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Sample records for equivalent thoron concentration

  1. Diurnal measurement of equilibrium equivalent radon/thoron concentration using time integrated flow mode grab sampler

    Pant, P.; Kandari, T.; Ramola, R.C.; Semwal, C.P.; Prasad, M.

    2018-01-01

    The basic processes which influenced the concentration of radon and thoron decay products are- attachment, recoil and deposition and by the room specific parameters of radon exhalation and ventilation. The freshly formed decay products have a high diffusivities (especially in air) and ability to stick to surfaces. According to UNSCEAR 1977, radon daughters may be combined as the so called equilibrium equivalent concentration which is related to the potential alpha energy distribution concentration. In the present study an effort has been made to see the diurnal variation of radon and thoron progeny concentration using time integrated flow mode sampler

  2. Metrology of radon and thoron concentrations

    Durcik, M; Vicanova, M.

    1998-01-01

    The alpha spectrometry measurements of radon (radon-222) and thoron (radon-220) concentrations by ionisation chamber, used only in laboratory conditions are described in this paper. For the measurements of radon and thoron in dwellings and work areas was proposed diffusion double chamber detector with track detector. The described dosimeter is very useful for routine measurement and would be applied in measuring of radon and thoron concentrations in caves and dwellings. Big disadvantage of the dosimeter is small holes in cover and it could not be used in dusty areas. From previous measurements of the equilibrium equivalent thoron concentrations by semiconductor detector the measured values ranged from 0.1 to 5.6 Bq m -3 in the Slovak kindergartens were obtained

  3. Measurements of thoron and radon progeny concentrations in Beijing, China

    Zhang Lei; Liu Cuihong; Guo Qiuju

    2008-01-01

    It has been reported that thoron levels in China are above the world average and may therefore make a significant contribution to the natural background radiation dose. We therefore conducted a pilot study of concentrations of both thoron and radon progeny during the spring of 2006 in the Beijing area, China. A new type of portable 24 h integrating monitor with a CR-39 detector was used during the survey. Seventy dwellings and eight outdoor sites were measured during the survey. For country houses built of red bricks and slurry, the average equilibrium equivalent concentrations (EEC) of thoron and radon were 1.02 ± 0.48 and 16.41 ± 9.02 Bq m -3 , respectively, whereas for city dwellings built of cement blocks and floor slabs, the results were 0.48 ± 0.47 and 11.50 ± 6.99 Bq m -3 for thoron and radon, respectively. For outdoor air, concentrations of thoron and radon progeny were 0.29 ± 0.28 and 7.05 ± 2.68 Bq m -3 , respectively. Radiation exposures from thoron and radon progeny were also evaluated; the ratio of dose contribution from thoron progeny to that of radon progeny was evaluated to be 28% and 17% in country houses and city dwellings, respectively. (note)

  4. Filtration approach to mitigate indoor Thoron progeny concentration

    Wang, J.; Meisenberg, O.; Karg, E.; Tschiersch, J.; Chen, Y.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates filtration of air as potential mitigation method of thoron progeny exposure. The experiments were conducted in a model room (volume 7.1 m 3 ) which was equipped with a pump and an HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter. Filtration at a rate of 0.2, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.8 h -1 during 88 h proved an effective practice in reducing the total indoor thoron decay product concentration. The results indicate that 0.4-0.8 h -1 filtration rate had almost the same filtration efficiency in decreasing the total thoron EEC (equilibrium equivalent concentration) by 97% while 80% of total thoron EEC were reduced by 0.2 h -1 filtration rate; meanwhile, the unattached thoron EEC rose significantly by 190, 270, 290%, respectively under 0.4-0.8 h -1 filtration rate, whereas 0.2 h -1 filtration rate increased unattached thoron EEC by 40%. The aerosol number size distribution variation reveals that filtration operation removes smaller particles faster or earlier than the larger ones. The annual effective dose calculated was reduced by 91-92% at a filtration rate of 0.4-0.8 h -1 while 75% reduced at 0.2 h -1 filtration rate after 88 h filtration process. (authors)

  5. Integrating measurements of indoor thoron and its progeny concentrations

    Zhuo, W.H.; Iida, T.; Hashiguchi, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, indoor surveys in Europe and Asia revealed that the dose contribution from thoron and its progeny can equal or even exceed that of radon and its progeny. For measuring thoron and its progeny, several methods had been reported. However, convenient, low-cost and time-integrating measuring methods which are suitable for large-scale surveys are still unavailable. To solve this problem, three integrating measuring methods with allyl diglycol carbonate plastic (CR-39) as detectors have recently been. The results indicated that they are suitable for estimating the indoor thoron and its progeny concentrations when the public exposure to thoron and its progeny is taken into account. Cup monitor - Former types of passive integrating 222 Rn and 220 Rn cup monitors had been reported. Recently, in order to improve the sensitivity of thoron detection, the air exchange rate between the inner and outer cup was enhanced, and the radius of the hemisphere was reduced to 37.5 mm. Furthermore, the procedure of detector exchange was made to be more convenient. Equilibrium-equivalent 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations monitor (EEC monitor) - The measuring system is composed of a monitor head and a diaphragm pump. The total weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg, which makes it portable. The construction of the monitor head and the measuring principle were also reported by the authors. Thoron progeny deposition rate monitor - The monitor is simply constituted a piece of CR-39 covered with thin sheets of absorbers. The thickness of the absorbers are adjusted to let only the α particles emitted from 212 Pb impinge on the detector. The concentrations of thoron progeny are estimated from the deposition rates, assuming that the deposition velocities of thoron progeny are constant in general dwellings. The improved cup monitor has higher sensitivity than former monitors, with a calibration factor of 1.59x10 -3 tracks·cm -2 (Bq·m -3 ·h) -1 for thoron. The accuracy of the ECC

  6. The study of thoron and radon progeny concentrations in dwellings in Japan

    Guo, Q.; Shimo, M.; Ikebe, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Ths paper aims to make a comparison of different concentrations of thoron ( 220 Rn) progeny and radon ( 222 Rn) progeny in different kinds of dwellings. The potential alpha energy concentrations and the effective dose equivalent caused by thoron and radon progeny, respectively, have also been estimated. The measurements were carried out in 23 dwellings. The results indicate that thoron progeny concentrations indoors might be strongly affected by the type of building material used. Traditional Japanese buildings made with mud may have high thoron progeny concentrations of about 3.52 Bq.m -3 and a concentration ratio of thoron progeny to radon progeny of about 0.5, whereas in concrete dwellings thoron progeny concentrations are about 0.72 Bq.m -3 and the concentration ratio of thoron progeny to radon progeny is about 0.1. The annual effective dose equivalent of thoron progeny is 1.23 mSv in mud dwellings and 0.25 mSv in concrete dwellings. (author)

