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Sample records for erythrocyte binding antigen

  1. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

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    Bolton Michael J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120 and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM. Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC. A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans.

  2. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals binding residues for the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines

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    Garry Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The surface glycoprotein (SU, gp120 of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV must bind to a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4, to invade CD4+ cells. Plasmodium vivax uses the Duffy Binding Protein (DBP to bind the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and invade reticulocytes. Results Variable loop 3 (V3 of HIV-1 SU and domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax DBP share a sequence similarity. The site of amino acid sequence similarity was necessary, but not sufficient, for DARC binding and contained a consensus heparin binding site essential for DARC binding. Both HIV-1 and P. vivax can be blocked from binding to their chemokine receptors by the chemokine, RANTES and its analog AOP-RANTES. Site directed mutagenesis of the heparin binding motif in members of the DBP family, the P. knowlesi alpha, beta and gamma proteins abrogated their binding to erythrocytes. Positively charged residues within domain 1 are required for binding of P. vivax and P. knowlesi erythrocyte binding proteins. Conclusion A heparin binding site motif in members of the DBP family may form part of a conserved erythrocyte receptor binding pocket.

  3. Specific T-cell recognition of the merozoite proteins rhoptry-associated protein 1 and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Hviid, L; Theander, T G

    1993-01-01

    The merozoite proteins merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) and rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP-1) and synthetic peptides containing sequences of MSP-1, RAP-1, and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1, induced in vitro proliferative responses of lymphocytes collected from Ghanaian blood donors living i...... by individuals living in an area with a high transmission rate of malaria. Most of the donor plasma samples tested contained immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies recognizing the merozoite proteins, while only a minority showed high IgG reactivity to the synthetic peptides.......The merozoite proteins merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) and rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP-1) and synthetic peptides containing sequences of MSP-1, RAP-1, and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1, induced in vitro proliferative responses of lymphocytes collected from Ghanaian blood donors living...

  4. Allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens (literature review

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    N. V. Mineeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article literature review of the causes of allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens are presented. It is shown that the ability to produce antierythrocyte antibodies is affected by many factors, principal of whom it is difficult to identify. For the allosensibilisation development requires genetically determined differences in erythrocyte antigens phenotypes of donor and recipient, mother and fetus, which can lead to immune response and antibodies production. The biochemical nature of erythrocyte antigens, antigen dose (the amount of transfused doses, the number of antigens determinants on donor and fetus erythrocytes, the number of pregnancies are important. Individual patient characteristics: age, gender, diseases, the use of immunosuppressive therapy and the presence of inflammatory processes, are also relevant. Note that antibody to one erythrocyte antigens have clinical value, and to the other – have no. The actual data about frequency of clinically significant antibodies contribute to the development of post-transfusion hemolytic complications prophylaxis as well as the improvement of laboratory diagnosis of hemolytic disease of the newborn in the presence of maternal antierythrocyte antibodies.

  5. Surface co-expression of two different PfEMP1 antigens on single Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes facilitates binding to ICAM1 and PECAM1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Bengtsson, Anja

    2010-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) antigens play a major role in cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes (IE), antigenic variation, and immunity to malaria. The current consensus on control of variant surface antigen expression is that only one PfEMP1 encoded by one var...

  6. Expression of senescent antigen on erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winograd, E.; Greenan, J.R.T.; Sherman, I.W.

    1987-01-01

    Erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of Plasmodium falciparum selectively bind IgG autoantibodies in normal human serum. Quantification of membrane-bound IgG, by use of 125 I-labeled protein A, revealed that erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant bound 30 times more protein A than did noninfected erythrocytes; infection with a knobless variant resulted in less than a 2-fold difference compared with noninfected erythrocytes. IgG binding to knobby erythrocytes appeared to be related to parasite development, since binding of 125 I-labeled protein A to cells bearing young trophozoites (less than 20 hr after parasite invasion) was similar to binding to uninfected erythrocytes. By immunoelectron microscopy, the membrane-bound IgG on erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant was found to be preferentially associated with the protuberances (knobs) of the plasma membrane. The removal of aged or senescent erythrocytes from the peripheral circulation is reported to involve the binding of specific antibodies to an antigen (senescent antigen) related to the major erythrocyte membrane protein band 3. Since affinity-purified autoantibodies against band 3 specifically bound to the plasma membrane of erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant of P. falciparum, it is clear that the malaria parasite induces expression of senescent antigen

  7. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals binding residues for the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, Michael J; Garry, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The surface glycoprotein (SU, gp120) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) must bind to a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4, to invade CD4+ cells. Plasmodium vivax uses the Duffy Binding Protein (DBP) to bind the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) and invade reticulocytes. Results Variable loop 3 (V3) of HIV-1 SU and domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax DBP share a sequence similarity. The site of amino acid sequence similarity was necessary, but not sufficient, ...

  8. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, Michael J; Garry, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120) and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM). Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infectio...

  9. Effects of proteolytic enzymes and neuraminidase on the I and i erythrocyte antigen sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doinel, C.; Ropars, C.; Salmon, C.

    1978-01-01

    Homogeneous cold agglutinins, purified and labelled with 125 I, have been used in a study of the effects of neuraminidase and proteolytic enzymes on the I and i reactivities of human adult erythrocytes. Measurements were made of antigen site numbers, equilibrium constants and thermodynamic parameters. There was enhanced reactivity after enzyme treatment as well as after the release of N-acetylneuraminic acid. Steric factors were shown to be of primary importance in the accessibility of the I and i antigenic determinant. After enzyme treatment, the antigenic structures became more homogeneous in their reaction with antibodies. The heterogeneity of binding constants observed with antigenic determinants of non-treated erythrocytes is probably due to the wide range of spatial distribution of these receptors within the membrane. (author)

  10. Age related changes in erythrocyte A and B antigen strength

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    Hollingsworth, J W; Hamilton, H B; Ishii, Goro

    1961-11-01

    The strength of A and B antigens of the erythrocyte, as indicated by agglutinability with dilutions of specific antibody, has been investigated in a group of subjects in Hiroshima. Antigen strength was found to rise to maximal levels at age 25 to 29, and decline with advancing years. Degree of irradiation from the Hiroshima atomic bomb in 1945 did not appear in the limited sample to affect this age-dependent structural property of erythrocytes. Antigen strength of females was somewhat less than that of males for those individuals from 20 to 40 years of age. When compared with group A or B subjects, individuals of group AB demonstrated full strength of both A and B antigens. Since Rh antigenicity also has been reported to change with age, it seems probable that multiple changes in the erythrocyte membrane occur with age. Further investigation into the nature of these changes may be fruitful to an understanding of aging processes at the cellular level. 13 references, 1 figure, 6 tables.

  11. Recognition of Human Erythrocyte Receptors by the Tryptophan-Rich Antigens of Monkey Malaria Parasite Plasmodium knowlesi.

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    Kriti Tyagi

    Full Text Available The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi also infect humans. There is a lack of information on the molecular mechanisms that take place between this simian parasite and its heterologous human host erythrocytes leading to this zoonotic disease. Therefore, we investigated here the binding ability of P. knowlesi tryptophan-rich antigens (PkTRAgs to the human erythrocytes and sharing of the erythrocyte receptors between them as well as with other commonly occurring human malaria parasites.Six PkTRAgs were cloned and expressed in E.coli as well as in mammalian CHO-K1 cell to determine their human erythrocyte binding activity by cell-ELISA, and in-vitro rosetting assay, respectively.Three of six PkTRAgs (PkTRAg38.3, PkTRAg40.1, and PkTRAg67.1 showed binding to human erythrocytes. Two of them (PkTRAg40.1 and PkTRAg38.3 showed cross-competition with each other as well as with the previously described P.vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs for human erythrocyte receptors. However, the third protein (PkTRAg67.1 utilized the additional but different human erythrocyte receptor(s as it did not cross-compete for erythrocyte binding with either of these two PkTRAgs as well as with any of the PvTRAgs. These three PkTRAgs also inhibited the P.falciparum parasite growth in in-vitro culture, further indicating the sharing of human erythrocyte receptors by these parasite species and the biological significance of this receptor-ligand interaction between heterologous host and simian parasite.Recognition and sharing of human erythrocyte receptor(s by PkTRAgs with human parasite ligands could be part of the strategy adopted by the monkey malaria parasite to establish inside the heterologous human host.

  12. Recognition of Human Erythrocyte Receptors by the Tryptophan-Rich Antigens of Monkey Malaria Parasite Plasmodium knowlesi.

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    Tyagi, Kriti; Gupta, Deepali; Saini, Ekta; Choudhary, Shilpa; Jamwal, Abhishek; Alam, Mohd Shoeb; Zeeshan, Mohammad; Tyagi, Rupesh K; Sharma, Yagya D

    2015-01-01

    The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi also infect humans. There is a lack of information on the molecular mechanisms that take place between this simian parasite and its heterologous human host erythrocytes leading to this zoonotic disease. Therefore, we investigated here the binding ability of P. knowlesi tryptophan-rich antigens (PkTRAgs) to the human erythrocytes and sharing of the erythrocyte receptors between them as well as with other commonly occurring human malaria parasites. Six PkTRAgs were cloned and expressed in E.coli as well as in mammalian CHO-K1 cell to determine their human erythrocyte binding activity by cell-ELISA, and in-vitro rosetting assay, respectively. Three of six PkTRAgs (PkTRAg38.3, PkTRAg40.1, and PkTRAg67.1) showed binding to human erythrocytes. Two of them (PkTRAg40.1 and PkTRAg38.3) showed cross-competition with each other as well as with the previously described P.vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs) for human erythrocyte receptors. However, the third protein (PkTRAg67.1) utilized the additional but different human erythrocyte receptor(s) as it did not cross-compete for erythrocyte binding with either of these two PkTRAgs as well as with any of the PvTRAgs. These three PkTRAgs also inhibited the P.falciparum parasite growth in in-vitro culture, further indicating the sharing of human erythrocyte receptors by these parasite species and the biological significance of this receptor-ligand interaction between heterologous host and simian parasite. Recognition and sharing of human erythrocyte receptor(s) by PkTRAgs with human parasite ligands could be part of the strategy adopted by the monkey malaria parasite to establish inside the heterologous human host.

  13. Temperature-dependent binding of cyclosporine to an erythrocyte protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, R.P.; Threatte, G.A.; McPherson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this competitive binding assay to measure endogenous binding capacity for cyclosporine (CsA) in erythrocyte lysates, a fixed amount of [ 3 H]CsA plus various concentrations of unlabeled CsA is incubated with aliquots of a test hemolysate. Free CsA is then adsorbed onto charcoal and removed by centrifugation; CsA complexed with a cyclosporine-binding protein (CsBP) remains in the supernate. We confirmed the validity of this charcoal-separation mode of binding analysis by comparison with equilibrium dialysis. Scatchard plot analysis of the results at 4 degrees C yielded a straight line with slope corresponding to a binding constant of 1.9 X 10(7) L/mol and a saturation capacity of approximately 4 mumol per liter of packed erythrocytes. Similar analysis of binding data at 24 degrees C and 37 degrees C showed that the binding constant decreased with increasing temperature, but the saturation capacity did not change. CsBP was not membrane bound but appeared to be freely distributed within erythrocytes. 125 I-labeled CsA did not complex with the erythrocyte CsBP. Several antibiotics and other drugs did not inhibit binding between CsA and CsBP. These findings may explain the temperature-dependent uptake of CsA by erythrocytes in whole blood and suggest that measurement of CsBP in erythrocytes or lymphocytes may help predict therapeutic response or toxicity after administration of CsA

  14. Insulin binding to erythrocytes after acute 16-methyleneprednisolone ingestion.

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    Dwenger, A; Holle, W; Zick, R; Trautschold, I

    1982-10-01

    The binding of [125I]insulin to erythrocytes, glucose and insulin were determined before and 1, 7 and 35 days after ingestion of 2 X 60-methyleneprednisolone. None of two groups of volunteers (7 males, 4 females showed clear alterations of the insulin binding parameters (Ka and R0), or of the fasting cortisol, glucose and insulin concentrations. These results exclude the possibility that the diabetogenic effect of glucocorticoides is accompanied by an alteration of the insulin receptor characteristics of erythrocytes.

  15. Specific binding of beta-endorphin to normal human erythrocytes

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    Chenet, B.; Hollis, V. Jr.; Kang, Y.; Simpkins, C.

    1986-03-05

    Beta-endorphin (BE) exhibits peripheral functions which may not be mediated by interactions with receptors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated binding of BE to both opioid and non-opioid receptors on lymphocytes and monocytes. Abood has reported specific binding of /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine in erythrocytes. Using 5 x 10/sup -11/M /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and 10/sup -5/M unlabeled BE, they have detected 50% specific binding to human erythrocytes. This finding is supported by results from immunoelectron microscopy using rabbit anti-BE antibody and biotinylated secondary antibody with avidin-biotin complexes horseradish peroxidase. Binding is clearly observed and is confined to only one side of the cells. Conclusions: (1) BE binding to human erythrocytes was demonstrated by radioreceptor assay and immunoelectron microscopy, and (2) BE binding sites exist on only one side of the cells.

  16. Enhancing blockade of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte invasion: assessing combinations of antibodies against PfRH5 and other merozoite antigens.

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    Andrew R Williams

    Full Text Available No vaccine has yet proven effective against the blood-stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which cause the symptoms and severe manifestations of malaria. We recently found that PfRH5, a P. falciparum-specific protein expressed in merozoites, is efficiently targeted by broadly-neutralizing, vaccine-induced antibodies. Here we show that antibodies against PfRH5 efficiently inhibit the in vitro growth of short-term-adapted parasite isolates from Cambodia, and that the EC(50 values of antigen-specific antibodies against PfRH5 are lower than those against PfAMA1. Since antibody responses elicited by multiple antigens are speculated to improve the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines, we conducted detailed assessments of parasite growth inhibition by antibodies against PfRH5 in combination with antibodies against seven other merozoite antigens. We found that antibodies against PfRH5 act synergistically with antibodies against certain other merozoite antigens, most notably with antibodies against other erythrocyte-binding antigens such as PfRH4, to inhibit the growth of a homologous P. falciparum clone. A combination of antibodies against PfRH4 and basigin, the erythrocyte receptor for PfRH5, also potently inhibited parasite growth. This methodology provides the first quantitative evidence that polyclonal vaccine-induced antibodies can act synergistically against P. falciparum antigens and should help to guide the rational development of future multi-antigen vaccines.

  17. The Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi from Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo show different binding activity level to human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Khai Lone; Amir, Amirah; Lau, Yee Ling; Fong, Mun Yik

    2017-08-11

    The zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi is a major cause of human malaria in Malaysia. This parasite uses the Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) to interact with the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) receptor on human and macaque erythrocytes to initiate invasion. Previous studies on P. knowlesi have reported distinct Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo PkDBPαII haplotypes. In the present study, the differential binding activity of these haplotypes with human and macaque (Macaca fascicularis) erythrocytes was investigated. The PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo were expressed on the surface of COS-7 cells and tested with human and monkey erythrocytes, with and without anti-Fy6 (anti-Duffy) monoclonal antibody treatment. Binding activity level was determined by counting the number of rosettes formed between the transfected COS-7 cells and the erythrocytes. Anti-Fy6 treatment was shown to completely block the binding of human erythrocytes with the transfected COS-7 cells, thus verifying the specific binding of human DARC with PkDBPαII. Interestingly, the PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia displayed a higher binding activity with human erythrocytes when compared with the Malaysian Borneo PkDBPαII haplotype (mean number of rosettes formed = 156.89 ± 6.62 and 46.00 ± 3.57, respectively; P < 0.0001). However, no difference in binding activity level was seen in the binding assay using M. fascicularis erythrocytes. This study is the first report of phenotypic difference between PkDBPαII haplotypes. The biological implication of this finding is yet to be determined. Therefore, further studies need to be carried out to determine whether this differential binding level can be associated with severity of knowlesi malaria in human.

  18. The 10 kDa domain of human erythrocyte protein 4.1 binds the Plasmodium falciparum EBA-181 protein

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    Coetzer Theresa L

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum parasites represents a key mechanism during malaria pathogenesis. Erythrocyte binding antigen-181 (EBA-181 is an important invasion protein, which mediates a unique host cell entry pathway. A novel interaction between EBA-181 and human erythrocyte membrane protein 4.1 (4.1R was recently demonstrated using phage display technology. In the current study, recombinant proteins were utilized to define and characterize the precise molecular interaction between the two proteins. Methods 4.1R structural domains (30, 16, 10 and 22 kDa domain and the 4.1R binding region in EBA-181 were synthesized in specific Escherichia coli strains as recombinant proteins and purified using magnetic bead technology. Recombinant proteins were subsequently used in blot-overlay and histidine pull-down assays to determine the binding domain in 4.1R. Results Blot overlay and histidine pull-down experiments revealed specific interaction between the 10 kDa domain of 4.1R and EBA-181. Binding was concentration dependent as well as saturable and was abolished by heat denaturation of 4.1R. Conclusion The interaction of EBA-181 with the highly conserved 10 kDa domain of 4.1R provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms utilized by P. falciparum during erythrocyte entry. The results highlight the potential multifunctional role of malaria invasion proteins, which may contribute to the success of the pathogenic stage of the parasite's life cycle.

  19. Plasmodium falciparum variant STEVOR antigens are expressed in merozoites and possibly associated with erythrocyte invasion

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    Petter Michaela

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum STEVOR proteins, encoded by the multicopy stevor gene family have no known biological functions. Their expression and unique locations in different parasite life cycle stages evoke multiple functionalities. Their abundance and hypervariability support a role in antigenic variation. Methods Immunoblotting of total parasite proteins with an anti-STEVOR antibody was used to identify variant antigens of this gene family and to follow changes in STEVOR expression in parasite populations panned on CSA or CD36 receptors. Immunofluorescence assays and immunoelectron microscopy were performed to study the subcellular localization of STEVOR proteins in different parasite stages. The capacity of the antibody to inhibit merozoite invasion of erythrocytes was assessed to determine whether STEVOR variants were involved in the invasion process. Results Antigenic variation of STEVORs at the protein level was observed in blood stage parasites. STEVOR variants were found to be present on the merozoite surface and in rhoptries. An insight into a participation in erythrocyte invasion was gained through an immunofluorescence analysis of a sequence of thin slides representing progressive steps in erythrocyte invasion. An interesting feature of the staining pattern was what appeared to be the release of STEVORs around the invading merozoites. Because the anti-STEVOR antibody did not inhibit invasion, the role of STEVORs in this process remains unknown. Conclusion The localization of STEVOR proteins to the merozoite surface and the rhoptries together with its prevalence as a released component in the invading merozoite suggest a role of these antigens in adhesion and/or immune evasion in the erythrocyte invasion process. These observations would also justify STEVORs for undergoing antigenic variation. Even though a role in erythrocyte invasion remains speculative, an association of members of the STEVOR protein family with

  20. Antibodies to variant antigens on the surfaces of infected erythrocytes are associated with protection from malaria in Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodoo, D; Staalsoe, T; Giha, H

    2001-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a variant antigen expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Each parasite genome contains about 40 PfEMP1 genes, but only 1 PfEMP1 gene is expressed at a given time. PfEMP1 serves as a parasite-sequestering ligand to endoth...

  1. Isolation of low-molecular-weight lead-binding protein from human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, S.R.V.; Gonick, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    In blood, lead is mainly associated with erythrocytes and only a very small amount is found in plasma. Previously it was thought that the lead was bound to the erythrocyte cell membrane but more recently it has been observed that lead is bound primarily to the cell contents, ostensibly hemoglobin. In examining the lead-binding properties of normal human erythrocytes and those of lead-exposed industrial workers, we have found that, whereas lead binds only to hemoglobin in normal erythrocytes, there is also appreciable binding of lead to a low-molecular weight-protein in erythrocytes from lead-exposed workers. The synthesis of this protein may be induced by lead exposure. The 10,000 molecular weight protein may act as a storage site and mechanism for segregating lead in a non-toxic form

  2. Host-parasite interaction: selective Pv-fam-a family proteins of Plasmodium vivax bind to a restricted number of human erythrocyte receptors.

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    Zeeshan, Mohammad; Tyagi, Rupesh Kumar; Tyagi, Kriti; Alam, Mohd Shoeb; Sharma, Yagya Dutta

    2015-04-01

    Plasmodium vivax synthesizes the largest number of 36 tryptophan-rich proteins belonging to the Pv-fam-a family. These parasite proteins need to be characterized for their biological function because tryptophan-rich proteins from other Plasmodium species have been proposed as vaccine candidates. Recombinant P. vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs) were used to determine their erythrocyte-binding activity by a cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry, and a rosetting assay. Only 4 (PvTRAg26.3, PvTRAg34, PvTRAg36, and PvTRAg36.6) of 21 PvTRAgs bind to host erythrocytes. The cross-competition data indicated that PvTRAg36 and PvTRAg34 share their erythrocyte receptors with previously described proteins PvTRAg38 and PvTRAg33.5, respectively. On the other hand, PvTRAg26.3 and PvTRAg36.6 cross-compete with each other and not with any other PvTRAg, indicating that these 2 proteins bind to the same but yet another set of erythrocyte receptor(s). Together, 10 of 36 PvTRAgs possess erythrocyte-binding activity in which each protein recognizes >1 erythrocyte receptor. Further, each erythrocyte receptor is shared by >1 PvTRAg. This redundancy may be useful for the parasite to invade red blood cells and cause disease pathogenesis, and it can be exploited to develop therapeutics against P. vivax malaria. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Rapid and specific biotin labelling of the erythrocyte surface antigens of both cultured and ex-vivo Plasmodium parasites

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    Thompson Joanne

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensitive detection of parasite surface antigens expressed on erythrocyte membranes is necessary to further analyse the molecular pathology of malaria. This study describes a modified biotin labelling/osmotic lysis method which rapidly produces membrane extracts enriched for labelled surface antigens and also improves the efficiency of antigen recovery compared with traditional detergent extraction and surface radio-iodination. The method can also be used with ex-vivo parasites. Methods After surface labelling with biotin in the presence of the inhibitor furosemide, detergent extraction and osmotic lysis methods of enriching for the membrane fractions were compared to determine the efficiency of purification and recovery. Biotin-labelled proteins were identified on silver-stained SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Results Detergent extraction and osmotic lysis were compared for their capacity to purify biotin-labelled Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium chabaudi erythrocyte surface antigens. The pellet fraction formed after osmotic lysis of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes is notably enriched in suface antigens, including PfEMP1, when compared to detergent extraction. There is also reduced co-extraction of host proteins such as spectrin and Band 3. Conclusion Biotinylation and osmotic lysis provides an improved method to label and purify parasitised erythrocyte surface antigen extracts from both in vitro and ex vivo Plasmodium parasite preparations.

  4. Erythrocyte 3H-ouabain binding and digitalis treatment in ethanol addicted patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaini, F.; Govoni, S.; Mauri, A.; Civelli, L.; Trabucchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    The binding of 3 H-ouabain to human erythrocytes was analyzed in a population of hospitalized male ethanol addicted patients under long term digitalis treatment. In the non-alcoholic patient group the long term digitalis treatment induced an increase in Bmax and Kd values; such modification was not observed in the alcoholic patients. Chronic alcohol intake itself induced an increase in 3 H-ouabain kinetic parameters. These observations confirm that ouabain binding to human erythrocytes is subject to pharmacological and toxicological regulation and that adaptive changes in peripheral tissues can be useful in predicting possible parallel modifications in other less accessible tissues. 22 references, 1 table

  5. Dog Erythrocyte Antigen 1 (DEA 1): Mode of Inheritance and Initial Characterization

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    Polak, Klaudia; Acierno, Michelle; Raj, Karthik; Mizukami, Keijiro; Siegel, Don L.; Giger, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Background The Dog Erythrocyte Antigen (DEA) 1 blood group system remains poorly defined. Objectives The purpose of the study was to determine the DEA 1 mode of inheritance and to characterize the DEA 1 antigen and alloantibodies. Animals Canine research colony families, clinic canine patients, and DEA 1.2+ blood bank dogs were studied. Methods Canine blood was typed by flow cytometry and immunochromatographic strips using anti-DEA 1 monoclonal antibodies. Gel column experiments with polyclonal and immunoblotting with monoclonal anti-DEA 1 antibodies were performed to analyze select samples. Cross-reactivity of human typing reagents against canine RBCs and one monoclonal anti-DEA 1 antibody against human RBC panels was assessed. Results Typing of 12 families comprising 144 dogs indicated an autosomal dominant inheritance with ≥4 alleles: DEA 1− (0) and DEA 1+ weak (1+), intermediate (2+) and strong (3+ and 4+). Samples from 6 dogs previously typed as DEA 1.2+ were typed as DEA 1+ or DEA 1− using monoclonal antibodies. Human typing reagents produced varied reactions in tube agglutination experiments against DEA 1+ and DEA 1− RBCs. Polypeptide bands were not detected on immunoblots using a monoclonal anti-DEA 1 antibody, therefore the anti-DEA 1 antibody may be specific for conformational epitopes lost during denaturation. Conclusions The autosomal dominant inheritance of DEA 1 with ≥4 alleles indicates a complex blood group system; the antigenicity of each DEA 1+ type will need to be determined. The biochemical nature of the DEA 1 antigen(s) appears different from human blood group systems tested. PMID:26291052

  6. Binding of hydrophobic antigens to surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A first aspect of the present invention is a method of detecting antibodies comprising the steps of: i) providing a first group of beads comprising a surface modified with C1-C10 alkyl groups comprising amine, ammonium, ether and/or hydroxyl groups, ii) contacting said first group of beads......-antigen-antibody conjugates, and v) detecting said bead-antigen-antibody conjugates. Further aspects include an antibody detection kit, a bead-antigen conjugate and a composition comprising at least two different groups of bead-antigen-conjugates....

  7. A method for visualizing surface-exposed and internal PfEMP1 adhesion antigens in Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes

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    Arnot David E

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The insertion of parasite antigens into the host erythrocyte membrane and the structure and distribution of Plasmodium falciparum adhesion receptors on that membrane are poorly understood. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM and a novel labelling and fixation method have been used to obtain high resolution immuno-fluorescent images of erythrocyte surface PfEMP1 and internal antigens which allow analysis of the accumulation of PfEMP1 on the erythrocyte membrane during asexual development. Methods A novel staining technique has been developed which permits distinction between erythrocyte surface PfEMP1 and intracellular PfEMP1, in parasites whose nuclear material is exceptionally well resolved. Primary antibody detection by fluorescence is carried out on the live parasitized erythrocyte. The surface labelled cells are then fixed using paraformaldehyde and permeabilized with a non-ionic detergent to permit access of antibodies to internal parasite antigens. Differentiation between surface and internal antigens is achieved using antibodies labelled with different fluorochromes and confocal microscopy Results Surface exposed PfEMP1 is first detectable by antibodies at the trophozoite stage of intracellular parasite development although the improved detection method indicates that there are differences between different laboratory isolates in the kinetics of accumulation of surface-exposed PfEMP1. Conclusion A sensitive method for labelling surface and internal PfEMP1 with up to three different fluorochromes has been developed for laser scanning confocal optical microscopy and the analysis of the developmental expression of malaria adhesion antigens.

  8. Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli are protected from leukocyte phagocytosis by binding to erythrocyte complement receptor 1 in human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, O. L.; Hellerud, B. C.; Christiansen, D.

    2011-01-01

    The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 N. meningitidis and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant...... antagonist (C5aRa) and a complement receptor 1 (CR1)-blocking antibody (3D9) were examined. Most bacteria (80%) immediately bound to erythrocytes. The binding gradually declined over time, with a parallel increase in phagocytosis. Complement inhibition with compstatin reduced erythrocyte binding...... and bacterial C3 opsonization. In contrast, the C5aRa efficiently reduced phagocytosis, but did not affect the binding of bacteria to erythrocytes. The anti-CR1 blocking mAb dose-dependently reduced bacterial binding to erythrocytes to nil, with subsequent increased phagocytosis and oxidative burst. LPS had...

  9. Functional and structural changes of human erythrocyte catalase induced by cimetidine: proposed model of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Jahngirvand, Mahboubeh; Almasirad, Ali; Mousavi, Zahra; Masoud, Masoudeh; Mollasalehi, Hamidreza

    2015-06-01

    In erythrocyte, catalase plays an important role to protect cells from hydrogen peroxide toxicity. Hydrogen peroxide is a byproduct compound which is produced during metabolic pathway of cells. Cimetidine, a histamine H2 receptor antagonist, is used for gastrointestinal tract diseases and prevents the extra release of gastric acid. In this study, the effect of cimetidine on the activity of human erythrocyte catalase was investigated. Erythrocytes were broken by hypotonic solution. The supernatant was used for catalase assay and kinetics study. Lineweaver-Burk plot was performed to determine the type of inhibition. The kinetics data revealed that cimetidine inhibited the catalase activity by mixed inhibition. The IC50 (1.54 μM) and Ki (0.45 μM) values of cimetidine determined that the drug was bound to the enzyme with high affinity. Circular dichroism and fluorescence measurement showed that the binding of cimetidine to the enzyme affected the content of secondary structure of the enzyme as well as its conformational changes. Docking studies were carried out to detect the site in which the drug was bound to the enzyme. Molecular modeling and energy calculation of the binding showed that the cyanoguanidine group of the drug connected to Asp59 via two hydrogen bonds, while the imidazole group of the drug interacted with Phe64 in the enzyme by a hydrophobic interaction. In conclusion, cimetidine could bind to human erythrocyte catalase, and its interaction caused functional and conformational changes in the enzyme.

  10. Demonstration of specific binding sites for 3H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol on human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitabchi, A.E.; Wimalasena, J.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated specific binding sites for 3 H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol ( 3 H-d alpha T) in membranes of rat adrenal cells. As tocopherol deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility of red blood cells to hemolysis, we investigated tocopherol binding sites in human RBCs. Erythrocytes were found to have specific binding sites for 3 H-d alpha T that exhibited saturability and time and cell-concentration dependence as well as reversibility of binding. Kinetic studies of binding demonstrated two binding sites--one with high affinity (Ka of 2.6 x 10(7) M-1), low capacity (7,600 sites per cell) and the other with low affinity (1.2 x 10(6) M-1), high capacity (150,000 sites per cell). In order to localize the binding sites further, RBCs were fractionated and greater than 90% of the tocopherol binding was located in the membranes. Similar to the findings in intact RBCs, the membranes exhibited two binding sites with a respective Ka of 3.3 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) M-1. Specificity data for binding demonstrated 10% binding for RRR-gamma-tocopherol, but not other tocopherol analog exhibited competition for 3 H-d alpha T binding sites. Instability data suggested a protein nature for these binding sites. Preliminary studies on Triton X-100 solubilized fractions resolved the binding sites to a major component with an Mr of 65,000 and a minor component with an Mr of 125,000. We conclude that human erythrocyte membranes contain specific binding sites for RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These sites may be of physiologic significance in the function of tocopherol on the red blood cell membrane

  11. Structural Studies on Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) Malaria Antigens Using Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Stig

    Chemistry (App I) [1]. VAR2CSA binds specifically to CSA in the placental tissue of pregnant women hereby causing severe malaria symptoms endangering both mother and child. The minimal VAR2CSA region required to effectively bind CSA was determined to be the N-terminal DBL domain, DBL2X which we locate......Infection with the pathogenic Plasmodium falciparum parasite causes the potentially deadly Malaria disease which leads to over 1 million fatalities each year according to the WHO (World Health Organization). Individuals subjected to multiple infections gradually become immune to the disease...... symptoms and vaccine research is focused on trying to mimic or advance this immune acquisition. Immunity is primarily caused by acquisition of antibodies directed against a family of Plasmodium protein antigens called PfEMP1s located on the surface of infected erythrocytes. The PfEMP1 proteins are adhesive...

  12. Phage display used for gene cloning of human recombinant antibody against the erythrocyte surface antigen, rhesus D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Nielsen, L K; Andersen, P S

    1995-01-01

    A novel phage display system has been developed for PCR amplification and cloning of the Fab fragments of human immunoglobulin genes. Using this system, we have cloned an antibody from a mouse-human hybridoma cell line directed against the erythrocyte antigen rhesus D. Intact erythrocytes were used...... for absorption of the Fab phages. Soluble Fab fragments produced from the cloned material showed identical performance to the parental antibody in agglutination assays. Gel filtration confirmed that the Fab fragment consists of a kappa-Fd heterodimer. The successful use of intact cells for selection of specific...... Fab phages demonstrates that it is possible to by-pass purification of the antigen of interest. Comparison with published germline sequences demonstrated that the immunoglobulin coding regions had the highest homology to the VH 1.9III and V kappa Hum kappa v325 germline genes, respectively....

  13. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  14. Antibodies to variable Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte surface antigens are associated with protection from novel malaria infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Staalsoe, T; Dodoo, D

    2000-01-01

    is maintained at low densities. Here, we test the hypothesis that the presence or absence of antibodies against variant antigens on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes protect individuals against some infectious challenges and render them susceptible to others. Plasma collected in Daraweesh...... susceptible and protected individuals. Together, the results indicate that pre-existing anti-PfEMP1 antibodies can reduce the risk of contracting clinical malaria when challenged by novel parasite clones expressing homologous, but not heterologous variable surface antigens. The results also confirm...

  15. Investigations into the binding of 125I-calmodulin to CA++ transport ATPase of human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterk, V.

    1983-01-01

    The study described was carried out in order to investigate the binding of 125 I-calmodulin to Ca ++ transport ATPase using different Ca ++ concentrations and temperatures. The data obtained from these experiments were subsequently analysed in such as a way as to yield meaningful information relating to the mechanisms underlying the attachment of calmodulin to Ca ++ transport ATPase, the % proportion of membrane protein that was attributable to the enzyme as well as the number of calmodulin receptor sites on the individual erythrocytes, etc. Comparisons with data from the relevant literature permitted conclusions to be drawn concerning the mode of Ca ++ transport at the level of the erythrocytes. A new methodology and processing technique had to be developed prior to the beginning of the experiments. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Polymorphism of leukocyte and erythrocyte antigens in chronic kidney disease patients in southern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Haruki Yamakawa

    Full Text Available We investigated the polymorphism of human leukocyte antigens (HLA and Duffy erythrocyte antigens in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients in southern Brazil. One hundred and eighty-three CKD patients, over 18 years old, on hemodialysis, were included. HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 typing was performed using the LABType®SSO (One Lambda, Inc.. Duffy phenotypes were determined by gel column agglutination using anti-Fy(a and anti-Fy(b monoclonal anti-sera. The patients' predominant ages ranged between 51 and 70 years (43% and the predominant gender, ethnic group and dialysis period were, respectively, male (62%, white (62% and 1-3 years (40%. The highest and lowest frequencies of Duffy phenotypes were Fy(a+b+ and Fy(a-b-, respectively. Nineteen HLA-A, 30 HLA-B and 13 HLA-DRB1 allele groups were identified. The most frequent HLA allele groups were HLA-A*01, -A*02, -A*03, -A*11, -A*24; HLA-B*07, -B*15, -B*35, -B*44, -B*51; HLA-DRB1*03, -DRB1*04, -DRB1*07, -DRB1*11 and -DRB1*13. Statistically significant differences were observed in the Duffy and HLA polymorphisms compared between CKD patients and healthy subjects. The Fy(a+b- phenotype (p<0.0001, OR = 2.56, 95% CI = 1.60-4.07 was the most frequent in the patients (p<0.05, and the Fy(a+b+ phenotype (p = 0.0039, OR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.18-2.51 was the most frequent in the healthy subjects in the same region of Paraná state (p<0.05. Regarding HLA, the HLA-B*42, -B*45, -B*51 and -DRB1*03 allele groups were the most frequent in the patients (p<0.05, and the HLA-B*44 allele group was the most frequent in the healthy subjects in the same region of Brazil (p<0.05. The polymorphism of these two markers among CKD patients in southern Brazil and healthy subjects of other studies, suggests that these markers might be involved with CKD development. Further studies should be undertaken to analyze the markers' influence on CKD and the long-term results from kidney transplantation.

  17. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype...

  18. Investigating the function of Fc -specific binding of IgM to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 mediating erythrocyte rosetting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Liz; Huda, Pie; Jeppesen, Anine

    2015-01-01

    of opsonized infected erythrocytes (IEs) without compromising the placental IE adhesion mediated by this PfEMP1 type. IgM also binds via Fc to several other PfEMP1 proteins, where it has been proposed to facilitate rosetting (binding of uninfected erythrocytes to a central IE). To further dissect...

  19. A method for visualizing surface-exposed and internal PfEMP1 adhesion antigens in Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Dominique; Sowa, Kordai M; Salanti, Ali

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The insertion of parasite antigens into the host erythrocyte membrane and the structure and distribution of Plasmodium falciparum adhesion receptors on that membrane are poorly understood. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and a novel labelling and fixation method have been used...... fluorochromes has been developed for laser scanning confocal optical microscopy and the analysis of the developmental expression of malaria adhesion antigens....

  20. Evidence that the low-affinity folate-binding protein in erythrocyte hemolysate is identical to hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1981-01-01

    Gel filtration studies on erythrocyte hemolysate demonstrated the presence of a folate binding protein, apparently of the low-affinity type, that co-elutes with hemoglobin. Further, the folate binder eluted with a low salt concentration after DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B anion-exchange chromatography of erythrocyte hemolysate at pH 6.3. The chromatographic behavior of hemoglobin labeled with [3H]folate was so similar to that of the present binder as to suggest that the folate binder in erythrocytes is in fact hemoglobin

  1. Targeted disruption of py235ebp-1: Invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodium yoelii using an alternative py235 erythrocyte binding protein

    KAUST Repository

    Ogun, Solabomi A.

    2011-02-17

    Plasmodium yoelii YM asexual blood stage parasites express multiple members of the py235 gene family, part of the super-family of genes including those coding for Plasmodium vivax reticulocyte binding proteins and Plasmodium falciparum RH proteins. We previously identified a Py235 erythrocyte binding protein (Py235EBP-1, encoded by the PY01365 gene) that is recognized by protective mAb 25.77. Proteins recognized by a second protective mAb 25.37 have been identified by mass spectrometry and are encoded by two genes, PY01185 and PY05995/PY03534. We deleted the PY01365 gene and examined the phenotype. The expression of the members of the py235 family in both the WT and gene deletion parasites was measured by quantitative RT-PCR and RNA-Seq. py235ebp-1 expression was undetectable in the knockout parasite, but transcription of other members of the family was essentially unaffected. The knockout parasites continued to react with mAb 25.77; and the 25.77-binding proteins in these parasites were the PY01185 and PY05995/PY03534 products. The PY01185 product was also identified as erythrocyte binding. There was no clear change in erythrocyte invasion profile suggesting that the PY01185 gene product (designated PY235EBP-2) is able to fulfill the role of EBP-1 by serving as an invasion ligand although the molecular details of its interaction with erythrocytes have not been examined. The PY01365, PY01185, and PY05995/PY03534 genes are part of a distinct subset of the py235 family. In P. falciparum, the RH protein genes are under epigenetic control and expression correlates with binding to distinct erythrocyte receptors and specific invasion pathways, whereas in P. yoelii YM all the genes are expressed and deletion of one does not result in upregulation of another. We propose that simultaneous expression of multiple Py235 ligands enables invasion of a wide range of host erythrocytes even in the presence of antibodies to one or more of the proteins and that this functional

  2. Targeted disruption of py235ebp-1: Invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodium yoelii using an alternative py235 erythrocyte binding protein

    KAUST Repository

    Ogun, Solabomi A.; Tewari, Rita; Otto, Thomas D.; Howell, Steven A.; Knuepfer, Ellen; Cunningham, Deirdre A.; Xu, Zhengyao; Pain, Arnab; Holder, Anthony A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium yoelii YM asexual blood stage parasites express multiple members of the py235 gene family, part of the super-family of genes including those coding for Plasmodium vivax reticulocyte binding proteins and Plasmodium falciparum RH proteins. We previously identified a Py235 erythrocyte binding protein (Py235EBP-1, encoded by the PY01365 gene) that is recognized by protective mAb 25.77. Proteins recognized by a second protective mAb 25.37 have been identified by mass spectrometry and are encoded by two genes, PY01185 and PY05995/PY03534. We deleted the PY01365 gene and examined the phenotype. The expression of the members of the py235 family in both the WT and gene deletion parasites was measured by quantitative RT-PCR and RNA-Seq. py235ebp-1 expression was undetectable in the knockout parasite, but transcription of other members of the family was essentially unaffected. The knockout parasites continued to react with mAb 25.77; and the 25.77-binding proteins in these parasites were the PY01185 and PY05995/PY03534 products. The PY01185 product was also identified as erythrocyte binding. There was no clear change in erythrocyte invasion profile suggesting that the PY01185 gene product (designated PY235EBP-2) is able to fulfill the role of EBP-1 by serving as an invasion ligand although the molecular details of its interaction with erythrocytes have not been examined. The PY01365, PY01185, and PY05995/PY03534 genes are part of a distinct subset of the py235 family. In P. falciparum, the RH protein genes are under epigenetic control and expression correlates with binding to distinct erythrocyte receptors and specific invasion pathways, whereas in P. yoelii YM all the genes are expressed and deletion of one does not result in upregulation of another. We propose that simultaneous expression of multiple Py235 ligands enables invasion of a wide range of host erythrocytes even in the presence of antibodies to one or more of the proteins and that this functional

  3. Targeted disruption of py235ebp-1: invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodium yoelii using an alternative Py235 erythrocyte binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solabomi A Ogun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium yoelii YM asexual blood stage parasites express multiple members of the py235 gene family, part of the super-family of genes including those coding for Plasmodium vivax reticulocyte binding proteins and Plasmodium falciparum RH proteins. We previously identified a Py235 erythrocyte binding protein (Py235EBP-1, encoded by the PY01365 gene that is recognized by protective mAb 25.77. Proteins recognized by a second protective mAb 25.37 have been identified by mass spectrometry and are encoded by two genes, PY01185 and PY05995/PY03534. We deleted the PY01365 gene and examined the phenotype. The expression of the members of the py235 family in both the WT and gene deletion parasites was measured by quantitative RT-PCR and RNA-Seq. py235ebp-1 expression was undetectable in the knockout parasite, but transcription of other members of the family was essentially unaffected. The knockout parasites continued to react with mAb 25.77; and the 25.77-binding proteins in these parasites were the PY01185 and PY05995/PY03534 products. The PY01185 product was also identified as erythrocyte binding. There was no clear change in erythrocyte invasion profile suggesting that the PY01185 gene product (designated PY235EBP-2 is able to fulfill the role of EBP-1 by serving as an invasion ligand although the molecular details of its interaction with erythrocytes have not been examined. The PY01365, PY01185, and PY05995/PY03534 genes are part of a distinct subset of the py235 family. In P. falciparum, the RH protein genes are under epigenetic control and expression correlates with binding to distinct erythrocyte receptors and specific invasion pathways, whereas in P. yoelii YM all the genes are expressed and deletion of one does not result in upregulation of another. We propose that simultaneous expression of multiple Py235 ligands enables invasion of a wide range of host erythrocytes even in the presence of antibodies to one or more of the proteins and that this

  4. New human erythrocyte protein with binding sites for both spectrin and calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, K.; Bennett, V.

    1986-01-01

    A new cytoskeletal protein that binds calmodulin has been purified to greater than 95% homogeneity from human erythrocyte cytoskeletons. The protein is a heterodimer with subunits of 103,000 and 97,000 and M/sub r/ = 197,000 calculated from its Stokes radius of 6.9 nm and sedimentation coefficient of 6.8. A binding affinity of this protein for calmodulin has been estimated to be 230 nM by displacement of two different concentrations of 125 I-azidocalmodulin with increasing concentrations of unmodified calmodulin followed by Dixon plot analysis. This protein is present in red cells at approximately 30,000 copies per cell and contains a very tight binding site(s) on cytoskeletons. The protein can be only partially solubilized from isolated cytoskeletons in buffers containing high salt, but can be totally solubilized from red cell ghost membranes by extraction in low ionic strength buffers. Affinity purified IgG against this calmodulin-binding protein identifies crossreacting polypeptide(s) in brain, kidney, testes and retina. Visualization of the calmodulin-binding protein by negative staining, rotary shadowing and unidirectional shadowing indicate that it is a flattened circular molecule with molecular height of 5.4 nm and a diameter of 12.4 nm. Preliminary cosedimentation studies with purified spectrin and F-actin indicate that the site of interaction of this calmodulin-binding protein with the cytoskeleton resides on spectrin

  5. Covalent glycoinositolphospholipid (GPI binding to hemoglobin is associated with insulin-activation of erythrocyte membrane protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VESNA NIKETIC

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it was demonstrated that prolonged hyperinsulinism associated with hypoglycemia, both in vivo and in vitro, caused covalent glycoinositolphospholipid (GPI binding to the C termini of both hemoglobin b-chains, which resulted in the formation of a novel, hitherto unrecognized, minor hemoglobin fraction (GPI-Hb (Niketic et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 239 (1997 435. In this study it was demonstrated that exposure of erythrocyte membranes to insulin causes the activation of membrane protease as well as that the formation of GPI-Hb parallels its activity. It is suggested that the insulin-activated protease is able to catalyze, albeit slowly, the transpeptidation, i.e., the replacement of the carboxy-terminal amino acid(s residues of the Hb b-chains with GPI as an exogenous nucleophile. To our knowledge the present results show for the first time that insulin stimulates protease activity in erythrocyte membranes, as well as that insulin-activated protease may be involved in post-translational GPI binding to proteins.

  6. Erythrocytes 125I-Insulin Binding Studies in Viral Hepatitis and Schistosomiasis Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the alterations of insulin binding sites in human erythrocytes in patients with chronic viral B and C hepatitis and in schistosomiasis. Fifty men with ages ranged from 20-45 years were diagnosed into five groups; hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, mixed hepatitis B and C, schistosomiasis and normal healthy volunteers as a control group. Biochemical analyses as erythrocyte insulin radioreceptor, plasma insulin estimation, fasting and post prandial blood glucose levels and liver function tests were performed. The results revealed significant decrease in insulin binding sites/cell in patients with hepatitis C virus, mixed B and C viruses and in schistosomiasis compared to the control group. There were significant increase in fasting plasma glucose levels in groups of hepatitis C virus mixed B and C viruses, while there were highly significant increase in post prandial plasma glucose levels in patients with mixed B and C viruses and in schistosomiasis groups compared to the normal control. Also, fasting plasma insulin levels were significantly elevated in groups of hepatitis C mixed B and C viruses and in schistosomiasis group. The obtained results revealed the importance of laboratory follow up of glucose and insulin levels in patients with chronic liver diseases

  7. Antigenic variation and the genetics and epigenetics of the PfEMP1 erythrocyte surface antigens in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnot, David E; Jensen, Anja T R

    2011-01-01

    . Sterile immunity is not achieved and chronic parasitization of apparently healthy adults is the norm. In this article, we analyse the best understood malaria "antigenic variation" system, that based on Plasmodium falciparum's PfEMP1-type cytoadhesion antigens, and critically review recent literature...

  8. Heparin-associated thrombocytopenia: antibody binding specificity to platelet antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, D M; Howe, S E

    1985-11-01

    Sera from four patients with heparin-associated thrombocytopenia (HAT) were evaluated by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect heparin-dependent serum platelet-bindable immunoglobulin (S-PBIg) and by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation to investigate the specificity of the antibody binding. All HAT sera showed mildly increased S-PBIg (mean, 7.8 fg per platelet; normal, less than 6.0 fg per platelet) to intact target platelets in the ELISA, which was markedly increased in the presence of heparin (mean, 20.9 fg per platelet). This increase was 20-fold greater than normal control sera, which showed a mean differential increase of only 0.5 fg per platelet. Immunoglobulin binding specificity to platelet antigens was investigated using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of platelet lysate with transfer of the platelet fractions onto nitrocellulose strips (Western blotting) and subsequent immunoassay using HAT and normal sera. In the presence of heparin, the four HAT patients demonstrated increased binding of immunoglobulin to platelet antigens of apparent molecular weights of 180, 124, and 82 kd. Radiolabeled heparin when incubated with HAT sera, normal sera, or albumin blanks bound to platelet proteins of the same apparent molecular weights. These observations are consistent with current hypotheses suggesting that HAT antibody is directed to heparin-platelet complexes or, alternatively, that heparin induces conformational change of antigenic sites on the platelet membrane.

  9. A portion of the Pf155/RESA antigen of Plasmodium falciparum is accessible on the surface of infected erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saul, A.; Maloy, W.L.; Howard, R.J.; Rock, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of antigens accessible to lactoperoxidase-catalysed cell surface iodination on intact Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (RBC) has identified a 125 I-labelled antigen with an apparent size of about 155 kD. This labelled protein was specifically immunoprecipitated by the following antibodies: a rabbit antiserum and a mouse monoclonal antibody raised against a synthetic peptide comprising the 3',8-mer repeat EENVEHDA of the Pf155/RESA protein; a rabbit antiserum raised against a synthetic octapeptide comprising two copies of the 3',4-mer repeat EENV of the Pf155/RESA protein; and rabbit antisera against another synthetic peptide C(MYSNNNVED) 2 . The last antibody shows a strong reaction in asexual blood state parasites with the Pf155/RESA antigen. While this antigen has been described previously as a submembrane component of the outer membrane of infected RBC, this report shows that at least part of it is accessible to the surface of both ring and late trophozoite-infected erythrocytes. 21 refs., 4 figs

  10. Selective radiolabeling and isolation of the hydrophobic membrane-binding domain of human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.L.; Rosenberry, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    The hydrophobic, membrane-binding domain of purified human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase was labeled with the photoactivated reagent 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[ 125 I]iodophenyl)diazirine. The radiolabel was incorporated when the enzyme was prepared in detergent-free aggregates, in detergent micelles, or in phospholipid liposomes, but the highest percentage of labeling occurred in the detergent-free aggregates. Papain digestion of the enzyme released the hydrophobic domain, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate or gel exclusion chromatography demonstrated that the label was localized exclusively in the cleaved hydrophobic domain fragment. This fragment was purified in a three-step procedure. Digestion was conducted with papain attached to Sepharose CL-4B, and the supernatant was adsorbed to acridinium affinity resin to remove the hydrophilic enzyme fragment. The nonretained fragment associated with Triton X-100 micelles was then chromatographed on Sepharose CL-6B, and finally detergent was removed by chromatography on Sephadex LH-60 in an ethanol-formic acid solvent. The fragment exhibited an apparent molecular weight of 3100 on the Sephadex LH-60 column when compared with peptide standards. However, amino acid analysis of the purified fragment revealed only 1 mol each of histidine and glycine per mole of fragment in contrast to the 25-30 mole of amino acids expected on the basis of the molecular weight estimate. This result suggests a novel non-amino acid structure for the hydrophobic domain of human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase

  11. Identification of pre-erythrocytic malaria antigens that target hepatocytes for killing in vivo and contribute to protection elicited by whole-parasite vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available Pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccines, including those based on whole-parasite approaches, have shown protective efficacy in animal and human studies. However few pre-erythocytic antigens other than the immunodominant circumsporozoite protein (CSP have been studied in depth with the goal of developing potent subunit malaria vaccines that are suited for use in endemic areas. Here we describe a novel technique to identify pre-erythrocytic malaria antigens that contribute to protection elicited by whole-parasite vaccination in the mouse model. Our approach combines immunization with genetically attenuated parasites and challenge with DNA plasmids encoding for potential protective pre-erythrocytic malaria antigens as luciferase fusions by hydrodynamic tail vein injection. After optimizing the technique, we first showed that immunization with Pyfabb/f-, a P. yoelii genetically attenuated parasite, induces killing of CSP-presenting hepatocytes. Depletion of CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells diminished the killing of CSP-expressing hepatocytes, indicating that killing is CD8+ T cell-dependent. Finally we showed that the use of heterologous prime/boost immunization strategies that use genetically attenuated parasites and DNA vaccines enabled the characterization of a novel pre-erythrocytic antigen, Tmp21, as a contributor to Pyfabb/f- induced protection. This technique will be valuable for identification of potentially protective liver stage antigens and has the potential to contribute to the understanding of immunity elicited by whole parasite vaccination, as well as the development of effective subunit malaria vaccines.

  12. Calcium-dependent binding of Escherichia coli alpha-hemolysin to erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    Alpha hemolysin (AH), a protein secreted by certain strains of Escherichia coli, causes lysis of erythrocytes (RBCs) and is cytotoxic for other cells. The primary structure of AH contains an eight amino acid sequence tandemly repeated 13 times near the C-terminus. These repeated sequences are essential for hemolytic activity. AH also requires an unknown modification by an accessory protein, Hly C, for hemolytic activity. The role of calcium in the interaction of Ah with RBCs was investigated using recombinant strains which produced active and inactive forms of the toxin. Hemolytic activity was calcium-dependent. Osmotic protection experiments and immunoblots of SDS-PAGE separated proteins from washed, toxin-treated RBCs showed that the binding of active AH to RBCs was calcium-dependent. Binding of active AH to RBCs increased the calcium permeability of RBC membranes and resulted in changes in membrane protein profiles. The changes in membrane proteins did not cause the lysis of the cells. These results were consistent with a mechanism of lysis involving the formation of cation-selective pores in the membranes of target cells. 45 Ca-autoradiography of the recombinant hemolysins separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to nitrocellulose showed that active AH bound calcium. The domain involved in binding calcium was identified as the tandemly repeated sequences since a deletion hemolysin missing 11 of the 13 repeated sequences did not bind calcium. This deletion hemolysin was non-hemolytic and did not bind to RBC membranes. Hemolysin lacking the Hly C modification was also non-hemolytic and did not bind to RBC membranes. This unmodified AH contained the repeated sequences and bound calcium as efficiently as active AH

  13. The Severity of Plasmodium falciparum infection is associated with transcript levels of var genes encoding endothelial protein C receptor-binding P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mkumbaye, Sixbert I; Wang, Christian W; Lyimo, Eric

    2017-01-01

    By attaching infected erythrocytes to the vascular lining, Plasmodium falciparum parasites leave blood circulation and avoid splenic clearance. This sequestration is central to pathogenesis. Severe malaria is associated with parasites expressing an antigenically distinct P. falciparum erythrocyte...

  14. Immunization with Pre-Erythrocytic Antigen CelTOS from Plasmodium falciparum Elicits Cross-Species Protection against Heterologous Challenge with Plasmodium berghei

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    or the early liver-stages of the mammalian life cycle . One of these antigens is the cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS...Immunization with Pre-Erythrocytic Antigen CelTOS from Plasmodium falciparum Elicits Cross-Species Protection against Heterologous Challenge with... Plasmodium berghei Elke S. Bergmann-Leitner1*, Ryan M. Mease1, Patricia De La Vega1, Tatyana Savranskaya2, Mark Polhemus1, Christian Ockenhouse1, Evelina

  15. The chicken erythrocyte-specific MHC antigen. Characterization and purification of the B-G antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K; Crone, M

    1987-01-01

    and affinity-purified once more. Finally, reverse-phase chromatography resulted in a pure product. The B-G antigen was identified in the various fractions by rocket immunoelectrophoresis. The final product was more than 99% pure, as estimated by SDS-PAGE analysis followed by silver stain of proteins. The yield...

  16. Hydroxychloroquine binding to cytoplasmic domain of Band 3 in human erythrocytes: Novel mechanistic insights into drug structure, efficacy and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Mizuki; Sugawara, Kotomi; Goto, Tatsufumi; Wakui, Hideki; Nunomura, Wataru

    2016-05-13

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is a widely used drug in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. It has also been prescribed for the treatment of malaria owing to its lower toxicity compared to its closely related compound chloroquine (CQ). However, the mechanisms of action of HCQ in erythrocytes (which bind preferentially this drug) have not been documented and the reasons underlying the lower side effects of HCQ compared to CQ remain unclear. Here we show that, although the activity of erythrocyte lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), but not GAPDH, was inhibited by both HCQ and CQ in vitro, LDH activity in erythrocytes incubated with 20 mM HCQ was not significantly reduced within 5 h in contrast to CQ did. Using HCQ coupled Sepharose chromatography (HCQ-Sepharose), we identified Band 3, spectrin, ankyrin, protein 4.1R and protein 4.2 as HCQ binding proteins in human erythrocyte plasma membrane. Recombinant cytoplasmic N-terminal 43 kDa domain of Band 3 bound to HCQ-Sepharose and was eluted with 40 mM (but not 20 mM) HCQ. Band 3 transport activity was reduced by only 23% in the presence of 20 mM HCQ. Taken together, these data demonstrate that HCQ binds to the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of Band 3 in human erythrocytes but does not inhibit dramatically its transport activity. We hypothesize that the trapping of HCQ on Band 3 contributes to the lower side effects of the drug on energy production in erythrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Photolabeling and radioligand binding of human erythrocyte NaK-ATPase with 125I-derivatives of cymarin and digitoxigenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    NaK-ATPase is an enzyme which maintains Na + and K + gradients across the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, and is specifically inhibited by cardiac glycosides. The cardiac glycoside binding site is located primarily on the catalytic α subunit but the glycoprotein β and proteolipid-γ subunits may also contribute to the structure of the site. In order to label the cardiac glycoside binding site of human erythrocytes, four photoaffinity ligands with very high specific radioactivity were synthesized. The compounds, which are abbreviated [ 125 I]AISC, [ 125 I]AIPP-GluD, [ 125 I]AIPP-GalD and [ 125 I]IA-GalD, were all effective photolabels for NaK-ATPase as shown by ouabain-protectable, covalent labeling of the α, β, and proteolipid-γ subunits. In order to study the possible existence of a very high affinity binding site in erythrocyte NaK-ATPase, a carrier-free radioligand, [ 125 I]I-TASC, was synthesized; this compound had the same structure as [ 125 I]AISC except that a light-sensitive azide group was replaced with a hydroxyl group. Competitive binding assays with cymarin against 0.2 nM [ 125 I]I-TASC suggested two classes of erythrocyte binding sites. Scatchard analysis of direct [ 125 I]I-TASC binding indicated that the very high affinity, low capacity class of erythrocyte bindings sites had a K D of 54 pM and a B max of 23 fmol/mg protein

  18. The green hemoproteins of bovine erythrocytes. II. Spectral, ligand-binding, and electrochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFilippi, L J; Hultquist, D E

    1978-05-10

    The two green hemoproteins isolated from bovine erythrocytes (form I and form II) have been characterized as to spectral, electrochemical, and chemical properties. The absorption spectra of the isolated hemoproteins are typical of high spin ferric states. Reduction of the hemoproteins yields high spin ferrohemoproteins. Complexation of the ferrohemoproteins with CO and the ferrihemoproteins with cyanide yields low spin complexes, demonstrating the presence of an exchangeable weak field ligand in both the ferrous and ferric states of the hemoproteins. The differences in position and intensity of the absorption peaks of the visible spectra allow the two forms to be distinguished from one another. The midpoint potential of forms I and II were found to be +0.075 and +0.019 V, respectively, at pH 6.4 and +0.038 and -0.005 V, respectively, at pH 7.0. This is consistent with the gaining of 1 proton/electron during the reduction. The Nernst plot reveals an unusual 0.5-electron transfer, whereas a quantitative titration demonstrates a 1-electron transfer. Form I binds cyanide more tightly than form II (KD of 84 and 252 micrometer, respectively). The observed spectral, electrochemical, and ligand-binding differences between forms I and II can be explained in terms of a greater electron-withdrawing ability of the side chains of the heme of form I relative to the heme of form II.

  19. Erythrocyte aging in sickle cell disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological removal of old erythrocytes from the circulation by macrophages is initiated by binding of autologous IgG to senescent cell antigen (SCA). SCA is generated from the anion exchanger band 3. This process is accompanied by a number of alterations in the function and structure of band 3.

  20. Nonimmune immunoglobulin binding and multiple adhesion characterize Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes of placental origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasti, Niloofar; Namusoke, Fatuma; Chêne, Arnaud

    2006-01-01

    The harmful effects of pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) are engendered by the heavy sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized RBCs in the placenta. It is well documented that this process is mediated by interactions of parasite-encoded variant surface antigens and placental receptors...... and adhesion to multiple receptors (IgG/IgM/HA/CSA) rather than the exclusive binding to CSA is a characteristic of fresh Ugandan placental isolates. These findings are of importance for the understanding of the pathogenesis of placental malaria and have implications for the ongoing efforts to develop a global...

  1. Temporal expression and localization patterns of variant surface antigens in clinical Plasmodium falciparum isolates during erythrocyte schizogony.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bachmann

    Full Text Available Avoidance of antibody-mediated immune recognition allows parasites to establish chronic infections and enhances opportunities for transmission. The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum possesses a number of multi-copy gene families, including var, rif, stevor and pfmc-2tm, which encode variant antigens believed to be expressed on the surfaces of infected erythrocytes. However, most studies of these antigens are based on in vitro analyses of culture-adapted isolates, most commonly the laboratory strain 3D7, and thus may not be representative of the unique challenges encountered by P. falciparum in the human host. To investigate the expression of the var, rif-A, rif-B, stevor and pfmc-2tm family genes under conditions that mimic more closely the natural course of infection, ex vivo clinical P. falciparum isolates were analyzed using a novel quantitative real-time PCR approach. Expression patterns in the clinical isolates at various time points during the first intraerythrocytic developmental cycle in vitro were compared to those of strain 3D7. In the clinical isolates, in contrast to strain 3D7, there was a peak of expression of the multi-copy gene families rif-A, stevor and pfmc-2tm at the young ring stage, in addition to the already known expression peak in trophozoites. Furthermore, most of the variant surface antigen families were overexpressed in the clinical isolates relative to 3D7, with the exception of the pfmc-2tm family, expression of which was higher in 3D7 parasites. Immunofluorescence analyses performed in parallel revealed two stage-dependent localization patterns of RIFIN, STEVOR and PfMC-2TM. Proteins were exported into the infected erythrocyte at the young trophozoite stage, whereas they remained inside the parasite membrane during schizont stage and were subsequently observed in different compartments in the merozoite. These results reveal a complex pattern of expression of P. falciparum multi-copy gene families during

  2. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine 125-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masouredis, S.P.; Branks, M.J.; Garratty, G.; Victoria, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine 125 -labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. 125 I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two 125 I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D

  3. Protective immune mechanisms against pre-erythrocytic forms of Plasmodium berghei depend on the target antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke S. Bergmann-Leitner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccines are believed to either stop the injected sporozoites from reaching the liver or to direct cellular immune responses towards eliminating infected hepatocytes. The present study reveals for the first time the anatomical sites at which these immune mechanisms act against the malaria parasites. To determine the mechanisms leading to protection mediated by two previously characterized vaccines against either the circumsporozoite protein (CSP or the cell traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS, mice were immunized and subsequently challenged by subcutaneous injection of salivary gland sporozoites of luciferase-transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites. The In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS was used to identify the anatomical site where the vaccine-induced immune response eliminates sporozoites after injection. The data demonstrate that CSP-based immunity acts at the site of infection (skin whereas CelTOS-based immunity is only partially efficient in the skin and allows reduced levels of liver infection that can be subsequently cleared. The results of this study challenge assumptions regarding CSP-mediated immune mechanisms and call into question the validity of some commonly used assays to evaluate anti-CSP immune responses. The knowledge of the mechanism and events leading to infection or immune defense will guide supportive treatment with drugs or combination therapies and thus accelerate the development of effective antimalarial strategies.

