate.

  12. Stretch induces cytokine release by alveolar epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahakis, N E; Schroeder, M A; Limper, A H; Hubmayr, R D

    1999-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, causing edema and alveolar inflammation. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays an important role in this inflammatory response. We postulated that cyclic cell stretch upregulates the production and release of IL-8 by human alveolar epithelium in the absence of structural cell damage or paracrine stimulation. To test this hypothesis, alveolar epithelial cells (A549 cells) were cultured on a deformable silicoelastic membrane. When stretched by 30% for up to 48 h, the cells released 49 +/- 34% more IL-8 (P static controls. Smaller deformations (20% stretch) produced no consistent increase in IL-8. Stretch of 4 h duration increased IL-8 gene transcription fourfold above baseline. Stretch had no effect on cell proliferation, cell viability as assessed by (51)Cr release assay, or the release of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. We conclude that deformation per se can trigger inflammatory signaling and that alveolar epithelial cells may be active participants in the alveolitis associated with ventilator-induced lung injury.

  13. Multiphoton autofluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada

    2017-06-01

    The multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging tomograph MPTflex with its flexible 360-deg scan head, articulated arm, and tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) cultures. Autofluorescence (AF) lifetime imaging was performed with 250-ps temporal resolution and submicron spatial resolution using time-correlated single-photon counting. The two-photon excited AF was based on the metabolic coenzymes NAD(P)H and flavin adenine dinucleotide/flavoproteins. iPS cells generated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cocultured with growth-arrested MEFs as feeder cells have been studied. Significant differences on AF lifetime signatures were identified between iPS and feeder cells as well as between their differentiating counterparts.

  14. Nitric oxide-induced signalling in rat lacrimal acinar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Dagnia Karen; Tritsaris, K.; Dissing, S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological role of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating secretory processes in rat lacrimal acinar cells. In addition, we wanted to determine whether the acinar cells possess endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity by measuring NO productio...... using the fluorescent NO indicator 4,5-diaminofluorescein (DAF-2). We initiated investigations by adding NO from an external source by means of the NO-donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP). Cellular concentrations of cyclic guanosine 5'-phosphate (cGMP) ([cGMP]) were measured...... by radioimmunoassay (RIA), and we found that SNAP induced a fast increase in the [cGMP], amounting to 350% of the [cGMP] in resting cells. Moreover, addition of SNAP and elevating [cGMP] in fura-2 loaded lacrimal acinar cells, resulted in a cGMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated release of Ca2+ from intracellular...

  15. Infrasound sensitizes human glioblastoma cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachlin, Kenneth; Moore, Dan H; Yount, Garret

    2013-11-01

    The development of nontoxic agents that can selectively enhance the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy is an important aim in oncology. This study evaluates the ability of infrasound exposure to sensitize glioblastoma cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. The infrasound was delivered using a device designed to replicate the unique infrasound emissions measured during external Qigong treatments. Human glioblastoma cell lines harboring wild-type p53 (U87) or mutant p53 (U251, SF210, and SF188) were treated in culture with cisplatin, infrasound emissions, or the combination of the 2 agents. Induction of apoptosis was quantified after 24 hours by flow cytometry following annexin V/propidium iodide staining. Infrasound emissions alone, delivered at moderate levels (~10 mPa) with dynamic frequency content (7-13 Hz), did not induce apoptosis, yet combining infrasound with cisplatin augmented the induction of apoptosis by cisplatin in all the 4 cell lines (P < .05). Increased cellular uptake of the fluorophore calcein associated with infrasound exposure was quantified by fluorescence microscopy as well as flow cytometry, demonstrating increased cell membrane permeability. The 4 cell lines differed in the degree to which infrasound exposure increased calcein uptake, and these differences were predictive of the extent to which infrasound enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis. When exposed to specific frequencies, membrane permeabilization also appeared to be differentially responsive for each cell line, suggesting the potential for selective targeting of tissue types using isolated infrasonic frequencies. Additionally, the pressure amplitudes used in this study were several orders of magnitude less than those used in similar studies involving ultrasound and shock waves. The results of this study provide support for using infrasound to enhance the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin in a clinical setting.

  16. Facilitated Anion Transport Induces Hyperpolarization of the Cell Membrane That Triggers Differentiation and Cell Death in Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Hernando, Elsa; Calabuig-Fariñas, Silvia; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Knöpfel, Thomas; García-Valverde, María; Rodilla, Ananda M; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Farràs, Rosa; Ciruela, Francisco; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    Facilitated anion transport potentially represents a powerful tool to modulate various cellular functions. However, research into the biological effects of small molecule anionophores is still at an early stage. Here we have used two potent anionophore molecules inspired in the structure of marine metabolites tambjamines to gain insight into the effect induced by these compounds at the cellular level. We show how active anionophores, capable of facilitating the transmembrane transport of chloride and bicarbonate in model phospholipid liposomes, induce acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of plasma cell membranes. We demonstrate how this combined effect can be used against cancer stem cells (CSCs). Hyperpolarization of cell membrane induces cell differentiation and loss of stemness of CSCs leading to effective elimination of this cancer cell subpopulation.

  17. Xanthohumol induces apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Wai Kuan; Ho, Yen Fong; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd

    2015-10-01

    Xanthohumol, a major prenylated chalcone found in female hop plant, Humulus lupulus, was reported to have various chemopreventive and anti-cancer properties. However, its apoptotic effect on human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of xanthohumol on apoptosis in A549 human NSCLC cells. A549 cell proliferation was determined by sulforhodamine B assay. Morphological changes of the cells were studied via phase contrast and fluorescent microscopy. Induction of apoptosis was assessed by Annexin-V fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide (Annexin V-FITC/PI) staining, DNA fragmentation (TUNEL) assay mitochondrial membrane potential assay, cell cycle analysis, and caspase activity studies. Xanthohumol was found to decrease cell proliferation in A549 cells but had relatively low cytotoxicity on normal human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Typical cellular and nuclear apoptotic features were also observed in A549 cells treated with xanthohumol. Onset of apoptosis in A549 cells was further confirmed by externalization of phosphatidylserine, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, and DNA fragmentation in the cells after treatment. Xanthohumol induced accumulation of cells in sub G1 and S phase based on cell cycle analysis and also increased the activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9. This work suggests that xanthohumol as an apoptosis inducer, may be a potent therapeutic compound for NSCLC.

  18. [6]-Gingerol Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Cell Death of Mutant p53-expressing Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yon Jung; Wen, Jing; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo

    2006-01-01

    [6]-Gingerol, a major phenolic compound derived from ginger, has anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities. While several molecular mechanisms have been described to underlie its effects on cells in vitro and in vivo, the underlying mechanisms by which [6]-gingerol exerts anti-tumorigenic effects are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the action of [6]-gingerol on two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, HPAC expressing wild-type (wt) p53 and BxPC-3 expressing mutated p53. We found that [6]-gingerol inhibited the cell growth through cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in both cell lines. Western blot analyses indicated that [6]-gingerol decreased both Cyclin A and Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) expression. These events led to reduction in Rb phosphorylation followed by blocking of S phase entry. p53 expression was decreased by [6]-gingerol treatment in both cell lines suggesting that the induction of Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21cip1, was p53-independent. [6]-Gingerol induced mostly apoptotic death in the mutant p53-expressing cells, while no signs of early apoptosis were detected in wild type p53-expressing cells and this was related to the increased phosphorylation of AKT. These results suggest that [6]-gingerol can circumvent the resistance of mutant p53-expressing cells towards chemotherapy by inducing apoptotic cell death while it exerts cytostatic effect on wild type p53-expressing cells by inducing temporal growth arrest. PMID:17066513

  19. Emodin enhances ATRA-induced differentiation and induces apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingyu; Li, Jing; Hu, Jianda; Zheng, Jing; Zheng, Zhihong; Liu, Tingbo; Lin, Zhenxing; Lin, Minhui

    2014-11-01

    Emodin, an extracted natural compound from the root and rhizome of Rheum palmatum L, has been shown to have multiple biological activities including anticancer functions in previous studies. In this study, we investigated the anti-leukemic activity of emodin alone or emodin in the presence all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and the potential signaling pathway involved. We demonstrated that emodin could significantly enhance the sensitivity to ATRA and present additive differentiation-inducing effects in AML cell line NB4 cells and, especially, in NB4-derived ATRA-resistant MR2 cells. Further study showed that increasing dose of emodin could effectively induce growth inhibition and apoptotic effects in both cell lines as well as in primary leukemic cells from AML patients. Moreover, the apoptotic induction in AML cells was associated with the activation of caspase cascades involving caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. In addition, leukemic cell response to emodin stimuli in vitro was observed through the decreased expression levels of Bcl-2 and retinoic acid receptor α (RARα). Importantly, emodin was demonstrated as a new inhibitor of PI3K/Akt in AML cells, even in primary AML cells. It inhibited Akt phosphoration (p-Akt) at Ser473 as efficiently as mTOR at Ser2448. Consistently, it exerted suppression effects on the phosphoration of mTOR downstream targets, 4E-BP1 and p70S6K. Taken together, these findings indicate that emodin might be developed as a promising anti-leukemic agent to improve the patient outcome in AML.

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cells: from Nobel Prizes to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, S Tamir; Alexander, Graeme J M

    2013-03-01

    Advances in basic hepatology have been constrained for many years by the inability to culture primary hepatocytes in vitro, until just over five years ago when the scientific playing field was changed beyond recognition with the demonstration that human skin fibroblasts could be reprogrammed to resemble embryonic cells. The reprogrammed cells, known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), were then shown to have the capacity to re-differentiate into almost any human cell type, including hepatocytes. The unlimited number and isogenic nature of the cells that can be generated from tiny fragments of tissue have massive implications for the study of human liver diseases in vitro. Of more immediate clinical importance were recent data demonstrating precision gene therapy on patient specific iPSCs, which opens up the real and exciting possibility of autologous hepatocyte transplantation as a substitute for allogeneic whole liver transplantation, which has been an effective approach to end-stage liver disease, but one that has now been outstripped by demand. In this review, we describe the historical development, current technology and potential clinical applications of induced pluripotency, concluding with a perspective on possible future directions in this dynamic field.

  1. Fenofibrate induces ketone body production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja M Grabacka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyrate, bHB, acetoacetate are mainly produced in the liver during prolonged fasting or starvation. bHB is a very efficient energy substrate for sustaining ATP production in peripheral tissues; importantly its consumption is preferred over glucose. However, the majority of malignant cells, particularly cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin such as glioblastoma, are not able to use ketone bodies as a source of energy. Here, we report a novel observation that fenofibrate, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa agonist, induces bHB production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells, as well as in neurospheres composed of nontransformed cells. Unexpectedly, this effect is not dependent on PPARa activity or its expression level. The fenofibrate-induced ketogenesis is accompanied by growth arrest and down-regulation of transketolase, but the NADP/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios remain unaffected. Our results reveal a new, intriguing aspect of cancer cell biology and highlight the benefits of fenofibrate as a supplement to both canonical and dietary (ketogenic therapeutic approaches against glioblastoma.

  2. Targeted Apoptosis of Parietal Cells Is Insufficient to Induce Metaplasia in Stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burclaff, Joseph; Osaki, Luciana H; Liu, Dengqun; Goldenring, James R; Mills, Jason C

    2017-03-01

    Parietal cell atrophy is considered to cause metaplasia in the stomach. We developed mice that express the diphtheria toxin receptor specifically in parietal cells to induce their death, and found this to increase proliferation in the normal stem cell zone and neck but not to cause metaplastic reprogramming of chief cells. Furthermore, the metaplasia-inducing agents tamoxifen or DMP-777 still induced metaplasia even after previous destruction of parietal cells by diphtheria toxin. Atrophy of parietal cells alone therefore is not sufficient to induce metaplasia: completion of metaplastic reprogramming of chief cells requires mechanisms beyond parietal cell injury or death. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology and inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Samantha Barratt; Fraser, Stuart T; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-08-18

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes, including familial long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and Brugada syndrome, can cause life-threatening arrhythmias and are responsible for a significant proportion of sudden deaths in the young. Identification of genetic mutations and pathophysiological changes that underlie disease development can inform clinical practice and guide novel drug development. However, disease mechanisms in a large number of patients remain elusive and pharmacologic treatment is suboptimal, so many patients rely on implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy. Induced pluripotent stem cell models of disease facilitate analysis of disease mechanisms in patient-specific cardiomyocytes, overcoming limitations of animal models and human tissue restrictions. This review outlines how studies using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are contributing to our understanding of the mechanisms that underpin disease pathogenesis and their potential to facilitate new pharmacologic therapies and personalized medicine. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Static Stretch Induces Active Morphological Remodeling and Functional Impairment of Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ren, Yanhong; Zhan, Qingyuan; Hu, Qinghua; Sun, Bing; Yang, Chun; Wang, Chen

    2009-01-01

    Background: Static stretch is frequently observed in the lung. Both static stretch and cyclic stretch can induce cell death and Na /K -ATPase trafficking, but stretch-induced alveolar epithelial cell (AEC...

  5. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Shen, Steven; Paena, Massimilano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten’s ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased ...

  6. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, António; Duarte, Ana M.; Azevedo, Flávio; Sousa, Maria J.; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Chaves, Susana R.

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria. PMID:28357256

  7. Demethoxycurcumin Retards Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Brain Malignant Glioma GBM 8401 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzuu-Yuan Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Demethoxycurcumin (DMC; a curcumin-related demethoxy compound has been recently shown to display antioxidant and antitumor activities. It has also produced a potent chemopreventive action against cancer. In the present study, the antiproliferation (using the MTT assay, DMC was found to have cytotoxic activities against GBM 8401 cell with IC50 values at 22.71 μM and induced apoptosis effects of DMC have been investigated in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells. We have studied the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, and NF-κB transcriptional factor activity. By these approaches, our results indicated that DMC has produced an inhibition of cell proliferation as well as the activation of apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells. Both effects were observed to increase in proportion with the dosage of DMC treatment, and the apoptosis was induced by DMC in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells via mitochondria- and caspase-dependent pathways.

  8. Rare Coumarins Induce Apoptosis, G1 Cell Block and Reduce RNA Content in HL60 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widelski Jarosław

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The rare coumarins stenocarpin, stenocarpin isobutyrate, oficinalin, oficinalin isobutyrate, 8-methoxypeucedanin and the known xanthotoxin, isoimperatorin, bergapten, peucedanin and 8–methoxyisoimperatorin were isolated from Peucedanum luxurians Tamamsch. (Apiaceae and identified by means of spectral data (1D and 2D NMR. Their immunomodulating activity was evaluated by flow cytometry and their influence on HL60 cells as well as on PHA-stimulated PBLs was tested. All tested coumarins induce apoptosis (maximal in the 48 h culture and decrease cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, especially in HL60 cells. They also induce partial G1 block, but only in HL60 cells (at 100 µM concentrations. Dose-dependent reduction of RNA content was also found in G1 cells treated by the coumarins. All of the tested coumarins also possessed immunomodulatory activities. Bergapten and xanthotoxin were found to be the best candidates for further evaluation as anti-cancer drugs.

  9. Mineralized gelatin methacrylate-based matrices induce osteogenic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Heemin; Shih, Yu-Ru V.; Hwang, Yongsung; Wen, Cai; Rao, Vikram; Seo, Timothy; Varghese, Shyni

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a promising cell source with pluripotency and self-renewal properties. Design of simple and robust biomaterials with an innate ability to induce lineage-specificity of hiPSCs is desirable to realize their applications in regenerative medicine. In this study, we investigated the potential of biomaterials containing calcium phosphate minerals to induce osteogenic differentiation of hiPSCs. hiPSCs cultured using mineralized gelatin methacrylate-based matrices underwent osteogenic differentiation ex vivo, both in two- dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cultures, in growth medium devoid of any osteogenic-inducing chemical components or growth factors. Our findings that osteogenic differentiation of hiPSCs can be achieved through biomaterial-based cues alone present new avenues for personalized regenerative medicine. Such biomaterials that could not only act as structural scaffolds, but could also provide tissue-specific functions such as directing stem cell differentiation commitment, have great potential in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25153779

  10. Extracellular delivery induced by ultrasound and microbubbles in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Farah; Antonescu, Costin; Karshafian, Raffi

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound and microbubble treatment (USMB) can enhance the intracellular uptake of molecules, which otherwise would be excluded from the cell, through USMB-mediated transient membrane disruption and through enhanced endocytosis. However, the effect of USMB on the outward movement of molecules from cells is not well understood. This study investigates the effects of USMB on the release of molecules from various cellular compartments including cytoplasm, lysosomes, and recycling endosomes. In vitro ARPE-19 (RPE henceforth) cells were loaded with Alexa fluor-labeled transferrin as a marker for recycling endosomes, LAMP-1 antibody was used to detect the fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane, GFP-transfected RPE cells were used to examine the release of GFP from the cytoplasm, and 7-AAD was used to assess cell viability. Subsequently, cells were exposed to USMB (106 cells/mL, 300 kPa peak negative pressure, 1 min treatment duration, and 20 µL/mL Definity microbubbles). Following USMB, the release of the fluorescent markers was examined at 1.5, 11.5, and 21.5 minutes from the start of USMB. The mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) of untreated and USMB treated samples were measured using flow cytometry. USMB increased the extracellular delivery of GFP molecules from the cytoplasm; the MFI in USMB treated GFP-transfected RPE cells decreased by 17% in viable cells and this MFI decreased by 70% in non-viable cells. This could be due to diffusion of GFP through the membrane disruptions induced by USMB. Additionally, the MFI of viable cells stained with LAMP-1 antibody increased by 50% and this increase was 15 folds in the non-viable cells indicating lysosome exocytosis as a mechanism for membrane repair. Furthermore, the MFI of cells loaded with fluorescent transferrin decreased by 22% after USMB treatment in viable cells, indicating a significant increase in transferrin recycling to the cell membrane. However, the increased recycling was not statistically significant

  11. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  12. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Suppresses Dendritic Cell-Induced, Antigen-Dependent CD4 T Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiyan; Ventevogel, Melissa S.; Knilans, Kayla J.; Anderson, James E.; Oldach, Laurel M.; McKinnon, Karen P.; Hobbs, Marcia M.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the second most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen worldwide. Diseases associated with N. gonorrhoeae cause localized inflammation of the urethra and cervix. Despite this inflammatory response, infected individuals do not develop protective adaptive immune responses to N. gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae is a highly adapted pathogen that has acquired multiple mechanisms to evade its host's immune system, including the ability to manipulate multiple immune signaling pathways. N. gonorrhoeae has previously been shown to engage immunosuppressive signaling pathways in B and T lymphocytes. We have now found that N. gonorrhoeae also suppresses adaptive immune responses through effects on antigen presenting cells. Using primary, murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and lymphocytes, we show that N. gonorrhoeae-exposed dendritic cells fail to elicit antigen-induced CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation. N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a number of secreted and dendritic cell surface proteins with immunosuppressive properties, particularly Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1). We also show that N. gonorrhoeae is able to inhibit dendritic cell- induced proliferation of human T-cells and that human dendritic cells upregulate similar immunosuppressive molecules. Our data suggest that, in addition to being able to directly influence host lymphocytes, N. gonorrhoeae also suppresses development of adaptive immune responses through interactions with host antigen presenting cells. These findings suggest that gonococcal factors involved in host immune suppression may be useful targets in developing vaccines that induce protective adaptive immune responses to this pathogen. PMID:22844448

  13. Mast Cell Proteases 6 and 7 Stimulate Angiogenesis by Inducing Endothelial Cells to Release Angiogenic Factors.

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    Devandir Antonio de Souza Junior

    Full Text Available Mast cell proteases are thought to be involved with tumor progression and neo-vascularization. However, their exact role is still unclear. The present study was undertaken to further elucidate the function of specific subtypes of recombinant mouse mast cell proteases (rmMCP-6 and 7 in neo-vascularization. SVEC4-10 cells were cultured on Geltrex® with either rmMCP-6 or 7 and tube formation was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the capacity of these proteases to induce the release of angiogenic factors and pro and anti-angiogenic proteins was analyzed. Both rmMCP-6 and 7 were able to stimulate tube formation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that incubation with the proteases induced SVEC4-10 cells to invade the gel matrix. However, the expression and activity of metalloproteases were not altered by incubation with the mast cell proteases. Furthermore, rmMCP-6 and rmMCP-7 were able to induce the differential release of angiogenic factors from the SVEC4-10 cells. rmMCP-7 was more efficient in stimulating tube formation and release of angiogenic factors than rmMCP-6. These results suggest that the subtypes of proteases released by mast cells may influence endothelial cells during in vivo neo-vascularization.

  14. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

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    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Xu, Chuan [Division of Scientific Research and Training, General Hospital of PLA Chengdu Military Area Command, Chengdu, Sichuan 610083 (China); Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Zhou, Zhansong, E-mail: zhouzhans@sina.com [Institute of Urinary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Xiang, Zhonghuai [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Cui, Hongjuan, E-mail: hcui@swu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  15. Mechanisms of palmitate-induced cell death in human osteoblasts

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    Krishanthi Gunaratnam

    2013-11-01

    Lipotoxicity is an overload of lipids in non-adipose tissues that affects function and induces cell death. Lipotoxicity has been demonstrated in bone cells in vitro using osteoblasts and adipocytes in coculture. In this condition, lipotoxicity was induced by high levels of saturated fatty acids (mostly palmitate secreted by cultured adipocytes acting in a paracrine manner. In the present study, we aimed to identify the underlying mechanisms of lipotoxicity in human osteoblasts. Palmitate induced autophagy in cultured osteoblasts, which was preceded by the activation of autophagosomes that surround palmitate droplets. Palmitate also induced apoptosis though the activation of the Fas/Jun kinase (JNK apoptotic pathway. In addition, osteoblasts could be protected from lipotoxicity by inhibiting autophagy with the phosphoinositide kinase inhibitor 3-methyladenine or by inhibiting apoptosis with the JNK inhibitor SP600125. In summary, we have identified two major molecular mechanisms of lipotoxicity in osteoblasts and in doing so we have identified a new potential therapeutic approach to prevent osteoblast dysfunction and death, which are common features of age-related bone loss and osteoporosis.