  7. The measurement of thoron (220Rn) concentration in indoor air continuously using pylon model WLx

    Hasnel Sofyan

    2011-01-01

    The concentration of thoron ( 220 Rn) in particular location can be higher than radon ( 220 Rn), however, its presence is always neglected. This might be due to the difficulties in calibration and discrimination between radon and thoron. From biokinetic and dosimetric model, it has been known that the dominant contribution of thoron to the effective dose is in the lungs. UNSCEAR estimates the doses contribution of thoron and its progenies is between 5-10% of the annual dose received by the general public and the risk level is 4.4 times greater than radon and progenies. Therefore, it is necessary to study the thoron concentration in indoor air and workplaces. Radon-thoron concentration in indoor air can be determined by direct methods using Pylon Model WLx device and passive methods using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTDs). In this research the measurement of thoron was carried out continuously using Pylon Model WLx equipment that is sensitive to radon for 24, 65, 72, 116 and 154 hours in different rooms. The measurement result showed that the mean value of thoron working level (WL) concentration obtained in room-1 was 2.53 ± 0.67 Bq/m 3 with maximum and minimum of thoron concentrations were 3.37 and 2.22 Bq/m 3 respectively. From the measurement in different locations, it was obtained that the largest and smallest average concentrations of thoron progenies were 0.83 ± 0.23 Bq/m 3 and 0.29 ± 0.64 Bq/m 3 , while the maximum and minimum concentration values were 7.80 Bq/m 3 and 0.01 Bq/m 3 respectively. Pylon Model WLx device is not enables to be used for longer and large scale survey area concurrently, so the SSNTDs which is sensitive to the emission of alpha particles and can measure cumulative thoron concentrations is required. (author)

  8. Correlation of radon and thoron concentrations with natural radioactivity of soil in Zonguldak, Turkey

    Koray, Abdullah; Akkaya, Gizem; Kahraman, Ayşegül

    2017-02-01

    Radon and thoron gases are produced by the decay of the radioactive elements those are radium and thorium in the soil. In this study, the correlations between soil radon and thoron concentration with their parent nuclide (226Ra and 232Th) concentrations in collected soil samples from the same locations were evaluated. The result of the measurement shows that the distribution of radon and thoron in soil showed the same tendency as 226Ra and 232Th distribution. It was found a weak correlation between the radon and the 226Ra concentration (R =0.57), and between the thoron and the 232Th concentration (R=0.64). No strong correlation was observed between soil-gas radon and thoron concentration (R = 0.29).

  9. Thoron and radon measurements in houses

    Gauthier, C.

    1980-01-01

    Studies were made to determine what effect thoron daughters have on radon working level measurements in occupied houses at Elliot Lake. The decay of radon daughters is faster than that of thoron daughters. Six hours after sampling radon daughters are no longer present on the filter, and essentially all alpha activity is due to thoron C in transient equilibrium with thoron B. The concentrations can be extrapolated back to the time of the Kuznetz count, and the WL overestimation due to the presence of thoron daughters calculated. It was found using this method that in 70 percent of the samples the thoron contribution was no more than one mWL equivalent, less than the statistical error in the estimation of working levels. Only in buildings with very low ventilation rates and large areas of exposed concrete may corrections for the presence of thoron be necessary

  10. Measurement of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations in the dwellings of Pauri Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India

    Joshi, Veena; Bijalwan, Pramesh; Rawat, Jasbir; Yadav, Manjulata; Ramola, R.C.; Mishra, Rosaline

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that inhalation of radon, thoron and their progeny contribute more than 50% of natural background radiation dose to human being. The time integrated passive measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were carried out in the dwellings of Pauri Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India. The measurements of radon and thoron concentrations were performed by LR-115 detector based single entry Pin-Hole dosimeter while for the measurement of progeny concentrations, LR-115 deposition based DTPS/DRPS technique was used. The experimental techniques and results obtained are discussed in detail. (author)

  11. Seasonal variation in concentration of radon and thoron at non-uranium mines in China

    Cui Hongxing; Wu Yunyun; Zhang Qingzhao; Shang Bing

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the seasonal variation in concentrations of radon and thoron in non-uranium mine. Methods: Eight kinds of mineral types from 9 non-uranium mines were selected, including copper, gold, aluminium, manganese, antimonium, tungsten, copper-nickel and coal mines in 6 provinces, such as Yunnan, Shandong, Xinjiang, Heilongjiang, Hunan and Guizhou. LD-P R-T discriminative detectors were used to measure radon and thoron concentrations in underground mines during four seasons in one year. Results: Radon concentrations in underground mines showed a significantly seasonal variation. Radon concentration ranged from 35.5 to 4841 Bq/m 3 in summer, and the average value in four mines exceeded 1000 Bq/m 3 of the control limit for workplace (GB 18871-2002) . In winter, radon concentration ranged from 5 to 1917 Bq/m 3 , only one of them exceeded the control limit. The ratio of radon from summer to winter ranged from 2 to 12. Ventilation was one of the main factors which influenced the seasonal variation of radon. While the thoron concentration in underground mines showed a tendency that it was higher in summer and lower in winter. It was difficult to attain representative values for thoron, due to the influence of location of detectors. The seasonal variation of thoron should be further studied. Conclusions: Seasonal variation for radon and thoron should be taken into account to estimate the effective dose to miners. The values of radon concentration during the short term should be corrected. (authors)

  12. The measurement of thoron concentrations in Australia using the Japanese passive R-T dosimeter

    Toussaint, L.F.; Tokonami, S.; Doi, M.; Solomon, S.B.; Peggie, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown higher gamma radiation levels and higher soil thorium concentrations in the Darling Scarp area to the east of the city of Perth in Western Australia. It was considered desirable to measure the concentrations of the 220 Rn (thoron) in houses built near such areas and compare these measurements with similar measurements at other sites within Australia. A monitor developed for surveying 220 Rn and 222 Rn levels in Japan was considered most suitable for this purpose. The monitor used for the survey was a passive radon-thoron discriminative dosimeter, similar in type to that used to measure thoron concentrations in traditional Japanese houses. Houses for this study were selected from areas in the Darling Scarp. To provide data on what might be considered typical thoron concentrations associated with other soil types within Australia, a small number of houses in areas on the coastal plain of Western Australia and from the coastal areas of Victoria were also monitored. The mean thoron concentration in homes on the Darling Scarp of 14.0 Bq.m -3 was higher than that in the coastal plain in Western Australia (3.0 Bq.m -3 ) but comparable to the measurements in Victoria (11.3 Bq.m -3 ). For the radon measurements in homes, the mean Scarp concentration was typically 49.2 Bq.m -3 while the WA coastal plain and in Victoria mean concentrations were 11.6 Bq.m -3 and 15.4 Bq.m -3 respectively. For outdoors in the Darling Scarp, the thoron mean was 76.3 Bq.m -3 while the radon level was 18.2 Bq.m -3 . These measurements would suggest that the source of the thoron in homes on the Scarp is from the underlying soil rather than from the building materials. (author)

  13. Analysis of atmospheric concentrations of radon and thoron using beta counting technique

    Islam, G.S.; Basunia, S.M.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed theory and experimental procedure for measurement and analysis of mixed radon and thoron in the environment. The technique has been successfully applied to the study of seasonal variations of radon and thoron in Rajshahi atmosphere during the years 1989-1991. The maximum radon concentration in outdoor air was observed in the winter from December to January while the indoor radon concentration was found to be maximum during the monsoon months of July and August. The implication of results is briefly discussed in the paper. (author). 4 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  14. A study of diurnal variations of radon and thoron concentrations in different indoor environmental conditions

    Pant, Preeti; Prasad, Mukesh; Ramola, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    The measurements for diurnal variations in radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) concentrations were performed in the different indoor conditions of Tehri Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India by using AlphaGUARD, Portable Radon Monitor and RAD7. While selecting the dwellings, the ventilation conditions, building materials, life style of the inhabitants and their exposure time indoors were also considered. The behavior of indoor radon and thoron concentrations was observed for different type of dwellings with different environmental conditions. The measurement techniques, results obtained and comparison of the results are discussed in details. (author)

  15. Thoron and radon progeny concentration measurements using direct progeny sensors in HLNRAs of Kerala

    Mishra, R.; Prajith, R.; Gole, A.C.; Kanse, S.D.; Chougaonkar, M.P.; Sapra, B.K.; Mayya, Y.S.; Jayalekshmi, P.; Nair, Raghu Ram K.