  4. An erythrocyte-specific DNA-binding factor recognizes a regulatory sequence common to all chicken globin genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.; Reitman, M.; Felsenfeld, G.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have identified a protein present only in erythroid cells that binds to two adjacent sites within an enhancer region of the chicken β-globin locus. Mutation of the sites, so that binding by the factor can no longer be detected in vitro, leads to a loss of enhancing ability, assayed by transient expression in primary erythrocytes. Binding sites for the erythroid-specific factor (Eryf1) are found within regulatory regions for all chicken globin genes. A strong Eryf1 binding site is also present within the enhancer of at least one human globin gene, and proteins from human erythroid cells (but not HeLa cells) bind to both the chicken and the human sites

  5. Prevalence of Dog Erythrocyte Antigens 1, 4, and 7 in Podenco Ibicenco (Ibizan Hounds from Ibiza Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Spada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of Dog Erythrocyte Antigens (DEA 1, 4, and 7 in Ibizan hounds, to compare the results with the prevalence of DEA in Spanish greyhounds, and to determine the risk of sensitization following the first transfusion of blood not typed for DEA 1 and the probability of an acute hemolytic reaction following a second incompatible transfusion using untyped DEA 1 blood. DEA 1, 4, and 7 status was determined in 92 Ibizan hounds. Results were compared with the previously reported prevalence in Spanish greyhounds. The risks of sensitization and of a hemolytic transfusion reaction were determined amongst Ibizan hounds and between Ibizan hounds and Spanish greyhounds. The prevalence of DEA 1, 4, and 7 was 75%, 98.9%, and 25%, respectively. There was a significantly higher expression of DEA 1 and 7 in Ibizan hounds than in Spanish greyhounds. The probability of sensitization of a recipient dog to DEA 1 with transfusions amongst Ibizan hounds was 18.5% and between Ibizan hounds and Spanish greyhounds was 13.7%. The probability of an acute hemolytic reaction in each group was 3.5% and 1.9%, respectively. There is a higher prevalence of DEA 1 and 7 in Ibizan hounds than in other sighthounds.

  6. Prevalence of Dog Erythrocyte Antigens 1, 4, and 7 in Podenco Ibicenco (Ibizan Hounds) from Ibiza Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proverbio, Daniela; Viñals Flórez, Luis Miguel; Serra Gómez de la Serna, Blanca; del Rosario Perlado Chamizo, Maria; Baggiani, Luciana; Perego, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of Dog Erythrocyte Antigens (DEA) 1, 4, and 7 in Ibizan hounds, to compare the results with the prevalence of DEA in Spanish greyhounds, and to determine the risk of sensitization following the first transfusion of blood not typed for DEA 1 and the probability of an acute hemolytic reaction following a second incompatible transfusion using untyped DEA 1 blood. DEA 1, 4, and 7 status was determined in 92 Ibizan hounds. Results were compared with the previously reported prevalence in Spanish greyhounds. The risks of sensitization and of a hemolytic transfusion reaction were determined amongst Ibizan hounds and between Ibizan hounds and Spanish greyhounds. The prevalence of DEA 1, 4, and 7 was 75%, 98.9%, and 25%, respectively. There was a significantly higher expression of DEA 1 and 7 in Ibizan hounds than in Spanish greyhounds. The probability of sensitization of a recipient dog to DEA 1 with transfusions amongst Ibizan hounds was 18.5% and between Ibizan hounds and Spanish greyhounds was 13.7%. The probability of an acute hemolytic reaction in each group was 3.5% and 1.9%, respectively. There is a higher prevalence of DEA 1 and 7 in Ibizan hounds than in other sighthounds. PMID:27034890

  7. Characterization of human placental glycosaminoglycans and regional binding to VAR2CSA in malaria infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaudet, Julie M; Mansur, Leandra; Joo, Eun Ji

    2014-01-01

    expressing VAR2CSA on the erythrocyte surface. This protein adheres to a low-sulfated chondroitin sulfate-A found in placental tissue causing great harm to both mother and developing fetus. In rare cases, the localization of infected erythrocytes to the placenta can even result in the vertical transmission...... placental tissue accessible to parasites in the bloodstream, suggesting it is the primary receptor for parasite infected red blood cells....

  8. Influence of reductive diet and physical aerobic training on binding and degradation of 125J-insulin by erythrocyte receptors in children with simple obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczesniak, L.; Rychlewski, T.; Kasprzak, Z.; Banaszak, F.

    1994-01-01

    Insuline resistance, expressed by lower insuline binding by receptors, is related to the obesity. Improvement of the binding was observed together with reduction of body weight and in result of physical exercise. In the work was investigated an influence of complex result of reductive diet at the level of 1300-1500 kcal and systematic half-an-hour aerobic exercise on binding and degradation of 125 J-insulin by erythrocyte receptors in children with simple obesity. The rest binding of insulin by erythrocyte receptors in obese children was compared with the result observed in the children having normal body weight. Results of these researches confirm that systematic physical exercise connected with reductive diet improves the indexes of lipid balance, increases efficiency of the organism, estimated by maximal oxygen absorption, decreases body weight and improves binding of 125 J-insulin to erythrocyte receptors. (authors)

  9. Erythrocyte Saturation with IgG Is Required for Inducing Antibody-Mediated Immune Suppression and Impacts Both Erythrocyte Clearance and Antigen-Modulation Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Leal, Yoelys; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2018-02-15

    Anti-D prevents hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, and this mechanism has been referred to as Ab-mediated immune suppression (AMIS). Anti-D, as well as other polyclonal AMIS-inducing Abs, most often induce both epitope masking and erythrocyte clearance mechanisms. We have previously observed that some Abs that successfully induce AMIS effects could be split into those that mediate epitope masking versus those that induce erythrocyte clearance, allowing the ability to analyze these mechanisms separately. In addition, AMIS-inducing activity has recently been shown to induce Ag modulation (Ag loss from the erythrocyte surface). To assess these mechanisms, we immunized mice with transgenic murine RBCs expressing a single Ag protein comprising a recombinant Ag composed of hen egg lysozyme, OVA sequences comprising aa 251-349, and the human Duffy transmembrane protein (HOD-Ag) with serial doses of polyclonal anti-OVA IgG as the AMIS-inducing Ab. The anti-OVA Ab induced AMIS in the absence of apparent epitope masking. AMIS occurred only when the erythrocytes appeared saturated with IgG. This Ab was capable of inducing HOD-RBC clearance, as well as loss of the OVA epitope at doses of Ab that caused AMIS effects. HOD-RBCs also lost reactivity with Abs specific for the hen egg lysozyme and Duffy portions of the Ag consistent with the initiation of Ag modulation and/or trogocytosis mechanisms. These data support the concept that an AMIS-inducing Ab that does not cause epitope masking can induce AMIS effects in a manner consistent with RBC clearance and/or Ag modulation. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Dog erythrocyte antigens (DEA) 1, 4, 7 and suspected naturally occurring anti-DEA 7 antibodies in Italian Corso dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, E; Proverbio, D; Priolo, V; Ippolito, D; Baggiani, L; Perego, R; Pennisi, M G

    2017-04-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence of dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA) 1, 4 and 7 and naturally occurring anti-DEA7 antibodies in Italian Corso dogs. In addition, we correlated DEAs with different epidemiologic variables, compared the prevalence of DEAs against other canine populations and assessed the risk of sensitisation and transfusion reactions (TRs) following unmatched transfusion. Blood samples from 100 Corso dogs were evaluated for DEA 1, 4, 7 and naturally occurring anti-DEA 7 antibodies. Seventy-one percent of samples were DEA 1-negative, 100% tested DEA 4-positive, and 95% tested DEA 7-negative. Suspected anti-DEA7 antibodies were found in 32% dogs. The DEA 1 and 7-negative phenotypes were significantly more common than in most canine populations. When a previously tested Italian canine population was considered as blood donors for Corso dogs, the risk of DEA 1 sensitisation using DEA 1 untyped blood was 29%, and of acute haemolytic TRs after a second untyped DEA 1-incompatible transfusion was 8%. The potential for delayed TRs between DEA 7-negative Corso dogs with suspected naturally occurring anti-DEA 7 antibodies receiving untyped DEA 7-positive blood was 11%. Conversely, when Corso dogs were blood donors for the same population, the risk of DEA 1 sensitisation was 17% and the risk of an acute haemolytic TR after a second DEA 1-incompatible blood transfusion was 3%. Corso dogs can be suitable blood donors. Additional studies are needed to clarify whether the high prevalence of naturally occurring anti-DEA 7 antibodies in this breed could increase their risk of delayed TRs when they are blood recipients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Specific binding of antigen-antibody in physiological environments: Measurement, force characteristics and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xin; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, Lu; Xie, Shusen; Petti, Lucia; Wang, Shaomin; Wang, Fuyan

    2018-05-01

    The specific recognition of the antigen by the antibody is the crucial step in immunoassays. Measurement and analysis of the specific recognition, including the ways in which it is influenced by external factors are of paramount significance for the quality of the immunoassays. Using prostate-specific antigen (PSA)/anti-PSA antibody and α-fetoprotein (AFP) /anti-AFP antibody as examples, we have proposed a novel solution for measuring the binding forces between the antigens and their corresponding antibodies in different physiological environments by combining laminar flow control technology and optical tweezers technology. On the basis of the experimental results, the different binding forces of PSA/anti-PSA antibody and AFP/anti-AFP antibody in the same phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) environments are analysed by comparing the affinity constant of the two antibodies and the number of antigenic determinants of the two antigens. In different electrolyte environments, the changes of the binding force of antigens-antibodies are explained by the polyelectrolyte effect and hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, in different pH environments, the changes of binding forces of antigens-antibodies are attributed to the role of the denaturation of protein. The study aims to recognise the antigen-antibody immune mechanism, thus ensuring further understanding of the biological functions of tumour markers, and it promises to be very useful for the clinical diagnosis of early-stage cancer.

  12. Development of a solid-phase radioimmunoassay for antibody to antigens of Babesia bovis infected bovine erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahl, L.P.; Anders, R.F.; Mitchell, G.F. (Walter and Eliza Hall Inst. of Medical Research, Parkville (Australia)); Callow, L.L.; Rodwell, B.J. (Animal Research Inst. Wacol (Australia). Tick Fever Research Centre)

    1982-06-01

    A quantitative solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) has been developed for the purpose of ranking sera from exposed animals according to their titre of anti-B. bovis antibody. The antigen was a sonicate of lysed infected blood cells, and antibody binding was detected with /sup 125/I-labelled anti-bovine IgG. The assay was tested using sera from experimentally infected splenectomized and intact cattle and from animals resident in an endemic area. A high specificity for B. bovis was demonstrated. There was good agreement in identifying exposed cattle when the test was compared with an indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test although no correlation was seen between titres obtained in the two tests. Analysis of the effects of challenge infection with B. bovis on IFA and RIA titres in previously exposed animals illustrated that the RIA was a more sensitive test for detecting changes in antibody titre.

  13. Antigen-binding radioimmunoassays for human IgG antibodies to bovine ν-lactoglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.W.; Paganelli, R.; Levinsky, R.J.; Williams, A.

    1983-01-01

    A double antibody antigen-binding assay for the detection of human IgG antibodies to the bovine milk allergen ν-lactoglobulin is described. The levels of such antibodies in patients with established cows' milk protein intolerance were significantly higher than the levels observed in a healthy control group (P<0.01). The assay showed excellent correlation with a solid phase antigen binding assay (rsub(s) = 0.8, P<0.001). (Auth.)

  14. Plasmodium knowlesi Skeleton-Binding Protein 1 Localizes to the 'Sinton and Mulligan' Stipplings in the Cytoplasm of Monkey and Human Erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucky, Amuza Byaruhanga; Sakaguchi, Miako; Katakai, Yuko; Kawai, Satoru; Yahata, Kazuhide; Templeton, Thomas J; Kaneko, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, exports protein products to the infected erythrocyte to introduce modifications necessary for the establishment of nutrient acquisition and surface display of host interaction ligands. Erythrocyte remodeling impacts parasite virulence and disease pathology and is well documented for the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, but has been less described for other Plasmodium species. For P. falciparum, the exported protein skeleton-binding protein 1 (PfSBP1) is involved in the trafficking of erythrocyte surface ligands and localized to membranous structures within the infected erythrocyte, termed Maurer's clefts. In this study, we analyzed SBP1 orthologs across the Plasmodium genus by BLAST analysis and conserved gene synteny, which were also recently described by de Niz et al. (2016). To evaluate the localization of an SBP1 ortholog, we utilized the zoonotic malaria parasite, Plasmodium knowlesi. Immunofluorescence assay of transgenic P. knowlesi parasites expressing epitope-tagged recombinant PkSBP1 revealed a punctate staining pattern reminiscent of Maurer's clefts, following infection of either monkey or human erythrocytes. The recombinant PkSBP1-positive puncta co-localized with Giemsa-stained structures, known as 'Sinton and Mulligan' stipplings. Immunoelectron microscopy also showed that recombinant PkSBP1 localizes within or on the membranous structures akin to the Maurer's clefts. The recombinant PkSBP1 expressed in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes co-localized with PfSBP1 at the Maurer's clefts, indicating an analogous trafficking pattern. A member of the P. knowlesi 2TM protein family was also expressed and localized to membranous structures in infected monkey erythrocytes. These results suggest that the trafficking machinery and induced erythrocyte cellular structures of P. knowlesi are similar following infection of both monkey and human erythrocytes, and are conserved with P. falciparum.

  15. Plasmodium knowlesi Skeleton-Binding Protein 1 Localizes to the ‘Sinton and Mulligan’ Stipplings in the Cytoplasm of Monkey and Human Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucky, Amuza Byaruhanga; Sakaguchi, Miako; Katakai, Yuko; Kawai, Satoru; Yahata, Kazuhide; Templeton, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, exports protein products to the infected erythrocyte to introduce modifications necessary for the establishment of nutrient acquisition and surface display of host interaction ligands. Erythrocyte remodeling impacts parasite virulence and disease pathology and is well documented for the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, but has been less described for other Plasmodium species. For P. falciparum, the exported protein skeleton-binding protein 1 (PfSBP1) is involved in the trafficking of erythrocyte surface ligands and localized to membranous structures within the infected erythrocyte, termed Maurer's clefts. In this study, we analyzed SBP1 orthologs across the Plasmodium genus by BLAST analysis and conserved gene synteny, which were also recently described by de Niz et al. (2016). To evaluate the localization of an SBP1 ortholog, we utilized the zoonotic malaria parasite, Plasmodium knowlesi. Immunofluorescence assay of transgenic P. knowlesi parasites expressing epitope-tagged recombinant PkSBP1 revealed a punctate staining pattern reminiscent of Maurer's clefts, following infection of either monkey or human erythrocytes. The recombinant PkSBP1-positive puncta co-localized with Giemsa-stained structures, known as ‘Sinton and Mulligan’ stipplings. Immunoelectron microscopy also showed that recombinant PkSBP1 localizes within or on the membranous structures akin to the Maurer's clefts. The recombinant PkSBP1 expressed in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes co-localized with PfSBP1 at the Maurer's clefts, indicating an analogous trafficking pattern. A member of the P. knowlesi 2TM protein family was also expressed and localized to membranous structures in infected monkey erythrocytes. These results suggest that the trafficking machinery and induced erythrocyte cellular structures of P. knowlesi are similar following infection of both monkey and human erythrocytes, and are conserved with P. falciparum. PMID:27732628

  16. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, E.K.; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from [ 35 S]methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of ≅72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO 4 /PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation

  17. Binding of monoclonal antibody to protein antigen in fluid phase or bound to solid supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, S J

    1982-01-01

    Rat monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to fragment D (FgD) of human fibrinogen was used to characterize the direct binding of antibody to protein in solution or bound to solid supports. Purified IgG, F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab' were prepared from ascites fluid of hybridoma 104-14B which is a fusion product of spleen cells from a rat immunized with FgD and the mouse myeloma cell line, P3-X63-Ag8. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of radioiodinated antibody preparations demonstrated the presence of hybrid immunoglobulin molecules, but only structures having rat heavy and rat light chains had active antibody combinig sites. The affinity constant for IgG as well as F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab', 6x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/, was identical when tested using fluid phase antigen (/sup 125/I-labeled FgD). Affinity constants determined for direct binding of iodinated IgG using FgD immobilized on solid supports showed a slight dependence on the antigen concentration used in the measurement. These values ranged from 0.5x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ at high antigen concentrations (1.3x10/sup -7/ M) to 9x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ at low antigen concentration (1.3x10/sup -10/ M). Binding constants for F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab' gave similar results indicating that binding was homogeneous and univalent. The capacity of solid state antigen to bind antibody varied with the method used to bind FgD to the solid support. FgD bound directly to polystyrene plates was least efficient at binding labeled antibody; FgD bound to plates through intermediate carriers poly(L-lysine) was only slightly more efficient, while antigen bound to Sepharose beads by cyanogen bromide activation was the most active.

  18. Low capacity of erythrocytes to bind with immune complexes via C3b receptor in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: correlation with pathological proteinuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Y.; Terai, C.; Minota, S.; Takano, K.; Miyakawa, Y.; Takaku, F.

    1985-01-01

    Erythrocytes from 51 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and 75 controls were tested for the capacity to bind aggregated human gamma-globulin labeled with radioiodine in the presence of complement. Both in patients and controls, a trimodal distribution of binding capacity was observed. Low (less than 9% of the added radioactivity), intermediate (9-17%), and high binding (more than 17%) were observed in 13, 58, and 29% in controls and in 49, 43 and 8% in lupus patients. The low binding capacity of erythrocytes persisted even after patients entered remission following steroid therapy. A genetic control of binding capacity was supported by familial surveys. Prevalence of pathological proteinuria was significantly higher in patients with low binding capacity than those with intermediate or high binding capacity (16/25 vs 7/26, P less than 0.01). These results indicate that an impaired physiological disposal of immune complexes via the erythrocyte C3b receptor in lupus patients may contribute to the development of renal involvement

  19. Decreased triiodothyronine receptor binding in skeletal muscle nuclei and erythrocyte membranes of obese (ob/ob) mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilvary, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Hindlimb skeletal muscle weights and binding of L-tri-iodothyronine (T 3 ) to isolated nuclei of this tissue were investigated in obese (ob/ob) mice and their lean littermates. Maximal binding capacities (Bmax) and dissociation constants (Kd) were determined by incubating isolated muscle nuclei with increasing conc. of 125 I-T 3 (0.4 nM to 4nM). At 12 wks. of age, although weighing substantially more, obese mice had only 55% as much muscle mass as their lean littermates. There was no phenotype effect observed for Kd, however, Bmax was significantly less for the obese mice. In a second experiment, a 16-wk. feeding study was conducted with 4 groups of mice according to the following design: lean mice fed rodent chow; obese mice fed rodent chow; obese mice, n-6 fatty acid (FA)-rich diet; and obese mice, n-3FA-rich diet. Erythrocyte T 3 receptor binding capacities were measured by incubating red cell ghosts from mice of these 4 groups with 125 I-T 3 . As with skeletal muscle nuclei there were no phenotype effects observed for Kd between any two groups. In contrasts obese mice fed chow and n-6FA-rich diets both exhibited lower Bmax than their lean counterparts, while no significant difference was observed between the latter group and the obese mice fed an n-3FA-rich diet. Bmax values of the n-6 group were also decreased compared to the n-3 group

  20. Studies on the immune response to fixed antigens. Preferential induction of helper function with heavily trinitrophenylated sheep erythrocytes, and glutaraldehyde-treated sheep erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahan, M.; Berman-Goldman, R.; Saltoun, R.; Naor, D.

    1976-01-01

    Mice primed with heavily trinitrophenylated sheep red cells (TNP 128 SRC) or glutaraldehyde-treated sheep red cells (G-SRC) developed an early helper function mediated by thymus-derived cells. Such mice were able to produce high secondary responses to both hapten and carrier after challenge 2 days after priming, with lightly trinitrophenylated SRC (TNP 0 . 14 SRC). However, the primary response of the TNP 128 SRC or G-SRC-primed mice were very low to undetectable, and their secondary responses were also low when the challenge antigen was administered 4 days after priming or later. Inhibitory humoral factor(s) which were induced in the primed animals appeared responsible for the decreased capacity of primed mice to mount a secondary response when challenged later than 2 days after priming. Transfer of spleen cells from TNP 128 SRC-primed mice to sublethally irradiated recipients circumvents their exposure to inhibitory humoral factor(s) present in intact animals allowing them to react with challenge antigen. Enriched populations of T cells, but not B cells, were able to transfer this early immunologic memory to irradiated recipients. The theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed

  1. Monoclonal antibody OKM5 inhibits the in vitro binding of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to monocytes, endothelial, and C32 melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnwell, J.W.; Ockenhouse, C.F.; Knowles, D.M. II

    1985-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind in vitro to human endothelial cells, monocytes, and a certain melanoma cell line. Evidence suggests that this interaction is mediated by similar mechanisms which lead to the sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes in vivo through their attachment to endothelial cells of small blood vessels. They show here the monoclonal antibody OKM5, previously shown to react with the membranes of endothelial cells, monocyte,s and platelets, also reacts with the C32 melanoma cell line which also binds P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. At relatively low concentrations, OKM5 inhibits and reverses the in vitro adherence of infected erythrocytes to target cells. As with monocytes, OKM5 antibody recognizes an 125 I-labeled protein of approximately 88 Kd on the surface of C32 melanoma cells. It seems likely, therefore, that the 88 Kd polypeptide plays a role in cytoadherence, possibly as the receptor or part of a receptor for a ligand on the surface of infected erythrocytes

  2. Computational identification of antigen-binding antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkovitz, Anat; Leiderman, Olga; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Byk, Gerardo; Ofran, Yanay

    2013-03-01

    Determining which parts of the Ab are essential for Ag recognition and binding is crucial for understanding B cell-mediated immunity. Identification of fragments of Abs that maintain specificity to the Ag will also allow for the development of improved Ab-based therapy and diagnostics. In this article, we show that structural analysis of Ab-Ag complexes reveals which fragments of the Ab may bind the Ag on their own. In particular, it is possible to predict whether a given CDR is likely to bind the Ag as a peptide by analyzing the energetic contribution of each CDR to Ag binding and by assessing to what extent the interaction between that CDR and the Ag depends on other CDRs. To demonstrate this, we analyzed five Ab-Ag complexes and predicted for each of them which of the CDRs may bind the Ag on its own as a peptide. We then show that these predictions are in agreement with our experimental analysis and with previously published experimental results. These findings promote our understanding of the modular nature of Ab-Ag interactions and lay the foundation for the rational design of active CDR-derived peptides.

  3. B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, binds Vitamin D3; conservation of binding among albuminoid molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzaneh, N.K.; Walden, T.L. Jr.; Hearing, V.J.; Gersten, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, is a member of the serum albumin protein family. Other members of this family include serum albumin (SMA), a-fetoprotein (AFP), vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and C700. The primary structure and biochemical functions of B700, as well as its in vivo metabolic fate are largely unknown. The authors examined the functional characteristics of MSA, AFP, and DBP, and for their ability to specifically bind [ 3 H]-1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D 3 . Scatchard analysis revealed a single binding site for B700 with a Kd of 51,000 M and a Bmax of 4.51 x 10 -7 . There is no significant difference between the Kd and Bmax values among the albuminoid proteins. However, differences in the binding sites could be distinguished by competition of the 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 with other steroids. 2nM of vitamin D 3 , vitamin D 2 , or estrogen competed for the specific binding of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 by B700 but not by DBP. The MSA binding site for 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D 3 more closely resembles that of DBP than B700. These data indicate that the binding function of the albuminoid proteins has been conserved in the B700 melanoma antigen

  4. Determining the binding affinity of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies towards their native unpurified antigens in human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Bee

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are a growing segment of therapeutics, yet their in vitro characterization remains challenging. While it is essential that a therapeutic mAb recognizes the native, physiologically occurring epitope, the generation and selection of mAbs often rely on the use of purified recombinant versions of the antigen that may display non-native epitopes. Here, we present a method to measure both, the binding affinity of a therapeutic mAb towards its native unpurified antigen in human serum, and the antigen's endogenous concentration, by combining the kinetic exclusion assay and Biacore's calibration free concentration analysis. To illustrate the broad utility of our method, we studied a panel of mAbs raised against three disparate soluble antigens that are abundant in the serum of healthy donors: proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9, progranulin (PGRN, and fatty acid binding protein (FABP4. We also determined the affinity of each mAb towards its purified recombinant antigen and assessed whether the interactions were pH-dependent. Of the six mAbs studied, three did not appear to discriminate between the serum and recombinant forms of the antigen; one mAb bound serum antigen with a higher affinity than recombinant antigen; and two mAbs displayed a different affinity for serum antigen that could be explained by a pH-dependent interaction. Our results highlight the importance of taking pH into account when measuring the affinities of mAbs towards their serum antigens, since the pH of serum samples becomes increasingly alkaline upon aerobic handling.

  5. Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in ex vivo perfused placental tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehrson, Caroline; Mathiesen, Line; Heno, Kristine K

    2016-01-01

    placental tissue. RESULTS: The ex vivo placental perfusion model was modified to study adhesion of infected erythrocytes binding to CSA, endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) or a transgenic parasite where P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 expression had been shut down. Infected erythrocytes......, such as binding to immunoglobulins. Furthermore, other parasite antigens have been associated with placental malaria. These findings have important implications for placental malaria vaccine design. The objective of this study was to adapt and describe a biologically relevant model of parasite adhesion in intact...... expressing VAR2CSA accumulated in perfused placental tissue whereas the EPCR binding and the transgenic parasite did not. Soluble CSA and antibodies specific against VAR2CSA inhibited binding of infected erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: The ex vivo model provides a novel way of studying receptor-ligand interactions...

  6. Effect of Scoparia dulcis extract on insulin receptors in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats: studies on insulin binding to erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pari, Leelavinothan; Latha, Muniappan; Rao, Chippada Appa

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the insulin-receptor-binding effect of Scoparia dulcis plant extract in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced male Wistar rats, using circulating erythrocytes (ER) as a model system. An aqueous extract of S dulcis plant (SPEt) (200 mg/kg body weight) was administered orally. We measured blood levels of glucose and plasma insulin and the binding of insulin to cell-membrane ER receptors. Glibenclamide was used as standard reference drug. The mean specific binding of insulin to ER was significantly lower in diabetic control rats (DC) (55.0 +/- 2.8%) than in SPEt-treated (70.0 +/- 3.5%)- and glibenclamide-treated (65.0 +/- 3.3%) diabetic rats, resulting in a significant decrease in plasma insulin. Scatchard plot analysis demonstrated that the decrease in insulin binding was accounted for by a lower number of insulin receptor sites per cell in DC rats when compared with SPEt- and glibenclamide-treated rats. High-affinity (Kd1), low-affinity (Kd2), and kinetic analysis revealed an increase in the average receptor affinity in ER from SPEt and glibenclamide treated diabetic rats having 2.5 +/- 0.15 x 10(10) M(-1) (Kd1); 17.0 +/- 1.0 x 10(-8) M(-1) (Kd2), and 2.0 +/- 0.1 x 10(-10) M(-1) (Kd1); 12.3 +/- 0.9 x 10(-8) M(-1) (Kd2) compared with 1.0 +/- 0.08 x 10(-10) M(-1) (Kd1); 2.7 +/- 0.25 x 10(-8) M(-1) (Kd2) in DC rats. The results suggest an acute alteration in the number of insulin receptors on ER membranes in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Treatment with SPEt and glibenclamide significantly improved specific insulin binding, with receptor number and affinity binding (p < 0.001) reaching almost normal non-diabetic levels. The data presented here show that SPEt and glibenclamide increase total ER membrane insulin binding sites with a concomitant significant increase in plasma insulin.

  7. Solid phase measurements of antibody and lectin binding to xenogenic carbohydrate antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In future pig-to-man xenotransplantation it is important to master tools that identify potentially xenogenic alphagalactose (Galalpha) antigens in the doner tissue. DESIGN AND METHODS: We have measured the binding potentials of Galalpha detecting lectins and antibodies, including...

  8. Bat Caliciviruses and Human Noroviruses Are Antigenically Similar and Have Overlapping Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Jacob F; Lindesmith, Lisa C; Debbink, Kari; Beall, Anne; Mallory, Michael L; Yount, Boyd L; Graham, Rachel L; Huynh, Jeremy; Gates, J Edward; Donaldson, Eric F; Baric, Ralph S

    2018-05-22

    Emerging zoonotic viral diseases remain a challenge to global public health. Recent surveillance studies have implicated bats as potential reservoirs for a number of viral pathogens, including coronaviruses and Ebola viruses. Caliciviridae represent a major viral family contributing to emerging diseases in both human and animal populations and have been recently identified in bats. In this study, we blended metagenomics, phylogenetics, homology modeling, and in vitro assays to characterize two novel bat calicivirus (BtCalV) capsid sequences, corresponding to strain BtCalV/A10/USA/2009, identified in Perimyotis subflavus near Little Orleans, MD, and bat norovirus. We observed that bat norovirus formed virus-like particles and had epitopes and receptor-binding patterns similar to those of human noroviruses. To determine whether these observations stretch across multiple bat caliciviruses, we characterized a novel bat calicivirus, BtCalV/A10/USA/2009. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BtCalV/A10/USA/2009 likely represents a novel Caliciviridae genus and is most closely related to "recoviruses." Homology modeling revealed that the capsid sequences of BtCalV/A10/USA/2009 and bat norovirus resembled human norovirus capsid sequences and retained host ligand binding within the receptor-binding domains similar to that seen with human noroviruses. Both caliciviruses bound histo-blood group antigens in patterns that overlapped those seen with human and animal noroviruses. Taken together, our results indicate the potential for bat caliciviruses to bind histo-blood group antigens and overcome a significant barrier to cross-species transmission. Additionally, we have shown that bat norovirus maintains antigenic epitopes similar to those seen with human noroviruses, providing further evidence of evolutionary descent. Our results reiterate the importance of surveillance of wild-animal populations, especially of bats, for novel viral pathogens. IMPORTANCE Caliciviruses are

  9. Na,K-ATPase binding sites in human erythrocytes in cirrhosis of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, O.; Oetting, G.; Bossaller, C.

    1985-01-01

    The number of red blood cell ouabain binding sites, total-body potassium (TBK), serum potassium, exchangeable sodium, and serum sodium was studied in 24 patients with cirrhosis of the liver. The number of red cell ouabain binding sites, measured by equilibrium binding of 3 H-ouabain, showed a significant increase in the number of Na,K pumps in patients with cirrhosis of the liver (447+-99) as compared with a control group (281+-50, n=36). TBK was measured by counting the endogenous K-40 in a whole-body counter. TBK was 76+-10% in cirrhosis. This significant reduction in TBK was accompanied by normal serum potassium levels, and slightly decreased serum sodium levels in cirrhosis, however exchangeable sodium (Na-24) was increased in cirrhosis of the liver (55+-13 mmol/kg) compared with controls (40+-7 mmol/kg). These results support the suggestion that changes of sodium-potassium concentration at the cell membrane may regulate the synthesis of Na,K-pump molecules. (orig.) [de

  10. Eculizumab treatment: stochastic occurrence of C3 binding to individual PNH erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Sica

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C5 blockade by eculizumab prevents complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH. However, C3-bound PNH red blood cells (RBCs, arising in almost all treated patients, may undergo extravascular hemolysis reducing clinical benefits. Despite the uniform deficiency of CD55 and of CD59, there are always two distinct populations of PNH RBCs, with (C3+ and without (C3− C3 binding. Methods To investigate this paradox, the phenomenon has been modeled in vitro by incubating RBCs from eculizumab untreated PNH patients with compatible sera containing eculizumab, and by assessing the C3 binding after activation of complement alternative pathway. Results When RBCs from untreated patients were exposed in vitro to activated complement in the context of C5-blockade, there was the prompt appearance of a distinct C3+ PNH RBC population whose size increased with time and also with the rate of complement activation. Eventually, all PNH RBCs become C3+ to the same extent, without differences between old and young (reticulocytes PNH RBCs. Conclusions This study indicates that the distinct (C3+ and C3− PNH RBC populations are not intrinsically different; rather, they result from a stochastic all-or-nothing phenomenon linked to the time-dependent cumulative probability of each individual PNH red cell to be exposed to levels of complement activation able to trigger C3 binding. These findings may envision novel approaches to reduce C3 opsonization and the subsequent extravascular hemolysis in PNH patients on eculizumab.

  11. The breed prevalence of Dog Erythrocyte Antigen 1.1 in the Onderstepoort area of South Africa and its significance in selection of canine blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L. Van der Merwe

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The blood group antigen Dog Erythrocyte Antigen (DEA 1.1 is clinically the most important canine blood group as DEA 1.1 antibodies are capable of causing acute haemolytic, potentially life-threatening transfusion reactions. Dogs do not have naturally occurring antibodies to DEA 1.1 but are rapidly sensitised by the first incompatible transfusion. The prevalence of DEA 1.1 in the general dog population is estimated at 42-46 %. Canine blood donors registered with the Onderstepoort Animal Blood Bank (n = 93 as well as potential donors (n = 140 were typed for DEA 1.1 using a monoclonal antibody card kit. All dogs came from the Onderstepoort area, near Pretoria, Gauteng province, South Africa. Overall prevalence of DEA 1.1 was 47 %. Prevalence was 47 % in purebred dogs and 48 % in mongrels. Distinct breed differences were noted with less than 20 % of German shepherd dogs and Boxers and greater than 75 % of Rottweilers, Great Danes, St Bernards and Dalmations testing DEA 1.1 positive. Knowledge of local breed differences will increase effectiveness of blood donor recruitment.

  12. Dynamics behind affinity maturation of an anti-HCMV antibody family influencing antigen binding

    KAUST Repository

    Di Palma, Francesco; Tramontano, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of antibody affinity maturation and its effects on antigen binding is important with respect to understanding the regulation of the immune response. To shed light on this crucial process, we analyzed two Igs neutralizing the human cytomegalovirus: the primary germline antibody M2J1 and its related mature antibody 8F9. Both antibodies target the AD-2S1 epitope of the gB envelope protein and are considered to establish similar interactions with the cognate antigen. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of mutations on the antibody–antigen interactions. The results provide a qualitative explanation for the increased 8F9 peptide affinity compared with that of M2J1. The emerging atomistic-detailed description of these complexes reveals the molecular effects of the somatic hypermutations occurring during affinity maturation.

  13. Foreign or Domestic CARs: Receptor Ligands as Antigen-Binding Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Shaffer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are increasingly being used in clinical trials to treat a variety of malignant conditions and recent results with CD19-specific CARs showing complete tumor regressions has sparked the interest of researchers and the public alike. Traditional CARs have been generated using single-chain variable fragments (scFv, often derived from murine monoclonal antibodies, for antigen specificity. As the clinical experience with CAR T cells grows, so does the potential for unwanted immune responses against the foreign transgene. Strategies that may reduce the immunogenicity of CAR T cells are humanization of the scFv and the use of naturally occurring receptor ligands as antigen-binding domains. Herein, we review the experience with alternatively designed CARs that contain receptor ligands rather than scFv. While most of the experiences have been in the pre-clinical setting, clinical data is also emerging.

  14. Dynamics behind affinity maturation of an anti-HCMV antibody family influencing antigen binding

    KAUST Repository

    Di Palma, Francesco

    2017-08-03

    The investigation of antibody affinity maturation and its effects on antigen binding is important with respect to understanding the regulation of the immune response. To shed light on this crucial process, we analyzed two Igs neutralizing the human cytomegalovirus: the primary germline antibody M2J1 and its related mature antibody 8F9. Both antibodies target the AD-2S1 epitope of the gB envelope protein and are considered to establish similar interactions with the cognate antigen. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of mutations on the antibody–antigen interactions. The results provide a qualitative explanation for the increased 8F9 peptide affinity compared with that of M2J1. The emerging atomistic-detailed description of these complexes reveals the molecular effects of the somatic hypermutations occurring during affinity maturation.

  15. Targeted disruption of a ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA)-like export protein gene in Plasmodium falciparum confers stable chondroitin 4-sulfate cytoadherence capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goel, Suchi; Muthusamy, Arivalagan; Miao, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family proteins mediate the adherence of infected erythrocytes to microvascular endothelia of various organs, including the placenta, thereby contributing to cerebral, placental, and other severe malaria pathogenesis. Several paras...

  16. The Plasmodium falciparum exported protein PF3D7_0402000 binds to erythrocyte ankyrin and band 4.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakya, Bikash; Penn, Wesley D.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Lacount, Douglas J.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium falciparum extensively modifies the infected red blood cell (RBC), resulting in changes in deformability, shape and surface properties. These alterations suggest that the RBC cytoskeleton is a major target for modification during infection. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to these changes are largely unknown. To begin to address this question, we screened for exported P. falciparum proteins that bound to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton proteins ankyrin 1 (ANK1) and band 4.1 (4.1R), which form critical interactions with other cytoskeletal proteins that contribute to the deformability and stability of RBCs. Yeast two-hybrid screens with ANK1 and 4.1R identified eight interactions with P. falciparum exported proteins, including an interaction between 4.1R and PF3D7_0402000 (PFD0090c). This interaction was first identified in a large-scale screen (Vignali et al., Malaria J, 7:211, 2008), which also reported an interaction between PF3D7_0402000 and ANK1. We confirmed the interactions of PF3D7_0402000 with 4.1R and ANK1 in pair-wise yeast two-hybrid and co-precipitation assays. In both cases, an intact PHIST domain in PF3D7_0402000 was required for binding. Complex purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis provided additional support for the interaction of PF3D7_0402000 with ANK1 and 4.1R. RBC ghost cells loaded with maltose-binding protein (MBP)-PF3D7_0402000 passed through a metal microsphere column less efficiently than mock- or MBP-loaded controls, consistent with an effect of PF3D7_0402000 on RBC rigidity or membrane stability. This study confirmed the interaction of PF3D7_0402000 with 4.1R in multiple independent assays, provided the first evidence that PF3D7_0402000 also binds to ANK1, and suggested that PF3D7_0402000 affects deformability or membrane stability of uninfected RBC ghosts.

  17. Functional antigen binding by the defective B cells of CBA/N mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snippe, H; Merchant, B; Lizzio, E F; Inman, J K

    1982-01-01

    CBA/N mice have an X-linked B cell defect which prevents them from responding to nonmitogenic thymic independent (TI-2) antigens such as dinitrophenylated DNP-Ficoll (1,2). The F1 male progeny of CBA/N female mice express the same defect. Spleen cell suspensions from such defective mice (CBA/N X C3H/HeN F1 males) could not respond to DNP-Ficoll following in vitro immunization and subsequent transfer into irradiated, syngeneic, F1 male recipients as expected. In contrast, normal CBA/N X C3H/HeN F1 female spleen cells could respond and effect a "rescue"; they mounted strong plaque-forming cell responses 7 days after in vitro exposure to DNP-Ficoll and subsequent transfer into irradiated F1 male recipients. Defective F1 male spleen cells, however, could bind significant quantities of 125I-DNP-Ficoll after in vitro exposure. Extensive washing of these spleen cells could not reverse this binding. Such DNP-Ficoll-exposed and washed F1 male spleen cells could, after transfer, aid normal untreated F1 female cells in their rescue function. The defective F1 male spleen cells could convey immunogenic quantities of DNP-Ficoll to the "rescuing" F1 female cells. Mitomycin treatment of F1 male cells did not interfere with their conveyor function. Goat anti-mouse mu serum impeded the passive antigen conveyor function of defective F1 male cells as did prior exposure to high concentrations of free DNP hapten. Our data support the view that the B cell defect of CBA/N X C3H/HeN F1 male mice does not relate to antigen binding, but rather to an inability to be effectively triggered by certain cell-bound polymeric antigens.

  18. Cell-mediated immunity against human retinal extract, S-antigen, and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein in onchocercal chorioretinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lelij, A.; Rothova, A.; Stilma, J. S.; Hoekzema, R.; Kijlstra, A.

    1990-01-01

    Autoimmune mechanisms are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of onchocercal chorioretinopathy. Cell-mediated immune responses to human retinal S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP), and crude retinal extract were investigated in patients with onchocerciasis from

  19. A computational method for identification of vaccine targets from protein regions of conserved human leukocyte antigen binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Simon, Christian; Kudahl, Ulrich J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Computational methods for T cell-based vaccine target discovery focus on selection of highly conserved peptides identified across pathogen variants, followed by prediction of their binding of human leukocyte antigen molecules. However, experimental studies have shown that T cells ofte...... or proteome using human leukocyte antigen binding predictions and made a web-accessible software implementation freely available at http://met-hilab.cbs.dtu.dk/blockcons/....

  20. Comparison of a gel column blood typing method and a point-of-care cartridge for dog erythrocyte antigen 1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Shauna L; Richardson, Danielle M; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G

    2013-01-01

    Blood typing for the presence of Dog Erythrocyte Antigen (DEA) 1.1 is recommended in all donor and recipient dogs prior to transfusion of blood products. The objective of this study was to determine if a point-of-care DEA 1.1 blood typing cartridge could be used in place of the gel column typing method. Detection of DEA 1.1 was performed using a laboratory-based gel column method and a point-of-care cartridge. A convenience sample of 30 healthy blood donors, 13 dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) (3 of which had concurrent immune-mediated thrombocytopenia [IMT]), and 44 dogs with other diseases was included in the study. Agreement was observed between the tests for normal dogs and dogs with nonimmune-mediated disease in 74/74 cases. Two dogs in the IMHA group had indeterminate gel column blood typing results; 1 dog in this group had a negative gel column test result but a positive cartridge test result. There was good agreement between the 2 methods for normal dogs and dogs with nonimmune-mediated disease. Blood typing methods in dogs with IMHA should be further investigated. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  1. Persistence of human parvovirus B19 in multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells expressing the erythrocyte P antigen: implications for transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, Mikael; Lindblom, Anna; Örvell, Claes; Barrett, A.John; Sundberg, Berit; Watz, Emma; Wikman, Agneta; Broliden, Kristina; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are used to improve the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and in regenerative medicine. However, MSC may harbor persistent viruses that may compromise their clinical benefit. Retrospectively screened, 1 of 20 MSC from healthy donors contained parvovirus B19 (B19) DNA. We found that MSC express the B19 receptor (the globoside P antigen) and a co-receptor (Ku 80), and can transmit B19 to bone marrow cells in vitro, suggesting that the virus can persist in the marrow stroma of healthy individuals. Two stem cell transplant patients received the B19 positive MSC as treatment for graft-versus-host disease. Neither developed viremia nor symptomatic B19 infection. These results demonstrate for the first time that persistent B19 in MSC can infect hematopoietic cells and underscore the importance of monitoring B19 transmission by MSC products. PMID:18804048

  2. Concanavalin A immobilized magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) beads for prostate specific antigen binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idil, Neslihan; Perçin, Işık; Karakoç, Veyis; Yavuz, Handan; Aksöz, Nilüfer; Denizli, Adil

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare Concanavalin A (Con A) immobilized magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (mPGMA) beads for prostate specific antigen (PSA) binding and to study binding capacities of the beads using lectin-glycoprotein interactions. Firstly, iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method and then, beads were synthesized by dispersion polymerization in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles. Con A molecules were both covalently immobilized onto the beads directly and through the spacer arm (1,6-diaminohexane-HDMA). The total PSA and free PSA binding onto the mPGMA-HDMA-Con A beads were higher than that of the mPGMA-Con A beads. Maximum PSA binding capacity was observed as 91.2 ng/g. Approximately 45% of the bound PSA was eluted by using 0.1 M mannose as elution agent. The mPGMA-HDMA-Con A beads could be reused without a remarkable decrease in the binding capacities after 5 binding-desorption cycles. Serum fractions were analyzed using SDS-PAGE. The mPGMA-HDMA-Con A beads could be useful for the detection of PSA and suggested as a model system for other glycoprotein biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Native Mass Spectrometry, Ion mobility, and Collision-Induced Unfolding Categorize Malaria Antigen/Antibody Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yining; Salinas, Nichole D.; Chen, Edwin; Tolia, Niraj H.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is a promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. Recently, we reported the epitopes on PvDBP region II (PvDBP-II) for three inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (2D10, 2H2, and 2C6). In this communication, we describe the combination of native mass spectrometry and ion mobility (IM) with collision induced unfolding (CIU) to study the conformation and stabilities of three malarial antigen-antibody complexes. These complexes, when collisionally activated, undergo conformational changes that depend on the location of the epitope. CIU patterns for PvDBP-II in complex with antibody 2D10 and 2H2 are highly similar, indicating comparable binding topology and stability. A different CIU fingerprint is observed for PvDBP-II/2C6, indicating that 2C6 binds to PvDBP-II on an epitope different from 2D10 and 2H2. This work supports the use of CIU as a means of classifying antigen-antibody complexes by their epitope maps in a high throughput screening workflow. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. IgG antibodies to endothelial protein C receptor-binding Cysteine-rich interdomain region domains of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 are acquired early in life in individuals exposed to malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Louise; Lavstsen, Thomas; Mmbando, Bruno P

    2015-01-01

    Severe malaria syndromes are precipitated by Plasmodium falciparum parasites binding to endothelial receptors on the vascular lining. This binding is mediated by members of the highly variant P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family. We have previously identified a subset of Pf...

  5. Human erythrocytes bind and inactivate type 5 adenovirus by presenting Coxsackie virus-adenovirus receptor and complement receptor 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carlisle, R. C.; Di, Y.; Cerny, A. M.; Sonnen, A. F. P.; Sim, R. B.; Green, N. K.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Gilbert, R. J. C.; Fisher, K. D.; Finberg, R. W.; Seymour, L. W.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 9 (2009), s. 1909-1918 ISSN 0006-4971 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : adenovirus * erythrocyte * complement receptor 1 Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 10.555, year: 2009

  6. Novel adenovirus encoded virus-like particles displaying the placental malaria associated VAR2CSA antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne-Marie C; dos Santos Marques Resende, Mafalda; Salanti, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum presents antigens on the infected erythrocyte surface that bind human receptors expressed on the vascular endothelium. The VAR2CSA mediated binding to a distinct chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) is a crucial step in the pathophysiology of placental malaria a...

  7. A novel method for radiolabeling antigen-binding receptors of lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.S.; Lee, M.S.; Rosenspire, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    Antigen-binding receptor (ABR) molecules have been selectively radiolabeled and isolated from immunized chicken spleen cells. The specific radiolabeling of the receptors has been accomplished by utilizing a novel technique employing lactoperoxidase (LPO) covalently linked to antigen (Ag) for which human gammaglobulin was used. The cell surface ABRs were first bound to the Ag-LPO conjugates through specific recognition sites on the Ag portion of the conjugates. The bound LPO portions were then allowed to catalyze the radioiodination of the ABRs. After radiolabeling, cells were solubilized with detergents, ABRs still bound to Ag-LPO conjugates were directly isolated from the lysates via immunoaffinity chromatography utilizing an immunoaffinity reagent directed toward the antigen portion of the ABR-Ag-LPO complex. The radioactive materials were then analyzed via SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. Most of the specifically-labeled and isolated materials were immunoglobulin (Ig). Both the membrane-bound form of the heavy chain as well as the secreted form were detected, along with the light chain. An additional polypeptide was also selectively labeled and isolated along with the Ig. This may be a molecule closely associated with the membrane immunoglobulin on the B-cell surface. (author)

  8. Isolation of a peptide binding protein and its role in antigen presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, E.; Pierce, S.K.; Margoliash, E.

    1986-01-01

    A mouse T cell hybrid, TPc9.1, recognizes pigeon cytochrome c (Pc) as processed and presented by histocompatible antigen presenting cells (APC). When paraformaldehyde fixed APC are employed, only a peptide fragment of Pc, Pc 81-104, and not the native Pc, is capable of stimulating TPc9.1 cells. Pc 81-104 appears to associate tightly with the APC surface since paraformaldehyde fixed APC which have been incubated with Pc 81-104 remain stimulatory following extensive washing. When APC are surface labeled with 125 I, solubilized and affinity purified on Pc 81-104-Sepharose 4B columns, two predominant polypeptides of approximately 72 and 74 kd are isolated. Little or no immunoglobulin, Class I or Class II proteins are obtained under these conditions. Antisera from rabbits immunized with the affinity purified material, but not preimmune sera, block the activation of TPc 9.1 cells by Pc as well as Pc 81-104 when presented by live APC. Furthermore, these antisera are even more effective in blocking the activation of TPc9.1 cells by either APC which had been pulsed with Pc and then paraformaldehyde fixed, or by Pc 81-104 when added to paraformaldehyde fixed APC, suggesting that these antisera were not affecting antigen processing. Thus, these peptide binding proteins may play a role in antigen presentation, and they are being further characterized

  9. Antibody Binding Selectivity: Alternative Sets of Antigen Residues Entail High-Affinity Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Nominé

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between protein sequence and molecular recognition selectivity remains a major challenge. The antibody fragment scFv1F4 recognizes with sub nM affinity a decapeptide (sequence 6TAMFQDPQER15 derived from the N-terminal end of human papilloma virus E6 oncoprotein. Using this decapeptide as antigen, we had previously shown that only the wild type amino-acid or conservative replacements were allowed at positions 9 to 12 and 15 of the peptide, indicating a strong binding selectivity. Nevertheless phenylalanine (F was equally well tolerated as the wild type glutamine (Q at position 13, while all other amino acids led to weaker scFv binding. The interfaces of complexes involving either Q or F are expected to diverge, due to the different physico-chemistry of these residues. This would imply that high-affinity binding can be achieved through distinct interfacial geometries. In order to investigate this point, we disrupted the scFv-peptide interface by modifying one or several peptide positions. We then analyzed the effect on binding of amino acid changes at the remaining positions, an altered susceptibility being indicative of an altered role in complex formation. The 23 starting variants analyzed contained replacements whose effects on scFv1F4 binding ranged from minor to drastic. A permutation analysis (effect of replacing each peptide position by all other amino acids except cysteine was carried out on the 23 variants using the PEPperCHIP® Platform technology. A comparison of their permutation patterns with that of the wild type peptide indicated that starting replacements at position 11, 12 or 13 modified the tolerance to amino-acid changes at the other two positions. The interdependence between the three positions was confirmed by SPR (Biacore® technology. Our data demonstrate that binding selectivity does not preclude the existence of alternative high-affinity recognition modes.

  10. Crystal structure of the anti-(carcinoembryonic antigen) single-chain Fv antibody MFE-23 and a model for antigen binding based on intermolecular contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, M K; Corper, A L; Wan, T; Sohi, M K; Sutton, B J; Thornton, J D; Keep, P A; Chester, K A; Begent, R H; Perkins, S J

    2000-03-01

    MFE-23 is the first single-chain Fv antibody molecule to be used in patients and is used to target colorectal cancer through its high affinity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a cell-surface member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. MFE-23 contains an N-terminal variable heavy-chain domain joined by a (Gly(4)Ser)(3) linker to a variable light-chain (V(L)) domain (kappa chain) with an 11-residue C-terminal Myc-tag. Its crystal structure was determined at 2.4 A resolution by molecular replacement with an R(cryst) of 19.0%. Five of the six antigen-binding loops, L1, L2, L3, H1 and H2, conformed to known canonical structures. The sixth loop, H3, displayed a unique structure, with a beta-hairpin loop and a bifurcated apex characterized by a buried Thr residue. In the crystal lattice, two MFE-23 molecules were associated back-to-back in a manner not seen before. The antigen-binding site displayed a large acidic region located mainly within the H2 loop and a large hydrophobic region within the H3 loop. Even though this structure is unliganded within the crystal, there is an unusually large region of contact between the H1, H2 and H3 loops and the beta-sheet of the V(L) domain of an adjacent molecule (strands DEBA) as a result of intermolecular packing. These interactions exhibited remarkably high surface and electrostatic complementarity. Of seven MFE-23 residues predicted to make contact with antigen, five participated in these lattice contacts, and this model for antigen binding is consistent with previously reported site-specific mutagenesis of MFE-23 and its effect on CEA binding.

  11. A critical examination of the numerology of antigen-binding cells: evidence for multiple receptor specificities on single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A

    1977-01-01

    The data available from other laboratories as well as our own on the frequency of cells recognizing major histocompatibility antigens or conventional protein and hapten antigens is critically evaluated. The frequency of specific binding for a large number of antigens is sufficiently high to support the idea that at least part of the antigen-binding cell population must have multiple specificities. Our results suggest that these multiple specific cells result from single cells synthesizing and displaying as many as 50-100 species of receptor, each at a frequency of 10(4) per cell. A model involving gene expansion of constant-region genes is suggested and some auxilliary evidence consistent with such C-gene expansion is presented.

  12. Characterisation of peptide microarrays for studying antibody-antigen binding using surface plasmon resonance imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Nogues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-specific binding to biosensor surfaces is a major obstacle to quantitative analysis of selective retention of analytes at immobilized target molecules. Although a range of chemical antifouling monolayers has been developed to address this problem, many macromolecular interactions still remain refractory to analysis due to the prevalent high degree of non-specific binding. We describe how we use the dynamic process of the formation of self assembling monolayers and optimise physical and chemical properties thus reducing considerably non-specific binding and allowing analysis of specific binding of analytes to immobilized target molecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We illustrate this approach by the production of specific protein arrays for the analysis of interactions between the 65kDa isoform of human glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65 and a human monoclonal antibody. Our data illustrate that we have effectively eliminated non-specific interactions with the surface containing the immobilised GAD65 molecules. The findings have several implications. First, this approach obviates the dubious process of background subtraction and gives access to more accurate kinetic and equilibrium values that are no longer contaminated by multiphase non-specific binding. Second, an enhanced signal to noise ratio increases not only the sensitivity but also confidence in the use of SPR to generate kinetic constants that may then be inserted into van't Hoff type analyses to provide comparative DeltaG, DeltaS and DeltaH values, making this an efficient, rapid and competitive alternative to ITC measurements used in drug and macromolecular-interaction mechanistic studies. Third, the accuracy of the measurements allows the application of more intricate interaction models than simple Langmuir monophasic binding. CONCLUSIONS: The detection and measurement of antibody binding by the type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD65 represents an example of an antibody-antigen

  13. The Leptospiral Antigen Lp49 is a Two-Domain Protein with Putative Protein Binding Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Giuseppe,P.; Oliveira Neves, F.; Nascimento, A.; Gomes Guimaraes, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Currently available vaccines have limited effectiveness and therapeutic interventions are complicated by the difficulty in making an early diagnosis of leptospirosis. The genome of Leptospira interrogans was recently sequenced and comparative genomic analysis contributed to the identification of surface antigens, potential candidates for development of new vaccines and serodiagnosis. Lp49 is a membrane-associated protein recognized by antibodies present in sera from early and convalescent phases of leptospirosis patients. Its crystal structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction using selenomethionine-labelled crystals and refined at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. Lp49 is composed of two domains and belongs to the all-beta-proteins class. The N-terminal domain folds in an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, whereas the C-terminal domain presents a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. Structural analysis of Lp49 indicates putative protein-protein binding sites, suggesting a role in Leptospira-host interaction. This is the first crystal structure of a leptospiral antigen described to date.

  14. Light-chain residue 95 is critical for antigen binding and multispecificity of monoclonal antibody G2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Daiki; Inaba, Satomi; Kamatari, Yuji O; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Oda, Masayuki

    2017-09-02

    The monoclonal antibody, G2, specifically binds to the immunogen peptide derived from the chicken prion protein, Pep18mer, and two chicken proteins derived peptides, Pep8 and Pep395; G2 binds with equal affinity to Pep18mer. The amino acid sequences of the three peptides are completely different, and so the recognition mechanism of G2 is unique and interesting. We generated a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody of G2, and demonstrated its correct folding with an antigen binding function similar to intact G2 antibody. We also generated a Pro containing mutant of G2 scFv at residue 95 of the light chain, and analyzed its antigen binding using a surface plasmon biosensor. The mutant lost its binding ability to Pep18mer, but remained those to Pep8 and Pep395. The results clearly indicate residue 95 as being critical for multispecific antigen binding of G2 at the site generated from the junctional diversity introduced at the joints between the V and J gene segments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of single physical exercise at 35% VO2 max. intensity on secretion activity of pancreas β-cells and 125J-insulin binding and degradation ability by erythrocyte receptors in children with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczesniak, L.; Rychlewski, T.; Banaszak, F.; Kasprzak, Z.; Walczak, M.

    1994-01-01

    In this report we showed research results of effect of single physical exercise on cycloergometer at 35% VO 2 max. intensity on 125 J-insulin binding and degradation ability by erythrocyte receptors in children with diabetes mellitus, secreting and non-secreting endogenous insulin. Insulin secretion was evaluated by measurement of C-peptide by Biodet test (Serono) of sensitivity threshold at 0.3 μg/ml. We indicated in children non-secreting endogenous insulin (n=32) there is statistically essential lower 125 J-insulin binding with erythrocyte receptor in comparison to children group with C-peptide. Physical exercise on cycloergometer at 35% VO 2 max. intensity caused different reaction in range of physiological indices, like acid-base parameters, level of glucose and 125 J-insulin binding and degradation. In children devoid of endogenous insulin we indicated statistically nonessential changes in 125 J-insulin degradation by non-impaired erythrocytes and by hemolizate, as well. 125 J-insulin binding after physical exercise increased in both groups, though change amplitude was different. Obtained research results allowed us to conclude, in children with I-type diabetes, that in dependence of impairment degree of pancreas βcells sensitivity of insulin receptor and/or number of receptors on erythrocyte surface is different

  16. Correlation between CD16a binding and immuno effector functionality of an antigen specific immunoglobulin Fc fragment (Fcab).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainer, Manuela; Antes, Bernhard; Wiederkum, Susanne; Wozniak-Knopp, Gordana; Bauer, Anton; Rüker, Florian; Woisetschläger, Max

    2012-10-15

    Antigen binding immunoglobulin Fc fragments (Fcab) are generated by engineering loop regions in the CH3 domain of human IgG1 Fc. Variants of an Fcab specific for Her-2 were designed to display either enhanced (S239D:A330L:I332E) or diminished (L234A:L235A) binding affinities to the Fc receptor CD16a based on mutations described previously. The two mutant Fcab proteins demonstrated the expected modulation of CD16a binding. Interaction with recombinant or cell surface expressed Her-2 was unaffected in both mutants compared to the parental Fcab. Binding affinities for CD16a correlated with the ADCC-potencies of the Fcab variants. Additional studies indicated that the L234A:L235A variant Fcab had equivalent structural features as the unmodified Fcab since their DSC profiles were similar and antigen binding after re-folding upon partial heat denaturation had not changed. Introduction of the S239D:A330L:I332E mutations resulted in a significant reduction of the CH2 domain melting temperature, a moderate decrease of the thermal transition of the CH3 domain and lower antigen binding after thermal stress compared to the parental Fcab. We conclude that the known correlation between CD16a binding affinity and ADCC potency is also valid in Fcab proteins and that antigen specific Fcab molecules can be further engineered for fine tuning of immuno effector functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactions of opsonized immune complexes with whole blood cells: binding to erythrocytes restricts complex uptake by leucocyte populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Svehag, S E; Marquart, H V

    1994-01-01

    binding, the main contributors being B cells. E initially inhibited and then later enhanced the IC binding to lymphocytes, suggesting that E promote B cell uptake of C3d,g-covered IC via CR2. Our findings, that E can restrict the IC uptake by circulating leucocytes, and that an IC-induced degranulation...

  18. Interaction of complement-solubilized immune complexes with CR1 receptors on human erythrocytes. The binding reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, H H; Svehag, S E; Jarlbaek, L

    1986-01-01

    showed no binding. IC solubilized in 50% human serum in the presence of autologous RBC bound rapidly to RBC-CR1, with maximal binding within less than 1 min at 37 degrees C. Release of CR1-bound IC under these conditions occurred slowly, requiring more than 30 min. Only binding of 'partially' solubilized...... of an intact classical pathway in preparing the IC for binding to RBC-CR1. C-solubilized IC could be absorbed to solid-phase conglutinin or antibody to C3c and C4c, and these ligands were able to inhibit the binding of solubilized IC to RBC. Heparin also exerted a marked, dose-dependent inhibitory effect...

  19. Radioimmunoassay for Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-associated Nuclear Antigen (EBNA). Binding of iodinated antibodies to antigen immobilized in polyacrylamide gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolken, G.; Klein, G.

    1977-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay was developed for the EBV-associated nuclear antigen (EBNA). Total homogenates of EBV-DNA and EBNA positive or negative cells were polymerized in polyacrylamide gel and compared for their ability to bind 125 I-IgG prepared from anti-EBNA positive and anti-EBNA negative sera. EBNA specific binding was demonstrated and confirmed by serological and cellular specificity controls. The assay allows the quantitation of antigen or antibody even in the presence of detergents and is suitable for biochemical characterization of the antigen. Reciprocal blocking studies with extracts from different cell lines showed quantitative and qualitative differences. One part of the EBNA specificiti(es) present in the human Burkitt lymphoma derived lines RAJI, DAUDI and AW-RAMOS was lacking in B96-8, a marmoset line carrying EBV derived from a human infectious mononucleosis line. This result may reflect differences in the viral genomes derived from Burkitt lymphoma and infectious mononucleosis lines or differences in the host cells. (author)

  20. A computational method for identification of vaccine targets from protein regions of conserved human leukocyte antigen binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Simon, Christian; Kudahl, Ulrich J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Computational methods for T cell-based vaccine target discovery focus on selection of highly conserved peptides identified across pathogen variants, followed by prediction of their binding of human leukocyte antigen molecules. However, experimental studies have shown that T cells often...... target diverse regions in highly variable viral pathogens and this diversity may need to be addressed through redefinition of suitable peptide targets. Methods: We have developed a method for antigen assessment and target selection for polyvalent vaccines, with which we identified immune epitopes from...... variable regions, where all variants bind HLA. These regions, although variable, can thus be considered stable in terms of HLA binding and represent valuable vaccine targets. Results: We applied this method to predict CD8+ T-cell targets in influenza A H7N9 hemagglutinin and significantly increased...

  1. A study on the prevalence of dog erythrocyte antigen 1.1 and detection of canine Babesia by polymerase chain reaction from apparently healthy dogs in a selected rural community in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Dhliwayo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to determine the prevalence of blood group antigen dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA 1.1 in mixed breed dogs in rural Chinamhora, Zimbabwe. DEA 1.1 is clinically the most important canine blood group as it is the most antigenic blood type; hence, DEA 1.1 antibodies are capable of causing acute haemolytic, potentially life-threatening transfusion reactions. In this study, blood samples were collected from 100 dogs in Chinamhora, and blood typing was carried out using standardised DEA 1.1 typing strips with monoclonal anti–DEA 1.1 antibodies (Alvedia® LAB DEA 1.1 test kits. Polymerase chain reaction for detecting Babesia spp. antigen was carried out on 58 of the samples. Of the 100 dogs, 78% were DEA 1.1 positive and 22% were DEA 1.1 negative. A significantly (p = 0.02 higher proportion of females (90.5% were DEA 1.1 positive than males (69.0%. The probability of sensitisation of recipient dogs following first-time transfusion of untyped or unmatched blood was 17.2%, and an approximately 3% (2.95% probability of an acute haemolytic reaction following a second incompatible transfusion was found. Babesia spp. antigen was found in 6.9% of the samples. No significant relationship (χ2 = 0.56, p = 0.45 was found between DEA 1.1 positivity and Babesia spp. antigen presence. Despite a low probability of haemolysis after a second incompatibility transfusion, the risk remains present and should not be ignored. Hence, where possible, blood typing for DEA 1.1 is recommended. A survey of DEA 3, 4, 5 and 7 in various breeds is also recommended.