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cells for modeling neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Fabiele B; Cugola, Fernanda R; Fernandes, Isabella R; Pignatari, Graciela C; Beltrão-Braga, Patricia C B

    2015-01-01

    Several diseases have been successfully modeled since the development of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology in 2006. Since then, methods for increased reprogramming efficiency and cell culture maintenance have been optimized and many protocols for differentiating stem cell lines have been successfully developed, allowing the generation of several cellular subtypes in vitro. Gene editing technologies have also greatly advanced lately, enhancing disease-specific phenotypes by creating isogenic cell lines, allowing mutations to be corrected in affected samples or inserted in control lines. Neurological disorders have benefited the most from iPSC-disease modeling for its capability for generating disease-relevant cell types in vitro from the central nervous system, such as neurons and glial cells, otherwise only available from post-mortem samples. Patient-specific iPSC-derived neural cells can recapitulate the phenotypes of these diseases and therefore, considerably enrich our understanding of pathogenesis, disease mechanism and facilitate the development of drug screening platforms for novel therapeutic targets. Here, we review the accomplishments and the current progress in human neurological disorders by using iPSC modeling for Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, spinal muscular atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, duchenne muscular dystrophy, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders, which include Timothy syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Phelan-McDermid, Rett syndrome as well as Nonsyndromic Autism. PMID:26722648

  17. Idebenone induces apoptotic cell death in the human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SHSY-5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Kwok-Keung; Pham, L; Truong, D D

    2011-11-01

    Idebenone is a coenzyme Q10 analog and an antioxidant that has been used clinically to treat Friedreich Ataxia. Being an antioxidant, idebenone could have potential therapeutic potential to treat other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease in which oxidative stress plays a role in their pathogenesis. But whether idebenone can be used to treat Parkinson's disease has not been evaluated. In this study, we found that exposure of the dopaminergic neuroblastoma SHSY-5Y cells to 1-10 μM idebenone for 72 h had no effect on the cell viability revealed by trypan blue exclusion assay and MTT assay. However, cells exposed to 25 μM or higher concentrations of idebenone showed extensive trypan blue-positive staining and significant reduction in cell viability revealed by MTT assay indicating that most of the cells were no longer viable. Idebenone-induced cell death was characterized by genomic DNA fragmentation and accumulation of cytochrome c in the cytosol indicating that the death was apoptotic in nature. In addition, idebenone induced an increase in the total RNA of the pro-apoptosis protein BAX, it also increased the caspase-3 activity in the cell lysates when compared with the untreated control cells or cells exposed to 10 μM or lower concentrations of idebenone. The detrimental effect of idebenone was attenuated by glutathione, an antioxidant, suggesting that oxidative stress contributed to the idebenone-induced cell death. In conclusion, our results suggest that antioxidant idebenone induced apoptosis when used in high concentrations.

  18. T cell-independent B cell activation induces immunosuppressive sialylated IgG antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Constanze; Winkler, André; Lorenz, Alexandra K; Holecska, Vivien; Blanchard, Véronique; Eiglmeier, Susanne; Schoen, Anna-Lena; Bitterling, Josephine; Stoehr, Alexander D; Petzold, Dominique; Schommartz, Tim; Mertes, Maria M M; Schoen, Carolin T; Tiburzy, Ben; Herrmann, Anne; Köhl, Jörg; Manz, Rudolf A; Madaio, Michael P; Berger, Markus; Wardemann, Hedda; Ehlers, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Antigen-specific Abs are able to enhance or suppress immune responses depending on the receptors that they bind on immune cells. Recent studies have shown that pro- or antiinflammatory effector functions of IgG Abs are also regulated through their Fc N-linked glycosylation patterns. IgG Abs that are agalactosylated (non-galactosylated) and asialylated are proinflammatory and induced by the combination of T cell-dependent (TD) protein antigens and proinflammatory costimulation. Sialylated IgG Abs, which are immunosuppressive, and Tregs are produced in the presence of TD antigens under tolerance conditions. T cell-independent (TI) B cell activation via B cell receptor (BCR) crosslinking through polysaccharides or via BCR and TLR costimulation also induces IgG Abs, but the Fc glycosylation state of these Abs is unknown. We found in mouse experiments that TI immune responses induced suppressive sialylated IgGs, in contrast to TD proinflammatory Th1 and Th17 immune responses, which induced agalactosylated and asialylated IgGs. Transfer of low amounts of antigen-specific sialylated IgG Abs was sufficient to inhibit B cell activation and pathogenic immune reactions. These findings suggest an immune regulatory function for TI immune responses through the generation of immunosuppressive sialylated IgGs and may provide insight on the role of TI immune responses during infection, vaccination, and autoimmunity.

  19. Cell stress induces upregulation of osteopontin via the ERK pathway in type II alveolar epithelial cells.

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    Aki Kato

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is a multifunctional protein that plays important roles in cell growth, differentiation, migration and tissue fibrosis. In human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and murine bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis, OPN is upregulated in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II. However, the mechanism of OPN induction in AEC II is not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate the molecular mechanism of OPN induction in AEC II and elucidate the functions of OPN in AEC II and lung fibroblasts. Human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 and mouse alveolar epithelial cells (MLE12, used as type II alveolar epithelial cell lines for in vitro assays, and human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiC were treated with either bleomycin, doxorubicin or tunicamycin. The mechanism of OPN induction in these cells and its function as a pro-fibrotic cytokine on A549 and lung fibroblasts were analyzed. The DNA damaging reagents bleomycin and doxorubicin were found to induce OPN expression in A549, MLE12 and HPAEpiC. OPN expression was induced via activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK-dependent signaling pathway in A549 and MLE12. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-inducing reagent tunicamycin induced OPN mRNA expression in A549, MLE12 and HPAEpiC, and OPN mRNA expression was induced via activation of the ERK-dependent signaling pathway in A549 and MLE12. Another ER stress-inducing reagent thapsigargin induced the expression of OPN mRNA as well as the subsequent production of OPN in A549 and MLE12. Furthermore, OPN promoted the proliferation of A549 and the migration of normal human lung fibroblasts. Inhibition of OPN by small interference RNA or neutralizing antibody suppressed both of these responses. The results of this study suggest that cell stress induces the upregulation of OPN in AEC II by signaling through the ERK pathway, and that upregulated OPN may play a role in fibrogenesis of the lung.

  20. Glycyrrhetinic Acid Inhibits Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Ovarian Cancer A2780 Cells

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    Venus Haghshenas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Accumulating evidence indicates that glycyrrhizin (GZ and its hydrolyzed metabolite 18-β glycyrrhetinic acid (GA exhibit anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro cytotoxic activity of GA on human ovarian cancer A2780 cells. Methods: A2780 cells were cultured in RPMI1640 containing 10% fetal bovine serum. Cells were treated with different doses of GA and cell viability and proliferation were detected by dye exclusion and 3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT assays. Apoptosis induction and expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: We observed that GA decreases cell viability and suppressed cells proliferation in a dose-dependent manner as detected by dye-exclusion and XTT assayes. In addition, our flow cytometry data show that GA not only induces apoptosis in A2780 cells but also upregulates both Fas and FasL on these cells in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: we demonstrate that GA causes cell death in A2780 cells by inducing apoptosis.

  1. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2009-10-06

    Background:Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines.Methods:MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting.Results:Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug.Conclusion:Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 6 October 2009; doi:10.1038\\/sj.bjc.6605308 www.bjcancer.com.

  2. [Apoptosis induced by MG-132 in Tca-8113 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-bin; Chen, Shuang-feng; Chen, Hai-ying; Zhang, Bin

    2011-02-01

    To explore the apoptotic effect of ubiquitin-proteasome inhibitor (PI) MG-132 on human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line (Tca-8113 cell) through endoplasmic reticulum stress. Tca-8113 cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, the exponential cells were divided into 5 groups.The cell culture medium was added to 1640 (negative control group), thapsigargin 5 μmol/L (positive control group), and 10,20,30 μmol/L (MG-132 group). After 24 h, the following experiments were carried out: morphological change of apoptotic cells was observed by Hoechst 33258 fluorescent staining under fluorescent microscope, apoptotic rate of cells was determined with annexin V-FITC/PI double staining by flow cytometry, the GRP78 mRNA level was determined by RT-PCR, the expression of caspase-12 protein was evaluated by Western blot, the human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 concentration was detected by ELISA. The data was analyzed using SPSS16.0 software package. Typical morphological change of apoptosis in Tca-8113 cells was observed 24 hours after treating with 10.0, 20.0, 30.0 μmol/L MG-132 and positive control group; The apoptotic rate of MG-132 groups gradually increased with MG-132 concentration; The GRP78 mRNA level was up-regulated; The expression of caspase-12 increased was demonstrated by Western blot; The expression of the human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 in MG-132 groups was 28.75 ± 2.28, 18.16 ± 0.65 and 8.85 ± 0.72. MG-132 can induce apoptosis of Tca-8113 cells through endoplasmic reticulum stress; MG-132 can inhibit the expression of human ubiquitin ligase E3.

  3. Blockade of maitotoxin-induced oncotic cell death reveals zeiosis

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    Schilling William P

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maitotoxin (MTX initiates cell death by sequentially activating 1 Ca2+ influx via non-selective cation channels, 2 uptake of vital dyes via formation of large pores, and 3 release of lactate dehydrogenase, an indication of cell lysis. MTX also causes formation of membrane blebs, which dramatically dilate during the cytolysis phase. To determine the role of phospholipase C (PLC in the cell death cascade, U73122, a specific inhibitor of PLC, and U73343, an inactive analog, were examined on MTX-induced responses in bovine aortic endothelial cells. Results Addition of either U73122 or U73343, prior to MTX, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the cell death cascade (IC50 ≈ 1.9 and 0.66 μM, respectively suggesting that the effect of these agents was independent of PLC. Addition of U73343 shortly after MTX, prevented or attenuated the effects of the toxin, but addition at later times had little or no effect. Time-lapse videomicroscopy showed that U73343 dramatically altered the blebbing profile of MTX-treated cells. Specifically, U73343 blocked bleb dilation and converted the initial blebbing event into "zeiosis", a type of membrane blebbing commonly associated with apoptosis. Cells challenged with MTX and rescued by subsequent addition of U73343, showed enhanced caspase-3 activity 48 hr after the initial insult, consistent with activation of the apoptotic program. Conclusions Within minutes of MTX addition, endothelial cells die by oncosis. Rescue by addition of U73343 shortly after MTX showed that a small percentage of cells are destined to die by oncosis, but that a larger percentage survive; cells that survive the initial insult exhibit zeiosis and may ultimately die by apoptotic mechanisms.

  4. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines. METHODS: MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting. RESULTS: Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug. CONCLUSION: Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  5. Ectosomes released by platelets induce differentiation of CD4+T cells into T regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadallah, S; Amicarella, F; Eken, C; Iezzi, G; Schifferli, J A

    2014-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests an immune-modulatory role for platelets (PLT) and PLT-derived microvesicles. In particular, ectosomes, i.e. vesicles budding from PLT surface, have been shown to exert immunosuppressive activities on phagocytes. Here we investigated the effects mediated by PLT-derived ectosomes (PLT-Ecto) on CD4+ T cells. Exposure of activated CD4+ T cells to PLT-Ecto decreased their release of IFNγ, TNFα and IL-6, and increased the production of TGF-β1. Concomitantly, PLT-Ecto-exposed CD4+ T cells displayed increased frequencies of CD25high Foxp3+ cells. These phenomena were dose-dependent and PLT-Ecto specific, since they were not observed in the presence of polymorphonuclear- and erythrocyte-derived ectosomes. Analysis of specific T cell subsets revealed that PLT-Ecto induced differentiation of naïve T cells into Foxp3+ cells, but had no effect on pre-differentiated Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Importantly, PLT-Ecto-induced Foxp3+ cells were as effective as peripheral blood Tregs in suppressing CD8+ T cell proliferation. PLT-Ecto-mediated effects were partly dependent on PLT-derived TGF-β1, as they were to some extent inhibited by PLT-Ecto pretreatment with TGF-β1-neutralising antibodies. Interestingly, ectosome-derived TGF-β1 levels correlated with Foxp3+ T cell frequencies in blood of healthy donors. In conclusion, PLT-Ecto induce differentiation of CD4+ T cells towards functional Tregs. This may represent a mechanism by which PLT-Ecto enhance peripheral tolerance.

  6. Radiation-induced bystander effects in cultured human stem cells.

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    Mykyta V Sokolov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The radiation-induced "bystander effect" (RIBE was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR. RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed.Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC and embryonic stem cells (hESC were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05. A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05.These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative-based therapies.

  7. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in Cultured Human Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta V.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The radiation-induced “bystander effect” (RIBE) was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC) are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed. Methodology/Principal Findings Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and embryonic stem cells (hESC) were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05). A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05). Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative

  8. Big Animal Cloning Using Transgenic Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: A Case Study of Goat Transgenic Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Li, Hui; Huang, Mingrui; Xu, Dan; Wang, Ziyu; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Using of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could improve production traits and disease resistance by improving the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. However, robust ESCs have not been established from domestic ungulates. In the present study, we generated goat induced pluripotent stem cells (giPSCs) and transgenic cloned dairy goat induced pluripotent stem cells (tgiPSCs) from dairy goat fibroblasts (gFs) and transgenic cloned dairy goat fibroblasts (tgFs), respectively, using lentiviruses that contained hOCT4, hSOX2, hMYC, and hKLF4 without chemical compounds. The giPSCs and tgiPSCs expressed endogenous pluripotent markers, including OCT4, SOX2, MYC, KLF4, and NANOG. Moreover, they were able to maintain a normal karyotype and differentiate into derivatives from all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. Using SCNT, tgFs and tgiPSCs were used as donor cells to produce embryos, which were named tgF-Embryos and tgiPSC-Embryos. The fusion rates and cleavage rates had no significant differences between tgF-Embryos and tgiPSC-Embryos. However, the expression of IGF-2, which is an important gene associated with embryonic development, was significantly lower in tgiPSC-Embryos than in tgF-Embryos and was not significantly different from vivo-Embryos.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

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    Juan Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that leads to permanent neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens are insufficient to treat the irreversible neurological disabilities. Tremendous progress in the experimental and clinical applications of cell-based therapies has recognized stem cells as potential candidates for regenerative therapy for many neurodegenerative disorders including MS. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs derived precursor cells can modulate the autoimmune response in the central nervous system (CNS and promote endogenous remyelination and repair process in animal models. This review highlights studies involving the immunomodulatory and regenerative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and iPSCs derived cells in animal models, and their translation into immunomodulatory and neuroregenerative treatment strategies for MS.

  10. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate Cigarette Smoke-Induced Cardiac Remodeling and Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingmin Liang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The strong relationship between cigarette smoking and cardiovascular disease (CVD has been well-documented, but the mechanisms by which smoking increases CVD risk appear to be multifactorial and incompletely understood. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are regarded as an important candidate for cell-based therapy in CVD. We hypothesized that MSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-MSCs or bone marrow (BM-MSCs might alleviate cigarette smoke (CS-induced cardiac injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of BM-MSCs or iPSC-MSCs on CS-induced changes in serum and cardiac lipid profiles, oxidative stress and inflammation as well as cardiac function in a rat model of passive smoking. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly selected for exposure to either sham air (SA as control or 4% CS for 1 h per day for 56 days. On day 29 and 43, human adult BM-MSCs, iPSC-MSCs or PBS were administered intravenously to CS-exposed rats. Results from echocardiography, serum and cardiac lipid profiles, cardiac antioxidant capacity, cardiac pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and cardiac morphological changes were evaluated at the end of treatment. iPSC-MSC-treated group showed a greater effect in the improvement of CS-induced cardiac dysfunction over BM-MSCs-treated group as shown by increased percentage left ventricular ejection fraction and percentage fractional shortening, in line with the greater reversal of cardiac lipid abnormality. In addition, iPSC-MSCs administration attenuated CS-induced elevation of cardiac pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as restoration of anti-inflammatory cytokines and anti-oxidative markers, leading to ameliorate cardiac morphological abnormalities. These data suggest that iPSC-MSCs on one hand may restore CS-induced cardiac lipid abnormality and on the other hand may attenuate cardiac oxidative stress and inflammation via inhibition of CS-induced NF-κB activation, leading to improvement of cardiac remodeling and

  11. Aire-Overexpressing Dendritic Cells Induce Peripheral CD4+ T Cell Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongbei; Li, Haijun; Fu, Haiying; Niu, Kunwei; Guo, Yantong; Guo, Chuan; Sun, Jitong; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) can promote the ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs), which leads to the deletion of autoreactive T cells and consequently prevents autoimmune diseases. However, the functions of Aire in the periphery, such as in dendritic cells (DCs), remain unclear. This study’s aim was to investigate the effect of Aire-overexpressing DCs (Aire cells) on the functions of CD4+ T cells and the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We demonstrated that Aire cells upregulated the mRNA levels of the tolerance-related molecules CD73, Lag3, and FR4 and the apoptosis of CD4+ T cells in STZ-T1D mouse-derived splenocytes. Furthermore, following insulin stimulation, Aire cells decreased the number of CD4+ IFN-γ+ T cells in both STZ-T1D and WT mouse-derived splenocytes and reduced the expression levels of TCR signaling molecules (Ca2+ and p-ERK) in CD4+ T cells. We observed that Aire cells-induced CD4+ T cells could delay the development of T1D. In summary, Aire-expressing DCs inhibited TCR signaling pathways and decreased the quantity of CD4+IFN-γ+ autoreactive T cells. These data suggest a mechanism for Aire in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance and provide a potential method to control autoimmunity by targeting Aire. PMID:26729097

  12. Aire-Overexpressing Dendritic Cells Induce Peripheral CD4+ T Cell Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongbei Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune regulator (Aire can promote the ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs, which leads to the deletion of autoreactive T cells and consequently prevents autoimmune diseases. However, the functions of Aire in the periphery, such as in dendritic cells (DCs, remain unclear. This study’s aim was to investigate the effect of Aire-overexpressing DCs (Aire cells on the functions of CD4+ T cells and the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D. We demonstrated that Aire cells upregulated the mRNA levels of the tolerance-related molecules CD73, Lag3, and FR4 and the apoptosis of CD4+ T cells in STZ-T1D mouse-derived splenocytes. Furthermore, following insulin stimulation, Aire cells decreased the number of CD4+ IFN-γ+ T cells in both STZ-T1D and WT mouse-derived splenocytes and reduced the expression levels of TCR signaling molecules (Ca2+ and p-ERK in CD4+ T cells. We observed that Aire cells-induced CD4+ T cells could delay the development of T1D. In summary, Aire-expressing DCs inhibited TCR signaling pathways and decreased the quantity of CD4+IFN-γ+ autoreactive T cells. These data suggest a mechanism for Aire in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance and provide a potential method to control autoimmunity by targeting Aire.

  13. Different Types of Cell Death Induced by Enterotoxins

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    Ming-Yuan Hong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The infection of bacterial organisms generally causes cell death to facilitate microbial invasion and immune escape, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. In addition to the intercellular infectious processes, pathogen-produced/secreted enterotoxins (mostly exotoxins are the major weapons that kill host cells and cause diseases by inducing different types of cell death, particularly apoptosis and necrosis. Blocking these enterotoxins with synthetic drugs and vaccines is important for treating patients with infectious diseases. Studies of enterotoxin-induced apoptotic and necrotic mechanisms have helped us to create efficient strategies to use against these well-characterized cytopathic toxins. In this article, we review the induction of the different types of cell death from various bacterial enterotoxins, such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B, staphylococcal alpha-toxin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, alpha-hemolysin of Escherichia coli, Shiga toxins, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1, heat-labile enterotoxins, and the cholera toxin, Vibrio cholerae. In addition, necrosis caused by pore-forming toxins, apoptotic signaling through cross-talk pathways involving mitochondrial damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and lysosomal injury is discussed.

  14. Cyclosporine Induces Endothelial Cell Release of Complement-Activating Microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Brandon; Klawitter, Jelena; Goldberg, Ryan; McCullough, James W.; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Cooper, James E.; Christians, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Defective control of the alternative pathway of complement is an important risk factor for several renal diseases, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Infections, drugs, pregnancy, and hemodynamic insults can trigger episodes of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in susceptible patients. Although the mechanisms linking these clinical events with disease flares are unknown, recent work has revealed that each of these clinical conditions causes cells to release microparticles. We hypothesized that microparticles released from injured endothelial cells promote intrarenal complement activation. Calcineurin inhibitors cause vascular and renal injury and can trigger hemolytic uremic syndrome. Here, we show that endothelial cells exposed to cyclosporine in vitro and in vivo release microparticles that activate the alternative pathway of complement. Cyclosporine-induced microparticles caused injury to bystander endothelial cells and are associated with complement-mediated injury of the kidneys and vasculature in cyclosporine-treated mice. Cyclosporine-induced microparticles did not bind factor H, an alternative pathway regulatory protein present in plasma, explaining their complement-activating phenotype. Finally, we found that in renal transplant patients, the number of endothelial microparticles in plasma increases 2 weeks after starting tacrolimus, and treatment with tacrolimus associated with increased C3 deposition on endothelial microparticles in the plasma of some patients. These results suggest that injury-associated release of endothelial microparticles is an important mechanism by which systemic insults trigger intravascular complement activation and complement-dependent renal diseases. PMID:24092930

  15. Bortezomib induces autophagic death in proliferating human endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloni, Daniela; Veschini, Lorenzo [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Foglieni, Chiara [Department of Cardiology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Dell' Antonio, Giacomo [Department of Pathology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Caligaris-Cappio, Federico [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Universita Vita-Salute IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Ferrarini, Marina [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Ferrero, Elisabetta, E-mail: elisabetta.ferrero@hsr.it [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    2010-04-01

    The proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib has been approved for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM), thanks to its ability to induce MM cell apoptosis. Moreover, Bortezomib has antiangiogenic properties. We report that endothelial cells (EC) exposed to Bortezomib undergo death to an extent that depends strictly on their activation state. Indeed, while quiescent EC are resistant to Bortezomib, the drug results maximally toxic in EC switched toward angiogenesis with FGF, and exerts a moderate effect on subconfluent HUVEC. Moreover, EC activation state deeply influences the death pathway elicited by Bortezomib: after treatment, angiogenesis-triggered EC display typical features of apoptosis. Conversely, death of subconfluent EC is preceded by ROS generation and signs typical of autophagy, including intense cytoplasmic vacuolization with evidence of autophagosomes at electron microscopy, and conversion of the cytosolic MAP LC3 I form toward the autophagosome-associated LC3 II form. Treatment with the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-MA prevents both LC3 I/LC3 II conversion and HUVEC cell death. Finally, early removal of Bortezomib is accompanied by the recovery of cell shape and viability. These findings strongly suggest that Bortezomib induces either apoptosis or autophagy in EC; interfering with the autophagic response may potentiate the antiangiogenic effect of the drug.