    2010-01-01

    Passive Progeny Dosimeters (PPDs) were deployed in 500 houses in 3 villages namely Allapad, Chavara and Neendakara villages of Karunagapally Taluk of Kollam district of Kerala. Each PPD unit is a combination of a DTPS and a DRPS placed side-by-side for time integrated thoron and radon progeny concentration estimation respectively. The PPDs were suspended vertically in the rooms, such that the nearest distance from any wall or surface was at least 30 cm. These are, as of now, being exposed for a period of 3 months, after which they will be retrieved and analysed by chemical etching and track counting. Simultaneously, external gamma radiation measurements have also been made using a survey meter; these showed a variation from 13 to 118 μR/h in indoors and 21 to 213 μR/h in the outdoor environments. Spot measurements of thoron progeny concentrations were also made in 7 selected houses using the conventional grab filter-paper sampling technique at a flow-rate of 21 min -1 for 30 minutes, followed by alpha counting. The average thoron progeny concentration was found to be 2.0 ± 0.7 Bq m -3 . In the outdoor environment, filter-paper sampling was carried out for 2 hours at 21 min -1 and the thoron progeny concentration was measured as 2.96 Bq m -3 . To corroborate these measurements, a flow mode integrated sampler which uses the DTPS and DRPS elements was used

  16. Investigation of radon and thoron concentrations in a landmark skyscraper in Tokyo

    Kazumasa Inoue; Masahiro Fukushi

    2013-01-01

    The temporal variation of the radon concentration, and the radon and thoron concentrations every 3 months for a year were measured using two types of devices in a landmark skyscraper, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Daiichi Building. In the measurement of temporal variation of the radon concentration using a pulse type ionization chamber, the average radon concentration was 21 ± 13 Bq m -3 (2-68 Bq m -3 ). The measured indoor radon concentration had a strong relationship with the operation of the mechanical ventilation system and the activities of the office workers. The radon concentration also increased together with temperature. Other environmental parameters, such as air pressure and relative humidity, were not related to the radon concentration. In the long-term measurements using a passive radon and thoron discriminative monitor, no seasonal variation was observed. The annual average concentrations of radon and thoron were 16 ± 8 and 16 ± 7 Bq m -3 , respectively. There was also no relationship between the two concentrations. The annual average effective dose for office workers in this skyscraper was estimated to be 0.08 mSv y -1 for 2000 working hours per year. When considering the indoor radon exposure received from their residential dwellings using the annual mean radon concentration indoors in Japan (15.5 Bq m -3 ), the annual average effective dose was estimated to be 0.37 mSv y -1 . This value was 31 % of the worldwide average annual effective dose. (author)

  17. Radon and thoron concentrations in offices and dwellings of the Gunma prefecture, Japan

    Sugino, M.; Tokonami, S.; Zhuo, W.

    2005-01-01

    A one year survey of indoor radon and thoron concentrations was carried out in offices and dwellings of the Gunma prefecture, Japan. A passive integrating radon and thoron discriminative monitor was used in the survey. The annual mean radon concentration was 22±14 Bq x m -3 , and ranged from 12 to 93 Bq x m -3 among the 56 surveyed rooms. Radon concentration in offices was generally higher than that in the dwellings, with the arithmetic averages of 29 and 17 Bq x m -3 , respectively. Radon concentrations were generally lower in the traditional Japanese wooden houses than those houses built with other building materials. Seasonal variation of indoor radon was also observed in this survey. Compared to summer and autumn, radon concentrations were generally higher in spring and winter. The mean value of thoron to radon ratio was estimated to be 1.3, higher values were observed in the dwellings than in the offices. The annual effective dose from the exposure to indoor radon was estimated to be 0.47 mSv after taking the occupancy factors of offices and dwellings into account. (author)

  18. Concentrations of indoor radon and thoron in cave-dwellings with discussions on risk estimation of lung cancer

    Sun Quanfu; Hou Changsong; Zhang Shouzhi; Nie Xiaoqian; Shang Bing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore a residential area with elevated indoor radon exposure for conducting epidemiological studies on indoor radon and lung cancer. Methods: Two hundred and two cave-dwellings (CD) including loess CD, brick CD, stone CD, and ordinary house in twenty villages were selected from Yan'an and Lvliang in the Chinese loess plateau. Indoor levels of thoron and its progeny as well as radon were measured with passive radon-thoron discriminative detectors and thoron progeny deposition rate devices. The exposure period covered from August 2001 through August 2002. Results: Loess CD was one of the most common type of dwelling caves in both areas. The indoor radon concentrations in loess CD ranged from 17 to 179 Bq/m 3 ; thoron varied sub-stantially depending upon the distance from the device to the wall, ranged from 10 to 760 Bq/m 3 . Geometric means of indoor radon, thoron and thoron's progeny (EEC Tn ) of loess caves in Yan'an area were estimated to be 71, 185 and 2.2 Bq/m 3 , respectively, and the corresponding figures were 73, 145 and 116 Bq/m 3 in Lvliang area. Possible contamination of thoron on radon measurement in a previous case-control study on lung caner was discussed. The study revealed that the indoor air pollution in Yan'an area was slight compared with that in Lvliang area. Migration was very low. Eighty-six percent of the investigated persons have had no migration in Yan'an area, and 90 percent of the cave-dwellings where the subjects once resided were available to our measurements. Two million people have been living in cave-dwellings over several generations. Conclusion: The investigated cave-dwelling area in Yan'an is suitable for conducting epidemiological study on residential thoron and radon exposure and lung cancer.(authors)

  19. Thoron measurements in Hungary

    Kovacs, T.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, several Hungarian dwellings and working places were surveyed using passive radon- and thoron-measuring devices (Radopot R and Raduet R from 2003 to 2008. The detectors were placed 15-30 cm from the wall throughout the 1-to 3-month period. In dwellings, the presence of thoron, ∼100 Bq m -3 , was detected almost in all cases; however, in the cellars of these buildings, a value ∼200 Bq m -3 was typical. In the cases of manganese and bauxite mines, the concentration of thoron was mainly 200 and 500 Bq m -3 , respectively. In caves, it was 1000 Bq m -3 , whereas in the radon bath it was ∼100 Bq m -3 . As in many cases, the ratio between thoron and radon concentrations was > 0.25 and the dose contribution from thoron and its progeny was not negligible. Therefore, further investigation on the thoron progeny will be necessary for an accurate dose estimation. (authors)

  20. Comparison of indoor radon and thoron concentrations in the urban and rural dwellings of Chhattisgarh state of India

    Khokhar, M.S.K.; Kher, R.S.; Rathore, V.B.; Pandey, S.; Ramachandran, T.V.