  2. Acquisition and decay of antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that protect against placental parasitemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, T; Megnekou, R; Fievét, N

    2001-01-01

    Otherwise clinically immune women in areas endemic for malaria are highly susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria during their first pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is characterized by placental accumulation of infected erythrocytes that adhere to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). S...... adhesion to CSA. Data suggest that VSA(CSA) is a target for vaccination against PAM....

  3. Determination of High-affinity Antibody-antigen Binding Kinetics Using Four Biosensor Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Danlin; Singh, Ajit; Wu, Helen; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel

    2017-04-17

    Label-free optical biosensors are powerful tools in drug discovery for the characterization of biomolecular interactions. In this study, we describe the use of four routinely used biosensor platforms in our laboratory to evaluate the binding affinity and kinetics of ten high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9). While both Biacore T100 and ProteOn XPR36 are derived from the well-established Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technology, the former has four flow cells connected by serial flow configuration, whereas the latter presents 36 reaction spots in parallel through an improvised 6 x 6 crisscross microfluidic channel configuration. The IBIS MX96 also operates based on the SPR sensor technology, with an additional imaging feature that provides detection in spatial orientation. This detection technique coupled with the Continuous Flow Microspotter (CFM) expands the throughput significantly by enabling multiplex array printing and detection of 96 reaction sports simultaneously. In contrast, the Octet RED384 is based on the BioLayer Interferometry (BLI) optical principle, with fiber-optic probes acting as the biosensor to detect interference pattern changes upon binding interactions at the tip surface. Unlike the SPR-based platforms, the BLI system does not rely on continuous flow fluidics; instead, the sensor tips collect readings while they are immersed in analyte solutions of a 384-well microplate during orbital agitation. Each of these biosensor platforms has its own advantages and disadvantages. To provide a direct comparison of these instruments' ability to provide quality kinetic data, the described protocols illustrate experiments that use the same assay format and the same high-quality reagents to characterize antibody-antigen kinetics that fit the simple 1:1 molecular interaction model.

  4. [Ceruloplasmin receptor on human erythrocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenko, E L; Basevich, V V; Iaropolov, A I

    1988-08-01

    The structural fragments of the human ceruloplasmin (CP) molecule and of erythrocyte receptors which provide for the specific interaction of CP with erythrocytes were identified, and their properties were investigated. The interaction of CP with erythrocytes, both intact and treated with neuroaminidase and proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, chymotrypsin, papaine, pronase E) is described. Experiments with CP reception were performed at 4 degrees C, using [125I]CP and [125I]asialo-CP. The parameters of binding were determined in Scatchard plots. It was demonstrated that the specific binding of CP to erythrocyte receptors is determined by its interaction with two structural sites of the carbohydrate moiety of the CP molecule, i.e., the terminal residues of sialic acids and a site, (formula; see text) located at a large distance from the chain terminus.

  5. Structure, Receptor Binding, and Antigenicity of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinins from the 1957 H2N2 Pandemic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C.; Basler, Christopher F.; Wilson, Ian A. (Sinai); (Scripps)

    2010-03-04

    The hemagglutinin (HA) envelope protein of influenza viruses mediates essential viral functions, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, and is the major viral antigen for antibody neutralization. The 1957 H2N2 subtype (Asian flu) was one of the three great influenza pandemics of the last century and caused 1 million deaths globally from 1957 to 1968. Three crystal structures of 1957 H2 HAs have been determined at 1.60 to 1.75 {angstrom} resolutions to investigate the structural basis for their antigenicity and evolution from avian to human binding specificity that contributed to its introduction into the human population. These structures, which represent the highest resolutions yet recorded for a complete ectodomain of a glycosylated viral surface antigen, along with the results of glycan microarray binding analysis, suggest that a hydrophobicity switch at residue 226 and elongation of receptor-binding sites were both critical for avian H2 HA to acquire human receptor specificity. H2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in birds and pigs and, therefore, remain a substantial threat for transmission to humans. The H2 HA structure also reveals a highly conserved epitope that could be harnessed in the design of a broader and more universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  6. Interactions of opsonized immune complexes with whole blood cells: binding to erythrocytes restricts complex uptake by leucocyte populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Svehag, S E; Marquart, H V

    1994-01-01

    -binding to granulocytes (PMN), monocytes and lymphocytes was inhibited by up to 46%, 61% and 48%, respectively, depending on the incubation time and the IC-concentration tested. The E-mediated inhibition of the binding to PMN was found to correlate with the average numbers of CR1 per E during the initial 15 min...... to the findings for PMN, the difference between IC-binding to monocytes in the absence and presence of E increased progressively over the 90 min observation period, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the late-phase IC uptake by monocytes and PMN. Lymphocytes were heterogeneous with respect to IC...... binding, the main contributors being B cells. E initially inhibited and then later enhanced the IC binding to lymphocytes, suggesting that E promote B cell uptake of C3d,g-covered IC via CR2. Our findings, that E can restrict the IC uptake by circulating leucocytes, and that an IC-induced degranulation...

  7. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Peptide Binding Profiles and the Identification of T cell Epitopes by Tetramer Staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers

    class I peptide binding characteristics in relation to immune responses to vaccination or infection. Applying proven technologies to newly produced, recombinant swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I proteins yielded a body of data for peptide:SLA:β2m (pSLA) complex affinity and stability. Mapping...... system to specifically identify and react upon non-self peptide fragments unique only to the foreign intruder. The polymorphism of the MHC molecule effectively individualizes the immune response of each member of any given species. Moreover, responding T cells recognize antigen ligands, only...... in the context of peptide:MHC:β2m (pMHC) complex. The gene encoding the MHC is one of the most polymorphic regions of the genome known. Despite thousands of different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variants identified, each member of a species only inherits and expresses a few of these MHC alleles. The “MHC...

  8. TTI-621 (SIRPαFc): A CD47-Blocking Innate Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor with Broad Antitumor Activity and Minimal Erythrocyte Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Penka S; Viller, Natasja Nielsen; Wong, Mark; Pang, Xinli; Lin, Gloria H Y; Dodge, Karen; Chai, Vien; Chen, Hui; Lee, Vivian; House, Violetta; Vigo, Noel T; Jin, Debbie; Mutukura, Tapfuma; Charbonneau, Marilyse; Truong, Tran; Viau, Stephane; Johnson, Lisa D; Linderoth, Emma; Sievers, Eric L; Maleki Vareki, Saman; Figueredo, Rene; Pampillo, Macarena; Koropatnick, James; Trudel, Suzanne; Mbong, Nathan; Jin, Liqing; Wang, Jean C Y; Uger, Robert A

    2017-02-15

    Purpose: The ubiquitously expressed transmembrane glycoprotein CD47 delivers an anti-phagocytic (do not eat) signal by binding signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα) on macrophages. CD47 is overexpressed in cancer cells and its expression is associated with poor clinical outcomes. TTI-621 (SIRPαFc) is a fully human recombinant fusion protein that blocks the CD47-SIRPα axis by binding to human CD47 and enhancing phagocytosis of malignant cells. Blockade of this inhibitory axis using TTI-621 has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy to promote tumor cell eradication. Experimental Design: The ability of TTI-621 to promote macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of human tumor cells was assessed using both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. In vivo antitumor efficacy was evaluated in xenograft and syngeneic models and the role of the Fc region in antitumor activity was evaluated using SIRPαFc constructs with different Fc tails. Results: TTI-621 enhanced macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of both hematologic and solid tumor cells, while sparing normal cells. In vivo , TTI-621 effectively controlled the growth of aggressive AML and B lymphoma xenografts and was efficacious in a syngeneic B lymphoma model. The IgG1 Fc tail of TTI-621 plays a critical role in its antitumor activity, presumably by engaging activating Fcγ receptors on macrophages. Finally, TTI-621 exhibits minimal binding to human erythrocytes, thereby differentiating it from CD47 blocking antibodies. Conclusions: These data indicate that TTI-621 is active across a broad range of human tumors. These results further establish CD47 as a critical regulator of innate immune surveillance and form the basis for clinical development of TTI-621 in multiple oncology indications. Clin Cancer Res; 23(4); 1068-79. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton, Jr

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV...... inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding...

  10. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-08

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  11. Normocyte-binding protein required for human erythrocyte invasion by the zoonotic malaria parasitePlasmodium knowlesi

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Robert W.; Sharaf, Hazem; Hastings, Claire H.; Ho, Yung Shwen; Nair, Mridul; Rchiad, ‍ Zineb; Knuepfer, Ellen; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Mohring, Franziska; Amir, Amirah; Yusuf, Noor A.; Hall, Joanna; Almond, Neil; Lau, Yee Ling; Pain, Arnab; Blackman, Michael J.; Holder, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    The dominant cause of malaria in Malaysia is now Plasmodium knowlesi, a zoonotic parasite of cynomolgus macaque monkeys found throughout South East Asia. Comparative genomic analysis of parasites adapted to in vitro growth in either cynomolgus or human RBCs identified a genomic deletion that includes the gene encoding normocyte-binding protein Xa (NBPXa) in parasites growing in cynomolgus RBCs but not in human RBCs. Experimental deletion of the NBPXa gene in parasites adapted to growth in human RBCs (which retain the ability to grow in cynomolgus RBCs) restricted them to cynomolgus RBCs, demonstrating that this gene is selectively required for parasite multiplication and growth in human RBCs. NBPXa-null parasites could bind to human RBCs, but invasion of these cells was severely impaired. Therefore, NBPXa is identified as a key mediator of P. knowlesi human infection and may be a target for vaccine development against this emerging pathogen.

  12. Normocyte-binding protein required for human erythrocyte invasion by the zoonotic malaria parasitePlasmodium knowlesi

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Robert W.

    2016-06-15

    The dominant cause of malaria in Malaysia is now Plasmodium knowlesi, a zoonotic parasite of cynomolgus macaque monkeys found throughout South East Asia. Comparative genomic analysis of parasites adapted to in vitro growth in either cynomolgus or human RBCs identified a genomic deletion that includes the gene encoding normocyte-binding protein Xa (NBPXa) in parasites growing in cynomolgus RBCs but not in human RBCs. Experimental deletion of the NBPXa gene in parasites adapted to growth in human RBCs (which retain the ability to grow in cynomolgus RBCs) restricted them to cynomolgus RBCs, demonstrating that this gene is selectively required for parasite multiplication and growth in human RBCs. NBPXa-null parasites could bind to human RBCs, but invasion of these cells was severely impaired. Therefore, NBPXa is identified as a key mediator of P. knowlesi human infection and may be a target for vaccine development against this emerging pathogen.

  13. HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitope of a novel osteosarcoma antigen, papillomavirus binding factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukahara Tomohide

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop peptide-based immunotherapy for osteosarcoma, we previously identified papillomavirus binding factor (PBF as a CTL-defined osteosarcoma antigen in the context of HLA-B55. However, clinical application of PBF-based immunotherapy requires identification of naturally presented CTL epitopes in osteosarcoma cells in the context of more common HLA molecules such as HLA-A2. Methods Ten peptides with the HLA-A*0201 binding motif were synthesized from the amino acid sequence of PBF according to the BIMAS score and screened with an HLA class I stabilization assay. The frequency of CTLs recognizing the selected PBF-derived peptide was determined in peripheral blood of five HLA-A*0201+ patients with osteosarcoma using limiting dilution (LD/mixed lymphocyte peptide culture (MLPC followed by tetramer-based frequency analysis. Attempts were made to establish PBF-specific CTL clones from the tetramer-positive CTL pool by a combination of limiting dilution and single-cell sorting. The cytotoxicity of CTLs was assessed by 51Cr release assay. Results Peptide PBF A2.2 showed the highest affinity to HLA-A*0201. CD8+ T cells reacting with the PBF A2.2 peptide were detected in three of five patients at frequencies from 2 × 10-7 to 5 × 10-6. A tetramer-positive PBF A2.2-specific CTL line, 5A9, specifically lysed allogeneic osteosarcoma cell lines that expressed both PBF and either HLA-A*0201 or HLA-A*0206, autologous tumor cells, and T2 pulsed with PBF A2.2. Five of 12 tetramer-positive CTL clones also lysed allogeneic osteosarcoma cell lines expressing both PBF and either HLA-A*0201 or HLA-A*0206 and T2 pulsed with PBF A2.2. Conclusion These findings indicate that PBF A2.2 serves as a CTL epitope on osteosarcoma cells in the context of HLA-A*0201, and potentially, HLA-A*0206. This extends the availability of PBF-derived therapeutic peptide vaccines for patients with osteosarcoma.

  14. Characteristics Studies of 125I- and total PSA antibody's Binding with prostate specific antigen (PSA) in Human Uterus Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mudaffar, S.; Al-Salihi, J.

    2005-01-01

    Two groups of uterus tumors (benign and malignant) postmenopausal patients were used to investigate the presence of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Preliminary experiments were performed to follow the binding of '1 25 I-anti total PSA antibody with PSA in uterus tissues homogenates of the two groups with their corresponding antigen and found to be (8.8,7.1%) for benign and malignant tumors, respectively. An Immuno Radio Metric Assay (IRMA) procedure was developed for measuring PSA in benign and malignant uterus tumors homogenates. The optimum conditions of the binding of 125 I-anti total PSA antibody with PSA were as follows: PSA concentration (150,200 μg protein),tracer antibody concentration (125,250 μg protein), p H (7.6,7.2), temp (15,25?C) and time (1.5 hrs) for postmenopausal benign and malignant uterus tumors tissue homogenates, respectively. The use of different concentrations of Na + and Mg 2+ ions were shown to cause an increase in the binding at concentration of (125,75 mΜ) of Na 1+ ions (75,225 mΜ) of Mg 2+ ions for benign and malignant uterus tumors homogenates, respectively, while the use of different concentrations of urea and polyethylene glycol (PEG) Caused a decrease in the binding with the increase in the concentration of each of urea and PEG in the both cases

  15. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandya, Mital; Rasmussen, Michael; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presentation......, and different antigen peptide motifs are associated with specific genetic sequences of class I molecules. Understanding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA), peptide-MHC class I binding specificities may facilitate development of vaccines or reagents for quantifying the adaptive immune response to intracellular...... pathogens, such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Six synthetic BoLA class I (BoLA-I) molecules were produced, and the peptide binding motif was generated for five of the six molecules using a combined approach of positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries (PSCPLs) and neural network...

  16. The HLA-B*5101 molecule-binding capacity to antigens used in animal models of Behçet's disease: a bioinformatics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharav, Ehud; Weinberger, Abraham

    2012-07-01

    The human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) molecule B*5101 is a functioning receptor of the immune system and is generally accepted as a genetic marker for Behçet disease (BD), a multi-organ, chronic inflammatory disorder. The role of the HLA-B*5101 in the pathogenesis of BD is elusive. The assumption that HLA-B*5101 has an active role in BD is suggestive, but no antigen has yet been identified. To evaluate the potential binding capacity of various antigens to the HLA-B*5101 molecule. Using bioinformatics programs, we studied the binding capacity of HLA-B*5101 and its corresponding rat molecule RT.A1 to the following antigens: heatshock protein-60 (HSP60), major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA), retinal S-antigen (S-Ag), HLA-B27 molecule and its peptide (PD) and tropomyosin (TPM), all of which serve as antigens in animal models corresponding to BD. In each protein including the B*5101 molecule itself, the computerized programs revealed several short sequences with potential high binding capacity to HLA-B*5101 with the exception of B-27PD. The rat MHC RT1. Al. had no binding capacity to S-Ag. The evaluated proteins have the potential to bind to and to serve as potential antigens to the HLA-B*5101 and the rat MHC RT1.Al. molecules. The pathogenicity of these suggested short peptides should be evaluated in animal models of BD.

  17. Carcinoma-specific Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I binding glycoproteins of human colorectal carcinoma and its relation to carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Y; Yonezawa, S; Nakamura, T; Shimizu, S; Ozawa, M; Muramatsu, T; Sato, E

    1985-08-01

    Glycoproteins binding to Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) lectin, which recognizes the terminal alpha-L-fucose residue, were analyzed in 18 cases of human colorectal carcinoma by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by the Western blotting method. In the distal large bowel (descending and sigmoid colon and rectum), high-molecular-weight glycoproteins binding to UEA-I existed in carcinoma tissue but not in normal mucosa. In the proximal large bowel (ascending and transverse colon), high-molecular-weight glycoproteins binding to UEA-I were found both in normal mucosa and in carcinoma tissue, whereas those from the carcinoma tissue had an apparently lower molecular weight as compared to the weight of those from the normal mucosa. Thus there is a biochemical difference in UEA-I binding glycoproteins between the normal mucosa and the carcinoma tissue, although in our previous histochemical study no difference was observed in UEA-I binding glycoproteins of the proximal large bowel between the carcinoma tissue and the normal mucosa. Furthermore, carcinoembryonic antigen from the carcinoma tissue was found to have the same electrophoretical mobility as the UEA-I binding glycoproteins.

  18. B-cell responses to pregnancy-restricted and -unrestricted Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 antigens in Ghanaian women naturally exposed to malaria parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ampomah, Paulina; Stevenson, Liz; Ofori, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    -linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and memory B-cell frequencies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay in a cohort of P. falciparum-exposed nonpregnant Ghanaian women. The antigens used were a VAR2CSA-type PfEMP1 (IT4VAR04) with expression restricted to parasites infecting the placenta, as well as two...... commonly recognized PfEMP1 proteins (HB3VAR06 and IT4VAR60) implicated in rosetting and not pregnancy restricted. This enabled, for the first time, a direct comparison in the same individuals of immune responses specific for a clinically important parasite antigen expressed only during well-defined periods...

  19. Competitor analogs for defined T cell antigens: peptides incorporating a putative binding motif and polyproline or polyglycine spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryanski, J L; Verdini, A S; Weber, P C; Salemme, F R; Corradin, G

    1990-01-12

    We describe a new approach for modeling antigenic peptides recognized by T cells. Peptide A24 170-182 can compete with other antigenic peptides that are recognized by H-2kd-restricted cytolytic T cells, presumably by binding to the Kd molecule. By comparing substituted A24 peptides as competitors in a functional competition assay, the A24 residues Tyr-171, Thr-178, and Leu-179 were identified as possible contact residues for Kd. A highly active competitor peptide analog was synthesized in which Tyr was separated from the Thr-Leu pair by a pentaproline spacer. The choice of proline allowed the prediction of a probable conformation for the analog when bound to the Kd molecule. The simplest conformation of the A24 peptide that allows the same spacing and orientation of the motif as in the analog would be a nearly extended polypeptide chain incorporating a single 3(10) helical turn or similar structural kink.

  20. The antibody response of pregnant Cameroonian women to VAR2CSA ID1-ID2a, a small recombinant protein containing the CSA-binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babakhanyan, Anna; Leke, Rose G F; Salanti, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In pregnant women, Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes expressing the VAR2CSA antigen bind to chondroitin sulfate A in the placenta causing placental malaria. The binding site of VAR2CSA is present in the ID1-ID2a region. This study sought to determine if pregnant Cameroonian women natura...

  1. MHC class II-derived peptides can bind to class II molecules, including self molecules, and prevent antigen presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosloniec, E F; Vitez, L J; Buus, S

    1990-01-01

    the alpha k-3 peptide binds slightly less well. These combined data, suggesting that class II-derived peptides can bind to MHC class II molecules, including the autologous molecule from which they are derived, have important implications for the molecular basis of alloreactivity and autoreactivity. Further...... found in the first and third polymorphic regions (PMR) of the A alpha k chain (alpha k-1 and alpha k-3) were capable of inhibiting the presentation of three different HEL-derived peptide antigens to their appropriate T cells. In addition, the alpha k-1 peptide inhibited the presentation of the OVA(323......-339) immunodominant peptide to the I-Ad-restricted T cell hybridomas specific for it. Prepulsing experiments demonstrated that the PMR peptides were interacting with the APC and not with the T cell hybridomas. These observations were confirmed and extended by the demonstration that the alpha k-1 and alpha k-3...

  2. Novel Prostate Specific Antigen plastic antibody designed with charged binding sites for an improved protein binding and its application in a biosensor of potentiometric transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, Tânia S.C.R.; Santos, C.; Costa-Rodrigues, J.; Fernandes, M.H.; Noronha, João P.; Sales, M. Goreti F.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: EF13-201, Novel Prostate Specific Antigen plastic antibody designed with charged binding sites for an improved protein binding and its application in a biosensor of potentiometric transduction. - Abstract: This work shows that the synthesis of protein plastic antibodies tailored with selected charged monomers around the binding site enhances protein binding. These charged receptor sites are placed over a neutral polymeric matrix, thus inducing a suitable orientation the protein reception to its site. This is confirmed by preparing control materials with neutral monomers and also with non-imprinted template. This concept has been applied here to Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), the protein of choice for screening prostate cancer throughout the population, with serum levels >10 ng/mL pointing out a high probability of associated cancer. Protein Imprinted Materials with charged binding sites (C/PIM) have been produced by surface imprinting over graphene layers to which the protein was first covalently attached. Vinylbenzyl(trimethylammonium chloride) and vinyl benzoate were introduced as charged monomers labelling the binding site and were allowed to self-organize around the protein. The subsequent polymerization was made by radical polymerization of vinylbenzene. Neutral PIM (N/PIM) prepared without oriented charges and non imprinted materials (NIM) obtained without template were used as controls. These materials were used to develop simple and inexpensive potentiometric sensor for PSA. They were included as ionophores in plasticized PVC membranes, and tested over electrodes of solid or liquid conductive contacts, made of conductive carbon over a syringe or of inner reference solution over micropipette tips. The electrodes with charged monomers showed a more stable and sensitive response, with an average slope of -44.2 mV/decade and a detection limit of 5.8 × 10 −11 mol/L (2 ng/mL). The corresponding non-imprinted sensors showed lower

  3. Structural analysis of peptides capable of binding to more than one Ia antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S

    1989-01-01

    The Ia binding regions were analyzed for three unrelated peptide Ag (sperm whale myoglobin 106-118, influenza hemagglutinin 130-142, and lambda repressor protein 12-26) for which binding to more than one Ia molecule has previously been demonstrated. By determining the binding profile of three...... separate series of truncated synthetic peptides, it was found that in all three cases the different Ia reactivities mapped to largely overlapping regions of the peptides; although, for two of the peptides, the regions involved in binding the different Ia specificities were distinct. Moreover, subtle...... differences were found to dramatically influence some, but not other, Ia reactivities. Using a large panel of synthetic peptides it was found that a significant correlation exists between the capacity of peptides to interact with different alleles of the same molecule (i.e., IAd and IAk), but no correlation...

  4. Identification and characterization of a novel Plasmodium falciparum adhesin involved in erythrocyte invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Hans

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major health problem worldwide. All clinical symptoms of malaria are attributed to the asexual blood stages of the parasite life cycle. Proteins resident in apical organelles and present on the surface of P. falciparum merozoites are considered promising candidates for the development of blood stage malaria vaccines. In the present study, we have identified and characterized a microneme associated antigen, PfMA [PlasmoDB Gene ID: PF3D7_0316000, PFC0700c]. The gene was selected by applying a set of screening criteria such as transcriptional upregulation at late schizogony, inter-species conservation and the presence of signal sequence or transmembrane domains. The gene sequence of PfMA was found to be conserved amongst various Plasmodium species. We experimentally demonstrated that the transcript for PfMA was expressed only in the late blood stages of parasite consistent with a putative role in erythrocyte invasion. PfMA was localized by immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy to be in the micronemes, an apical organelle of merozoites. The functional role of the PfMA protein in erythrocyte invasion was identified as a parasite adhesin involved in direct attachment with the target erythrocyte. PfMA was demonstrated to bind erythrocytes in a sialic acid independent, chymotrypsin and trypsin resistant manner and its antibodies inhibited P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion. Invasion of erythrocytes is a complex multistep process that involves a number of redundant ligand-receptor interactions many of which still remain unknown and even uncharacterized. Our work has identified and characterized a novel P. falciparum adhesin involved in erythrocyte invasion.

  5. Antibodies from malaria-exposed pregnant women recognize trypsin resistant epitopes on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes selected for adhesion to chondroitin sulphate A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharling, Lisa; Enevold, Anders; Sowa, Kordai M P

    2004-01-01

    of CSA binding and surface recognition of CSA selected parasites by serum IgG from malaria exposed pregnant women. Thus, the complete molecular definition of an antigenic P. falciparum erythrocyte surface protein that can be used as a malaria in pregnancy vaccine has not yet been achieved.......-specific antibodies induced as a result of pregnancy associated malaria (PAM). METHODS: Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to measure the levels of adult Scottish and Ghanaian male, and Ghanaian pregnant female plasma immunoglobulin G (IgG) that bind to the surface of infected erythrocytes. P....... falciparum infected erythrocytes selected for adhesion to CSA were found to express trypsin-resistant VSA that are the target of naturally acquired antibodies from pregnant women living in a malaria endemic region of Ghana. However in vitro adhesion to CSA and HA was relatively trypsin sensitive. An improved...

  6. Plasmodium vivax Tryptophan Rich Antigen PvTRAg36.6 Interacts with PvETRAMP and PvTRAg56.6 Interacts with PvMSP7 during Erythrocytic Stages of the Parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriti Tyagi

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax is most wide spread and a neglected malaria parasite. There is a lack of information on parasite biology of this species. Genome of this parasite encodes for the largest number of tryptophan-rich proteins belonging to 'Pv-fam-a' family and some of them are potential drug/vaccine targets but their functional role(s largely remains unexplored. Using bacterial and yeast two hybrid systems, we have identified the interacting partners for two of the P. vivax tryptophan-rich antigens called PvTRAg36.6 and PvTRAg56.2. The PvTRAg36.6 interacts with early transcribed membrane protein (ETRAMP of P.vivax. It is apically localized in merozoites but in early stages it is seen in parasite periphery suggesting its likely involvement in parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM development or maintenance. On the other hand, PvTRAg56.2 interacts with P.vivax merozoite surface protein7 (PvMSP7 and is localized on merozoite surface. Co-localization of PvTRAg56.2 with PvMSP1 and its molecular interaction with PvMSP7 probably suggest that, PvTRAg56.2 is part of MSP-complex, and might assist or stabilize the protein complex at the merozoite surface. In conclusion, the PvTRAg proteins have different sub cellular localizations and specific associated functions during intra-erythrocytic developmental cycle.

  7. Plasmodium vivax Tryptophan Rich Antigen PvTRAg36.6 Interacts with PvETRAMP and PvTRAg56.6 Interacts with PvMSP7 during Erythrocytic Stages of the Parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Kriti; Hossain, Mohammad Enayet; Thakur, Vandana; Aggarwal, Praveen; Malhotra, Pawan; Mohmmed, Asif; Sharma, Yagya Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is most wide spread and a neglected malaria parasite. There is a lack of information on parasite biology of this species. Genome of this parasite encodes for the largest number of tryptophan-rich proteins belonging to ‘Pv-fam-a’ family and some of them are potential drug/vaccine targets but their functional role(s) largely remains unexplored. Using bacterial and yeast two hybrid systems, we have identified the interacting partners for two of the P. vivax tryptophan-rich antigens called PvTRAg36.6 and PvTRAg56.2. The PvTRAg36.6 interacts with early transcribed membrane protein (ETRAMP) of P.vivax. It is apically localized in merozoites but in early stages it is seen in parasite periphery suggesting its likely involvement in parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) development or maintenance. On the other hand, PvTRAg56.2 interacts with P.vivax merozoite surface protein7 (PvMSP7) and is localized on merozoite surface. Co-localization of PvTRAg56.2 with PvMSP1 and its molecular interaction with PvMSP7 probably suggest that, PvTRAg56.2 is part of MSP-complex, and might assist or stabilize the protein complex at the merozoite surface. In conclusion, the PvTRAg proteins have different sub cellular localizations and specific associated functions during intra-erythrocytic developmental cycle. PMID:26954579

  8. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Pu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1 protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP, regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA

  9. Diagnostic value of soluble receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells and carcinoembryonic antigen in differentiating malignant from benign pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jiahui; Sun, Gengyun; Zhu, Hongbin

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion (MPE) remains a major clinical challenge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of combined detection of receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in patients with MPE and benign pleural effusion (BPE). The serum and pleural fluid samples were collected from 53 patients diagnosed with MPE and 49 patients with BPE. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the concentration of RCAS1 in serum and pleural effusion. The clinical data and laboratory information, including CEA levels, were gathered from these cases. The concentration of RCAS1 in MPE was significantly higher than that of BPE (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two serum groups. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of pleural fluid RCAS1 were 67.92 and 81.63 %, respectively, at the optimized cutoff value of 7.326 U/mL; meanwhile, the sensitivity and specificity of pleural fluid CEA were 83.02 and 91.84 % at the cutoff value of 3.93 ng/mL. The specificity could be elevated to 98.50 % in serial detection, while the sensitivity may be improved to 94.55 % in parallel detection. Serum RCAS1 concentration was only detected in 53 serum samples out of the 102 samples, indicating that serum RCAS1 may not be a better option in differential diagnosis of malignancies compared with serum CEA, of which the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 64.15 and 83.67 % at the cutoff value of 3.90 ng/mL. No significant differences were found in pleural fluid RCAS1 concentration in MPE patients with different ages, gender, and pathological types of lung cancers. The detection of RCAS1 concentration in pleural fluid is informative for the diagnosis of MPE. Joint detection of RCAS1 and CEA can improve the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. However, the diagnostic value of RCAS1 is not higher than that of CEA.

  10. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte Antigen-4 Binding to SHP2 Interacting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in 1% Triton X-100 lysis buffer, subjected to SDS-PAGE, and immunoblotted with anti-pTyr Ab (upper panel) or anti-SIT Ab (lower panel). Positions of molecular mass markers (kDa) are indicated. C, Densitometric analysis using the Scantjet laser scanner (Hewlett-Packard) of anti-pTyr binding to SIT (B, upper panel). Values ...

  11. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-02

    A {sup 13}C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V{sub H}, V{sub L}, and C{sub L} domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with {sup 13}C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with (1-{sup 13}C)Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule.

  12. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji

    1991-01-01

    A 13 C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V H , V L , and C L domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with 13 C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with [1- 13 C]Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how 13 C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule

  13. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori blood-group antigen-binding adhesion 2 and sialic acid binding adhesion genes among dyspeptic patients in Tabriz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Yousefi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this research was to analyze blood-group antigen-binding adhesion (babA2 and sialic acid binding adhesion (sabA genotypes status in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori isolates and their relationship with clinical outcomes. Methods: Gastric biopsy specimens were homogenized and placed in Brucella agar medium supplemented with 5% sheep blood and 3 antibiotics and were cultured at 37 °C under microaerophilic conditions and incubated for 4-7 days. H. pylori was identified by typical morphology, gram-staining and urease tests, and babA2 and sabA genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: From a total of 100 H. pylori isolates; babA2 and sabA genes were detected in 23.0 and 26.4%, respectively. There was a significant relationship between these genes and clinical outcomes (P < 0.050. Conclusion: We found that the babA2 status was not related to clinical outcomes in Tabriz, Iran. However, sabA was a promoting determinant for disease, and multivariate analysis disclosed sabA to be an independent marker of non-ulcer diseases in our subjects.

  14. Genotoxic effect and antigen binding characteristics of SLE auto-antibodies to peroxynitrite-modified human DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Asad; Alam, Khursheed; Mehdi, Syed Hassan; Rizvi, M Moshahid A

    2017-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by auto-antibodies against native deoxyribonucleic acid after modification and is one of the reasons for the development of SLE. Here, we have evaluated the structural perturbations in human placental DNA by peroxynitrite using spectroscopy, thermal denaturation and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Peroxynitrite is a powerful potent bi-functional oxidative/nitrative agent that is produced both endogenously and exogenously. In experimental animals, the peroxynitrite-modified DNA was found to be highly immunogenic. The induced antibodies showed cross-reactions with different types of DNA and nitrogen bases that were modified with peroxynitrite by inhibition ELISA. The antibody activity was inhibited by approximately 89% with its immunogen as the inhibitor. The antigen-antibodies interaction between induced antibodies with peroxynitrite-modified DNA showed retarded mobility as compared to the native form. Furthermore, significantly increased binding was also observed in SLE autoantibodies with peroxynitrite-modified DNA than native form. Moreover, DNA isolated from lymphocyte of SLE patients revealed significant recognition of anti-peroxynitrite-modified DNA immunoglobulin G (IgG). Our data indicates that DNA modified with peroxynitrite presents unique antigenic determinants that may induce autoantibody response in SLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Anti-nucleosome antibodies complexed to nucleosomal antigens show anti-DNA reactivity and bind to rat glomerular basement membrane in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramers, C; Hylkema, M N; van Bruggen, M C; van de Lagemaat, R; Dijkman, H B; Assmann, K J; Smeenk, R J; Berden, J H

    1994-01-01

    Histones can mediate the binding of DNA and anti-DNA to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). In ELISA histone/DNA/anti-DNA complexes are able to bind to heparan sulfate (HS), an intrinsic constituent of the GBM. We questioned whether histone containing immune complexes are able to bind to the GBM, and if so, whether the ligand in the GBM is HS. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) complexed to nucleosomal antigens and noncomplexed mAbs were isolated from culture supernatants of four IgG anti-nuclear mAbs. All noncomplexed mAbs showed strong anti-nucleosome reactivity in ELISA. One of them showed in addition anti-DNA reactivity in noncomplexed form. The other three mAbs only showed anti-DNA reactivity when they were complexed to nucleosomal antigens. After renal perfusion a fine granular binding of complexed mAbs to the glomerular capillary wall and activation of complement was observed in immunofluorescence, whereas noncomplexed mAbs did not bind. Immuno-electron microscopy showed binding of complexes to the whole width of the GBM. When HS in the GBM was removed by renal heparinase perfusion the binding of complexed mAb decreased, but did not disappear completely. We conclude that anti-nucleosome mAbs, which do not bind DNA, become DNA reactive once complexed to nucleosomal antigens. These complexed mAbs can bind to the GBM. The binding ligand in the GBM is partly, but not solely, HS. Binding to the GBM of immune complexes containing nucleosomal material might be an important event in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. Images PMID:8040312

  16. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I restricted epitope discovery in yellow fewer and dengue viruses: importance of HLA binding strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Lund

    Full Text Available Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV and dengue fever virus (DENV restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, K(D, stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA-A*02:01, 28 HLA-A*24:02 and 28 HLA-B*07:02 binding peptides was tested in three HLA-transgenic mice models and led to the identification of 17 HLA-A*02:01, 4 HLA-A*2402 and 4 HLA-B*07:02 immunogenic peptides. The immunogenic peptides bound HLA significantly stronger than the non-immunogenic peptides. All except one of the immunogenic peptides had K(D below 100 nM and the peptides with K(D below 5 nM were more likely to be immunogenic. In addition, all the immunogenic peptides that were identified as having a high functional avidity had K(D below 20 nM. A*02:01 transgenic mice were also inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding in shaping the immune response.

  17. Protein kinase a dependent phosphorylation of apical membrane antigen 1 plays an important role in erythrocyte invasion by the malaria parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Leykauf

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are obligate intracellular parasites that infect a variety of hosts, causing significant diseases in livestock and humans. The invasive forms of the parasites invade their host cells by gliding motility, an active process driven by parasite adhesion proteins and molecular motors. A crucial point during host cell invasion is the formation of a ring-shaped area of intimate contact between the parasite and the host known as a tight junction. As the invasive zoite propels itself into the host-cell, the junction moves down the length of the parasite. This process must be tightly regulated and signalling is likely to play a role in this event. One crucial protein for tight-junction formation is the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1. Here we have investigated the phosphorylation status of this key player in the invasion process in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We show that the cytoplasmic tail of P. falciparum AMA1 is phosphorylated at serine 610. We provide evidence that the enzyme responsible for serine 610 phosphorylation is the cAMP regulated protein kinase A (PfPKA. Importantly, mutation of AMA1 serine 610 to alanine abrogates phosphorylation of AMA1 in vivo and dramatically impedes invasion. In addition to shedding unexpected new light on AMA1 function, this work represents the first time PKA has been implicated in merozoite invasion.

  18. I-Ad-binding peptides derived from unrelated protein antigens share a common structural motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S

    1988-01-01

    on the I-Ad binding of the immunogenic peptide OVA 323-339. The results obtained demonstrated the very permissive nature of Ag-Ia interaction. We also showed that unrelated peptides that are good I-Ad binders share a common structural motif and speculated that recognition of such motifs could represent...... that I-Ad molecules recognize a large library of Ag by virtue of common structural motifs present in peptides derived from phylogenetically unrelated proteins....

  19. Using molecular principal axes for structural comparison: determining the tertiary changes of a FAB antibody domain induced by antigenic binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman B David

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of different protein x-ray structures has previously been made in a number of different ways; for example, by visual examination, by differences in the locations of secondary structures, by explicit superposition of structural elements, e.g. α-carbon atom locations, or by procedures that utilize a common symmetry element or geometrical feature of the structures to be compared. Results A new approach is applied to determine the structural changes that an antibody protein domain experiences upon its interaction with an antigenic target. These changes are determined with the use of two different, however comparable, sets of principal axes that are obtained by diagonalizing the second-order tensors that yield the moments-of-geometry as well as an ellipsoidal characterization of domain shape, prior to and after interaction. Determination of these sets of axes for structural comparison requires no internal symmetry features of the domains, depending solely upon their representation in three-dimensional space. This representation may involve atomic, Cα, or residue centroid coordinates. The present analysis utilizes residue centroids. When the structural changes are minimal, the principal axes of the domains, prior to and after interaction, are essentially comparable and consequently may be used for structural comparison. When the differences of the axes cannot be neglected, but are nevertheless slight, a smaller relatively invariant substructure of the domains may be utilized for comparison. The procedure yields two distance metrics for structural comparison. First, the displacements of the residue centroids due to antigenic binding, referenced to the ellipsoidal principal axes, are noted. Second, changes in the ellipsoidal distances with respect to the non-interacting structure provide a direct measure of the spatial displacements of the residue centroids, towards either the interior or exterior of the domain

  20. Acquired Antibody Responses against Plasmodium vivax Infection Vary with Host Genotype for Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Amanda; Muskus, Carlos; Duque, Victoria; Agudelo, Olga; Liu, Pu; Takagi, Akihide; Ntumngia, Francis B.; Adams, John H.; Sim, Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Corradin, Giampietro; Velez, Ivan D.; Wang, Ruobing

    2010-01-01

    Background Polymorphism of the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) is associated with susceptibility to and the severity of Plasmodium vivax malaria in humans. P. vivax uses DARC to invade erythrocytes. Individuals lacking DARC are ‘resistant’ to P. vivax erythrocytic infection. However, susceptibility to P. vivax in DARC+ individuals is reported to vary between specific DARC genotypes. We hypothesized that the natural acquisition of antibodies to P. vivax blood stages may vary with the host genotype and the level of DARC expression. Furthermore, high parasitemia has been reported to effect the acquisition of immunity against pre-erythrocytic parasites. We investigated the correlation between host DARC genotypes and the frequency and magnitude of antibodies against P. vivax erythrocytic stage antigens. Methodology/Findings We assessed the frequencies and magnitudes of antibody responses against P. vivax and P. falciparum sporozoite and erythrocytic antigens in Colombian donors from malaria-endemic regions. The frequency and level of naturally-acquired antibodies against the P. vivax erythrocytic antigens merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP1) and Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) varied with the host DARC genotypes. Donors with one negative allele (FY*B/FY*Bnull and FY*A/FY*Bnull) were more likely to have anti-PvMSP1 and anti-PvDBP antibodies than those with two positive alleles (FY*B/FY*B and FY*A/FY*B). The lower IgG3 and IgG1 components of the total IgG response may account for the decreased responses to P. vivax erythrocytic antigens with FY*A/FY*B and FY*B/FY*B genotypes. No such association was detected with P. falciparum erythrocytic antigens, which does not use DARC for erythrocyte invasion. Conclusion/Significance Individuals with higher DARC expression, which is associated with higher susceptibility to P. vivax infection, exhibited low frequencies and magnitudes of P. vivax blood-stage specific antibody responses. This may indicate that one of the

  1. Acquired antibody responses against Plasmodium vivax infection vary with host genotype for duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Maestre

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphism of the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC is associated with susceptibility to and the severity of Plasmodium vivax malaria in humans. P. vivax uses DARC to invade erythrocytes. Individuals lacking DARC are 'resistant' to P. vivax erythrocytic infection. However, susceptibility to P. vivax in DARC+ individuals is reported to vary between specific DARC genotypes. We hypothesized that the natural acquisition of antibodies to P. vivax blood stages may vary with the host genotype and the level of DARC expression. Furthermore, high parasitemia has been reported to effect the acquisition of immunity against pre-erythrocytic parasites. We investigated the correlation between host DARC genotypes and the frequency and magnitude of antibodies against P. vivax erythrocytic stage antigens.We assessed the frequencies and magnitudes of antibody responses against P. vivax and P. falciparum sporozoite and erythrocytic antigens in Colombian donors from malaria-endemic regions. The frequency and level of naturally-acquired antibodies against the P. vivax erythrocytic antigens merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP1 and Duffy binding protein (PvDBP varied with the host DARC genotypes. Donors with one negative allele (FY*B/FY*Bnull and FY*A/FY*Bnull were more likely to have anti-PvMSP1 and anti-PvDBP antibodies than those with two positive alleles (FY*B/FY*B and FY*A/FY*B. The lower IgG3 and IgG1 components of the total IgG response may account for the decreased responses to P. vivax erythrocytic antigens with FY*A/FY*B and FY*B/FY*B genotypes. No such association was detected with P. falciparum erythrocytic antigens, which does not use DARC for erythrocyte invasion.Individuals with higher DARC expression, which is associated with higher susceptibility to P. vivax infection, exhibited low frequencies and magnitudes of P. vivax blood-stage specific antibody responses. This may indicate that one of the primary mechanisms by which P. vivax evades

  2. Chondroitin sulphate A (CSA)-binding of single recombinant Duffy-binding-like domains is not restricted to Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 expressed by CSA-binding parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resende, Mafalda; Ditlev, Sisse B; Nielsen, Morten A

    2009-01-01

    Individuals living in areas with high Plasmodium falciparum transmission acquire immunity to malaria over time and adults have a markedly reduced risk of contracting severe disease. However, pregnant women constitute an important exception. Pregnancy-associated malaria is a major cause of mother....... In this study, we confirm the CSA-binding of these DBL domains, however, the analysis of a number of DBL domains of a non-VAR2CSA origin shows that CSA-binding is not exclusively restricted to VAR2CSA DBL domains. Furthermore, we show that the VAR2CSA DBL domains as well as other DBL domains also bind heparan...

  3. Detection of a nuclear, EBNA-type antigen in apparently EBNA-negative Herpesvirus papio (HVP)-transformed lymphoid lines by the acid-fixed nuclear binding technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, S; Luka, J; Falk, L; Klein, G

    1977-12-15

    In agreement with the findings of previous authors, we could not detect a virally determined nuclear antigen in Herpesvirus papio (HVP)-transformed baboon lymphoid lines by anticomplementary staining in situ, as for EBNA. However, by means of our recently developed acid-fixed nuclear binding technique an EBNA-like antigen could be readily demonstrated, after extraction from both producer and non-producer lines. We propose to designate the antigen as HUPNA. It can be detected by a human anti-EBNA antibody, suggesting cross-reactivity, if not identity, between EBNA and HUPNA. HVP-DNA carrying non-producer lines, negative for in situ ACIF stainability but capable of yielding HUPNA by the nuclear binding technique, can be superinfected with EBV, with brilliant EBNA expression as the result, suggesting that the defective in situ staining is a property associated with the baboon HVP, rather than the baboon lymphoid cell per se.

  4. Transformation and radiosensitivity of human diploid skin fibroblasts transfected with SV40 T-antigen mutants defective in RB and P53 binding domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LingNah Su; Little, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    A series of human diploid fibroblast cell clones were developed by DNA transfection with either wild-type SV40 T-antigen (SV40T) or T-antigen mutants defective in its various functional domains. Cell clones expressing the wild-type SV40 T were significantly radioresistant as compared with clones transfected with the neo gene only (D o 192 ± 13 vs 127 ± 19). This radioresistance persisted in post-crisis, immortalized cell lines. A series of mutants with point or deletion mutations within each functionally active domain of SV40 T were also examined for their ability to alter radiosensitivity and induce morphological transformation. Cell clones transfected with T-antigen mutants defective in nuclear localization or origin binding showed increased radioresistance similar to clones transfected with wild-type T-antigen, and expressed morphological changes characteristic of SV40 T-transfected cells. (author)

  5. Maternally transmitted antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum: relation to child susceptibility to malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cot, Michel; Le Hesran, Jean Yves; Staalsoe, Trine

    2003-01-01

    The consequences of pregnancy-associated malaria on a child's health have been poorly investigated. Malarial infection of the placenta seems to result in a higher susceptibility of children to the parasite during their first year of life. In 1993-1995, the authors investigated the role of antibod......The consequences of pregnancy-associated malaria on a child's health have been poorly investigated. Malarial infection of the placenta seems to result in a higher susceptibility of children to the parasite during their first year of life. In 1993-1995, the authors investigated the role......, Cameroon. These newborns were subsequently followed up for 2 years to determine the date of first occurrence of blood parasites and mean parasite density during follow-up. Maternally transmitted antibodies to VSA expressed by CSA-binding parasites, but not antibodies to any other specificity, were...... negatively related to time of first appearance of Plasmodium falciparum in a child's blood and were positively related to mean parasite density during the first 2 years of life. If maternal infection is thought to be the main mechanism influencing susceptibility of the newborn to malaria, antibodies to VSA...

  6. Humoral markers of active Epstein-Barr virus infection associate with anti-extractable nuclear antigen autoantibodies and plasma galectin-3 binding protein in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, N S; Nielsen, C T; Houen, G; Jacobsen, S

    2016-12-01

    We investigated if signs of active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections associate with certain autoantibodies and a marker of type I interferon activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. IgM and IgG plasma levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse and cytomegalovirus pp52 were applied as humoral markers of ongoing/recently active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections, respectively. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein served as a surrogate marker of type I interferon activity. The measurements were conducted in 57 systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 29 healthy controls using ELISAs. Regression analyses and univariate comparisons were performed for associative evaluation between virus serology, plasma galectin-3 binding protein and autoantibodies, along with other clinical and demographic parameters. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein concentrations were significantly higher in systemic lupus erythematosus patients (P = 0.009) and associated positively with Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse-directed antibodies and the presence of autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens in adjusted linear regressions (B = 2.02 and 2.02, P = 0.02 and P = 0.002, respectively). Furthermore, systemic lupus erythematosus patients with anti-extractable nuclear antigens had significantly higher antibody levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse (P = 0.02). Our study supports a link between active Epstein-Barr virus infections, positivity for anti-extractable nuclear antigens and increased plasma galectin-3 binding protein concentrations/type I interferon activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Effects of egg-adaptation on receptor-binding and antigenic properties of recent influenza A (H3N2) vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lauren; Wharton, Stephen A; Martin, Stephen R; Cross, Karen; Lin, Yipu; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Daniels, Rodney S; McCauley, John W

    2016-06-01

    Influenza A virus (subtype H3N2) causes seasonal human influenza and is included as a component of influenza vaccines. The majority of vaccine viruses are isolated and propagated in eggs, which commonly results in amino acid substitutions in the haemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein. These substitutions can affect virus receptor-binding and alter virus antigenicity, thereby, obfuscating the choice of egg-propagated viruses for development into candidate vaccine viruses. To evaluate the effects of egg-adaptive substitutions seen in H3N2 vaccine viruses on sialic acid receptor-binding, we carried out quantitative measurement of virus receptor-binding using surface biolayer interferometry with haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays to correlate changes in receptor avidity with antigenic properties. Included in these studies was a panel of H3N2 viruses generated by reverse genetics containing substitutions seen in recent egg-propagated vaccine viruses and corresponding cell culture-propagated wild-type viruses. These assays provide a quantitative approach to investigating the importance of individual amino acid substitutions in influenza receptor-binding. Results show that viruses with egg-adaptive HA substitutions R156Q, S219Y, and I226N, have increased binding avidity to α2,3-linked receptor-analogues and decreased binding avidity to α2,6-linked receptor-analogues. No measurable binding was detected for the viruses with amino acid substitution combination 156Q+219Y and receptor-binding increased in viruses where egg-adaptation mutations were introduced into cell culture-propagated virus. Substitutions at positions 156 and 190 appeared to be primarily responsible for low reactivity in HI assays with post-infection ferret antisera raised against 2012-2013 season H3N2 viruses. Egg-adaptive substitutions at position 186 caused substantial differences in binding avidity with an insignificant effect on antigenicity.

  8. Antigen-binding properties of monoclonal antibodies reactive with EBNA1 and use in immunoaffinity chromatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Duellman

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1 was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs were prepared that react with EBNA1. Eleven high affinity mAbs were recovered. Nine mAbs are isotype IgG (all subisotype IgG(1 and two mAbs are isotype IgM. All mAbs react strongly with EBNA1 in an ELISA assay while only one mAb (designated 1EB6 fails to react in a Western blot assay. The epitopes for these mAbs were mapped to seven different regions, providing good coverage of the entire EBNA1 protein. The mAbs had differing affinity for an EBNA1/DNA complex with four mAbs able to supershift the complex completely. All mAbs can immunoprecipitate EBNA1 from E. coli overexpressing EBNA1. A modified ELISA assay, termed ELISA-elution assay, was used to screen for mAbs that release EBNA1 in the presence of a low molecular weight polyhydroxylated compound (polyol and a nonchaotropic salt. MAbs with this property, termed polyol-responsive (PR-mAbs, allow gentle elution of labile proteins and protein complexes. Four mAbs are polyol-responsive with two showing usefulness in gentle immunoaffinity chromatography. Purification with these PR-mAbs may be useful in purifying EBNA1 complexes and elucidating EBNA1-associated proteins. This panel of anti-EBNA1 mAbs will advance the study of EBV by providing new tools to detect and purify EBNA1.

  9. Quantitative analysis of rat Ig (sub)classes binding to cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, R.; Brodin, T.; Sjoegren, H.-O.

    1982-01-01

    An indirect 125 I-labeled protein A assay for detection of cell surface-bound rat immunoglobulins is presented. The assay is quantitative and rapid and detects as little as 1 ng of cell surface-bound Ig. It discriminates between antibodies belonging to different IgG subclasses, IgM and IgA. The authors describe the production and specificity control of the reagents used and show that the test can be used for quantitative analysis. A large number of sera from untreated rats are tested to evaluate the frequency of falsely positive responses and variation due to age, sex and strain of rat. With this test it is relatively easy to quantitate the binding of classes and subclasses of rat immunoglobulins in a small volume (6 μl) of untreated serum. (Auth.)

  10. An Extended Surface Loop on Toxoplasma gondii Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 Governs Ligand Binding Selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Parker

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of globally prevalent diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. These obligate intracellular pathogens have evolved a sophisticated host cell invasion strategy that relies on a parasite-host cell junction anchored by interactions between apical membrane antigens (AMAs on the parasite surface and rhoptry neck 2 (RON2 proteins discharged from the parasite and embedded in the host cell membrane. Key to formation of the AMA1-RON2 complex is displacement of an extended surface loop on AMA1 called the DII loop. While conformational flexibility of the DII loop is required to expose the mature RON2 binding groove, a definitive role of this substructure has not been elucidated. To establish a role of the DII loop in Toxoplasma gondii AMA1, we engineered a form of the protein where the mobile portion of the loop was replaced with a short Gly-Ser linker (TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements with a panel of RON2 peptides revealed an influential role for the DII loop in governing selectivity. Most notably, an Eimeria tenella RON2 (EtRON2 peptide that showed only weak binding to TgAMA1 bound with high affinity to TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. To define the molecular basis for the differential binding, we determined the crystal structure of TgAMA1ΔDIIloop in complex with the EtRON2 peptide. When analyzed in the context of existing AMA1-RON2 structures, spatially distinct anchor points in the AMA1 groove were identified that, when engaged, appear to provide the necessary traction to outcompete the DII loop. Collectively, these data support a model where the AMA1 DII loop serves as a structural gatekeeper to selectively filter out ligands otherwise capable of binding with high affinity in the AMA1 apical groove. These data also highlight the importance of considering the functional implications of the DII loop in the ongoing development of therapeutic intervention strategies targeting the AMA1-RON

  11. Inefficient binding of IgM immune complexes to erythrocyte C3b-C4b receptors (CR1) and weak incorporation of C3b-iC3b into the complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kávai, M; Rasmussen, J M; Baatrup, G

    1988-01-01

    , but the binding was low (2-3%) when compared to the binding of the corresponding IgG-IC (50-60%). Solid phase IC were prepared by coating microwells with heat-aggregated bovine serum albumin (BSA) followed by incubation with rabbit IgM anti-BSA antibody. The IC were reacted with human serum at 37 degrees C....... The binding of C3b-iC3b was determined by use of biotinylated F(ab')2 antibodies to C3b-C3c and avidin-coupled alkaline phosphatase. The incorporation of C3b-iC3b into solid-phase IgM-IC increased when increasing amounts of IgM antibody were reacted with the antigen. The binding reaction was slow, reaching...

  12. Effect of polyethylene glycol conjugation on conformational and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Cristopher; Sheung, Anthony; Rahman, Nausheen; Ausar, S Fernando

    2015-02-02

    We have investigated the effects of site specific "hinge" polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) on thermal, pH, and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab') using a variety of biophysical techniques. The results obtained by circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet (UV) absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that the physical stability of the Fab' is maximized at pH 6-7 with no apparent differences due to PEGylation. Temperature-induced aggregation experiments revealed that PEGylation was able to increase the transition temperature, as well as prevent the formation of visible and subvisible aggregates. Statistical comparison of the three-index empirical phase diagram (EPD) revealed significant differences in thermal and pH stability signatures between Fab' and PEG-Fab'. Upon mechanical stress, micro-flow imaging (MFI) and measurement of the optical density at 360 nm showed that the PEG-Fab' had significantly higher resistance to surface-induced aggregation compared to the Fab'. Analysis of the interaction parameter, kD, indicated repulsive intermolecular forces for PEG-Fab' and attractive forces for Fab'. In conclusion, PEGylation appears to protect Fab' against thermal and mechanical stress-induced aggregation, likely due to a steric hindrance mechanism.

  13. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen binds DNA polymerase-β and mediates 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced neuronal death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhentao Zhang

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson disease (PD remain poorly understood. We recently reported that aberrant DNA replication mediated by DNA polymerase-β (DNA pol-β plays a causal role in the death of postmitotic neurons in an in vitro model of PD. In the present study, we show that both proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and DNA pol-β are required for MPP(+-induced neuronal death. PCNA binds to the catalytic domain of DNA pol-β in MPP(+-treated neurons and in post-mortem brain tissues of PD patients. The PCNA-DNA pol-β complex is loaded into DNA replication forks and mediates DNA replication in postmitotic neurons. The aberrant DNA replication mediated by the PCNA-DNA pol-β complex induces p53-dependent neuronal cell death. Our results indicate that the interaction of PCNA and DNA pol-β contributes to neuronal death in PD.

  14. Extracellular histones induce erythrocyte fragility and anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordbacheh, Farzaneh; O'Meara, Connor H; Coupland, Lucy A; Lelliott, Patrick M; Parish, Christopher R

    2017-12-28

    Extracellular histones have been shown to play an important pathogenic role in many diseases, primarily through their cytotoxicity toward nucleated cells and their ability to promote platelet activation with resultant thrombosis and thrombocytopenia. In contrast, little is known about the effect of extracellular histones on erythrocyte function. We demonstrate in this study that histones promote erythrocyte aggregation, sedimentation, and using a novel in vitro shear stress model, we show that histones induce erythrocyte fragility and lysis in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, histones impair erythrocyte deformability based on reduced passage of erythrocytes through an artificial spleen. These in vitro results were mirrored in vivo with the injection of histones inducing anemia within minutes of administration, with a concomitant increase in splenic hemoglobin content. Thrombocytopenia and leukopenia were also observed. These findings suggest that histones binding to erythrocytes may contribute to the elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rates observed in inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, histone-induced increases in red blood cell lysis and splenic clearance may be a significant factor in the unexplained anemias seen in critically ill patients. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. Conserved epitope on several human vitamin K-dependent proteins: location of the antigenic site and influence of metal ions on antibody binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, W.R.; Messier, T.; Howard, P.R.; Amiral, J.; Meyer, D.; Mann, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (designated H-11) produced by injecting mice with purified human protein C was found to bind several human vitamin K-dependent proteins. Using a solid-phase competitive radioimmunoassay with antibody immobilized onto microtiter plates, binding of 125 I-labeled protein C to the antibody was inhibited by increasing amounts of protein C, prothrombin, and Factors X and VII over a concentration range of 1 x 10 -8 to 1 x 10 -6 M. Chemical treatment of prothrombin with a variety of agents did not destroy the antigenic site recognized by the antibody as measured by immunoblotting of prothrombin or prothrombin derivative immobilized onto nitrocellulose. Immunoblotting of purified vitamin K-dependent polypeptides with the monoclonal antibody following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electrophoretic transfer to nitrocellulose indicated that the antigenic site was found on the light chains of protein C and Factor X. The exact location of the antigenic determinant for antibody H-11 was established using synthetic peptides. Comparison of protein sequences of bovine and human vitamin K-dependent proteins suggests that the sequence Phe-Leu-Glu-Glu-Xaa-Arg/Lys is required for antibody binding. Increasing concentrations of Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , or Mn 2+ partially inhibited binding of 125 I-protein C to the antibody in a solid-phase assay system with half-maximal binding observed at divalent metal ion concentrations of 2, 4, and 0.6 mM, respectively. The antigenic site thus recognized by monoclonal antibody H-11 is located at the amino-terminal region in the highly conserved γ-carboxyglutamic acid-containing domains of several, but not all, vitamin K-dependent proteins

  16. Humoral markers of active Epstein-Barr virus infection associate with anti-extractable nuclear antigen autoantibodies and plasma galectin-3 binding protein in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, N S; Nielsen, C T; Houen, G

    2016-01-01

    We investigated if signs of active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections associate with certain autoantibodies and a marker of type I interferon activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. IgM and IgG plasma levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse...... and cytomegalovirus pp52 were applied as humoral markers of ongoing/recently active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections, respectively. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein served as a surrogate marker of type I interferon activity. The measurements were conducted in 57 systemic lupus erythematosus patients...... concentrations were significantly higher in systemic lupus erythematosus patients (P = 0.009) and associated positively with Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse-directed antibodies and the presence of autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens in adjusted linear regressions (B = 2.02 and 2.02, P...

  17. Binding of two desmin derivatives to the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope of avian erythrocytes: evidence for a conserved site-specificity in intermediate filament-membrane interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgatos, S.D.; Weber, K.; Geisler, N.; Blobel, G.

    1987-01-01

    Using solution binding assays, the authors found that a 45-kDa fragment of 125 I-labelled desmin, lacking 67 residues from the N terminus, could specifically associate with avian erythrocyte nuclear envelopes but not with plasma membranes from the same cells. It was also observed that a 50-kDa desmin peptide, missing 27 C-terminal residues, retained the ability to bind to both membrane preparations. Displacement experiments with an excess of purified vimentin suggested that the two desmin derivatives were interacting with a previously identified vimentin receptor at the nuclear envelope, the protein lamin B. Additional analysis by affinity chromatography confirmed this conclusion. Employing an overlay assay, they demonstrated that the 50-kDa fragment, but not the 45-kDa desmin peptide, was capable of interacting with the plasma membrane polypeptide ankyrin (a known vimentin attachment site), as was intact vimentin. Conversely, the nuclear envelope protein lamin B was recognized by both fragments but not by a chymotryptic peptide composed solely of the helical rod domain of desmin. These data imply that the lamin B-binding site on desmin resides within the 21 residues following its helical rod domain, whereas the ankyrin-associating region is localized within its N-terminal head domain, exactly as in the case of vimentin

  18. Blood-group-Ii-active gangliosides of human erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feizi, T.; Childs, R.A.; Hakomori, S.-I.; Powell, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    More than ten new types of gangliosides, in addition to haematoside and sialosylparagloboside, were isolated from human erythrocyte membranes. These were separated by successive chromatographies on DAEA-Sephadex, on porous silica-gel columns and on thin-layer silica gel as acetylated compounds. Highly potent blood-group-Ii and moderate blood-group-H activities were demonstrated in some of the ganglioside fractions. The gangliosides incorporated into chlolesterol/phosphatidylcholine liposomes stoicheiometrically inhibited binding of anti-(blood-group-I and i) antibodies to a radioiodinated blood-group-Ii-active glycoprotein. The fraction with the highest blood-group-I activity, I(g) fraction, behaved like sialosyl-deca- to dodeca-glycosylceramides on t.l.c. Certain blood-group-I and most of the i-determinants were in partially or completely cryptic form and could be unmasked by sialidase treatment. Thus the I and i antigens, which are known to occur on internal structures of blood-group-ABH-active glycoproteins in secretions, also occur in the interior of the carbohydrate chains of erythrocyte gangliosides. (author)

  19. RNA Binding of T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA Recognition Motif Is Modified by pH Conditions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B. Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms. PMID:23902765

  20. Binding Properties of Streptococcus gordonii SspA and SspB (Antigen I/II Family) Polypeptides Expressed on the Cell Surface of Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Ann R.; Gilbert, Christophe; Wells, Jeremy M.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    1998-01-01

    The oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii expresses two cell wall-associated polypeptides, designated SspA (1,542 amino acid residues) and SspB (1,462 amino acid residues), that have 70% sequence identity. These polypeptides are members of the antigen I/II family of oral streptococcal adhesins and mediate the binding of streptococci to salivary glycoproteins, collagen, and other oral microorganisms such as Actinomyces naeslundii. To determine if SspA and SspB have differential binding propert...