  16. Cell geometry dictates TNFα-induced genome response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Aninda; Venkatachalapathy, Saradha; Ratna, Prasuna; Wang, Yejun; Jokhun, Doorgesh Sharma; Shivashankar, G V

    2017-05-16

    Cells in physiology integrate local soluble and mechanical signals to regulate genomic programs. Whereas the individual roles of these signals are well studied, the cellular responses to the combined chemical and physical signals are less explored. Here, we investigated the cross-talk between cellular geometry and TNFα signaling. We stabilized NIH 3T3 fibroblasts into rectangular anisotropic or circular isotropic geometries and stimulated them with TNFα and analyzed nuclear translocation of transcription regulators -NFκB (p65) and MKL and downstream gene-expression patterns. We found that TNFα induces geometry-dependent actin depolymerization, which enhances IκB degradation, p65 nuclear translocation, nuclear exit of MKL, and sequestration of p65 at the RNA-polymerase-II foci. Further, global transcription profile of cells under matrix-TNFα interplay reveals a geometry-dependent gene-expression pattern. At a functional level, we find cell geometry affects TNFα-induced cell proliferation. Our results provide compelling evidence that fibroblasts, depending on their geometries, elicit distinct cellular responses for the same cytokine.

  17. Regulatory T cells in γ irradiation-induced immune suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh I McFarland

    Full Text Available Sublethal total body γ irradiation (TBI of mammals causes generalized immunosuppression, in part by induction of lymphocyte apoptosis. Here, we provide evidence that a part of this immune suppression may be attributable to dysfunction of immune regulation. We investigated the effects of sublethal TBI on T cell memory responses to gain insight into the potential for loss of vaccine immunity following such exposure. We show that in mice primed to an MHC class I alloantigen, the accelerated graft rejection T memory response is specifically lost several weeks following TBI, whereas identically treated naïve mice at the same time point had completely recovered normal rejection kinetics. Depletion in vivo with anti-CD4 or anti-CD25 showed that the mechanism involved cells consistent with a regulatory T cell (T reg phenotype. The loss of the T memory response following TBI was associated with a relative increase of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+ expressing T regs, as compared to the CD8+ T effector cells requisite for skin graft rejection. The radiation-induced T memory suppression was shown to be antigen-specific in that a third party ipsilateral graft rejected with normal kinetics. Remarkably, following the eventual rejection of the first MHC class I disparate skin graft, the suppressive environment was maintained, with markedly prolonged survival of a second identical allograft. These findings have potential importance as regards the immunologic status of T memory responses in victims of ionizing radiation exposure and apoptosis-inducing therapies.

  18. Static Magnetic Field Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Pulp Cells by Affecting Cell Membrane Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chih Hsieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the causes of dental pulpitis is lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced inflammatory response. Following pulp tissue inflammation, odontoblasts, dental pulp cells (DPCs, and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs will activate and repair damaged tissue to maintain homeostasis. However, when LPS infection is too serious, dental repair is impossible and disease may progress to irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether static magnetic field (SMF can attenuate inflammatory response of dental pulp cells challenged with LPS. In methodology, dental pulp cells were isolated from extracted teeth. The population of DPSCs in the cultured DPCs was identified by phenotypes and multilineage differentiation. The effects of 0.4 T SMF on DPCs were observed through MTT assay and fluorescent anisotropy assay. Our results showed that the SMF exposure had no effect on surface markers or multilineage differentiation capability. However, SMF exposure increases cell viability by 15%. In addition, SMF increased cell membrane rigidity which is directly related to higher fluorescent anisotropy. In the LPS-challenged condition, DPCs treated with SMF demonstrated a higher tolerance to LPS-induced inflammatory response when compared to untreated controls. According to these results, we suggest that 0.4 T SMF attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response to DPCs by changing cell membrane stability.

  19. Natural compound Alternol induces oxidative stress-dependent apoptotic cell death preferentially in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuzhe; Chen, Ruibao; Huang, Yan; Li, Guodong; Huang, Yiling; Chen, Jiepeng; Duan, Lili; Zhu, Bao-Ting; Thrasher, J Brantley; Zhang, Xu; Li, Benyi

    2014-06-01

    Prostate cancers at the late stage of castration resistance are not responding well to most of current therapies available in clinic, reflecting a desperate need of novel treatment for this life-threatening disease. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effect of a recently isolated natural compound, Alternol, in multiple prostate cancer cell lines with the properties of advanced prostate cancers in comparison to prostate-derived nonmalignant cells. As assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay, significant cell death was observed in all prostate cancer cell lines except DU145 but not in nonmalignant (RWPE-1 and BPH1) cells. Further analyses revealed that Alternol-induced cell death was an apoptotic response in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evidenced by the appearance of apoptosis hallmarks such as caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage. Interestingly, Alternol-induced cell death was completely abolished by reactive oxygen species scavengers N-acetylcysteine and dihydrolipoic acid. We also demonstrated that the proapoptotic Bax protein was activated after Alternol treatment and was critical for Alternol-induced apoptosis. Animal xenograft experiments in nude mice showed that Alternol treatment largely suppressed tumor growth of PC-3 xenografts but not Bax-null DU-145 xenografts in vivo. These data suggest that Alternol might serve as a novel anticancer agent for patients with late-stage prostate cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection induces intestinal epithelial cell autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Fengna; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Kong, Xiangfeng; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2014-06-25

    The morbidity and mortality in piglets caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) results in large economic losses to the swine industry, but the precise pathogenesis of ETEC-associated diseases remains unknown. Intestinal epithelial cell autophagy serves as a host defense against pathogens. We found that ETEC induced autophagy, as measured by both the increased punctae distribution of GFP-LC3 and the enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. Inhibiting autophagy resulted in decreased survival of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. ETEC triggered autophagy in IPEC-1 cells through a pathway involving the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Light-induced performance increase of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kobayashi, Eiji

    2016-10-11

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells consist of crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers coated with doped/intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) bilayers for passivating-contact formation. Here, we unambiguously demonstrate that carrier injection either due to light soaking or (dark) forward-voltage bias increases the open circuit voltage and fill factor of finished cells, leading to a conversion efficiency gain of up to 0.3% absolute. This phenomenon contrasts markedly with the light-induced degradation known for thin-film a-Si:H solar cells. We associate our performance gain with an increase in surface passivation, which we find is specific to doped a-Si:H/c-Si structures. Our experiments suggest that this improvement originates from a reduced density of recombination-active interface states. To understand the time dependence of the observed phenomena, a kinetic model is presented.

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid induces apoptosis in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Guièze

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an indolent disorder with an increased infectious risk remaining one of the main causes of death. Development of therapies with higher safety profile is thus a challenging issue. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 is an omega-3 fatty acid, a natural compound of normal cells, and has been shown to display antitumor potency in cancer. We evaluated the potential in vitro effect of DHA in primary CLL cells. DHA induces high level of in vitro apoptosis compared to oleic acid in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Estimation of IC50 was only of 4.813 μM, which appears lower than those reported in solid cancers. DHA is highly active on CLL cells in vitro. This observation provides a rationale for further studies aiming to understand its mechanisms of action and its potent in vivo activity.

  3. Carica papaya induces in vitro thrombopoietic cytokines secretion by mesenchymal stem cells and haematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Jazli; Abu Kassim, Noor Lide; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Haque, Nazmul; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2015-07-08

    Use of Carica papaya leaf extracts, reported to improve thrombocyte counts in dengue patients, demands further analysis on the underlying mechanism of its thrombopoietic cytokines induction In vitro cultures of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) were treated with unripe papaya pulp juice (UPJ) to evaluate its potential to induce thrombopoietic cytokines (IL-6 and SCF) RESULTS: In vitro scratch gap closure was significantly faster (p papaya to induce thrombopoietic cytokines synthesis in cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin.

  4. The business of exploiting induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Catherine

    2011-08-12

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) can be exploited for both research and clinical applications. The first part of this review seeks to provide an understanding of the financial drivers and key elements of a successful business strategy that underpin a company focused on developing iPS-related products and services targeted at the research market. The latter part of the review highlights some of the reasons as to why the reprogramming of somatic cells is currently being used to develop cell-based models to screen for small molecules with drug-like properties rather than to develop cell-based regenerative medicines per se. The latter may be used to repair or replace a patient's damaged cells and thereby have the potential to 'cure' a disease and, in doing so, prevent or delay the onset of associated medical conditions. However, the cost of an expensive regenerative medicine and time to accrue any benefit linked to a decrease in co-morbidity expenditure may not outweigh the benefit for a healthcare community that has finite resources. The implications of this are discussed together with evidence that the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and the National Health Service (NHS) have established a precedent for a cost-sharing strategy with the pharmaceutical industry.

  5. Extinction of Learned Fear Induces Hippocampal Place Cell Remapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Melissa E.; Yuan, Robin K.; Keinath, Alexander T.; Ramos Álvarez, Manuel M.

    2015-01-01

    The extinction of learned fear is a hippocampus-dependent process thought to embody new learning rather than erasure of the original fear memory, although it is unknown how these competing contextual memories are represented in the hippocampus. We previously demonstrated that contextual fear conditioning results in hippocampal place cell remapping and long-term stabilization of novel representations. Here we report that extinction learning also induces place cell remapping in C57BL/6 mice. Specifically, we observed cells that preferentially remapped during different stages of learning. While some cells remapped in both fear conditioning and extinction, others responded predominantly during extinction, which may serve to modify previous representations as well as encode new safe associations. Additionally, we found cells that remapped primarily during fear conditioning, which could facilitate reacquisition of the original fear association. Moreover, we also observed cells that were stable throughout learning, which may serve to encode the static aspects of the environment. The short-term remapping observed during extinction was not found in animals that did not undergo fear conditioning, or when extinction was conducted outside of the conditioning context. Finally, conditioning and extinction produced an increase in spike phase locking to the theta and gamma frequencies. However, the degree of remapping seen during conditioning and extinction only correlated with gamma synchronization. Our results suggest that the extinction learning is a complex process that involves both modification of pre-existing memories and formation of new ones, and these traces coexist within the same hippocampal representation. PMID:26085635

  6. Thapsigargin induces apoptosis in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, C; Vallejo, S; Cercas, E; Llergo, J L; Lafuente, N; Matesanz, N; Rodríguez-Mañas, L; Sánchez-Ferrer, C F

    2000-11-01

    Vascular remodeling is a key feature of many pathologic states, including atherosclerosis, or hypertension. Vascular smooth muscle cells participate in determining the vessel structure by several mechanisms such as cell migration, cell growth, or cell death (necrosis or apoptosis). Here we report that thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), is able to induce apoptosis in human vascular smooth muscle cells (HVSMCs). Apoptosis was assessed by three different methods: differential chromatin binding dye staining. cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). When HVSMCs were treated for 1 h with thapsigargin (100 nM-10 microM), there was a concentration-dependent increase in both parameters 24 h after the thapsigargin pulse. When a time-course experiment was performed, both parameters were significantly enhanced from 3 to 6 h after the exposure to thapsigargin. We conclude that thapsigargin promotes apoptosis in HVSMCs, providing a useful tool for the study of programmed cell death in human vascular smooth muscle.

  7. Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Model Skeletal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barruet, Emilie; Hsiao, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders affecting the bones and joints are major health problems among children and adults. Major challenges such as the genetic origins or poor diagnostics of severe skeletal disease hinder our understanding of human skeletal diseases. The recent advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (human iPS cells) provides an unparalleled opportunity to create human-specific models of human skeletal diseases. iPS cells have the ability to self-renew, allowing us to obtain large amounts of starting material, and have the potential to differentiate into any cell types in the body. In addition, they can carry one or more mutations responsible for the disease of interest or be genetically corrected to create isogenic controls. Our work has focused on modeling rare musculoskeletal disorders including fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive (FOP), a congenital disease of increased heterotopic ossification. In this review, we will discuss our experiences and protocols differentiating human iPS cells toward the osteogenic lineage and their application to model skeletal diseases. A number of critical challenges and exciting new approaches are also discussed, which will allow the skeletal biology field to harness the potential of human iPS cells as a critical model system for understanding diseases of abnormal skeletal formation and bone regeneration.

  8. Targeting proliferating cell nuclear antigen and its protein interactions induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekka Müller

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer that is considered incurable despite advances in treatment strategy during the last decade. Therapies targeting single pathways are unlikely to succeed due to the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a multifunctional protein essential for DNA replication and repair that is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Many proteins involved in the cellular stress response interact with PCNA through the five amino acid sequence AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM. Thus inhibiting PCNA's protein interactions may be a good strategy to target multiple pathways simultaneously. We initially found that overexpression of peptides containing the APIM sequence increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to contemporary therapeutics. Here we have designed a cell-penetrating APIM-containing peptide, ATX-101, that targets PCNA and show that it has anti-myeloma activity. We found that ATX-101 induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary cancer cells, while bone marrow stromal cells and primary healthy lymphocytes were much less sensitive. ATX-101-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and cell cycle phase-independent. ATX-101 also increased multiple myeloma cells' sensitivity against melphalan, a DNA damaging agent commonly used for treatment of multiple myeloma. In a xenograft mouse model, ATX-101 was well tolerated and increased the anti-tumor activity of melphalan. Therefore, targeting PCNA by ATX-101 may be a novel strategy in multiple myeloma treatment.

  9. Ecdysone signaling induces two phases of cell cycle exit in Drosophila cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Guo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During development, cell proliferation and differentiation must be tightly coordinated to ensure proper tissue morphogenesis. Because steroid hormones are central regulators of developmental timing, understanding the links between steroid hormone signaling and cell proliferation is crucial to understanding the molecular basis of morphogenesis. Here we examined the mechanism by which the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates the cell cycle in Drosophila. We find that a cell cycle arrest induced by ecdysone in Drosophila cell culture is analogous to a G2 cell cycle arrest observed in the early pupa wing. We show that in the wing, ecdysone signaling at the larva-to-puparium transition induces Broad which in turn represses the cdc25c phosphatase String. The repression of String generates a temporary G2 arrest that synchronizes the cell cycle in the wing epithelium during early pupa wing elongation and flattening. As ecdysone levels decline after the larva-to-puparium pulse during early metamorphosis, Broad expression plummets, allowing String to become re-activated, which promotes rapid G2/M progression and a subsequent synchronized final cell cycle in the wing. In this manner, pulses of ecdysone can both synchronize the final cell cycle and promote the coordinated acquisition of terminal differentiation characteristics in the wing.

  10. Exendin-4 induces cell adhesion and differentiation and counteracts the invasive potential of human neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Luciani

    Full Text Available Exendin-4 is a molecule currently used, in its synthetic form exenatide, for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Exendin-4 binds and activates the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R, thus inducing insulin release. More recently, additional biological properties have been associated to molecules that belong to the GLP-1 family. For instance, Peptide YY and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide have been found to affect cell adhesion and migration and our previous data have shown a considerable actin cytoskeleton rearrangement after exendin-4 treatment. However, no data are currently available on the effects of exendin-4 on tumor cell motility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of this molecule on cell adhesion, differentiation and migration in two neuroblastoma cell lines, SH-SY5Y and SK-N-AS. We first demonstrated, by Extra Cellular Matrix cell adhesion arrays, that exendin-4 increased cell adhesion, in particular on a vitronectin substrate. Subsequently, we found that this molecule induced a more differentiated phenotype, as assessed by i the evaluation of neurite-like protrusions in 3D cell cultures, ii the analysis of the expression of neuronal markers and iii electrophysiological studies. Furthermore, we demonstrated that exendin-4 reduced cell migration and counteracted anchorage-independent growth in neuroblastoma cells. Overall, these data indicate for the first time that exendin-4 may have anti-tumoral properties.

  11. PARP Inhibition by Flavonoids Induced Selective Cell Killing to BRCA2-Deficient Cells

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    Cathy Su

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available High consumption of dietary flavonoids might contribute to a reduction of cancer risks. Quercetin and its glycosides have PARP inhibitory effects and can induce selective cytotoxicity in BRCA2-deficient cells by synthetic lethality. We hypothesized that common flavonoids in diet naringenin, hesperetin and their glycosides have a similar structure to quercetin, which might have comparable PARP inhibitory effects, and can induce selective cytotoxicity in BRCA2-deficient cells. We utilized Chinese hamster V79 wild type, V-C8 BRCA2-deficient and its gene-complemented cells. In vitro analysis revealed that both naringenin and hesperetin present a PARP inhibitory effect. This inhibitory effect is less specific than for quercetin. Hesperetin was more cytotoxic to V79 cells than quercetin and naringenin based on colony formation assay. Quercetin and naringenin killed V-C8 cells with lower concentrations, and presented selective cytotoxicity to BRCA2-deficient cells. However, the cytotoxicity of hesperetin was similar among all three cell lines. Glycosyl flavonoids, isoquercetin and rutin as well as naringin showed selective cytotoxicity to BRCA2-deficient cells; hesperidin did not. These results suggest that flavonoids with the PARP inhibitory effect can cause synthetic lethality to BRCA2-deficient cells when other pathways are not the primary cause of death.

  12. Ecdysone signaling induces two phases of cell cycle exit in Drosophila cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongfeng; Flegel, Kerry; Kumar, Jayashree; McKay, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During development, cell proliferation and differentiation must be tightly coordinated to ensure proper tissue morphogenesis. Because steroid hormones are central regulators of developmental timing, understanding the links between steroid hormone signaling and cell proliferation is crucial to understanding the molecular basis of morphogenesis. Here we examined the mechanism by which the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates the cell cycle in Drosophila. We find that a cell cycle arrest induced by ecdysone in Drosophila cell culture is analogous to a G2 cell cycle arrest observed in the early pupa wing. We show that in the wing, ecdysone signaling at the larva-to-puparium transition induces Broad which in turn represses the cdc25c phosphatase String. The repression of String generates a temporary G2 arrest that synchronizes the cell cycle in the wing epithelium during early pupa wing elongation and flattening. As ecdysone levels decline after the larva-to-puparium pulse during early metamorphosis, Broad expression plummets, allowing String to become re-activated, which promotes rapid G2/M progression and a subsequent synchronized final cell cycle in the wing. In this manner, pulses of ecdysone can both synchronize the final cell cycle and promote the coordinated acquisition of terminal differentiation characteristics in the wing. PMID:27737823

  13. Mechanisms involved in alternariol-induced cell cycle arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solhaug, A., E-mail: Anita.Solhaug@vetinst.no [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Vines, L.L. [Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, East Lansing, MI (United States); Ivanova, L.; Spilsberg, B. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Holme, J.A. [Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Environmental Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Pestka, J. [Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, East Lansing, MI (United States); Collins, A. [University of Oslo, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, G.S. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-10-15

    Alternariol (AOH), a mycotoxin produced by Alternaria sp, is often found as a contaminant in fruit and cereal products. Here we employed the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to test the hypothesis that AOH causes toxicity as a response to DNA damage. AOH at concentrations of 15-30 {mu}M almost completely blocked cell proliferation. Within 30 min treatment, AOH (30 {mu}M) significantly increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, DNA base oxidations as well as DNA strand breaks and/or alkaline labile sites were detected by the comet assay after 2 h exposure of AOH. Cell death (mostly necrosis) was observed after prolonged exposure to the highest concentration of AOH (60 {mu}M for 24 and 48 h) in our study. The DNA damage response involved phosphorylation (activation) of histone H2AX and check point kinase-1- and 2 (Chk-1/2). Moreover, AOH activated p53 and increased the expression of p21, Cyclin B, MDM2, and Sestrin 2; likewise the level of several miRNA was affected. AOH-induced Sestrin 2 expression was regulated by p53 and could at least partly be inhibited by antioxidants, suggesting a role of ROS in the response. Interestingly, the addition of antioxidants did not inhibit cell cycle arrest. Although the formation of ROS by itself was not directly linked cell proliferation, AOH-induced DNA damage and resulting transcriptional changes in p21, MDM2, and Cyclin B likely contribute to the reduced cell proliferation; while Sestrin 2 would contribute to the oxidant defense.

  14. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate Sensitizes Human 786-O Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ruojing; Zhu, Guodong; Jia, Ning; Yang, Wenzeng

    2015-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising anticancer agent. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a polyphenolic constituent of green tea. In this study, potentiating effect of EGCG on TRAIL-induced apoptosis human renal carcinoma cell line 786-O which is relatively resistant to TRAIL was examined, and the possible mechanism was investigated. Here, we show that co-treatment with EGCG and TRAIL induced significantly more profound apoptosis in 786-O cells. Treatment of 786-O cells with EGCG and TRAIL downregulated c-FLIP, Mcl-1, and Bcl-2 proteins in a caspase-dependent pathway. Moreover, we found that pretreatment with NAC markedly inhibited the expression levels of c-FLIP, Mcl-1, and Bcl-2 downregulated by the combinatory treatment, suggesting that the regulating effect of EGCG on these above apoptosis-relevant molecules was partially mediated by generation of ROS. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that EGCG sensitizes human 786-O renal cell carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by downregulation of c-FLIP, Mcl-1, and Bcl-2.

  15. Therapeutic Benefits of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Chun; Ke, Meng-Wei; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Wann, Shue-Ren; Shu, Chih-Wen; Chiou, Kuan-Rau; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn; Pan, Hung-Wei; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Liu, Chun-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by progressive increases in vascular resistance and the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. The accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lung and elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines in the bloodstream suggest that inflammation may play a role in PAH. In this study, the benefits of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and iPSC-conditioned medium (iPSC CM) were explored in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rats. We demonstrated that both iPSCs and iPSC CM significantly reduced the right ventricular systolic pressure and ameliorated the hypertrophy of the right ventricle in MCT-induced PAH rats in models of both disease prevention and disease reversal. In the prevention of MCT-induced PAH, iPSC-based therapy led to the decreased accumulation of inflammatory cells and down-regulated the expression of the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12α, IL-12β, IL-23 and IFNγ genes in lung specimens, which implied that iPSC-based therapy may be involved in the regulation of inflammation. NF-κB signaling is essential to the inflammatory cascade, which is activated via the phosphorylation of the NF-κB molecule. Using the chemical inhibitor specifically blocked the phosphorylation of NF-κB, and in vitro assays of cultured human M1 macrophages implied that the anti-inflammation effect of iPSC-based therapy may contribute to the disturbance of NF-κB activation. Here, we showed that iPSC-based therapy could restore the hemodynamic function of right ventricle with benefits for preventing the ongoing inflammation in the lungs of MCT-induced PAH rats by regulating NF-κB phosphorylation.

  16. Therapeutic Benefits of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Huang

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is characterized by progressive increases in vascular resistance and the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. The accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lung and elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines in the bloodstream suggest that inflammation may play a role in PAH. In this study, the benefits of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and iPSC-conditioned medium (iPSC CM were explored in monocrotaline (MCT-induced PAH rats. We demonstrated that both iPSCs and iPSC CM significantly reduced the right ventricular systolic pressure and ameliorated the hypertrophy of the right ventricle in MCT-induced PAH rats in models of both disease prevention and disease reversal. In the prevention of MCT-induced PAH, iPSC-based therapy led to the decreased accumulation of inflammatory cells and down-regulated the expression of the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12α, IL-12β, IL-23 and IFNγ genes in lung specimens, which implied that iPSC-based therapy may be involved in the regulation of inflammation. NF-κB signaling is essential to the inflammatory cascade, which is activated via the phosphorylation of the NF-κB molecule. Using the chemical inhibitor specifically blocked the phosphorylation of NF-κB, and in vitro assays of cultured human M1 macrophages implied that the anti-inflammation effect of iPSC-based therapy may contribute to the disturbance of NF-κB activation. Here, we showed that iPSC-based therapy could restore the hemodynamic function of right ventricle with benefits for preventing the ongoing inflammation in the lungs of MCT-induced PAH rats by regulating NF-κB phosphorylation.