    2008-01-01

    In the frame of nationwide radon/thoron monitoring program, indoor radon/thoron and their progeny concentrations have been estimated for 210 dwellings situated in 8 towns (urban) and 9 villages (rural) of Chhattisgarh state of India. The measurement has been made on quarterly integrating cycle for one full year in each dwelling. Twin chamber dosimeter cup with LR-115 Type-II Solid State Nuclear Track Detector was used for the measurement of indoor radon/thoron concentration. The results show that the geometric mean of indoor thoron concentration in urban dwellings varies from 11.57 to 25.88Bqm -3 with an overall geometric mean value of 16.65Bqm -3 , while in rural dwellings it varies from 12.50 to 30.08Bqm -3 with an overall geometric mean value of 19.00Bqm -3 . The potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) levels of thoron in the urban and rural dwellings are found to be 2.58 and 4.57 mWL, respectively. Similarly, the geometric mean of indoor radon concentrations in urban dwellings is found to vary from 20.20 to 30.13Bqm -3 with an overall geometric mean value of 25.28Bqm -3 , while in rural dwellings it varies from 15.50 to 36.05Bqm -3 with an overall geometric mean value of 27.32Bqm -3 . The PAEC levels of radon in the urban and rural dwellings are found to be 1.50 and 1.87 mWL, respectively. The dose contribution of thoron and progeny in total inhalation dose has been found to be more than 20% in all the surveyed places that show the necessity to pay attention to the presence of thoron and progeny from public health point of view

  1. Evaluation of thoron-daughter instruments

    George, J.L.

    1992-09-01

    Several DOE decontamination and decommissioning sites need to accurately measure thoron-daughter concentrations during decontamination efforts. Because the workers at these sites receive their dose from thoron-daughters rather than thoron gas, the thoron-daughter concentration is the measurement of interest. Some instruments currently used for making radon-daughter concentration measurements also claim the ability to measure thoron-daughter concentrations. This study evaluated the validity of those claims

  2. Measurement of radon and thoron progenies in Coimbatore

    Sivakumar, R.; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Mahendraprasad, M.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Santhanam, R.; Raghunath, V.M.

    2001-01-01

    The radon and thoron daughter concentrations have been measured in different dwellings of Coimbatore city by grab sampling method and two count. It has been found that the radon daughter concentration varies from 0.5 to 10.5 mWL with mean value of 2.9 mWL and that of thoron progeny is from 0.7 to 16.3 mWL with mean value of 3.8 mWL. The average annual effective dose equivalent due to radon daughters is found to be 1.3 mSv and that of thoron progeny is 3.8 mSv. (author)

  3. Measurement of radon, radon daughters and thoron concentrations by multi-detector devices. No. E/12

    Somogyi, G.; Varga, Zs.

    1983-01-01

    There is a growing interest in collection of data concerning human exposures to naturally occurring alpha-emitting radionuclides (e.g. in mines, dwellings, building materials, industrial wastes, coal fuel cycle, water supply, soil, plants, etc.). Most of such studies are incomplete for the following reasons: in radon measurements the contribution of thoron is generally neglected, the determination of equilibrium factor is complicated or not possible at all, short- and long-term concentration fluctuations cause difficulties in obtaining representative mean values, the plate-out effect is generally not taken into account. A variety of simple methods were studied that could be used to overcome some of these difficulties by using cups equipped with two or more alpha-sensitive nuclear track detectors. A theoretical foundation of the quantitative measurements with such devices is presented. Experimental data are reported on radon, radon daughters and thoron concentrations measured by multi-detector devices in cave soil gas and in air of Hungarian dwellings. (author)

  4. Variations of soil radon and thoron concentrations in a fault zone and prospective earthquakes in SW Taiwan

    Yang, T.F.; Walia, V.; Chyi, L.L.; Fu, C.C.; Chen, C.-H.; Liu, T.K.; Song, S.R.; Lee, C.Y.; Lee, M.

    2005-01-01

    An automatic station for soil gas monitoring was set up on an active fault zone of SW Taiwan. After more than one year of continuous measurements, some spike-like anomalous high radon and thoron concentrations could be observed. A similar soil radon spectrum was also obtained from an independent monitoring station, which was only 100m away. These anomalous peaks usually occurred a few days or weeks before the earthquakes (M L >=4.5). This indicates that variations of both soil radon and thoron can serve as useful tools for earthquake surveillance, esp. at fault zones

  5. Concentration of Radon, thoron and their progeny levels in different types of floorings, walls, rooms and building materials

    Sathish, L. A.; Nagaraja, K.; Ramanna, H. C.; Nagesh, V.; Sundareshan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Radon, thoron and their progenies are the most important contributions to human exposure from natural sources. Radon exists in soil gas, building materials, Indoor atmosphere etc. Among all the natural sources of radiation dose to human beings, inhalation of radon contributes a lot. The work presented here emphasizes the long term measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations in about 100 dwellings using solid state nuclear track detectors. Materials and Methods: Measurements were made using dosimeters and the concentrations were estimated by knowing the track density of films through spark counter, and sensitivity factor for bare, filter and membrane films. Results: Presence of radon and thoron in houses is the effect of several aspects such as the activity concentrations of uranium, radium and thorium in the local soil, building materials, ventilation of houses and also entry of radon into houses through the cracks in floor/wall. Conclusion: The observations reveal that the concentrations of radon and/or thoron are relatively higher in granite than in concrete, cement and bricks. In continuation to this the concentration observed in bathrooms is more compared to kitchen bedroom and living rooms. This study discloses that the residential rooms of good ventilation will avoid the health hazards due to radon and its rich materials.

  6. Effect of ventilation on concentrations of indoor radon- and thoron-progeny: Experimental verification of a simple model

    Sheets, R.W.; Thompson, C.C.

    1993-01-01

    Different models relating the dependence of radon ( 222 Rn)- and thoron ( 220 Rn)-progeny activities on room ventilation rates are presented in the literature. Some of these models predict that, as the rate of ventilation increases, activities of thoron progeny decrease more rapidly than those of radon progeny. Other models predict the opposite trend. In this study alpha activities of the radon progeny, 218 Po, 214 Pb, and 214 Bi, together with the thoron progeny 212 Pb, were measured over periods of several days in two rooms of a closed, heated house. Effective ventilation rates were calculated from measured 214 Pb/ 214 Bi ratios. A simple model in which progeny concentrations decrease by radioactive decay and by dilution with outside air has been used to calculate 212 Pb/ 214 Pb ratios as a function of ventilation rate. Calculated ratios are found to correlate significantly with experimentally-determined ratios (R 2 ∼ 0.5--0.8 at p < 0.005) confirming that, for this house, thoron progeny activities decrease faster than radon progeny activities with increasing rates of ventilation

  7. Assessment of indoor radon, thoron concentrations, and their relationship with seasonal variation and geology of Udhampur district, Jammu & Kashmir, India.