  1. Insulin radioreceptor assay on murine splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, F.; Kahn, R.

    1982-01-01

    Insulin radioreceptor assays were developed using splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes from individual mice. Splenic leukocytes were prepared using an NH 4 Cl buffer which did not alter insulin binding, but gave much higher yields than density gradient methods. Mouse erythrocytes were isolated from heparinized blood by three passages over a Boyum gradient, and a similar buffer was used to separate cells from free [ 125 I]iodoinsulin at the end of the binding incubation. Insulin binding to both splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes had typical pH, temperature, and time dependencies, and increased linearly with an increased number of cells. Optimal conditions for the splenic leukocytes (6 x 10 7 /ml) consisted of incubation with [ 125 I]iodoinsulin at 15 C for 2 h in Hepes buffer, pH 8.0. In cells from 20 individual mice, the specific [ 125 I]iodoinsulin binding was 2.6 +/- 0.1% (SEM), and nonspecific binding was 0.3 +/- 0.04% (10.6% of total binding). Erythrocytes (2.8 x 10 9 /ml) were incubated with [ 125 ]iodoinsulin at 15 C for 2 h in Hepes buffer, pH 8.2. In cells from 25 individual mice, the specific [ 125 I]iodoinsulin binding was 4.5 +/- 0.2%, and nonspecific binding was 0.7 +/- 0.03% (13.6% of total binding). In both splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes, analysis of equilibrium binding data produced curvilinear Scatchard plots with approximately 3500 binding sites/leukocyte and 20 binding sites/erythrocyte. These data demonstrate that adequate numbers of splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes can be obtained from individual mice to study insulin binding in a precise and reproducible manner

  2. ABO Blood Groups Influence Macrophage-mediated Phagocytosis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Donald R.; Hult, Annika K.; Olsson, Martin L.; Liles, W. Conrad; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine M.; Kain, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Erythrocyte polymorphisms associated with a survival advantage to Plasmodium falciparum infection have undergone positive selection. There is a predominance of blood group O in malaria-endemic regions, and several lines of evidence suggest that ABO blood groups may influence the outcome of P. falciparum infection. Based on the hypothesis that enhanced innate clearance of infected polymorphic erythrocytes is associated with protection from severe malaria, we investigated whether P. falciparum-infected O erythrocytes are more efficiently cleared by macrophages than infected A and B erythrocytes. We show that human macrophages in vitro and mouse monocytes in vivo phagocytose P. falciparum-infected O erythrocytes more avidly than infected A and B erythrocytes and that uptake is associated with increased hemichrome deposition and high molecular weight band 3 aggregates in infected O erythrocytes. Using infected A1, A2, and O erythrocytes, we demonstrate an inverse association of phagocytic capacity with the amount of A antigen on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Finally, we report that enzymatic conversion of B erythrocytes to type as O before infection significantly enhances their uptake by macrophages to observed level comparable to that with infected O wild-type erythrocytes. These data provide the first evidence that ABO blood group antigens influence macrophage clearance of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes and suggest an additional mechanism by which blood group O may confer resistance to severe malaria. PMID:23071435

  3. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    With the aim of forming the ‘lock-washer’ conformation of the origin-binding domain of SV40 large T antigen in solution, using structure-based analysis an intermolecular disulfide bridge was engineered into the origin-binding domain to generate higher order oligomers in solution. The 1.7 Å resolution structure shows that the mutant forms a spiral in the crystal and has the de novo disulfide bond at the protein interface, although structural rearrangements at the interface are observed relative to the wild type. The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS–PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner

  4. Multiple Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variants per genome can bind IgM via its Fc fragment Fcμ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Anine; Ditlev, Sisse Bolm; Soroka, Vladyslav

    2015-01-01

    with severe clinical manifestations, such as cerebral malaria in children and placental malaria in pregnant women. PfEMP1 that can bind the Fc part of IgM (Fcμ) characterizes one such type, although the functional significance of this IgM binding to PfEMP1 remains unclear. In this study, we report...... resemble the rosette-mediating and IgM-binding PfEMP1 HB3VAR06, but none of them mediated formation of rosettes. We could map the capacity for Fc-specific IgM binding to DBLε domains near the C terminus for three of the four PfEMP1 proteins tested. Our study provides new evidence regarding Fc...

  5. The influence of short-term endurance training on the insulin blood level, binding, and degradation of 125I-insulin by erythrocyte receptors in patients after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylewicz, P; Przywarska, I; Szcześniak, L; Rychlewski, T; Bieńkowska, S; Długiewicz, I; Wilk, M

    1999-01-01

    This study was directed toward establishing whether and to what extent, short-term endurance training influences the insulin blood level, and the binding and degradation of 125I-insulin by erythrocyte receptors in patients undergoing rehabilitation after myocardial infarction. The study was conducted in a group of 60 patients who had had myocardial infarction within the past 1.5 to 3 months and who did not have arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. All the patients took a symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test. Before and after the test, venous blood was collected to determine lactic acid and insulin blood levels as well as the binding and degradation of 125I-insulin. The study group was randomized into two subgroups. One subgroup entered into a 3-week in-patient rehabilitation course. The control group was discharged from the hospital and was given no recommendations for physical exercise. The same investigation was repeated 3 weeks later. In the patients (50%) with hyperinsulinemia (insulin resistance index, > 10 microIU/mL), which was detected during the first investigation, insulin blood level decreased from 23.9 +/- 4.4 to 15.0 +/- 1.9 microIU/mL (P endurance training period during rehabilitation after myocardial infarction reduces insulin resistance in patients with hyperinsulinemia.

  6. The spacing between adjacent binding sites in the family of repeats affects the functions of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 in transcription activation and stable plasmid maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebner, Christy; Lasanen, Julie; Battle, Scott; Aiyar, Ashok

    2003-07-05

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the closely related Herpesvirus papio (HVP) are stably replicated as episomes in proliferating latently infected cells. Maintenance and partitioning of these viral plasmids requires a viral sequence in cis, termed the family of repeats (FR), that is bound by a viral protein, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1). Upon binding FR, EBNA1 maintains viral genomes in proliferating cells and activates transcription from viral promoters required for immortalization. FR from either virus encodes multiple binding sites for the viral maintenance protein, EBNA1, with the FR from the prototypic B95-8 strain of EBV containing 20 binding sites, and FR from HVP containing 8 binding sites. In addition to differences in the number of EBNA1-binding sites, adjacent binding sites in the EBV FR are typically separated by 14 base pairs (bp), but are separated by 10 bp in HVP. We tested whether the number of binding sites, as well as the distance between adjacent binding sites, affects the function of EBNA1 in transcription activation or plasmid maintenance. Our results indicate that EBNA1 activates transcription more efficiently when adjacent binding sites are separated by 10 bp, the spacing observed in HVP. In contrast, using two separate assays, we demonstrate that plasmid maintenance is greatly augmented when adjacent EBNA1-binding sites are separated by 14 bp, and therefore, presumably lie on the same face of the DNA double helix. These results provide indication that the functions of EBNA1 in transcription activation and plasmid maintenance are separable.

  7. The spacing between adjacent binding sites in the family of repeats affects the functions of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 in transcription activation and stable plasmid maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebner, Christy; Lasanen, Julie; Battle, Scott; Aiyar, Ashok

    2003-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the closely related Herpesvirus papio (HVP) are stably replicated as episomes in proliferating latently infected cells. Maintenance and partitioning of these viral plasmids requires a viral sequence in cis, termed the family of repeats (FR), that is bound by a viral protein, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1). Upon binding FR, EBNA1 maintains viral genomes in proliferating cells and activates transcription from viral promoters required for immortalization. FR from either virus encodes multiple binding sites for the viral maintenance protein, EBNA1, with the FR from the prototypic B95-8 strain of EBV containing 20 binding sites, and FR from HVP containing 8 binding sites. In addition to differences in the number of EBNA1-binding sites, adjacent binding sites in the EBV FR are typically separated by 14 base pairs (bp), but are separated by 10 bp in HVP. We tested whether the number of binding sites, as well as the distance between adjacent binding sites, affects the function of EBNA1 in transcription activation or plasmid maintenance. Our results indicate that EBNA1 activates transcription more efficiently when adjacent binding sites are separated by 10 bp, the spacing observed in HVP. In contrast, using two separate assays, we demonstrate that plasmid maintenance is greatly augmented when adjacent EBNA1-binding sites are separated by 14 bp, and therefore, presumably lie on the same face of the DNA double helix. These results provide indication that the functions of EBNA1 in transcription activation and plasmid maintenance are separable

  8. [Correlation of the degree of band 3 protein absence on erythrocyte membrane by eosin-5'-maleimide binding test and clinical phenotype in hereditary spherocytosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, G X; Yang, W R; Jing, L P; Zhang, L; Zhou, K; Li, Y; Ye, L; Li, Y; Li, J P; Fan, H H; Song, L; Zhao, X; Wu, Z J; Yang, Y; Xiong, Y Z; Wang, H J; Zhang, F K

    2017-06-14

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) binding test and the clinical severity of hereditary spherocytosis (HS). Methods: A total of 258 un-splenectomize HS patients were consecutively enrolled. Correlation of hemoglobin concentration, hemolytic parameters, compensating erythropoiesis and the EMA binding test were evaluated. Results: 258 (128 male and 130 female) patients were included in this study, including 91 compensatory hemolysis patients, 53 patients with mild anemia, 78 patients with moderate anemia and 36 patients with severe anemia. The median age at diagnosis was 23 (2-70) years. The median decreased fluorescence intensity of EMA binding test was 29.97% (16.09%-47.34%) and the average intensity was (29.70±6.28) % of 258 HS patients. The decreased EMA binding fluorescence intensity correlated with MCV ( r =-0.343, P <0.001) and MCHC ( r =0.223, P <0.001). There was no relationship between EMA fluorescence intensity and absolute reticulocyte count ( r =0.080, P =0.198) , reticulocyte percentile ( r =-0.015, P =0.813) , IBIL levels ( r =-0.009, P =0.902) , HGB levels ( r =-0.067, P =0.280). Evaluated as a quartile variable, EMA fluorescence intensity was not correlated with anemia severity ( C =0.150, P =0.746). Conclusion: EMA binding test does not related to anemia levels and has no major clinical implications for disease severity in HS.

  9. Erythrocyte membrane ATPase and calcium pumping activities in porcine malignant hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatte, H.S.; Mickelson, J.R.; Addis, P.B.; Louis, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate possible abnormalities in erythrocyte membrane enzyme activities in the pharmacogenetic disorder MH, membrane ATPase activities have been examined in erythrocyte ghosts prepared from red blood cells of MHS and normal swine. While no differences were noted in Mg2+-ATPase activities, the (Na+, K+)-ATPase activity of MHS erythrocyte ghosts was less than that of normal ghosts. Ca2+-ATPase activity exhibited low- and high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites in both types of erythrocyte ghost. While the Km for Ca2+ was greater for normal than for MHS erythrocyte ghosts at the high-affinity Ca2+-binding site, the reverse was true at the low-affinity Ca2+-binding site. Irrespective of the type of calcium binding site occupied, the Vmax for normal erythrocyte ghost Ca2+-ATPase activity was greater than that for MHS ghosts. In the presence of calmodulin, there was now no difference between MHS and normal erythrocyte ghosts in either the Km for Ca2+ or the Vmax of the Ca2+-ATPase activity. To determine if the calcium pumping activity of intact MHS and normal pig erythrocytes differed, calcium efflux from the 45 Ca-loaded erythrocytes was determined; this activity was significantly greater for MHS than for normal erythrocytes. Thus, the present study confirms that there are abnormalities in the membranes of MHS pig red blood cells. However, we conclude that these abnormalities are unlikely to result in an impaired ability of MHS erythrocytes to regulate their cytosolic Ca2+ concentration

  10. Use of thermodynamic coupling between antibody-antigen binding and phospholipid acyl chain phase transition energetics to predict immunoliposome targeting affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klegerman, Melvin E; Zou, Yuejiao; Golunski, Eva; Peng, Tao; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D

    2014-09-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of ligand-target binding has been a useful tool for dissecting the nature of the binding mechanism and, therefore, potentially can provide valuable information regarding the utility of targeted formulations. Based on a consistent coupling of antibody-antigen binding and gel-liquid crystal transition energetics observed for antibody-phosphatidylethanolamine (Ab-PE) conjugates, we hypothesized that the thermodynamic parameters and the affinity for antigen of the Ab-PE conjugates could be effectively predicted once the corresponding information for the unconjugated antibody is determined. This hypothesis has now been tested in nine different antibody-targeted echogenic liposome (ELIP) preparations, where antibody is conjugated to dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) head groups through a thioether linkage. Predictions were satisfactory (affinity not significantly different from the population of values found) in five cases (55.6%), but the affinity of the unconjugated antibody was not significantly different from the population of values found in six cases (66.7%), indicating that the affinities of the conjugated antibody tended not to deviate appreciably from those of the free antibody. While knowledge of the affinities of free antibodies may be sufficient to judge their suitability as targeting agents, thermodynamic analysis may still provide valuable information regarding their usefulness for specific applications.

  11. Assignment of C1q-binding HLA antibodies as unacceptable HLA antigens avoids positive CDC-crossmatches prior to transplantation of deceased donor organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, David; Marget, Matthias; Hallensleben, Michael; Görg, Siegfried; Ziemann, Malte

    2017-03-01

    Soon, a virtual crossmatch shall replace the complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) allocation crossmatch in the Eurotransplant region. To prevent positive CDC-crossmatches in the recipient centre, careful definition of unacceptable antigens is necessary. For highly sensitized patients, this is difficult by CDC alone. Assignment of all antibodies detected by sensitive assays, however, could prevent organ allocation. To assess the usefulness of the Luminex C1q-assay to prevent positive CDC-crossmatches, all CDC-crossmatches performed prior to deceased kidney transplantation in a 16-month-period were reviewed. Sera causing positive crossmatches were investigated by the C1q-assay. 31 out of 1432 crossmatches (2.2%) were positive. Sera involved in 26 positive crossmatches were available. C1q-binding donor-specific antibodies were detected in 19 sera (73.1%). The other sera were from recipients without any HLA antibodies detectable by CDC or common solid phase assays. Three patients had known Non-HLA antibodies causing positive CDC-results. Four crossmatches were only weak positive. Therefore, avoidance of donors with HLA antigens against whom C1q-binding antibodies were detected would have prevented all positive crossmatches due to HLA antibodies. Provided that all HLA specificities against which antibodies are detected by the Luminex C1q-assay are considered as unacceptable antigens, CDC-crossmatches prior to transplantation might safely be omitted in many patients. They should be maintained in highly immunized patients, however, for whom assignment of all C1q-positive antibodies as unacceptable antigens could lead to a significant delay or even prevention of transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Circulating immune complexes in the serum in systemic lupus erythematosus and in carriers of hepatitis B antigen: quantitation by binding to radiolabeled Cl/sub q/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nydegger, U.E.; Lambert, P.H.; Gerber, H.; Miescher, P.A.

    1974-01-01

    A sensitive and reproducible procedure fr the detection of souble immune complexes in sera from patients with various immunopathological disorders is reported. Radiolabeled Clq is reacted with sera containing immune complexes. Separation of free from complex bound [ 125 I]Clq is achieved by selective precipitation with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The minimal amount of aggregated immunoglobulins thus detected is about 10 μg and that of soluble human IgG-anti-IgG complexes is about 3 μg of complexed antibody. Some immune complexes formed in large antigen excess (Ag 2 Ab) can still be detected by this radiolabeled Clq bining assay. In a second step, this radiolabeled Clq binding assay was applied to an experimental model of immune complex disease and was shown to be efficient for the detection of in vivo formed immune complexes. Finally, the technique could be applied to the study of sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or to carriers of the Hepatitis B antigen (HB-Ag). Particularly high values were seen in active disease, a finding which was confirmed by follow-up studies performed with four SLE patients. No increased [ 125 I]Clq binding was seen in 18 healthy carriers of the HB-Ag; whereas, sera from carriers with hepatitis appear to precipitate increased [ 125 I]Clq percentages: 7/24 cases with acute transient and 4/7 cases with chronic persistent hepatitis were found to increasingly bind [ 125 I]Clq. The results were also used for a correlative study of [ 125 I]Clq binding to IgG levels in the sera but increased [ 125 I]Clq binding could not be attributed to high serum IgG levels which are likely to account for the evaluation of immune complex diseases in human pathology. (U.S.)

  13. Mannose-binding lectin is a disease modifier in clinical malaria and may function as opsonin for Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garred, Peter; Nielsen, Morten A; Kurtzhals, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Variant alleles in the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene (mbl2) causing low levels of functional MBL are associated with susceptibility to different infections and are common in areas where malaria is endemic. Therefore, we investigated whether MBL variant alleles in 551 children from Ghana were...... associated with the occurrence and outcome parameters of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and asked whether MBL may function as an opsonin for P. falciparum. No difference in MBL genotype frequency was observed between infected and noninfected children or between children with cerebral malaria and/or severe...... malarial anemia and children with uncomplicated malaria. However, patients with complicated malaria who were homozygous for MBL variant alleles had significantly higher parasite counts and lower blood glucose levels than their MBL-competent counterparts. Distinct calcium-dependent binding of MBL...

  14. [Importance of binding of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and ATP to hemoglobin for erythrocyte glycolysis: activation by 2,3-diphosphoglycerate of hexokinase at intracellular conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, T; Glende, M; Reich, J G

    1978-01-01

    In a theoretical study the influence of hemoglobin and Mg-ions as binding partners of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and ATP was investigated. Free hemoglobin may be an efficient competitor of Mg2+ for the ligand ATP. At conditions which favour hemoglobin as binding partner (i.e. desoxygenation, low medium pH and incubation temperature, as in blood preservation) up to 95% of the whole cellular ATP (ca. 2mM in cell water) may be bound to hemoglobin (ca. 7 mM). This binding is largely prevented in the presence of physiological amounts of diphosphoglycerate (ca. 7 mM) which is in excess and has a higher binding affinity to hemoglobin. Therefore, diphosphoglycerate keeps ATP (MgATP) in cell water solution at conditions in which Hb would trop it in the presence of Mg2+ (ca. 3mM). It can be calculated that, by lack of free MgATP, the activity of hexokinase within the cell drops by a factor of greater than 10 when diphosphoglycerate is metabolized. This indirect activation by diphosphoglycerate of hexokinase is operative at free concentrations of DPG far below those which exert the well known excess inhibitory effect on hexokinase and phosphofructokinase. In a model study, the activation by diphosphoglycerate of the initial two-kinase stage was introduced into a simplified kinetic model of glycolysis. A pronounced hysteresis loop of the stationary concentrations of ATP and diphosphoglycerate was produced indicating the existence of several stationary states, one with high ATP and high diphosphoglycerate, the other one with low values. It is demonstrated that diphosphoglycerate, being a protector of glycolysis at physiological concentrations, triggers an autocatalytic breakdown of the energy state when permitted to drop to low values.

  15. Multivalent Soluble Antigen Arrays Exhibit High Avidity Binding and Modulation of B Cell Receptor-Mediated Signaling to Drive Efficacy against Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Brittany L; Pickens, Chad J; Leon, Martin; Berkland, Cory

    2017-06-12

    A pressing need exists for antigen-specific immunotherapies (ASIT) that induce selective tolerance in autoimmune disease while avoiding deleterious global immunosuppression. Multivalent soluble antigen arrays (SAgA PLP:LABL ), consisting of a hyaluronic acid (HA) linear polymer backbone cografted with multiple copies of autoantigen (PLP) and cell adhesion inhibitor (LABL) peptides, are designed to induce tolerance to a specific multiple sclerosis (MS) autoantigen. Previous studies established that hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL , employing a degradable linker to codeliver PLP and LABL, was therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in vivo and exhibited antigen-specific binding with B cells, targeted the B cell receptor (BCR), and dampened BCR-mediated signaling in vitro. Our results pointed to sustained BCR engagement as the SAgA PLP:LABL therapeutic mechanism, so we developed a new version of the SAgA molecule using nonhydrolyzable conjugation chemistry, hypothesizing it would enhance and maintain the molecule's action at the cell surface to improve efficacy. "Click SAgA" (cSAgA PLP:LABL ) uses hydrolytically stable covalent conjugation chemistry (Copper-catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC)) rather than a hydrolyzable oxime bond to attach PLP and LABL to HA. We explored cSAgA PLP:LABL B cell engagement and modulation of BCR-mediated signaling in vitro through flow cytometry binding and calcium flux signaling assays. Indeed, cSAgA PLP:LABL exhibited higher avidity B cell binding and greater dampening of BCR-mediated signaling than hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL . Furthermore, cSAgA PLP:LABL exhibited significantly enhanced in vivo efficacy compared to hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL , achieving equivalent efficacy at one-quarter of the dose. These results indicate that nonhydrolyzable conjugation increased the avidity of cSAgA PLP:LABL to drive in vivo efficacy through modulated BCR-mediated signaling.

  16. Glycosphingolipid antigens from Leishmania (L. amazonensis amastigotes: Binding of anti-glycosphingolipid monoclonal antibodies in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Straus

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Specific glycosphingolipid antigens of Leishmania (L. amazonensis amastigotes reactive with the monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs ST-3, ST-4 and ST-5 were isolated, and their structure was partially elucidated by negative ion fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The glycan moieties of five antigens presented linear sequences of hexoses and N-acetylhexosamines ranging from four to six sugar residues, and the ceramide moieties were found to be composed by a sphingosine d18:1 and fatty acids 24:1 or 16:0. Affinities of the three monoclonal antibodies to amastigote glycosphingolipid antigens were also analyzed by ELISA. MoAb ST-3 reacted equally well with all glycosphingolipid antigens tested, whereas ST-4 and ST-5 presented higher affinities to glycosphingolipids with longer carbohydrate chains, with five or more sugar units (slow migrating bands on HPTLC. Macrophages isolated from footpad lesions of BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania (L. amazonensis were incubated with MoAb ST-3 and, by indirect immunofluorescence, labeling was only detected on the parasite, whereas no fluorescence was observed on the surface of the infected macrophages, indicating that these glycosphingolipid antigens are not acquired from the host cell but synthesized by the amastigote. Intravenous administration of 125I-labeled ST-3 antibody to infected BALB/c mice showed that MoAb ST-3 accumulated significantly in the footpad lesions in comparison to blood and other tissues

  17. Improved Prediction of Bovine Leucocyte Antigens (BoLA) Presented Ligands by Use of Mass-Spectrometry-Determined Ligand and in Vitro Binding Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Connelley, Tim; Ternette, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    Peptide binding to MHC class I molecules is the single most selective step in antigen presentation and the strongest single correlate to peptide cellular immunogenicity. The cost of experimentally characterizing the rules of peptide presentation for a given MHC-I molecule is extensive, and predic...... available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCpan/NetBoLApan . The approach has here been applied to the BoLA-I system, but the pipeline is readily applicable to MHC systems in other species....

  18. Clofazimine Induced Suicidal Death of Human Erythrocytes

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    Arbace Officioso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The antimycobacterial riminophenazine clofazimine has previously been shown to up-regulate cellular phospholipase A2 and to induce apoptosis. In erythrocytes phospholipase A2 stimulates eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Phospholipase A2 is in part effective by fostering formation of prostaglandin E2, which triggers Ca2+ entry. Stimulators of Ca2+ entry and eryptosis further include oxidative stress and energy depletion. The present study tested, whether and how clofazimine induces eryptosis. Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, hemolysis from hemoglobin release, cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, reactive oxygen species (ROS from 2′, 7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA fluorescence, and cytosolic ATP level utilizing a luciferin-luciferase assay kit. Results: A 24-48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to clofazimine (≥1.5 µg/ml significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells without appreciably modifying forward scatter. Clofazimine significantly increased [Ca2+]i, significantly decreased cytosolic ATP, but did not significantly modify ROS. The effect of clofazimine on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted, but not fully abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+, and by phospholipase A2 inhibitor quinacrine (25 µM. Clofazimine further augmented the effect of Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (0.1 µM on eryptosis. The clofazimine induced annexin-V-binding was, however, completely abrogated by combined Ca2+ removal and addition of quinacrine. Conclusion: Clofazimine stimulates phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect in part dependent on entry of extracellular Ca2+, paralleled by cellular energy depletion and sensitive to

  19. Stimulation of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by the Antimalarial Drug Mefloquine

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    Rosi Bissinger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The antimalarial drug mefloquine has previously been shown to stimulate apoptosis of nucleated cells. Similar to apoptosis, erythrocytes may enter suicidal death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Stimulators of eryptosis include oxidative stress, increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, and ceramide. Methods: Phosphatidylserine abundance at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, reactive oxidant species (ROS from 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA fluorescence, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and ceramide abundance from specific antibody binding. Results: A 48 h treatment of human erythrocytes with mefloquine significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥5 µg/ml, significantly decreased forward scatter (≥5 µg/ml, significantly increased ROS abundance (5 µg/ml, significantly increased [Ca2+]i (7.5 µg/ml and significantly increased ceramide abundance (10 µg/ml. The up-regulation of annexin-V-binding following mefloquine treatment was significantly blunted but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, mefloquine significantly increased annexin-V-binding. Conclusions: Mefloquine treatment leads to erythrocyte shrinkage and erythrocyte membrane scrambling, effects at least partially due to induction of oxidative stress, increase of [Ca2+]i and up-regulation of ceramide abundance.

  20. High throughput testing of the SV40 Large T antigen binding to cellular p53 identifies putative drugs for the treatment of SV40-related cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbone, Michele; Rudzinski, Jennifer; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    SV40 has been linked to some human malignancies, and the evidence that this virus plays a causative role in mesothelioma and brain tumors is mounting. The major SV40 oncoprotein is the Large tumor antigen (Tag). A key Tag transforming activity is connected to its capability to bind and inactivate cellular p53. In this study we developed an effective, high throughput, ELISA-based method to study Tag-p53 interaction in vitro. This assay allowed us to screen a chemical library and to identify a chemical inhibitor of the Tag binding to p53. We propose that our in vitro assay is a useful method to identify molecules that may be used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of SV40-related human cancers

  1. The Uremic Toxin Acrolein Promotes Suicidal Erythrocyte Death

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    Mohamed Siyabeldin E. Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anemia is a major complication of end stage renal disease. The anemia is mainly the result of impaired formation of erythrocytes due to lack of erythropoietin and iron deficiency. Compelling evidence, however, points to the contribution of accelerated erythrocyte death, which decreases the life span of circulating erythrocytes. Erythrocytes may enter suicidal death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and by cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. Erythrocytes could be sensitized to cytosolic Ca2+ by ceramide. In end stage renal disease, eryptosis may possibly be stimulated by uremic toxins. The present study explored, whether the uremic toxin acrolein could trigger eryptosis. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin-V-binding, hemolysis from hemoglobin release, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and ceramide from fluorescent antibodies. Results: A 48 h exposure to acrolein (30 - 50 µM did not significantly modify [Ca2+]i but significantly decreased forward scatter and increased annexin-V-binding. Acrolein further triggered slight, but significant hemolysis and increased ceramide formation in erythrocytes. Acrolein (50 µM induced annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted in the nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+. Acrolein augmented the annexin-V-binding following treatment with Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM. Conclusion: Acrolein stimulates suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, an effect at least in part due to stimulation of ceramide formation with subsequent sensitisation of the erythrocytes to cytosolic Ca2+.

  2. A remote arene-binding site on prostate specific membrane antigen revealed by antibody-recruiting small molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, A.X.; Murelli, R.P.; Bařinka, Cyril; Michel, J.; Cocleaza, A.; Jorgensen, W.L.; Lubkowski, J.; Spiegel, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 36 (2010), s. 12711-12716 ISSN 0002-7863 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Prostate -specific membrane antigen * antibody recruiting molecules * Structure-activity relationship Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 9.019, year: 2010

  3. Laminin binding protein, 34/67 laminin receptor, carries stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 epitope defined by monoclonal antibody Raft.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Yohko U.; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Kyoko; Takenouchi, Hisami; Taguchi, Tomoko; Okita, Hajime; Umezawa, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Junichiro

    2005-01-01

    We previously produced monoclonal antibodies against the detergent-insoluble microdomain, i.e., the raft microdomain, of the human renal cancer cell line ACHN. Raft.2, one of these monoclonal antibodies, recognizes sialosyl globopentaosylceramide, which has the stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 epitope. Although the mouse embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line F9 does not express SSEA-4, some F9 cells stained with Raft.2. Western analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identified the Raft.2 binding molecule as laminin binding protein (LBP), i.e., 34/67 laminin receptor. Weak acid treatment or digestion with Clostridium perfringens sialidase reduced Raft.2 binding to LBP on nitrocellulose sheets and [ 14 C]galactose was incorporated into LBP, indicating LBP to have a sialylated carbohydrate moiety. Subcellular localization analysis by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and examination by confocal microscopy revealed LBP to be localized on the outer surface of the plasma membrane. An SSEA-4-positive human EC cell line, NCR-G3 cells, also expressed Raft.2-binding LBP

  4. Role of N-terminal His6-Tags in binding and efficient translocation of polypeptides into cells using anthrax protective antigen (PA.

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    Christoph Beitzinger

    Full Text Available It is of interest to define bacterial toxin biochemical properties to use them as molecular-syringe devices in order to deliver enzymatic activities into host cells. Binary toxins of the AB(7/8-type are among the most potent and specialized bacterial protein toxins. The B subunits oligomerize to form a pore that binds with high affinity host cell receptors and the enzymatic A subunit. This allows the endocytosis of the complex and subsequent injection of the A subunit into the cytosol of the host cells. Here we report that the addition of an N-terminal His(6-tag to different proteins increased their binding affinity to the protective antigen (PA PA(63-channels, irrespective if they are related (C2I or unrelated (gpJ, EDIN to the AB(7/8-family of toxins. His(6-EDIN exhibited voltage-dependent increase of the stability constant for binding by a factor of about 25 when the trans-side corresponding to the cell interior was set to -70 mV. Surprisingly, the C. botulinum toxin C2II-channel did not share this feature of PA(63. Cell-based experiments demonstrated that addition of an N-terminal His(6-tag promoted also intoxication of endothelial cells by C2I or EDIN via PA(63. Our results revealed that addition of His(6-tags to several factors increase their binding properties to PA(63 and enhance the property to intoxicate cells.

  5. The binding parameters of radiolabelled monoclonal F (ab')2 and Fab' fragments relative to immunoglobulin G in reactions with surface-bound antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fjeld, J.G.; Nustad, K.; Michaelsen, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    The binding parameters of iodine-125-labelled intact monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG), F(ab') 2 and Fab' fragments were compared. The study was carried out with the two monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) K13 and K16 specific for human Ig light chains κ and λ, respectively. When testing the 125 I-MoAbs against monodisperse polymer particles coated with the specific antigens, the K a for the F(ab') 2 fragments were similar to that for IgG, while the K a for the Fab' fragments were reduced to 10%-20% of that for IgG. The number N of effective target sites revealed with Fab' was higher than with F(ab') and IgG, presumably because less surface area is occupied by the small Fab' molecules. The immunoreactive fraction F ranged according to IgG>F(ab') 2 >Fab'. The explanation of the moderate difference between the K a of the monoclonal Fab' and the divalent IgG and F(ab') 2 was that the divalent molecules were not divalently attached to the particles. When testing the same antibody preparations against humanlymphoma cells producing Ig with light chains κ or λ, the binding results were less reliable than when particles were utilised, presumably due to antigen shedding. Different MoAbs vary in their loss of immunoreactivity due to enzymatic degradation and the radiolabelling procedure. The preparation of the radiolabelled fragments should therefore be optimized for each MoAb, and evaluation is necessary before injection. Artificial targets with a low leakage of antigen, like the monodisperse polymer particles here applied, are recommended for the in vitro evaluation of the immunoreactivity of labelled MoAb preparations. (orig.)

  6. Transcriptomic Analysis of Young and Old Erythrocytes of Fish

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    Miriam Götting

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding gene expression changes over the lifespan of cells is of fundamental interest and gives important insights into processes related to maturation and aging. This study was undertaken to understand the global transcriptome changes associated with aging in fish erythrocytes. Fish erythrocytes retain their nuclei throughout their lifetime and they are transcriptionally and translationally active. However, they lose important functions during their lifespan in the circulation. We separated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss erythrocytes into young and old fractions using fixed angle-centrifugation and analyzed transcriptome changes using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq technology and quantitative real-time PCR. We found 930 differentially expressed between young and old erythrocyte fractions; 889 of these showed higher transcript levels in young, while only 34 protein-coding genes had higher transcript levels in old erythrocytes. In particular genes involved in ion binding, signal transduction, membrane transport, and those encoding various enzyme classes are affected in old erythrocytes. The transcripts with higher levels in old erythrocytes were associated with seven different GO terms within biological processes and nine within molecular functions and cellular components, respectively. Our study furthermore found several highly abundant transcripts as well as a number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs for which the protein products are currently not known revealing the gaps of knowledge in most non-mammalian vertebrates. Our data provide the first insight into changes involved in aging on the transcriptional level and thus opens new perspectives for the study of maturation processes in fish erythrocytes.

  7. The role of primary lymphoid organs of chickens in the elimination of 51Cr-labelled erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hala, K.; Schulmannova, J.; Nemeckova, S.

    1980-01-01

    F 1 chicken hybrids of the inbred lines CC and IC were injected erythrocytes from CB line chickens (differing in alloantigens of the major histocompatibility system B) or IA line chickens (differing in the A blood group system alloantigens). Injected erythrocytes were labelled with 51 Cr and their gradual elimination from the recipient's circulation was checked. Surgical bursectomy was performed at the end of embryogenesis and thymectomy immediately after hatching. Bursectomy prolonged the survival of B- and A-incompatible erythrocytes. Thymectomy prolonged the survival of A-incompatible erythrocytes and had no effect on the elimination of erythrocytes possessing B antigens. (author)

  8. Predicted MHC peptide binding promiscuity explains MHC class I 'hotspots' of antigen presentation defined by mass spectrometry eluted ligand data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jappe, Emma Christine; Kringelum, Jens; Trolle, Thomas; Nielsen, Morten

    2018-02-15

    Peptides that bind to and are presented by MHC class I and class II molecules collectively make up the immunopeptidome. In the context of vaccine development, an understanding of the immunopeptidome is essential, and much effort has been dedicated to its accurate and cost-effective identification. Current state-of-the-art methods mainly comprise in silico tools for predicting MHC binding, which is strongly correlated with peptide immunogenicity. However, only a small proportion of the peptides that bind to MHC molecules are, in fact, immunogenic, and substantial work has been dedicated to uncovering additional determinants of peptide immunogenicity. In this context, and in light of recent advancements in mass spectrometry (MS), the existence of immunological hotspots has been given new life, inciting the hypothesis that hotspots are associated with MHC class I peptide immunogenicity. We here introduce a precise terminology for defining these hotspots and carry out a systematic analysis of MS and in silico predicted hotspots. We find that hotspots defined from MS data are largely captured by peptide binding predictions, enabling their replication in silico. This leads us to conclude that hotspots, to a great degree, are simply a result of promiscuous HLA binding, which disproves the hypothesis that the identification of hotspots provides novel information in the context of immunogenic peptide prediction. Furthermore, our analyses demonstrate that the signal of ligand processing, although present in the MS data, has very low predictive power to discriminate between MS and in silico defined hotspots. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Triggering of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Regorafenib

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    Jens Zierle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib is utilized for the treatment of malignancy. The substance is effective in part by triggering suicidal death or apoptosis of tumor cells. Side effects of regorafenib include anemia. At least in theory, regorafenib induced anemia could result from stimulated suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, oxidative stress and ceramide. The present study explored, whether regorafenib induces eryptosis and, if so, whether it is effective up- and/or downstream of Ca2+. Methods: To this end, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ROS formation from DCFDA dependent fluorescence, and ceramide abundance utilizing specific antibodies. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to regorafenib (≥ 0.5 µg/ml significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, significantly decreased forward scatter (≥ 1.25 µg/ml, but did not significantly increase Fluo3-fluorescence, DCFDA fluorescence or ceramide abundance. The effect of regorafenib on annexin-V-binding and forward scatter was not significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Regorafenib (5 µg/ml significantly augmented the increase of annexin-V-binding, but significantly blunted the decrease of forward scatter following treatment with the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin. Conclusions: Regorafenib triggers cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least in part downstream of Ca2+.

  10. Triggering of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Regorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierle, Jens; Bissinger, Rosi; Bouguerra, Ghada; Abbès, Salem; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib is utilized for the treatment of malignancy. The substance is effective in part by triggering suicidal death or apoptosis of tumor cells. Side effects of regorafenib include anemia. At least in theory, regorafenib induced anemia could result from stimulated suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i), oxidative stress and ceramide. The present study explored, whether regorafenib induces eryptosis and, if so, whether it is effective up- and/or downstream of Ca2+. To this end, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ROS formation from DCFDA dependent fluorescence, and ceramide abundance utilizing specific antibodies. A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to regorafenib (≥ 0.5 µg/ml) significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, significantly decreased forward scatter (≥ 1.25 µg/ml), but did not significantly increase Fluo3-fluorescence, DCFDA fluorescence or ceramide abundance. The effect of regorafenib on annexin-V-binding and forward scatter was not significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Regorafenib (5 µg/ml) significantly augmented the increase of annexin-V-binding, but significantly blunted the decrease of forward scatter following treatment with the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin. Regorafenib triggers cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least in part downstream of Ca2+. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Human erythrocytes inhibit complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes by human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorval, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an autologus human system to evaluate the effects of human erythrocytes on solubilization of immune complex precipitates (IC) by human serum. Incubation of IC with fresh human serum or guinea pig serum resulted in solubilization of IC. When packed erythrocytes were added to human serum or guinea pig serum binding of IC to the erythrocyte occurred and IC solubilization was inhibited significantly (p <.025). Sheep erythrocytes did not bind IC or inhibit IC solubilization. To evaluate the role of human erythrocyte complement receptor (CR1) on these findings, human erythrocytes were treated with trypsin or anti-CR1 antibodies. Both treatments abrogated IC binding to human erythrocytes but did not affect the ability of the human erythrocyte to inhibit IC solubilization. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure C3, C4 and C5 activation in human serum after incubation with IC, human erythrocytes, human erythrocytes plus IC, whole blood or in whole blood plus IC

  12. Structure and calcium binding activity of LipL32, the major surface antigen of pathogenic Leptospira sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauk, Pricila; Roman-Ramos, Henrique; Ho, Paulo Lee; Guzzo, Cristiane R.; Farah, Chuck S.

    2009-01-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by the spirochaete Leptospira is an important emerging infectious disease. LipL32 is the major exposed outer membrane protein found exclusively in pathogenic leptospira. It is highly immunogenic and has been shown to bind to host extracellular matrix components, including collagens, fibronectin and laminin. In this work we crystallized recombinant LipL32 protein and determined its structure to 2.25 A resolution. Initial phases were determined using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique with data collected from selenomethionine-containing crystals at the MX2 beamline at the LNLS. The LipL32 monomer is made of a jelly-roll fold core from which protrude several peripheral secondary structures. Some structural features suggested that LipL32 could bind Ca 2+ ions and indeed, spectroscopic data (circular (dichroism. intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and extrinsic 1-amino-2-anaphthol-4-sulfonic acid fluorescence) confirmed the calcium binding properties of LipL32. (author)

  13. Diminished ability of erythrocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus to limit opsonized immune complex deposition on leukocytes and activation of granulocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Rasmussen, J M; Voss, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the ability of normal erythrocytes and erythrocytes from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients to bind immune complexes (IC), thereby inhibiting IC deposition on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the consequent induction of a PMN respiratory burst (RB). METHODS...

  14. Aspectos estruturais da membrana eritrocitária Structural aspects of the erythrocyte membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Murador

    2007-06-01

    . With its high sialic acid content, GPA is the main contributor to the net negative cell-surface charge and is thus critical for minimizing cell-cell interactions and preventing red cell aggregation. Glycophorin C (GPC is the receptor for PfEBP-2 (baebl, EBA-140, the newly identified erythrocyte binding ligand of Plasmodium falciparum. The ternary complex of spectrin, actin and 4.1R defines the nodes of the erythrocyte membrane skeletal network, and is inseparable from membrane stability when under mechanical stress. This erythrocyte membrane review is important for a better understanding of transfusion reactions, where the antibody formation against high prevalence antigens makes compatible transfusions difficult. The study of antigen diversity and biochemical characterization of different proteins will contribute to healthcare, as well as diagnosis, development of technology such as monoclonal antibody production and the therapeutic conduct of many diseases.

  15. Induction of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Novobiocin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Lupescu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Novobiocin, an aminocoumarin antibiotic, interferes with heat shock protein 90 and hypoxia inducible factor dependent gene expression and thus compromises cell survival. Similar to survival of nucleated cells, erythrocyte survival could be disrupted by eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and by phospholipd scrambling of the cell membrane with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. The Ca2+ sensitivity of phospholipid scrambling is enhanced by ceramide. The present study explored, whether novobiocin elicits eryptosis. Methods: [Ca2+]i was estimated from Fluo3-fluorescence, ceramide abundance utilizing fluorescent antibodies, cell volume from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin V binding. Results: A 48 hours exposure to novobiocin (500 µM was followed by a significant increase of [Ca2+]i, decrease of forward scatter, increase of annexin-V-binding and enhanced ceramide formation. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ virtually abrogated the increase of annexin-V-binding following novobiocin exposure. Conclusions: Novobiocin stimulates eryptosis, an effect at least in part due to entry of extracellular Ca2+ and formation of ceramide.

  16. Effect of single physical exercise at 35% VO{sub 2} max. intensity on secretion activity of pancreas {beta}-cells and {sup 125}J-insulin binding and degradation ability by erythrocyte receptors in children with diabetes mellitus; Einfluss der einmaligen Koerperanstrengung von 35% VO{sub 2} max. auf Sekretionsfaehigkeit von B-Zellen der Bauchspeicheldruese und auf Bindungs-und Degradationsfaehigkeit von {sup 125}J-Insulin durch Erythrozytenrezeptoren bei Kindern mit Diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczesniak, L; Rychlewski, T [Lehrstuhl fuer Physiologie, Biochemie und Hygiene, Akademie fuer Koerpererziehung, Poznan (Poland); Banaszak, F; Kasprzak, Z; Walczak, M [3. Klinik von Kinderkrankheiten, Medizinische Akademie, Poznan (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    In this report we showed research results of effect of single physical exercise on cycloergometer at 35% VO{sub 2} max. intensity on {sup 125}J-insulin binding and degradation ability by erythrocyte receptors in children with diabetes mellitus, secreting and non-secreting endogenous insulin. Insulin secretion was evaluated by measurement of C-peptide by Biodet test (Serono) of sensitivity threshold at 0.3 {mu}g/ml. We indicated in children non-secreting endogenous insulin (n=32) there is statistically essential lower {sup 125}J-insulin binding with erythrocyte receptor in comparison to children group with C-peptide. Physical exercise on cycloergometer at 35% VO{sub 2} max. intensity caused different reaction in range of physiological indices, like acid-base parameters, level of glucose and {sup 125}J-insulin binding and degradation. In children devoid of endogenous insulin we indicated statistically nonessential changes in {sup 125}J-insulin degradation by non-impaired erythrocytes and by hemolizate, as well. {sup 125}J-insulin binding after physical exercise increased in both groups, though change amplitude was different. Obtained research results allowed us to conclude, in children with I-type diabetes, that in dependence of impairment degree of pancreas {beta}cells sensitivity of insulin receptor and/or number of receptors on erythrocyte surface is different.

  17. An integrated top-down and bottom-up proteomic approach to characterize the antigen-binding fragment of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Lennard; Wu, Si; Vanduijn, Martijn; Tolić, Nikolai; Stingl, Christoph; Zhao, Rui; Luider, Theo; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-05-01

    We have previously shown that different individuals exposed to the same antigen produce antibodies with identical mutations in their complementarity determining regions (CDR), suggesting that CDR tryptic peptides can serve as biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis. Complete Fabs derived from disease specific antibodies have even higher potential; they could potentially be used for disease treatment and are required to identify the antigens toward which the antibodies are directed. However, complete Fab sequence characterization via LC-MS analysis of tryptic peptides (i.e. bottom-up) has proven to be impractical for mixtures of antibodies. To tackle this challenge, we have developed an integrated bottom-up and top-down MS approach, employing 2D chromatography coupled with Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS), and applied this approach for full characterization of the variable parts of two pharmaceutical monoclonal antibodies with sensitivity comparable to the bottom-up standard. These efforts represent an essential step toward the identification of disease specific antibodies in patient samples with potentially significant clinical impact. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Fundamental studies on the insulin receptor in rabbit erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinomiya, Y; Kagawa, S; Konishi, Y; Morimoto, H; Tsumura, Y [Hyogo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1975-09-01

    The authors studied the binding of insulin to rabbit erythrocytes as a mode case in the hope of characterizing the physiologic role of the binding of insulin to receptor in both normal adults and patients. Specific binding sites for insulin were detected in rabbit erythrocytes. The characteristics of the binding were similar to those observed in other target tissues. The specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled insulin was competitively inhibited by a small amount of unlabeled insulin and was completely inhibited by 1,000 ng/ml of unlabeled insulin. Glucagon, however, had no effect on the insulin binding to fat cells or liver membranes nor had it any effect on the binding of insulin to rabbit erythrocytes. Scatchard analysis of this binding reaction indicated two different binding sites with Ksub(aff)=3.2 x 10/sup 8//M, Ksub(diss)=3.1 x 10/sup -9/M; Ksub(aff)=1.4 x 10/sup 8//M, Ksub(diss)=7.1 x 10/sup -9/M respectively, and the binding capacities of each site were estimated at 0.011 ng/4 x 10/sup 8/ cells and 0.138 ng/4 x 10/sup 8/ cells. The binding of /sup 125/I-insulin to rabbit erythrocytes was a saturable function of the insulin concentration and was a linear function of cell concentration. The pH optimum for the reaction was 7.4 at 0/sup 0/C, the amount of insulin binding increased continuously under the reaction and this binding reaction reached a steady state after 10 to 15hr. On the other hand, the specific binding of insulin at higher temperatures showed maximal amounts after 20 to 30 min. and subsequently fell off at later time points.

  19. Autoantibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus bind a shared sequence of SmD and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen EBNA I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, A; Bombardieri, S; Migliorini, P

    1993-05-01

    SmD is one of the small nuclear ribonucleoproteins frequently targeted by autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. We isolated and characterized the antibodies present in lupus sera that are specific for the C-terminal region of SmD (sequence 95-119). This region is highly homologous to sequence 35-58 of the EBNA I antigen, one of the nuclear antigens induced by infection with Epstein-Barr virus. Antibodies affinity purified over a peptide 95-119 column were able to recognize this sequence in the context of the whole SmD molecule, as they reacted with blotted recombinant SmD. Anti-SmD 95-119 antibodies bound also the EBNA I 35-58 peptide and detected the EBNA I molecule in a total cell extract from Epstein-Barr virus-infected lines. A population of anti-SmD antibodies is, therefore, able to bind an epitope shared by the autoantigen and the viral antigen EBNA I. To investigate the involvement of this shared epitope in the generation of anti-SmD antibodies, we immunized mice with the EBNA I 35-58 peptide. Sera from immunized animals displayed the same pattern of reactivity of spontaneously produced anti-SmD antibodies. They reacted in fact with the EBNA peptide as well as with SmD 95-119 and recombinant SmD. These data suggest that molecular mimicry may play a role in the induction of anti-SmD autoantibodies.

  20. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seho [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chunghun [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yoon-Jae [Department of Life Science, Kyungwon University, Seongnam-Si, Kyeonggi-Do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Junsoo [Division of Biological Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-100 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Joonho [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Taegun, E-mail: tseo@dongguk.edu [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  1. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Seho; Lim, Chunghun; Lee, Jae Young; Song, Yoon-Jae; Park, Junsoo; Choe, Joonho; Seo, Taegun

    2010-01-01

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  2. A FRET-based high throughput screening assay to identify inhibitors of anthrax protective antigen binding to capillary morphogenesis gene 2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Rogers

    Full Text Available Anti-angiogenic therapies are effective for the treatment of cancer, a variety of ocular diseases, and have potential benefits in cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and psoriasis. We have previously shown that anthrax protective antigen (PA, a non-pathogenic component of anthrax toxin, is an inhibitor of angiogenesis, apparently as a result of interaction with the cell surface receptors capillary morphogenesis gene 2 (CMG2 protein and tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8. Hence, molecules that bind the anthrax toxin receptors may be effective to slow or halt pathological vascular growth. Here we describe development and testing of an effective homogeneous steady-state fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET high throughput screening assay designed to identify molecules that inhibit binding of PA to CMG2. Molecules identified in the screen can serve as potential lead compounds for the development of anti-angiogenic and anti-anthrax therapies. The assay to screen for inhibitors of this protein-protein interaction is sensitive and robust, with observed Z' values as high as 0.92. Preliminary screens conducted with a library of known bioactive compounds identified tannic acid and cisplatin as inhibitors of the PA-CMG2 interaction. We have confirmed that tannic acid both binds CMG2 and has anti-endothelial properties. In contrast, cisplatin appears to inhibit PA-CMG2 interaction by binding both PA and CMG2, and observed cisplatin anti-angiogenic effects are not mediated by interaction with CMG2. This work represents the first reported high throughput screening assay targeting CMG2 to identify possible inhibitors of both angiogenesis and anthrax intoxication.

  3. Oxidative Hemolysis of Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodek, Lidia; Kusior, Dorota

    2006-01-01

    This exercise for students will allow them to simultaneously observe lipid peroxidation and consequent hemolysis of rat erythrocytes and the effect of sodium azide, a catalase inhibitor, on these processes. It will also demonstrate a protective action of antioxidants, the therapeutically used N-acetylcysteine and albumins present in plasma.

  4. Anti-HIV-1 B cell responses are dependent on B cell precursor frequency and antigen-binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosenovic, Pia; Kara, Ervin E; Pettersson, Anna-Klara; McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew; Hartweger, Harald; Thientosapol, Eddy S; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2018-04-16

    The discovery that humans can produce potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to several different epitopes on the HIV-1 spike has reinvigorated efforts to develop an antibody-based HIV-1 vaccine. Antibody cloning from single cells revealed that nearly all bNAbs show unusual features that could help explain why it has not been possible to elicit them by traditional vaccination and instead would require a sequence of different immunogens. This idea is supported by experiments with genetically modified immunoglobulin (Ig) knock-in mice. Sequential immunization with a series of specifically designed immunogens was required to shepherd the development of bNAbs. However, knock-in mice contain superphysiologic numbers of bNAb precursor-expressing B cells, and therefore how these results can be translated to a more physiologic setting remains to be determined. Here we make use of adoptive transfer experiments using knock-in B cells that carry a synthetic intermediate in the pathway to anti-HIV-1 bNAb development to examine how the relationship between B cell receptor affinity and precursor frequency affects germinal center (GC) B cell recruitment and clonal expansion. Immunization with soluble HIV-1 antigens can recruit bNAb precursor B cells to the GC when there are as few as 10 such cells per mouse. However, at low precursor frequencies, the extent of clonal expansion is directly proportional to the affinity of the antigen for the B cell receptor, and recruitment to GCs is variable and dependent on recirculation.

  5. Stimulation of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Garcinol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Fazio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The benzophenone garcinol from dried fruit rind of Garcinia indica counteracts malignancy, an effect at least in part due to stimulation of apoptosis. The proapototic effect of garcinol is attributed in part to inhibition of histone acetyltransferases and thus modification of gene expression. Moreover, garcinol triggers mitochondrial depolarisation. Erythrocytes lack gene expression and mitochondria but are nevertheless able to enter apoptosis-like suicidal death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Stimulators of eryptosis include oxidative stress, energy depletion and Ca2+ entry with increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i. The present study explored, whether and how garcinol induces eryptosis. Methods: To this end, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, hemolysis from hemoglobin release, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ROS formation from DCFDA dependent fluorescence and cytosolic ATP levels utilizing a luciferin-luciferase-based assay. Results: A 24 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to garcinol (2.5 or 5 µM significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells. Garcinol decreased (at 1 µM and 2.5 µM or increased (at 5 µM forward scatter. Garcinol (5 µM further increased Fluo3-fluorescence, increased DCFDA fluorescence, and decreased cytosolic ATP levels. The effect of garcinol on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted, but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Conclusions: Garcinol triggers cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect in part due to stimulation of ROS formation, energy depletion and Ca2+ entry.

  6. Fucoxanthin Induced Suicidal Death of Human Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Briglia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fucoxanthin, a carotenoid isolated from brown seaweeds, induces suicidal death or apoptosis of tumor cells and is thus considered for the treatment or prevention of malignancy. In analogy to apoptosis of nucleated cell, erythrocytes may enter eryptosis, the suicidal death characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include Ca2+ entry with increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, oxidative stress and activation of p38 kinase or protein kinase C. The present study explored, whether and how fucoxanthin induces eryptosis. Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, hemolysis from hemoglobin release, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and abundance of reactive oxygen species (ROS from DCFDA dependent fluorescence and lipid peroxidation using BODIPY fluoresence. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to fucoxanthin significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥ 50 µM, significantly decreased average forward scatter (≥ 25 µM, significantly increased hemolysis (≥ 25 µM, significantly increased Fluo3-fluorescence (≥ 50 µM, significantly increased lipid peroxidation, but did not significantly modify DCFDA fluorescence. The effect of fucoxanthin on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted, but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+, and was insensitive to p38 kinase inhibitor skepinone (2 µM and to protein kinase C inhibitor calphostin (100 nM. Conclusion: Fucoxanthin triggers cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect in part due to stimulation of Ca2+ entry.

  7. Structure and calcium binding activity of LipL32, the major surface antigen of pathogenic Leptospira sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauk, Pricila; Roman-Ramos, Henrique; Ho, Paulo Lee [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Guzzo, Cristiane R.; Farah, Chuck S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Bioquimica

    2009-07-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by the spirochaete Leptospira is an important emerging infectious disease. LipL32 is the major exposed outer membrane protein found exclusively in pathogenic leptospira. It is highly immunogenic and has been shown to bind to host extracellular matrix components, including collagens, fibronectin and laminin. In this work we crystallized recombinant LipL32 protein and determined its structure to 2.25 A resolution. Initial phases were determined using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique with data collected from selenomethionine-containing crystals at the MX2 beamline at the LNLS. The LipL32 monomer is made of a jelly-roll fold core from which protrude several peripheral secondary structures. Some structural features suggested that LipL32 could bind Ca{sup 2+} ions and indeed, spectroscopic data (circular (dichroism. intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and extrinsic 1-amino-2-anaphthol-4-sulfonic acid fluorescence) confirmed the calcium binding properties of LipL32. (author)

  8. Hierarchical, domain type-specific acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 in Tanzanian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cham, Gerald K K; Turner, Louise; Kurtis, Jonathan D

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a variant antigen expressed on the surface of malaria-infected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 attaches to the vascular lining and allows infected erythrocytes to avoid filtration through the spleen. Each parasite genome encodes about 60 diffe...... and play a major role in limiting parasite multiplication in the blood.......Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a variant antigen expressed on the surface of malaria-infected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 attaches to the vascular lining and allows infected erythrocytes to avoid filtration through the spleen. Each parasite genome encodes about 60...... different PfEMP1 variants, each PfEMP1 comprises several domains in its extracellular region, and the PfEMP1 repertoire in different parasites contains domain types that are serologically cross-reactive. In this longitudinal study, we followed 672 children living in an area of high malaria transmission...

  9. Development and validation of an antigen-binding capture ELISA for native and putrescine-modified anti-tetanus F(ab')2 fragments for the assessment of the cellular uptake and plasma kinetics of the antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Welfringer, Frédéric; D'Athis, Philippe; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Hervé, Françoise

    2005-01-01

    International audience; Cationization is a strategy to enhance the permeability of antibodies to physiological membranes for potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of these proteins, with one of its crucial points being the retention of antigen binding activity. Here, we describe the cationization of horse polyclonal anti-tetanus F(ab')(2) fragments and the development and validation of an ELISA for quantitative measurements of the binding activity of the native and cationized F(ab...

  10. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Xia, Di

    2016-07-27

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space groupP1), with unit-cell parametersa= 40.67,b= 44.91,c= 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.

  11. Tumor-promoting function and prognostic significance of the RNA-binding protein T-cell intracellular antigen-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Junichi; Shoda, Katsutoshi; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Fujita, Yuji; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Miyakami, Yuko; Watanabe, Miki; Kudo, Yasusei; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Otsuji, Eigo; Imoto, Issei

    2016-03-29

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA1) is an RNA-binding protein involved in many regulatory aspects of mRNA metabolism. Here, we report previously unknown tumor-promoting activity of TIA1, which seems to be associated with its isoform-specific molecular distribution and regulation of a set of cancer-related transcripts, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Immunohistochemical overexpression of TIA1 ectopically localized in the cytoplasm of tumor cells was an independent prognosticator for worse overall survival in a cohort of 143 ESCC patients. Knockdown of TIA1 inhibited proliferation of ESCC cells. By exogenously introducing each of two major isoforms, TIA1a and TIA1b, only TIA1a, which was localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm, promoted anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent ESCC cell proliferation. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation, followed by microarray analysis or massive-parallel sequencing, identified a set of TIA1-binding mRNAs, including SKP2 and CCNA2. TIA1 increased SKP2 and CCNA2 protein levels through the suppression of mRNA decay and translational induction, respectively. Our findings uncover a novel oncogenic function of TIA1 in esophageal tumorigenesis, and implicate its use as a marker for prognostic evaluation and as a therapeutic target in ESCC.

  12. Differential protein expression, DNA binding and interaction with SV40 large tumour antigen implicate the p63-family of proteins in replicative senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelloul, Siham; Tarunina, Marina; Barnouin, Karin; Mackay, Alan; Jat, Parmjit S

    2002-02-07

    P53 activity plays a key role in mammalian cells when they undergo replicative senescence at their Hayflick limit. To determine whether p63 proteins, members of the family of p53-related genes, are also involved in this process, we examined their expression in serially passaged rat embryo fibroblasts. Upon senescence, two truncated DeltaNp63 proteins decreased in abundance whereas two TAp63 isoforms accumulated. 2-D gel analysis showed that the DeltaNp63 proteins underwent post-translational modifications in both proliferating and senescent cells. Direct binding of DeltaNp63 proteins to a p53 consensus motif was greater in proliferating cells than senescent cells. In contrast p63alpha isoforms bound to DNA in a p53 dependent manner and this was higher in senescent cells than proliferating cells. An interaction of p63alpha proteins with SV40 large tumour antigen was also detected and ectopic expression of DeltaNp63alpha can extend the lifespan of rat embryo fibroblasts. Taken together the results indicate that p63 proteins may play a role in replicative senescence either by competition for p53 DNA binding sites or by direct interaction with p53 protein bound to DNA.

  13. Stimulation of ceramide formation and suicidal erythrocyte death by vitamin K(3) (menadione).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, Syed M; Eberhard, Matthias; Mahmud, Hasan; Föller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2009-11-25

    Vitamin K(3) is an essential micronutrient required for the activation of coagulation factors and thus hemostasis. Administration of vitamin K(3) analogues may cause anemia, which at least in theory could be due to stimulation of suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis characterized by cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane leading to exposure of phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface. Eryptosis is triggered by an increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) activity, by ceramide and by energy depletion (decrease of cytosolic ATP). The present experiments explored, whether vitamin K(3) may influence eryptosis. Hemolysis was estimated from the supernatant hemoglobin concentration, phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes from annexin V-binding in fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis, erythrocyte volume from forward scatter in FACS analysis, ceramide formation from binding of fluorescent antibodies, and erythrocyte ATP content from a luciferin-luciferase assay. As a result, vitamin K(3) (> or =1microM) caused lysis of an only small fraction of erythrocytes, but significantly increased ceramide formation, significantly increased the percentage of annexin V-binding erythrocytes, significantly decreased forward scatter and, at higher concentrations, significantly decreased the cellular ATP content. In conclusion, vitamin K(3) stimulates suicidal erythrocyte death, an effect at least partially due to ceramide formation and ATP depletion.

  14. The PD-1/PD-L1 complex resembles the antigen-binding Fv domains of antibodies and T cell receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, David Yin-wei; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Masashi; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Su, Hua-Poo; Mikami, Bunzo; Okazaki, Taku; Honjo, Tasuku; Minato, Nagahiro; Garboczi, David N. (NIH); (Kyoto)

    2008-07-29

    Signaling through the programmed death 1 (PD-1) inhibitory receptor upon binding its ligand, PD-L1, suppresses immune responses against autoantigens and tumors and plays an important role in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance. Release from PD-1 inhibitory signaling revives 'exhausted' virus-specific T cells in chronic viral infections. Here we present the crystal structure of murine PD-1 in complex with human PD-L1. PD-1 and PD-L1 interact through the conserved front and side of their Ig variable (IgV) domains, as do the IgV domains of antibodies and T cell receptors. This places the loops at the ends of the IgV domains on the same side of the PD-1/PD-L1 complex, forming a surface that is similar to the antigen-binding surface of antibodies and T cell receptors. Mapping conserved residues allowed the identification of residues that are important in forming the PD-1/PD-L1 interface. Based on the structure, we show that some reported loss-of-binding mutations involve the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction but that others compromise protein folding. The PD-1/PD-L1 interaction described here may be blocked by antibodies or by designed small-molecule drugs to lower inhibitory signaling that results in a stronger immune response. The immune receptor-like loops offer a new surface for further study and potentially the design of molecules that would affect PD-1/PD-L1 complex formation and thereby modulate the immune response.

  15. Erythrocyte nanovesicles: Biogenesis, biolo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamaleldin I. Harisa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanovesicles (NVs represent a novel transporter for cell signals to modify functions of target cells. Therefore, NVs play many roles in both physiological and pathological processes. This report highlights biogenesis, composition and biological roles of erythrocytes derived nanovesicles (EDNVs. Furthermore, we address utilization of EDNVs as novel drug delivery cargo as well as therapeutic target. EDNVs are lipid bilayer vesicles rich in phospholipids, proteins, lipid raft, and hemoglobin. In vivo EDNVs biogenesis is triggered by an increase of intracellular calcium levels, ATP depletion and under effect of oxidative stress conditions. However, in vitro production of EDNVs can be achieved via hypotonic treatment and extrusion of erythrocyte. NVs can be used as biomarkers for diagnosis, monitoring of therapy and drug delivery system. Many therapeutic agents are suggested to decrease NVs biogenesis.

  16. Characterization of highly frequent epitope-specific CD45RA+/CCR7+/- T lymphocyte responses against p53-binding domains of the human polyomavirus BK large tumor antigen in HLA-A*0201+ BKV-seropositive donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zajac Paul

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human polyomavirus BK (BKV has been implicated in oncogenic transformation. Its ability to replicate is determined by the binding of its large tumor antigen (LTag to products of tumor-suppressor genes regulating cell cycle, as specifically p53. We investigated CD8+ T immune responses to BKV LTag portions involved in p53 binding in HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals. Peptides selected from either p53-binding region (LTag351–450 and LTag533–626 by current algorithms and capacity to bind HLA-A*0201 molecule were used to stimulate CD8+ T responses, as assessed by IFN-γ gene expression ex vivo and detected by cytotoxicity assays following in vitro culture. We observed epitope-specific immune responses in all HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals tested. At least one epitope, LTag579–587; LLLIWFRPV, was naturally processed in non professional antigen presenting cells and induced cytotoxic responses with CTL precursor frequencies in the order of 1/20'000. Antigen specific CD8+ T cells were only detectable in the CD45RA+ subset, in both CCR7+ and CCR7- subpopulations. These data indicate that widespread cellular immune responses against epitopes within BKV LTag-p53 binding regions exist and question their roles in immunosurveillance against tumors possibly associated with BKV infection.