  17. Levamisole induced apoptosis in cultured vascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artwohl, Michaela; Hölzenbein, Thomas; Wagner, Ludwig; Freudenthaler, Angelika; Waldhäusl, Werner; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M

    2000-01-01

    To better understand the anticancer activity of Levamisole (LMS), which serves as an adjuvant in colon cancer therapy in combination with 5-Fluorouracil, this study analyses LMS' ability to induce apoptosis and growth arrest in cultured human micro- and macrovascular endothelial cells (ECs) and fibroblasts. Cells exposed (24 h) to Levamisole (range: 0.5–2 mmol l−1) alone or in combination with antioxidants (10 mmol l−1 glutathione or 5 mmol l−1 N-Acetylcysteine or 0.1 mmol l−1 Tocopherol) were evaluated for apoptosis (3H-thymidine assays, in situ staining), mRNA/protein expression (Northern/Western blot), and proliferation (3H-thymidine incorporation). Levamisole dose-dependently increased apoptosis in ECs to 230% (HUVECs-human umbilical vein ECs), 525% (adult human venous ECs) and 600% (human uterine microvascular ECs) but not in fibroblasts compared to control cells (set as 100%). Levamisole increased in ECs integrin-dependent matrix adhesion, inhibited proliferation (−70%), reduced expression of survival factors such as clusterin (−30%), endothelin-1 (−43%), bcl-2 (−34%), endothelial NO-synthase (−32%) and pRb (Retinoblastoma protein: −89%), and increased that of growth arrest/death signals such as p21 (+73%) and bak (+50%). LMS (2 mmol l−1)-induced apoptosis was inhibited by glutathione (−50%) and N-Acetylcysteine (−36%), which also counteracted reduction by Levamisole of pRb expression, suggesting reactive oxygen species and pRb play a role in these processes. The ability of LMS to selectively induce apoptosis and growth arrest in endothelial cells potentially hints at vascular targeting to contribute to Levamisole's anticancer activity. PMID:11139434

  18. Bacterial Cell Wall Polymer-Induced Granulomatous Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor; Herfarth; Van Tol EAF

    1996-04-01

    Local or systemic injection of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide polymers, which are the primary structural components of cell walls of nearly all bacteria, leads to acute inflammation, which can develop into chronic, spontaneously relapsing, granulomatous inflammation in a number of organs. Evolution into chronic granulomatous inflammation is dependent upon persistence of poorly biodegradable cell wall polymers within tissues, genetically determined host susceptibility, and generation of a T-lymphocyte-mediated immune response. Intraperitoneal injection of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide fragments from group A streptococci or selected intestinal bacteria into susceptible Lewis rats leads to chronic, spontaneously reactivating erosive arthritis and hepatic granulomas. Subserosal (intramural) injection of poorly biodegradable cell wall fragments into the distal intestine of Lewis rats induces chronic, spontaneously relapsing granulomatous enterocolitis with associated arthritis, hepatic granulomas, anemia, and leukocytosis. Chronic inflammation does not occur in T-lymphocyte-deficient rats and is prevented by cyclosporin-A therapy and degradation of peptidoglycan by the muralytic enzyme, mutanolysin. Moreover, resistant Buffalo and Fischer F344 rats, the latter sharing identical MHC antigens with Lewis rats, develop only acute inflammation with no chronic granulomatous response. Peptidoglycan-polysaccharide polymers activate almost every limb of the inflammatory response. Blockade of specific pathways suggests that interleukin-1, transforming growth factor-beta, plasma kallikrein, and T lymphocytes are dominant mediators of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide-induced arthritis, hepatic granulomas, and enterocolitis. Because of the similarity of immune mechanisms of these rat models to human disease, bacterial cell wall-induced inflammation provides unique opportunities to study pathogenic mechanisms of granuloma formation in response to ubiquitous microbial agents and to test

  19. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells in Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcamo-Orive, Ivan; Huang, Ngan F; Quertermous, Thomas; Knowles, Joshua W

    2017-11-01

    Insulin resistance leads to a number of metabolic and cellular abnormalities including endothelial dysfunction that increase the risk of vascular disease. Although it has been particularly challenging to study the genetic determinants that predispose to abnormal function of the endothelium in insulin-resistant states, the possibility of deriving endothelial cells from induced pluripotent stem cells generated from individuals with detailed clinical phenotyping, including accurate measurements of insulin resistance accompanied by multilevel omic data (eg, genetic and genomic characterization), has opened new avenues to study this relationship. Unfortunately, several technical barriers have hampered these efforts. In the present review, we summarize the current status of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells for modeling endothelial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance and discuss the challenges to overcoming these limitations. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) induces ferroptosis and causes cell cycle arrest in head and neck carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Renyu; Zhang, Ziheng; Chen, Lingfeng; Zhou, Yunfang; Zou, Peng; Feng, Chen; Wang, Li; Liang, Guang

    2016-10-10

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, exhibits a wide range of biological roles including a highly efficient and specific anti-tumor activity. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of DHA on head and neck carcinoma cells and elucidate the potential mechanisms. We used five head and neck carcinoma cell lines and two non-tumorigenic normal epithelial cell lines to achieve our goals. Cells were exposed to DHA and subjected to cellular activity assays including viability, cell cycle analysis, cell death, and angiogenic phenotype. Our results show that DHA causes cell cycle arrest which is mediated through Forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1). We also demonstrate that DHA induces ferroptosis and apoptosis in head and neck carcinoma cells. Lastly, our results show that DHA alters the angiogenic phenotype of cancer cells by reducing the expression of angiogenic factors and the ability of cancer cells to support endothelial cell tubule formation. Our study suggests that DHA specifically causes head and neck cancer cell death through contribution from both ferroptosis and apoptosis. DHA may represent an effective strategy in head and neck cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Toona Sinensis Extracts Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in the Human Lung Large Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Toona sinensis extracts have been shown to exhibit anti-cancer effects in human ovarian cancer cell lines, human promyelocytic leukemia cells and human lung adenocarcinoma. Its safety has also been confirmed in animal studies. However, its anti-cancer properties in human lung large cell carcinoma have not been studied. Here, we used a powder obtained by freeze-drying the super-natant of centrifuged crude extract from Toona sinensis leaves (TSL-1 to treat the human lung carcinoma cell line H661. Cell viability was evaluated by the 3-(4-,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that TSL-1 blocked H661 cell cycle progression. Western blot analysis showed decreased expression of cell cycle proteins that promote cell cycle progression, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin D1, and increased the expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression, including p27. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that TSL-1 induced H661 cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that TSL-1 reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2, and degraded the DNA repair protein, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase. TSL-1 shows potential as a novel therapeutic agent or for use as an adjuvant for treating human lung large cell carcinoma.

  2. Design of a Tumorigenicity Test for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC-Derived Cell Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Kawamata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Pluripotent Stem Cell (PSC-derived cell therapy holds enormous promise because of the cells’ “unlimited” proliferative capacity and the potential to differentiate into any type of cell. However, these features of PSC-derived cell products are associated with concerns regarding the generation of iatrogenic teratomas or tumors from residual immature or non-terminally differentiated cells in the final cell product. This concern has become a major hurdle to the introduction of this therapy into the clinic. Tumorigenicity testing is therefore a key preclinical safety test in PSC-derived cell therapy. Tumorigenicity testing becomes particularly important when autologous human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC-derived cell products with no immuno-barrier are considered for transplantation. There has been, however, no internationally recognized guideline for tumorigenicity testing of PSC-derived cell products for cell therapy. In this review, we outline the points to be considered in the design and execution of tumorigenicity tests, referring to the tests and laboratory work that we have conducted for an iPSC-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cell product prior to its clinical use.

  3. Punicalagin induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death in human U87MG glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shyang-guang; Huang, Ming-hung; Li, Jui-hsiang; Lai, Fu-i; Lee, Horng-mo; Hsu, Yuan-nian

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the effects of punicalagin, a polyphenol isolated from Punica granatum, on human U87MG glioma cells in vitro. The viability of human U87MG glioma cells was evaluated using MTT assay. Cell cycle was detected with flow cytometry analysis. The levels of Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), phosphor-AMPK and phosphor-p27 at Thr198 were measured using immunoblot analyses. Caspase-3 activity was determined with spectrophotometer. To determine autophagy, LC3 cleavage and punctate patterns were examined. Punicalagin (1-30 μg/mL) dose-dependently inhibited the cell viability in association with increased cyclin E level and decreased cyclin B and cyclin A levels. The treatment also induced apoptosis as shown by the cleavage of PARP, activation of caspase-9, and increase of caspase-3 activity in the cells. However, pretreatment of the cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-DEVD-fmk (50 μmol/L) did not completely prevent the cell death. On the other hand, punicalagin treatment increased LC3-II cleavage and caused GFP-LC3-II-stained punctate pattern in the cells. Suppressing autophagy of cells with chloroquine (1-10 μmol/L) dose-dependently alleviated the cell death caused by punicalagin. Punicalagin (1-30 μg/mL) also increased the levels phosphor-AMPK and phosphor-p27 at Thr198 in the cells, which were correlated with the induction of autophagic cell death. Punicalagin induces human U87MG glioma cell death through both apoptotic and autophagic pathways.

  4. Male Differentiation of Germ Cells Induced by Embryonic Age-Specific Sertoli Cells in Mice1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kohei; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Lin, Yanling; Hogg, Nathanael; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Behringer, Richard R.; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retinoic acid (RA) is a meiosis-inducing factor. Primordial germ cells (PGCs) in the developing ovary are exposed to RA, resulting in entry into meiosis. In contrast, PGCs in the developing testis enter mitotic arrest to differentiate into prospermatogonia. Sertoli cells express CYP26B1, an RA-metabolizing enzyme, providing a simple explanation for why XY PGCs do not initiate meios/is. However, regulation of entry into mitotic arrest is likely more complex. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate male germ cell differentiation, we cultured XX and XY germ cells at 11.5 and 12.5 days postcoitus (dpc) with an RA receptor inhibitor. Expression of Stra8, a meiosis initiation gene, was suppressed in all groups. However, expression of Dnmt3l, a male-specific gene, during embryogenesis was elevated but only in 12.5-dpc XY germ cells. This suggests that inhibiting RA signaling is not sufficient for male germ cell differentiation but that the male gonadal environment also contributes to this pathway. To define the influence of Sertoli cells on male germ cell differentiation, Sertoli cells at 12.5, 15.5, and 18.5 dpc were aggregated with 11.5 dpc PGCs, respectively. After culture, PGCs aggregated with 12.5 dpc Sertoli cells increased Nanos2 and Dnmt3l expression. Furthermore, these PGCs established male-specific methylation imprints of the H19 differentially methylated domains. In contrast, PGCs aggregated with Sertoli cells at late embryonic ages did not commit to the male pathway. These findings suggest that male germ cell differentiation is induced both by inhibition of RA signaling and by molecule(s) production by embryonic age-specific Sertoli cells. PMID:22262692

  5. [Increase in cell metabolism in normal, diploid human glial cells in stationary cell cultures induced by meclofenoxate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig-Festl, M; Gräter, B; Bayreuther, K

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative biochemical studies were undertaken in order to examine the influence of the accumulation of lipofuscin in secondary lysosomes on cell metabolic activities of normal diploid human glia cells in a stationary cell culture system. Glia cells accumulate lipofuscin as a function of the duration of the stationary cultivation in vitro. The accumulation of lipofuscin can be decreased by the long-term treatment with the pharmacon meclofenoxate (centrophenoxine, Helfergin). Concomitant with the reduction of the accumulated lipofuscin, meclofenoxate-treated glia cells show enhanced rates of RNA synthesis, protein synthesis and glucose uptake. Most likely, in meclofenoxate-treated normal diploid human glia cells in vitro, the utilisation of glucose is shifted from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway. The data suggest that the meclofenoxate-induced reduction of lipofuscin accumulation has a positive effect on cell metabolic functions and causes a delay of the cellular aging of the human glia cells in vitro.

  6. Revving up natural killer cells and cytokine-induced killer cells against hematological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco ePittari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D, NKG2A/CD94, NKp46 and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols.Cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming.NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide accelerates fine particulate matter-induced cell apoptosis in human lung bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Qin; Xiong, Qi; Chen, Lin; Tian, Xiang; Yue, Kai; Ma, Baomiao; Liu, Lu; Wu, Rihui; Xu, Congyue; Pi, Mingshan; Li, Chaoying

    2017-11-03

    The aim of the study has been to investigate the effect of the Standard Reference Material of fine particulate matter (SRM 2786) on cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human lung bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE cells). Whether the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation could further accelerate cell apoptosis induced by SRM 2786 stimulation has also been determined. 16HBE cells were exposed to various doses of SRM 2786 with or without LPS. The following parameters: cytotoxicity, apoptotic rate, Bax/Bcl-2 expression, nitric oxide (NO) production, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were measured. The results have shown that SRM 2786 induces cell damage and apoptosis of 16HBE cells as demonstrated by significant decrease in expression of Bcl-2 and increase in expression of Bax. When compared with the control cells, the apoptotic rate of cells treated by 500 μg/ml of SRM 2786 increased from 2.43±0.21% to 43.96±2.95% (p < 0.01). Further, there was an elevated production of NO and ROS post SRM 2786 treatment. The level of NO in cells treated with 500 μg/ml of SRM 2786 was 18.33±1.02 μmol/l whereas that of control cells was 1.58±0.31 μmol/l (p < 0.01). When compared with the control group, the level of intracellular ROS increased by 24% after treatment with 500 μg/ml of SRM 2786 (p < 0.05). In addition, LPS pre-treatment may accelerate cell apoptosis by increasing generation of NO and ROS followed by SRM 2786 stimulation. When compared to cells treated with 125 μg/ml of SRM 2786 alone, the levels of NO and ROS in cells pretreated with LPS increased by 28% and 11.6%, respectively (p < 0.05), and the apoptotic rate increased from 34.62±4.44% to 54.11±3.34% (p < 0.01). These findings have suggested that in vitro exposure to SRM 2786 could induce 16HBE cells apoptosis probably by means of the mechanism involving the generation of free radicals, while the degree of apoptosis would be further aggravated under inflammation condition. Int J Occup Med

  8. Dioscin induces caspase-independent apoptosis through activation of apoptosis-inducing factor in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ae; Jang, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Yun-Han; Sung, Eon-Gi; Song, In-Hwan; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Suji; Sohn, Ho-Yong; Lee, Tae-Jin

    2014-07-01

    Dioscin, a saponin extracted from the roots of Polygonatum zanlanscianense, shows several bioactivities such as antitumor, antifungal, and antiviral properties. Although, dioscin is already known to induce cell death in variety cancer cells, the molecular basis for dioscin-induced cell death was not definitely known in cancer cells. In this study, we found that dioscin treatment induced cell death in dose-dependent manner in breast cancer cells such as MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-453, and T47D cells. Dioscin decreased expressions of Bcl-2 and cIAP-1 proteins, which were down-regulated at the transcriptional level. Conversely, Mcl-1 protein level was down-regulated by facilitating ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated Mcl-1 degradation in dioscin-treated cells. Pretreatment with z-VAD fails to attenuate dioscin-induced cell death as well as caspase-mediated events such as cleavages of procaspase-3 and PARP. In addition, dioscin treatment increased the population of annexin V positive cells and induced DNA fragmentation in a dose-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) was released from the mitochondria and translocated to the nucleus. Suppression in AIF expression by siRNA reduced dioscin-induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that dioscin-induced cell death was mediated via AIF-facilitating caspase-independent pathway as well as down-regulating anti-apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, cIAP-1, and Mcl-1 in breast cancer cells.

  9. DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Protoporphyrin IX in Sarcoma 180 Cells

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    Qing Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Porphyrin derivatives have been widely used in photodynamic therapy as effective sensitizers. Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX, a well-known hematoporphyrin derivative component, shows great potential to enhance light induced tumor cell damage. However, PpIX alone could also exert anti-tumor effects. The mechanisms underlying those direct effects are incompletely understood. This study thus investigated the putative mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor effects of PpIX on sarcoma 180 (S180 cells. Methods: S180 cells were treated with different concentrations of PpIX. Following the treatment, cell viability was evaluated by the 3-(4, 5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT assay; Disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by flow cytometry; The trans-location of apoptosis inducer factor (AIF from mitochondria to nucleus was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy; DNA damage was detected by single cell gel electrophoresis; Cell cycle distribution was analyzed by DNA content with flow cytometry; Cell cycle associated proteins were detected by western blotting. Results: PpIX (≥ 1 µg/ml significantly inhibited proliferation and reduced viability of S180 cells in a dose-dependent manner. PpIX rapidly and significantly triggered mitochondrial membrane depolarization, AIF (apoptosis inducer factor translocation from mitochondria to nucleus and DNA damage, effects partially relieved by the specific inhibitor of MPTP (mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Furthermore, S phase arrest and upregulation of the related proteins of P53 and P21 were observed following 12 and 24 h PpIX exposure. Conclusion: PpIX could inhibit tumor cell proliferation by induction of DNA damage and cell cycle arrest in the S phase.

  10. Graphene Oxide Nanoribbons Induce Autophagic Vacuoles in Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

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    Emanuela Mari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since graphene nanoparticles are attracting increasing interest in relation to medical applications, it is important to understand their potential effects on humans. In the present study, we prepared graphene oxide (GO nanoribbons by oxidative unzipping of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and analyzed their toxicity in two human neuroblastoma cell lines. Neuroblastoma is the most common solid neoplasia in children. The hallmark of these tumors is the high number of different clinical variables, ranging from highly metastatic, rapid progression and resistance to therapy to spontaneous regression or change into benign ganglioneuromas. Patients with neuroblastoma are grouped into different risk groups that are characterized by different prognosis and different clinical behavior. Relapse and mortality in high risk patients is very high in spite of new advances in chemotherapy. Cell lines, obtained from neuroblastomas have different genotypic and phenotypic features. The cell lines SK-N-BE(2 and SH-SY5Y have different genetic mutations and tumorigenicity. Cells were exposed to low doses of GO for different times in order to investigate whether GO was a good vehicle for biological molecules delivering individualized therapy. Cytotoxicity in both cell lines was studied by measuring cellular oxidative stress (ROS, mitochondria membrane potential, expression of lysosomial proteins and cell growth. GO uptake and cytoplasmic distribution of particles were studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM for up to 72 h. The results show that GO at low concentrations increased ROS production and induced autophagy in both neuroblastoma cell lines within a few hours of exposure, events that, however, are not followed by growth arrest or death. For this reason, we suggest that the GO nanoparticle can be used for therapeutic delivery to the brain tissue with minimal effects on healthy cells.

  11. Modeling Andersen's Syndrome in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Jonathan; Rouleau, Matthieu; Desnuelle, Claude; Sacconi, Sabrina; Bendahhou, Saïd

    2016-01-15

    Andersen's syndrome (AS) is a rare disorder characterized by a triad of symptoms: periodic paralysis, cardiac arrhythmia, and bone developmental defects. Most of the patients carry mutations on the inward rectifier potassium channel Kir2.1 encoded by the KCNJ2 gene. kcnj2 knockout mice are lethal at birth preventing, hence, thorough investigations of the physiological and pathophysiological events. We have generated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from healthy as well as from AS patient muscular biopsies using the four-gene cassette required for cellular reprogramming (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc). The generated AS-iPS cells exhibited the gold standard requirement for iPS cells: expression of genetics and surface pluripotent markers, strong alkaline phosphatase activity, self-renewal, and could be differentiated by the formation of embryoid bodies (EBs) into the three germ layers. Sequencing of the entire coding sequence of the KCNJ2 gene, in AS-iPS cells, revealed that the reprogramming process did not revert the Andersen's syndrome-associated mutation. Moreover, no difference was observed between control and AS-iPS cells in terms of pluripotent markers' expression, self-renewal, and three germ layer differentiation. Interestingly, expression of osteogenic markers are lower in EB-differentiated AS-iPS compared to control iPS cells. Our results showed that the Kir2.1 channel is not important for the reprogramming process and the early step of the development in vitro. However, the osteogenic machinery appears to be hastened in AS-iPS cells, strongly indicating that the generated AS-iPS cells could be a good model to better understand the AS pathophysiology.

  12. SHR overexpression induces the formation of supernumerary cell layers with cortex cell identity in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, S; Dievart, A; Divol, F; Pauluzzi, G; Meynard, D; Swarup, R; Wu, S; Gallagher, K L; Périn, C

    2017-05-01

    The number of root cortex cell layers varies among plants, and many species have several cortical cell layers. We recently demonstrated that the two rice orthologs of the Arabidopsis SHR gene, OsSHR1 and OsSHR2, could complement the A. thaliana shr mutant. Moreover, OsSHR1 and OsSHR2 expression in A. thaliana roots induced the formation of extra root cortical cell layers. In this article, we demonstrate that the overexpression of AtSHR and OsSHR2 in rice roots leads to plants with wide and short roots that contain a high number of extra cortical cell layers. We hypothesize that SHR genes share a conserved function in the control of cortical cell layer division and the number of ground tissue cell layers in land plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Metformin Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Drug-Resistant Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodríguez-Lirio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological studies indicate that the antidiabetic drug metformin has chemosensitizing and chemopreventive effects against carcinogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that metformin exerts varying degrees of antitumor activity against human leukemia cells, as reflected by differences in growth inhibition, apoptosis, and alterations to metabolic enzymes. In metformin-sensitive cells, autophagy was not induced but rather it blocked proliferation by means of arresting cells in the S and G2/M phases which was associated with the downregulation of cyclin A, cyclin B1, and cdc2, but not that of cyclin E. In 10E1-CEM cells that overexpress Bcl-2 and are drug-resistant, the effect of metformin on proliferation was more pronounced, also inducing the activation of the caspases 3/7 and hence apoptosis. In all sensitive cells, metformin decreased the Δψm and it modified the expression of enzymes involved in energy metabolism: PKCε (PKCepsilon and PKCδ (PKCdelta. In sensitive cells, metformin altered PKCε and PKCδ expression leading to a predominance of PKCε over PKCδ which implies a more glycolytic state. The opposite occurs in the nonresponsive cells. In conclusion, we provide new insights into the activity of metformin as an antitumoral agent in leukemia cells that could be related to its capability to modulate energy metabolism.