    Kumar, Ajay; Sharma, Sumit; Mehra, Rohit; Narang, Saurabh; Mishra, Rosaline

    2017-07-01

    Background The inhalation doses resulting from the exposure to radon, thoron, and their progeny are important quantities in estimating the radiation risk for epidemiological studies as the average global annual effective dose due to radon and its progeny is 1.3 mSv as compared to that of 2.4 mSv due to all other natural sources of ionizing radiation. Objectives The annual inhalation dose has been assessed with an aim of investigating the health risk to the inhabitants of the studied region. Methods Time integrated deposition based 222 Rn/ 220 Rn sensors have been used to measure concentrations in 146 dwellings of Udhampur district, Jammu and Kashmir. An active smart RnDuo monitor has also been used for comparison purposes. Results The range of indoor radon/thoron concentrations is found to vary from 11 to 58 Bqm -3 with an average value of 29 ± 9 Bqm -3 and from 25 to 185 Bqm -3 with an average value of 83 ± 32 Bqm -3 , respectively. About 10.7% dwellings have higher values than world average of 40 Bqm -3 prescribed by UNSCEAR. The relationship of indoor radon and thoron levels with different seasons, ventilation conditions, and different geological formations have been discussed. Conclusions The observed values of concentrations and average annual effective dose due to radon, thoron, and its progeny in the study area have been found to be below the recommended level of ICRP. The observed concentrations of 222 Rn and 220 Rn measured with active and passive techniques are found to be in good agreement.

  8. Thoron in the air: assessment of the occupational dose

    Campos, Marcia Pires de

    1999-01-01

    The occupational dose due to inhalation of thoron was assessed through the committed effective dose and the committed equivalent dose received by workers exposed to the radionuclide at the nuclear materials storage site and the thorium purification plant of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP). The radiation doses were performed by compartmental analysis following the compartmental model of the lung and biokinetic model of the lead, through the thoron equilibrium equivalent concentrations. These values were obtained by gamma ray spectrometry, total alpha count and alpha particle spectrometry of air samples glass fiber filters. The results of the thoron equilibrium equivalent concentration varied from 0.3 to 0,67 Bq/m 3 at the nuclear materials storage site and from 0.9 to 249.8 Bq/m 3 at the thorium purification plant. The committed effective dose due to thoron inhalation varied from 0.03 mSv/a to 0.67 mSv/a at the nuclear materials storage site and from 0.12 mSv/a to 6.0 mSv/a at the thorium purification plant. The risk assessment of lung cancer and fatal cancers for the workers exposed to thoron at the nuclear materials storage site and the thorium purification plant showed an increment for both risk cancer. (author)

  9. Determination of Radon-222 and Thoron Concentration in Decorative Stone Warehouses Indoor Air and the Received Effective Dose by Staff

    Amir Hossein Mahvi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radon is a colorless, odorless, and radioactive gas that can be emitted from decorative stones such as granite, marble, etc. Inhaling radon gas in a long period may cause for incidence of lung cancer among peoples. Material and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, Radon 222 and Thoron concentrations in background and indoor air were measured in four decorative stones warehouse using portable radon meter(RTM1688-2 model. Totally, 24 samples of 24- hours concentrations in indoor air and 24 samples of 4-hours concentrations of Radon 222 and thoron in the background air at three stages were measured. Then, received effective dose of Radon 222 and Thoron was calculated by UNSCEAR equations. Results: The mean radon concentrations for indoor and background air were 74±37 and 34±16 Bq/m3, respectively. The mean radon concentrations for indoor air in decorative stones warehouses for DSW1, DSW2, DSW3 and DSW4 were 72.50±34, 98.25±43, 34.42±18 and 88.92±51 Bq/m3, respectively. The received effective dose mean of Radon 222 and Thoron by the staff at 8 working hours was 0.53±0.18 and 0.05±0.03 mSv/y and in 16 working hours was 1.05±0.36 and 0.11±0.07 mSv/y, respectively. Generally, the mean received effective dose by staff from Radon at 8 and 16 working hours was 0.58±0.2  and 1.16±0.41 mSv/y, respectively. Conclusions: Radon concentration mean in indoor air and the received effective dose mean by staff was lower than the standards level. Decorative stone warehouses were the resources for accumulation of Radon gas that can be reduced by corrective actions.

  10. Elevated radon and thoron concentrations from natural radioactivity in building materials

    Smith, D.; Vivyurka, A.

    1980-01-01

    Radon levels in excess of 20 mWL were observed in an apartment building under construction in Elliot Lake. Tracer studies showed ventilation periods as long as 29 hours since the ventilation system of the building was not yet working. It was concluded that, once the contribution from thoron daughters was taken into account, the natural radioactivity of the concrete and other building materials was sufficient to produce the observed levels of radioactivity

  11. Study of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentration levels in the surrounding areas of Mangaldoi, Assam

    Deka, P.C.; Sarkar, S.; Goswami, T.D.; Sarma, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    Natural sources contribute a significant percentage of radiation towards the total radiation exposure that humans receive. The majority of this natural radiation is harmless to humans in the ambient environment. However, radon, a major component of the natural radiation that humans are exposed to (greater than sixty percent), can pose a threat to the public health when radon gas accumulates in poorly ventilated residential and occupational settings. Measurements of concentration of radon, thoron and their decay products in various indoor environment covering four seasons of a year were carried out using the passive time-integrated method by employing LR-15 type II detectors in plastic twin-chamber dosimeter cups. The estimated indoor radon levels for well ventilated houses varied from a minimum value of 25.2 Bq.m -3 to a maximum of 80J Bq.m -3 with an annual geometric mean of 46.9 Bq.m -3 and that for poorly ventilated houses varied from a minimum value of 46.8 Bq.m -3 to a maximum of 146.8 Bq.m -3 with the annual geometric mean of 82 .2 Bq.m -3 . The thoron levels in well ventilated houses were also varied from a minimum value of 4.9 Bq.m -3 to a maximum of 21.5 Bq.m -3 with an annual geometric mean of 10.5 Bq.m -3 and that for poorly ventilated houses varied from a minimum of 6.3 Bq.m -3 to a maximum value of 29.2 Bq.m -3 with the annual geometric mean of 14.1 Bq.m -3 . Thus it is seen that both radon and thoron levels are higher in poorly ventilated houses than in well-ventilated houses. The ranges of radon and thoron progeny levels for well ventilated houses were 0.10 mWL to 0.58 mWL with an annual geometric mean of 0.21 mWL and 0.01 mWL to 0.06 mWL with an annual geometric mean of 0.03 mWL respectively. Similar variation was also observed in poorly ventilated houses. In poorly ventilated houses, the radon and thoron progeny levels varied between 0.16 mWL and 1.61 mWL with an annual geometric mean of 0.41 mWL and 0.02 to 029 mWL with the annual geometric mean