  17. Fasciola spp: Mapping of the MF6 epitope and antigenic analysis of the MF6p/HDM family of heme-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Martínez-Sernández

    Full Text Available MF6p/FhHDM-1 is a small cationic heme-binding protein which is recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb MF6, and abundantly present in parenchymal cells and secreted antigens of Fasciola hepatica. Orthologs of this protein (MF6p/HDMs also exist in other causal agents of important foodborne trematodiasis, such as Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini and Paragonimus westermani. Considering that MF6p/FhHDM-1 is relevant for heme homeostasis in Fasciola and was reported to have immunomodulatory properties, this protein is expected to be a useful target for vaccination. Thus, in this study we mapped the epitope recognized by mAb MF6 and evaluated its antigenicity in sheep. The sequence of the MF6p/FhHDM-1 ortholog from F. gigantica (MF6p/FgHDM-1 was also reported. By means of ELISA inhibitions with overlapping synthetic peptides, we determined that the epitope recognized by mAb MF6 is located within the C-terminal moiety of MF6p/FhHDM-1, which is the most conserved region of MF6p/HDMs. By immunoblotting analysis of parasite extracts and ELISA inhibitions with synthetic peptides we also determined that mAb MF6 reacted with the same intensity with F. hepatica and F. gigantica, and in decreasing order of intensity with C. sinensis, O.viverrini and P. westermani orthologs. On the contrary, mAb MF6 showed no reactivity against Dicrocoelium dendriticum and Schistosoma mansoni. The study of the recognition of peptides covering different regions of MF6p/FhHDM-1 by sera from immunized sheep revealed that the C-terminal moiety is the most antigenic, thus being of potential interest for vaccination. We also demonstrated that the production of antibodies to MF6p/FhHDM-1 in sheep infected by F. hepatica occurs relatively early and follows the same pattern as those produced against L-cathepsins.

  18. A Lectin-Like Receptor is Involved in Invasion of Erythrocytes by Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungery, M.; Pasvol, G.; Newbold, C. I.; Weatherall, D. J.

    1983-02-01

    Glycophorin both in solution and inserted into liposomes blocks invasion of erythrocytes by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Furthermore, one sugar, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), completely blocks invasion of the erythrocyte by this parasite. GlcNAc coupled to bovine serum albumin to prevent the sugar entering infected erythrocytes was at least 100,000 times more effective than GlcNAc alone. Bovine serum albumin coupled to lactose or bovine serum albumin alone had no effect on invasion. These results suggest that the binding of P. falciparum to erythrocytes is lectin-like and is determined by carbohydrates on glycophorin.

  19. [Blood groups - minuses and pluses. Do the blood group antigens protect us from infectious diseases?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwiński, Marcin

    2015-06-25

    Human blood can be divided into groups, which is a method of blood classification based on the presence or absence of inherited erythrocyte surface antigens that can elicit immune response. According to the International Society of Blood Transfusion, there are 341 blood group antigens collected in 35 blood group systems. These antigens can be proteins, glycoproteins or glycosphingolipids, and function as transmembrane transporters, ion channels, adhesion molecules or receptors for other proteins. The majority of blood group antigens is present also on another types of cells. Due to their localization on the surface of cells, blood group antigens can act as receptors for various pathogens or their toxins, such as protozoa (malaria parasites), bacteria (Helicobacter pylori, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella dysenteriae) and viruses (Noroviruses, Parvoviruses, HIV). If the presence of group antigen (or its variant which arised due to mutation) is beneficial for the host (e.g. because pathogens are not able to bind to the cells), the blood group may become a selection trait, leading to its dissemination in the population exposed to that pathogen. There are thirteen blood group systems that can be related to pathogen resistance, and it seems that the particular influence was elicit by malaria parasites. It is generally thought that the high incidence of blood groups such as O in the Amazon region, Fy(a-b-) in Africa and Ge(-) in Papua-New Guinea is the result of selective pressure from malaria parasite. This review summarizes the data about relationship between blood groups and resistance to pathogens.

  20. Heat shock factor 1 upregulates transcription of Epstein–Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 by binding to a heat shock element within the BamHI-Q promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Feng-Wei; Wu, Xian-Rui; Liu, Wen-Ju; Liao, Yi-Ji; Lin, Sheng; Zong, Yong-Sheng; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Mai, Shi-Juan; Xie, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for maintenance of the episome and establishment of latency. In this study, we observed that heat treatment effectively induced EBNA1 transcription in EBV-transformed B95-8 and human LCL cell lines. Although Cp is considered as the sole promoter used for the expression of EBNA1 transcripts in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, the RT-PCR results showed that the EBNA1 transcripts induced by heat treatment arise from Qp-initiated transcripts. Using bioinformatics, a high affinity and functional heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-binding element within the − 17/+4 oligonucleotide of the Qp was found, and was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, heat shock and exogenous HSF1 expression induced Qp activity in reporter assays. Further, RNA interference-mediated HSF1 gene silencing attenuated heat-induced EBNA1 expression in B95-8 cells. These results provide evidence that EBNA1 is a new target for the transcription factor HSF1.

  1. Heat shock factor 1 upregulates transcription of Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 by binding to a heat shock element within the BamHI-Q promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng-Wei [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Wu, Xian-Rui [Department of Surgery, Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Wen-Ju; Liao, Yi-Ji [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Sheng [Laboratory of Integrated Biosciences, School of Life Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zong, Yong-Sheng; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zeng, Yi-Xin [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mai, Shi-Juan, E-mail: maishj@sysucc.org.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Dan, E-mail: xied@mail.sysu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-12-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for maintenance of the episome and establishment of latency. In this study, we observed that heat treatment effectively induced EBNA1 transcription in EBV-transformed B95-8 and human LCL cell lines. Although Cp is considered as the sole promoter used for the expression of EBNA1 transcripts in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, the RT-PCR results showed that the EBNA1 transcripts induced by heat treatment arise from Qp-initiated transcripts. Using bioinformatics, a high affinity and functional heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-binding element within the - 17/+4 oligonucleotide of the Qp was found, and was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, heat shock and exogenous HSF1 expression induced Qp activity in reporter assays. Further, RNA interference-mediated HSF1 gene silencing attenuated heat-induced EBNA1 expression in B95-8 cells. These results provide evidence that EBNA1 is a new target for the transcription factor HSF1.

  2. Fluorescence energy transfer on erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, H.M.; Hof, M.; Lawaczeck, R.

    1995-08-01

    Stationary and time-dependent fluorescence have been measured for a donor/acceptor (DA) pair bound to membrane proteins of bovine erythrocyte ghosts. The donor N-(p-(2-benzoxazolyl)phenyl)-maleimid (BMI) and the acceptor fluram bind to SH- and NH 2 -residues, respectively. The fluorescence spectra and the time-dependent emission are consistent with a radiationless fluorescence energy transfer (RET). The density of RET-effective acceptor binding sites c=0.072 nm -2 was calculated on the basis of the two-dimensional Foerster-kinetic. Band3 protein is the only membrane spanning protein with accessible SH-groups, and therefore only effective binding sites on the band3 protein are counted for the RET measurements performed. (author). 23 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Erythrocyte signal transduction pathways, their oxygenation dependence and functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barvitenko, Nadezhda N; Adragna, Norma C; Weber, Roy E

    2005-01-01

    Erythrocytes play a key role in human and vertebrate metabolism. Tissue O2 supply is regulated by both hemoglobin (Hb)-O2 affinity and erythrocyte rheology, a key determinant of tissue perfusion. Oxygenation-deoxygenation transitions of Hb may lead to re-organization of the cytoskeleton and signalling pathways activation/deactivation in an O2-dependent manner. Deoxygenated Hb binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the anion exchanger band 3, which is anchored to the cytoskeleton, and is considered a major mechanism underlying the oxygenation-dependence of several erythrocyte functions. This work discusses the multiple modes of Hb-cytoskeleton interactions. In addition, it reviews the effects of Mg2+, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, NO, shear stress and Ca2+, all factors accompanying the oxygenation-deoxygenation cycle in circulating red cells. Due to the extensive literature on the subject, the data discussed here, pertain mainly to human erythrocytes whose O2 affinity is modulated by 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, ectothermic vertebrate erythrocytes that use ATP, and to bird erythrocytes that use inositol pentaphosphate. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Inhibition by nucleosides of glucose-transport activity in human erythrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, S M

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of nucleosides with the glucose carrier of human erythrocytes was examined by studying the effect of nucleosides on reversible cytochalasin B-binding activity and glucose transport. Adenosine, inosine and thymidine were more potent inhibitors of cytochalasin B binding to human erythrocyte membranes than was D-glucose [IC50 (concentration causing 50% inhibition) values of 10, 24, 28 and 38 mM respectively]. Moreover, low concentrations of thymidine and adenosine inhibited D-glu...

  5. Dynamics of interaction between complement-fixing antibody/dsDNA immune complexes and erythrocytes. In vitro studies and potential general applications to clinical immune complex testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.P.; Horgan, C.; Hooper, M.; Burge, J.

    1985-01-01

    Soluble antibody/ 3 H-double-stranded PM2 DNA (dsDNA) immune complexes were briefly opsonized with complement and then allowed to bind to human erythrocytes (via complement receptors). The cells were washed and subsequently a volume of autologous blood in a variety of media was added, and the release of the bound immune complexes from the erythrocytes was studied as a function of temperature and time. After 1-2 h, the majority of the bound immune complexes were not released into the serum during blood clotting at either 37 degrees C or room temperature, but there was a considerably greater release of the immune complexes into the plasma of blood that was anticoagulated with EDTA. Similar results were obtained using various conditions of opsonization and also using complexes that contained lower molecular weight dsDNA. Thus, the kinetics of release of these antibody/dsDNA immune complexes differed substantially from the kinetics of release of antibody/bovine serum albumin complexes that was reported by others. Studies using the solution phase C1q immune complex binding assay confirmed that in approximately half of the SLE samples that were positive for immune complexes, there was a significantly higher level of detectable immune complexes in plasma vs. serum. Freshly drawn erythrocytes from some SLE patients exhibiting this plasma/serum discrepancy had IgG antigen on their surface that was released by incubation in EDTA plasma. Thus, the higher levels of immune complexes observed in EDTA plasma vs. serum using the C1q assay may often reflect the existence of immune complexes circulating in vivo bound to erythrocytes

  6. Dielectric inspection of erythrocyte morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Oshige, Ikuya; Katsumoto, Yoichi; Omori, Shinji; Yasuda, Akio; Asami, Koji

    2008-01-01

    We performed a systematic study of the sensitivity of dielectric spectroscopy to erythrocyte morphology. Namely, rabbit erythrocytes of four different shapes were prepared by precisely controlling the pH of the suspending medium, and their complex permittivities over the frequency range from 0.1 to 110 MHz were measured and analyzed. Their quantitative analysis shows that the characteristic frequency and the broadening parameter of the dielectric relaxation of interfacial polarization are highly specific to the erythrocyte shape, while they are insensitive to the cell volume fraction. Therefore, these two dielectric parameters can be used to differentiate erythrocytes of different shapes, if dielectric spectroscopy is applied to flow-cytometric inspection of single blood cells. In addition, we revealed the applicability and limitations of the analytical theory of interfacial polarization to explain the experimental permittivities of non-spherical erythrocytes

  7. Dielectric inspection of erythrocyte morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Oshige, Ikuya; Katsumoto, Yoichi; Omori, Shinji; Yasuda, Akio [Life Science Laboratory, Materials Laboratories, Sony Corporation, Sony Bioinformatics Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Asami, Koji [Laboratory of Molecular Aggregation Analysis, Division of Multidisciplinary Chemistry, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)], E-mail: Yoshihito.Hayashi@jp.sony.com

    2008-05-21

    We performed a systematic study of the sensitivity of dielectric spectroscopy to erythrocyte morphology. Namely, rabbit erythrocytes of four different shapes were prepared by precisely controlling the pH of the suspending medium, and their complex permittivities over the frequency range from 0.1 to 110 MHz were measured and analyzed. Their quantitative analysis shows that the characteristic frequency and the broadening parameter of the dielectric relaxation of interfacial polarization are highly specific to the erythrocyte shape, while they are insensitive to the cell volume fraction. Therefore, these two dielectric parameters can be used to differentiate erythrocytes of different shapes, if dielectric spectroscopy is applied to flow-cytometric inspection of single blood cells. In addition, we revealed the applicability and limitations of the analytical theory of interfacial polarization to explain the experimental permittivities of non-spherical erythrocytes.

  8. Lack of radioimmunodetection and complications associated with monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen antibody cross-reactivity with an antigen on circulating cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.; Beauregard, J.C.; Sobol, R.E.; Royston, I.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Hagan, P.S.; Halpern, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    Characterization of several high-affinity murine monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies suggested good specificity except for cross-reactivity with an antigen on granulocytes and erythrocytes which was different from the previously described normal cross-reacting antigen of granulocytes. In vivo studies in athymic mice using an indium conjugate of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (MoAb) revealed excellent specific uptake in colorectal carcinoma xenografts. Studies were conducted in humans to determine the limitations produced by the cross-reactivity with granulocytes and erythrocytes. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer received 3 to 6 mg of anti-CEA MoAb over 10 min or 2 hr. In five of six trials, the MoAb infusion was associated with a 40 to 90% decrease in circulating granulocytes and systemic toxicity including fever, rigors, and emesis. One patient had no change in cell count and had no toxicity. Radionuclide scans with 111 In-anti-CEA MoAb showed marked uptake in the spleen when cells were eliminated, and in the liver, especially when pretreatment CEA levels were high. Metastatic tumor sites failed to concentrate the isotope. This study emphasizes the potential limitations for radioimmunodetection and/or radioimmunotherapy imposed by reactivity with circulating cells, and suggests that certain toxic reactions associated with MoAb infusions are related to destruction of circulating cells rather than allergic reactions to mouse protein. It also emphasizes how variables such as dose and binding affinity of antibody, radioisotope used, and assessment at different observation points can obscure lack of antibody specificity

  9. Lack of radioimmunodetection and complications associated with monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen antibody cross-reactivity with an antigen on circulating cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillman, R.O.; Beauregard, J.C.; Sobol, R.E.; Royston, I.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Hagan, P.S.; Halpern, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Characterization of several high-affinity murine monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies suggested good specificity except for cross-reactivity with an antigen on granulocytes and erythrocytes which was different from the previously described normal cross-reacting antigen of granulocytes. In vivo studies in athymic mice using an indium conjugate of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (MoAb) revealed excellent specific uptake in colorectal carcinoma xenografts. Studies were conducted in humans to determine the limitations produced by the cross-reactivity with granulocytes and erythrocytes. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer received 3 to 6 mg of anti-CEA MoAb over 10 min or 2 hr. In five of six trials, the MoAb infusion was associated with a 40 to 90% decrease in circulating granulocytes and systemic toxicity including fever, rigors, and emesis. One patient had no change in cell count and had no toxicity. Radionuclide scans with /sup 111/In-anti-CEA MoAb showed marked uptake in the spleen when cells were eliminated, and in the liver, especially when pretreatment CEA levels were high. Metastatic tumor sites failed to concentrate the isotope. This study emphasizes the potential limitations for radioimmunodetection and/or radioimmunotherapy imposed by reactivity with circulating cells, and suggests that certain toxic reactions associated with MoAb infusions are related to destruction of circulating cells rather than allergic reactions to mouse protein. It also emphasizes how variables such as dose and binding affinity of antibody, radioisotope used, and assessment at different observation points can obscure lack of antibody specificity.

  10. An approach to the unification of suppressor T cell circuits: a simplified assay for the induction of suppression by T cell-derived, antigen-binding molecules (T-ABM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chue, B; Ferguson, T A; Beaman, K D; Rosenman, S J; Cone, R E; Flood, P M; Green, D R

    1989-01-01

    A system is presented in which the in vitro response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) can be regulated using antigenic determinants coupled to SRBC and T cell-derived antigen-binding molecules (T-ABM) directed against the coupled determinants. T suppressor-inducer factors (TsiF's) are composed of two molecules, one of which is a T-ABM and one which bears I-J determinants (I-J+ molecule). Using two purified T-ABM which have not previously been shown to have in vitro activity, we produced antigen-specific TsiF's which were capable of inducing the suppression of the anti-SRBC response. Suppression was found to require both the T-ABM and the I-J+ molecule, SRBC conjugated with the antigen for which the T-ABM was specific, and a population of Ly-2+ T cells in the culture. Two monoclonal TsiF (or TsF1) were demonstrated to induce suppression of the anti-SRBC response in this system, provided the relevant antigen was coupled to the SRBC in culture. The results are discussed in terms of the general functions of T-ABM in the immune system. This model will be useful in direct, experimental comparisons of the function of T-ABM and suppressor T cell factors under study in different systems and laboratories.

  11. Direct binding to antigen-coated beads refines the specificity and cross-reactivity of four monoclonal antibodies that recognize polymorphic epitopes of HLA class I molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, H G; Parham, P

    2013-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies with specificity for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I determinants of HLA were originally characterized using serological assays in which the targets were cells expressing three to six HLA class I variants. Because of this complexity, the specificities of the antibodies were defined indirectly by correlation. Here we use a direct binding assay, in which the targets are synthetic beads coated with 1 of 111 HLA class I variants, representing the full range of HLA-A, -B and -C variation. We studied one monoclonal antibody with monomorphic specificity (W6/32) and four with polymorphic specificity (MA2.1, PA2.1, BB7.2 and BB7.1) and compared the results with those obtained previously. W6/32 reacted with all HLA class I variants. MA2.1 not only exhibits high specificity for HLA-A*02, -B*57 and -B*58, but also exhibited cross-reactivity with HLA-A*11 and -B*15:16. At low concentration (1 µg/ml), PA2.1 and BB7.2 were both specific for HLA-A*02 and -A*69, and at high concentration (50 µg/ml) exhibited significant cross-reactions with HLA-A*68, -A*23 and -A*24. BB7.1 exhibits specificity for HLA-B*07 and -B*42, as previously described, but reacts equally well with HLA-B*81, a rare allotype defined some 16 years after the description of BB7.1. The results obtained with cell-based and bead-based assays are consistent and, in combination with amino acid sequence comparison, increase understanding of the polymorphic epitopes recognized by the MA2.1, PA2.1, BB7.2 and BB7.1 antibodies. Comparison of two overlapping but distinctive bead sets from two sources gave similar results, but the overall levels of binding were significantly different. Several weaker reactions were observed with only one of the bead sets. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Plasmodium falciparum secretome in erythrocyte and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani eSoni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of deadly malaria disease. It is an intracellular eukaryote and completes its multi-stage life cycle spanning the two hosts viz, mosquito and human. In order to habituate within host environment, parasite conform several strategies to evade host immune responses such as surface antigen polymorphism or modulation of host immune system and it is mediated by secretion of proteins from parasite to the host erythrocyte and beyond, collectively known as, malaria secretome. In this review, we will discuss about the deployment of parasitic secretory protein in mechanism implicated for immune evasion, protein trafficking, providing virulence, changing permeability and cyto-adherence of infected erythrocyte. We will be covering the possibilities of developing malaria secretome as a drug/vaccine target. This gathered information will be worthwhile in depicting a well-organized picture for host-pathogen interplay during the malaria infection and may also provide some clues for development of novel anti-malarial therapies.

  13. Use of JH4 joining segment gene by an anti-arsonate antibody that bears the major A-strain cross-reactive idiotype but displays diminished antigen binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, C A; Jeske, D J; Kuziel, W A; Milner, E C; Capra, J D

    1984-06-01

    One of the antibody families utilized by the A/J mouse in its response to p-azophenylarsonate (Ars) is characterized by the expression of the major anti-arsonate cross-reactive idiotype (CRI) of the A strain. This family has been termed the Ars-A family. A hybridoma antibody (HP 101F11 ) obtained after immunization of an A/J mouse with Ars was identified initially as displaying the CRI, but was subsequently found to bind antigen at a level much lower than most members of the Ars-A family. The results of binding studies suggested that HP 101F11 possesses reduced avidity for antigen. When isolated light and heavy chains were allowed to recombine with the heavy and light chains of a strongly antigen-binding, strongly CRI-positive antibody of the Ars-A family (HP 93G7 ), the low level of antigen binding by HP 101F11 was found to be due to a structurally variant heavy chain. Whereas antibodies of the Ars-A family with normal avidity for antigen had been shown to use the JH2 joining segment gene, amino acid sequence analysis of HP 101F11 revealed that this antibody has a JH segment with a sequence identical to that encoded by a portion of a different JH gene, JH4 . The implication that 101F11 uses the JH4 gene instead of JH2 was supported by the observation that the productively rearranged gene is associated with an Eco R1 restriction fragment 0.95 Kb smaller than the corresponding fragments of Ars-A hybridomas with normal avidity for antigen. The size difference of 0.95 Kb corresponds exactly to the known distance between the JH2 and JH4 genes in BALB/c germline DNA. In addition to the structural differences immediately attributable to the use of JH4 , HP 101F11 has shown an amino acid interchange in the DH segment, and a single amino acid deletion at the DH-JH boundary. These results show that variation among members of the Ars-A family in the DH and/or JH segments provides alternative structural forms of Ars-A antibodies upon which selective processes can operate

  14. Binding of antibodies to the extractable nuclear antigens SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La is induced on the surface of human keratinocytes by ultraviolet light (UVL): Implications for the pathogenesis of photosensitive cutaneous lupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, F.; Kashihara-Sawami, M.; Lyons, M.B.; Norris, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the non-histone nucleoprotein antigens SS-A/Ro, SS-B/La, and RNP are highly associated with photosensitive cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). In order to better understand the potential mechanisms of ultraviolet (UV) light on photosensitivity in patients with cutaneous LE, we designed immunopathologic in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate the effects of UV on the binding of such autoantibodies to the surface of human keratinocytes, one major target of immunologic damage in photosensitive LE. Short-term 2% paraformaldehyde fixation of suspensions of cultured human keratinocytes previously incubated with monospecific antiserum probes enabled the detection of ENA expression on the cell surface by flow-cytometry analysis. UVB light (280-320 nm) induced the binding of monospecific antibody probes for SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La on keratinocytes in a dose-dependent pattern with maximal induction observed at the dose of 200 mJ/cm2 UVB. Binding of SS-A/Ro, SS-B/La, and RNP antibody was augmented strongly, but binding of anti-Sm was very weak. In contrast, UVA (320-400 nm) light had no effect on the induction of binding of these antibody probes. Identical results were seen by standard immunofluorescence techniques. Hydroxyurea-treated keratinocytes showed similar induction of those antigens by UVB irradiation, which suggested that ENA expression on cultured keratinocytes by UVB were cell-cycle independent. Tunicamycin, an inhibitor of glycosylation of proteins, reduced UVB light effect on the SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La antigen's expression. These in vitro FACS analyses revealed that ENA augmentation on the keratinocyte cell surface was dose dependent, UVB dependent, glycosylation dependent, and cell-cycle independent. In vivo ENA augmentation on the keratinocyte surface was examined in suction blister epidermal roofs

  15. Stimulation of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Increased Extracellular Phosphate Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Voelkl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Anemia in renal insufficiency results in part from impaired erythrocyte formation due to erythropoietin and iron deficiency. Beyond that, renal insufficiency enhances eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Eryptosis may be stimulated by increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. Several uremic toxins have previously been shown to stimulate eryptosis. Renal insufficiency is further paralleled by increase of plasma phosphate concentration. The present study thus explored the effect of phosphate on erythrocyte death. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin V binding, and [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence. Results: Following a 48 hours incubation, the percentage of phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes markedly increased as a function of extracellular phosphate concentration (from 0-5 mM. The exposure to 2 mM or 5 mM phosphate was followed by slight but significant hemolysis. [Ca2+]i did not change significantly up to 2 mM phosphate but significantly decreased at 5 mM phosphate. The effect of 2 mM phosphate on phosphatidylserine exposure was significantly augmented by increase of extracellular Ca2+ to 1.7 mM, and significantly blunted by nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+, by additional presence of pyrophosphate as well as by presence of p38 inhibitor SB203580. Conclusion: Increasing phosphate concentration stimulates erythrocyte membrane scrambling, an effect depending on extracellular but not intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is hypothesized that suicidal erythrocyte death is triggered by complexed CaHPO4.

  16. Tailoring subunit vaccine immunity with adjuvant combinations and delivery routes using the Middle East respiratory coronavirus (MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain as an antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaming Lan

    Full Text Available The development of an effective vaccine is critical for prevention of a Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV pandemic. Some studies have indicated the receptor-binding domain (RBD protein of MERS-CoV spike (S is a good candidate antigen for a MERS-CoV subunit vaccine. However, highly purified proteins are typically not inherently immunogenic. We hypothesised that humoral and cell-mediated immunity would be improved with a modification of the vaccination regimen. Therefore, the immunogenicity of a novel MERS-CoV RBD-based subunit vaccine was tested in mice using different adjuvant formulations and delivery routes. Different vaccination regimens were compared in BALB/c mice immunized 3 times intramuscularly (i.m. with a vaccine containing 10 µg of recombinant MERS-CoV RBD in combination with either aluminium hydroxide (alum alone, alum and polyriboinosinic acid (poly I:C or alum and cysteine-phosphate-guanine (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN. The immune responses of mice vaccinated with RBD, incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA and CpG ODN by a subcutaneous (s.c. route were also investigated. We evaluated the induction of RBD-specific humoral immunity (total IgG and neutralizing antibodies and cellular immunity (ELISpot assay for IFN-γ spot-forming cells and splenocyte cytokine production. Our findings indicated that the combination of alum and CpG ODN optimized the development of RBD-specific humoral and cellular immunity following subunit vaccination. Interestingly, robust RBD-specific antibody and T-cell responses were induced in mice immunized with the rRBD protein in combination with IFA and CpG ODN, but low level of neutralizing antibodies were elicited. Our data suggest that murine immunity following subunit vaccination can be tailored using adjuvant combinations and delivery routes. The vaccination regimen used in this study is promising and could improve the protection offered by the MERS-CoV subunit vaccine by eliciting

  17. Triggering of Erythrocyte Cell Membrane Scrambling by Emodin

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    Morena Mischitelli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The natural anthraquinone derivative emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthraquinone is a component of several Chinese medicinal herbal preparations utilized for more than 2000 years. The substance has been used against diverse disorders including malignancy, inflammation and microbial infection. The substance is effective in part by triggering suicidal death or apoptosis. Similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells erythrocytes may enter suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Signaling involved in the triggering of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, oxidative stress and ceramide. The present study aimed to test, whether emodin induces eryptosis and, if so, to elucidate underlying cellular mechanisms. Methods: Phosphatidylserine abundance at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ROS formation from DCFDA dependent fluorescence, and ceramide abundance utilizing specific antibodies. Results: Exposure of human erythrocytes for 48 hours to emodin (≥ 10 µM significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, and at higher concentrations (≥ 50 µM significantly increased forward scatter. Emodin significantly increased Fluo3-fluorescence (≥ 10 µM, DCFDA fluorescence (75 µM and ceramide abundance (75 µM. The effect of emodin on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Conclusions: Emodin triggers phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least in part due to stimulation of Ca2+ entry and paralleled by oxidative stress and ceramide appearance at the erythroctye surface.

  18. Structure of malaria invasion protein RH5 with erythrocyte basigin and blocking antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Katherine E; Hjerrild, Kathryn A; Bartlett, Jonathan; Douglas, Alexander D; Jin, Jing; Brown, Rebecca E; Illingworth, Joseph J; Ashfield, Rebecca; Clemmensen, Stine B; de Jongh, Willem A; Draper, Simon J; Higgins, Matthew K

    2014-11-20

    Invasion of host erythrocytes is essential to the life cycle of Plasmodium parasites and development of the pathology of malaria. The stages of erythrocyte invasion, including initial contact, apical reorientation, junction formation, and active invagination, are directed by coordinated release of specialized apical organelles and their parasite protein contents. Among these proteins, and central to invasion by all species, are two parasite protein families, the reticulocyte-binding protein homologue (RH) and erythrocyte-binding like proteins, which mediate host-parasite interactions. RH5 from Plasmodium falciparum (PfRH5) is the only member of either family demonstrated to be necessary for erythrocyte invasion in all tested strains, through its interaction with the erythrocyte surface protein basigin (also known as CD147 and EMMPRIN). Antibodies targeting PfRH5 or basigin efficiently block parasite invasion in vitro, making PfRH5 an excellent vaccine candidate. Here we present crystal structures of PfRH5 in complex with basigin and two distinct inhibitory antibodies. PfRH5 adopts a novel fold in which two three-helical bundles come together in a kite-like architecture, presenting binding sites for basigin and inhibitory antibodies at one tip. This provides the first structural insight into erythrocyte binding by the Plasmodium RH protein family and identifies novel inhibitory epitopes to guide design of a new generation of vaccines against the blood-stage parasite.

  19. β-endorphin antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to the production of antigens comprising β-endorphin, βsub(h)-endorphin, or βsub(c)-endorphin, in covalent conjugation with human gammaglobulin as immunogenic carrier material, and an antibody having the property of specifically binding β-endorphin or fragments thereof, containing the (6-15) residue sequence. (U.K.)

  20. Statistical prediction of immunity to placental malaria based on multi-assay antibody data for malarial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siriwardhana, Chathura; Fang, Rui; Salanti, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum infections are especially severe in pregnant women because infected erythrocytes (IE) express VAR2CSA, a ligand that binds to placental trophoblasts, causing IE to accumulate in the placenta. Resulting inflammation and pathology increases a woman’s risk of anemia...... to 28 malarial antigens and used the data to develop statistical models for predicting if a woman has sufficient immunity to prevent PM. Methods Archival plasma samples from 1377 women were screened in a bead-based multiplex assay for Ab to 17 VAR2CSA-associated antigens (full length VAR2CSA (FV2), DBL...... in the following seven statistical approaches: logistic regression full model, logistic regression reduced model, recursive partitioning, random forests, linear discriminant analysis, quadratic discriminant analysis, and support vector machine. Results The best and simplest model proved to be the logistic...

  1. Triggers, Inhibitors, Mechanisms, and Significance of Eryptosis: The Suicidal Erythrocyte Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Lang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis is characterized by erythrocyte shrinkage, cell membrane blebbing, and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include Ca2+ entry, ceramide formation, stimulation of caspases, calpain activation, energy depletion, oxidative stress, and dysregulation of several kinases. Eryptosis is triggered by a wide variety of xenobiotics. It is inhibited by several xenobiotics and endogenous molecules including NO and erythropoietin. The susceptibility of erythrocytes to eryptosis increases with erythrocyte age. Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes adhere to the vascular wall by binding to endothelial CXC-Motiv-Chemokin-16/Scavenger-receptor for phosphatidylserine and oxidized low density lipoprotein (CXCL16. Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes are further engulfed by phagocytosing cells and are thus rapidly cleared from circulating blood. Eryptosis eliminates infected or defective erythrocytes thus counteracting parasitemia in malaria and preventing detrimental hemolysis of defective cells. Excessive eryptosis, however, may lead to anemia and may interfere with microcirculation. Enhanced eryptosis contributes to the pathophysiology of several clinical disorders including metabolic syndrome and diabetes, malignancy, cardiac and renal insufficiency, hemolytic uremic syndrome, sepsis, mycoplasma infection, malaria, iron deficiency, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and Wilson’s disease. Facilitating or inhibiting eryptosis may be a therapeutic option in those disorders.

  2. Influence of a sublethal irradiation on the immune response of the mouse against sheep erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaumariage, M.L.; Hiesche, K.; Moeller, E.; Revesz, L.; Haot, J.

    1975-01-01

    In the CBA mice, the immunological response of the spleen cells (RFC and PFC direct and indirect) against the sheep erythrocytes is highly depressed by a 400R dose of X rays. The recovery is not complete at the 30th day after irradiation. The response of the bone marrow cells either irradiated or unirradiated to the antigenic stimulation is very low [fr

  3. Erythrocyte fluorescence and lead intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K G

    1976-01-01

    Blood samples from people exposed to inorganic lead were examined by fluorescence microscopy for excess erythrocyte porphyrin. With continued lead absorption, fluorescent erythrocytes appeared in the circulation of workers handling this metal or its compounds, and they progressively increased in number and brilliance. These changes ensued if the blood lead concentration was maintained above 2-42 mumol/l (50 mug/100 ml), and preceded any material fall in the haemoglobin value. At one factory, 62-5% of 81 symptomless workers showed erythrocyte fluorescence attributable to the toxic effects of lead. Excess fluorocytes were found in blood samples from a child with pica and three of her eight siblings. These four were subsequently shown to have slightly increased blood lead concentrations (2-03 to 2-32 mumol/l). Fluorescence microscopy for excess erythrocyte porphyrin is a sensitive method for the detection of chronic lead intoxication. A relatively slight increase in the blood lead is associated with demonstrabel changes in erythrocyte porphyrin content. The procedure requires little blood, and may be performed upon stored samples collected for lead estimation. The results are not readily influenced by contamination, and provide good confirmatory evidence for the absorption of biochemically active lead. PMID:963005

  4. Carbon dioxide transport in alligator blood and its erythrocyte permeability to anions and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, F B; Wang, T; Jones, D R

    1998-01-01

    Deoxygenation of alligator red blood cells (RBCs) caused binding of two HCO3- equivalents per hemoglobin (Hb) tetramer at physiological pH. At lowered pH, some HCO3- binding also occurred to oxygenated Hb. The erythrocytic total CO2 content was large, and Hb-bound HCO3-, free HCO3-, and carbamate...

  5. A recombinant dromedary antibody fragment (VHH or nanobody) directed against human Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarek, Dorota; Hattab, Claude; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Cochet, Sylvie; Gutiérrez, Carlos; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Picot, Julien; Grodecka, Magdalena; Wasniowska, Kazimiera; Muyldermans, Serge; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Czerwinski, Marcin; Bertrand, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Fy blood group antigens are carried by the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC), a red cells receptor for Plasmodium vivax broadly implicated in human health and diseases. Recombinant VHHs, or nanobodies, the smallest intact antigen binding fragment derivative from the heavy chain-only antibodies present in camelids, were prepared from a dromedary immunized against DARC N-terminal extracellular domain and selected for DARC binding. A described VHH, CA52, does recognize native DARC on cells. It inhibits P. vivax invasion of erythrocytes and displaces interleukin-8 bound to DARC. The targeted epitope overlaps the well-defined DARC Fy6 epitope. K (D) of CA52-DARC equilibrium is sub-nanomolar, hence ideal to develop diagnostic or therapeutic compounds. Immunocapture by immobilized CA52 yielded highly purified DARC from engineered K562 cells. This first report on a VHH with specificity for a red blood cell protein exemplifies VHHs' potentialities to target, to purify, and to modulate the function of cellular markers.

  6. A sequence in subdomain 2 of DBL1α of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 induces strain transcending antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Blomqvist

    Full Text Available Immunity to severe malaria is the first level of immunity acquired to Plasmodium falciparum. Antibodies to the variant antigen PfEMP1 (P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 present at the surface of the parasitized red blood cell (pRBC confer protection by blocking microvascular sequestration. Here we have generated antibodies to peptide sequences of subdomain 2 of PfEMP1-DBL1α previously identified to be associated with severe or mild malaria. A set of sera generated to the amino acid sequence KLQTLTLHQVREYWWALNRKEVWKA, containing the motif ALNRKE, stained the live pRBC. 50% of parasites tested (7/14 were positive both in flow cytometry and immunofluorescence assays with live pRBCs including both laboratory strains and in vitro adapted clinical isolates. Antibodies that reacted selectively with the sequence REYWWALNRKEVWKA in a 15-mer peptide array of DBL1α-domains were also found to react with the pRBC surface. By utilizing a peptide array to map the binding properties of the elicited anti-DBL1α antibodies, the amino acids WxxNRx were found essential for antibody binding. Complementary experiments using 135 degenerate RDSM peptide sequences obtained from 93 Ugandan patient-isolates showed that antibody binding occurred when the amino acids WxLNRKE/D were present in the peptide. The data suggests that the ALNRKE sequence motif, associated with severe malaria, induces strain-transcending antibodies that react with the pRBC surface.

  7. [Erythrocyte blood groups and geographic pathology (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, C

    1979-01-01

    Blood groups are an obstacle to reproduction, transfusion and transplantation. There are immunological abortions due to the antibodies of "p" phenotype women; and Rh haemolytic disease of the new-born is in direct proportion to the frequency of the "r" gene in a given population; the problem of transfusional allo-immunisation is completely parallel. Certain membrane anomalies (due to exceptional erythrocyte blood groups--Rh null, Rh mod or McLeod, for example), can provoke hemolytic anaemias, but in these cases the subjects are scattered throughout the world. An important problem is that of the relationships between Duffy antigens and malaria: from what is known about plasmodium Knowlesi, Fya and Fyb antigens are related to the erythrocyte receptors for this plasmodium: the Fy(a-b-) red cells, even of exceptional non-blacks, are not infested with parasites. Two kinds of receptors are postulated: one for adherence and another for penetration. In contrast, plasmodium falciparum does not recognise the same receptors as plasmodium Knowlesi. Experiments carried out on man have led to the conclusion that plasmodium vivax also used Fya and Fyb antigens to penetrate the red cell. These recent facts give rise to the problem of a possible natural selection by plasmodium vivax, which would eradicate polymorphism, whilst until now, the facts concerning plasmodium falciparum have explained the balance of polymorphism.

  8. Stimulation of erythrocyte phosphatidylserine exposure by mercury ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisele, Kerstin; Lang, Philipp A.; Kempe, Daniela S.; Klarl, Barbara A.; Niemoeller, Olivier; Wieder, Thomas; Huber, Stephan M.; Duranton, Christophe; Lang, Florian

    2006-01-01

    The sequelae of mercury intoxication include induction of apoptosis. In nucleated cells, Hg 2+ -induced apoptosis involves mitochondrial damage. The present study has been performed to elucidate effects of Hg 2+ in erythrocytes which lack mitochondria but are able to undergo apoptosis-like alterations of the cell membrane. Previous studies have documented that activation of a Ca 2+ -sensitive erythrocyte scramblase leads to exposure of phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface, a typical feature of apoptotic cells. The erythrocyte scramblase is activated by osmotic shock, oxidative stress and/or energy depletion which increase cytosolic Ca 2+ activity and/or activate a sphingomyelinase leading to formation of ceramide. Ceramide sensitizes the scramblase to Ca 2+ . The present experiments explored the effect of Hg 2+ ions on erythrocytes. Phosphatidylserine exposure after mercury treatment was estimated from annexin binding as determined in FACS analysis. Exposure to Hg 2+ (1 μM) indeed significantly increased annexin binding from 2.3 ± 0.5% (control condition) to 23 ± 6% (n = 6). This effect was paralleled by activation of a clotrimazole-sensitive K + -selective conductance as measured by patch-clamp recordings and by transient cell shrinkage. Further experiments revealed also an increase of ceramide formation by ∼66% (n = 7) after challenge with mercury (1 μM). In conclusion, mercury ions activate a clotrimazole-sensitive K + -selective conductance leading to transient cell shrinkage. Moreover, Hg 2+ increases ceramide formation. The observed mechanisms could similarly participate in the triggering of apoptosis in nucleated cells by Hg 2+

  9. Development and validation of an antigen-binding capture ELISA for native and putrescine-modified anti-tetanus F(ab')2 fragments for the assessment of the cellular uptake and plasma kinetics of the antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welfringer, Frédéric; d'Athis, Philippe; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Hervé, Françoise

    2005-12-20

    Cationization is a strategy to enhance the permeability of antibodies to physiological membranes for potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of these proteins, with one of its crucial points being the retention of antigen binding activity. Here, we describe the cationization of horse polyclonal anti-tetanus F(ab')(2) fragments and the development and validation of an ELISA for quantitative measurements of the binding activity of the native and cationized F(ab')(2) in cell lysates and rat plasma samples, assessing the cellular uptake and plasma kinetics of these antibodies, respectively. The method used tetanus anatoxin coated on microtitre plates as capture antigen to bind sample or standard F(ab')(2), the amount of antibody binding being quantified using, first, a secondary biotinylated anti-horse antibody/streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase complex in situ and then a measurement of the substrate product. Cationization of the F(ab')(2) was performed with putrescine at pH 4.5 using soluble carbodiimide as carboxyl activator. The average substitution ratio was determined at 3 putrescine molecules per F(ab')(2) molecule. The cationized F(ab')(2) retained roughly 80% of the initial antigen binding activity and was stable over a 1 year period of storage at -20 degrees C. The ELISA validation data showed that the method was linear for both the native and cationized F(ab')(2) using Hanks' balanced saline solution with 0.2% bovine serum albumin as assay diluent for the cell lysate samples. The useful F(ab')(2) concentration range was 2.5-25 ng/ml and the limit of quantification was 2.5 ng/ml. With rat blank plasma used as assay diluent for the rat plasma samples the useful F(ab')(2) concentration range was 3.5-25 ng/ml and the limit of quantification was 3.5 ng/ml. Specific requirements for the limits of quantification were fulfilled: precision tetanus F(ab')(2) in an HL 60 cell model, and of plasma kinetics after i.v. administration to rats.

  10. Factors influencing erythrocyte choline concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B L; Jenden, D J; Tang, C; Read, S

    1989-01-01

    Choline concentrations in human erythrocytes increase after freezing and thawing, during incubation in Krebs-phosphate for 30 min or on storage at 0 degrees C for 3-24 hr. The increase is prevented by protein precipitation by 10% perchloric acid, 10% zinc hydroxide, 10% sodium tungstate or boiling in water. It is not prevented by EDTA (10 mM) and is increased by oleate (5 mM). We suggest that the increase is due to the action of phospholipase D on erythrocyte phospholipids.

  11. Changes in haematology, plasma biochemistry and erythrocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results suggest that maintaining wild birds in captivity for a prolonged period could be stressful as shown by the heterophil/lymphocytes ratio and reduced erythrocyte osmotic resistance, and could lead to decreases in erythrocyte parameters and muscle wasting. Keywords: Haematological parameters, erythrocyte ...

  12. Human leucocyte antigen class I-redirected anti-tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M P; Dolton, G M; Gerry, A B; Brewer, J E; Bennett, A D; Pumphrey, N J; Jakobsen, B K; Sewell, A K

    2017-01-01

    CD4 + T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour-specific CD4 + T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low-affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4 + T cells with tumour-specific HLA class I-restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co-receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4 + cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing wild-type and a range of affinity-enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1- and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4 + T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4 + T cells than CD8 + T cells. These results indicate that the CD4 + T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8 + T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Society for Immunology.

  13. Triggering of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death Following Boswellic Acid Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatrice Calabrò

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The antinflammatory natural product boswellic acid is effective against cancer at least in part by inducing tumor cell apoptosis. Similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells erythrocytes may enter eryptosis, a suicidal death characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Stimulators of eryptosis include oxidative stress, increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, energy depletion, ceramide formation and p38 kinase activation. The present study tested, whether and how boswellic acid induces eryptosis. Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, hemolysis from hemoglobin release, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ceramide abundance utilizing specific antibodies, reactive oxygen species (ROS from 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofuorescein diacetate (DCFDA fluorescence, and cytosolic ATP concentration utilizing a luciferin-luciferase assay kit. Results: A 24 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to boswellic acid (5 µg/ml significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (to 9.3 ±0.9 % and significantly decreased forward scatter. Boswellic acid did not significantly modify [Ca2+]i, cytosolic ATP, ROS, or ceramide abundance. The effect of boswellic acid on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted, but not abolished by p38 kinase inhibitors skepinone (2 µM and SB203580 (2 µM. Conclusions: Boswellic acid stimulates cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect in part dependent on p38 protein kinase activity.

  14. Potential radioimmunoassay system for detection of Hanganutziu-Deicher type heterophile antigen(s) and antibodies in tissues and fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukuria, J C; Naiki, Masaharu; Hashimoto, Masato; Nishiura, Katsumi; Okabe, Masahiro; Kato, Shiro

    1985-06-12

    A relatively simple, specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay system has been developed for the detection of heterophile Hanganutziu-Deicher (H-D) antigen(s) and antibodies. The SVI-labeled H-D antigen-active molecule used for the assay is a bovine erythrocyte major glycoprotein previously found to have a strong H-D antigen potency. Different H-D antigen-active molecules were compared for heterophile H-D antigen potency. Eight different lung cancer tissues were assayed for H-D antigen. The sera from the 8 lung cancer patients were also screened by ELISA and RIA in an attmept to correlate expression of H-D antigen on tissues with elevation of H-D antibodies.

  15. Influence of Erythrocyte Membrane Stability in Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Garrote-Filho, Mario; Bernardino-Neto, Morun; Penha-Silva, Nilson

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to show how an excess of cholesterol in the erythrocyte membrane contributes stochastically to the progression of atherosclerosis, leading to damage in blood rheology and O 2 transport, deposition of cholesterol (from trapped erythrocytes) in an area of intraplaque hemorrhage, and local exacerbation of oxidative stress. Cholesterol contained in the membrane of erythrocytes trapped in an intraplaque hemorrhage contributes to the growth of the necrotic nucleus. There is even a relationship between the amount of cholesterol in the erythrocyte membrane and the severity of atherosclerosis. In addition, the volume variability among erythrocytes, measured by RDW, is predictive of a worsening of this disease. Erythrocytes contribute to the development of atherosclerosis in several ways, especially when trapped in intraplate hemorrhage. These erythrocytes are oxidized and phagocytosed by macrophages. The cholesterol present in the membrane of these erythrocytes subsequently contributes to the growth of the atheroma plaque. In addition, when they rupture, erythrocytes release hemoglobin, which leads to the generation of free radicals. Finally, increased RDW may predict the worsening of atherosclerosis, due to the effects of inflammation and oxidative stress on erythropoiesis and erythrocyte volume. A better understanding of erythrocyte participation in atherosclerosis may contribute to the improvement of the prevention and treatment strategies of this disease.

  16. Fasting and feeding variations of insulin requirements and insulin binding to erythrocytes at different times of the day in insulin dependent diabetics--assessed under the condition of glucose-controlled insulin infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C T; Beyer, J; Schulz, G

    1986-07-01

    Nine insulin-dependent diabetic patients were examined for insulin requirement, counterregulatory hormones, and receptor binding during their connection to glucose-controlled insulin infusion system. They were of 103% ideal body weight. A diet of 45% carbohydrate, 20% protein and 35% fat was divided into three meals and three snacks averaging the daily calorie intake of 1859 kcal. Following an equilibrating phase of 14 hours after the connection to the glucose-controlled insulin infusion system the blood samples were taken at 0800, 1200 and 1800. The insulin infusion rate increased at 0300 in the early morning from 0.128 mU/kg/min to 0.221 mU/kg/min (P less than 0.02). The postprandial insulin infusion rate jumped from 0.7 U/h (0700-0800) to 7.5 U/h (0800-0900). The calorie related and carbohydrate related insulin demands after breakfast were also highest and declined after lunch respectively (1.16 uU/kg/min kj vs. 0.61 uU/kg/min kj, P less than 0.05 and 236 mU/g CHO vs. 129 mU/g CHO and 143 mU/g CHO). Of the counterregulatory hormones the cortisol showed a significant diurnal rhythm to insulin demands. The insulin tracer binding was higher at 0800 before breakfast than that at 1200 before lunch (P less than 0.05). The increased binding could be better attributed to receptor concentration change than to affinity change. The cause of insulin relative insensitivity in the morning could be due to altered liver response to the cortisol peak in type 1 diabetics. The preserved variation of insulin binding in our patients might be referred to feeding.

  17. Interaction of Plasmodium falciparum knob-associated histidine-rich protein (KAHRP) with erythrocyte ankyrin R is required for its attachment to the erythrocyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Haibo; Guo, Xinhua; Papoin, Julien; Wang, Jie; Coppel, Ross; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2014-01-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum exports a large number of proteins into the erythrocyte cytoplasm during the asexual intraerythrocytic stage of its life cycle. A subset of these proteins interacts with erythrocyte membrane skeletal proteins and grossly alters the structure and function of the membrane. Several of the exported proteins, such as PfEMP1, PfEMP3, RESA and KAHRP, interact with the preponderant erythrocyte skeleton protein, spectrin. Here we have searched for possible interaction of these four malaria proteins with another major erythrocyte skeleton protein, ankyrin R. We have shown that KAHRP, but none of the other three, binds to ankyrin R. We have mapped the binding site for ankyrin R to a 79-residue segment of the KAHRP sequence, and the reciprocal binding site for KAHRP in ankyrin R to a subdomain (D3) of the 89kDa ankyrin R membrane-binding domain. Interaction of intact ankyrin R with KAHRP was inhibited by the free D3 subdomain. When, moreover, red cells loaded with the soluble D3 subdomain were infected with P. falciparum, KAHRP secreted by the intraerythrocytic parasite no longer migrated to the host cell membrane, but remained diffusely distributed throughout the cytosol. Our findings suggest a potentially important role for interaction of KAHRP with red cell membrane skeleton in promoting the adhesion of malaria-infected red cells to endothelial surfaces, a central element in the pathophysiology of malaria. © 2013.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of respiration induced metabolic oscillations in erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn; Madsen, Mads F; Danø, Sune

    2009-01-01

    The changes in the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide (P(O(2)) and P(CO(2))) during blood circulation alter erythrocyte metabolism, hereby causing flux changes between oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. In the study we have modeled this effect by extending the comprehensive kinetic...... model by Mulquiney and Kuchel [P.J. Mulquiney, and P.W. Kuchel. Model of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate metabolism in the human erythrocyte based on detailed enzyme kinetic equations: equations and parameter refinement, Biochem. J. 1999, 342, 581-596.] with a kinetic model of hemoglobin oxy...... solely by steady state consideration. The metabolic system exhibits a broad distribution of time scales. Relaxations of modes with hemoglobin and Mg(2+) binding reactions are very fast, while modes involving glycolytic, membrane transport and 2,3-BPG shunt reactions are much slower. Incomplete slow mode...

  19. Cellular responses to modified Plasmodium falciparum MSP119 antigens in individuals previously exposed to natural malaria infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awobode Henrietta O

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MSP1 processing-inhibitory antibodies bind to epitopes on the 19 kDa C-terminal region of the Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP119, inhibiting erythrocyte invasion. Blocking antibodies also bind to this antigen but prevent inhibitory antibodies binding, allowing invasion to proceed. Recombinant MSP119 had been modified previously to allow inhibitory but not blocking antibodies to continue to bind. Immunization with these modified proteins, therefore, has the potential to induce more effective protective antibodies. However, it was unclear whether the modification of MSP119 would affect critical T-cell responses to epitopes in this antigen. Methods The cellular responses to wild-type MSP119 and a panel of modified MSP119 antigens were measured using an in-vitro assay for two groups of individuals: the first were malaria-naïve and the second had been naturally exposed to Plasmodium falciparum infection. The cellular responses to the modified proteins were examined using cells from malaria-exposed infants and adults. Results Interestingly, stimulation indices (SI for responses induced by some of the modified proteins were at least two-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type MSP119. A protein with four amino acid substitutions (Glu27→Tyr, Leu31→Arg, Tyr34→Ser and Glu43→Leu had the highest stimulation index (SI up to 360 and induced large responses in 64% of the samples that had significant cellular responses to the modified proteins. Conclusion This study suggests that specific MSP119 variants that have been engineered to improve their antigenicity for inhibitory antibodies, retain T-cell epitopes and the ability to induce cellular responses. These proteins are candidates for the development of MSP1-based malaria vaccines.

  20. 51Cr - erythrocyte survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva Costa, J. de.

    1982-07-01

    Sixteen patients were studied, being fifteen patients in hemolytic state, and a normal individual as a witness. The aim was to obtain better techniques for the analysis of the erythrocytes, survival curves, according to the recommendations of the International Committee of Hematology. It was used the radiochromatic method as a tracer. Previously a revisional study of the International Literature was made in its aspects inherent to the work in execution, rendering possible to establish comparisons and clarify phonomena observed in cur investigation. Several parameters were considered in this study, hindering both the exponential and the linear curves. The analysis of the survival curves of the erythrocytes in the studied group, revealed that the elution factor did not present a homogeneous answer quantitatively to all, though, the result of the analysis of these curves have been established, through listed programs in the electronic calculator. (Author) [pt

  1. Cytoadhesion to gC1qR through Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 in severe malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magallón-Tejada, Ariel; Machevo, Sónia; Cisteró, Pau

    2016-01-01

    Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes to gC1qR has been associated with severe malaria, but the parasite ligand involved is currently unknown. To assess if binding to gC1qR is mediated through the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family, we analyzed...

  2. Comparison of the binding properties of the mushroom Marasmius oreades lectin and Griffonia simplicifolia I-B isolectin to alphagalactosyl carbohydrate antigens in the surface phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J

    2004-01-01

    The binding of two alpha-galactophilic lectins, Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA), and Griffonia simplicifolia I isolectin B(4) (GS I-B(4)) to neoglycoproteins and natural glycoproteins were compared in a surface phase assay. Neoglycoproteins carrying various alpha-galactosylated glycans and lam...

  3. Traffic pathways of Plasmodium vivax antigens during intraerythrocytic parasite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, Carmen; Dunia, Irene; De, La Rosa Mercedes; Benedetti, Ennio-Lucio; Perez, Hilda A

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the secretory traffic of a Plasmodium vivax antigen (Pv-148) synthesised by the parasite during the blood cycle, exported into the host cell cytosol and then transported to the surface membrane of the infected erythrocyte. Studies of the ultrastructure of erythrocytes infected with P. vivax showed that intracellular schizogony is accompanied by the generation of parasite-induced membrane profiles in the erythrocyte cytoplasm. These structures are detectable soon after the parasite invades the erythrocyte and develop an elaborate organisation, leading to a tubovesicular membrane (TVM) network, in erythrocytes infected with mature trophozoites. Interestingly, the clefts formed stacked, flattened cisternae resembling a classical Golgi apparatus. The TVM network stained with the fluorescent Golgi marker Bodipy-ceramide. Specific immunolabelling showed that Pv-148 was transferred from the parasite to the erythrocyte surface membrane via the clefts and the TVM network. These findings suggest that the TVM network is part of the secretory pathways involved in parasite protein transport across the Plasmodium-infected erythrocyte and that Pv- 148 may represent a marker that links the parasite with the host cell cytoplasm and, in turn, with the extracellular milieu.

  4. A study on antigenicity and receptor-binding ability of fragment 450-650 of the spike protein of SARS coronavirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jincun; Wang Wei; Yuan Zhihong; Jia Rujing; Zhao Zhendong; Xu Xiaojun; Lv Ping; Zhang Yan; Jiang Chengyu; Gao Xiaoming

    2007-01-01

    The spike (S) protein of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is responsible for viral binding with ACE2 molecules. Its receptor-binding motif (S-RBM) is located between residues 424 and 494, which folds into 2 anti-parallel β-sheets, β5 and β6. We have previously demonstrated that fragment 450-650 of the S protein (S450-650) is predominantly recognized by convalescent sera of SARS patients. The N-terminal 60 residues (450-510) of the S450-650 fragment covers the entire β6 strand of S-RBM. In the present study, we demonstrate that patient sera predominantly recognized 2 linear epitopes outside the β6 fragment, while the mouse antisera, induced by immunization of BALB/c mice with recombinant S450-650, mainly recognized the β6 strand-containing region. Unlike patient sera, however, the mouse antisera were unable to inhibit the infectivity of S protein-expressing (SARS-CoV-S) pseudovirus. Fusion protein between green fluorescence protein (GFP) and S450-650 (S450-650-GFP) was able to stain Vero E6 cells and deletion of the β6 fragment rendered the fusion product (S511-650-GFP) unable to do so. Similarly, recombinant S450-650, but not S511-650, was able to block the infection of Vero E6 cells by the SARS-CoV-S pseudovirus. Co-precipitation experiments confirmed that S450-650 was able to specifically bind with ACE2 molecules in lysate of Vero E6 cells. However, the ability of S450-510, either alone or in fusion with GFP, to bind with ACE2 was significantly poorer compared with S450-650. Our data suggest a possibility that, although the β6 strand alone is able to bind with ACE2 with relatively high affinity, residues outside the S-RBM could also assist the receptor binding of SARS-CoV-S protein

  5. Identification of a human erythroid progenitor cell population which expresses the CD34 antigen and binds the plant lectin Ulex europaeus I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unverzagt, K L; Martinson, J; Lee, W; Stiff, P J; Williams, S; Bender, J G

    1996-01-01

    Two and three color flow cytometry of normal human bone marrow was used to identify CD34+ progenitor cells and examine their binding to the plant lectin Ulex europaeus I (Ulex). In normal bone marrow, 48.48 +/- 17.4% of the CD34+ cells bind to Ulex. Two color flow cytometry was used to sort CD34 + cells, and subsets of CD34+ cells, CD34+ Ulex+ and CD34+ Ulex-. These populations were sorted into colony assays to assess myeloid (CFU-GM) and erythroid (BFU-E) progenitors. The CD34+ Ulex+ subset was 84 +/- 14% BFU-E colonies (mean +/- S.D.) and had the highest cloning efficiency of 28 +/- 13%. Three color analysis of CD34+ Ulex+ cells showed staining with other erythroid (CD71, GlyA) antibodies and lack of stain. ing with myeloid (CD13, CD45RA) antibodies. These studies confirmed the erythroid characteristics of this subpopulation.

  6. Binding of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K to the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2 enhances viral LMP2A expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Gross

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV -encoded EBNA2 protein, which is essential for the in vitro transformation of B-lymphocytes, interferes with cellular processes by binding to proteins via conserved sequence motifs. Its Arginine-Glycine (RG repeat element contains either symmetrically or asymmetrically di-methylated arginine residues (SDMA and ADMA, respectively. EBNA2 binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to the survival motor neurons protein (SMN and via the ADMA-RG-repeat to the NP9 protein of the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K (HML-2 Type 1. The hypothesis of this work was that the methylated RG-repeat mimics an epitope shared with cellular proteins that is used for interaction with target structures. With monoclonal antibodies against the modified RG-repeat, we indeed identified cellular homologues that apparently have the same surface structure as methylated EBNA2. With the SDMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the Sm protein D3 (SmD3 which, like EBNA2, binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to SMN. With the ADMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K. Specific binding of the ADMA- antibody to hnRNP K was demonstrated using E. coli expressed/ADMA-methylated hnRNP K. In addition, we show that EBNA2 and hnRNP K form a complex in EBV- infected B-cells. Finally, hnRNP K, when co-expressed with EBNA2, strongly enhances viral latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A expression by an unknown mechanism as we did not detect a direct association of hnRNP K with DNA-bound EBNA2 in gel shift experiments. Our data support the notion that the methylated surface of EBNA2 mimics the surface structure of cellular proteins to interfere with or co-opt their functional properties.

  7. Erythrocyte and porcine intestinal glycosphingolipids recognized by F4 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddens, Annelies; Valis, Erik; Benktander, John; Ångström, Jonas; Breimer, Michael E; Cox, Eric; Teneberg, Susann

    2011-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic F4-fimbriated Escherichia coli is associated with diarrheal disease in neonatal and postweaning pigs. The F4 fimbriae mediate attachment of the bacteria to the pig intestinal epithelium, enabling an efficient delivery of diarrhea-inducing enterotoxins to the target epithelial cells. There are three variants of F4 fimbriae designated F4ab, F4ac and F4ad, respectively, having different antigenic and adhesive properties. In the present study, the binding of isolated F4ab, F4ac and F4ad fimbriae, and F4ab/ac/ad-fimbriated E. coli, to glycosphingolipids from erythrocytes and from porcine small intestinal epithelium was examined, in order to get a comprehensive view of the F4-binding glycosphingolipids involved in F4-mediated hemagglutination and adhesion to the epithelial cells of porcine intestine. Specific interactions between the F4ab, F4ac and F4ad fimbriae and both acid and non-acid glycosphingolipids were obtained, and after isolation of binding-active glycosphingolipids and characterization by mass spectrometry and proton NMR, distinct carbohydrate binding patterns were defined for each fimbrial subtype. Two novel glycosphingolipids were isolated from chicken erythrocytes, and characterized as GalNAcα3GalNAcß3Galß4Glcß1Cer and GalNAcα3GalNAcß3Galß4GlcNAcß3Galß4Glcß1Cer. These two compounds, and lactosylceramide (Galß4Glcß1Cer) with phytosphingosine and hydroxy fatty acid, were recognized by all three variants of F4 fimbriae. No binding of the F4ad fimbriae or F4ad-fimbriated E. coli to the porcine intestinal glycosphingolipids occurred. However, for F4ab and F4ac two distinct binding patterns were observed. The F4ac fimbriae and the F4ac-expressing E. coli selectively bound to galactosylceramide (Galß1Cer) with sphingosine and hydroxy 24:0 fatty acid, while the porcine intestinal glycosphingolipids recognized by F4ab fimbriae and the F4ab-fimbriated bacteria were characterized as galactosylceramide, sulfatide (SO(3)-3Galß1Cer), sulf

  8. Erythrocytic cation transport receptor numbers and activity in pregnancies complicated by essential hypertension and pre-eclampsia.

    OpenAIRE

    Aronson, J K; Moore, M P; Redman, C W; Harper, C

    1984-01-01

    Various functions of erythrocytic cation transport were studied in normotensive and hypertensive pregnancy (women with pre-eclampsia and essential hypertension). The results showed that in pregnancy there is an increase in the number of erythrocytic glycoside binding sites accompanied by a proportional increase in the active inward transport of rubidium (used as a substitute for potassium). There was no evidence of an effect of pregnancy on intraerythrocytic sodium concentrations. These chang...

  9. Erythrocytes in alternating electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morariu, V.V.; Chifu, A.; Simplaceanu, T.; Frangopol, P.T.

    1983-02-01

    The elastic and inelastic deformation of erythrocytes induced by alternating fields and the suggestion that moderate field intensities (1.2 kV/cm) when continuously applied can cause lysis by a different mechanism compared to the action of short intense field pulses is presented. The different experimental conditions can be used to approach various properties of the membrane such as those related to the dielectric polarization of the membrane or to the interfacial polarization, leading to the inelastic deformation of the cells. (authors)

  10. An indirect antibody assay using haptenated antigen and 125I-labelled anti-hapten antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalberse, R.C.; Amsterdam Univ.