  14. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis.

  15. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma protect human mammary epithelial cells from Tam-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Brian J; Regan Anderson, Tarah M; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Ostrander, Julie H

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness.

  16. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma protect human mammary epithelial cells from Tam-induced cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Girard

    Full Text Available Tamoxifen (Tam is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+ breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1 promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness.

  17. Inhibition of human antigen-induced lymphoblastoid B-cell function by an in vivo-induced suppressor T cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieva, J A; Stevens, R H

    1983-04-01

    Lymphoblastoid (LB) B cells which spontaneously produce antitetanus toxoid IgG antibodies (Tet-IgG) in short-term cultures (3 days) appear in the circulation 5-7 days after immunization with tetanus toxoid. Addition of pokeweed mitogen (PWM), normally a stimulator of antibody production, caused instead a reduction in the in vitro synthesis of Tet-IgG by the LB cells. In order for this inhibition of antibody production to occur, T cells had to be present, and the inhibition was proportional to the number of T cells added to the culture, demonstrating the existence of PWM-inducible suppressor cells. The cells mediating the suppression had the OKT8 phenotype and also exhibited the following characteristics: (1) a PWM pretreatment period as little as 14 hr was enough to complete activation; (2) conventional inhibitors of suppressor T cells as hydrocortisone and cyclosporin A only partially reversed its effect; and (3) DNA synthesis was not required. The T-suppressor activity was detectable in the circulation before immunization, increased two- to fourfold by 5-12 days after boosting, and waned after 3 weeks. The mechanism of action of this suppression does not appear to involve conventional cytotoxic T cells as (1) the suppression was mediated across allogeneic barriers and (2) the suppression could not be reversed by inclusion of anti-Leu-2a antibodies in the culture. These results suggest that this suppressor T-cell subset may be important in the normal regulation of activated stages of human B lymphocytes.

  18. Seven cases of radiation-induced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

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    Sugita, Kazunari; Yamamoto, Osamu; Suenaga, Yoshinori [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-09-01

    We report 7 cases of radiation-induced skin cancer. The diagnosis was based on the history of radiotherapy for benign skin diseases (5 cases) and of occupational exposures to medical doctors (2 cases). All cases were squamous cell carcinomas which arose from chronic radiodermatitis. The estimated latent period of these tumors ranged from 6 to 64 years, with an average of 29.9 years. After surgical treatments of the lesions, no local recurrences were observed in all cases. Benign skin diseases had sometimes been treated with low-energy radiation before the 1960s. Considering the estimated latent period, the peak time point of developing risk of radiation-induced skin cancer by such treatment has been already passed, however, the danger of it should not be ignored in future. In association with multiplicity of radiation usage, occupational exposure of radiation may develop the risk of occurrence of skin cancer in future. Therefore, we should recognize that radiation-induced skin cancer is not in the past. In the cases of chronic skin diseases showing warty keratotic growth, erosion and ulcer, we should include chronic radio-dermatitis in the differential diagnosis. It is necessary to recall all patients about the history of radiotherapy or radiation exposure. Rapid histopathological examination is mandatory because of the suspicion of radiation-induced skin cancer. (author)

  19. Cyclosporine A induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death in rat pituitary GH3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Seung-Il; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Yoo, Yeong-Min

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a powerful immunosuppressive drug with side effects including the development of chronic nephrotoxicity. In this study, we investigated CsA treatment induced apoptotic and autophagic cell death in pituitary GH3 cells. CsA treatment (0.1 to 10 µM) decreased survival of GH3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cell viability decreased significantly with increasing CsA concentrations largely due to an increase in apoptosis, while cell death rates due to autophagy altered only slightly. Several molecular and morphological features correlated with cell death through these distinct pathways. At concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 10 µM, CsA induced a dose-dependent increase in expression of the autophagy markers LC3-I and LC3-II. Immunofluorescence staining revealed markedly increased levels of both LC3 and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (Lamp2), indicating increases in autophagosomes. At the same CsA doses, apoptotic cell death was apparent as indicated by nuclear and DNA fragmentation and increased p53 expression. In apoptotic or autophagic cells, p-ERK levels were highest at 1.0 µM CsA compared to control or other doses. In contrast, Bax levels in both types of cell death were increased in a dose-dependent manner, while Bcl-2 levels showed dose-dependent augmentation in autophagy and were decreased in apoptosis. Manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) showed a similar dose-dependent reduction in cells undergoing apoptosis, while levels of the intracellular calcium ion exchange maker calbindin-D9k were decreased in apoptosis (1.0 to 5 µM CsA), but unchanged in autophagy. In conclusion, these results suggest that CsA induction of apoptotic or autophagic cell death in rat pituitary GH3 cells depends on the relative expression of factors and correlates with Bcl-2 and Mn-SOD levels.

  20. Deletion of Rb1 induces both hyperproliferation and cell death in murine germinal center B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiwen; O'Neal, Julie; Wilson, William C; Mahajan, Nitin; Luo, Jun; Wang, Yinan; Su, Mack Y; Lu, Lan; Skeath, James B; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Tomasson, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    The retinoblastoma gene (RB1) has been implicated as a tumor suppressor in multiple myeloma (MM), yet its role remains unclear because in the majority of cases with 13q14 deletions, un-mutated RB1 remains expressed from the retained allele. To explore the role of Rb1 in MM, we examined the functional consequences of single- and double-copy Rb1 loss in germinal center B cells, the cells of origin of MM. We generated mice without Rb1 function in germinal center B cells by crossing Rb1(Flox/Flox) with C-γ-1-Cre (Cγ1) mice expressing the Cre recombinase in class-switched B cells in a p107(-/-) background to prevent p107 from compensating for Rb1 loss (Cγ1-Rb1(F/F)-p107(-/-)). All mice developed normally, but B cells with two copies of Rb1 deleted (Cγ1-Rb1(F/F)-p107(-/-)) exhibited increased proliferation and cell death compared with Cγ1-Rb1(+/+)-p107(-/-) controls ex vivo. In vivo, Cγ1-Rb1(F/F)-p107(-/-) mice had a lower percentage of splenic B220+ cells and reduced numbers of bone marrow antigen-specific secreting cells compared with control mice. Our data indicate that Rb1 loss induces both cell proliferation and death in germinal center B cells. Because no B-cell malignancies developed after 1 year of observation, our data also suggest that Rb1 loss is not sufficient to transform post-germinal center B cells and that additional, specific mutations are likely required to cooperate with Rb1 loss to induce malignant transformation. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute Malaria Induces PD1+CTLA4+ Effector T Cells with Cell-Extrinsic Suppressor Function.

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    Maria Sophia Mackroth

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In acute Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum malaria, the pro- and anti-inflammatory immune pathways must be delicately balanced so that the parasitemia is controlled without inducing immunopathology. An important mechanism to fine-tune T cell responses in the periphery is the induction of coinhibitory receptors such as CTLA4 and PD1. However, their role in acute infections such as P. falciparum malaria remains poorly understood. To test whether coinhibitory receptors modulate CD4+ T cell functions in malaria, blood samples were obtained from patients with acute P. falciparum malaria treated in Germany. Flow cytometric analysis showed a more frequent expression of CTLA4 and PD1 on CD4+ T cells of malaria patients than of healthy control subjects. In vitro stimulation with P. falciparum-infected red blood cells revealed a distinct population of PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells that simultaneously produced IFNγ and IL10. This antigen-specific cytokine production was enhanced by blocking PD1/PDL1 and CTLA4. PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells were further isolated based on surface expression of PD1 and their inhibitory function investigated in-vitro. Isolated PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells suppressed the proliferation of the total CD4+ population in response to anti-CD3/28 and plasmodial antigens in a cell-extrinsic manner. The response to other specific antigens was not suppressed. Thus, acute P. falciparum malaria induces P. falciparum-specific PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ Teffector cells that coproduce IFNγ and IL10, and inhibit other CD4+ T cells. Transient induction of regulatory Teffector cells may be an important mechanism that controls T cell responses and might prevent severe inflammation in patients with malaria and potentially other acute infections.

  2. Vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy induced by glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, C; Angulo, J; Rodríguez-Mañas, L; Llergo, J L; Vallejo, S; Cercas, E; Sánchez-Ferrer, C F

    1998-10-01

    1. Nonenzymatic protein glycosylation is a possible mechanism contributing to oxidative stress and vascular disease in diabetes. In this work, the influence of 14%-glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin (GHHb), compared to the non-glycosylated protein (HHb), was studied on several growth parameters of rat cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). A role for reactive oxygen species was also analysed. 2. Treatment of VSMC for 48 h with GHHb, but not with HHb, increased planar cell surface area in a concentration dependent manner. The threshold concentration was 10 nM, which increased cell size from 7965+/-176 to 9411+/-392 microm2. Similarly, only GHHb enhanced protein content per well in VSMC cultures. 3. The planar surface area increase induced by 10 nM GHHb was abolished by superoxide dismutase (SOD; 50 200 u ml(-1)), deferoxamine (100 nM-100 microM), or dimethylthiourea (1 mM), while catalase (50 200 u ml(-1)) or mannitol (1 mM) resulted in a partial inhibition of cell size enhancement. 4. When a known source of oxygen free radicals was administered to VSMC, the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, the results were analogous to those produced by GHHb. Indeed, enhancements of cell size were observed, which were inhibited by SOD, deferoxamine, or catalase. 5. These results indicate that, at low concentrations, GHHb induces hypertrophy in VSMC, this effect being mediated by superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, and/or hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, glycosylated proteins can have a role in the development of the structural vascular alterations associated to diabetes by enhancing oxidative stress.

  3. Vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy induced by glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, Concepción; Angulo, Javier; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Llergo, José L; Vallejo, Susana; Cercas, Elena; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F

    1998-01-01

    Nonenzymatic protein glycosylation is a possible mechanism contributing to oxidative stress and vascular disease in diabetes. In this work, the influence of 14%-glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin (GHHb), compared to the non-glycosylated protein (HHb), was studied on several growth parameters of rat cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). A role for reactive oxygen species was also analysed.Treatment of VSMC for 48 h with GHHb, but not with HHb, increased planar cell surface area in a concentration dependent manner. The threshold concentration was 10 nM, which increased cell size from 7965±176 to 9411±392 μm2. Similarly, only GHHb enhanced protein content per well in VSMC cultures.The planar surface area increase induced by 10 nM GHHb was abolished by superoxide dismutase (SOD; 50–200 u ml−1), deferoxamine (100 nM–100 μM), or dimethylthiourea (1 mM), while catalase (50–200 u ml−1) or mannitol (1 mM) resulted in a partial inhibition of cell size enhancement.When a known source of oxygen free radicals was administered to VSMC, the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, the results were analogous to those produced by GHHb. Indeed, enhancements of cell size were observed, which were inhibited by SOD, deferoxamine, or catalase.These results indicate that, at low concentrations, GHHb induces hypertrophy in VSMC, this effect being mediated by superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, and/or hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, glycosylated proteins can have a role in the development of the structural vascular alterations associated to diabetes by enhancing oxidative stress. PMID:9831896

  4. Actein induces calcium release in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einbond, Linda Saxe; Mighty, Jason; Redenti, Stephen; Wu, Hsan-au

    2013-12-01

    The triterpene glycoside actein from the herb black cohosh preferentially inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells and activates the ER stress response. The ER IP3 receptor and Na,K-ATPase form a signaling microdomain. Since actein is lipophilic, its action may be limited by bioavailability. To develop actein to prevent and treat cancer, we examined the primary targets and combinations with chemotherapy agents, as well as the ability of nanoparticles to enhance the activity. To reveal signaling pathways, we treated human breast and colon cancer, as well as 293T and 293T (NF-κB), cells with actein, and measured effects using the MTT, luciferase promoter, Western blot and histology assays. To assess effects on calcium release, we preloaded cells with the calcium sensitive dye Fura-2. To enhance bioavailability, we conjugated actein to nanoparticle liposomes. Actein strongly inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cells and induced a dose dependent release of calcium into the cytoplasm. The ER IP3 receptor antagonist heparin blocked this release, indicating that the receptor is required for activity. Heparin partially blocked the growth inhibitory effect, while the MEK inhibitor U0126 enhanced it. Consistent with this, actein synergized with the ER mobilizer thapsigargin. Further, actein preferentially inhibited the growth of 293T (NF-κB) cells. Nanoparticle liposomes increased the growth inhibitory activity of actein. Actein alters the activity of the ER IP3 receptor and Na,K-ATPase, induces calcium release and modulates the NF-κB and MEK pathways and may be worthwhile to explore to prevent and treat breast cancer. © 2013.

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology and aquatic animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Alexis M; Spyropoulos, Demetri D

    2014-06-01

    Aquatic animal species are the overall leaders in the scientific investigation of tough but important global health issues, including environmental toxicants and climate change. Historically, aquatic animal species also stand at the forefront of experimental biology, embryology and stem cell research. Over the past decade, intensive and high-powered investigations principally involving mouse and human cells have brought the generation and study of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to a level that facilitates widespread use in a spectrum of species. A review of key features of these investigations is presented here as a primer for the use of iPSC technology to enhance ongoing aquatic animal species studies. iPSC and other cutting edge technologies create the potential to study individuals from "the wild" closer to the level of investigation applied to sophisticated inbred mouse models. A wide variety of surveys and hypothesis-driven investigations can be envisioned using this new capability, including comparisons of organism-specific development and exposure response and the testing of fundamental dogmas established using inbred mice. However, with these new capabilities, also come new criteria for rigorous baseline assessments and testing. Both the methods for inducing pluripotency and the source material can negatively impact iPSC quality and bourgeoning applications. Therefore, more rigorous strategies not required for inbred mouse models will have to be implemented to approach global health issues using individuals from "the wild" for aquatic animal species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived gamete-associated proteins incite rejection of induced pluripotent stem cells in syngeneic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Manzar, Gohar; Zavazava, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    The safety of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in autologous recipients has been questioned after iPSCs, but not embryonic stem cells (ESCs), were reported to be rejected in syngeneic mice. This important topic has remained controversial because there has not been a mechanistic explanation for this phenomenon. Here, we hypothesize that iPSCs, but not ESCs, readily differentiate into gamete-forming cells that express meiotic antigens normally found in immune-privileged gonads. Because peripheral blood T cells are not tolerized to these antigens in the thymus, gamete-associated-proteins (GAPs) sensitize T cells leading to rejection. Here, we provide evidence that GAPs expressed in iPSC teratomas, but not in ESC teratomas, are responsible for the immunological rejection of iPSCs. Furthermore, silencing the expression of Stra8, 'the master regulator of meiosis', in iPSCs, using short hairpin RNA led to significant abrogation of the rejection of iPSCs, supporting our central hypothesis that GAPs expressed after initiation of meiosis in iPSCs were responsible for rejection. In contrast to iPSCs, iPSC-derivatives, such as haematopoietic progenitor cells, are able to engraft long-term into syngeneic recipients because they no longer express GAPs. Our findings, for the first time, provide a unifying explanation of why iPSCs, but not ESCs, are rejected in syngeneic recipients, ending the current controversy on the safety of iPSCs and their derivatives. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Baicalein induces cell death in murine T cell lymphoma via inhibition of thioredoxin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Pal, Debojyoti; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K

    2017-10-01

    We have earlier demonstrated the radioprotective potential of baicalein using murine splenic lymphocytes. Here, we have studied the effect of baicalein on murine T cell lymphoma EL4 cells and investigated the underlying mechanism of action. We observed that baicalein induced a dose dependent cell death in EL4 cells in vitro and significantly reduced the frequency of cancer stem cells. Previously, we have reported that murine and human T cell lymphoma cells have increased oxidative stress tolerance capacity due to active thioredoxin system. Hence, we monitored the effect of baicalein on thioredoxin system in EL4 cells. Docking studies revealed that baicalein could bind to the active site of thioredoxin reductase. Baicalein treatment led to significant reduction in the activity of thioredoxin reductase and nuclear levels of thioredoxin-1 thereby increasing ASK1 levels and caspase-3 activity. Interestingly, CRISPR-Cas9 based knock-out of ASK1 or over-expression of thioredoxin-1 abolished anti-tumor effects of baicalein in EL4 cells. Further, baicalein administration significantly reduced intra-peritoneal tumor burden of EL4 cells in C57BL/6 mice. Thus, our study describes anti-tumor effects of baicalein in EL4 cells via inhibition of thioredoxin system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adipose Tissue Inflammation Induces B Cell Inflammation and Decreases B Cell Function in Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Frasca

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the greatest risk factor for developing chronic diseases. Inflamm-aging, the age-related increase in low-grade chronic inflammation, may be a common link in age-related diseases. This review summarizes recent published data on potential cellular and molecular mechanisms of the age-related increase in inflammation, and how these contribute to decreased humoral immune responses in aged mice and humans. Briefly, we cover how aging and related inflammation decrease antibody responses in mice and humans, and how obesity contributes to the mechanisms for aging through increased inflammation. We also report data in the literature showing adipose tissue infiltration with immune cells and how these cells are recruited and contribute to local and systemic inflammation. We show that several types of immune cells infiltrate the adipose tissue and these include macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells, innate lymphoid cells, eosinophils, T cells, B1, and B2 cells. Our main focus is how the adipose tissue affects immune responses, in particular B cell responses and antibody production. The role of leptin in generating inflammation and decreased B cell responses is also discussed. We report data published by us and by other groups showing that the adipose tissue generates pro-inflammatory B cell subsets which induce pro-inflammatory T cells, promote insulin resistance, and secrete pathogenic autoimmune antibodies.

  9. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

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    Brandl, Anita [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Nerlich, Michael [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Angele, Peter, E-mail: Peter.Angele@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  10. Procaine Induces Epigenetic Changes in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Sabit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world, and it is the major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The present study aimed at treating colon cancer cell line (HCT116 with different chemotherapeutic drug/drug combinations (procaine, vorinostat “SAHA,” sodium phenylbutyrate, erlotinib, and carboplatin. Two different final concentrations were applied: 3 μM and 5 μM. Trypan blue test was performed to assess the viability of the cell before and after being treated with the drugs. The data obtained showed that there was a significant decrease in the viability of cells after applying the chemotherapeutic drugs/drug combinations. Also, DNA fragmentation assay was carried out to study the effect of these drugs on the activation of apoptosis-mediated DNA degradation process. The results indicated that all the drugs/drug combinations had a severe effect on inducing DNA fragmentation. Global DNA methylation quantification was performed to identify the role of these drugs individually or in combination in hypo- or hypermethylating the CpG dinucleotide all over the genome of the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Data obtained indicated that different combinations had different effects in reducing or increasing the level of methylation, which might indicate the effectiveness of combining drugs in treating colon cancer cells.

  11. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Regenerative Medicine and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Duanqing; Xu, Jianyong; Zhuang, Qiang; Tse, Hung-Fat; Esteban, Miguel A.

    The potential of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) for regenerative medicine is unquestionable, but practical and ethical considerations have hampered clinical application and research. In an attempt to overcome these issues, the conversion of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells similar to ESCs, commonly termed nuclear reprogramming, has been a top objective of contemporary biology. More than 40 years ago, King, Briggs, and Gurdon pioneered somatic cell nuclear reprogramming in frogs, and in 1981 Evans successfully isolated mouse ESCs. In 1997 Wilmut and collaborators produced the first cloned mammal using nuclear transfer, and then Thomson obtained human ESCs from in vitro fertilized blastocysts in 1998. Over the last 2 decades we have also seen remarkable findings regarding how ESC behavior is controlled, the importance of which should not be underestimated. This knowledge allowed the laboratory of Shinya Yamanaka to overcome brilliantly conceptual and technical barriers in 2006 and generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse fibroblasts by overexpressing defined combinations of ESC-enriched transcription factors. Here, we discuss some important implications of human iPSCs for biology and medicine and also point to possible future directions.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide produced by oral Streptococci induces macrophage cell death.

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    Nobuo Okahashi

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 produced by members of the mitis group of oral streptococci plays important roles in microbial communities such as oral biofilms. Although the cytotoxicity of H2O2 has been widely recognized, the effects of H2O2 produced by oral streptococci on host defense systems remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of H2O2 produced by Streptococcus oralis on human macrophage cell death. Infection by S. oralis was found to stimulate cell death of a THP-1 human macrophage cell line at multiplicities of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited the cytotoxic effect of S. oralis. S. oralis deletion mutants lacking the spxB gene, which encodes pyruvate oxidase, and are therefore deficient in H2O2 production, showed reduced cytotoxicity toward THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, H2O2 alone was capable of inducing cell death. The cytotoxic effect seemed to be independent of inflammatory responses, because H2O2 was not a potent stimulator of tumor necrosis factor-α production in macrophages. These results indicate that streptococcal H2O2 plays a role as a cytotoxin, and is implicated in the cell death of infected human macrophages.

  13. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells 10 Years Later: For Cardiac Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yoshinori; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2017-06-09

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are reprogrammed cells that have features similar to embryonic stem cells, such as the capacity of self-renewal and differentiation into many types of cells, including cardiac myocytes. Although initially the reprogramming efficiency was low, several improvements in reprogramming methods have achieved robust and efficient generation of iPSCs without genomic insertion of transgenes. iPSCs display clonal variations in epigenetic and genomic profiles and cellular behavior in differentiation. iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes (iPSC cardiac myocytes) recapitulate phenotypic differences caused by genetic variations, making them attractive human disease models, and are useful for drug discovery and toxicology testing. In addition, iPSC cardiac myocytes can help with patient stratification in regard to drug responsiveness. Furthermore, they can be used as source cells for cardiac regeneration in animal models. Here, we review recent progress in iPSC technology and its applications to cardiac diseases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg Rp; Dugladze, Tamar; Gloveli, Tengis

    2016-05-24

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner.

  15. The Cell Nucleus in Physiological and Experimentally Induced Hypometabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, M.