  12. Committed effective dose from thoron daughters inhalation

    Campos, M.P.; Pecequilo, B.R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Mankind's interest in natural radiation exposure levels has increased over the past fifty years and it is now recognized that the most significant contributors to human irradiation by natural sources are the short-lived decay products of radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn). Despite the thoron short half-life of 55 s, effective dose from inhalation of thoron an its progeny ( 212 Pb and 212 Bi) must be considered, owing to the high thorium background in countries like Brazil, China and India, for example. The indoor committed effective dose was assessed by air sampling at the thorium purification plant and the nuclear materials storage site of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares; Sao Paulo, Brazil. A total of 21 glass fiber filter samples was analyzed by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry in order to obtain the 212 Pb and 212 Bi activities. The equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) varied from 0.3 Bq/m 3 to 6.8 Bq/m 3 for the storage site air samples and from 9.9 Bq/m 3 to 249.8 Bq/m 3 for the thorium purification plant air samples. As retention studies indicate a biological half-life of a few hours inhaled thoron progeny in the human lungs, the main fraction of the potential alpha energy (PAEC) deposited is absorbed in the lungs, meaning negligible to the effective dose the contribution of the dose in other times. The committed effective dose due thoron progeny was performed by compartimental analysis following the ICRP 66 lung compartimental model and ICRP 67 lead compartimental model. The values obtained varied from 0.03 mSv/a to 0.67 mSv/a for the storage site air samples and from 0.12 mSv/a to 6.00 mSv/a for the thorium purification plant air samples. (author)

  13. Dose assessment from exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations in the dwellings of sub-mountainous region of Jammu and Kashmir, India

    Kaur, M.; Dr. B. R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar, Punjab; Kumar, A.; Mehra, R.; Mishra, R.

    2018-01-01

    The present work deals with the assessment of annual inhalation dose due to exposure of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations in the villages situated in sub-mountainous region of Jammu and Kashmir, India. The distribution of the data and the homogeneity of medians among different seasons and dwellings were assessed with the Shapiro-Wilk test and the Mann-Whitney test. The estimated total annual inhalation dose in these villages varied from 0.5 to 1.9 mSv year -1 which is less than the prescribed limit by ICRP (2008). Thus, the investigated area is safe from irradiation of radon, thoron and their progeny. (author)

  14. Estimation of Toxicity Equivalent Concentration (TEQ) of ...

    Estimation of Toxicity Equivalent Concentration (TEQ) of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils from Idu Ekpeye playground and University of Port ... Effective soil remediation and detoxification method like Dispersion by chemical reaction technology should be deployed to clean-up sites to avoid soil toxicity ...

  15. The determination of airborne concentrations of radon and thoron progeny by repetitive alpha counting of filter samples

    French, Clayton S. Jr.; Skrable, Kenneth W.; Chabot, George E.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical equations have been used to determine the airborne concentrations of the particulate daughters of radon and thoron from five net alpha counts obtained at preset time intervals post sampling. The same expressions were used to propagate the associated standard deviations. These propagated errors were minimized by the selection of optimum sampling and counting intervals. An extensive error analysis examined sources of interference and their influence on the calculated concentrations. This system offers sufficient precision for research applications, yet is simple and inexpensive enough for application in field studies. The radon and thoron daughters measured with this technique are 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi, 212 Pb, and 212 Bi. Because of the decay kinetics involved, the calculated concentrations of 218 Po and 212 Bi involve the greatest uncertainty. The proper choice of sampling and counting intervals optimizes the system for any one of the above radionuclides or for all five collectively. A sampling time of 15 minutes is best for the simultaneous estimation of all five concentrations. Millipore filter samples were obtained from a large, unventilated sub-basement of the University of Lowell research reactor facility and were counted later in direct contact with the window of a gas flow proportional detector having alpha particle counting efficiencies near 0.4 ca -1 and an alpha background of about 1 c min -1 . A typical 15 minute sample obtained at a flow rate of 2 x 10 4 cm 3 min -1 yielded estimates of the airborne concentrations and relative standard deviations: 218 Po, 4.75 x 10 -9 μCi cm -3 ± 18.9%; 214 Pb, 5.15 x 10 -9 μCi cm -3 ± 2.5%; 214 Bi, 4.86 x 10 -9 μCi cm -3 ± 2.4%; 212 Pb, 1.41 x 10 -10 μCi cm -3 ± 2.0%; and 212 Bi, 2.15 x 10 -10 μCi cm -3 ± 27.0%. (author)

  16. Inhalation dose due to indoor radon and thoron concentrations in the surrounding villages of Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Sreenath Reddy, M.; Sreenivasa Reddy, B.; Yadagiri Reddy, P.; Gopal Reddy, Ch.; Rama Reddy, K.

    2006-01-01

    Inhalation of radon, thoron and their decay products is the major contribution to the total radioactive dose received by the human population from the natural radiation. The indoor inhalation doses due to radon, thoron and their progenies in the surrounding villages of Hyderabad, India are evaluated. The average inhalation dose due to radon and its progeny is found to be 0.26 ± 0.21 mSv y -1 and due to thoron and its progeny is 0.35 ± 0.38 mSv y -1 . The inhalation dose is also analyzed based on the types of floor, roof and walls of the dwellings and it is found that the dwellings with mud type construction materials have higher inhalation dose. Generally, the contribution of thoron and its progeny to the total dose is neglected but in the present study area the fractional dose of thoron and its progeny is found to be comparable to that of radon and its progeny. (author)

  17. An unattended device for high-voltage sampling and passive measurement of thoron decay products

    Gierl, Stefanie; Meisenberg, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.meisenberg@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Wielunski, Marek; Tschiersch, Jochen [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Haninger, Thomas [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Auswertungsstelle für Strahlendosimeter, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 München (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    An integrating measurement device for the concentration of airborne thoron decay products was designed and calibrated. It is suitable for unattended use over up to several months also in inhabited dwellings. The device consists of a hemispheric capacitor with a wire mesh as the outer electrode on ground potential and the sampling substrates as the inner electrode on +7.0 kV. Negatively charged and neutral thoron decay products are accelerated to and deposited on the sampling substrates. As sampling substrates, CR39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are used in order to record the alpha decay of the sampled decay products. Nuclide discrimination is achieved by covering the detectors with aluminum foil of different thickness, which are penetrated only by alpha particles with sufficient energy. Devices of this type were calibrated against working level monitors in a thoron experimental house. The sensitivity was measured as 9.2 tracks per Bq/m{sup 3} × d of thoron decay products. The devices were used over 8 weeks in several houses built of earthen material in southern Germany, where equilibrium equivalent concentrations of 1.4–9.9 Bq/m{sup 3} of thoron decay products were measured.

  18. Radon and thoron emanation from various marble materials: impact on the workers

    Misdaq, M.A.; Amghar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Uranium ( 238 U) and thorium ( 232 Th) concentrations were measured inside different pulverized marble material samples by using a method based on determining detection efficiencies of the CR-39 and LR-115 II solid state nuclear track detectors for the emitted alpha particles. Radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) alpha-activities per unit volume were evaluated inside and outside the marble samples studied. Radon emanation coefficient was determined for the considered marble samples. Alpha- and beta-activities per unit volume of air due to radon, thoron and their progenies were measured in the atmosphere of a marble factory. Equilibrium factors between radon and its progeny and thoron and its decay products were evaluated in the air of the studied marble factory. The committed equivalent doses due to short-lived radon decay products were determined in different regions of the respiratory tract of workers in the considered marble factory

  19. Radon and thoron progeny levels in air samples at Udagamandalam region of Nilgiris in India

    Manikandan, N.M.; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sivakumar, R.; Raghunath, V.M.; Sundaram, V.M.; Santhanam, S.