    1978-01-01

    Hapten (trinitrophenyl) was coupled to antigen (ovalbumin). The haptenated antigen was bound by anti-ovalbumin antibody and binding was quantitated with 125 I-labelled anti-hapten antibodies. Thus, with a single radioactive reagent, antibodies against a variety of antigens can be detected while the problems inherent in a labelled antiglobulin binding test are avoided. In the ovalbumin system, the haptenated antigen binding test proved to be approximately 20 times as sensitive as the iodinated ovalbumin binding test

  11. Molecular immune recognition of botulinum neurotoxin B. The light chain regions that bind human blocking antibodies from toxin-treated cervical dystonia patients. Antigenic structure of the entire BoNT/B molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atassi, M Zouhair; Jankovic, Joseph; Steward, Lance E; Aoki, K Roger; Dolimbek, Behzod Z

    2012-01-01

    We recently mapped the regions on the heavy (H) chain of botulinum neurotoxin, type B (BoNT/B) recognized by blocking antibodies (Abs) from cervical dystonia (CD) patients who develop immunoresistance during toxin treatment. Since blocking could also be effected by Abs directed against regions on the light (L) chain, we have mapped here the L chain, using the same 30 CD antisera. We synthesized, purified and characterized 32 19-residue L chain peptides that overlapped successively by 5 residues (peptide L32 overlapped with peptide N1 of the H chain by 12 residues). In a given patient, Abs against the L chain seemed less intense than those against H chain. Most sera recognized a limited set of L chain peptides. The levels of Abs against a given region varied with the patient, consistent with immune responses to each epitope being under separate MHC control. The peptides most frequently recognized were: L13, by 30 of 30 antisera (100%); L22, by 23 of 30 (76.67%); L19, by 15 of 30 (50.00%); L26, by 11 of 30 (36.70%); and L14, by 12 of 30 (40.00%). The activity of L14 probably derives from its overlap with L13. The levels of Ab binding decreased in the following order: L13 (residues 169-187), L22 (295-313), L19 (253-271), and L26 (351-369). Peptides L12 (155-173), L18 (239-257), L15 (197-215), L1 (1-19) and L23 (309-327) exhibited very low Ab binding. The remaining peptides had little or no Ab-binding activity. The antigenic regions are analyzed in terms of their three-dimensional locations and the enzyme active site. With the previous localization of the antigenic regions on the BoNT/B H chain, the human Ab recognition of the entire BoNT/B molecule is presented and compared to the recognition of BoNT/A by human blocking Abs. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Erythrocyte Glutathione S-transferase Activity of Non-Malarious Male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hilaire

    Cameroon Journal of Experimental Biology 2009 Vol. 05 N° 02, 112-116. ... GST activity from the inhibitory action of the drugs. The results of these findings suggested the capability of these drugs to bind to the human erythrocyte GST, accompanied with ... of the five antimalarial drugs constituted the control sample analysis.

  13. Fowl plague virus replication in mammalian cell-avian erythrocyte heterokaryons: studies concerning the actinomycin D and ultra-violet lig sensitive phase in influenza virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.C.; Dimmock, N.J.

    1974-01-01

    The replication of fowl plague virus in BHK and L cells specifically blocked prior to infection with inhibitors of influenza virus replication (actinomycin D and ultraviolet light irradiation) has been studied by the introduction of a metabolically dormant avian erythrocyte nucleus. This permits the synthesis of just the influenza virus nucleoprotein in actinomycin D (but not ultraviolet light) blocked cells. The NP antigen is first detected in the avian erythrocyte nucleus and subsequently in the heterokaryon cytoplasm

  14. Solution Structure, Membrane Interactions, and Protein Binding Partners of the Tetraspanin Sm-TSP-2, a Vaccine Antigen from the Human Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xinying; Schulte, Leigh; Loukas, Alex; Pickering, Darren; Pearson, Mark; Mobli, Mehdi; Jones, Alun; Rosengren, Karl J.; Daly, Norelle L.; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; Jones, Malcolm K.; Craik, David J.; Mulvenna, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The tetraspanins (TSPs) are a family of integral membrane proteins that are ubiquitously expressed at the surface of eukaryotic cells. TSPs mediate a range of processes at the surface of the plasma membrane by providing a scaffold for the assembly of protein complexes known as tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs). We report here the structure of the surface-exposed EC2 domain from Sm-TSP-2, a TSP from Schistosoma mansoni and one of the better prospects for the development of a vaccine against schistosomiasis. This is the first solution structure of this domain, and our investigations of its interactions with lipid micelles provide a general model for interactions between TSPs, membranes, and other proteins. Using chemical cross-linking, eight potential protein constituents of Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs were also identified. These include proteins important for membrane maintenance and repair, providing further evidence for the functional role of Sm-TSP-2- and Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs. The identification of calpain, Sm29, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, themselves potential vaccine antigens, suggests that the Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs could be disrupted via multiple targets. The identification of further Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEM proteins increases the available candidates for multiplex vaccines and/or novel drugs targeting TEMs in the schistosome tegument. PMID:24429291

  15. Solution structure, membrane interactions, and protein binding partners of the tetraspanin Sm-TSP-2, a vaccine antigen from the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xinying; Schulte, Leigh; Loukas, Alex; Pickering, Darren; Pearson, Mark; Mobli, Mehdi; Jones, Alun; Rosengren, Karl J; Daly, Norelle L; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Jones, Malcolm K; Craik, David J; Mulvenna, Jason

    2014-03-07

    The tetraspanins (TSPs) are a family of integral membrane proteins that are ubiquitously expressed at the surface of eukaryotic cells. TSPs mediate a range of processes at the surface of the plasma membrane by providing a scaffold for the assembly of protein complexes known as tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs). We report here the structure of the surface-exposed EC2 domain from Sm-TSP-2, a TSP from Schistosoma mansoni and one of the better prospects for the development of a vaccine against schistosomiasis. This is the first solution structure of this domain, and our investigations of its interactions with lipid micelles provide a general model for interactions between TSPs, membranes, and other proteins. Using chemical cross-linking, eight potential protein constituents of Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs were also identified. These include proteins important for membrane maintenance and repair, providing further evidence for the functional role of Sm-TSP-2- and Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs. The identification of calpain, Sm29, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, themselves potential vaccine antigens, suggests that the Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs could be disrupted via multiple targets. The identification of further Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEM proteins increases the available candidates for multiplex vaccines and/or novel drugs targeting TEMs in the schistosome tegument.

  16. Tuning SERS for living erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda; Parshina, E.Y.; Khabanova, V.V.

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a unique technique to study submembrane hemoglobin (Hbsm) in erythrocytes. We report the detailed design of SERS experiments on living erythrocytes to estimate dependence of the enhancemen t factor for main Raman bands of Hbsm on silver nanoparticle (Ag......NP) properties. We demonstrate that the enhancement factor for 4/A1g, 10/B1g and A2g Raman bands of Hbsm varies from 105 to 107 under proposed experimental conditions with 473 nm laser excitation. For the first time we show that the enhancement of Raman scattering increases with the increase in the relative...... between small AgNPs and Hbsm and, consequently, leads to the higher enhancement of Raman scattering of Hbsm. The enhancement of higher wavenumber bands 10/B1g and A2g is more sensitive to AgNPs' size and the relative amount of small AgNPs than the enhancement of the lower wavenumber band 4/A1g. This can...

  17. Invasion of erythrocytes by Babesia bovis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaffar, Fasila Razzia

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the invasion of erythrocytes taking place during the asexual erythrocytic blood stage of the apicomplexan parasites Babesia bovis parasite. Host cell invasion by apicomplexan parasites is a complex process requiring multiple receptor-ligand interactions, involving

  18. Enzymatic assay for methotrexate in erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H; Heinsvig, E M

    1985-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) accumulates in erythrocytes in MTX-treated patients. We present a modified enzymatic assay measuring MTX concentrations between 10 and 60 nmol/l in erythrocytes, adapted for a centrifugal analyser (Cobas Bio). About 40 patient's samples could be analysed within 1 h. The detection...

  19. Molecular mechanisms of erythrocyte photo-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, W.T.; Souza, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    The role of singlet oxygen and the lipid peroxidation of erythrocyte membrane are studied. The irradiation of erythrocytes with visible light in the presence of a photodynamic mediator (toluidine blue) is reported. A system of light application by optical fiber, connected to a catheter is suggested for local instillation of the photosensitizing agent. (M.A.C.) [pt

  20. Detection and quantification of Duffy antigen on bovine red blood cell membranes using a polyclonal antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa B.F. Antonangelo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Babesiosis is one of the most important diseases affecting livestock agriculture worldwide. Animals from the subspecies Bos taurus indicus are more resistant to babesiosis than those from Bos taurus taurus. The genera Babesia and Plasmodium are Apicomplexa hemoparasites and share features such as invasion of red blood cells (RBC. The glycoprotein Duffy is the only human erythrocyte receptor for Pasmodium vivax and a mutation which abolishes expression of this glycoprotein on erythrocyte surfaces is responsible for making the majority of people originating from the indigenous populations of West Africa resistant to P. vivax. The current work detected and quantified the Duffy antigen on Bos taurus indicus and Bos taurus taurus erythrocyte surfaces using a polyclonal antibody in order to investigate if differences in susceptibility to Babesia are due to different levels of Duffy antigen expression on the RBCs of these animals, as is known to be the case in human beings for interactions of Plasmodium vivax-Duffy antigen. ELISA tests showed that the antibody that was raised against Duffy antigens detected the presence of Duffy antigen in both subspecies and that the amount of this antigen on those erythrocyte membranes was similar. These results indicate that the greater resistance of B. taurus indicus to babesiosis cannot be explained by the absence or lower expression of Duffy antigen on RBC surfaces.

  1. DEA 1 Expression on Dog Erythrocytes Analyzed by Immunochromatographic and Flow Cytometric Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Acierno, M.M.; Raj, K.; Giger, U.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA) 1 blood group system was thought to contain types DEA 1.1 and 1.2 (and possibly 1.3 [A3]). However, DEA 1.2+ dogs are very rare and newer typing methods reveal varying degrees of DEA 1 positivity. Objectives To assess if variation in DEA 1 positivity is because of quantitative differences in surface antigen expression. To determine expression patterns in dogs over time and effects of blood storage (4?C). To evaluate DEA 1.2+ samples by DEA 1 typing...

  2. Parasites causing cerebral falciparum malaria bind multiple endothelial receptors and express EPCR and ICAM-1-binding PfEMP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuikue Ndam, Nicaise; Moussiliou, Azizath; Lavstsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background: Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) mediates the binding and accumulation of infected erythrocytes (IE) to blood vessels and tissues. Specific interactions have been described between PfEMP1 and human endothelial proteins CD36, intercellular adhesion molecule-1...

  3. Dual fluorescence labeling of surface-exposed and internal proteins in erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Dominique C; Sowa, Kordai M P; Arnot, David E

    2008-01-01

    There is a need for improved methods for in situ localization of surface proteins on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to help understand how these antigens are trafficked to, and positioned within, the host cell membrane. This protocol for confocal immunofluorescence microscopy combines...... and permeabilization; indirect labeling of the internal antigen using a secondary antibody tagged with a spectrally distinct fluorescent dye; and detection of the differentially labeled antigens using a laser scanning confocal microscope. The protocol can be completed in approximately 7 h. Although the protocol...... surface antigen labeling on live cells with subsequent fixation and permeabilization, which enables antibodies to penetrate the cell and label internal antigens. The key steps of the protocol are as follows: indirect labeling of the surface antigen using a fluorescently tagged secondary antibody; fixation...

  4. Interaction of lectins with membrane receptors on erythrocyte surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, L A; Kabat, E A; Chien, S

    1985-08-01

    The interactions of human genotype AO erythrocytes (red blood cells) (RBCs) with N-acetylgalactosamine-reactive lectins isolated from Helix pomatia (HPA) and from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) were studied. Binding curves obtained with the use of tritium-labeled lectins showed that the maximal numbers of lectin molecules capable of binding to human genotype AO RBCs were 3.8 X 10(5) and 2.7 X 10(5) molecules/RBC for HPA and DBA, respectively. The binding of one type of lectin may influence the binding of another type. HPA was found to inhibit the binding of DBA, but not vice versa. The binding of HPA was weakly inhibited by a beta-D-galactose-reactive lectin isolated from Ricinus communis (designated RCA1). Limulus polyphemus lectin (LPA), with specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, did not influence the binding of HPA but enhanced the binding of DBA. About 80% of LPA receptors (N-acetylneuraminic acid) were removed from RBC surfaces by neuraminidase treatment. Neuraminidase treatment of RBCs resulted in increases of binding of both HPA and DBA, but through different mechanisms. An equal number (7.6 X 10(5) of new HPA sites were generated on genotypes AO and OO RBCs by neuraminidase treatment, and these new sites accounted for the enhancement (AO cells) and appearance (OO cells) of hemagglutinability by HPA. Neuraminidase treatment did not generate new DBA sites, but increased the DBA affinity for the existing receptors; as a result, genotype AO cells increased their hemagglutinability by DBA, while OO cells remained unagglutinable. The use of RBCs of different genotypes in binding assays with 3H-labeled lectins of known specificities provides an experimental system for studying cell-cell recognition and association.

  5. Blood group antigen studies using CdTe quantum dots and flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabral Filho PE

    2015-07-01

    , this methodology with high sensibility and specificity can be applied to study a variety of RBC antigens, and, as a quantitative tool, can help in achieving a better comprehension of the antigen expression patterns on RBC membranes. Keywords: erythrocytes, nanoparticles, ABO antigens, carbohydrates, covalent binding

  6. Elevated insulin and reduced insulin like growth factor binding protein-3/prostate specific antigen ratio with increase in prostate size in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasulu, Karli; Nandeesha, Hanumanthappa; Dorairajan, Lalgudi Narayanan; Rajappa, Medha; Vinayagam, Vickneshwaran

    2017-06-01

    Insulin and insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) have growth promoting effects, while insulin like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) has growth inhibitory effects. The present study was designed to assess the concentrations of insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and their association with prostate size in patients with BPH. Ninety 90 BPH cases and 90 controls were enrolled in the study. Insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3, PSA, testosterone and estradiol were estimated in both the groups. Insulin, IGF-1 and estradiol were increased and IGFBP-3/PSA was decreased in BPH cases when compared with controls. Insulin (r=0.64, p=0.001) and IGF-1 (r=0.22, p=0.03) were positively correlated and IGFBP-3/PSA (r=-0.316, p=0.002) were negatively correlated with prostate size in BPH. Multivariate analysis showed that insulin (p=0.001) and IGFBP-3/PSA (p=0.004) predicts the prostate size in patients with BPH. Insulin was increased and IGFBP-3/PSA was reduced in BPH patients with increased prostate size. At a cutoff concentration of 527.52, IGFBP-3/PSA ratio was found to differentiate benign growth of prostate from normal prostate with 96% sensitivity and 96% specificity. Insulin is elevated and IGFBP-3/PSA is reduced with increase prostate size in BPH cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced effect of BCG vaccine against pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice with lung Th17 response to mycobacterial heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Masayuki; Shinjo, Kikuko; Umemura, Masayuki; Shigeno, Satoko; Harakuni, Tetsuya; Arakawa, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Goro

    2015-12-01

    Although the BCG vaccine can prevent tuberculosis (TB) in infants, its ability to prevent adult pulmonary TB is reportedly limited. Therefore, development of a novel effective vaccine against pulmonary TB has become an international research priority. We have previously reported that intranasal vaccination of mice with a mycobacterial heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA) plus mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) enhances production of IFN-γ and anti-HBHA antibody and suppresses extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination after intranasal infection with BCG. In the present study, the effects of intranasal HBHA + CT vaccine on murine pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection were examined. Intranasal HBHA + CT vaccination alone failed to reduce the bacterial burden in the infected lung. However, a combination vaccine consisting of s.c. BCG priming and an intranasal HBHA + CT booster significantly enhanced protective immunity against pulmonary Mtb infection on day 14 compared with BCG vaccine alone. Further, it was found that intranasal HBHA + CT vaccine enhanced not only IFN-γ but also IL-17A production by HBHA-specific T cells in the lung after pulmonary Mtb infection. Therefore, this combination vaccine may be a good candidate for a new vaccine strategy against pulmonary TB. © 2015 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. The antigen-binding fragment of human gamma immunoglobulin prevents amyloid β-peptide folding into β-sheet to form oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Comamala, Victòria; Guivernau, Biuse; Bonet, Jaume; Puig, Marta; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Palomer, Ernest; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Altafaj, Xavier; Tajes, Marta; Puig-Pijoan, Albert; Vicente, Rubén; Oliva, Baldomero; Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (Aβ) plays a leading role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) physiopathology. Even though monomeric forms of Aβ are harmless to cells, Aβ can aggregate into β-sheet oligomers and fibrils, which are both neurotoxic. Therefore, one of the main therapeutic approaches to cure or delay AD onset and progression is targeting Aβ aggregation. In the present study, we show that a pool of human gamma immunoglobulins (IgG) protected cortical neurons from the challenge with Aβ oligomers, as assayed by MTT reduction, caspase-3 activation and cytoskeleton integrity. In addition, we report the inhibitory effect of IgG on Aβ aggregation, as shown by Thioflavin T assay, size exclusion chromatography and atomic force microscopy. Similar results were obtained with Palivizumab, a human anti-sincitial virus antibody. In order to dissect the important domains, we cleaved the pool of human IgG with papain to obtain Fab and Fc fragments. Using these cleaved fragments, we functionally identified Fab as the immunoglobulin fragment inhibiting Aβ aggregation, a result that was further confirmed by an in silico structural model. Interestingly, bioinformatic tools show a highly conserved structure able to bind amyloid in the Fab region. Overall, our data strongly support the inhibitory effect of human IgG on Aβ aggregation and its neuroprotective role. PMID:28467807

  9. The solvent at antigen-binding site regulated C3d-CR2 interactions through the C-terminal tail of C3d at different ion strengths: insights from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Jingjing; Li, Lanlan; Liu, Xuewei; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Huanxiang

    2016-10-01

    The interactions of complement receptor 2 (CR2) and the degradation fragment C3d of complement component C3 play important links between the innate and adaptive immune systems. Due to the importance of C3d-CR2 interaction in the design of vaccines and inhibitors, a number of studies have been performed to investigate C3d-CR2 interaction. Many studies have indicated C3d-CR2 interactions are ionic strength-dependent. To investigate the molecular mechanism of C3d-CR2 interaction and the origin of effects of ionic strength, molecular dynamics simulations for C3d-CR2 complex together with the energetic and structural analysis were performed. Our results revealed the increased interactions between charged protein and ions weaken C3d-CR2 association, as ionic strengths increase. Moreover, ion strengths have similar effects on antigen-binding site and CR2 binding site. Meanwhile, Ala17 and Gln20 will transform between the activated and non-activated states mediated by His133 and Glu135 at different ion strengths. Our results reveal the origins of the effects of ionic strengths on C3d-CR2 interactions are due to the changes of water, ion occupancies and distributions. This study uncovers the origin of the effect of ionic strength on C3d-CR2 interaction and deepens the understanding of the molecular mechanism of their interaction, which is valuable for the design of vaccines and small molecule inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Induction of transient radioresistance in human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krokosz, Anita; Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia

    2006-01-01

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%), were irradiated with γ-rays with single and split doses under air or N 2 O in order to determine the physicochemical changes caused by the dose inducing an increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. The obtained results showed that under the applied irradiation conditions, the dose of 0.4 kGy induced changes in erythrocytes, which were responsible for temporary resistance of erythrocytes to hemolysis. We concluded that the observed resistance is caused mainly by the structural changes in proteins

  11. A Role of Sp1 Binding Motifs in Basal and Large T-Antigen-Induced Promoter Activities of Human Polyomavirus HPyV9 and Its Variant UF-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Moens

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9 was originally detected in the serum of a renal transplant patient. Seroepidemiological studies showed that ~20–50% of the human population have antibodies against this virus. HPyV9 has not yet been associated with any disease and little is known about the route of infection, transmission, host cell tropism, and genomic variability in circulating strains. Recently, the HPyV9 variant UF-1 with an eight base-pair deletion, a thirteen base-pair insertion and with point mutations, creating three putative Sp1 binding sites in the late promoter was isolated from an AIDS patient. Transient transfection studies with a luciferase reporter plasmid driven by HPyV9 or UF1 promoter demonstrated that UF1 early and late promoters were stronger than HPyV9 promoters in most cell lines, and that the UF1 late promoter was more potently activated by HPyV9 large T-antigen (LTAg. Mutation of two Sp1 motifs strongly reduced trans-activation of the late UF1 promoter by HPyV9 LTAg in HeLa cells. In conclusion, the mutations in the UF1 late promoter seem to strengthen its activity and its response to stimulation by HPyV9 LTAg in certain cells. It remains to be investigated whether these promoter changes have an influence on virus replication and affect the possible pathogenic properties of the virus.

  12. Analysis of IgG with specificity for variant surface antigens expressed by placental Plasmodium falciparum isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kremsner Peter G

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM is caused by Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that can sequester in placental intervillous space by expressing particular variant surface antigens (VSA that can mediate adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA in vitro. IgG antibodies with specificity for the VSA expressed by these parasites (VSAPAM are associated with protection from maternal anaemia, prematurity and low birth weight, which is the greatest risk factor for death in the first month of life. Methods In this study, the development of anti-VSAPAM antibodies in a group of 151 women who presented to the maternity ward of Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon for delivery was analysed using flow cytometry assays. Plasma samples from placenta infected primiparous women were also investigated for their capacity to inhibit parasite binding to CSA in vitro. Results In the study cohort, primiparous as well as secundiparous women had the greatest risk of infection at delivery as well as during pregnancy. Primiparous women with infected placentas at delivery showed higher levels of VSAPAM-specific IgG compared to women who had no malaria infections at delivery. Placental isolates of Gabonese and Senegalese origin tested on plasma samples from Gabon showed parity dependency and gender specificity patterns. There was a significant correlation of plasma reactivity as measured by flow cytometry between different placental isolates. In the plasma of infected primiparous women, VSAPAM-specific IgG measured by flow cytometry could be correlated with anti-adhesion antibodies measured by the inhibition of CSA binding. Conclusion Recognition of placental parasites shows a parity- and sex- dependent pattern, like that previously observed in laboratory strains selected to bind to CSA. Placental infections at delivery in primiparous women appear to be sufficient to induce functional antibodies which can both recognize the surface of

  13. Breakdown of Phosphatidylserine Asymmetry Following Treatment of Erythrocytes with Lumefantrine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousi Alzoubi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumefantrine, a commonly used antimalarial drug, inhibits hemozoin formation in parasites. Several other antimalarial substances counteract parasitemia by triggering suicidal death or eryptosis of infected erythrocytes. Eryptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling leading to phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Signaling involved in eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, formation of ceramide, oxidative stress and/or activation of p38 kinase, protein kinase C (PKC, or caspases. The present study explored, whether lumefantrine stimulates eryptosis. Methods: Cell volume has been estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin V binding, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, reactive oxygen species from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein-diacetate fluorescence, content of reduced glutathione (GSH from mercury orange fluorescence, and ceramide abundance from binding of fluorescent antibodies in flow cytometry. Results: A 48 h exposure to lumefantrine (3 µg/mL was followed by a significant increase of annexin-V-binding without significantly altering forward scatter, [Ca2+]i, ROS formation, reduced GSH, or ceramide abundance. The annexin-V-binding following lumefantrine treatment was not significantly modified by p38 kinase inhibitors SB203580 (2 μM and p38 Inh III (1 μM, PKC inhibitor staurosporine (1 µM or pancaspase inhibitor zVAD (1 or 10 µM. Conclusions: Lumefantrine triggers cell membrane scrambling, an effect independent from entry of extracellular Ca2+, ceramide formation, ROS formation, glutathione content, p38 kinase, PKC or caspases.

  14.  Oxidative stress modulates the organization of erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Olszewska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  Background:Apart from their main role in transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide, erythrocytes play also an important role in organism antioxidative defence. Direct exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS results in shortening of their half-life, even by 50�20The presence of glucose, being the substrate in pentose phosphate pathway (PPP cycle, is one of the factors that can have influence on the level of oxidative stress. The activity of PPP increases during oxidative stress. Glucose guarantees normal PPP functioning with the production of reductive equivalents in the amounts necessary to reproduction of glutathione – nonenzymatic free radical scavenger. In available literature there are no reports regarding the changes in protein contents of erythrocyte cytoskeleton exposed to t-butyl hydroperoxide in relation to glucose presence in incubation medium.Material/methods:Erythrocytes taken from 10 healthy subjects were used to assess the influence of generated free radicals on erythrocyte proteins and chosen parameters of oxidative stress. Erythrocytes were incubated in the solutions containing deferent concentrations of t-butyl hydroperoxide and glucose. Electrophoresis was performed on polyacrylamide gel in denaturating conditions. The contents of tryptophan in membranes was evaluated spectrofluorometrically.Results/conclusions:In vitro conditions oxidative stress leads to protein damage in erythrocyte cytoskeleton, both in proteins inside the cell as well as having contact with extracellular environment. In consequence, the amount of low-molecular proteins – mainly globin, which bind to cytoskeleton, increases. This process takes place independently of glucose presence in incubation medium. One of the element of protein cytoskeleton, tryptophan, also undergoes degradation. The decrease of its contents is higher during erythrocyte exposure to t-BOOH in environment containing glucose, what can suggest prooxidative influence of glucose in

  15. Inhibition of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Indirubin-3’-Monoxime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqiu Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Qing Dai is a prized traditional Chinese medicine whose major component, indirubin, and its derivative, indirubin-3’-monoxime (IDM, have inhibitory effects on the growth of many human tumor cells and pronounced anti-leukemic activities. However, the effects of IDM on mature human erythrocytes are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the potential impact of IDM on erythrocytes and the mechanisms underlying that impact. Methods: Utilizing flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC. The relative cell size, expressed in arbitrary units, was evaluated by forward scatter in a flow cytometer. Fluo-3 fluorescence was used to bewrite changes in cytosolic Ca2+ activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS formation was assessed by 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA fluorescence, and ceramide abundance was evaluated by FITC-conjugated specific antibodies. Results: The 24-h exposure of human erythrocytes to IDM (12 µM significantly decreased the percentage of annexin V-binding erythrocytes and the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i. IDM (3-12 µM did not significantly modify the ceramide level or DCFH-DA fluorescence. Energy depletion (removal of glucose for 24 hours significantly increased annexin V binding and Fluo-3 fluorescence and diminished forward scatter, and these effects were significantly mitigated by IDM (12 µM. Moreover, the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM, 60 min and oxidative stress (30 min exposure to 0.05 mM tert-butyl hydroperoxide, t-BHP similarly triggered eryptosis, which was also significantly suppressed by IDM. Conclusions: IDM is a novel inhibitor of suicidal erythrocyte death following ionomycin treatment, t-BHP treatment and energy depletion. Thus, IDM may counteract anemia and impairment of microcirculation, at least in part, by inhibition of Ca2+ entry into erythrocytes.

  16. Estimation of vascular spaces using radiolabeled erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasseri, K.

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of vascular volume is important in many physiological and pathological studies. For isolated organ preparations, this is usually performed using normal erythrocytes (red blood cell; RBC) and in the whole body studies, labeled RBCs are used. The aim of the present project was to compare the two methods in model organ (the liver) in terms of sensitivity and packed RBCs are suspended in normal saline. 100 u l aliquot is injected into the portal vein of rat. The outflow samples collected, hemo lysed and measured by colorimeter. In the second method, the packed RBCs are incubated with Cr-sodium and then resuspended in normal saline. A bolus of labelled RBCs with known activity is injected into portal vein of rats and the outflow activity is determined by gamma spectrometry. The extend of Cr binding to RBCs was investigated; in all experiments less than 2% of the total radioactivity after washing was extra cellular. Both methods were tested in 30 preparations. The normalized frequency outflow profiles of RBCs counted by two methods were then compared. The standard curves of the two methods were also obtained and the correlation was compared. The shape of the curves and calculated vascular volume obtained from the two methods were similar. A good correlation was observed between the methods of measurement of RBCs. The results indicated the second method is more precise and sensitive to low grade changes while the first method is quicker and better preserves RBCs than the second method. Theses advantages, together with safety considerations, favour the first method when it is applicable

  17. Evidence for coordinate genetic control of Na,K pump density in erythrocytes and lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuise, M.; Flier, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The erythrocyte is widely used as a model cell for studies of the Na,K pump in health and disease. However, little is known about the factors that control the number of Na,K pumps expressed on the erythrocytes of a given individual, nor about the extent to which erythrocytes can be used to validly assess the pump density on other cell types. In this report, the authors have compared the interindividual variance of Na,K pump density in erythrocytes of unrelated individuals to that seen with identical twins. Unlike unrelated individuals, in whom pump parameters, i.e., ouabain binding sites, 86 Rb uptake, and cell Na concentration vary widely, identical twin pairs showed no significant intrapair variation for these values. Thus, a role for genetic factors is suggested. In addition, the authors established and validated a method for determining Na,K pump density and pump-mediated 86 Rb uptake in human peripheral lymphocytes. Using this method, they show that whereas Na,K pump density differs markedly between erythrocytes (mean of 285 sites per cell) and lymphocytes (mean 40,600 sites per cell), there is a strong and highly significant correlation (r = 0.79, P less than 0.001) between the pump density in these cell types in any given individual. Taken together, these studies suggest that genetic factors are important determinants of Na,K pump expression, and that pump density appears to be coordinately regulated in two cell types in healthy individuals

  18. Quinones: reactions with hemoglobin, effects within erythrocytes and potential for antimalarial development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denny, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this research was to characterize the interactions of some simple quinone like compounds with purified hemoglobin and to study the effects of these compounds within erythrocytes. It is proposed that these sorts of agents can have an antimalarial effect. The simplest compounds chosen for study were benzoquinone, methylquinone (toluquinone) and hydroquinone. When 14 C-quinone was reacted with purified hemoglobin (Hb) there was rapid binding of the first two moles of substrate per Hb molecule. An unusual property of the modified Hb's is that in the presence of a redox sensitive agent such as cytochrome c they are capable of generating superoxide anions. Within erythrocytes, quinone and toluquinone which differ only by a single methyl group have completely different effects. Toluquinone causes the cells to hemolyse and the effect was enhanced when the erythrocyte superoxide dismutase was inhibited; the effect was diminished when scavengers of activated oxygen such as histidine, mannitol and vital E were present. Benzoquinone on the other hand did not cause the cells to hemolyse and instead appeared to protect the cells from certain hemolytic stresses. Growth of malaria parasites in erythrocytes has been shown to be inhibited by activated forms of oxygen, also some quinone like agents in the past have been shown to inhibit the parasite's metabolism. An initial experiment with erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites showed that quinone and toluquinone could both inhibit the growth rate of parasites

  19. Molecular insights into the interaction between Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 and an invasion-inhibitory peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geqing Wang

    Full Text Available Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1 of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been implicated in invasion of the host erythrocyte. It interacts with malarial rhoptry neck (RON proteins in the moving junction that forms between the host cell and the invading parasite. Agents that block this interaction inhibit invasion and may serve as promising leads for anti-malarial drug development. The invasion-inhibitory peptide R1 binds to a hydrophobic cleft on AMA1, which is an attractive target site for small molecules that block parasite invasion. In this work, truncation and mutational analyses show that Phe5-Phe9, Phe12 and Arg15 in R1 are the most important residues for high affinity binding to AMA1. These residues interact with two well-defined binding hot spots on AMA1. Computational solvent mapping reveals that one of these hot spots is suitable for small molecule targeting. We also confirm that R1 in solution binds to AMA1 with 1:1 stoichiometry and adopts a secondary structure consistent with the major form of R1 observed in the crystal structure of the complex. Our results provide a basis for designing high affinity inhibitors of the AMA1-RON2 interaction.

  20. Adenosine deaminase activity of erythrocytes in hyperuricemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, W.; Richter, V.; Beenken, O.; Weinhold, D.; Hirschberg, K.; Rotzsch, W.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Leipzig. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung)

    1982-01-01

    Erythrocytic adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was determined in 55 patients with primary hyperuricemia and in 37 healthy control persons. Unlike the controls, the ADA activity in the patient group showed a two-peak response. Hyperuricemia patients with high ADA activity also exhibited increased uric acid excretion and elevated 15 N incorporation into uric acid. High activity values of erythrocytic ADA can be interpreted as an uric acid overproduction, giving hints for a therapeutic plan. (author)

  1. Immunity to tumour antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Geng; Ali, Selman A; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Mian, Shahid; Ahmad, Murrium; Miles, Amanda; Rees, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade, a large number of human tumour antigens have been identified. These antigens are classified as tumour-specific shared antigens, tissue-specific differentiation antigens, overexpressed antigens, tumour antigens resulting from mutations, viral antigens and fusion proteins. Antigens recognised by effectors of immune system are potential targets for antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. However, most tumour antigens are self-proteins and are generally of low immunogenicity and the immune response elicited towards these tumour antigens is not always effective. Strategies to induce and enhance the tumour antigen-specific response are needed. This review will summarise the approaches to discovery of tumour antigens, the current status of tumour antigens, and their potential application to cancer treatment.

  2. Studies on antigenic competition. Efforts to identify the cellular basis of competition using a cell transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArthur, W.P.; Siskind, G.W.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1974-01-01

    Antigenic competition was studied in a cell transfer system. The effect of reconstituting lethally irradiated mice with various numbers of thymus or bone marrow cells on the extent of antigenic competition was evaluated. Brucella or burro erythrocytes both caused inhibition of the immune response (Plaque-forming cell) to sheep erythrocytes when given two days prior to the test antigen. Varying the dose of thymus cells, or of bone marrow cells did not alter the degree of competition. Competition was observed even when the competing antigen was injected with bone marrow cells alone two days before the test antigen and thymus cells. The results suggest that mechanisms other than T-cell activation alone must be considered as operative in some models of antigenic competition

  3. Altitude Acclimatization and Blood Volume: Effects of Exogenous Erythrocyte Volume Expansion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sawka, M

    1996-01-01

    ...: (a) altitude acclimatization effects on erythrocyte volume and plasma volume; (b) if exogenous erythrocyte volume expansion alters subsequent erythrocyte volume and plasma volume adaptations; (c...

  4. Endogenous sphingomyelin segregates into submicrometric domains in the living erythrocyte membrane[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carquin, Mélanie; Pollet, Hélène; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Cominelli, Antoine; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N’kuli, Francisca; Emonard, Hervé; Henriet, Patrick; Mizuno, Hideaki; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that trace insertion of exogenous fluorescent (green BODIPY) analogs of sphingomyelin (SM) into living red blood cells (RBCs), partially spread onto coverslips, labels submicrometric domains, visible by confocal microscopy. We here extend this feature to endogenous SM, upon binding of a SM-specific nontoxic (NT) fragment of the earthworm toxin, lysenin, fused to the red monomeric fluorescent protein, mCherry [construct named His-mCherry-NT-lysenin (lysenin*)]. Specificity of lysenin* binding was verified with composition-defined liposomes and by loss of 125I-lysenin* binding to erythrocytes upon SM depletion by SMase. The 125I-lysenin* binding isotherm indicated saturation at 3.5 × 106 molecules/RBC, i.e., ∼3% of SM coverage. Nonsaturating lysenin* concentration also labeled sub­micrometric domains on the plasma membrane of partially spread erythrocytes, colocalizing with inserted green BODIPY-SM, and abrogated by SMase. Lysenin*-labeled domains were stable in time and space and were regulated by temperature and cholesterol. The abundance, size, positioning, and segregation of lysenin*-labeled domains from other lipids (BODIPY-phosphatidylcholine or -glycosphingolipids) depended on membrane tension. Similar lysenin*-labeled domains were evidenced in RBCs gently suspended in 3D-gel. Taken together, these data demonstrate submicrometric compartmentation of endogenous SM at the membrane of a living cell in vitro, and suggest it may be a genuine feature of erythrocytes in vivo. PMID:24826836

  5. Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins Play an Essential Role in Signalling and Activation of Invasion into Human Erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Hong Tham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The most severe form of malaria in humans is caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The invasive form of malaria parasites is termed a merozoite and it employs an array of parasite proteins that bind to the host cell to mediate invasion. In Plasmodium falciparum, the erythrocyte binding-like (EBL and reticulocyte binding-like (Rh protein families are responsible for binding to specific erythrocyte receptors for invasion and mediating signalling events that initiate active entry of the malaria parasite. Here we have addressed the role of the cytoplasmic tails of these proteins in activating merozoite invasion after receptor engagement. We show that the cytoplasmic domains of these type 1 membrane proteins are phosphorylated in vitro. Depletion of PfCK2, a kinase implicated to phosphorylate these cytoplasmic tails, blocks P. falciparum invasion of red blood cells. We identify the crucial residues within the PfRh4 cytoplasmic domain that are required for successful parasite invasion. Live cell imaging of merozoites from these transgenic mutants show they attach but do not penetrate erythrocytes implying the PfRh4 cytoplasmic tail conveys signals important for the successful completion of the invasion process.

  6. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus nucleic acid binding proteins BRO-B and BRO-E associate with host T-cell intracellular antigen 1 homologue BmTRN-1 to influence protein synthesis during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Eiji; Muto, Sayaka; Ijiri, Hiroshi; Mori, Hajime

    2015-07-01

    Previous reports have indicated that the Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) nucleic acid binding proteins BRO-B and BRO-E are expressed during the early stage of infection and that the BRO family likely supports the regulation of mRNA; however, no study has directly examined the function of BRO family proteins in virus-permissive cells. Here, we show that BRO-B and BRO-E associate with cellular T-cell intracellular antigen 1 homologue (BmTRN-1), a translational regulator, and other cellular translation-related proteins in silkworm cells during viral infection. We created BM-N cells that expressed BRO-B/E to study molecular interactions between BmTRN-1 and BRO-B/E and how they influenced protein synthesis. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that BmTRN-1 was localized in cytoplasmic foci during BmNPV infection. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed that BmTRN-1 and BRO-B/E were colocalized in the amorphous conspicuous cytoplasmic foci. Reporter gene studies revealed that co-expression of BRO-B/E synergistically led to a significant decrease in protein synthesis from a designed transcript carrying the 5'untranslated region of a cellular mRNA with no significant change of transcript abundance. Additionally, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of BmTRN-1 resulted in a marked inhibition of the ability of BRO-B/E to regulate the transcript. These results suggested that the association of BmTRN-1 with BRO-B/E is responsible for the inhibitory regulation of certain mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level and add an additional mechanism for how baculoviruses control protein synthesis during infection.

  7. HLA-DPβ1 Asp84-Lys69 antigen-binding signature predicts event-free survival in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: results from the MRC UKALL XI childhood ALL trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G M; Wade, R; Hussain, A; Thompson, P; Hann, I; Gibson, B; Eden, T; Richards, S

    2012-07-01

    We previously reported that children in the UKALL XI ALL trial with HLA-DP 1 and -DP 3 supertypes had significantly worse event-free survival (EFS) than children with other DP supertypes. As DP 1 and DP 3 share two of four key antigen-binding amino-acid polymorphisms (aspartic acid84-lysine69), we asked whether Asp84-Lys69 or Asp84 alone were independent prognostic indicators in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We analysed EFS in 798 UKALL XI patients, stratified by Asp84-Lys69 vs non-Asp84-Lys69, for a median follow-up of 12.5 years. Asp84-Lys69 was associated with a significantly worse EFS than non-Asp84-Lys69 (5-year EFS: Asp84-Lys69: 58.8% (95% CI (confidence of interval): 52.7-64.9%); non-Asp84-Lys69: 67.3% (63.4-71.2%); 2P=0.007). Post-relapse EFS was 10% less in Asp84-Lys69 than non-Asp84-Lys69 patients. EFS was significantly worse (P=0.03) and post-relapse EFS marginally worse (P=0.06) in patients with Asp84 compared with Gly84. These results suggest that Asp84-Lys69 predicted adverse EFS in the context of UKALL XI because of Asp84, and may have influenced post-relapse EFS. We speculate that this may be due to the recruitment of Asp84-Lys69-restricted regulatory T cells in the context of this regimen, leading to the re-emergence of residual disease. However, functional and molecular studies of the prognostic value of this and other HLA molecular signatures in other childhood ALL trials are needed.

  8. Biologic significance of receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) as a pivotal regulator of tumor growth through angiogenesis in human uterine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Kenzo; Miyamoto, Shingo; Yamazaki, Ayano; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nakashima, Manabu; Mekada, Eisuke; Wake, Norio

    2007-11-01

    The expression of receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) is related significantly to the overall survival of patients with various cancers. RCAS1 reportedly induces apoptotic cell death in peripheral lymphocytes, which may contribute to the escape of tumor cells from immune surveillance. RCAS1 expression also has been related to tumor invasiveness and size in uterine cervical cancer. To clarify whether RCAS1 exacerbates tumor progression, the authors investigated the association between RCAS1 expression and tumor growth potential. The authors constructed small interfering ribonucleic acid (RNA) (siRNA) to target RCAS1. After transfection of siRNA and the RCAS1-encoding gene, growth of tumor cells was assessed in vitro and in vivo. The correlation between RCAS1 expression and angiogenesis was investigated in the transfected cells and in inoculated tumors from nude mice. In addition, the same association was investigated immunohistochemically with tissue samples from patients with uterine cervical cancer. Knockdown of RCAS1 expression by siRNA significantly suppressed the in vivo growth of SiSo and HOUA tumor cells (P cell growth was not affected significantly. Enhanced RCAS1 expression significantly promoted in vivo growth, but not in vitro growth, of tumors derived from COS-7 cells (P = .0039). Introduction of the RCAS1-encoding gene increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In uterine cervical cancer, RCAS1 expression was associated significantly with VEGF expression (P = .0407) and with microvessel density (P = .0108). RCAS1 may be a pivotal regulator of tumor growth through angiogenesis. Continued exploration of the biologic function of RCAS1 may allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies for uterine cancer.

  9. Lead-Binding Proteins: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey C. Gonick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead-binding proteins are a series of low molecular weight proteins, analogous to metallothionein, which segregate lead in a nontoxic form in several organs (kidney, brain, lung, liver, erythrocyte. Whether the lead-binding proteins in every organ are identical or different remains to be determined. In the erythrocyte, delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD isoforms have commanded the greatest attention as proteins and enzymes that are both inhibitable and inducible by lead. ALAD-2, although it binds lead to a greater degree than ALAD-1, appears to bind lead in a less toxic form. What may be of greater significance is that a low molecular weight lead-binding protein, approximately 10 kDa, appears in the erythrocyte once blood lead exceeds 39 μg/dL and eventually surpasses the lead-binding capacity of ALAD. In brain and kidney of environmentally exposed humans and animals, a cytoplasmic lead-binding protein has been identified as thymosin β4, a 5 kDa protein. In kidney, but not brain, another lead-binding protein has been identified as acyl-CoA binding protein, a 9 kDa protein. Each of these proteins, when coincubated with liver ALAD and titrated with lead, diminishes the inhibition of ALAD by lead, verifying their ability to segregate lead in a nontoxic form.

  10. Quality control of insulin radioreceptor assay for human erythrocytes. Effect of ageing of mono-125I-Tyr-A14-insulin preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marttinen, A.; Pasternack, A.; Koivula, T.; Jokela, H.; Lehtinen, M.

    1984-01-01

    The quality control of insulin radioreceptor assay for human erythrocytes is based on the storage of erythrocyte preparations in Hepes buffer of pH 8.0, containing 10 g/l of albumin and 20 mmol/l of glucose. The change of erythrocytes into spherocytes and crenated cells reduces the apparent number of insulin receptors in a relatively constant way by less than 8% a week after 10 days of storage. At the same time the dissociation constants of the insulin-receptor complex increase rapidly. Thus the use of a preparation must be limited to controlling the determination of the insulin binding sites of erythrocytes, and not to the measurement of the affinities of the receptors. When mono- 125 I-Tyr-A14-insulin gets old, a slow decrease in the insulin binding sites can be measured, but the dissociation constants of the insulin receptor complex are not affected. (author)

  11. Quality control of insulin radioreceptor assay for human erythrocytes. Effect of ageing of mono-/sup 125/I-Tyr-A14-insulin preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marttinen, A; Pasternack, A [Tampere Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Clinical Sciences; Koivula, T; Jokela, H; Lehtinen, M [Tampere Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Clinical Chemistry

    1984-09-01

    The quality control of insulin radioreceptor assay for human erythrocytes is based on the storage of erythrocyte preparations in Hepes buffer of pH 8.0, containing 10 g/l of albumin and 20 mmol/l of glucose. The change of erythrocytes into spherocytes and crenated cells reduces the apparent number of insulin receptors in a relatively constant way by less than 8% a week after 10 days of storage. At the same time the dissociation constants of the insulin-receptor complex increase rapidly. Thus the use of a preparation must be limited to controlling the determination of the insulin binding sites of erythrocytes, and not to the measurement of the affinities of the receptors. When mono-/sup 125/I-Tyr-A14-insulin gets old, a slow decrease in the insulin binding sites can be measured, but the dissociation constants of the insulin receptor complex are not affected.

  12. Altered erythrocyte Na-K pump in anorectic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquali, R.; Strocchi, E.; Malini, P.; Casimirri, F.; Ambrosioni, E.; Melchionda, N.; Labo, G.

    1985-01-01

    The status of the erythrocyte sodium pump was evaluated in a group of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa and a group of healthy female control subjects. Anorectic patients showed significantly higher mean values of digoxin-binding sites/cell (ie, the number of Na-K-ATPase units) with respect to control subjects while no differences were found in the specific 86 Rb uptake (which reflects the Na-K-ATPase activity) between the two groups. A significant correlation was found between relative weight and the number of Na-K-ATPase pump units (r = -0.66; P less than 0.0001). Anorectic patients showed lower serum T3 concentrations (71.3 +/- 53 ng/dL) with respect to control subjects (100.8 +/- 4.7 ng/dL; P less than 0.0005) and a significant negative correlation between T3 levels and the number of pump units (r = -0.52; P less than 0.003) was found. This study therefore shows that the erythrocyte Na-K pump may be altered in several anorectic patients. The authors suggest that this feature could be interrelated with the degree of underweight and/or malnutrition

  13. Altered erythrocyte Na-K pump in anorectic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquali, R.; Strocchi, E.; Malini, P.; Casimirri, F.; Ambrosioni, E.; Melchionda, N.; Labo, G.

    1985-07-01

    The status of the erythrocyte sodium pump was evaluated in a group of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa and a group of healthy female control subjects. Anorectic patients showed significantly higher mean values of digoxin-binding sites/cell (ie, the number of Na-K-ATPase units) with respect to control subjects while no differences were found in the specific /sup 86/Rb uptake (which reflects the Na-K-ATPase activity) between the two groups. A significant correlation was found between relative weight and the number of Na-K-ATPase pump units (r = -0.66; P less than 0.0001). Anorectic patients showed lower serum T3 concentrations (71.3 +/- 53 ng/dL) with respect to control subjects (100.8 +/- 4.7 ng/dL; P less than 0.0005) and a significant negative correlation between T3 levels and the number of pump units (r = -0.52; P less than 0.003) was found. This study therefore shows that the erythrocyte Na-K pump may be altered in several anorectic patients. The authors suggest that this feature could be interrelated with the degree of underweight and/or malnutrition.

  14. Lectin binding patterns and immunohistochemical antigen detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... placenta and lungs of Brucella abortus-bovine infected fetuses. María Andrea ... The present lectin histochemical study revealed a distinctive pattern of oligosaccharide .... tissue was used as a positive control and nonimmune.

  15. Polymorphism in the Mr 32,000 Rh protein purified from Rh(D)-positive and -negative erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboori, A.M.; Smith, B.L.; Agre, P.

    1988-01-01

    A M r 32,000 integral membrane protein has previously been identified on erythrocytes bearing the Rh(D) antigen and is thought to contain the antigenic variations responsible for the different Rh phenotypes. To study it on a biochemical level, a simple large-scale method was developed to purify the M r 32,000 Rh protein from multiple units of Rh(D)-positive and -negative blood. Erythrocyte membrane vesicles were solubilized in NaDodSO 4 , and a tracer of immunoprecipitated 125 I surface-labeled Rh protein was added. The Rh protein was purified to homogeneity by hydroxylapatite chromatography followed by preparative NaDodSO 4 /PAGE. Approximately 25 nmol of pure Rh protein was recovered from each unit of Rh(D)-positive and -negative blood. Rh protein purified from both Rh phenotypes appeared similar by one-dimensional NaDodSO 4 /PAGE, and the N-terminal amino acid sequences for the first 20 residues were identical. Rh proteins purified from Rh(D)-positive and -negative blood were compared by two-dimensional iodopeptide mapping after 125 I-labeling and α-chymotrypsin digestion. The peptide maps were very similar. These data indicate that a similar core Rh protein exists in both Rh(D)-positive and -negative erythrocytes, and the Rh proteins from erythrocytes with different Rh phenotypes contain distinct structural polymorphisms

  16. [The physiologic significance of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and changes in its erythrocyte levels in an experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béder, I; Orgonásová, M; Brozman, B; Horecký, J; Mataseje, A

    1990-05-01

    The regulatory effect of 2,3-DPG on oxygen transport and binding to hemoglobin was analyzed. Under conditions of substitution hemodilution by isooncotic 3.4% Rheodextran (Spofa), changes in the content of 2,3-DPG in arterial and venous blood were enzymatically determined over several days. Reference values of 2,3-DPG were obtained in the studied series of dogs (2.05 +/- 0.74 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 in whole blood 4.69 +/- 1.52 x 10(-6) mol.g-1 of erythrocyte volume, and 13.39 +/- 2.82 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 of hemoglobin). In anesthetized animals the content of 2,3-DPG in arterial blood was significantly higher (6.28 +/- 0.84 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 of erythrocyte volume) than in venous blood (6.01 +/- 0.80 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 of erythrocyte volume). At substitution hemodilution the 2,3-DPG content in erythrocytes of venous blood decreased from 5.46 +/- 0.67 to 4.97 +/- 1.31 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 of erythrocyte volume. The subsequent increase to 6.04 +/- 0.71 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 of erythrocyte volume was achieved by nonlinear increase over the following days, at persisting low hemoglobin content in blood.

  17. Carcinoma-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartorelli, A.; Accinni, R.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to novel antigens associated with breast carcinoma, anti-sera specific to said antigens, 125 I-labeled forms of said antigens and methods of detecting said antigens in serum or plasma. The invention also relates to a diagnostic kit containing standardised antigens or antisera or marked forms thereof for the detection of said antigens in human blood, serum or plasma. (author)

  18. Sequential, ordered acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cham, Gerald K K; Turner, Louise; Lusingu, John

    2009-01-01

    The binding of erythrocytes infected with mature blood stage parasites to the vascular bed is key to the pathogenesis of malignant malaria. The binding is mediated by members of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family. PfEMP1s can be divided into groups, and it has pr....... The identification of PfEMP1 domains expressed by parasites causing disease in infants and young children is important for development of vaccines protecting against severe malaria.......The binding of erythrocytes infected with mature blood stage parasites to the vascular bed is key to the pathogenesis of malignant malaria. The binding is mediated by members of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family. PfEMP1s can be divided into groups, and it has...... previously been suggested that parasites expressing group A or B/A PfEMP1s are most pathogenic. To test the hypothesis that the first malaria infections in infants and young children are dominated by parasites expressing A and B/A PfEMP1s, we measured the plasma Ab level against 48 recombinant PfEMP1 domains...

  19. The glycosphingolipid P₁ is an ovarian cancer-associated carbohydrate antigen involved in migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, F; Anugraham, M; Pochechueva, T; Tse, B W C; Alam, S; Guertler, R; Bovin, N V; Fedier, A; Hacker, N F; Huflejt, M E; Packer, N; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, V A

    2014-10-14

    The level of plasma-derived naturally circulating anti-glycan antibodies (AGA) to P1 trisaccharide has previously been shown to significantly discriminate between ovarian cancer patients and healthy women. Here we aim to identify the Ig class that causes this discrimination, to identify on cancer cells the corresponding P1 antigen recognised by circulating anti-P1 antibodies and to shed light into the possible function of this glycosphingolipid. An independent Australian cohort was assessed for the presence of anti-P1 IgG and IgM class antibodies using suspension array. Monoclonal and human derived anti-glycan antibodies were verified using three independent glycan-based immunoassays and flow cytometry-based inhibition assay. The P1 antigen was detected by LC-MS/MS and flow cytometry. FACS-sorted cell lines were studied on the cellular migration by colorimetric assay and real-time measurement using xCELLigence system. Here we show in a second independent cohort (n=155) that the discrimination of cancer patients is mediated by the IgM class of anti-P1 antibodies (P=0.0002). The presence of corresponding antigen P1 and structurally related epitopes in fresh tissue specimens and cultured cancer cells is demonstrated. We further link the antibody and antigen (P1) by showing that human naturally circulating and affinity-purified anti-P1 IgM isolated from patients ascites can bind to naturally expressed P1 on the cell surface of ovarian cancer cells. Cell-sorted IGROV1 was used to obtain two study subpopulations (P1-high, 66.1%; and P1-low, 33.3%) and observed that cells expressing high P1-levels migrate significantly faster than those with low P1-levels. This is the first report showing that P1 antigen, known to be expressed on erythrocytes only, is also present on ovarian cancer cells. This suggests that P1 is a novel tumour-associated carbohydrate antigen recognised by the immune system in patients and may have a role in cell migration. The clinical value of our data

  20. Erythrocyte Membrane Failure by Electromechanical Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Du

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We envision that electrodeformation of biological cells through dielectrophoresis as a new technique to elucidate the mechanistic details underlying membrane failure by electrical and mechanical stresses. Here we demonstrate the full control of cellular uniaxial deformation and tensile recovery in biological cells via amplitude-modified electric field at radio frequency by an interdigitated electrode array in microfluidics. Transient creep and cyclic experiments were performed on individually tracked human erythrocytes. Observations of the viscoelastic-to-viscoplastic deformation behavior and the localized plastic deformations in erythrocyte membranes suggest that electromechanical stress results in irreversible membrane failure. Examples of membrane failure can be separated into different groups according to the loading scenarios: mechanical stiffening, physical damage, morphological transformation from discocyte to echinocyte, and whole cell lysis. These results show that this technique can be potentially utilized to explore membrane failure in erythrocytes affected by other pathophysiological processes.

  1. Influence of styryl dyes on blood erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizomov, Negmat; Barakaeva, Mubaro; Kurtaliev, Eldar N.; Rahimov, Sherzod I.; Khakimova, Dilorom P.; Khodjayev, Gayrat; Yashchuk, Valeriy N.

    2008-08-01

    It was studied the influence of F, Sbt, Sil, Sbo monomer and homodimer Dst-5, Dst-10, Dbt-5, Dbt-10, Dil-10, Dbo-10 styryl dyes on blood erythrocytes of white rats. It was shown that the homodimer styryl dyes Dst-5, Dbt-5 and Dbo-10 decrease the erythrocytes quantity by 1.5-2 times more as compared with monomer dyes Sbt and Sbo. The main cause of dyes different action is the different oxidation degree of intracellular hemoglobin evoked by these dyes. It was established that the observed effects was connected with different penetration of these dyes through membrane of erythrocytes and with interaction of these dyes with albumin localized in membranes of cells.

  2. Cryo scanning electron microscopy of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes as an essential part of their life cycle. While living inside erythrocytes, the parasite remodels the cell's intracellular organization as well as its outer surface. Late trophozoite-stage parasites and schizonts introduce numerous small protrusions...

  3. The role of Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens in protective immunity and vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2010-01-01

    There is substantial immuno-epidemiological evidence that the parasite-encoded, so-called variant surface antigens (VSAs) such as PfEMP1 on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IEs) are important-in some cases probably decisive-determinants of clinical outcome of P. falciparum malaria. The evide...... of VSAs, and how vaccines based on this type of antigens fit into the current global strategy to reduce, eliminate and eventually eradicate the burden of malaria....

  4. Role of erythrocyte tropomodulin in the biomechanics and topology of the erythrocyte membrane skeletal network

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Terrell Ann

    2010-01-01

    The erythrocyte membrane skeleton is a multi-protein complex providing mechanical properties and stability to erythrocytes. Defects in the skeleton can manifest in dysfunction and disease such as hemolytic anemia. Erythrocyte tropomodulin (E-Tmod) is a slow-growing end actin-capping protein and has been proposed that together with tropomyosin 5 or 5b they form a "molecular ruler" which dictates protofilament length of 37 nm in the network. In this study, the role for E-Tmod in the network org...

  5. Paired Chicken and Mammalian Erythrocyte Indicator Systems for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three levels of erythrocytes suspensions, 1.5%, 1% and 0.5% respectively from goat and guinea pig, were compared to conventional 0.5% chicken erythrocytes, in an attempt to investigate the suitability for the two sources of mammalian erythrocytes as indicators for Newcastle disease virus haemagglutination (HA) tests.

  6. Effect of pH on molecular constitution and distribution of hemoglobin in living erythrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Huang, Yao-Xiong; Kang, Li-Li; Wu, Zheng-Jie; Luo, Man

    2010-04-01

    The molecular constitution of in situ hemoglobin (Hb) and their distribution in living erythrocyte were investigated versus pH using the technique of confocal Raman microscopy. Both Raman point spectra and line mapping measurements were performed on living erythrocytes in suspensions with pH values from 4.82 to 9.70. It was found that the Hb inside a living erythrocyte would dissociate into monomer/dimer when the cells are in low and high pH environments. In contrast to the homogeneous distribution of the Hbs in the cells in neutral suspension, there are more Hbs distributing around the cell membrane or binding to the membrane as pH increases. While in low pH, as the cell become spherical, most of the Hbs distribute to the central part of the cell. In summary, our investigation suggests that the variation of the external pH not only brings changes in the morphology and membrane structure of an erythrocyte, but also affects the constitution and distribution of its intracellular Hbs, thereby the flexibility of the cell membrane and the oxygenation ability of the Hb.

  7. Conservation of myeloid surface antigens on primate granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letvin, N L; Todd, R F; Palley, L S; Schlossman, S F; Griffin, J D

    1983-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with myeloid cell surface antigens were used to study evolutionary changes in granulocyte surface antigens from primate species. Certain of these granulocyte membrane antigens are conserved in phylogenetically distant species, indicating the potential functional importance of these structures. The degree of conservation of these antigens reflects the phylogenetic relationship between primate species. Furthermore, species of the same genus show similar patterns of binding to this panel of anti-human myeloid antibodies. This finding of conserved granulocyte surface antigens suggests that non-human primates may provide a model system for exploring uses of monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of human myeloid disorders.

  8. Sickle erythrocytes enhance phenylephrine and histamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sickle erythrocytes enhance phenylephrine and histamine contractions of isolated rabbit carotid arteries. ... enhancement of histamine contractions, compared with phenylephrine (in AS and SS), suggests a possible role for histamine in the increased vascular tone and vaso-occlusive crisis in sickle cell disease.

  9. Baseline Haematology and Erythrocyte Morphological Changes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: This study evaluates the haematological parameters and the observed erythrocytes morphological changes in dogs raised in Ibadan, Oyo State in the south western part of Nigeria. Blood samples were collected from sixty-four apparently healthy dogs. The haematological parameters of the blood samples ...

  10. Erythrocyte seditnentation rate in elderly blacks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract This study inv~tigated the erythrocyte sedimen- tation rate (ESR) in an elderly population with the objective of establishing reference ranges and the diagnostic value of the ESR. Elderly blacks were randomly selected frOIn conununities in the. Orange Free State. ESR determinations were done according to the ...

  11. Sickle erythrocytes enhance phenylephrine and histamine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    the influence of sickle erythrocyte on contractile responses induced by phenylephrine and histamine. ... obtained from subjects of different haemoglobin (Hb) genotypes (AA, AS and SS), under ... the sixth position of the β-chain of the hemoglobin S. Address for ... blood pressure values in sickle cell anaemia subjects as.

  12. Comparative Erythrocytes Osmotic Fragility Test and some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erythrocytes osmotic fragility and haematological parameters of subjects with HbAS (sickle cell trait) and HbSS (sickle cell anaemia) were determined and compared with subjects with HbAA (normal adult haemoglobin), which acted as control. They were divided into three groups of 40 subjects for HbAA, 35 subjects for ...

  13. The Duffy binding protein as a key target for a Plasmodium vivax vaccine: lessons from the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís Nóbrega de Sousa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax infects human erythrocytes through a major pathway that requires interaction between an apical parasite protein, the Duffy binding protein (PvDBP and its receptor on reticulocytes, the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC. The importance of the interaction between PvDBP (region II, DBPII and DARC to P. vivax infection has motivated our malaria research group at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (state of Minas Gerais, Brazil to conduct a number of immunoepidemiological studies to characterise the naturally acquired immunity to PvDBP in populations living in the Amazon rainforest. In this review, we provide an update on the immunology and molecular epidemiology of PvDBP in the Brazilian Amazon - an area of markedly unstable malaria transmission - and compare it with data from other parts of Latin America, as well as Asia and Oceania.

  14. Revealing the sequence and resulting cellular morphology of receptor-ligand interactions during Plasmodium falciparum invasion of erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta E Weiss

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available During blood stage Plasmodium falciparum infection, merozoites invade uninfected erythrocytes via a complex, multistep process involving a series of distinct receptor-ligand binding events. Understanding each element in this process increases the potential to block the parasite's life cycle via drugs or vaccines. To investigate specific receptor-ligand interactions, they were systematically blocked using a combination of genetic deletion, enzymatic receptor cleavage and inhibition of binding via antibodies, peptides and small molecules, and the resulting temporal changes in invasion and morphological effects on erythrocytes were filmed using live cell imaging. Analysis of the videos have shown receptor-ligand interactions occur in the following sequence with the following cellular morphologies; 1 an early heparin-blockable interaction which weakly deforms the erythrocyte, 2 EBA and PfRh ligands which strongly deform the erythrocyte, a process dependant on the merozoite's actin-myosin motor, 3 a PfRh5-basigin binding step which results in a pore or opening between parasite and host through which it appears small molecules and possibly invasion components can flow and 4 an AMA1-RON2 interaction that mediates tight junction formation, which acts as an anchor point for internalization. In addition to enhancing general knowledge of apicomplexan biology, this work provides a rational basis to combine sequentially acting merozoite vaccine candidates in a single multi-receptor-blocking vaccine.

  15. Conjugated Bilirubin Triggers Anemia by Inducing Erythrocyte Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca2+ influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Conclusion: Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. (Hepatology 2015;61:275–284) PMID:25065608

  16. Determination of CFTR densities in erythrocyte plasma membranes using recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebner, Andreas; Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Nikova, Dessy; Lange, Tobias; Bruns, Reimer; Oberleithner, Hans; Schillers, Hermann [Institute of Physiology II, University of Muenster, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Haeberle, Johannes; Falk, Sabine; Duebbers, Angelika [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals of Muenster, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)], E-mail: schille@uni-muenster.de

    2008-09-24

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl{sup -}) channel that plays an important role in salt and fluid movement across epithelia. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR. The most predominant mutation, F508del, disturbs CFTR protein trafficking, resulting in a reduced number of CFTR in the plasma membrane. Recent studies indicate that CFTR is not only found in epithelia but also in human erythrocytes. Although considerable attempts have been made to quantify CFTR in cells, conclusions on numbers of CFTR molecules localized in the plasma membrane have been drawn indirectly. AFM has the power to provide the needed information, since both sub-molecular spatial resolution and direct protein recognition via antibody-antigen interaction can be observed. We performed a quantification study of the CFTR copies in erythrocyte membranes at the single molecule level, and compared the difference between healthy donors and CF patients. We detected that the number of CFTR molecules is reduced by 70% in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients.