    The main problem for manned space mission is, at present, represented by the mass penalty associated to the human presence. An efficient approach could be the induction of a hypometabolic stasis in the astronauts, thus drastically reducing the physical and psychological requirements of the crew. On the other hand, in the wild, a reduction in resource consumptions physiologi- cally occurs in certain animals which periodically enter hibernation, a hypometabolic state in which both the energy need and energy offer are kept at a minimum. During the last twelve years, we have been studying different tissues of hibernating dormice, with the aim of analyzing their features during the euthermia -hibernation-arousal cycle as well as getting insight into the mechanisms allowing adaptation to hypometabolism. We paid particular attention to the cell nucleus, as it is the site of chief metabolic functions, such as DNA replication and RNA transcription. Our observations revealed no significant modification in the basic features of cell nuclei during hibernation; however, the cell nuclei of hibernating dormice showed unusual nuclear bodies containing molecules involved in RNA pathways. Therefore, we supposed that they could represent storage/assembly sites of several factors for processing some RNA which could be slowly synthesised during hibernation and rapidly and abundantly released in early arousal in order to meet the increased metabolic needs of the cell. The nucleolus also underwent structural and molecular modifications during hibernation, maybe to continue important nucleolar functions, or, alternatively, permit a most efficient reactivation upon arousal. On the basis of the observations made in vivo , we recently tried to experimentally induce a reversible hypometabolic state in in vitro models, using cell lines derived from hibernating and non-hibernating species. By administering the synthetic opioid DADLE, we could significantly reduce both RNA transcrip- tion and

  16. Regulatory T cells induced by B cells: a novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chien-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2017-11-18

    Regulatory T cells play a crucial role in the homeostasis of the immune response. In addition to CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, several subsets of Foxp3- regulatory T cells, such as T helper 3 (Th3) cells and type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, have been described in mice and human. Accumulating evidence shows that naïve B cells contribute to tolerance and are able to promote regulatory T cell differentiation. Naïve B cells can convert CD4+CD25- T cells into CD25+Foxp3- regulatory T cells, named Treg-of-B cells by our group. Treg-of-B cells express LAG3, ICOS, GITR, OX40, PD1, and CTLA4 and secrete IL-10. Intriguingly, B-T cell-cell contact but not IL-10 is essential for Treg-of-B cells induction. Moreover, Treg-of-B cells possess both IL-10-dependent and IL-10-independent inhibitory functions. Treg-of-B cells exert suppressive activities in antigen-specific and non-antigen-specific manners in vitro and in vivo. Here, we review the phenotype and function of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, Th3 cells, Tr1 cells, and Treg-of-B cells.

  17. Methylene blue photodynamic therapy induces selective and massive cell death in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Ancély F; Terra, Letícia F; Wailemann, Rosangela A M; Oliveira, Talita C; Gomes, Vinícius de Morais; Mineiro, Marcela Franco; Meotti, Flávia Carla; Bruni-Cardoso, Alexandre; Baptista, Maurício S; Labriola, Leticia

    2017-03-15

    Breast cancer is the main cause of mortality among women. The disease presents high recurrence mainly due to incomplete efficacy of primary treatment in killing all cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an approach that causes tissue destruction by visible light in the presence of a photosensitizer (Ps) and oxygen, appears as a promising alternative therapy that could be used adjunct to chemotherapy and surgery for curing cancer. However, the efficacy of PDT to treat breast tumours as well as the molecular mechanisms that lead to cell death remain unclear. In this study, we assessed the cell-killing potential of PDT using methylene blue (MB-PDT) in three breast epithelial cell lines that represent non-malignant conditions and different molecular subtypes of breast tumours. Cells were incubated in the absence or presence of MB and irradiated or not at 640 nm with 4.5 J/cm 2 . We used a combination of imaging and biochemistry approaches to assess the involvement of classical autophagic and apoptotic pathways in mediating the cell-deletion induced by MB-PDT. The role of these pathways was investigated using specific inhibitors, activators and gene silencing. We observed that MB-PDT differentially induces massive cell death of tumour cells. Non-malignant cells were significantly more resistant to the therapy compared to malignant cells. Morphological and biochemical analysis of dying cells pointed to alternative mechanisms rather than classical apoptosis. MB-PDT-induced autophagy modulated cell viability depending on the cell model used. However, impairment of one of these pathways did not prevent the fatal destination of MB-PDT treated cells. Additionally, when using a physiological 3D culture model that recapitulates relevant features of normal and tumorous breast tissue morphology, we found that MB-PDT differential action in killing tumour cells was even higher than what was detected in 2D cultures. Finally, our observations underscore the potential of MB

  18. Different cell responses induced by exposure to maghemite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo, Yurena; Nardecchia, Stefania; Morales, María Puerto; Serrano, M. Concepción

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have permitted the development of a wide repertoire of inorganic magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with extensive promise for biomedical applications. Despite this remarkable potential, many questions still arise concerning the biocompatible nature of NPs when in contact with biological systems. Herein, we have investigated how controlled changes in the physicochemical properties of iron oxide NPs at their surface (i.e., surface charge and hydrodynamic size) affect, first, their interaction with cell media components and, subsequently, cell responses to NP exposure. For that purpose, we have prepared iron oxide NPs with three different coatings (i.e., dimercaptosuccinic acid - DMSA, (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane - APS and dextran) and explored the response of two different cell types, murine L929 fibroblasts and human Saos-2 osteoblasts, to their exposure. Interestingly, different cell responses were found depending on the NP concentration, surface charge and cell type. In this sense, neutral NPs, as those coated with dextran, induced negligible cell damage, as their cellular internalization was significantly reduced. In contrast, surface-charged NPs (i.e., those coated with DMSA and APS) caused significant cellular changes in viability, morphology and cell cycle under certain culture conditions, as a result of a more active cellular internalization. These results also revealed a particular cellular ability to detect and remember the original physicochemical properties of the NPs, despite the formation of a protein corona when incubated in culture media. Overall, conclusions from these studies are of crucial interest for future biomedical applications of iron oxide NPs.Recent advances in nanotechnology have permitted the development of a wide repertoire of inorganic magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with extensive promise for biomedical applications. Despite this remarkable potential, many questions still arise concerning the biocompatible

  19. Dendritic cells from oral cavity induce Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells upon antigen stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayuri Yamazaki

    Full Text Available Evidence is accumulating that dendritic cells (DCs from the intestines have the capacity to induce Foxp3(+CD4(+ regulatory T cells (T-regs and regulate immunity versus tolerance in the intestines. However, the contribution of DCs to controlling immunity versus tolerance in the oral cavity has not been addressed. Here, we report that DCs from the oral cavity induce Foxp3(+ T-regs as well as DCs from intestine. We found that oral-cavity-draining cervical lymph nodes contained higher frequencies of Foxp3(+ T-regs and ROR-γt(+ CD4(+T cells than other lymph nodes. The high frequency of Foxp3(+ T-regs in the oral-cavity-draining cervical lymph nodes was not dependent on the Toll like receptor (TLR adaptor molecules, Myd88 and TICAM-1 (TRIF. In contrast, the high frequency of ROR-γt(+ CD4(+T cells relies on Myd88 and TICAM-1. In vitro data showed that CD11c(+ DCs from oral-cavity-draining cervical lymph nodes have the capacity to induce Foxp3(+ T-regs in the presence of antigen. These data suggest that, as well as in the intestinal environment, antigen-presenting DCs may play a vital role in maintaining tolerance by inducing Foxp3(+ T-regs in the oral cavity.

  20. Development and Characterization of a Brain Endothelial Cell Phenotype using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldeman, Charlotte; Saaby, Lasse; Holst, Bjørn

    be used to investigate drug transport in vitro, and screen candidates for permeation properties. One recent approach is to develop in vitro models of the BBB using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) as described by Stebbins et al. (2015).The aim of the present study was to investigate whether...

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and aspirin interact synergistically to induce cell death in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Hüls, Isabel; Sigler, Michael; Palani, Chithra D; Hong, Le Thi Thu; Völker, Uwe; Kroemer, Heyo K; Beck, James F

    2008-07-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) as well as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin show promise as antineoplastic agents. The treatment with both HDIs and aspirin can result in hyperacetylation of proteins. In this study, we investigated whether HDIs and aspirin interacted in inducing anticancer activity and histone acetylation. We found that the HDIs, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and sodium butyrate, and aspirin cooperated to induce cell death in the ovarian cancer cell line, A2780. The effect was synergistic, as evidenced by CI-isobologram analysis. However, aspirin had no effect on histone acetylation, neither in the absence nor presence of HDIs. To gain insight into the mechanism underlying the synergistic action of HDIs and aspirin, we employed the deacetylated metabolite of aspirin, salicylic acid, and the cyclooxygenase-1- and -2-selective inhibitors, SC-560 and NS-398, respectively. We found that HDIs and salicylic acid interacted synergistically, albeit less efficiently than HDIs and aspirin, to induce cancer cell death, suggesting that the acetyl and the salicyl moiety contributed to the cooperative interaction of aspirin with HDIs. SC-560 and NS-398 had little effect both when applied alone or in conjunction with HDIs, indicating that the combinatorial effect of HDIs and aspirin was not the result of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that HDIs and aspirin synergize to induce cancer cell death and, thus, provides a rationale for a more in-depth exploration into the potential of combining HDIs and aspirin as a strategy for anticancer therapy.

  2. Differentiation and Application of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Eithne Margaret; Xiao, Qingzhong; Xu, Qingbo

    2017-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play a role in the development of vascular disease, for example, neointimal formation, arterial aneurysm, and Marfan syndrome caused by genetic mutations in VSMCs, but little is known about the mechanisms of the disease process. Advances in induced pluripotent stem cell technology have now made it possible to derive VSMCs from several different somatic cells using a selection of protocols. As such, researchers have set out to delineate key signaling processes involved in triggering VSMC gene expression to grasp the extent of gene regulatory networks involved in phenotype commitment. This technology has also paved the way for investigations into diseases affecting VSMC behavior and function, which may be treatable once an identifiable culprit molecule or gene has been repaired. Moreover, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived VSMCs are also being considered for their use in tissue-engineered blood vessels as they may prove more beneficial than using autologous vessels. Finally, while several issues remains to be clarified before induced pluripotent stem cell-derived VSMCs can become used in regenerative medicine, they do offer both clinicians and researchers hope for both treating and understanding vascular disease. In this review, we aim to update the recent progress on VSMC generation from stem cells and the underlying molecular mechanisms of VSMC differentiation. We will also explore how the use of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived VSMCs has changed the game for regenerative medicine by offering new therapeutic avenues to clinicians, as well as providing researchers with a new platform for modeling of vascular disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. PAF-Wnt signaling-induced cell plasticity is required for maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Jun, Sohee; Lee, Sunhye; Wang, Wenqi; Schneider, Andrea; Sun Oh, Young; Lin, Steven H; Park, Bum-Joon; Chen, Junjie; Keyomarsi, Khandan; Park, Jae-Il

    2016-02-04

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to tumour heterogeneity, therapy resistance and metastasis. However, the regulatory mechanisms of cancer cell stemness remain elusive. Here we identify PCNA-associated factor (PAF) as a key molecule that controls cancer cell stemness. PAF is highly expressed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells (MECs). In MECs, ectopic expression of PAF induces anchorage-independent cell growth and breast CSC marker expression. In mouse models, conditional PAF expression induces mammary ductal hyperplasia. Moreover, PAF expression endows MECs with a self-renewing capacity and cell heterogeneity generation via Wnt signalling. Conversely, ablation of endogenous PAF induces the loss of breast cancer cell stemness. Further cancer drug repurposing approaches reveal that NVP-AUY922 downregulates PAF and decreases breast cancer cell stemness. Our results unveil an unsuspected role of the PAF-Wnt signalling axis in modulating cell plasticity, which is required for the maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness.

  4. Cell population structure prior to bifurcation predicts efficiency of directed differentiation in human induced pluripotent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargaje, Rhishikesh; Trachana, Kalliopi; Shelton, Martin N; McGinnis, Christopher S; Zhou, Joseph X; Chadick, Cora; Cook, Savannah; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Huang, Sui; Hood, Leroy

    2017-02-28

    Steering the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) toward specific cell types is crucial for patient-specific disease modeling and drug testing. This effort requires the capacity to predict and control when and how multipotent progenitor cells commit to the desired cell fate. Cell fate commitment represents a critical state transition or "tipping point" at which complex systems undergo a sudden qualitative shift. To characterize such transitions during iPSC to cardiomyocyte differentiation, we analyzed the gene expression patterns of 96 developmental genes at single-cell resolution. We identified a bifurcation event early in the trajectory when a primitive streak-like cell population segregated into the mesodermal and endodermal lineages. Before this branching point, we could detect the signature of an imminent critical transition: increase in cell heterogeneity and coordination of gene expression. Correlation analysis of gene expression profiles at the tipping point indicates transcription factors that drive the state transition toward each alternative cell fate and their relationships with specific phenotypic readouts. The latter helps us to facilitate small molecule screening for differentiation efficiency. To this end, we set up an analysis of cell population structure at the tipping point after systematic variation of the protocol to bias the differentiation toward mesodermal or endodermal cell lineage. We were able to predict the proportion of cardiomyocytes many days before cells manifest the differentiated phenotype. The analysis of cell populations undergoing a critical state transition thus affords a tool to forecast cell fate outcomes and can be used to optimize differentiation protocols to obtain desired cell populations.

  5. Quality Assurance in Stem Cell Banking: Emphasis on Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallur, Therése; Blomberg, Pontus; Stenfelt, Sonya; Tryggvason, Kristian; Hovatta, Outi

    2017-01-01

    For quality assurance (QA) in stem cell banking, a planned system is needed to ensure that the banked products, stem cells, meet the standards required for research, clinical use, and commercial biotechnological applications. QA is process oriented, avoids, or minimizes unacceptable product defects, and particularly encompasses the management and operational systems of the bank, as well as the ethical and legal frameworks. Quality control (QC ) is product oriented and therefore ensures the stem cells of a bank are what they are expected to be. Testing is for controlling, not assuring, product quality, and is therefore a part of QC , not QA. Like QA, QC is essential for banking cells for quality research and translational application (Schwartz et al., Lancet 379:713-720, 2012). Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), as cells derived from donated supernumerary embryos from in vitro fertilization (IVF) therapy, are different from other stem cell types in resulting from an embryo that has had two donors . This imposes important ethical and legal constraints on the utility of the cells, which, together with quite specific culture conditions, require special attention in the QA system. Importantly, although the origin and derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs ) differ from that of hESCs, many of the principles of QA for hESC banking are applicable to iPSC banking (Stacey et al., Cell Stem Cell 13:385-388, 2013). Furthermore, despite differences between the legal and regulatory frameworks for hESC and iPSC banking between different countries, the requirements for QA are being harmonized (Stacey et al., Cell Stem Cell 13:385-388, 2013; International Stem Cell Banking Initiative, Stem Cell Rev 5:301-314, 2009).

  6. Cell-free DNA induced apoptosis of granulosa cells by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yichun; Zhang, Wenjuan; Wang, Xingling; Cai, Pengfei; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Wenjie

    2017-10-01

    Cell-free DNA is a DNA fragment that is produced by cell apoptosis which can affect the micro-environment of cell apoptosis. The levels of Cell-free DNA have been associated with successful rate of in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) and embryonic development. Our aim is to determine the relationship between cell-free DNA and embryo quality. The mechanisms of cell-free DNA in granulose and the apoptosis will be determined also. The study enrolled patients who were undergone IVF for the first time and grouped the patients as pregnant (n=130) and non-pregnant (n=59). The relationship was determined by statistical analysis between the levels of cell-free DNA in the follicular fluid and clinical data of IVF patients. Flow cytometry was done to detect the rate of granulosa cell apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Western blotting and fluorescent quantitative PCR detected the apoptosis-related gene expressions. Clinical data statistics showed that cell-free DNA levels were positively correlated with granulosa cell apoptosis and negatively correlated with embryo quality and pregnancy rates. High levels of cell-free DNA lead to increased ROS in granulosa cells and activated caspase through Fas/FasL that induced apoptosis. High levels of cell-free DNA triggers granulosa cell apoptosis and influences oocyte maturation embryo development and pregnancy rates in IVF treatments. Cell-free DNA can be as a secondary criteria and predictive marker for the quality control of IVF embryo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fractalkine expression induces endothelial progenitor cell lysis by natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilyana Todorova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circulating CD34(+ cells, a population that includes endothelial progenitors, participate in the maintenance of endothelial integrity. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate their survival is crucial to improve their regenerative activity in cardiovascular and renal diseases. Chemokine-receptor cross talk is critical in regulating cell homeostasis. We hypothesized that cell surface expression of the chemokine fractalkine (FKN could target progenitor cell injury by Natural Killer (NK cells, thereby limiting their availability for vascular repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that CD34(+-derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFC can express FKN in response to TNF-α and IFN-γ inflammatory cytokines and that FKN expression by ECFC stimulates NK cell adhesion, NK cell-mediated ECFC lysis and microparticles release in vitro. The specific involvement of membrane FKN in these processes was demonstrated using FKN-transfected ECFC and anti-FKN blocking antibody. FKN expression was also evidenced on circulating CD34(+ progenitor cells and was detected at higher frequency in kidney transplant recipients, when compared to healthy controls. The proportion of CD34(+ cells expressing FKN was identified as an independent variable inversely correlated to CD34(+ progenitor cell count. We further showed that treatment of CD34(+ circulating cells isolated from adult blood donors with transplant serum or TNF-α/IFN-γ can induce FKN expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our data highlights a novel mechanism by which FKN expression on CD34(+ progenitor cells may target their NK cell mediated killing and participate to their immune depletion in transplant recipients. Considering the numerous diseased contexts shown to promote FKN expression, our data identify FKN as a hallmark of altered progenitor cell homeostasis with potential implications in better evaluation of vascular repair in patients.

  8. Palbociclib-induced autophagy and senescence in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Claudio A; Vargas, Leandro; Martinez, Valentina; Bravo, Sindy; Brown, Nelson E

    2017-11-15

    Targeting cyclin D-CDK4/6 kinase complexes has recently been shown to increase the survival of breast cancer patients with estrogen receptor positive breast tumors. Based on these outcomes, CDK4/6 inhibitors are currently being tested, alone o in combination with other drugs, in the treatment of other malignancies characterized by hyper-activation of cyclin D-CDK4/6 complexes. Nonetheless, a better understanding of the cellular processes that are implemented in response to CDK4/6 inhibition is necessary to expand the therapeutic window and confront the development of drug resistance. Herein, we show that, similar to mammary cells, gastric cancer cells are sensitive to the CDK4/6 inhibitor Palbociclib. Inhibition of CDK4/6 in gastric cancer cells leads to the implementation of cellular senescence. However, whether or not this response is accompanied by induction of autophagy seems to depend on both the pRB and p53 status. In cells retaining expression of both tumor suppressive proteins (AGS gastric cancer cells), exposure to Palbociclib induces senescence and autophagy. However, the simultaneous blockade of CDK4/6 and autophagy in these cells exacerbates the senescence phenotype, an indication that autophagy in these experimental settings represents an adaptive mechanism that promotes cell survival rather than being an effector mechanism of senescence. Interestingly, knocking down p53 resulted in senescence reduction and autophagy blockade, the latter apparently involving a disruption of the degradation of autophagosome cargo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sulforaphane induces DNA single strand breaks in cultured human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sestili, Piero, E-mail: piero.sestili@uniurb.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Paolillo, Marco [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Lenzi, Monia [Dipartimento di Farmacologia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Colombo, Evelin; Vallorani, Luciana; Casadei, Lucia; Martinelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Fimognari, Carmela [Dipartimento di Farmacologia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-07-07

    Sulforaphane (SFR), an isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, possesses growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing activities in cancer cell lines. Recently, SFR has been shown to promote the mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human cancer cell lines. The present study was undertaken to see whether SFR-derived ROS might cause DNA damage in cultured human cells, namely T limphoblastoid Jurkat and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). 1-3 h treatments with 10-30 {mu}M SFR elicited intracellular ROS formation (as assayed with dihydrorhodamine, DHR, oxidation) as well as DNA breakage (as assessed with fast halo assay, FHA). These effects lacked cell-type specificity, since could be observed in both Jurkat and HUVEC. Differential-pH FHA analysis of damaged DNA showed that SFR causes frank DNA single strand breaks (SSBs); no DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were found within the considered treatment times (up to 3 h). SFR-derived ROS were formed at the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) level: indeed rotenone or myxothiazol (MRC Complex I and III inhibitors, respectively) abrogated ROS formation. Furthermore ROS were not formed in Jurkat cells pharmacologically depleted of respiring mitochondria (MRC-/Jurkat). Formation of ROS was causally linked to the induction of SSBs: indeed all the experimental conditions capable of preventing ROS formation also prevented the damage of nuclear DNA from SFR-intoxicated cells. As to the toxicological relevance of SSBs, we found that their prevention slightly but significantly attenuated SFR cytotoxicity, suggesting that high-dose SFR toxicity is the result of a complex series of events among which GSH depletion seems to play a pivotal role. In conclusion, the present study identifies a novel mechanism contributing to SFR toxicity which - since DNA damage is a prominent mechanism underlying the cytotoxic activity of established antineoplastic agents - might help to exploit the therapeutic value

  10. 4-phenylbutyrate Mitigates Fluoride-Induced Cytotoxicity in ALC Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Suzuki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fluoride over-exposure during pre-eruptive enamel development can cause dental fluorosis. Severe dental fluorosis is characterized by porous, soft enamel that is vulnerable to erosion and decay. The prevalence of dental fluorosis among the population in the USA, India and China is increasing. Other than avoiding excessive intake, treatments to prevent dental fluorosis remain unknown. We previously reported that high-dose fluoride induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and oxidative stress in ameloblasts. Cell stress induces gene repression, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. An aromatic fatty acid, 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA is a chemical chaperone that interacts with misfolded proteins to prevent ER stress. We hypothesized that 4PBA ameliorates fluoride-induced ER stress in ameloblasts. To determine whether 4PBA protects ameloblasts from fluoride toxicity, we analyzed gene expression of Tgf-β1, Bcl2/Bax ratio and cytochrome-c release in vitro. In vivo, we measured fluorosis levels, enamel hardness and fluoride concentration. Fluoride treated Ameloblast-lineage cells (ALC had decreased Tgf-β1 expression and this was reversed by 4PBA treatment. The anti-apoptotic Blc2/Bax ratio was significantly increased in ALC cells treated with fluoride/4PBA compared to fluoride treatment alone. Fluoride treatment induced cytochrome-c release from mitochondria into the cytosol and this was inhibited by 4PBA treatment. These results suggest that 4PBA mitigates fluoride-induced gene suppression, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage in vitro. In vivo, C57BL/6J mice were provided fluoridated water for six weeks with either fluoride free control-chow or 4PBA-containing chow (7 g/kg 4PBA. With few exceptions, enamel microhardness, fluorosis levels, and fluoride concentrations of bone and urine did not differ significantly between fluoride treated animals fed with control-chow or 4PBA-chow. Although 4PBA mitigated high-dose fluoride toxicity in vitro, a diet

  11. Generation and Characterization of Erythroid Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Hsin Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the imbalance in the supply and demand of red blood cells (RBCs, especially for alloimmunized patients or patients with rare blood phenotypes, extensive research has been done to generate therapeutic quantities of mature RBCs from hematopoietic stem cells of various sources, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, and cord blood. Since human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs can be maintained indefinitely in vitro, they represent potentially inexhaustible sources of donor-free RBCs. In contrast to other ex vivo stem-cell-derived cellular therapeutics, tumorigenesis is not a concern, as RBCs can be irradiated without marked adverse effects on in vivo function. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the recent publications relevant to the generation and characterization of hESC- and iPSC-derived erythroid cells and discuss challenges to be met before the eventual realization of clinical usage of these cells.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Like Cells Derived from Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Ameliorate Diabetic Polyneuropathy in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhito Himeno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although pathological involvements of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN have been reported, no dependable treatment of DPN has been achieved. Recent studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs ameliorate DPN. Here we demonstrate a differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs into MSC-like cells and investigate the therapeutic potential of the MSC-like cell transplantation on DPN. Research Design and Methods. For induction into MSC-like cells, GFP-expressing iPSCs were cultured with retinoic acid, followed by adherent culture for 4 months. The MSC-like cells, characterized with flow cytometry and RT-PCR analyses, were transplanted into muscles of streptozotocin-diabetic mice. Three weeks after the transplantation, neurophysiological functions were evaluated. Results. The MSC-like cells expressed MSC markers and angiogenic/neurotrophic factors. The transplanted cells resided in hindlimb muscles and peripheral nerves, and some transplanted cells expressed S100β in the nerves. Impairments of current perception thresholds, nerve conduction velocities, and plantar skin blood flow in the diabetic mice were ameliorated in limbs with the transplanted cells. The capillary number-to-muscle fiber ratios were increased in transplanted hindlimbs of diabetic mice. Conclusions. These results suggest that MSC-like cell transplantation might have therapeutic effects on DPN through secreting angiogenic/neurotrophic factors and differentiation to Schwann cell-like cells.