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of concentration of radon and thoron daughter products in various indoor environment covering four seasons of a year in Udagamandalam Taluk of Nilgiris biosphere has been carried out using a high volume air sampler to assess the inhalation dose to the population which delivers higher dose than the radon and thoron gas alone. The potential alpha-energy concentrations of the radon and thoron progeny ranged from 0.97 to 12.72 mWL and from 1.63 to 15.83 mWL with a geometric mean of 6.02 and 7.89 mWL, respectively, taking all seasons into account. These measurements have yielded a wealth of data on the variation among the indoor radon and thoron progeny in various places during different seasons. The radon and thoron progeny levels are higher in winter seasons and are less in summer season with autumn and spring data lie in between winter and summer. Using the dose conversion factor for indoor exposures given in UNSCEAR 93 report the internal equivalent dose to the inhalation of radon progeny is evaluated to be 1357 μSv x y -1 and the corresponding annual effective dose equivalent value has been found to be 2.13 mSv x y -1 . It can be observed that the mean value of radon is higher than the Indian average. Also it is found the radon and thoron progeny levels are higher in the case of houses built with rock and granite and in tiled type houses of nearly 100 years old. The levels are less in the case of houses built with brick and cement. The observed results for different types of houses and seasons are discussed in this paper. (author)

  20. Radon and thoron concentrations in traditional cave dwellings and soil beds

    Shang Bing; Cui Hongxing; Li Hongzhou

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the measured results of 222 Rn and 220 Tn concentrations in six cave dwellings and adobe Kang in Ning county of Gansu Province by using Rn-Tn solid-state nuclear track detectors. 222 Rn and 220 Tn concentrations are 161 and 307 Bq·m -3 (10 cm from soil wall), 99 and 158 Bq·m -3 (middle of the room) in cave dwellings, and 133 and 317 Bq·m -3 (5 cm above adobe Kang), 179 and 145 Bq·m -3 (20 cm above adobe Kang) on soil beds, respectively. 222 Rn and 220 Tn concentrations near the wall are higher than those obtained other place in the room. 222 Rn and 220 Tn concentrations above the adobe Kang are related to the distance from the surface of adobe Kang and heating situation. The residents sleep directly on the beds, especially for the children, the time staying on the adobe Kang are longer than other position. The dose of 222 Rn and 220 Tn from the traditional adobe Kang should be continuously studied

  1. Baseline studies of radon/thoron concentration levels in and around the Lambapur and Peddagattu areas in Nalgonda district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Vinay Kumar Reddy, K.; Sreenivasa Reddy, B.; Sreenath Reddy, M.; Gopal Reddy, Ch.; Yadagiri Reddy, P.; Rama Reddy, K.

    2003-01-01

    Studies conducted by Atomic Minerals Directorate of Exploration and Research (AMD) of Hyderabad, India had established the presence of higher concentrations of uranium in Lambapur and Peddagattu areas of Nalgonda district, AP, India and it was estimated that it could be a viable source for commercial extraction. The envisaged extraction process involves dispersion of radioactive particulate matter into atmosphere. Environmental radioactive studies in and around proposed mining areas at this point of time will be extremely useful for establishing base line data before a large scale uranium extraction process comes into existence. To this end, Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors were installed to evaluate indoor radon and thoron concentration levels in the dwellings of the area. The geometric means of radon and thoron concentration levels were found to be (7.1±0.2)x10 1 and (6.7±0.3)x10 1 Bq/m 3 , respectively. Simultaneously, natural background radiation measurements were also made and these levels are found to vary from 770 to 3995 μGy/y in the spatial distribution

  2. Measurement of indoor radon-thoron and their progeny levels in dwellings and radon concentrations in ground water of Hassan city, Karnataka, India

    Srinivasa, E.; Rangaswamy, D.R.; Sannappa, J.

    2014-01-01

    The indoor radon and thoron concentrations in dwellings of Hassan city have been measured by using LR-115 type-Il Solid State Nuclear Tracks Detectors (SSNTDs). Measurements were carried in summer season from March to May-2013. The radon and thoron activity concentration in the corresponding dwellings has been found to vary from 7.4 to 45.7 Bqm -3 and 5.4 to 34.9 Bqm -3 with a median of 23.59±11 Bqm -3 and 14.47±8 Bqm -3 respectively. The overall average radon concentrations are found to be less than the lower reference level of 200 Bq m -3 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The annual effective dose received due to radon and its progeny by the inhabitants in the dwellings under study has also been calculated which found to vary from 0.320 ±0.4 to 1.86 ±1.1 mSv y -1 with an average value of 0.957±0.8 mSv -1 . The obtained results are much lower than the upper reference level of 10 mSv y -1 (ICRP 2007). Radon in bore well water at different locations of Hassan city was determined using the emanometry technique and exposure dose from ingestion of drinking water was estimated. The radon concentration in ground water was found to vary from 19.49 to 60.74 Bq l -1 with an average value of 47.16±14Bq l -1 . From this study it is evident that, the recorded ground water radon concentration values are higher than MCL of 11 Bq l -1 proposed by USEPA. The total dose due to inhalation and ingestion of 222 Rn in ground water ranges from 0.053 mSv y -1 to 0.165mSv y -1 with an average value of 0.127±0.038mSv y -1 . (author)

  3. Mitigation of radon and thoron decay products by filtration

    Wang Jin; Meisenberg, Oliver; Chen Yongheng; Karg, Erwin; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation of indoor radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) decay products is the most important source of exposure to ionizing radiation for the human respiratory tract. Decreasing ventilation rates due to energy saving reasons in new buildings suggest additional active mitigation techniques to reduce the exposure in homes with high radon and thoron concentrations but poor ventilation. Filtration techniques with HEPA filters and simple surgical mask material have been tested for their potential to reduce the indoor exposure in terms of the total effective dose for mixed radon and thoron indoor atmospheres. The tests were performed inside an experimental room providing stable conditions. Filtration (at filtration rates of 0.2 h -1 and larger) removes attached radon and thoron decay products effectively but indoor aerosol as well. Therefore the concentration of unattached decay products (which have a higher dose coefficient) may increase. The decrease of the attached decay product concentrations could be theoretically described by a slowly decreasing exponential process. For attached radon decay products, it exhibited a faster but weaker removal process compared to attached thoron decay products (- 70% for attached radon decay products and - 80% for attached thoron decay products at a filtration rate of 0.5 h -1 with an HEPA filter). The concentration of unattached thoron decay products increased distinctly during the filtration process (+ 300%) while that of unattached radon decay products rose only slightly though at a much higher level (+ 17%). In the theoretical description these observed differences could be attributed to the different half-lives of the nuclides. Considering both effects, reduced attached and increased unattached decay product concentrations, filtration could significantly decrease the total effective dose from thoron whereas the overall effect on radon dose is small. A permanent filtration is recommended because of the slow decrease of the