  17. Determination of CFTR densities in erythrocyte plasma membranes using recognition imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebner, Andreas; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Nikova, Dessy; Lange, Tobias; Bruns, Reimer; Oberleithner, Hans; Schillers, Hermann; Haeberle, Johannes; Falk, Sabine; Duebbers, Angelika

    2008-01-01

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl - ) channel that plays an important role in salt and fluid movement across epithelia. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR. The most predominant mutation, F508del, disturbs CFTR protein trafficking, resulting in a reduced number of CFTR in the plasma membrane. Recent studies indicate that CFTR is not only found in epithelia but also in human erythrocytes. Although considerable attempts have been made to quantify CFTR in cells, conclusions on numbers of CFTR molecules localized in the plasma membrane have been drawn indirectly. AFM has the power to provide the needed information, since both sub-molecular spatial resolution and direct protein recognition via antibody-antigen interaction can be observed. We performed a quantification study of the CFTR copies in erythrocyte membranes at the single molecule level, and compared the difference between healthy donors and CF patients. We detected that the number of CFTR molecules is reduced by 70% in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients

  18. Trial of using antibodies as carriers of alkylating agents. Pt. 2. Evaluation of ability to form /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide + immune antibody complexes with homologous antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzeciak, J; Felus, E; Nolewajka, E; Szaflarski, J; Dudziak, Z [Slaska Akademia Medyczna, Katowice (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide was found to combine with ..gamma..-globulin fractions of immune sera. Immune sera incubated with /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide retained ability to react specifically with homologou antigen in vitro in the system: MN antigens of human erythrocytes + rabbit anti-MN antibody, and probably reacted selectively with target antigens in vivo in the system: antigens of guinea pig kidney tissue + rabbit antibodies against these antigens. Hemagglutination, passive hemagglutination and precipitation in agar gel tests were used in the experiments. Ability to combine of the immune antibody + /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide complex with homologous antigens was evaluated by measurements of radioactivity of studied materials (erythrocyte agglutinates and organ homogenates). The results indicate feasibility of using immune antibodies as carriers of cytostatic agents.

  19. Biophysical parameters of erythrocyte membranes and mechanisms of interaction with non-opioid analgesics under acute pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Gubskyi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods of fluorescent probing, spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry were applied to investigate the alterations in biophysical parameters of erythrocytes membranes, and specifically microviscosity, surface charge, molecular organization of lipid bilayer and lipid-protein interactions under conditions of acute pain syndrome produced by experimental chemical lesion. The distinctive features of non-opiod analgesics interactions and binding to the erythrocytes membranes of rats subjected to acute nociceptive pain accompanied with oxidative stress development were investigated. The abilities of analgesics under research, and namely paracetamol, aspirin, phenazone, ketorolac, pyrodazole, ketoprofenum, natrium mefenaminate, indometacin, nimesulide to make up physico-chemical complexes with lipoperoxidation modified erythrocytes surface and protein-lipid bilayer showed marked changes. The significance of oxidative damage of biophase under conditions of acute pain syndrome for analgesics effective pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics realization is under consideration.

  20. Facilitated uptake of a bioactive metabolite of maritime pine bark extract (pycnogenol into human erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Kurlbaum

    Full Text Available Many plant secondary metabolites exhibit some degree of biological activity in humans. It is a common observation that individual plant-derived compounds in vivo are present in the nanomolar concentration range at which they usually fail to display measurable activity in vitro. While it is debatable that compounds detected in plasma are not the key effectors of bioactivity, an alternative hypothesis may take into consideration that measurable concentrations also reside in compartments other than plasma. We analysed the binding of constituents and the metabolite δ-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl-γ-valerolactone (M1, that had been previously detected in plasma samples of human consumers of pine bark extract Pycnogenol, to human erythrocytes. We found that caffeic acid, taxifolin, and ferulic acid passively bind to red blood cells, but only the bioactive metabolite M1 revealed pronounced accumulation. The partitioning of M1 into erythrocytes was significantly diminished at higher concentrations of M1 and in the presence of glucose, suggesting a facilitated transport of M1 via GLUT-1 transporter. This concept was further supported by structural similarities between the natural substrate α-D-glucose and the S-isomer of M1. After cellular uptake, M1 underwent further metabolism by conjugation with glutathione. We present strong indication for a transporter-mediated accumulation of a flavonoid metabolite in human erythrocytes and subsequent formation of a novel glutathione adduct. The physiologic role of the adduct remains to be elucidated.

  1. Physical and Chemical Processes and the Morphofunctional Characteristics of Human Erythrocytes in Hyperglycaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor V. Revin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study examines the effect of graduated hyperglycaemia on the state and oxygen-binding ability of hemoglobin, the correlation of phospholipid fractions and their metabolites in the membrane, the activity of proteolytic enzymes and the morphofunctional state of erythrocytes.Methods: Conformational changes in the molecule of hemoglobin were determined by Raman spectroscopy. The structure of the erythrocytes was analyzed using laser interference microscopy (LIM. To determine the activity of NADN-methemoglobinreductase, we used the P.G. Board method. The degree of glycosylation of the erythrocyte membranes was determined using a method previously described by Felkoren et al. Lipid extraction was performed using the Bligh and Dyer method. Detection of the phospholipids was performed using V. E. Vaskovsky method.Results: Conditions of hyperglycaemia are characterized by a low affinity of hemoglobin to oxygen, which is manifested as a parallel decrease in the content of hemoglobin oxyform and the growth of deoxyform, methemoglobin and membrane-bound hemoglobin. The degree of glycosylation of membrane proteins and hemoglobin is high. For example, in the case of hyperglycaemia, erythrocytic membranes reduce the content of all phospholipid fractions with a simultaneous increase in lysoforms, free fatty acids and the diacylglycerol (DAG. Step wise hyperglycaemia in incubation medium and human erythrocytes results in an increased content of peptide components and general trypsin-like activity in the cytosol, with a simultaneous decreased activity of μ-calpain and caspase 3.Conclusions: Metabolic disorders and damage of cell membranes during hyperglycaemia cause an increase in the population of echinocytes and spherocytes. The resulting disorders are accompanied with a high probability of intravascular haemolysis.

  2. Solubilization of human erythrocyte membranes by ASB detergents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Domingues

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the membrane solubilization process and finding effective solubilizing agents are crucial challenges in biochemical research. Here we report results on the interaction of the novel linear alkylamido propyl dimethyl amino propanosulfonate detergents, ASB-14 and ASB-16, with human erythrocyte membranes. An estimation of the critical micelle concentration of these zwitterionic detergents (ASB-14 = 100 µM and ASB-16 = 10 µM was obtained using electron paramagnetic resonance. The amount of proteins and cholesterol solubilized from erythrocytes by these detergents was then determined. The hemolytic activities of the ASB detergents were assayed and the detergent/lipid molar ratios for the onset of hemolysis (Re sat and total lysis (Re sol were calculated, allowing the determination of the membrane binding constants (Kb. ASB-14 presented lower membrane affinity (Kb = 7050 M-1 than ASB-16 (Kb = 15610 M-1. The amount of proteins and cholesterol solubilized by both ASB detergents was higher while Re sat values (0.22 and 0.08 detergent/lipid for ASB-14 and ASB-16, respectively were smaller than those observed with the classic detergents CHAPS and Triton X-100. These results reveal that, besides their well-known use as membrane protein solubilizers to enhance the resolution of two dimensional electrophoresis/mass spectrometry, ASB-14 and ASB-16 are strong hemolytic agents. We propose that the physicochemical properties of ASB detergents determine their membrane disruption efficiency and can help to explain the improvement in the solubilization of membrane proteins, as reported in the literature.

  3. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 in experimentally infected humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavstsen, Thomas; Magistrado, Pamela; Hermsen, Cornelus C

    2005-01-01

    -encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family, which is expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes where it mediates binding to endothelial receptors. Thus, severe malaria may be caused by parasites expressing PfEMP1 variants that afford parasites optimal sequestration...... in immunologically naive individuals and high effective multiplication rates. METHODS: var gene transcription was analysed using real time PCR and PfEMP1 expression by western blots as well as immune plasma recognition of parasite cultures established from non-immune volunteers shortly after infection with NF54...... compared to parasites expressing other var genes. The differential expression of PfEMP1 was confirmed at the protein level by immunoblot analysis. In addition, serological typing showed that immune sera more often recognized second and third generation parasites than first generation parasites. CONCLUSION...

  4. Comparative biology of the ubiquitous Na+/H+ exchanger, NHE1: lessons from erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Cala, Peter Michael

    2004-01-01

    of NHE1 in erythrocytes, in their own right and as model systems, but pertinent findings from non-erythroid cells are also discussed. NHE1 plays a key role in the regulation of cell volume and pH, and consequently in the control of such diverse processes as blood O2/CO2 transport, and cell proliferation......, motility, and survival. Disturbances in NHE1 function are involved in important pathological states such as hypoxic cell damage and cancer development. NHE1 has a predicted topology of 12 transmembrane domains, and a hydrophilic C-terminus thought to be the major site for NHE1 regulation. NHE1 is highly...... conserved throughout the vertebrate phylum, particularly in the transmembrane region and the proximal part of the C-terminus. In non-erythroid, and probably also in erythroid cells, this part of the hydrophilic C-terminus interacts with multiple binding partners important for NHE1 function. Erythrocyte NHE1...

  5. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  6. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the [ 3 H]thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% [SD]) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition

  7. Survival and antigenic profile of irradiated malarial sporozoites in infected liver cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhrbier, A.; Winger, L.A.; Castellano, E.; Sinden, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Exoerythrocytic (EE) stages of Plasmodium berghei derived from irradiated sporozoites were cultured in vitro in HepG2 cells. They synthesized several antigens, predominantly but not exclusively those expressed by normal early erythrocytic schizonts. After invasion, over half the intracellular sporozoites, both normal and irradiated, appeared to die. After 24 h, in marked contrast to the normal parasites, EE parasites derived from irradiated sporozoites continued to break open, shedding their antigens into the cytoplasm of the infected host cells. Increasing radiation dosage, which has previously been shown to reduce the ability of irradiated sporozoites to protect animals, correlated with reduced de novo antigen synthesis by EE parasites derived from irradiated sporozoites

  8. P-gp expression in brown trout erythrocytes: evidence of a detoxification mechanism in fish erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valton, Emeline; Amblard, Christian; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Bamdad, Mahchid

    2013-12-05

    Blood is a site of physiological transport for a great variety of molecules, including xenobiotics. Blood cells in aquatic vertebrates, such as fish, are directly exposed to aquatic pollution. P-gp are ubiquitous "membrane detoxification proteins" implicated in the cellular efflux of various xenobiotics, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which may be pollutants. The existence of this P-gp detoxification system inducible by benzo [a] pyrene (BaP), a highly cytotoxic PAH, was investigated in the nucleated erythrocytes of brown trout. Western blot analysis showed the expression of a 140-kDa P-gp in trout erythrocytes. Primary cultures of erythrocytes exposed to increasing concentrations of BaP showed no evidence of cell toxicity. Yet, in the same BaP-treated erythrocytes, P-gp expression increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Brown trout P-gp erythrocytes act as membrane defence mechanism against the pollutant, a property that can be exploited for future biomarker development to monitor water quality.

  9. The mechanism of erythrocyte sedimentation. Part 2: The global collapse of settling erythrocyte network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribush, A; Meyerstein, D; Meyerstein, N

    2010-01-01

    Results reported in the companion paper showed that erythrocytes in quiescent blood are combined into a network followed by the formation of plasma channels within it. This study is focused on structural changes in the settling dispersed phase subsequent to the channeling and the effect of the structural organization on the sedimentation rate. It is suggested that the initial, slow stage of erythrocyte sedimentation is mainly controlled by the gravitational compactness of the collapsed network. The lifetime of RBC network and hence the duration of the slow regime of erythrocyte sedimentation decrease with an increase in the intercellular pair potential and with a decrease in Hct. The gravitational compactness of the collapsed network causes its rupture into individual fragments. The catastrophic collapse of the network transforms erythrocyte sedimentation from slow to fast regime. The size of RBC network fragment is insignificantly affected by Hct and is mainly determined by the intensity of intercellular attractive interactions. When cells were suspended in the weak aggregating medium, the Stokes radius of fragments does not differ measurably from that of individual RBCs. The proposed mechanism provides a reasonable explanation of the effects of RBC aggregation, Hct and the initial height of the blood column on the delayed erythrocyte sedimentation.

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of lipid and protein membrane components of erythrocytes oxidized with hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendanha, S.A.; Anjos, J.L.V.; Silva, A.H.M.; Alonso, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2012-04-05

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of spin labels was used to monitor membrane dynamic changes in erythrocytes subjected to oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The lipid spin label, 5-doxyl stearic acid, responded to dramatic reductions in membrane fluidity, which was correlated with increases in the protein content of the membrane. Membrane rigidity, associated with the binding of hemoglobin (Hb) to the erythrocyte membrane, was also indicated by a spin-labeled maleimide, 5-MSL, covalently bound to the sulfhydryl groups of membrane proteins. At 2% hematocrit, these alterations in membrane occurred at very low concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 µM) after only 5 min of incubation at 37°C in azide phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. Lipid peroxidation, suggested by oxidative hemolysis and malondialdehyde formation, started at 300 µM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (for incubation of 3 h), which is a concentration about six times higher than those detected with the probes. Ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol protected the membrane against lipoperoxidation, but did not prevent the binding of proteins to the erythrocyte membrane. Moreover, the antioxidant (+)-catechin, which also failed to prevent the cross-linking of cytoskeletal proteins with Hb, was very effective in protecting erythrocyte ghosts from lipid peroxidation induced by the Fenton reaction. This study also showed that EPR spectroscopy can be useful to assess the molecular dynamics of red blood cell membranes in both the lipid and protein domains and examine oxidation processes in a system that is so vulnerable to oxidation.

  11. Characterization of antigen association with accessory cells: specific removal of processed antigens from the cell surface by phospholipases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falo, L.D. Jr.; Haber, S.I.; Herrmann, S.; Benacerraf, B.; Rock, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    To characterize the basis for the cell surface association of processed antigen with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) the authors analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. Antigen-exposed APC that are treated with phospholipase and then immediately fixed lose their ability to stimulate antigen-plus-Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. This effect is seen with highly purified phospholipase A 2 and phospholipase C. In addition it is observed with three distinct antigens - ovalbumin, bovine insulin, and poly(LGlu 56 LLys 35 LPhe 9 )[(GluLysPhe)/sub n/]. The effect of phospholipases is highly specific. Identically treated APC are equivalent to control in their ability to stimulate alloreactive hybridomas specific for precisely the same Ia molecule that is corecognized by antigen-plus-Ia-specific hybrids. Furthermore, the antigen-presenting function of enzyme-treated, fixed APC can be reconstituted by the addition of exogenous in vitro processed or processing independent antigens. In parallel studies 125 I-labeled avidin was shown to specifically bind to APC that were previously exposed and allowed to process biotin-insulin. Biotin-insulin-exposed APC that are pretreated with phospholipase bind significantly less 125 I-labeled avidin than do untreated, exposed APC. Identical enzyme treatment does not reduce the binding of avidin to a biotinylated antibody already bound to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules of APC. These studies demonstrate that phospholipase effectively removes processed cell surface antigen

  12. Global transformation of erythrocyte properties via engagement of an SH2-like sequence in band 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchulu-Campanella, Estela; Turrini, Francesco M; Li, Yen-Hsing; Low, Philip S

    2016-11-29

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are composed of weakly conserved sequences of ∼100 aa that bind phosphotyrosines in signaling proteins and thereby mediate intra- and intermolecular protein-protein interactions. In exploring the mechanism whereby tyrosine phosphorylation of the erythrocyte anion transporter, band 3, triggers membrane destabilization, vesiculation, and fragmentation, we discovered a SH2 signature motif positioned between membrane-spanning helices 4 and 5. Evidence that this exposed cytoplasmic sequence contributes to a functional SH2-like domain is provided by observations that: (i) it contains the most conserved sequence of SH2 domains, GSFLVR; (ii) it binds the tyrosine phosphorylated cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3-PO 4 ) with K d = 14 nM; (iii) binding of cdb3-PO 4 to erythrocyte membranes is inhibited both by antibodies against the SH2 signature sequence and dephosphorylation of cdb3-PO 4 ; (iv) label transfer experiments demonstrate the covalent transfer of photoactivatable biotin from isolated cdb3-PO 4 (but not cdb3) to band 3 in erythrocyte membranes; and (v) phosphorylation-induced binding of cdb3-PO 4 to the membrane-spanning domain of band 3 in intact cells causes global changes in membrane properties, including (i) displacement of a glycolytic enzyme complex from the membrane, (ii) inhibition of anion transport, and (iii) rupture of the band 3-ankyrin bridge connecting the spectrin-based cytoskeleton to the membrane. Because SH2-like motifs are not retrieved by normal homology searches for SH2 domains, but can be found in many tyrosine kinase-regulated transport proteins using modified search programs, we suggest that related cases of membrane transport proteins containing similar motifs are widespread in nature where they participate in regulation of cell properties.

  13. Leukemia-associated antigens in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G; Capellaro, D; Greaves, M

    1975-12-01

    Rabbit antisera raised against acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells were used to distinguish ALL from other leukemias, to identify rare leukemia cells in the bone marrow of patients in remission, and to define human leukemia-associated antigens. Antibody binding was studied with the use of immunofluorescence reagents and the analytic capacity of the Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter-1 (FACS-1). The results indicated that most non-T-cell ALL have three leukemia-associated antigens on their surface which are absent from normal lymphoid cells: 1) an antigen shared with myelocytes, myeloblastic leukemia cells, and fetal liver (hematopoietic) cells; 2) an antigen shared with a subset of intermediate normoblasts in normal bone marrow and fetal liver; and 3) an antigen found thus far only on non-T-cell ALL and in some acute undifferentiated leukemias, which we therefore regard as a strong candidate for a leukemia-specific antigen. These antigens are absent from a subgroup of ALL patients in which the lymphoblasta express T-cell surface markers. Preliminary studies on the bone marrow samples of patients in remission indicated that rare leukemia cells were present in some samples. The implications of these findings with respect to the heterogeneity and cell origin(s) of ALL, its diagnosis, and its potential monitoring during treatment were discussed.

  14. Absence of erythrocyte sequestration and lack of multicopy gene family expression in Plasmodium falciparum from a splenectomized malaria patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bachmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To avoid spleen-dependent killing mechanisms parasite-infected erythrocytes (IE of Plasmodium falciparum malaria patients have the capacity to bind to endothelial receptors. This binding also known as sequestration, is mediated by parasite proteins, which are targeted to the erythrocyte surface. Candidate proteins are those encoded by P. falciparum multicopy gene families, such as var, rif, stevor or PfMC-2TM. However, a direct in vivo proof of IE sequestration and expression of multicopy gene families is still lacking. Here, we report on the analysis of IE from a black African immigrant, who received the diagnosis of a malignant lymphoproliferative disorder and subsequently underwent splenectomy. Three weeks after surgery, the patient experienced clinical falciparum malaria with high parasitemia and circulating developmental parasite stages usually sequestered to the vascular endothelium such as late trophozoites, schizonts or immature gametocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Initially, when isolated from the patient, the infected erythrocytes were incapable to bind to various endothelial receptors in vitro. Moreover, the parasites failed to express the multicopy gene families var, A-type rif and stevor but expression of B-type rif and PfMC-2TM genes were detected. In the course of in vitro cultivation, the parasites started to express all investigated multicopy gene families and concomitantly developed the ability to adhere to endothelial receptors such as CD36 and ICAM-1, respectively. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This case strongly supports the hypothesis that parasite surface proteins such as PfEMP1, A-type RIFIN or STEVOR are involved in interactions of infected erythrocytes with endothelial receptors mediating sequestration of mature asexual and immature sexual stages of P. falciparum. In contrast, multicopy gene families coding for B-type RIFIN and PfMC-2TM proteins may not be involved in sequestration, as these genes were

  15. Duffy blood group antigens: structure, serological properties and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Łukasik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Duffy (Fy blood group antigens are located on seven-transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on erythrocytes and endothelial cells, which acts as atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR1 and malarial receptor. The biological role of the Duffy glycoprotein has not been explained yet. It is suggested that Duffy protein modulate the intensity of the inflammatory response. The Duffy blood group system consists of two major antigens, Fya and Fyb, encoded by two codominant alleles designated FY*A and FY*B which differ by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at position 125G>A of the FY gene that results in Gly42Asp amino acid change in the Fya and Fyb antigens, respectively. The presence of antigen Fya and/or Fyb on the erythrocytes determine three Duffy-positive phenotypes: Fy(a+b-, Fy(a-b+ and Fy(a+b+, identified in Caucasian population. The Duffy-negative phenotype Fy(a-b-, frequent in Africans, but very rare in Caucasians, is defined by the homozygous state of FY*B-33 alleles. The FY*B-33 allele is associated with a SNP -33T>C in the promoter region of the FY gene, which suppresses erythroid expression of this gene without affecting its expression in other tissues. The FY*X allele, found in Caucasians, is correlated with weak expression of Fyb antigen. Fyx antigen differs from the native Fyb by the Arg89Cys and Ala100Thr amino acid substitutions due to SNPs: 265C>T and 298G>A in FY*B allele. The frequency of the FY alleles shows marked geographic disparities, the FY*B-33 allele is predominant in Africans, the FY*B in Caucasians, while the FY*A allele is dominant in Asians and it is the most prevalent allele globally.

  16. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas Salhøj

    2014-01-01

    falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome...... of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens....

  17. Relation of erythrocyte and iron indices to oral cancer growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattathiri, Vasudevaru Narayanan

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Anaemia is known to influence prognosis of head and neck cancer patients, but how anaemia and tumour growth influences each other is not clear. The present study investigates the relation of erythrocyte and iron indices of oral cancer patients to primary tumour size (Tsize), invasiveness and lymph node involvement. Materials and methods: The haemoglobin (Hb), erythrocyte count (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), Serum iron (SFe), transferrin iron-binding capacity (TIBC) and transferrin saturation (%Fe) were evaluated in 217 untreated patients with epidermoid cancer of the bucco-gingivo-palatine area. The association of erythrocyte and iron indices with sex, tumour size groups, invasion of adjacent structures and lymph node involvement, as well as the relation of SFe to Hb were analyzed. Results: Most of the patients were anaemic in terms of Hb (63%), RBC (43%) and PCV (48.4%) but almost all had normal or higher MCH (97.3%) and MCV (93.3%) though MCHC was less than normal in 70.7%. Normal or higher SFe was seen in nearly 70% and TIBC in 45% of patients. Hb, RBC and PCV were significantly lower in women, but there was no difference between men and women in the case of MCV, MCH and MCHC. Primary tumour size showed negative association with Hb, RBC and PCV but positive association with MCH ( 4 cm: 31. 7 pg; P=0.04) and MCHC ( 4 cm: 32.1; P=0.006). MCV, SFe, TIBC and %Fe did not show any relation to primary tumour size. None of the indices had any relation to invasion of adjacent structures or lymph node involvement. MCH, MCHC and MCV were not different in men and women but women had significantly lower Hb, RBC and PCV. The SFe showed poor correlation with Hb. Conclusions: The negative association of Hb, RBC and PCV with tumour size is most likely due to chronic RBC destruction, probably tumour induced, with the products of

  18. Subcutaneous administration of carrier erythrocytes: slow release of entrapped agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLoach, J.R.; Corrier, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Carrier erythrocytes administered subcutaneously in mice release encapsulated molecules at the injection site and through cells that escape the injection site. One day postinjection, the efflux of encapsulated [ 14 C]sucrose, [ 3 H]inulin, and 51 Cr-hemoglobin from the injection site was 45, 55, and 65%, respectively. Intact carrier erythrocytes escaped the injection site and entered the blood circulation carrying with them the encapsulated molecules. Most of the encapsulated [ 3 H]inulin that reached whole blood circulated within erythrocytes. Small but measurable numbers of encapsulated molecules were trapped within lymph nodes. Subcutaneous injection of carrier erythrocytes may allow for limited extravascular tissue targeting of drugs

  19. Hepatic or splenic targeting of carrier erythrocytes: a murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zocchi, E.; Guida, L.; Benatti, U.; Canepa, M.; Borgiani, L.; Zanin, T.; De Flora, A.

    1987-01-01

    Carrier mouse erythrocytes, i.e., red cells, subjected to a dialysis technique involving transient hypotonic hemolysis and isotonic resealing were treated in vitro in three different ways: (a) energy depletion by exposure for 90 min at 42 degrees C; (b) desialylation by incubation with neuroaminidase; and (c) oxidative stress by incubation with H 2 O 2 and NaN3. Procedure (c) afforded maximal damage, as shown by analysis of biochemical properties of the treated erythrocytes. Reinfusion in mice of the variously manipulated erythrocytes following their 51 Cr labeling showed extensive fragilization as indicated by rapid clearance of radioactivity from the circulation. Moreover, both the energy-depleted and the neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes showed a preferential liver uptake, reaching 50 and 75%, respectively, within 2 h. On the other hand, exposure of erythrocytes to the oxidant stress triggered a largely splenic removal, accounting for almost 40% of the reinjected cells within 4 h. Transmission electron microscopy of liver from mice receiving energy-depleted erythrocytes demonstrated remarkable erythrocyte congestion within the sinusoids, followed by hyperactivity of Kupffer cells and by subsequent thickening of the perisinusoidal Disse space. Concomitantly, levels of serum transaminase activities were moderately increased. Each of the three procedures of manipulation of carrier erythrocytes may prove applicable under conditions where selective targeting of erythrocyte-encapsulated chemicals and drugs to either the liver or the spleen has to be achieved

  20. Limited cross-reactivity among domains of the Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 erythrocyte membrane protein 1 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Turner, Louise; Magistrado, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family is responsible for antigenic variation and sequestration of infected erythrocytes during malaria. We have previously grouped the 60 PfEMP1 variants of P. falciparum clone 3D7 into groups A and B/A (category A......) and groups B, B/C, and C (category non-A). Expression of category A molecules is associated with severe malaria, and that of category non-A molecules is associated with uncomplicated malaria and asymptomatic infection. Here we assessed cross-reactivity among 60 different recombinant PfEMP1 domains derived...... from clone 3D7 by using a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a pool of plasma from 63 malaria-exposed Tanzanian individuals. We conclude that naturally acquired antibodies are largely directed toward epitopes varying between different domains with a few, mainly category A, domains...

  1. Role of the Antigen Capture Pathway in the Induction of a Neutralizing Antibody Response to Anthrax Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Verma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxin neutralizing antibodies represent the major mode of protective immunity against a number of toxin-mediated bacterial diseases, including anthrax; however, the cellular mechanisms that lead to optimal neutralizing antibody responses remain ill defined. Here we show that the cellular binding pathway of anthrax protective antigen (PA, the binding component of anthrax toxin, determines the toxin neutralizing antibody response to this antigen. PA, which binds cellular receptors and efficiently enters antigen-presenting cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, was found to elicit robust anti-PA IgG and toxin neutralizing antibody responses. In contrast, a receptor binding-deficient mutant of PA, which does not bind receptors and only inefficiently enters antigen-presenting cells by macropinocytosis, elicited very poor antibody responses. A chimeric protein consisting of the receptor binding-deficient PA mutant tethered to the binding subunit of cholera toxin, which efficiently enters cells using the cholera toxin receptor rather than the PA receptor, elicited an anti-PA IgG antibody response similar to that elicited by wild-type PA; however, the chimeric protein elicited a poor toxin neutralizing antibody response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the antigen capture pathway can dictate the magnitudes of the total IgG and toxin neutralizing antibody responses to PA as well as the ratio of the two responses.

  2. α2-macroglobulin can crosslink multiple Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) molecules and may facilitate adhesion of parasitized erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Liz; Laursen, Erik; Cowan, Graeme J

    2015-01-01

    -macroglobulin (α2M), which is both required and sufficient for rosetting mediated by the PfEMP1 protein HB3VAR06 and some other rosette-mediating PfEMP1 proteins. We map the α2M binding site to the C terminal end of HB3VAR06, and demonstrate that α2M can bind at least four HB3VAR06 proteins, plausibly....... Together, our results are evidence that P. falciparum parasites exploit α2M (and IgM) to expand the repertoire of host receptors available for PfEMP1-mediated IE adhesion, such as the erythrocyte carbohydrate moieties that lead to formation of rosettes. It is likely that this mechanism also affects IE...

  3. The interaction of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) with mouse class I major histocompatibility antigens and its ability to support peptide binding. A comparison of human and mouse beta 2m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Stryhn, A; Holter, T L

    1995-01-01

    of class I molecules are involved in peptide binding, whereas most of class I molecules are involved in beta 2m binding. We propose that mouse beta 2m interacts with the minor peptide binding (i.e. the "empty") fraction with a lower affinity than human beta 2m does, whereas mouse and human beta 2m interact......The function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to sample peptides derived from intracellular proteins and to present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this paper, biochemical assays addressing MHC class I binding of both peptide and beta 2-microglobulin...... (beta 2m) have been used to examine the assembly of the trimolecular MHC class I/beta 2m/peptide complex. Recombinant human beta 2m and mouse beta 2ma have been generated to compare the binding of the two beta 2m to mouse class I. It is frequently assumed that human beta 2m binds to mouse class I heavy...

  4. Effect of thyroid hormone on the levels of erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase isozymes and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, T; Taniguchi, N; Ishikawa, N; Ide, H; Takakuwa, E; Murao, M

    1978-05-01

    Levels of rabbit erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase B and C isozymes were determined in experimental hyperthyroidism using a quantitative immunologic technique. Levels of erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and protein binding iodine were simultaneously determined. Thyroxine and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine were administered to rabbits orally for 30 days. A significant decrease in carbonic anhydrase B type was observed after 30 days, although no significant change was observed in carbonic anhydrase C type. These findings suggest that the steady state level of carbonic anhydrase B type in red cells is affected by thyroid hormone more readily than that of carbonic anhydrase C type. The level of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate increased markedly after 10 days of treatment, corresponding to the increase of protein binding iodine. The clinical or pathologic significances were discussed in relation to the changes in the levels of these isozymes and 2,3-diphosphglycerate in red cells.

  5. Relationship between secretion of the Anton blood group antigen in saliva and adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to oropharynx epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, L.; van Ham, M.; Geelen-van den Broek, L.; Pieters, T.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of adherence of bacteria to epithelial cells contributes to a reduction of infections by these bacteria. We have shown that the Anton blood group antigen, the erythrocyte receptor for Haemophilus influenzae (van Alphen et al. 1986, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 37, 69-71), occurs in saliva, that

  6. Evidence for in vitro and in vivo expression of the conserved VAR3 (type 3) plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Christian W; Lavstsen, Thomas; Bengtsson, Dominique C

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Members of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) adhesion antigen family are major contributors to the pathogenesis of P. falciparum malaria infections. The PfEMP1-encoding var genes are among the most diverse sequences in nature, but three genes......, var1, var2csa and var3 are found conserved in most parasite genomes. The most severe forms of malaria disease are caused by parasites expressing a subset of antigenically conserved PfEMP1 variants. Thus the ubiquitous and conserved VAR3 PfEMP1 is of particular interest to the research field. Evidence...... of VAR3 expression on the infected erythrocyte surface has never been presented, and var3 genes have been proposed to be transcribed and expressed differently from the rest of the var gene family members. METHODS: In this study, parasites expressing VAR3 PfEMP1 were generated using anti-VAR3 antibodies...

  7. Bayesian nonparametric clustering in phylogenetics: modeling antigenic evolution in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybis, Gabriela B; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Bedford, Trevor; Rambaut, Andrew; Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A

    2018-01-30

    Influenza is responsible for up to 500,000 deaths every year, and antigenic variability represents much of its epidemiological burden. To visualize antigenic differences across many viral strains, antigenic cartography methods use multidimensional scaling on binding assay data to map influenza antigenicity onto a low-dimensional space. Analysis of such assay data ideally leads to natural clustering of influenza strains of similar antigenicity that correlate with sequence evolution. To understand the dynamics of these antigenic groups, we present a framework that jointly models genetic and antigenic evolution by combining multidimensional scaling of binding assay data, Bayesian phylogenetic machinery and nonparametric clustering methods. We propose a phylogenetic Chinese restaurant process that extends the current process to incorporate the phylogenetic dependency structure between strains in the modeling of antigenic clusters. With this method, we are able to use the genetic information to better understand the evolution of antigenicity throughout epidemics, as shown in applications of this model to H1N1 influenza. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Evasion of immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria by IgM masking of protective IgG epitopes in infected erythrocyte surface-exposed PfEMP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Lea; Dalgaard, Michael B; Pleman, Suzan T

    2011-01-01

    1 (PfEMP1) family is central to both. Here, we present evidence of a P. falciparum evasion mechanism not previously documented: the masking of PfEMP1-specific IgG epitopes by nonspecific IgM. Nonspecific IgM binding to erythrocytes infected by parasites expressing the PfEMP1 protein VAR2CSA...

  9. A Novel Virus-Like Particle Based Vaccine Platform Displaying the Placental Malaria Antigen VAR2CSA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Thrane

    Full Text Available Placental malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is a major cause of mortality and severe morbidity. Clinical testing of a soluble protein-based vaccine containing the parasite ligand, VAR2CSA, has been initiated. VAR2CSA binds to the human receptor chondroitin sulphate A (CSA and is responsible for sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in the placenta. It is imperative that a vaccine against malaria in pregnancy, if administered to women before they become pregnant, can induce a strong and long lasting immune response. While most soluble protein-based vaccines have failed during clinical testing, virus-like particle (VLP based vaccines (e.g., the licensed human papillomavirus vaccines have demonstrated high efficacy, suggesting that the spatial assembly of the vaccine antigen is a critical parameter for inducing an optimal long-lasting protective immune response. We have developed a VLP vaccine display platform by identifying regions of the HPV16 L1 coat protein where a biotin acceptor site (AviTagTM can be inserted without compromising VLP-assembly. Subsequent biotinylation of Avi-L1 VLPs allow us to anchor monovalent streptavidin (mSA-fused proteins to the biotin, thereby obtaining a dense and repetitive VLP-display of the vaccine antigen. The mSA-VAR2CSA antigen was delivered on the Avi-L1 VLP platform and tested in C57BL/6 mice in comparison to two soluble protein-based vaccines consisting of naked VAR2CSA and mSA-VAR2CSA. The mSA-VAR2CSA Avi-L1 VLP and soluble mSA-VAR2CSA vaccines induced higher antibody titers than the soluble naked VAR2CSA vaccine after three immunizations. The VAR2CSA Avi-L1 VLP vaccine induced statistically significantly higher endpoint titres compared to the soluble mSA-VAR2CSA vaccine, after 1st and 2nd immunization; however, this difference was not statistically significant after 3rd immunization. Importantly, the VLP-VAR2CSA induced antibodies were functional in inhibiting the binding of

  10. Lipopeptide-Induced Suicidal Erythrocyte Death Correlates with the Degree of Acylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Al Mamun Bhuyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Consequences of bacterial infection include anemia, which could result from stimulation of suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Bacterial components known to stimulate eryptosis include lipopeptides. Signaling mediating the triggering of eryptosis include increased cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, oxidative stress and cellular accumulation of ceramide. The present study aimed to define the molecular requirements for lipopeptide-induced cell membrane scrambling. Methods: Human erythrocytes were incubated for 48 hours in the absence and presence of 1 or 5 µg/ml of the synthetic lipopeptides Pam1 (lipopeptide with one fatty acid, Pam2 (lipopeptide with two fatty acids, or Pam3 (lipopeptide with three fatty acids. In the following phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ROS formation from DCF dependent fuorescence, and ceramide abundance utilizing specific antibodies. Results: Pam1 (5 µg/ml, Pam2 (5 µg/ml and Pam3 (1 and 5 µg/ml significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding to erythrocytes in a dose dependent manner, which was largely independent of Ca2+. Pam1-3 increased the percentage of both, swollen and shrunken erythrocytes without significantly modifying the average forward scatter. They also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS and ceramide abundance. In all assays the effect on eryptosis increased with increasing number of fatty acids, with Pam3 showing always the strongest effect. In contrast, a comparison of the effect of Pam1-3 on TLR2 dependent immune stimulation showed that not Pam3 but Pam2 displayed the strongest activity, and that immune stimulation was triggered at much lower concentrations than eryptosis. Conclusions: Lipopeptides are not only important

  11. Metallic mercury uptake by catalase Part 1 In Vitro metallic mercury uptake by various kind of animals' erythrocytes and purified human erythrocyte catalase

    OpenAIRE

    劒持,堅志

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of metallic mercury was studied using erythrocytes with different catalase activities taken from various kind of animals. The results were: 1) The uptake of metallic mercury by erythrocytes paralleled the activity of catalase in the erythrocytes with and without hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that the erythrocyte catalase activity is related to the uptake of metallic mercury. 2) The uptake of metallic mercury occurred not only with purified human erythrocyte catalase but also with h...

  12. Enzymatic oxidation of mercury vapor by erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbach, S; Clarkson, T W

    1978-01-01

    The formation of glutathione radicals, the evolution of nascent oxygen or the peroxidatic reaction with catalase complex I are considered as possible mechanisms for the oxidation of mercury vapor by red blood cells. To select among these, the uptake of atomic mercury by erythrocytes from different species was studied and related to their various activities of catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.6) and glutathione peroxidase (glutathione:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.9). A slow and continuouus infusion of diluted H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was used to maintain steady concentrations of complex I. 1% red cell suspensions were found most suitable showing high rates of Hg uptake and yielding still enough cells for subsequent determinations. The results indicate that the oxidation of mercury depends upon the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-generation rate and upon the specific acticity of red-cell catalase. The oxidation occurred in a range of the catalase-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ reaction where the evolution of oxygen could be excluded. Compounds reacting with complex I were shown to be effective inhibitors of the mercury uptake. GSH-peroxidase did not participate in the oxidation but rather, was found to inhibit it by competing with catalase for hydrogen peroxide. These findings support the view that elemental mercury is oxidized in erythrocytes by a peroxidatic reaction with complex I only.

  13. The role of the erythrocyte in antitumour drug transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumez, Herlinde

    2005-01-01

    The area of research on the substance-carrier capacity of the erythrocyte is rather limited and it remains difficult to estimate the impact of erythrocyte drug level monitoring in the clinic. Although equilibrium between blood and tissues based on the dissolution of compounds in the plasma water

  14. The Role and Mechanism of Erythrocyte Invasion by Francisella tularensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M. Schmitt

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is an extremely virulent bacterium that can be transmitted naturally by blood sucking arthropods. During mammalian infection, F. tularensis infects numerous types of host cells, including erythrocytes. As erythrocytes do not undergo phagocytosis or endocytosis, it remains unknown how F. tularensis invades these cells. Furthermore, the consequence of inhabiting the intracellular space of red blood cells (RBCs has not been determined. Here, we provide evidence indicating that residing within an erythrocyte enhances the ability of F. tularensis to colonize ticks following a blood meal. Erythrocyte residence protected F. tularensis from a low pH environment similar to that of gut cells of a feeding tick. Mechanistic studies revealed that the F. tularensis type VI secretion system (T6SS was required for erythrocyte invasion as mutation of mglA (a transcriptional regulator of T6SS genes, dotU, or iglC (two genes encoding T6SS machinery severely diminished bacterial entry into RBCs. Invasion was also inhibited upon treatment of erythrocytes with venom from the Blue-bellied black snake (Pseudechis guttatus, which aggregates spectrin in the cytoskeleton, but not inhibitors of actin polymerization and depolymerization. These data suggest that erythrocyte invasion by F. tularensis is dependent on spectrin utilization which is likely mediated by effectors delivered through the T6SS. Our results begin to elucidate the mechanism of a unique biological process facilitated by F. tularensis to invade erythrocytes, allowing for enhanced colonization of ticks.

  15. Desickling of Sickle Cell Erythrocytes by Pulsed RF Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-16

    spectrophotometery. Field induced menbrane potential which causes the L partyl breakdown of the memrbrane and the formation of pores was calculated... plasma . Fig.5 shows the photographs of sickled and desickled SS erythrocytes which are suspended in Hank’s solution. As shown, desickled erythrocytes

  16. Paired Chicken and Mammalian Erythrocyte Indicator Systems for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective flock health analysis revealed that the higher titres were associated with confirmable Newcastle Disease (ND) outbreaks in the affected flocks. These findings therefore suggested that the use of standardised guinea pig erythrocytes in parallel with chicken erythrocytes as indicators, might facilitate field ND ...

  17. 21 CFR 864.6700 - Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythrocyte sedimentation rate test. 864.6700 Section 864.6700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6700 Erythrocyte...

  18. Erythrocyte metallothionein as an index of zinc status in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grider, A.; Bailey, L.B.; Cousins, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Metallothionein concentrations in erythrocyte lysates derived from human subjects were measured by an ELISA procedure. IgG obtained from serum of sheep injected with human metallothionein 1 was used in this competitive assay. Subjects were fed a semipurified zinc-deficient diet for an 8-day depletion period after 3 days of acclimation. Fasting plasma zinc concentrations were reduced ∼7%. Metallothionein in the erythrocyte lysates was significantly decreased to 59% of the initial level by the end of the depletion period. Supplementation of these depleted subjects with zinc did not increase erythrocyte metallothionein levels within 24 hr. Daily supplementation of control subjects with zinc increased erythrocyte metallothionein to a 7-fold maximum within 7 days. These levels were reduced by 61% within 14 days after zinc supplementation was terminated. Incubation of rat [ 35 S]metallothionein with human erythrocyte lysate showed a time-dependent increase in 35 S soluble in 20% trichloroacetic acid, indicating degradation of the labeled protein, presumably via protease activity in the lysate. It is proposed that zinc supplementation induces erythrocyte metallothionein during erythropoiesis and that low zinc intake decreases synthesis and/or accelerates degradation of the protein in reticulocytes/erythrocytes. Metallothionein levels in erythrocytes may provide a useful index upon which to assess zinc status in humans

  19. Protein A-containing staphylococcus aureus as an immunoglobulin-binding reagent: 1) in radioimmunoassays - 'staf-RIA' - recently also for antibiotics and microbial antigens/antibodies, and 2) in a non-radioactive surface immunoassay - 'Staph-ace ay' read by the naked eye - primarily for antibodies to antigens adsorbed to transparent surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, S.

    1977-01-01

    This paper is intended to summarize recent developments for the use of protein A-containing staphylococci as an immunoglobulin-binding reagent in various types of radioimmunoassay and some related areas, particularly the staphylococcal surface immunoassay. The paper also presents a new process for the large scale preparation of a freeze-dried preparation of the immunoglobulin-binding, killed staphylococci, which thereby gain a much improved suspension stability. (orig.) [de

  20. Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 Diversity in Seven Genomes – Divide and Conquer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Thomas Salhøj; Hansen, Daniel Aaen; Theander, Thor G.

    2010-01-01

    of a PfEMP1 based vaccine mimicking natural acquired immunity depends on a thorough understanding of the evolved PfEMP1 diversity, balancing antigenic variation against conserved receptor binding affinities. This study redefines and reclassifies the domains of PfEMP1 from seven genomes. Analysis...

  1. Ferrokinetic and erythrocyte survival studies in healthy and anemic cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madewell, B.R.; Holmes, P.H.; Onions, D.E.

    1983-03-01

    Erythrocyte survival and ferrokinetic studies were adapted to the cat. For 5 clinically healthy 4- to 9-month-old cats, mean /sup 51/Cr-labeled erythrocyte survival was 144 hours, and mean plasma /sup 59/Fe-labeled transferrin disappearance halftime was 51 minutes. Erythrocyte use of radioiron was rapid and efficient, with 50% to 80% of labeled iron incorporated into the erythron by 100 hours after injection into the cat. Six cats with feline leukemia virus infection were studied. For 2 cats with erythroid aplasia associated with C subgroup of feline leukemia virus, erythrocyte survival times were similar to those determined for the healthy cats, but plasma radioiron disappearance half time and erythrocyte use of radioiron were markedly diminished.

  2. Ferrokinetic and erythrocyte survival studies in healthy and anemic cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madewell, B.R.; Holmes, P.H.; Onions, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Erythrocyte survival and ferrokinetic studies were adapted to the cat. For 5 clinically healthy 4- to 9-month-old cats, mean 51 Cr-labeled erythrocyte survival was 144 hours, and mean plasma 59 Fe-labeled transferrin disappearance halftime was 51 minutes. Erythrocyte use of radioiron was rapid and efficient, with 50% to 80% of labeled iron incorporated into the erythron by 100 hours after injection into the cat. Six cats with feline leukemia virus infection were studied. For 2 cats with erythroid aplasia associated with C subgroup of feline leukemia virus, erythrocyte survival times were similar to those determined for the healthy cats, but plasma radioiron disappearance half time and erythrocyte use of radioiron were markedly diminished

  3. DEA 1 expression on dog erythrocytes analyzed by immunochromatographic and flow cytometric techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acierno, M M; Raj, K; Giger, U

    2014-01-01

    The Dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA) 1 blood group system was thought to contain types DEA 1.1 and 1.2 (and possibly 1.3 [A3]). However, DEA 1.2+ dogs are very rare and newer typing methods reveal varying degrees of DEA 1 positivity. To assess if variation in DEA 1 positivity is because of quantitative differences in surface antigen expression. To determine expression patterns in dogs over time and effects of blood storage (4°C). To evaluate DEA 1.2+ samples by DEA 1 typing methods. Anticoagulated blood samples from 66 dogs in a research colony and from a hospital, and 9 previously typed DEA 1.2+ dogs from an animal blood bank. Research study: Samples were analyzed by flow cytometry and immunochromatographic strip using a monoclonal anti-DEA 1 antibody. Twenty dogs were DEA 1-, whereas 46 dogs were weakly to strongly DEA 1+. Antigen quantification revealed excellent correlation between strip and flow cytometry (r = 0.929). Both methods reclassified DEA 1.2+ samples as weakly to moderately DEA 1+, but they were not retyped with the polyclonal anti-DEA 1.1/1.X antibodies. Dogs and blood samples retained their relative DEA 1 antigen densities over time. The blood group system DEA 1 is a continuum from negative to strongly positive antigen expression. Previously typed DEA 1.2+ appears to be DEA 1+. These findings further the understanding of the DEA 1 system and suggest that all alleles within the DEA 1 system have a similarly based epitope recognized by the monoclonal antibody. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling

  5. Facts on the fragmentation of antigens in presenting cells, on the association of antigen fragments with MHC molecules in cell-free systems, and speculation on the cell biology of antigen processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Mouritsen, S; Petersen, B L

    1988-01-01

    The processing of a protein antigen is a multi-step event taking place in antigen-presenting cells. Processing is a prerequisite for the recognition of most antigens by T lymphocytes. The antigen is ingested by endocytosis, transported to an acid cellular compartment and subjected to proteolytic...... fragmentation. Some of the antigen fragments bind to MHC class II molecules and are transported to the surface of the antigen-presenting cell where the actual presentation to T lymphocytes occurs. The nature of the processed antigen, how and where it is derived and subsequently becomes associated with MHC...... molecules are the questions discussed in this review. To us, the entire concept of processing has appeal not only because it explains some hitherto well-established, but poorly understood, phenomena such as the fact that T lymphocytes focus their attention entirely upon antigens on other cells. It has...

  6. Erythrocyte abnormalities induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy: Induction of preleukaemic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, M.; Bernard, J.-F.; Boivin, P.; Schlegel, N.; Amar, M.; Torres, M.; Lopez, M.

    1978-01-01

    Increased incidence of acute leukaemia (AL) following exposure to ionizing radiation is well documented. AL has also been reported with increased frequency after chemotherapy for nonmalignant diseases. The effect of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy on the following erythrocyte parameters: pyruvate-kinase (PK) activity, phospho-fructo-kinase (PFK) activity, HbF level, red cell antigens production and bone marrow sideroblasts, has been studied in 31 patients with myelomatosis and in 33 patients with nonhaematological malignancies. We have demonstrated the apperance after chemotherapy or radiotherapy of some abnormalities usually associated with leukaemia or preleukaemic states. In patients treated for myelomatosis, a PK deficiency has been detected in 58 % of the cases, an increased HbF level in 47 %, a modification of blood groups antigens in 68 % and abnormal sideroblasts in 30 %. No PFK deficiency was found. In patients treated for solid tumors, a PK deficiency in 50 % of the cases, a PFK deficiency in 20 %, an increased HbF level in 10 %, a modification of blood group antigens in 40 % has been detected. Chemotherapy administered over a period of 3 months has been shown to induce these abnormalities. Localized radiotherapy may have a similar effect. The combination of these two factors seems to cause an increase in the frequency and intensity of these abnormalities. (author)

  7. Plasmodium Falciparum: Adhesion Phenotype of Infected Erythrocytes Using Classical and Mini-Column Cytoadherence Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kalantari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytoadherence of Plasmodium falciparum- infected erythrocytes to host cells is an impor­tant trait for parasite survival and has a major role in pathology of malaria disease. Infections with P. falciparum usually consist of several subpopulations of parasites with different adhesive proper­ties. This study aimed to compare relative sizes of various binding subpopulations of different P. falciparum isolates. It also investigated the adhesive phenotype of a laboratory P. falciparum line, A4, using different binding techniques.Methods: Seven different P. falciparum isolates (ITG, A4, 3D7 and four field isolates were cultivated to late trophozoite and schizont and then cytoadherence to cell differentiation 36 (CD36, intercellu­lar cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule (V-CAM and E-selectin were examined. The relative binding sizes of parasite subpopulations to human receptors were meas­ured by mini-column cytoadherence method. The adhesion phenotype of P. falciparum-A4 line was evaluated by in vitro static, flow-based and mini-column binding assays.Results: The relative binding size of ITG, A4 and 3D7 clones to a column made with CHO/ICAM-1 was 68%, 54% and 0%, respectively. The relative binding sizes of these lines to CHO/CD36 were 59.7%, 28.7% and 0%, respectively. Different field isolates had variable sizes of respective CD36 and ICAM1-binding subpopulations. A4 line had five different subpopulations each with different binding sizes.Conclusion: This study provided further evidence that P. falciparum isolates have different binding subpopulations sizes in an infection. Furthermore, measurement of ICAM-1 or CD36 binding subpopula­tions may practical to study the cytoadherence phenotypes of P. falciparum field isolates at the molecular level.

  8. Effects of cobalt-60 ionizing radiation on human erythrocyte and its membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amancio, Francisco Fernandes

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has several uses, as sterilization and radiotherapy, by its effects on living beings. recently, it has been used, at relatively lower doses (25 Gy), on blood for transfusions, mainly to eliminate undesirable graft host reactions, for use in multi transfused or immunocompromised patients. Here, we study the effect of larger doses of cobalt-60 ionizing radiation (25-1600 Gy) on human erythrocytes, by cytometric, physiologic, biochemical and immunological methods, looking for its effects and its detection. The red cells presented a clear dose-dependent increase in this volume, when irradiated in doses higher than 200 Gy, more significant in stored blood, but without hemolysis. Osmotic fragility was increased only after irradiation of more than 400 Gy. By ektacytometry, there was a lower deformability of irradiated red cells, at low stress (0.3 Pa), similar to capillary flow, but without alteration in higher stress (3 Pa), found in cardiac chambers. By SDS-PAGE, it was demonstrated that irradiated isolated erythrocyte membranes had aggregation of spectrin molecules, and decay of bands with lower molecular mass. This effect could be attributed to the radiation-induced hydroxyl radical, by specific scavenger studies. Those modifications were both antigenic and immunogenic in experimental animals, and the induced antibodies recognizes, by ELISA and immunoblot, both native or irradiated membrane proteins. They recognize rather irradiated whole erythrocyte than native ones, by hemagglutination, indirect immunofluorescence or flow cytometry assays. Our data suggests that human red cells could be irradiated at higher doses than those usually employed, with possible effect on other contaminant pathogens, without loss of viability of its use in transfusions. After improvements, irradiation induced epitopes detection could be a new tool in biological dosimetry. (author)

  9. 31P-NMR measurements of ATP, ADP, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and Mg2+ in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, A; Kristensen, S R; Jacobsen, J P; Hørder, M

    1990-08-17

    Absolute 31P-NMR measurements of ATP, ADP and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) in oxygenated and partly deoxygenated human erythrocytes, compared to measurements by standard assays after acid extraction, show that ATP is only 65% NMR visible, ADP measured by NMR is unexpectedly 400% higher than the enzymatic measurement and 2,3-DPG is fully NMR visible, regardless of the degree of oxygenation. These results show that binding to hemoglobin is unlikely to cause the decreased visibility of ATP in human erythrocytes as deoxyhemoglobin binds the phosphorylated metabolites more tightly than oxyhemoglobin. The high ADP visibility is unexplained. The levels of free Mg2+ [( Mg2+]free) in human erythrocytes are 225 mumol/l at an oxygen saturation of 98.6% and instead of the expected increase, the level decreased to 196 mumol/l at an oxygen saturation of 38.1% based on the separation between the alpha- and beta-ATP peaks. [Mg2+]free in the erythrocytes decreased to 104 mumol/l at a high 2,3-DPG concentration of 25.4 mmol/l red blood cells (RBC) and a normal ATP concentration of 2.05 mmol/l RBC. By increasing the ATP concentration to 3.57 mmol/l RBC, and with a high 2,3-DPG concentration of 24.7 mmol/l RBC, the 31P-NMR measured [Mg2+]free decreased to 61 mumol/l. These results indicate, that the 31P-NMR determined [Mg2+]free in human erythrocytes, based solely on the separation of the alpha- and beta-ATP peaks, does not give a true measure of intracellular free Mg2+ changes with different oxygen saturation levels. Furthermore the measurement is influenced by the concentration of the Mg2+ binding metabolites ATP and 2,3-DPG. Failure to take these factors into account when interpreting 31P-NMR data from human erythrocytes may explain some discrepancies in the literature regarding [Mg2+]free.

  10. Structure-guided identification of a family of dual receptor-binding PfEMP1 that is associated with cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lennartz, Frank; Adams, Yvonne; Bengtsson, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a deadly outcome of infection by Plasmodium falciparum, occurring when parasite-infected erythrocytes accumulate in the brain. These erythrocytes display parasite proteins of the PfEMP1 family that bind various endothelial receptors. Despite the importance of cerebral malaria...

  11. Erythrocyte 22Na+ influx in hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalev, O.; Eaton, J.W.; Ben-Ishay, D.

    1984-01-01

    We assessed 22Na+ uptake by erythrocytes (RBC) from 38 individuals with essential hypertension and 37 healthy controls. All subjects were male, white, non-obese and with normal renal function, obviating sex, race, hormonal, ponderal and renal factors known to influence RBC Na+ handling. The mean +/- sem 22Na+ uptake of the patients was 284 +/- 16 mumole/liter RBC/hour while that of normal controls was 249 +/- 11 mumole/liter RBC/hour; although the difference reached borderline significance, individual values showed considerable overlap. Consequently, in our population, RBC 22Na+ uptake is not a reliable marker for essential hypertension. We believe that previous studies should be reassessed with regard to patients' characteristics and future studies employ rigorous criteria in selection of subjects

  12. In Vitro Protective Effect of Phikud Navakot Extraction on Erythrocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchana Kengkoom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phikud Navakot (PN, Thai herbal remedy in National List of Essential Medicines, has been claimed to reduce many cardiovascular symptoms especially dizziness and fainting. Apart from blood supply, erythrocyte morphology, in both shape and size, is one of the main consideration factors in cardiovascular diseases and may be affected by vascular oxidative stress. However, little is known about antioxidative property of PN on erythrocyte to preserve red blood cell integrity. In this study, 1,000 μM hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress was conducted on sheep erythrocyte. Three doses of PN (1, 0.5, and 0.25 mg/mL and 10 μM of ascorbic acid were compared. The released hemoglobin absorbance was measured to demonstrate hemolysis. Electron microscopic and immunohistochemical studies were also performed to characterize dysmorphic erythrocyte and osmotic ability in relation to aquaporin- (AQP- 1 expression, respectively. The results revealed that all doses of PN and ascorbic acid decreased the severity of dysmorphic erythrocyte, particularly echinocyte, acanthocyte, knizocyte, codocyte, clumping, and other malformations. However, the most effective was 0.5 mg/mL PN dosage. In addition, hydrostatic pressure may be increased in dysmorphic erythrocyte in association with AQP-1 upregulation. Our results demonstrated that PN composes antioxidative effect to maintain the integrity and osmotic ability on sheep erythrocyte.

  13. Deformability of Erythrocytes and Oxidative Damage in Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukerrem Betul Yerer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A lowered cerebral perfusion as a consequence of hemodynamic microcirculatory insufficiency is one of the factors underlying in Alzheimer's disease, which is a neurodegenerative disorder leading to progressive cognitive impairment. Erythrocyte deformability is one of the major factors affecting the microcirculatory hemodynamics which is closely related to the oxidative damage. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the erythrocyte deformability, nitric oxide levels and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. Methods: The blood samples of 30 elderly people in three groups consisting of healthy control and different severities of the disease (low and severe were used. Then the erythrocytes were isolated and the deformability of erythrocytes was determined by Rheodyne SSD evaluating the elongation indexes of the erythrocytes under different shear stress. The catalase, glutathione peroxidase and plasma nitric oxide levels were measured spectrophotometric ally. Results: The plasma nitric oxide levels, catalase activities were found significantly higher and glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly lower in severe Alzheimer's disease patients compared to the control group. However, the deformability of erythrocytes was not significantly affected from these alterations. Conclusion: the oxidant-antioxidant status is dramatically changed in Alzheimer's disease patients with the severity of the disease and similar alterations were seen in the nitric oxide levels without any significant change in erythrocyte deformability. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(2.000: 65-75

  14. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines mediates chemokine endocytosis through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Zhao

    Full Text Available The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC shows high affinity binding to multiple inflammatory CC and CXC chemokines and is expressed by erythrocytes and endothelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial DARC facilitates chemokine transcytosis to promote neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanism of chemokine endocytosis by DARC remains unclear.We investigated the role of several endocytic pathways in DARC-mediated ligand internalization. Here we report that, although DARC co-localizes with caveolin-1 in endothelial cells, caveolin-1 is dispensable for DARC-mediated (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis as knockdown of caveolin-1 failed to inhibit ligand internalization. (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis by DARC was also independent of clathrin and flotillin-1 but required cholesterol and was, in part, inhibited by silencing Dynamin II expression.(125I-CXCL1 endocytosis was inhibited by amiloride, cytochalasin D, and the PKC inhibitor Gö6976 whereas Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF enhanced ligand internalization through DARC. The majority of DARC-ligand interactions occurred on the endothelial surface, with DARC identified along plasma membrane extensions with the appearance of ruffles, supporting the concept that DARC provides a high affinity scaffolding function for surface retention of chemokines on endothelial cells.These results show DARC-mediated chemokine endocytosis occurs through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells and caveolin-1 is dispensable for CXCL1 internalization.

  15. Identification of Two New Protective Pre-erythrocytic Malaria Vaccine Antigen Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Anthony R, Grainger M, Haynes J, Moch J, Muster N, Sacci J, Tabb D, Witney A, Wolters D, Wu Y, Gardner M, Holder A, Sinden R, Yates J, Carucci D: A...proteomic view of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle. Nature 2002, 419:520-526. 16. LeRoch D, Zhou Y, Blair P, Grainger M, Moch J, Haynes J, De La Vega P

  16. Mature Erythrocytes of Iguana iguana (Squamata, Iguanidae Possess Functional Mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Di Giacomo

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy analyses of Iguana iguana blood preparations revealed the presence of mitochondria within erythrocytes with well-structured cristae. Fluorescence microscopy analyses upon incubation with phalloidin-FITC, Hoechst 33342 and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm-sensitive probe MitoTracker Red indicated that mitochondria i widely occur in erythrocytes, ii are polarized, and iii seem to be preferentially confined at a "perinuclear" region, as confirmed by electron microscopy. The analysis of NADH-dependent oxygen consumption showed that red blood cells retain the capability to consume oxygen, thereby providing compelling evidence that mitochondria of Iguana erythrocytes are functional and capable to perform oxidative phosphorylation.

  17. Mature Erythrocytes of Iguana iguana (Squamata, Iguanidae) Possess Functional Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Giuseppina; Campello, Silvia; Corrado, Mauro; Di Giambattista, Livia; Cirotti, Claudia; Filomeni, Giuseppe; Gentile, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy analyses of Iguana iguana blood preparations revealed the presence of mitochondria within erythrocytes with well-structured cristae. Fluorescence microscopy analyses upon incubation with phalloidin-FITC, Hoechst 33342 and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm)-sensitive probe MitoTracker Red indicated that mitochondria i) widely occur in erythrocytes, ii) are polarized, and iii) seem to be preferentially confined at a "perinuclear" region, as confirmed by electron microscopy. The analysis of NADH-dependent oxygen consumption showed that red blood cells retain the capability to consume oxygen, thereby providing compelling evidence that mitochondria of Iguana erythrocytes are functional and capable to perform oxidative phosphorylation.

  18. Erythrocyte survival studies in a rat myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derelanko, M.J.; Meagher, R.C.; Lobue, J.; Khouri, J.A.; Gordon, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    To determine the extent intrinsic erythrocyte defects and/or extrinsic factors were involved in anemia of rats bearing Shay chloroleukemia (SCL), survival of 3 H-DFP labeled erythrocytes was studied in leukemic and nonleukemic hosts. Red blood cells labeled before induction of leukemia, were rapidly lost from the peripheral circulation of SCL rats in terminal stages of disease. However, labeled erythrocytes from terminal SCL animals displayed normal lifespans when transfused into nonleukemic controls. Thus the anemia of this leukemia probably resulted from extrinsic factors associated with the leukemic process. Hemorrhage appeared to be primarily responsible for the anemia of this disease

  19. Targeting Human Cancer by a Glycosaminoglycan Binding Malaria Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salanti, Ali; Clausen, Thomas M.; Agerbæk, Mette Ø.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum engineer infected erythrocytes to present the malarial protein, VAR2CSA, which binds a distinct type chondroitin sulfate (CS) exclusively expressed in the placenta. Here, we show that the same CS modification is present on a high proportion of malignant cells and that it can...

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of 3 H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes.

  2. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ephraim, K.H.; Cox, P.H.; Hamer, C.J.A. v.d.; Berends, W.; Delhez, H.