  13. Acute ethanol exposure inhibits silencing of cerebellar Golgi cell firing induced by granule cell axon input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo eBotta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Golgi cells (GoCs are specialized interneurons that provide inhibitory input to granule cells in the cerebellar cortex. GoCs are pacemaker neurons that spontaneously fire action potentials, triggering spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in granule cells and also contributing to the generation tonic GABAA receptor-mediated currents in granule cells. In turn, granule cell axons provide feedback glutamatergic input to GoCs. It has been shown that high frequency stimulation of granule cell axons induces a transient pause in GoC firing in a type 2-metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2-dependent manner. Here, we investigated the effect ethanol on the pause of GoC firing induced by high frequency stimulation of granule cell axons. GoC electrophysiological recordings were performed in parasagittal cerebellar vermis slices from postnatal day 23 to 26 rats. Loose-patch cell-attached recordings revealed that ethanol (40 mM reversibly decreases the pause duration. An antagonist of mGluR2 reduced the pause duration but did not affect the effect of ethanol. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings showed that currents evoked by an mGluR2 agonist were not significantly affected by ethanol. Perforated-patch experiments in which hyperpolarizing and depolarizing currents were injected into GoCs demonstrated that there is an inverse relationship between spontaneous firing and pause duration. Slight inhibition of the Na+/K+ pump mimicked the effect of ethanol on pause duration. In conclusion, ethanol reduces the granule cell axon-mediated feedback mechanism by reducing the input responsiveness of GoCs. This would result in a transient increase of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition of granule cells, limiting information flow at the input stage of the cerebellar cortex.

  14. Activation-induced cell death of dendritic cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eSchwiebs

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P is an immune modulatory lipid mediator and has been implicated in numerous pathophysiological processes. S1P is produced by sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1 and Sphk2. Dendritic cells (DCs are central for the direction of immune responses and crucially involved in autoimmunity and cancerogenesis. In this study we examined the function and survival of bone marrow-derived DCs under long-term inflammatory stimulation. We observed that differentiated cells undergo activation-induced cell death upon LPS stimulation with an increased metabolic activity shortly after stimulation, followed by a rapid activation of caspase 3 and subsequent augmented apoptosis. Importantly, we highlight a profound role of Sphk1 in secretion of inflammatory cytokines and survival of dendritic cells that might be mediated by a change in sphingolipid levels as well as by a change in STAT3 expression. Cell growth during differentiation of Sphk1-deficient cells treated with the functional S1P receptor antagonist FTYP was reduced. Importantly, in dendritic cells we did not observe a compensatory regulation of Sphk2 mRNA in Sphk1-deficient cells. Instead, we discovered a massive increase in Sphk1 mRNA concentration upon long-term stimulation with LPS in wild type cells that might function as an attempt to rescue from inflammation-caused cell death. Taken together, in this investigation we describe details of a crucial involvement of sphingolipids and Sphk1 in activation-induced cell death during long-term immunogenic activity of DCs that might play an important role in autoimmunity and might explain the differences in immune response observed in in vivo studies of Sphk1 modulation.

  15. Icarisid II inhibits the proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Xie, Mao; Jiang, Neng; Huang, Feifei; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Ruishan; Lu, Jingjing; Liao, Shijie; Liu, Yun

    2017-06-01

    Icarisid II, one of the main active components of Herba Epimedii extracts, shows potent antitumor activity in various cancer cell lines, including osteosarcoma cells. However, the anticancer mechanism of icarisid II against osteosarcoma U2OS needs further exploration. This study aims to investigate further antitumor effects of icarisid II on human osteosarcoma cells and elucidate the underlying mechanism. We cultivated human osteosarcoma USO2 cells in vitro using different concentrations of icarisid II (0-30 µM). Cell viability was detected at 24, 48, and 72 h using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide analysis. Cell cycle was tested by flow cytometry after treatment with icarisid II for 48 h. Annexin V-allophycocyanin and 7-aminoactinomycin D staining were conducted to detect cell apoptosis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay were performed to measure the levels of genes and proteins related to cell cycle and apoptosis. Results showed that icarisid II significantly inhibited the proliferation and induced apoptosis of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells. The half maximal inhibitory concentration values were 14.44, 11.02, and 7.37 µM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. Cell cycle was arrested in the G2/M phase in vitro. In addition, icarisid II upregulated the expression levels of P21 and CyclinB1 whereas downregulated the expression levels of CyclinD1, CDC2, and P-Cdc25C, which were related to cell cycle arrest in U2OS cells. The cell apoptotic rate increased in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with icarisid II for 48 h. Icarisid II induced apoptosis by upregulating Bax, downregulating Bcl-2, and activating apoptosis-related proteins, including cleaved caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. These data indicate that icarisid II exhibits an antiproliferation effect on human osteosarcoma cells and induces apoptosis by activating the caspase family in a time- and dose

  16. The involvement of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in eugenol-induced cell death in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei-Zhe; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Liao, Wei-Chuan; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Tseng, Hui-Wen; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2015-01-05

    Eugenol, a natural phenolic constituent of clove oil, has a wide range of applications in medicine as a local antiseptic and anesthetic. However, the effect of eugenol on human glioblastoma is unclear. This study examined whether eugenol elevated intracellular free Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i) and induced apoptosis in DBTRG-05MG human glioblastoma cells. Eugenol evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises which were reduced by removing extracellular Ca(2+). Eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises were not altered by store-operated Ca(2+) channel blockers but were inhibited by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and the transient receptor potential channel melastatin 8 (TRPM8) antagonist capsazepine. In Ca(2+)-free medium, pretreatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) or 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) abolished eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 significantly inhibited eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Eugenol killed cells which were not reversed by prechelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM). Eugenol induced apoptosis through increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, releasing cytochrome c and activating caspase-9/caspase-3. Together, in DBTRG-05MG cells, eugenol evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises by inducing PLC-dependent release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum and caused Ca(2+) influx possibly through TRPM8 or PKC-sensitive channels. Furthermore, eugenol induced the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cobalt chloride treatment induces autophagic apoptosis in human glioma cells via a p53-dependent pathway.

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    Cheng, Bor-Chin; Chen, Jui-Tai; Yang, Shun-Tai; Chio, Chung-Ching; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Malignant glioma is the most aggressive brain tumor. Hypoxic condition has been explored for killing cancer stem cells or drug-resistant tumor cells. This study investigated the effects of hypoxia on autophagic death and the possible mechanisms. Exposure of human malignant glioma U87-MG cells to cobalt chloride (CoCl2) increased cellular hypoxia-inducible factor-1α levels and concurrently decreased cell viability concentration- and time-dependently. In parallel, treatment with CoCl2 suppressed proliferation of human U87-MG cells. Autophagic cells and levels of LC3-II were concentration- and time-dependently induced in human U87-MG cells after exposure to CoCl2. However, pretreatment with 3-mehyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine, inhibitors of cell autophagy, caused significant alleviations in CoCl2-induced cell autophagy. In contrast, exposure to rapamycin, an inducer of cell autophagy, synergistically induced hypoxia-induced autophagy of U87-MG cells. Administration of human U87-MG cells with CoCl2 triggered caspase-3 activation and cell apoptosis. Interestingly, pretreatment with 3-MA and chloroquine remarkably suppressed CoCl2-induced caspase-3 activation and cell apoptosis. Application of p53 small interference (si)RNA into human U87-MG cells downregulated levels of this protein and simultaneously lowered hypoxia- and 3-MA-induced alterations in cell autophagy, apoptosis, and death. The hypoxia-induced autophagy and apoptosis of DBTRG-05MG cells were significantly lowered by 3-MA pretreatment and p53 knockdown. Therefore, the present study shows that CoCl2 treatment can induce autophagy of human glioma cells and subsequent autophagic apoptosis via a p53-dependent pathway. Hypoxia-induced autophagic apoptosis may be applied as a therapeutic strategy for treatment of glioma patients.

  18. Cannabidiol rather than Cannabis sativa extracts inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhele, Sindiswa T; Motadi, Lesetja R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer remains a global health related issue among females of Sub-Saharan Africa, with over half a million new cases reported each year. Different therapeutic regimens have been suggested in various regions of Africa, however, over a quarter of a million women die of cervical cancer, annually. This makes it the most lethal cancer amongst black women and calls for urgent therapeutic strategies. In this study we compare the anti-proliferative effects of crude extract of Cannabis sativa and its main compound cannabidiol on different cervical cancer cell lines. To achieve our aim, phytochemical screening, MTT assay, cell growth analysis, flow cytometry, morphology analysis, Western blot, caspase 3/7 assay, and ATP measurement assay were conducted. Results obtained indicate that both cannabidiol and Cannabis sativa extracts were able to halt cell proliferation in all cell lines at varying concentrations. They further revealed that apoptosis was induced by cannabidiol as shown by increased subG0/G1 and apoptosis through annexin V. Apoptosis was confirmed by overexpression of p53, caspase 3 and bax. Apoptosis induction was further confirmed by morphological changes, an increase in Caspase 3/7 and a decrease in the ATP levels. In conclusion, these data suggest that cannabidiol rather than Cannabis sativa crude extracts prevent cell growth and induce cell death in cervical cancer cell lines.

  19. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

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    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  20. PKC activation induces inflammatory response and cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

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    Hyunhee Kim

    Full Text Available A variety of airborne pathogens can induce inflammatory responses in airway epithelial cells, which is a crucial component of host defence. However, excessive inflammatory responses and chronic inflammation also contribute to different diseases of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that the activation of protein kinase C (PKC is one of the essential mechanisms of inflammatory response in airway epithelial cells. In the present study, we stimulated human bronchial lung epithelial (BEAS-2B cells with the phorbol ester Phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu, and examined gene expression profile using microarrays. Microarray analysis suggests that PKC activation induced dramatic changes in gene expression related to multiple cellular functions. The top two interaction networks generated from these changes were centered on NFκB and TNF-α, which are two commonly known pathways for cell death and inflammation. Subsequent tests confirmed the decrease in cell viability and an increase in the production of various cytokines. Interestingly, each of the increased cytokines was differentially regulated at mRNA and/or protein levels by different sub-classes of PKC isozymes. We conclude that pathological cell death and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells in various situations may be mediated through PKC related signaling pathways. These findings suggest that PKCs can be new targets for treatment of lung diseases.

  1. Nanotopography Promotes Pancreatic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Cha, Kyoung Je; Han, Jiyou; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-03-22

    Although previous studies suggest that nanotopographical features influence properties and behaviors of stem cells, only a few studies have attempted to derive clinically useful somatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells using nanopatterned surfaces. In the present study, we report that polystyrene nanopore-patterned surfaces significantly promote the pancreatic differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. We compared different diameters of nanopores and showed that 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces highly upregulated the expression of PDX1, a critical transcription factor for pancreatic development, leading to an approximately 3-fold increase in the percentage of differentiating PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitors compared with control flat surfaces. Furthermore, in the presence of biochemical factors, 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces profoundly enhanced the derivation of pancreatic endocrine cells producing insulin, glucagon, or somatostatin. We also demonstrate that nanopore-patterned surface-induced upregulation of PDX1 is associated with downregulation of TAZ, suggesting the potential role of TAZ in nanopore-patterned surface-mediated mechanotransduction. Our study suggests that appropriate cytokine treatments combined with nanotopographical stimulation could be a powerful tool for deriving a high purity of desired cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

  2. Glioblastoma cell-secreted interleukin-8 induces brain endothelial cell permeability via CXCR2.

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    Julie Dwyer

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma constitutes the most aggressive and deadly of brain tumors. As yet, both conventional and molecular-based therapies have met with limited success in treatment of this cancer. Among other explanations, the heterogeneity of glioblastoma and the associated microenvironment contribute to its development, as well as resistance and recurrence in response to treatments. Increased vascularity suggests that tumor angiogenesis plays an important role in glioblastoma progression. However, the molecular crosstalk between endothelial and glioblastoma cells requires further investigation. To examine the effects of glioblastoma-derived signals on endothelial homeostasis, glioblastoma cell secretions were collected and used to treat brain endothelial cells. Here, we present evidence that the glioblastoma secretome provides pro-angiogenic signals sufficient to disrupt VE-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions and promote endothelial permeability in brain microvascular endothelial cells. An unbiased angiogenesis-specific antibody array screen identified the chemokine, interleukin-8, which was further demonstrated to function as a key factor involved in glioblastoma-induced permeability, mediated through its receptor CXCR2 on brain endothelia. This underappreciated interface between glioblastoma cells and associated endothelium may inspire the development of novel therapeutic strategies to induce tumor regression by preventing vascular permeability and inhibiting angiogenesis.

  3. Dying cells protect survivors from radiation-induced cell death in Drosophila.

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    Amber Bilak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a phenomenon wherein induction of cell death by a variety of means in wing imaginal discs of Drosophila larvae resulted in the activation of an anti-apoptotic microRNA, bantam. Cells in the vicinity of dying cells also become harder to kill by ionizing radiation (IR-induced apoptosis. Both ban activation and increased protection from IR required receptor tyrosine kinase Tie, which we identified in a genetic screen for modifiers of ban. tie mutants were hypersensitive to radiation, and radiation sensitivity of tie mutants was rescued by increased ban gene dosage. We propose that dying cells activate ban in surviving cells through Tie to make the latter cells harder to kill, thereby preserving tissues and ensuring organism survival. The protective effect we report differs from classical radiation bystander effect in which neighbors of irradiated cells become more prone to death. The protective effect also differs from the previously described effect of dying cells that results in proliferation of nearby cells in Drosophila larval discs. If conserved in mammals, a phenomenon in which dying cells make the rest harder to kill by IR could have implications for treatments that involve the sequential use of cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy.

  4. Human metapneumovirus Induces Reorganization of the Actin Cytoskeleton for Direct Cell-to-Cell Spread.

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    Farah El Najjar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Paramyxovirus spread generally involves assembly of individual viral particles which then infect target cells. We show that infection of human bronchial airway cells with human metapneumovirus (HMPV, a recently identified paramyxovirus which causes significant respiratory disease, results in formation of intercellular extensions and extensive networks of branched cell-associated filaments. Formation of these structures is dependent on actin, but not microtubule, polymerization. Interestingly, using a co-culture assay we show that conditions which block regular infection by HMPV particles, including addition of neutralizing antibodies or removal of cell surface heparan sulfate, did not prevent viral spread from infected to new target cells. In contrast, inhibition of actin polymerization or alterations to Rho GTPase signaling pathways significantly decreased cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, viral proteins and viral RNA were detected in intercellular extensions, suggesting direct transfer of viral genetic material to new target cells. While roles for paramyxovirus matrix and fusion proteins in membrane deformation have been previously demonstrated, we show that the HMPV phosphoprotein extensively co-localized with actin and induced formation of cellular extensions when transiently expressed, supporting a new model in which a paramyxovirus phosphoprotein is a key player in assembly and spread. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for HMPV direct cell-to-cell spread and provide insights into dissemination of respiratory viruses.

  5. Alginate-matrigel microencapsulated schwann cells for inducible secretion of glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Roche C; Ereifej, Evon S; Broadrick, Kristy M; Rogers, Richard A; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2008-10-01

    Controlled expression of glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf) can be integrated in the development of a system for repair of injured peripheral nerves. This delivery strategy was demonstrated via inducible Gdnf from microencapsulated cells in barium alginate. The Schwann cell line RT4-D6P2T was initially modified utilizing an ecdysone-based stable transfection system to produce RT4-Gdnf cells. During construct preparation, it was found that C6 cells (where Gdnf cDNA was isolated) make three Gdnf transcript variants. Additionally, the importance of 5' untranslated region to drive biologically-functional Gdnf synthesis was shown. Encapsulation of RT4-Gdnf in 1% alginate was then performed. It was determined that cells were able to survive at least 1 month in vitro using starting densities of 20, 200 and 2000 cells/capsule and barium ion concentrations of 10, 50, 100 and 200 mM. Most importantly, encapsulated cells secreted exogenous Gdnf upon ponasterone A induction. Mixture of basement membrane extract Matrigel to alginate promoted increased proliferation, cell spreading and Gdnf release. Finally, compression tests showed that cell-loaded microcapsules fractured at 75% diameter compression with 38 kPa of stress. Regulated Gdnf release from these microcapsules in vivo may potentially aid in the regeneration of damaged nerves.

  6. Mesenchymal cell interaction with ovarian cancer cells induces a background dependent pro-metastatic transcriptomic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Raphael; Touboul, Cyril; Halabi, Najeeb M; Madduri, Abishek Sainath; Querleu, Denis; Mezey, Jason; Malek, Joel A; Suhre, Karsten; Rafii, Arash

    2014-03-05

    The cross talk between the stroma and cancer cells plays a major role in phenotypic modulation. During peritoneal carcinomatosis ovarian cancer cells interact with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) resulting in increased metastatic ability. Understanding the transcriptomic changes underlying the phenotypic modulation will allow identification of key genes to target. However in the context of personalized medicine we must consider inter and intra tumoral heterogeneity. In this study we used a pathway-based approach to illustrate the role of cell line background in transcriptomic modification during a cross talk with MSC. We used two ovarian cancer cell lines as a surrogate for different ovarian cancer subtypes: OVCAR3 for an epithelial and SKOV3 for a mesenchymal subtype. We co-cultured them with MSCs. Genome wide gene expression was determined after cell sorting. Ingenuity pathway analysis was used to decipher the cell specific transcriptomic changes related to different pro-metastatic traits (Adherence, migration, invasion, proliferation and chemoresistance). We demonstrate that co-culture of ovarian cancer cells in direct cellular contact with MSCs induces broad transcriptomic changes related to enhance metastatic ability. Genes related to cellular adhesion, invasion, migration, proliferation and chemoresistance were enriched under these experimental conditions. Network analysis of differentially expressed genes clearly shows a cell type specific pattern. The contact with the mesenchymal niche increase metastatic initiation and expansion through cancer cells' transcriptome modification dependent of the cellular subtype. Personalized medicine strategy might benefit from network analysis revealing the subtype specific nodes to target to disrupt acquired pro-metastatic profile.

  7. Genistein inhibits cell invasion and motility by inducing cell differentiation in murine osteosarcoma cell line LM8

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    Nakamura Atsushi

    2012-09-01

    . Treatment of LM8 cells with genistein induced morphological changes, markedly decreased the formation of multilayer masses of cells, and markedly increased the expression of osteocalcin mRNA. Conclusions Genistein decreased invasive and motile potential by inducing cell differentiation in LM8 cells. Genistein may be useful as an anti-metastatic drug for osteosarcoma through its differentiation-inducing effects.

  8. Induced pluripotent stem cell models of lysosomal storage disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borger, Daniel K.; McMahon, Benjamin; Roshan Lal, Tamanna; Serra-Vinardell, Jenny; Aflaki, Elma

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have provided new opportunities to explore the cell biology and pathophysiology of human diseases, and the lysosomal storage disorder research community has been quick to adopt this technology. Patient-derived iPSC models have been generated for a number of lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher disease, Pompe disease, Fabry disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, Niemann-Pick types A and C1, and several of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Here, we review the strategies employed for reprogramming and differentiation, as well as insights into disease etiology gleaned from the currently available models. Examples are provided to illustrate how iPSC-derived models can be employed to develop new therapeutic strategies for these disorders. We also discuss how models of these rare diseases could contribute to an enhanced understanding of more common neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, and discuss key challenges and opportunities in this area of research. PMID:28592657

  9. Induced pluripotent stem cell models of lysosomal storage disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K. Borger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have provided new opportunities to explore the cell biology and pathophysiology of human diseases, and the lysosomal storage disorder research community has been quick to adopt this technology. Patient-derived iPSC models have been generated for a number of lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher disease, Pompe disease, Fabry disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, Niemann-Pick types A and C1, and several of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Here, we review the strategies employed for reprogramming and differentiation, as well as insights into disease etiology gleaned from the currently available models. Examples are provided to illustrate how iPSC-derived models can be employed to develop new therapeutic strategies for these disorders. We also discuss how models of these rare diseases could contribute to an enhanced understanding of more common neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, and discuss key challenges and opportunities in this area of research.

  10. Cinnamaldehyde induces fat cell-autonomous thermogenesis and metabolic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Juan; Emont, Margo P; Jun, Heejin; Qiao, Xiaona; Liao, Jiling; Kim, Dong-Il; Wu, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA) is a food compound that has previously been observed to be protective against obesity and hyperglycemia in mouse models. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms behind this protective effect by assessing the cell-autonomous response of primary adipocytes to CA treatment. Primary murine adipocytes were treated with CA and thermogenic and metabolic responses were assessed after both acute and chronic treatments. Human adipose stem cells were differentiated and treated with CA to assess whether the CA-mediated signaling is conserved in humans. CA significantly activated PKA signaling, increased expression levels of thermogenic genes and induced phosphorylation of HSL and PLIN1 in murine primary adipocytes. Inhibition of PKA or p38 MAPK enzymatic activity markedly inhibited the CA-induced thermogenic response. In addition, chronic CA treatment regulates metabolic reprogramming, which was partially diminished in FGF21KO adipocytes. Importantly, both acute and chronic effects of CA were observed in human adipose stem cells isolated from multiple donors of different ethnicities and ages and with a variety of body mass indexes (BMI). CA activates thermogenic and metabolic responses in mouse and human primary subcutaneous adipocytes in a cell-autonomous manner, giving a mechanistic explanation for the anti-obesity effects of CA observed previously and further supporting its potential metabolic benefits on humans. Given the wide usage of cinnamon in the food industry, the notion that this popular food additive, instead of a drug, may activate thermogenesis, could ultimately lead to therapeutic strategies against obesity that are much better adhered to by participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Calcium handling in human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes.