    1977-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex of antigen determinants and also the carrier of these determinants. Chemically it is a glycoprotein. Its occurrence in blood serum or urine is correlated with malignant disease. Several radioimmunoassays (RIA) have been developed, one by Hoffmann-Laroche and one by the Rotterdam Radiotherapeutic Institute. Both methods and the Hoffmann assay kit are tested. Specifications are given for isolation of the antigen, preparation of the antiserum, and the execution of the RIA. Biochemical and clinical aspects are discussed

  3. Independent Origin and Global Distribution of Distinct Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein Gene Duplications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica B Hostetler

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax causes the majority of malaria episodes outside Africa, but remains a relatively understudied pathogen. The pathology of P. vivax infection depends critically on the parasite's ability to recognize and invade human erythrocytes. This invasion process involves an interaction between P. vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP in merozoites and the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC on the erythrocyte surface. Whole-genome sequencing of clinical isolates recently established that some P. vivax genomes contain two copies of the PvDBP gene. The frequency of this duplication is particularly high in Madagascar, where there is also evidence for P. vivax infection in DARC-negative individuals. The functional significance and global prevalence of this duplication, and whether there are other copy number variations at the PvDBP locus, is unknown.Using whole-genome sequencing and PCR to study the PvDBP locus in P. vivax clinical isolates, we found that PvDBP duplication is widespread in Cambodia. The boundaries of the Cambodian PvDBP duplication differ from those previously identified in Madagascar, meaning that current molecular assays were unable to detect it. The Cambodian PvDBP duplication did not associate with parasite density or DARC genotype, and ranged in prevalence from 20% to 38% over four annual transmission seasons in Cambodia. This duplication was also present in P. vivax isolates from Brazil and Ethiopia, but not India.PvDBP duplications are much more widespread and complex than previously thought, and at least two distinct duplications are circulating globally. The same duplication boundaries were identified in parasites from three continents, and were found at high prevalence in human populations where DARC-negativity is essentially absent. It is therefore unlikely that PvDBP duplication is associated with infection of DARC-negative individuals, but functional tests will be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  4. Decreased level of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and alteration of structural integrity in erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, M L; Hegde, Ramakrishna; Ganguly, N K; Mahajan, R C

    2003-04-01

    2,3-Diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), an intracellular metabolite of glycolytic pathway is known to affect the oxygen binding capacity of haemoglobin and mechanical properties of the red blood cells. 2,3-DPG levels have been reported to be elevated during anaemic conditions including visceral leishmaniasis. 2,3-DPG activity in P. falciparum infected red blood cells, particularly in cells infected with different stages of the parasite and its relationship with structural integrity of the cells is not known. Chloroquine sensitive and resistant strains of P. falciparum were cultured in vitro and synchronized cultures of ring, trophozoite and schizont stage rich cells along with the uninfected control erythrocytes were assayed for 2,3-DPG activity and osmotic fragility. It was observed that in both the strains, in infected erythrocytes the 2,3-DPG activity gradually decreased and osmotic fragility gradually increased as the parasite matured from ring to schizont stage. The decrease in 2,3-DPG may probably be due to increased pyruvate kinase activity of parasite origin, which has been shown in erythrocytes infected with several species of Plasmodium. The absence of compensatory increase in 2,3-DPG in P. falciparum infected erythrocytes may aggravate hypoxia due to anaemia in malaria and probably may contribute to hypoxia in cerebral malaria. As 2,3-DPG was not found to be increased in erythrocytes parasitized with P. falciparum, the increased osmotic fragility observed in these cells is not due to increased 2,3-DPG as has been suggested in visceral leishmaniasis.

  5. Identification of Stages of Erythroid Differentiation in Bone Marrow and Erythrocyte Subpopulations in Blood Circulation that Are Preferentially Lost in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreoshi Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Repeated weekly injections of rat erythrocytes produced autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA in C57BL/6 mice after 5-6 weeks. Using the double in vivo biotinylation (DIB technique, recently developed in our laboratory, turnover of erythrocyte cohorts of different age groups during AIHA was monitored. Results indicate a significant decline in the proportion of reticulocytes, young and intermediate age groups of erythrocytes, but a significant increase in the proportion of old erythrocytes in blood circulation. Binding of the autoantibody was relatively higher to the young erythrocytes and higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS were also seen in these cells. Erythropoietic activity in the bone marrows and the spleen of AIHA induced mice was examined by monitoring the relative proportion of erythroid cells at various stages of differentiation in these organs. Cells at different stages of differentiation were enumerated flow cytometrically by double staining with anti-Ter119 and anti-transferrin receptor (CD71 monoclonal antibodies. Erythroid cells in bone marrow declined significantly in AIHA induced mice, erythroblast C being most affected (50% decline. Erythroblast C also recorded high intracellular ROS level along with increased levels of membrane-bound autoantibody. No such decline was observed in spleen. A model of AIHA has been proposed indicating that binding of autoantibodies may not be a sufficient condition for destruction of erythroid cells in bone marrow and in blood circulation. Last stage of erythropoietic differentiation in bone marrow and early stages of erythrocytes in blood circulation are specifically susceptible to removal in AIHA.

  6. Antigen injection (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprosy is caused by the organism Mycobacterium leprae . The leprosy test involves injection of an antigen just under ... if your body has a current or recent leprosy infection. The injection site is labeled and examined ...

  7. Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR): MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. Brunner & Suddarth's Handbook of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests. 2 nd Ed, Kindle. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; c2014. Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR); p. 267– ...

  8. Erythrocytes for Drug Delivery and their Applications: A Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , dogs, rabbits, rats and mice. Encapsulation in erythrocytes drastically changes the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in both animals and humans, enhancing liver and spleen uptake and targeting the reticulo-endothelial system (RES).

  9. Spin labelling of human erythrocytes with nitroxide radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagalj, C.; DePaoli, T.C.P.; Hager, A.A.; Palaoro, L.A.; Rubin de Celis, E.; Farach, H.A.; Poole, C.P. jr

    1984-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were labelled with nitroxide, the spin label SYNVAR 101, under various experimantal conditions. A study was made of the influence of antireductants on the labelling efficiency and the kinetics of the radical decay during the labelling process

  10. Peripheral erythrocytes decrease upon specific respiratory challenge with grass pollen allergen in sensitized mice and in human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galateja Jordakieva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Specific hyper-responsiveness towards an allergen and non-specific airway hyperreactivity both impair quality of life in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We aimed to investigate cellular responses following specific and non-specific airway challenges locally and systemically in i sensitized BALB/c mice challenged with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5, and in ii grass pollen sensitized allergic rhinitis subjects undergoing specific airway challenge in the Vienna Challenge Chamber (VCC. METHODS AND RESULTS: BALB/c mice (n = 20 were intraperitoneally immunized with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5 and afterwards aerosol challenged with either the specific allergen Phl p 5 (n = 10 or the non-specific antigen ovalbumin (OVA (n = 10. A protocol for inducing allergic asthma as well as allergic rhinitis, according to the united airway concept, was used. Both groups of exposed mice showed significantly reduced physical activity after airway challenge. Specific airway challenge further resulted in goblet cell hyperplasia, enhanced mucous secretion, intrapulmonary leukocyte infiltration and lymphoid follicle formation, associated with significant expression of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 in splenocytes and also partially in lung tissue. Concerning circulating blood cell dynamics, we observed a significant drop of erythrocyte counts, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in both mouse groups, challenged with allergen or OVA. A significant decrease in circulating erythrocytes and hematocrit levels after airway challenges with grass pollen allergen was also found in grass pollen sensitized human rhinitis subjects (n = 42 at the VCC. The effects on peripheral leukocyte counts in mice and humans however were opposed, possibly due to the different primary inflammation sites. CONCLUSION: Our data revealed that, besides significant leukocyte dynamics, particularly erythrocytes are involved in acute hypersensitivity reactions to respiratory allergens

  11. Effects of dietary fat on lipid composition of serum and erythrocytes of the swine and in vitro incorporation of fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroaki

    1974-01-01

    Changes in ftty acid patterns of lipids in serum and erythrocytes induced by dietary fats and in vitro incorporation of fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes were investigated with pigs. On feeding various diets, it was found that fatty acid composition of serum and erythrocytes could be modified and altered toward the fatty acid pattern of the diet. In vitro, the incorporation of labelled fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes was accelerated by the addition of cofactors such as lysolecithin, CoA and ATP. Dietary fats also had certain effects on the incorporation of fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes. Erythrocytes, collected from the blood of pigs fed corn oil, incorporated and also released more labelled linoleate than those of pigs fed hydrogenated soybean oil. Palmitic acid was more slowly incorporated into erythrocyte membranes than linoleic acid in the pigs fed both a commercial chow and scheduled meals, indicating selective esterification of fatty acids in the erythrocyte membranes. (author)

  12. Platelet inhibition by nitrite is dependent on erythrocytes and deoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirada Srihirun

    Full Text Available Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated.Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger, suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes.Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia.

  13. Erythrocyte zinc levels in children with bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arik Yilmaz, E; Ozmen, S; Bostanci, I; Misirlioglu, E Dibek; Ertan, U

    2011-12-01

    Zinc deficiency may be suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis, control, and severity of asthma because of its antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects. We aimed to investigate whether there was any relationship between erythrocyte zinc levels and childhood asthma. The erythrocyte zinc levels of 67 asthmatic and 45 healthy children were analyzed in this case-control study. The mean concentrations of erythrocyte zinc were 1215.8 ± 145.1 µg/dl in asthma patients and 1206.9 ± 119.5 µg/dl in controls with no significant difference (P = 0.472). The erythrocyte zinc level was below 1,000 µg/dl in 6 asthmatic patients (8.9%) and 2 control group patients (4.4%). There was no relationship between erythrocyte zinc levels and duration of follow-up, severity, and control of the asthma (P > 0.05). On the other hand, patients hospitalized for an asthma attack had significantly lower erythrocyte zinc levels compared with nonhospitalized patients and the control group (P = 0.000 and P = 0.004 respectively). This study's findings indicate that asthmatic children are not a risk group for zinc deficiency. We emphasize that checking zinc levels in children who are hospitalized for an asthma attack may be useful. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Determinants of variant surface antigen antibody response in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in an area of low and unstable malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A-Elgadir, T M E; Theander, T G; Elghazali, G

    2006-01-01

    The variant surface antigens (VSA) of infected erythrocytes are important pathogenic markers, a set of variants (VSA(SM)), were assumed to be associated with severe malaria (SM), while SM constitutes clinically diverse forms, such as, severe malarial anemia (SMA) and cerebral malaria (CM). This s...

  15. Trifluoperazine-Induced Suicidal Erythrocyte Death and S-Nitrosylation Inhibition, Reversed by the Nitric Oxide Donor Sodium Nitroprusside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Ghashghaeinia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The high potency antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine (10-[3-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl-propyl]-2-(trifluoromethyl-(10H-phenothiazine dihydrochloride; TFP may either counteract or promote suicidal cell death or apoptosis. Similar to apoptosis, erythrocytes may enter eryptosis, characterized by phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface and cell shrinkage. Eryptosis can be stimulated by an increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i and inhibited by nitric oxide (NO. We explored whether TFP treatment of erythrocytes induces phosphatidylserine exposure, cell shrinkage, and calcium influx, whether it impairs S-nitrosylation and whether these effects are inhibited by NO. Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and protein nitrosylation from fluorescence switch of the Bodipy-TMR/Sypro Ruby signal. Results: Exposure of human erythrocytes to TFP significantly enhanced the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, raised [Ca2+]i, and decreased S-nitrosylation. The effect of TFP on annexin-V-binding was not affected by removal of extracellular Ca2+ alone, but was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment with sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an effect significantly augmented by additional removal of extracellular Ca2+. A 3 hours treatment with 0.1 µM Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin triggered annexin-V-binding and cell shrinkage, effects fully reversed by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Conclusions: TFP induces eryptosis and decreases protein S-nitrosylation, effects blunted by nitroprusside. The effect of nitroprusside is attenuated in the presence of extracellular Ca2+.

  16. Diabetic Erythrocytes Test by Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, A.M; Foresto, P; Darrigo, M; Rosso, O.A

    2008-01-01

    Even when a healthy individual is studied, his/her erythrocytes in capillaries continually change their shape in a synchronized erratic fashion. In this work, the problem of characterizing the cell behavior is studied from the perspective of bounded correlated random walk, based on the assumption that diffractometric data involves both deterministic and stochastic components. The photometric readings are obtained by ektacytometry over several millions of shear elongated cells, using a home-made device called Erythrodeformeter. We have only a scalar signal and no governing equations; therefore the complete behavior has to be reconstructed in an artificial phase space. To analyze dynamics we used the technique of time delay coordinates suggested by Takens, May algorithm, and Fourier transform. The results suggest that on random-walk approach the samples from healthy controls exhibit significant differences from those from diabetic patients and these could allow us to claim that we have linked mathematical nonlinear tools with clinical aspects of diabetic erythrocytes’ rheological properties. PMID:19415139

  17. Kinetics of heat-damaged homologous erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitriou, P.A.; Depascouale, A.K.; Germenis, A.E.; Antipas, S.E.P.

    1990-01-01

    A new theoretical five-compartmental model (5CM) was developed for analysis of the clearance of heat-damaged erythroctes (HDE) labelled with chronium 51. Besides the HDE-spleen interaction, this new model also takes into account the interaction between extrasplenic reticuloendothelial (RES) sites and HDE, i.e. the hepatic clearance of fragment erythrocytes (FE). Accordingly, HDE clearance curves are analysed into three exponential components, the fastest of which describes the RES-FE interaction, whereas the others describe the splenic clearance of spherocytes. Therefore, an estimation of the effective liver blood flow for HDE (ELBF) was achieved, along with a series of parameters describing splenic function. The 5CM proved to be more efficient than a previously proposed three-compartmental model (3CM) in the mathematical description of HDE clearance. Comparison was made by applying both models to 37 experimental curves obtained from 20 patients with congenital hemolytic anemias. The values for the splenic function parameters calculated by 5CM analysis and the strong correlations observed among them offer evidence that this model provides an adequate approximation to the real conditions under which HDE clearance takes place. Furthermore, a detailed quantitative analysis of the pooling of spherocytes within the spleen was attempted in this work, and this phenomenon was found to compete with splenic irreversible spherocyte trapping. The ELBF proved to be closely correlated with the hemodynamic splenic parameters, following first-order kinetics, as do low-dose colloids. (orig.)

  18. Morphological characteristics of urine erythrocytes in children with erythrocyturia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Minakova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nephropathies with erythrocyturia make up about 1/3 of all diseases of the kidneys and the urinary system, and they have some difficulties in differential diagnostics. Quite often, erythrocyturia is the only symptom of these diseases. In connection with this, determination of its origin is an important task in forming the correct diagnosis. Erythrocyturia in most diseases of the lower urinary tract is not accompanied by proteinuria or the presence of cylinders in the urine. The presence of proteinuria (more than 0.3 g/l or 1 g protein in urine per day, along with the appearance of erythrocytic cylinder in the urine sediment, raises suspicion in favor of glomerular or tubular diseases. Glomerular erythrocytes may be detected by means of urea concentration factor (UCF in the urinary sediment as a preliminary test for the determination of the erythrocyturia site. Erythrocytes that pass through the glomerular membrane have a changed form (dysmorphic. Determination of acanthocytes in the urine (ring-shaped erythrocytes with one or several bulges in the form of bubbles of different sizes and types is a more precise criterion of glomerular nephropathy than the presence of dysmorphic erythrocytes. The purpose of the study was to determine the morphological characteristics of urine erythrocytes in children with erythrocyturia, to improve the quality of differential diagnosis. Materials and methods. Determination of the morphological characteristics of urinary erythrocytes using UCF in 73 patients aged 1 to 18 years, of which 45 (61.6 % are patients with hematuric form of glomerulonephritis, 23 (31.5 % — with hereditary nephritis, and 5 (6.8 % — with dysmetabolic nephropathy. Detection of 50 to 80 % of dysmorphic erythrocytes in the urine sediment and finding in urine of more than 5 % of acanthocytes is a highly sensitive and specific diagnostic criterion for glomerular hematuria. Results. In children with a clinical diagnosis

  19. Antigenic and functional characterization of p57 produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weins, G.; Chien, M.S.; Winton, J.R.; Kaatari, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, produces large quantities of a 57-58 kDa protein (p57) during growth in broth culture and during infection of salmonid fish. Biological activities of secreted p57 include agglutination of salrnonid leucocytes and rabbit erythrocytes. We define the location of epitopes on p57 recognized by agglutination-blocking monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 4Cl1, 4H8 and 4D3, and demonstrate that the majority of secreted p57 is a nlonomer that retains salrnonid leucocyte agglutinat~ng activity. The 3 MAbs bound a recombinant, amino-terminal fragment of p57 (211 aa) but not a carboxy-terminal fragment (315 aa) demonstrating that the neutralizing epitopes are located within the amino-terminal portion of p57. When combinations of the MAbs were used in an antigen capture ELISA. the epitopes recognized by the 3 MAbs were shown to be sterically separate. However, when the same MAb was used as both the coating and detection MAb, binding of the biotinylated detection MAb was not observed. These data indicate that the epitopes recognized by the 3 agglutination-blocking antibodies are functionally available only once per molecule and that native p57 exists as a monomer Similar ELISA results were obtained when kidney tissues from 3 naturally infected chinook salmon were assayed. Finally, a p57 monomer was purified using anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography that retained in vitro agglutinating activity. A model in which p57 is released from R. salmoninarum as a biologically active monomer during infection of salmonid fish is proposed.

  20. Radioimmunoassay for hepatitis B core antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagnelli, E.; Pereira, C.; Triolo, G.; Vernace, S.; Paronetto, F.

    1982-01-01

    Serum hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is an important marker of hepatitis B virus replication. We describe an easy, sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of HBcAg in detergent-treated serum pellets containing Dane particles. Components of a commercial kit for anticore determination are used, and HBcAG is measured by competitive inhibition of binding of 125 I-labeled antibodies to HBcAg with HBcAg-coated beads. We assayed for HBcAG in the sera of 49 patients with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive chronic hepatitis, 50 patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis, and 30 healthy volunteers. HBcAg was detected in 41% of patients with HBsAg-positive chronic hepatitis but not in patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis Be antigen (an antigen closely associated with the core of Dane particles) determined in the same sera by radioimmunoassay, was not detected in 50% of HBcAg-positive sera

  1. Aflatoxin effect on erythrocyte profile and histopathology of broilers given different additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimy, M. F.; Sutrisno, B.; Agus, A.; Suryani, A. E.; Istiqomah, L.; Damayanti, E.

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate erythrocyte profile and microscopic changes effect of AF induces by low level (57.18 ppb) and chronic exposure (34 days) with administration of additive (Lactobacillus plantarum G7 and methionine). Aflatoxin-contaminated corn was prepared by inoculate Aspergillus flavus FNCC 6002 on corn. Total number of 576 broiler Lohman strain (MB202) unsexed DOC were allocated completely randomized into four treatments and 12 replicates, with 12 broiler chicks each. The treatments as follows: T1 = aflatoxin-contaminated diet, T2 = aflatoxin-contaminated diet + 1% of LAB (w/w), T3 = aflatoxin-contaminated diet + 0.8% of methionine (w/w), and T4 = aflatoxin-contaminated diet + 1% of LAB + 0.8% of methionine (w/w). The effect of treatments was evaluated using ANOVA and the difference among mean treatments were analyzed using DMRT. The result showed that administration of additives had no significant effect (P>0.05) on erythrocyte profile, liver, and bursa of Fabricius. The dose of additive in each treatment (T2, T3, T4) were insufficient to reduce adverse effect of chronic aflatoxicosis. It was concluded that the LAB dose for binding AF (57.18%) should be evaluated and the dose for methionine should be reduced for chronic treatment of aflatoxicosis.

  2. Characterization of Antigen-Specific B Cells Using Nominal Antigen-Coated Flow-Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Ahmed; Lepetit, Maud; Crochette, Romain; Giral, Magali; Lepourry, Julie; Pallier, Annaick; Castagnet, Stéphanie; Dugast, Emilie; Guillot-Gueguen, Cécile; Jacq-Foucher, Marylène; Saulquin, Xavier; Cesbron, Anne; Laplaud, David; Nicot, Arnaud; Brouard, Sophie; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    In order to characterize the reactivity of B cells against nominal antigens, a method based on the coupling of antigens onto the surface of fluorescent core polystyrene beads was developed. We first demonstrate that murine B cells with a human MOG-specific BCR are able to interact with MOG-coated beads and do not recognize beads coated with human albumin or pp65. B cells purified from human healthy volunteer blood or immunized individuals were tested for their ability to interact with various nominal antigens, including viral, vaccine, self and alloantigens, chosen for their usefulness in studying a variety of pathological processes. A substantial amount of B cells binding self-antigen MOG-coated beads can be detected in normal blood. Furthermore, greater frequencies of B cell against anti-Tetanic Toxin or anti-EBNA1 were observed in primed individuals. This method can reveal increased frequencies of anti-HLA committed B cells in patients with circulating anti-HLA antibodies compared to unsensitized patients and normal individuals. Of interest, those specific CD19 cells were preferentially identified within CD27−IgD+ (i-e naïve) subset. These observations suggest that a broad range of medical situations could benefit from a tool that allows the detection, the quantification and the characterization of antigen-specific blood B cells. PMID:24386360

  3. Detection of Occult Erythrocytic Membrane Damages upon Pharmacological Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yu. Alekseyeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood administration of pharmaceuticals may cause occult effects of these agents on erythrocytic membranes. These effects may damage and cause additional membrane defects, but may strengthen. The type and degree of the effects of an agent were detected by calibrated irreversible electroporation with a pulsed electric field (PEF. The paper considers the erythrocytic membranous effects of a wide concentration range of agents used in anesthesiology, such as esmerone, tracrium, and mar-caine-adrenaline. Under the action of PEF and esmerone at the normal concentration N, the rate of erythrocytic hemolysis increased by several times as compared with the control. The similar effect also occurred when esmerone was added at the concentration C=10N. Tracrium exerted a fixing effect on erythrocytic membranes. Upon a combined exposure to PEF and tracrium in the normal concentration C=N; erythrocytic hemolysis was slow. So was with the concentration C=10N. The rate of hemolysis of the red blood cells subjected to a combined action of marcaine adrenaline at the normal concentration C=N and even at the concentration C=10N and PEF was comparable with the hemolytic rate of the reference suspension. 

  4. MODIFICATION OF ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE PROTEINS WITH POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 1500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Zemlianskykh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to study the effect of polyethylene glycol PEG-1500 on the Ca2+-ATPase activity and changes in CD44 surface marker expression in human erythrocyte membranes. Determination of the Ca2+-ATPase activity was carried out in sealed erythrocyte ghosts by the level of accumulation of inorganic phosphorus. Changes in the expression of CD44 and amount of CD44+-erythrocytes were evaluated by flow cytometry. The inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity and a reduction in the level of CD44 expression and also the decrease in the amount CD44+-cells were found, reflecting a fairly complex restructuring in the membrane-cytoskeleton complex of erythrocytes under the influence of PEG-1500. Effect of PEG-1500 on the surface CD44 marker could be mediated by modification of proteins of membrane-cytoskeleton complex, as indicated by accelerated loss of CD44 in erythrocyte membranes after application of protein cross-linking reagent diamide. Reduced activity of Ca2+-ATPase activity may contribute to the increase in intracellular Ca2+ level and thus leads to a modification of interactions of integral proteins with cytoskeletal components that eventually could result in membrane vesiculation and decreasing in expression of the CD44 marker, which is dynamically linked to the cytoskeleton.

  5. Erythrocyte and platelet fatty acids in retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanzial, A M; Bonomi, L; Cobbe, C; Olivieri, O; Girelli, D; Trevisan, M T; Bassi, A; Ferrari, S; Corrocher, R

    1991-05-01

    The fatty acid composition and the glutathione-peroxidase activity (GSH-Px) of erythrocytes and platelets, the production of malondialdehyde (MDA) by platelets and the activity of the main systems of transmembrane cation transport in erythrocyte have been studied in 12 patients (5 males and 7 females) affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP). A remarkable increase of saturated fatty acids (SFA), particularly of stearic acid (C18:0), has been noted in these patients. The reduced unsaturated/saturated fatty acids ratio (PUFA/SFA) observed in both erythrocytes and platelets and the decrease of arachidonic acid in platelets may depend by an active peroxidation process as documented by the increase of MDA. Platelet glutathione-peroxidase (PTL-GSH-PX) and plasma retinol were in the normal range, whereas erythrocyte glutathione-peroxidase (E-GSH-PX), MDA and plasma alfa-toco-pherol were increased in patients with RP. The activities of Na(+)-K+ pump, cotransport and Na(+)-Li+ countertransport were normal in RP erythrocytes.

  6. Very Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Morphologic Classification of Erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Thomas J S; Olson, Eben M; Schulz, Wade L; Torres, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Morphologic profiling of the erythrocyte population is a widely used and clinically valuable diagnostic modality, but one that relies on a slow manual process associated with significant labor cost and limited reproducibility. Automated profiling of erythrocytes from digital images by capable machine learning approaches would augment the throughput and value of morphologic analysis. To this end, we sought to evaluate the performance of leading implementation strategies for convolutional neural networks (CNNs) when applied to classification of erythrocytes based on morphology. Erythrocytes were manually classified into 1 of 10 classes using a custom-developed Web application. Using recent literature to guide architectural considerations for neural network design, we implemented a "very deep" CNN, consisting of >150 layers, with dense shortcut connections. The final database comprised 3737 labeled cells. Ensemble model predictions on unseen data demonstrated a harmonic mean of recall and precision metrics of 92.70% and 89.39%, respectively. Of the 748 cells in the test set, 23 misclassification errors were made, with a correct classification frequency of 90.60%, represented as a harmonic mean across the 10 morphologic classes. These findings indicate that erythrocyte morphology profiles could be measured with a high degree of accuracy with "very deep" CNNs. Further, these data support future efforts to expand classes and optimize practical performance in a clinical environment as a prelude to full implementation as a clinical tool. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  7. The association of heavy and light chain variable domains in antibodies: implications for antigen specificity.

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-06-28

    The antigen-binding site of immunoglobulins is formed by six regions, three from the light and three from the heavy chain variable domains, which, on association of the two chains, form the conventional antigen-binding site of the antibody. The mode of interaction between the heavy and light chain variable domains affects the relative position of the antigen-binding loops and therefore has an effect on the overall conformation of the binding site. In this article, we analyze the structure of the interface between the heavy and light chain variable domains and show that there are essentially two different modes for their interaction that can be identified by the presence of key amino acids in specific positions of the antibody sequences. We also show that the different packing modes are related to the type of recognized antigen.

  8. Synthetic antigens, radiolabelled derivatives thereof, and methods of analysis using such derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhardt, W.A. Jr.; Hedaya, E.; Theodoropulos, S.

    1981-01-01

    This patent claim on behalf of Union Carbide Corporation, relates to a method of carrying out a competitive binding radioassay of a compound of interest in a clinical sample, using isocyanates labelled with radioiodine as synthetic antigens. (U.K.)

  9. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...

  10. Humoral and cell-mediated immune response against human retinal antigens in relation to ocular onchocerciasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lelij, A.; Rothova, A.; Stilma, J. S.; Vetter, J. C.; Hoekzema, R.; Kijlstra, A.

    1990-01-01

    Autoimmune mechanisms are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of the chorioretinal changes in ocular onchocerciasis. The humoral autoimmune response was determined by measuring serum levels of autoantibodies, directed against human S-antigen and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein

  11. Atorvastatin acts synergistically with N-acetyl cysteine to provide therapeutic advantage against Fas-activated erythrocyte apoptosis during chronic arsenic exposure in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Sen, Gargi; Sarkar, Avik; Biswas, Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant that reduces the lifespan of circulating erythrocytes during chronic exposure. Our previous studies had indicated involvement of hypercholesterolemia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in arsenic-induced apoptotic death of erythrocytes. In this study, we have shown an effective recovery from arsenic-induced death signaling in erythrocytes in response to treatment with atorvastatin (ATV) and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) in rats. Our results emphasized on the importance of cholesterol in the promotion of ROS-mediated Fas signaling in red cells. Arsenic-induced activation of caspase 3 was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure on the cell surface and microvesiculation of erythrocyte membrane. Administration of NAC in combination with ATV, proved to be more effective than either of the drugs alone towards the rectification of arsenic-mediated disorganization of membrane structural integrity, and this could be linked with decreased ROS accumulation through reduced glutathione (GSH) repletion along with cholesterol depletion. Moreover, activation of caspase 3 was capable of promoting aggregation of band 3 with subsequent binding of autologous IgG and opsonization by C3b that led to phagocytosis of the exposed cells by the macrophages. NAC-ATV treatment successfully amended these events and restored lifespan of erythrocytes from the exposed animals almost to the control level. This work helped us to identify intracellular membrane cholesterol enrichment and GSH depletion as the key regulatory points in arsenic-mediated erythrocyte destruction and suggested a therapeutic strategy against Fas-activated cell death related to enhanced cholesterol and accumulation of ROS.

  12. Decreased calcium pump expression in human erythrocytes is connected to a minor haplotype in the ATP2B4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámbó, Boglárka; Várady, György; Padányi, Rita; Szabó, Edit; Németh, Adrienn; Langó, Tamás; Enyedi, Ágnes; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2017-07-01

    Plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPases are key calcium exporter proteins in most tissues, and PMCA4b is the main calcium transporter in the human red blood cells (RBCs). In order to assess the expression level of PMCA4b, we have developed a flow cytometry and specific antibody binding method to quantitatively detect this protein in the erythrocyte membrane. Interestingly, we found several healthy volunteers showing significantly reduced expression of RBC-PMCA4b. Western blot analysis of isolated RBC membranes confirmed this observation, and indicated that there are no compensatory alterations in other PMCA isoforms. In addition, reduced PMCA4b levels correlated with a lower calcium extrusion capacity in these erythrocytes. When exploring the potential genetic background of the reduced PMCA4b levels, we found no missense mutations in the ATP2B4 coding regions, while a formerly unrecognized minor haplotype in the predicted second promoter region closely correlated with lower erythrocyte PMCA4b protein levels. In recent GWA studies, SNPs in this ATP2B4 haplotype have been linked to reduced mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations (MCHC), and to protection against malaria infection. Our data suggest that an altered regulation of gene expression is responsible for the reduced RBC-PMCA4b levels that is probably linked to the development of human disease-related phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antigen detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  15. Isocyanate test antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karol, M.H.; Alarie, Y.C.

    1980-01-01

    A test antigen for detecting antibodies to a diisocyanate comprises the reaction product of a protein and a monoisocyanate derived from the same radical as the diisocyanate. The diisocyanates most usually encountered and therefore calling for antibody detection are those of toluene, hexamethylene, methylene, isophorone and naphthylene. The preferred protein is human serum albumin. (author)

  16. Induced refolding of a temperature denatured llama heavy-chain antibody fragment by its antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.; Vliet, C. van; Perez, J.M.J.; Vriend, G.; Darbon, H.; Ferrat, G.; Cambillau, C.; Frenken, L.G.J.; Verrips, T.

    2005-01-01

    In a previous study we have shown that llama VHH antibody fragments are able to bind their antigen after a heat shock of 90°C, in contrast to the murine monoclonal antibodies. However, the molecular mechanism by which antibody:antigen interaction occurs under these extreme conditions remains

  17. The role of CD4 in antigen-independent activation of isolated single T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelso, A; Owens, T

    1988-01-01

    The membrane molecule CD4 (L3T4) is thought to facilitate activation of Class II H-2-restricted T cells by binding to Ia determinants on antigen-presenting cells. Recent reports suggest that CD4 can also contribute to antigen-independent activation by anti-T cell receptor (TCR) antibodies. An ass...

  18. Radioimmunoassay for detecting antibodies against murine malarial parasite antigens: monoclonal antibodies recognizing Plasmodium yoelii antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.; Taylor, D.W.; Evans, C.B.; Asofsky, R.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) in microtiter wells was established for detecting antibodies against Plasmodium yoelii Ag. The SPRIA was found (1) to require as little as 5 μg of crude parasite Ag per well, (2) to be able to detect 0.5 ng of monoclonal Ab, and (3) to be 10 4 times more sensitive than the indirect fluorescent Ab staining technique. In a modification of the above assay using intact RBC as an Ag, hyperimmune serum showed significant binding to the surface of erythrocytes of mice infected with P. yoelii parasites but not to RBC of normal mice. Hybridomas were prepared by fusing infected mouse spleen cells with myeloma cells. Using the SPRIA, hybrids secreting Ab against P. yoelii 17XL Ag were detected

  19. Optical Assay of Erythrocyte Function in Banked Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Kandel, Mikhail; Brugnara, Carlo; Tangella, Krishna; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-09-01

    Stored red blood cells undergo numerous biochemical, structural, and functional changes, commonly referred to as storage lesion. How much these changes impede the ability of erythrocytes to perform their function and, as result, impact clinical outcomes in transfusion patients is unknown. In this study we investigate the effect of the storage on the erythrocyte membrane deformability and morphology. Using optical interferometry we imaged red blood cell (RBC) topography with nanometer sensitivity. Our time-lapse imaging quantifies membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale, which in turn report on cell stiffness. This property directly impacts the cell's ability to transport oxygen in microvasculature. Interestingly, we found that cells which apparently maintain their normal shape (discocyte) throughout the storage period, stiffen progressively with storage time. By contrast, static parameters, such as mean cell hemoglobin content and morphology do not change during the same period. We propose that our method can be used as an effective assay for monitoring erythrocyte functionality during storage time.

  20. Determination of somatic mutations in human erythrocytes by cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.H.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Flow cytometric assays of human erythrocytes labeled with monoclonal antibodies specific for glycophorin A were used to enumerate variant cells that appear in peripheral blood as a result of somatic gene-loss mutations in erythrocyte precursor cells. The assay was performed on erythrocytes from 10 oncology patients who had received at least one treatment from radiation or mutagenic chemotherapy at least 3 weeks before being assayed. The patients were suffering from many different malignancies (e.g., breast, renal, bone, colon and lung), and were treated with several different mutagenic therapeutics (e.g., cisplatinum, adriamycin, daunomycin, or cyclophosphamide). The frequency of these variant cells is an indication of the amount of mutagenic damage accumulated in the individual's erythropoietic cell population. Comparing these results to HPRT clonogenic assays, we find similar baseline frequencies of somatic mutation as well as similar correlation with mutagenic exposures. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Determination of somatic mutations in human erythrocytes by cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R.H.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1985-06-21

    Flow cytometric assays of human erythrocytes labeled with monoclonal antibodies specific for glycophorin A were used to enumerate variant cells that appear in peripheral blood as a result of somatic gene-loss mutations in erythrocyte precursor cells. The assay was performed on erythrocytes from 10 oncology patients who had received at least one treatment from radiation or mutagenic chemotherapy at least 3 weeks before being assayed. The patients were suffering from many different malignancies (e.g., breast, renal, bone, colon and lung), and were treated with several different mutagenic therapeutics (e.g., cisplatinum, adriamycin, daunomycin, or cyclophosphamide). The frequency of these variant cells is an indication of the amount of mutagenic damage accumulated in the individual's erythropoietic cell population. Comparing these results to HPRT clonogenic assays, we find similar baseline frequencies of somatic mutation as well as similar correlation with mutagenic exposures. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Genotoxic Biomarkers in Erythrocytes of Lepidochelys olivacea (Cheloniidae from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Hugo Quiroz Herrera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted in the municipality of Bahia Solano, Colombia, and had as a goal to detect damage erythrocytes circulating with nuclear lesions in fifty-five Olive Ridley adult females using acridine orange immunostain, and correlate its frequencies with some physiological and biometric parameters. We determine a micronucleated erythrocytes (MNE frequency of 0.6 ± 0.6 and nuclear buds (NBE of 2.1 ± 1.9. We not found any relationship between the nuclear lesions with physiological or biometric parameters evaluated (Pearson and Kruskal-Wallis, p<0.05. We define a significative statistical difference (p=0.035 between both nuclear lesions frequencies. This results show nuclear damages in erythrocytes of Olive Ridley sea turtle for the first time in Colombia as an outcome of genotoxic stress. Also contributes key information for future research in the ecotoxicology area for endangered marine species.

  3. A novel approach for assessments of erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribush, A; Hatskelzon, L; Meyerstein, N

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the dispersed phase of sedimenting blood undergoes dramatic structural changes: Discrete red blood cell (RBC) aggregates formed shortly after a settling tube is filled with blood are combined into a continuous network followed by its collapse via the formation of plasma channels, and finally, the collapsed network is dispersed into individual fragments. Based on this scheme of structural transformation, a novel approach for assessments of erythrocyte sedimentation is suggested. Information about erythrocyte sedimentation is extracted from time records of the blood conductivity measured after a dispersion of RBC network into individual fragments. It was found that the sedimentation velocity of RBC network fragments correlates positively with the intensity of attractive intercellular interactions, whereas no effect of hematocrit (Hct) was observed. Thus, unlike Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate, sedimentation data obtained by the proposed method do not require correction for Hct. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Red not dead: signaling in and from erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Randy S; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellsworth, Mary L

    2007-11-01

    The oxygen required to meet metabolic needs of all tissues is delivered by the erythrocyte, a small, flexible cell which, in mammals, is devoid of a nucleus and mitochondria. Despite its simple appearance, this 'bag of hemoglobin' has an important role in its own distribution, enabling the delivery of oxygen to precisely meet localized metabolic need. When an erythrocyte enters an area in which tissue oxygen demand exceeds supply, a signaling pathway is activated resulting in the release of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). This ATP acts in a paracrine fashion to increase vascular caliber resulting in increased oxygen delivery. Defects in this pathway are found in erythrocytes of humans with type 2 diabetes (DM2) and could contribute to the perfusion abnormalities in skeletal muscle associated with this disease.

  5. The malaria parasite RhopH protein complex interacts with erythrocyte calmyrin identified from a comprehensive erythrocyte protein library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Takeo, Satoru; Ntege, Edward H; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Ishino, Tomoko; Takashima, Eizo; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2018-06-02

    Malaria merozoite apical organelles; microneme and rhoptry secreted proteins play functional roles during and following invasion of host erythrocytes. Among numerous proteins, the rhoptries discharge high molecular weight proteins known as RhopH complex. Recent reports suggest that the RhopH complex is essential for growth and survival of the malaria parasite within erythrocytes. However, an in-depth understanding of the host-parasite molecular interactions is indispensable. Here we utilized a comprehensive mouse erythrocyte protein library consisting of 443 proteins produced by a wheat germ cell-free system, combined with AlphaScreen technology to identify mouse erythrocyte calmyrin as an interacting molecule of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii RhopH complex (PyRhopH). The PyRhopH interaction was dependent on the calmyrin N-terminus and divalent cation capacity. The finding unveils a recommendable and invaluable usefulness of our comprehensive mouse erythrocyte protein library together with the AlphaScreen technology in investigating a wide-range of host-parasite molecular interactions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tracing of erythrocytes in vitro with technetium-99 m: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boasquevisque, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    The human beings' erythrocytes were studied in vitro by the pre tinning method, using the pyrophosphate - Stannous Chloride Kit. Investigation of factors that can alter the labeling efficiency includes tin concentration, temperature and incubation period, besides of plasma concentration and hematocrit. It was seen that tin uptake by the red blood cells (RBC) was in an exponential fashion, with a reaction constant, K = 0,03 min -1 . The reaction approaches the equilibrium about the 90 minutes. The binding of Tc-99 m in the Acidic insoluble fraction occurs in greater amounts with more concentrated tin solutions. The labeled and heated TBC were used in vivo to scintigraphic investigation. Normal subjects, splenomegaly, accessory spleen and splenic function in sickel-cell disease were studied. Circulation time of labeled RBC appears to be greater in sickel-cell anemia than in controls or splenectomized patients. Uptake was greater in kidney than lungs and liver. (author)

  7. Membrane-bound 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase of human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, W; Neuvians, M

    1970-12-01

    Gradual osmotic hemolysis of human erythrocytes reduces the cell content of whole protein, hemoglobin, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and triosephosphate isomerase extensively, but not that of membrane protein and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase. After the refilling of the ghosts with 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and reconstitution of the membrane, the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase activity equals that of intact red cells. The membrane-bound 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase can be activated by sodium hyposulfite. The enzyme system of ghosts seems to differ from that of intact red cells with regard to the optima of pH and temperature. It remains to be elucidated if the membrane binding of the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase is related to the transfer of inorganic phosphate across the red cell membrane.

  8. [Role of erythrocyte cytoplasmic structures in changes in the affinity of haemoglobin for oxygen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryzgalova, N Iu; Brazhe, N A; Iusipovich, A U; Maksimov, G V; Rubin, A B

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the refractive index of the cytoplasm and the affinity of haemoporphyrin of erythrocyte haemoglobin to oxygen (pH, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) have been investigated using laser interference microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It has been established that a decrease in pH and an increase in the content of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate are accompanied by changes in both the form of the cell and the refractive index of the cytoplasm and the affinity of haemoporphyrin of hemoglobin to oxygen. It has been shown that as pH is reduced, the capacity of haemoporphyrin for binding oxygen decreases and as the concentration of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate is increased, the ability of haemoporphyrin for oxygen reabsorption increases.

  9. Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes and the infected placenta: a two-way pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.T.M. Costa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is undoubtedly the world's most devastating parasitic disease, affecting 300 to 500 million people every year. Some cases of Plasmodium falciparum infection progress to the deadly forms of the disease responsible for 1 to 3 million deaths annually. P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes adhere to host receptors in the deep microvasculature of several organs. The cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes to placental syncytiotrophoblast receptors leads to pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM. This specific maternal-fetal syndrome causes maternal anemia, low birth weight and the death of 62,000 to 363,000 infants per year in sub-Saharan Africa, and thus has a poor outcome for both mother and fetus. However, PAM and non-PAM parasites have been shown to differ antigenically and genetically. After multiple pregnancies, women from different geographical areas develop adhesion-blocking antibodies that protect against placental parasitemia and clinical symptoms of PAM. The recent description of a new parasite ligand encoded by the var2CSA gene as the only gene up-regulated in PAM parasites renders the development of an anti-PAM vaccine more feasible. The search for a vaccine to prevent P. falciparum sequestration in the placenta by eliciting adhesion-blocking antibodies and a cellular immune response, and the development of new methods for evaluating such antibodies should be key priorities in mother-child health programs in areas of endemic malaria. This review summarizes the main molecular, immunological and physiopathological aspects of PAM, including findings related to new targets in the P. falciparum var gene family. Finally, we focus on a new methodology for mimicking cytoadhesion under blood flow conditions in human placental tissue.

  10. Surface complement C3 fragments and cellular binding of microparticles in patients with SLE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winberg, Line Kjær; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Jacobsen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To examine microparticles (MPs) from patients with SLE and healthy controls (HCs) by determining the cellular origin of the MPs, quantifying attached fragments of complement component 3 (C3) and assessing the ability of MPs to bind to circulating phagocytes and erythrocytes. These fea......Objectives: To examine microparticles (MPs) from patients with SLE and healthy controls (HCs) by determining the cellular origin of the MPs, quantifying attached fragments of complement component 3 (C3) and assessing the ability of MPs to bind to circulating phagocytes and erythrocytes...

  11. Erythrocyte stiffness during morphological remodeling induced by carbon ion radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoping Zhang

    Full Text Available The adverse effect induced by carbon ion radiation (CIR is still an unavoidable hazard to the treatment object. Thus, evaluation of its adverse effects on the body is a critical problem with respect to radiation therapy. We aimed to investigate the change between the configuration and mechanical properties of erythrocytes induced by radiation and found differences in both the configuration and the mechanical properties with involving in morphological remodeling process. Syrian hamsters were subjected to whole-body irradiation with carbon ion beams (1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy or X-rays (2, 4, 6, and 12 Gy for 3, 14 and 28 days. Erythrocytes in peripheral blood and bone marrow were collected for cytomorphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were determined using atomic force microscopy, and the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was analyzed via western blotting. The results showed that dynamic changes were evident in erythrocytes exposed to different doses of carbon ion beams compared with X-rays and the control (0 Gy. The magnitude of impairment of the cell number and cellular morphology manifested the subtle variation according to the irradiation dose. In particular, the differences in the size, shape and mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were well exhibited. Furthermore, immunoblot data showed that the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was changed after irradiation, and there was a common pattern among its substantive characteristics in the irradiated group. Based on these findings, the present study concluded that CIR could induce a change in mechanical properties during morphological remodeling of erythrocytes. According to the unique characteristics of the biomechanical categories, we deduce that changes in cytomorphology and mechanical properties can be measured to evaluate the adverse effects generated by tumor radiotherapy. Additionally, for the first time, the current study

  12. Viral erythrocytic necrosis: Chapter 2.2.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, James R.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN), originally termed piscine erythrocytic necrosis, is a condition that has been reported to affect the red blood cells (RBCs) of many species of marine and anadromous fishes in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans (Nicholson and Reno 1981; Smail 1982; Wolf 1988; Dannevig and Thorud 1999). Fish with VEN may develop a severe anemia that can reduce their stamina, predispose them to other infections or increase the impact of other stressors (MacMillan et al. 1980; Nicholson and Reno 1981; Meyers et al. 1986; Haney et al. 1992) resulting in population-scale impacts in susceptible species (Hershberger et al. 2009).

  13. The complete amino acid sequence of human erythrocyte diphosphoglycerate mutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggarty, N W; Dunbar, B; Fothergill, L A

    1983-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of human erythrocyte diphosphoglycerate mutase, comprising 239 residues, was determined. The sequence was deduced from the four cyanogen bromide fragments, and from the peptides derived from these fragments after digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. Comparison of this sequence with that of the yeast glycolytic enzyme, phosphoglycerate mutase, shows that these enzymes are 47% identical. Most, but not all, of the residues implicated as being important for the activity of the glycolytic mutase are conserved in the erythrocyte diphosphoglycerate mutase. PMID:6313356

  14. Antibodies against high frequency Gerbich 2 antigen (anti-Ge2: A real challenge in cross matching lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra P Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion management of patients′ alloimmunized against high-prevalence erythrocyte antigens is often problematic in emergency situations. Gerbich (Ge is very common blood group system and Gerbich-2 (Ge-2 antigen present in high frequency and outside Papua New Guinea population, Ge-2 negative population almost nil. To manage such kind of problems with real emergencies, implementation of rare donor registry program, cryopreservation of red cells of rare donors and biological cross matching to assess significance of these antibodies is warranted.

  15. Python erythrocytes are resistant to α-hemolysin from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Casper K; Skals, Marianne; Wang, Tobias; Cheema, Muhammad U; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A

    2011-12-01

    α-Hemolysin (HlyA) from Escherichia coli lyses mammalian erythrocytes by creating nonselective cation pores in the membrane. Pore insertion triggers ATP release and subsequent P2X receptor and pannexin channel activation. Blockage of either P2X receptors or pannexin channels reduces HlyA-induced hemolysis. We found that erythrocytes from Python regius and Python molurus are remarkably resistant to HlyA-induced hemolysis compared to human and Trachemys scripta erythrocytes. HlyA concentrations that induced maximal hemolysis of human erythrocytes did not affect python erythrocytes, but increasing the HlyA concentration 40-fold did induce hemolysis. Python erythrocytes were more resistant to osmotic stress than human erythrocytes, but osmotic stress tolerance per se did not confer HlyA resistance. Erythrocytes from T. scripta, which showed higher osmotic resistance than python erythrocytes, were as susceptible to HlyA as human erythrocytes. Therefore, we tested whether python erythrocytes lack the purinergic signalling known to amplify HlyA-induced hemolysis in human erythrocytes. P. regius erythrocytes increased intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration and reduced cell volume when exposed to 3 mM ATP, indicating the presence of a P2X₇-like receptor. In addition, scavenging extracellular ATP or blocking P2 receptors or pannexin channels reduced the HlyA-induced hemolysis. We tested whether the low HlyA sensitivity resulted from low affinity of HlyA to the python erythrocyte membrane. We found comparable incorporation of HlyA into human and python erythrocyte membranes. Taken together, the remarkable HlyA resistance of python erythrocytes was not explained by increased osmotic resistance, lack of purinergic hemolysis amplification, or differences in HlyA affinity.

  16. Kinetics of viral load and erythrocytic inclusion body formation in pacific herring artificially infected with erythrocytic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jolene A.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Grady, Courtney A.; Roon, Sean R.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Conway, Carla M.; Winton, James R.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition that affects marine and anadromous fish species, including herrings and salmonids, in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Infection is frequently associated with severe anemia and causes episodic mortality among wild and hatchery fish when accompanied by additional stressors; VEN can be presumptively diagnosed by (1) light microscopic identification of a single characteristic—a round, magenta-colored, 0.8-μm-diameter inclusion body (IB) within the cytoplasm of erythrocytes and their precursors on Giemsa-stained blood films; or (2) observation (via transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) of the causative iridovirus, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), within erythrocytes or their precursors. To better understand the kinetics of VEN, specific-pathogen-free Pacific herring Clupea pallasii were infected with ENV by intraperitoneal injection. At 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 d postexposure, samples of blood, spleen, and kidney were collected and assessed (1) via light microscopy for the number of intracytoplasmic IBs in blood smears and (2) via TEM for the number of virions within erythrocytes. The mean prevalence of intracytoplasmic IBs in the blood cells increased from 0% at 0–4 d postexposure to 94% at 28 d postexposure. Viral load within circulating red blood cells peaked at 7 d postexposure, fell slightly, and then reached a plateau. However, blood cells observed within the kidney and spleen tissues demonstrated high levels of ENV between 14 and 28 d postexposure. The results indicate that the viral load within erythrocytes does not correlate well with IB prevalence and that the virus can persist in infected fish for more than 28 d.

  17. Correlation between 'H' blood group antigen and Plasmodium falciparum invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Vrushali; Colah, Roshan; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-06-01

    The ABO blood group system is the most important blood group system in clinical practice. The relationship between Plasmodium falciparum and ABO blood groups has been studied for many years. This study was undertaken to investigate the abilities of different blood group erythrocytes to support in vitro growth of P. falciparum parasites. P. falciparum parasites of four different strains (3D7, 7G8, Dd2 and RKL9) were co-cultured with erythrocytes of blood group 'A', 'B', 'O' (n = 10 for each) and 'O(h)' (Bombay group) (n = 7) for 5 days. Statistically significant differences were observed on the fourth day among the mean percent parasitemias of 'O', non-'O' ('A' and 'B') and 'O(h)' group cultures. The parasitemias of four strains ranged from 12.23 to 14.66, 11.68 to 13.24, 16.89 to 22.3, and 7.37 to 11.27 % in 'A', 'B', 'O' and Bombay group cultures, respectively. As the expression of H antigen decreased from 'O' blood group to 'A' and 'B' and then to Bombay blood group, parasite invasion (percent parasitemia) also decreased significantly (p Ulex europaeus seeds. Mean percent parasitemia of lectin-treated cultures on the fourth day was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that of non-treated cultures and was found to be similar with the mean percent parasitemia demonstrated by the Bombay group erythrocyte cultures, thus further strengthening the hypothesis.

  18. Experiment study and FEM simulation on erythrocytes under linear stretching of optical micromanipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Song, Huadong; Zhu, Panpan; Lu, Hao; Tang, Qi

    2017-08-01

    The elasticity of erythrocytes is an important criterion to evaluate the quality of blood. This paper presents a novel research on erythrocytes' elasticity with the application of optical tweezers and the finite element method (FEM) during blood storage. In this work, the erythrocytes with different in vitro times were linearly stretched by trapping force using optical tweezers and the time dependent elasticity of erythrocytes was investigated. The experimental results indicate that the membrane shear moduli of erythrocytes increased with the increasing in vitro time, namely the elasticity was decreasing. Simultaneously, an erythrocyte shell model with two parameters (membrane thickness h and membrane shear modulus H) was built to simulate the linear stretching states of erythrocytes by the FEM, and the simulations conform to the results obtained in the experiment. The evolution process was found that the erythrocytes membrane thicknesses were decreasing. The analysis assumes that the partial proteins and lipid bilayer of erythrocyte membrane were decomposed during the in vitro preservation of blood, which results in thin thickness, weak bending resistance, and losing elasticity of erythrocyte membrane. This study implies that the FEM can be employed to investigate the inward mechanical property changes of erythrocyte in different environments, which also can be a guideline for studying the erythrocyte mechanical state suffered from different diseases.

  19. Blood Group Antigens C, Lub and P1 May Have a Role in HIV Infection in Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motswaledi, Modisa Sekhamo; Kasvosve, Ishmael; Oguntibeju, Oluwafemi Omoniyi

    2016-01-01

    Botswana is among the world's countries with the highest rates of HIV infection. It is not known whether or not this susceptibility to infection is due to genetic factors in the population. Accumulating evidence, however, points to the role of erythrocytes as potential mediators of infection. We therefore sought to establish the role, if any, of some erythrocyte antigens in HIV infection in a cross-section of the population. 348 (346 HIV-negative and 2 HIV-positive) samples were obtained from the National Blood Transfusion Service as residual samples, while 194 HIV-positive samples were obtained from the Botswana-Harvard HIV Reference Laboratory. Samples were grouped for twenty three antigens. Chi-square or Fischer Exact analyses were used to compare the frequencies of the antigens in the two groups. A stepwise, binary logistic regression was used to study the interaction of the various antigens in the light of HIV-status. The Rh antigens C and E were associated with HIV-negative status, while blood group Jka, P1 and Lub were associated with HIV-positive status. A stepwise binary logistic regression analysis yielded group C as the most significant protective blood group while Lub and P1 were associated with significantly higher odds ratio in favor of HIV-infection. The lower-risk-associated group C was significantly lower in Africans compared to published data for Caucasians and might partially explain the difference in susceptibility to HIV-1. The most influential antigen C, which also appears to be protective, is significantly lower in Africans than published data for Caucasians or Asians. On the other hand, there appear to be multiple antigens associated with increased risk that may override the protective role of C. A study of the distribution of these antigens in other populations may shed light on their roles in the HIV pandemic.

  20. Associations of erythrocyte fatty acid patterns with insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Synergistic and/or additive effects on cardiometabolic risk may be missed by examining individual fatty acids (FA). A pattern analysis may be a more useful approach. As well, it remains unclear whether erythrocyte fatty acid composition relates to insulin resistance among Hispanic/Latino...

  1. Fragmentation of Human Erythrocyte Actin following Exposure to Hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Risso, A.; Santamaria, B.; Pistarino, E.; Cosulich, M. E.; Pompach, Petr; Bezouška, Karel; Antonutto, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 1 (2010), s. 6-13 ISSN 0001-5792 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : beta-Actin * Erythrocytes * Hypoxia Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2010

  2. Erythrocyte membrane modified janus polymeric motors for thrombus therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shao, Jingxin; Abdelghani, Mona; Shen, Guizhi; Cao, Shoupeng; Williams, David S.; van Hest, Jan C.M.

    2018-01-01

    We report the construction of erythrocyte membrane-cloaked Janus polymeric motors (EM-JPMs) which are propelled by near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation and are successfully applied in thrombus ablation. Chitosan (a natural polysaccharide with positive charge, CHI) and heparin (glycosaminoglycan

  3. Determination of molecular species of lecithin from erythrocytes and plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golde, L.M.G. van; Tomasi, V.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    The molecular species of lecithin from erythrocyte and plasma of man and rabbit were determined after conversion of the lecithins into diglycerides by means of hydrolysis with phospholipase C. The resultant diglycerides were separated by thin-layer chromatography on silica impregnated with silver

  4. Erythrocyte antioxidant protection of rose hips (Rosa spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widén, C; Ekholm, A; Coleman, M D; Renvert, S; Rumpunen, K

    2012-01-01

    Rose hips are popular in health promoting products as the fruits contain high content of bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate whether health benefits are attributable to ascorbic acid, phenols, or other rose-hip-derived compounds. Freeze-dried powder of rose hips was preextracted with metaphosphoric acid and the sample was then sequentially eluted on a C(18) column. The degree of amelioration of oxidative damage was determined in an erythrocyte in vitro bioassay by comparing the effects of a reducing agent on erythrocytes alone or on erythrocytes pretreated with berry extracts. The maximum protection against oxidative stress, 59.4 ± 4.0% (mean ± standard deviation), was achieved when incubating the cells with the first eluted meta-phosphoric extract. Removal of ascorbic acid from this extract increased the protection against oxidative stress to 67.9 ± 1.9%. The protection from the 20% and 100% methanol extracts was 20.8 ± 8.2% and 5.0 ± 3.2%, respectively. Antioxidant uptake was confirmed by measurement of catechin by HPLC-ESI-MS in the 20% methanol extract. The fact that all sequentially eluted extracts studied contributed to protective effects on the erythrocytes indicates that rose hips contain a promising level of clinically relevant antioxidant protection.

  5. Erythrocyte indices and serum biochemical constituents of broiler ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and twenty (120) four weeks old Ross breed broiler finisher birds were used to study the effect of feeding maggot meal as a replacement for fish meal on erythrocyte indices and serum biochemical constituents. The birds were divided into 5 treatment groups identified as T1, T2, T3 , T4 and T5 with 24 birds per ...

  6. The role of inorganic phosphate in intact human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiguchi, Eiko; Umeda, Masahiro.

    1988-01-01

    The role of inorganic phosphate in intact human erythrocytes was investigated by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P NMR). When erythrocytes stored for 5 weeks were incubated at 37 deg C, pH 7.4, in medium containing 2 mM adenine and 10 mM inosine, with or without 5 mM glucose, a substance of around 4 ppm, as assessed by 31 P NMR chemical shift, was detected in the mixture. However, this substance disappeared by the addition of inorganic phosphate. When erythrocytes stored for 4 weeks in acid citrate dextrose (ACD) solution were incubated with 2 mM adenine, 10 mM inosine, 5 mM glucose, 50 mM inorganic phosphate and 10 mM pyruvate at 37 deg C, pH 7.4, the 2,3-DPG level increased gradually, whereas the ATP level initially increased and then decreased. Intracellular inorganic phosphate appeared to be used for the synthesis of ATP and 2,3-DPG during the first 30 min. of the reaction. These results suggests that the inorganic phosphate accelerates glycolysis by increasing the activity of glycolytic enzymes rather than its direct involvement in synthesizing organic phosphorus compounds in stored erythrocytes. The results also suggests that the reserve energy from ATP synthesis is not sufficient for the synthesis of 2,3-DPG. (author)

  7. Erythrocytes and von Willebrand factor in venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, M.W.J.

    2018-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism represents the third leading vascular disease after myocardial infarction and stroke. Erythrocytes, the most abundant cells in venous thrombi, were thought to be innocent bystanders that become tangled up in the fibrin mesh of venous thrombi. However, this thesis describes

  8. Erythrocyte Osmotic Fragility and Excitability Score in Rabbit fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    protect cells against oxidative stress in rats (Wang et al., 2000) and ... method, total red blood cell (RBC) count, total leukocyte (WBC) count .... maturative stages of the erythroblast (pluripotent stem cells) involved in cell formation (Kaur and. Kapoor, 2005). ... effect of zinc on chlorpyrifos- induced erythrocyte fragility in wistar ...

  9. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-01-01

    The uptake of exogenous 32 Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-[ 32 P]ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments

  10. Delayed effects of radiation on enzymes in erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinying; Zhang Weiping; Liu Benti

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To study the delayed effects of radiation on the enzymes in erythrocytes. Methods: The activity of 8 enzymes, related glycolysis, hexose monophosphate shunt, nucleotide metabolism, redox reaction and esterase in erythrocytes of five patients with bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were assayed at 1,2,3 and 6 years after exposure to 60 Co radiation. Results: The decreased activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), pyruvate kinase (PK), NADH-methemoglobin reductase (MR) during the stage of crisis and of acetylcholinesterase (ACE) during the stage of convalescence were recovered to varying extent, whereas the lowered activities of the first three enzymes in some cases remained unchanged. There was no correlation between the enzyme activity and the radiation dose as well as the age of the patients. Conclusion: It is demonstrated that the delayed effects of radiation damage to erythrocyte enzymes are most significant in PK of glycolysis, G6PD of hexose monophosphate shunt and MR of redox reaction. It is suggested that the genes related to the synthesis of erythrocyte enzymes may be damaged by radiation

  11. Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids in multiple sclerosis patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with increased dietary intake of saturated fatty acids. For many years it has been suspected that this disease might be associated with an imbalance between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids. We determined erythrocyte membrane fatty acids levels in Hot ...

  12. A review on radiation damage of erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junling; Wang Weidong; Qin Guangyong

    2007-01-01

    Biomembrane has very important biological function. Its damage will seriously disturb the directivity, the orderly nature and coordination of cell metabolism, and finally causes the cell death. This paper reviewed the effects of radiation damage on erythrocyte membrane in membrane composition, membrane function and oxidation resistance system. (authors)

  13. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility of pigs administered ascorbic acid and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-11

    Jan 11, 2010 ... procedure, were taken early in the morning a day before ... transportation and the difference in the post-transportation values was higher (P < 0.05) in experimental ..... erythrocytes in sedentary rats but not exercise-trained rats.

  14. Erratum Detergent-resistant membranes in human erythrocytes and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Figure 3. Immunodetection of flotillin-2 and band 3 in DRMs isolated from erythrocyte ghosts by various treatments. Flotillin-2. (left) and band 3 (right) Western blotting in ten fractions of 0⋅5 ml each, obtained from the sucrose gradients described in figure 2 and numbered from top to bottom. Flotillin-2 is enriched in DRMs ...

  15. Alterations of thalassemic erythrocytes detected by wavelet entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, A. M.; Rasia, R. J.; Rosso, O. A.

    2007-02-01

    A quantitative analysis of erythrocytes deformation under shear stress (the viscoelastic properties) observed on healthy donors as well as thalassemic patients are made by means of the normalized total wavelet entropy (NTWS). The results suggest that NTWS quantifier could be useful for characterizing pathological disturbances for the sake of clinical treatment.

  16. Apolipoprotein M mediates sphingosine-1-phosphate efflux from erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Pernille M.; Bosteen, Markus H.; Hajny, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid implicated in e.g. angiogenesis, lymphocyte trafficking, and endothelial barrier function. Erythrocytes are a main source of plasma S1P together with platelets and endothelial cells. Apolipoprotein M (apoM) in HDL carries 70% of plasma S1P, whereas...... 30% is carried by albumin. The current aim was to investigate the role of apoM in export of S1P from human erythrocytes. Erythrocytes exported S1P more efficiently to HDL than to albumin, particularly when apoM was present in HDL. In contrast, export of sphingosine to HDL was unaffected...... by the presence of apoM. The specific ability of apoM to promote export of S1P was independent of apoM being bound in HDL particles. Treatment with MK-571, an inhibitor of the ABCC1 transporter, effectively reduced export of S1P from human erythrocytes to apoM, whereas the export was unaffected by inhibitors...

  17. Dyslipidemia, altered erythrocyte fatty acids and selenium are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous blood sample was drawn from all subjects and erythrocytes separated for the determination of fatty acids. Plasma lipids, selenium and vitamin E levels were also measured. There were no differences in BMI, weight and height among the three groups except for systolic BP that was lower in VD (148.3±41.8mmHg) ...

  18. Changes in erythrocyte ATPase activity under different pathological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in erythrocyte ATPase activity under different pathological conditions. Ali A Kherd, Nawal Helmi, Khadijah Saeed Balamash, Taha A Kumosani, Shareefa A AL-Ghamdi, Qari M, Etimad A Huwait, Soonham S Yaghmoor, Alaama Nabil, Maryam A AL-Ghamdi, Said S Moselhy ...

  19. Improved Erythrocyte Osmotic Fragility and Packed Cell Volume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improved Erythrocyte Osmotic Fragility and Packed Cell Volume following administration of Aloe barbadensis Juice Extract in Rats. ... Abstract. Aloe barbadensis is a popular house plant that has a long history of a multipurpose folk remedy. ... Keywords: osmotic fragility, packed cell volume, haemoglobin, Aloe vera ...

  20. Effect of Aflatoxin B1 - contaminated feed on goat erythrocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... action was concentration-dependent, typical of a saturation kinetic effect. The degree of stimulation varied from 20% to more than 90% between the lowest (0.1 M) and highest (1000 M) contentrations. AFB1 induced changes in the apparent kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax, of the erythrocyte membrane-bound enzyme.