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    Ilanit Itzhaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to establish human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs by reprogramming of adult fibroblasts and to coax their differentiation into cardiomyocytes opens unique opportunities for cardiovascular regenerative and personalized medicine. In the current study, we investigated the Ca(2+-handling properties of hiPSCs derived-cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry experiments identified the expression of key Ca(2+-handling proteins. Detailed laser confocal Ca(2+ imaging demonstrated spontaneous whole-cell [Ca(2+](i transients. These transients required Ca(2+ influx via L-type Ca(2+ channels, as demonstrated by their elimination in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+ or by administration of the L-type Ca(2+ channel blocker nifedipine. The presence of a functional ryanodine receptor (RyR-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+ store, contributing to [Ca(2+](i transients, was established by application of caffeine (triggering a rapid increase in cytosolic Ca(2+ and ryanodine (decreasing [Ca(2+](i. Similarly, the importance of Ca(2+ reuptake into the SR via the SR Ca(2+ ATPase (SERCA pump was demonstrated by the inhibiting effect of its blocker (thapsigargin, which led to [Ca(2+](i transients elimination. Finally, the presence of an IP3-releasable Ca(2+ pool in hiPSC-CMs and its contribution to whole-cell [Ca(2+](i transients was demonstrated by the inhibitory effects induced by the IP3-receptor blocker 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB and the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study establishes the presence of a functional, SERCA-sequestering, RyR-mediated SR Ca(2+ store in hiPSC-CMs. Furthermore, it demonstrates the dependency of whole-cell [Ca(2+](i transients in hiPSC-CMs on both sarcolemmal Ca(2+ entry via L-type Ca(2+ channels and intracellular store Ca(2+ release.

  12. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayoubi, Sohrab; Sheikh, Søren P; Eskildsen, Tilde V

    2017-01-01

    . To this end, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have generated great enthusiasm, and have been a driving force for development of novel strategies in drug discovery and regenerative cell-therapy for the last decade. Hence, investigating the mechanisms underlying the differentiation of hi......PSCs into specialized cell types such as cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) may lead to a better understanding of developmental cardiovascular processes and potentiate progress of safe autologous regenerative therapies in pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize......Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death worldwide and current treatment strategies have limited effect of disease progression. It would be desirable to have better models to study developmental and pathological processes and model vascular diseases in laboratory settings...

  13. Exploiting Cell Death Pathways for Inducible Cell Elimination to Modulate Graft-versus-Host-Disease

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    Corey Falcon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potent form of immunotherapy, potentially life-saving for many malignant hematologic diseases. However, donor lymphocytes infused with the graft while exerting a graft versus malignancy effect can also cause potentially fatal graft versus host disease (GVHD. Our group has previously validated the inducible caspase-9 suicide gene in the haploidentical stem cell transplant setting, which proved successful in reversing signs and symptoms of GVHD within hours, using a non-therapeutic dimerizing agent. Cellular death pathways such as apoptosis and necroptosis are important processes in maintaining healthy cellular homeostasis within the human body. Here, we review two of the most widely investigated cell death pathways active in T-cells (apoptosis and necroptosis, as well as the emerging strategies that can be exploited for the safety of T-cell therapies. Furthermore, such strategies could be exploited for the safety of other cellular therapeutics as well.

  14. Parthenolide Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Human 5637 Bladder Cancer Cells In Vitro

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    Guang Cheng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Parthenolide, the principal component of sesquiterpene lactones present in medical plants such as feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium, has been reported to have anti-tumor activity. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of parthenolide against bladder cancer and its mechanism of action. Treatment of bladder cancer cells with parthenolide resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability. Parthenolide induced apoptosis through the modulation of Bcl-2 family proteins and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase degradation. Treatment with parthenolide led to G1 phase cell cycle arrest in 5637 cells by modulation of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated cyclin-dependent kinase 2. Parthenolide also inhibited the invasive ability of bladder cancer cells. These findings suggest that parthenolide could be a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of bladder cancer.

  15. Exploiting Cell Death Pathways for Inducible Cell Elimination to Modulate Graft-versus-Host-Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Corey; Al-Obaidi, Mustafa; Di Stasi, Antonio

    2017-06-14

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potent form of immunotherapy, potentially life-saving for many malignant hematologic diseases. However, donor lymphocytes infused with the graft while exerting a graft versus malignancy effect can also cause potentially fatal graft versus host disease (GVHD). Our group has previously validated the inducible caspase-9 suicide gene in the haploidentical stem cell transplant setting, which proved successful in reversing signs and symptoms of GVHD within hours, using a non-therapeutic dimerizing agent. Cellular death pathways such as apoptosis and necroptosis are important processes in maintaining healthy cellular homeostasis within the human body. Here, we review two of the most widely investigated cell death pathways active in T-cells (apoptosis and necroptosis), as well as the emerging strategies that can be exploited for the safety of T-cell therapies. Furthermore, such strategies could be exploited for the safety of other cellular therapeutics as well.

  16. Virus-induced non-specific signals cause cell cycle progression of primed CD8(+) T cells but do not induce cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Andreasen, Susanne; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O

    1999-01-01

    inducer poly(I:C), proliferation of memory (CD44(hi)) CD8(+) T cells but no phenotypic or functional activation was observed. Following injection of an unrelated virus [vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)], naive TCR transgenic cells did not become significantly activated with respect to any...... of the parameters investigated. In contrast, memory TCR transgenic cells were found to proliferate extensively early after VSV infection (day 0-3), whereas limited proliferation was observed later (day 3-6) when proliferation of non-transgenic CD8(+) T cells is maximal. This aborted response did not result from...... anergy to TCR stimulation, as memory TCR transgenic cells proliferated vigorously upon stimulation with their nominal peptide. Despite the massive proliferation of memory cells observed early after VSV infection, no phenotypic or functional activation was observed. Together these findings indicate...

  17. Apoptotic Cell Death Induced by Resveratrol Is Partially Mediated by the Autophagy Pathway in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells.

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    Fangfang Lang

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (trans-3,4,5'-trihydroxystilbene is an active compound in food, such as red grapes, peanuts, and berries. Resveratrol exhibits an anticancer effect on various human cancer cells. However, the mechanism of resveratrol-induced anti-cancer effect at the molecular level remains to be elucidated. In this study, the mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effect of resveratrol in human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3 and Caov-3 was investigated using various molecular biology techniques, such as flow cytometry, western blotting, and RNA interference, with a major focus on the potential role of autophagy in resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. We demonstrated that resveratrol induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, which triggers autophagy and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Resveratrol induced ATG5 expression and promoted LC3 cleavage. The apoptotic cell death induced by resveratrol was attenuated by both pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine, which functions at the late stage of autophagy, significantly reduced resveratrol-induced cell death and caspase 3 activity in human ovarian cancer cells. We also demonstrated that targeting ATG5 by siRNA also suppressed resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. Thus, we concluded that a common pathway between autophagy and apoptosis exists in resveratrol-induced cell death in OVCAR-3 human ovarian cancer cells.

  18. Inhibition of the autophagy flux by gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced tumor cell death.

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    Nazim, Uddin Md; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a primary anticancer agent and a member of the tumor necrosis factor family that selectively induces apoptosis in various tumor cells, but not in normal cells. Gingerol is a major ginger component with anti-inflammatory and anti‑tumorigenic activities. Autophagy flux is the complete process of autophagy, in which the autophagosomes are lysed by lysosomes. The role of autophagy in cell death or cell survival is controversial. A549 adenocarcinoma cells are TRAIL-resistant. In the present study, we showed that treatment with TRAIL slightly induced cell death, but gingerol treatment enhanced the TRAIL-induced cell death in human lung cancer cells. The combination of gingerol and TRAIL increased accumulation of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II and p62, confirming the inhibited autophagy flux. Collectively, our results suggest that gingerol sensitizes human lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the autophagy flux.

  19. IL-4 Induces Cholinergic Differentiation of Retinal Cells In Vitro.

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    Granja, Marcelo Gomes; Braga, Luis Eduardo Gomes; Carpi-Santos, Raul; de Araujo-Martins, Leandro; Nunes-Tavares, Nilson; Calaza, Karin C; Dos Santos, Aline Araujo; Giestal-de-Araujo, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is a pleiotropic cytokine that regulates several phenomena, among them survival and differentiation of neuronal and glial cells. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of IL-4 on the cholinergic differentiation of neonatal rat retinal cells in vitro, evaluating its effect on the levels of cholinergic markers (CHT1-high-affinity choline transporter; VAChT-vesicular acetylcholine transporter, ChAT-choline acetyltransferase, AChE-acetylcholinesterase), muscarinic receptors, and on the signaling pathways involved. Lister Hooded rat pups were used in postnatal days 0-2 (P0-P2). Our results show that IL-4 treatment (50 U/mL) for 48 h increases the levels of the cholinergic transporters VAChT and CHT1, the acetylcholinesterase activity, and the number of ChAT-positive cells. It also induces changes in muscarinic receptor levels, leading to a small decrease in M1 levels and a significant increase in M3 and M5 levels after 48 h of treatment. We also showed that IL-4 effect on M3 receptors is dependent on type I IL-4 receptor and on an increase in NFκB phosphorylation. These results indicate that IL-4 stimulates cholinergic differentiation of retinal cells.

  20. MicroRNAs in Hyperglycemia Induced Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

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    Maskomani Silambarasan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia is closely associated with prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Hyperglycemia increases the risk of vascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, peripheral vascular disease and cerebro/cardiovascular diseases. Under hyperglycemic conditions, the endothelial cells become dysfunctional. In this study, we investigated the miRNA expression changes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to different glucose concentrations (5, 10, 25 and 40 mM glucose and at various time intervals (6, 12, 24 and 48 h. miRNA microarray analyses showed that there is a correlation between hyperglycemia induced endothelial dysfunction and miRNA expression. In silico pathways analyses on the altered miRNA expression showed that the majority of the affected biological pathways appeared to be associated to endothelial cell dysfunction and apoptosis. We found the expression of ten miRNAs (miR-26a-5p, -26b-5p, 29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -140-5p, -192-5p, -221-3p and -320a to increase gradually with increasing concentration of glucose. These miRNAs were also found to be involved in endothelial dysfunction. At least seven of them, miR-29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -221-3p, -320a and -192-5p, can be correlated to endothelial cell apoptosis.

  1. Transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived renal stem cells improved acute kidney injury.

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    Li, Qing; Tian, Shou-Fu; Guo, Ye; Niu, Xin; Hu, Bin; Guo, Shang-Chun; Wang, Nian-Song; Wang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a severe disease with high morbidity and mortality. Methods that promote repair of the injured kidney have been extensively investigated. Cell-based therapy with mesenchymal stem cells or renal progenitor cells (RPCs) resident in the kidney has appeared to be an effective strategy for the treatment of AKI. Embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are also utilized for AKI recovery. However, the therapeutic effect of iPSC-derived RPCs for AKI has yet to be determined. In this study, we induced iPSCs differentiation into RPCs using a nephrogenic cocktail of factors combined with the renal epithelial cell growth medium. We then established the rat ischemia-reperfusion injury (IR) model and transplanted the iPSC-derived RPCs into the injured rats in combination with the hydrogel. Next, we examined the renal function-related markers and renal histology to assess the therapeutic effect of the injected cells. Moreover, we investigated the mechanism by which iPSC-derived RPCs affect AKI caused by IR. We showed that the differentiation efficiency of iPSCs to RPCs increased when cultured with renal epithelial cell growth medium after stimulation with a nephrogenic cocktail of factors. The transplantation of iPSC-derived RPCs decreased the levels of biomarkers indicative of renal injury and attenuated the necrosis and apoptosis of renal tissues, but resulted in the up-regulation of renal tubules formation, cell proliferation, and the expression of pro-renal factors. Our results revealed that iPSC-derived RPCs can protect AKI rat from renal function impairment and severe tubular injury by up-regulating the renal tubules formation, promoting cell proliferation, reducing apoptosis, and regulating the microenvironment in the injured kidney.

  2. Titanium dioxide particle – induced goblet cell hyperplasia : association with mast cells and IL-13

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    Kim Soo-Ho

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhalation of particles aggravates respiratory symptoms including mucus hypersecretion in patients with chronic airway disease and induces goblet cell hyperplasia (GCH in experimental animal models. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Methods To understand this, the numbers of goblet cells, Muc5ac (+ expressing epithelial cells and IL-13 expressing mast cells were measured in the trachea of sham or TiO2 particles – treated rats using periodic acid-Schiff, toluidine blue and immunohistochemical staining. RT-PCR for Muc-1, 2 and 5ac gene transcripts was done using RNA extracted from the trachea. Differential cell count and IL-13 levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. In pretreatment groups, cyclophosphamide (CPA or dexamethasone (DEX was given before instillation of TiO2. TiO2 treatment markedly increased Muc5ac mRNA expression, and Muc5ac (+ or PAS (+ epithelial cells 48 h following treatment. Results The concentration of IL-13 in BAL fluids was higher in TiO2 treated – rats when compared to those in sham rats (p 2 treated – rats (p 0.05. In contrast, pretreatment with dexamethasone (DEX diminished the percentage of PAS (+ cells and the levels of IL-13 (p 2 treatment increased the IL-13 (+ mast cells (p 0.05. In addition there were significant correlations of IL-13 (+ rate of mast cells in the trachea with IL-13 concentration in BAL fluid (p 2 treated rats (p Conclusion In conclusion, TiO2 instillation induces GCH and Muc5ac expression, and this process may be associated with increased production of IL-13 by mast cells.

  3. Antiproliferative and cell apoptosis-inducing activities of compounds from Buddleja davidii in Mgc-803 cells.

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    Wu, Jian; Yi, Wenshi; Jin, Linhong; Hu, Deyu; Song, Baoan

    2012-08-31

    Buddleja davidii is widely distributed in the southwestern region of China. We have undertaken a systematic analysis of B. davidii as a Chinese traditional medicine with anticancer activity by isolating natural products for their activity against the human gastric cancer cell line Mgc-803 and the human breast cancer cell line Bcap-37. Ten compounds were extracted and isolated from B. davidii, among which colchicine was identified in B. davidii for the first time. The inhibitory activities of these compounds were investigated in Mgc-803, Bcap-37 cells in vitro by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, and the results showed that luteolin and colchicine had potent inhibitory activities against the growth of Mgc-803 cells. Subsequent fluorescence staining and flow cytometry analysis indicated that these two compounds could induce apoptosis in Mgc-803 cells. The results also showed that the percentages of early apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI-, where PI is propidium iodide) and late apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI+) increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. After 36 h of incubation with luteolin at 20 μM, the percentages of cells were approximately 15.4% in early apoptosis and 43.7% in late apoptosis; after 36 h of incubation with colchicine at 20 μM, the corresponding values were 7.7% and 35.2%, respectively. Colchicine and luteolin from B. davidii have potential applications as adjuvant therapies for treating human carcinoma cells. These compounds could also induce apoptosis in tumor cells.

  4. Antiproliferative and cell apoptosis-inducing activities of compounds from Buddleja davidii in Mgc-803 cells

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    Wu Jian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Buddleja davidii is widely distributed in the southwestern region of China. We have undertaken a systematic analysis of B. davidii as a Chinese traditional medicine with anticancer activity by isolating natural products for their activity against the human gastric cancer cell line Mgc-803 and the human breast cancer cell line Bcap-37. Results Ten compounds were extracted and isolated from B. davidii, among which colchicine was identified in B. davidii for the first time. The inhibitory activities of these compounds were investigated in Mgc-803, Bcap-37 cells in vitro by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, and the results showed that luteolin and colchicine had potent inhibitory activities against the growth of Mgc-803 cells. Subsequent fluorescence staining and flow cytometry analysis indicated that these two compounds could induce apoptosis in Mgc-803 cells. The results also showed that the percentages of early apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI-, where PI is propidium iodide and late apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI+ increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. After 36 h of incubation with luteolin at 20 μM, the percentages of cells were approximately 15.4% in early apoptosis and 43.7% in late apoptosis; after 36 h of incubation with colchicine at 20 μM, the corresponding values were 7.7% and 35.2%, respectively. Conclusions Colchicine and luteolin from B. davidii have potential applications as adjuvant therapies for treating human carcinoma cells. These compounds could also induce apoptosis in tumor cells.

  5. Extinction of Learned Fear Induces Hippocampal Place Cell Remapping.

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    Wang, Melissa E; Yuan, Robin K; Keinath, Alexander T; Ramos Álvarez, Manuel M; Muzzio, Isabel A

    2015-06-17

    The extinction of learned fear is a hippocampus-dependent process thought to embody new learning rather than erasure of the original fear memory, although it is unknown how these competing contextual memories are represented in the hippocampus. We previously demonstrated that contextual fear conditioning results in hippocampal place cell remapping and long-term stabilization of novel representations. Here we report that extinction learning also induces place cell remapping in C57BL/6 mice. Specifically, we observed cells that preferentially remapped during different stages of learning. While some cells remapped in both fear conditioning and extinction, others responded predominantly during extinction, which may serve to modify previous representations as well as encode new safe associations. Additionally, we found cells that remapped primarily during fear conditioning, which could facilitate reacquisition of the original fear association. Moreover, we also observed cells that were stable throughout learning, which may serve to encode the static aspects of the environment. The short-term remapping observed during extinction was not found in animals that did not undergo fear conditioning, or when extinction was conducted outside of the conditioning context. Finally, conditioning and extinction produced an increase in spike phase locking to the theta and gamma frequencies. However, the degree of remapping seen during conditioning and extinction only correlated with gamma synchronization. Our results suggest that the extinction learning is a complex process that involves both modification of pre-existing memories and formation of new ones, and these traces coexist within the same hippocampal representation. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/359122-15$15.00/0.

  6. A Lectin from the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Has a Highly Novel Primary Structure and Induces Glycan-mediated Cytotoxicity of Globotriaosylceramide-expressing Lymphoma Cells*

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    Fujii, Yuki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Takio, Koji; Kawsar, Sarkar M. A.; Matsumoto, Ryo; Hasan, Imtiaj; Koide, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A.; Yasumitsu, Hidetaro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Sugawara, Shigeki; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A novel lectin structure was found for a 17-kDa α-d-galactose-binding lectin (termed “MytiLec”) isolated from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis. The complete primary structure of the lectin was determined by Edman degradation and mass spectrometric analysis. MytiLec was found to consist of 149 amino acids with a total molecular mass of 16,812.59 Da by Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, in good agreement with the calculated value of 16,823.22 Da. MytiLec had an N terminus of acetylthreonine and a primary structure that was highly novel in comparison with those of all known lectins in the structure database. The polypeptide structure consisted of three tandem-repeat domains of ∼50 amino acids each having 45–52% homology with each other. Frontal affinity chromatography technology indicated that MytiLec bound specifically to globotriose (Gb3; Galα1–4Galβ1–4Glc), the epitope of globotriaosylceramide. MytiLec showed a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect on human Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells (which have high surface expression of Gb3) but had no such effect on erythroleukemia K562 cells (which do not express Gb3). The cytotoxic effect of MytiLec was specifically blocked by the co-presence of an α-galactoside. MytiLec treatment of Raji cells caused increased binding of anti-annexin V antibody and incorporation of propidium iodide, which are indicators of cell membrane inversion and perforation. MytiLec is the first reported lectin having a primary structure with the highly novel triple tandem-repeat domain and showing transduction of apoptotic signaling against Burkitt lymphoma cells by interaction with a glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomain containing Gb3. PMID:23093409

  7. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

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    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae-Hoon [Division of Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seongman [Division of Life Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Bin, E-mail: yblim@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  8. ArtinM Mediates Murine T Cell Activation and Induces Cell Death in Jurkat Human Leukemic T Cells.

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    da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Oliveira-Brito, Patrícia Kellen Martins; Gonçalves, Thiago Eleutério; Vendruscolo, Patrícia Edivânia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2017-06-30

    The recognition of cell surface glycans by lectins may be critical for the innate and adaptive immune responses. ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus , activates antigen-presenting cells by recognizing TLR2 N -glycans and induces Th1 immunity. We recently demonstrated that ArtinM stimulated CD4⁺ T cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we further studied the effects of ArtinM on adaptive immune cells. We showed that ArtinM activates murine CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells, augmenting their positivity for CD25, CD69, and CD95 and showed higher interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The CD4⁺ T cells exhibited increased T-bet expression in response to ArtinM, and IL-2 production by CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells depended on the recognition of CD3εγ-chain glycans by ArtinM. The ArtinM effect on aberrantly-glycosylated neoplastic lymphocytes was studied in Jurkat T cells, in which ArtinM induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-1β production, but decreased cell viability and growth. A higher frequency of AnnexinV- and propidium iodide-stained cells demonstrated the induction of Jurkat T cells apoptosis by ArtinM, and this apoptotic response was reduced by caspases and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ArtinM effects on murine T cells corroborated with the immunomodulatory property of lectin, whereas the promotion of Jurkat T cells apoptosis may reflect a potential applicability of ArtinM in novel strategies for treating lymphocytic leukemia.

  9. Rhabdastrellic acid-A induced autophagy-associated cell death through blocking Akt pathway in human cancer cells.

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    Dan-Dan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved protein degradation pathway. A defect in autophagy may contribute to tumorigenesis. Autophagy inducers could have a potential function in tumor prevention and treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results showed that Rhabdastrellic acid-A, an isomalabaricane triterpenoid isolated from the sponge Rhabdastrella globostellata, inhibited proliferation of human cancer cell lines Hep3B and A549 and induced caspase-independent cell death in both the cell lines. Further investigation showed that Rhabdastrellic acid-A induced autophagy of cancer cells determined by YFP-LC3 punctation and increased LC3-II. The pretreatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-MA inhibited Rhabdastrellic acid-A-induced cell death. Knockdown of autophagy-related gene Atg5 inhibited Rhabdastrellic acid-A-induced cell death in A549 cells. Also, phospho-Akt and its downstream targets significantly decreased after treatment with Rhabdastrellic acid-A in both cancer cell lines. Transfection of constitutive active Akt plasmid abrogated autophagy and cell death induced by Rhabdastrellic acid-A. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that Rhabdastrellic acid-A could induce autophagy-associated cell death through blocking Akt pathway in cancer cells. It also provides the evidence that Rhabdastrellic acid-A deserves further investigation as a potential anticancer or cancer preventive agent.

  10. Current-Induced Transistor Sensorics with Electrogenic Cells

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    Peter Fromherz

    2016-04-01

    Full Te