  4. The passive radon-thoron discriminative dosimeter for practical use

    Doi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Sadayoshi

    1994-01-01

    A passive radon-thoron discriminative dosimeter for practical use has been developed. The body of the practical R-T dosimeter is made of two hemispheric diffusion chambers of carbonized plastic whose diameters are 110 mm and 70 mm, respectively. These diameters are determined to improve the detection efficiency of radon as well as thoron and also the discrimination ratio of radon to thoron. Inner surface of the detector housing is smooth and free from electrified charge to assure the uniform deposition of radon and thoron progeny, because the detector housing is molded out of carbonized plastic as an anti-static material. In addition, structure of an air inlet has improved to contact more tightly with a glass fiber filter to prevent dust from entering the detector housing. The air inlet of the detector housing is also covered with a half-cutted hemispherical windbreak to protect the glass fiber filter from weathering and to stabilize the influence of convectional air flow on the radon and thoron entry rate into two hemispherical diffusion chambers of the dosimeter. The results of calibration exercises showed that the lower detection limit of radon and thoron concentrations were estimated to be 5.1 Bqm -3 and 7.9 Bqm -3 respectively in 2 months exposure. And an interim measurement in the concrete cellar proved that the practical R-T dosimeter has enough specifications to be used in the large-scale radon-thoron discriminative survey. (author)

  5. Experimental technique to measure thoron generation rate of building material samples using RAD7 detector

    Csige, I.; Szabó, Zs.; Szabó, Cs.

    2013-01-01

    Thoron ( 220 Rn) is the second most abundant radon isotope in our living environment. In some dwellings it is present in significant amount which calls for its identification and remediation. Indoor thoron originates mainly from building materials. In this work we have developed and tested an experimental technique to measure thoron generation rate in building material samples using RAD7 radon-thoron detector. The mathematical model of the measurement technique provides the thoron concentration response of RAD7 as a function of the sample thickness. For experimental validation of the technique an adobe building material sample was selected for measuring the thoron concentration at nineteen different sample thicknesses. Fitting the parameters of the model to the measurement results, both the generation rate and the diffusion length of thoron was estimated. We have also determined the optimal sample thickness for estimating the thoron generation rate from a single measurement. -- Highlights: • RAD7 is used for the determination of thoron generation rate (emanation). • The described model takes into account the thoron decay and attenuation. • The model describes well the experimental results. • A single point measurement method is offered at a determined sample thickness

  6. Preliminary indoor thoron measurements in high radiation background area of southeastern coastal Orissa (India)

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, G.; Gusain, G. S.; Rautela, B. S.; Choubey, V. M.; Vidya Sagar, D.; Tokonami, S.; Sorimachi, A.; Sahoo, S. K.; Janik, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of radon and thoron measurements in the houses of Chhatrapur area of southeastern coast of Orissa (India). This area is one of the high radiation background radiation areas in India, which consists of monazite sand as the source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurements. Radon and thoron concentrations were measured in the houses of Chhatrapur area using twin cup radon dosemeters, RAD7 and radon-thoron discriminative detector (Raduet). Thoron progeny concentration was also measured in the houses using deposition rate measurements. Radon and thoron concentrations in the houses of study area were found to vary from 8 to 47 Bq m -3 and the below detection level to 77 Bq m -3 , respectively. While thoron progeny concentration in these houses ranges between 0.17 and 4.24 Bq m -3 , preliminary investigation shows that the thoron concentration is higher than radon concentration in the houses of the study area. The thoron progeny concentration was found to be comparatively higher, which forms a base for further study in the area. The comparison between the results of various techniques is presented in this paper. (authors)

  7. Preliminary indoor thoron measurements in high radiation background area of southeastern coastal Orissa (India)

    Ramola, R C; Prasad, G; Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S [Dept. of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal Univ., Badshahi Thaul, Tehri Garhwal 249 199 (India); Choubey, V M [Wadia Inst. of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun 248 001 (India); Vidya Sagar, D [Health Physics Unit (EAD, BARC), IRE, OSCOM, Matikhalo, Dt. Ganjam, Orissa 761 045 (India); Tokonami, S; Sorimachi, A; Sahoo, S K; Janik, M; Ishikawa, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263 8555 (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of radon and thoron measurements in the houses of Chhatrapur area of southeastern coast of Orissa (India). This area is one of the high radiation background radiation areas in India, which consists of monazite sand as the source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurements. Radon and thoron concentrations were measured in the houses of Chhatrapur area using twin cup radon dosemeters, RAD7 and radon-thoron discriminative detector (Raduet). Thoron progeny concentration was also measured in the houses using deposition rate measurements. Radon and thoron concentrations in the houses of study area were found to vary from 8 to 47 Bq m{sup -3} and the below detection level to 77 Bq m{sup -3}, respectively. While thoron progeny concentration in these houses ranges between 0.17 and 4.24 Bq m{sup -3}, preliminary investigation shows that the thoron concentration is higher than radon concentration in the houses of the study area. The thoron progeny concentration was found to be comparatively higher, which forms a base for further study in the area. The comparison between the results of various techniques is presented in this paper. (authors)

  8. Study on radon and thoron levels in different types of granitic work industries around Tumkur city

    Nagabhushan, S.R.; Ujjinappa; Srilatha; Sannappa, J.

    2013-01-01

    Radon, Thoron and its progeny monitoring has become a global phenomenon due to its health hazards on human being. The concentration of radon, thoron and their progeny levels have been measured in different types of Granite and brick work industries around Tumkur city by using LR-115 type II Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) have been used for the measurement of these gases. The higher concentration of radon, thoron and their progeny were observed in the dwellings near brick industries compared to Granite cutting and polishing industries. The inhalation dose due to Radon, Thoron and their progeny to the workers and public living near these industries have been estimated. (author)

  9. Indoor thoron and radon progeny measurements

    Tu, K.W.; George, A.C.; Lowder, W.M.; Gogolak, C.V.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of indoor thoron ( 220 Rn) and radon ( 222 Rn) progeny activities were conducted in 40 homes and six public buildings in five states. A commercial alpha spectrometer system and four portable alpha integrating sampling monitors using diffused junction silicon detectors were used for sampling and recording of radionuclide data in particular the potential alpha energy concentrations (PAEC). The data were analysed for the ratios of PAEC- 220 Rn to PAEC- 222 Rn, and the correlations between the two quantities, and their estimated annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE). The results show that the PAEC ratios were 0.09, 0.6, 0.55, and 0.47, respectively, for all homes with the PAEC- 222 Rn > 400, between 100 and 400, -3 , and the total of all homes tested; the AEDE ratios were 0.03, 0.21, 0.19 and 0.16, respectively. No strong correlations were found between PAEC- 220 Rn and PAEC- 222 Rn, and between basement and ground floor data for PAEC- 220 Rn, but the PAEC- 222 Rn data showed a strong correlation between the basement and the ground floor values. Simultaneous measurements of PAEC- 220 Rn and PAEC- 222 Rn on the ground floor and in the basement of each of the 23 single-family houses tested suggests that 220 Rn entry from building materials may be as significant as from the underlying soil. (author)

  10. Levels of thoron and progeny in high background radiation area of southeastern coast of Odisha (India))

    Ramola, R. C.; Gusain, G. S.; Rautela, B. S.; Sagar, D. V.; Prasad, G.; Shahoo, S. K.; Ishikawa, T.; Omori, Y.; Janik, M.; Sorimachi, A.; Tokonami, S.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to radon, 222 Rn, is assumed to be the most significant source of natural radiation to human beings in most cases. It is thought that radon and its progeny are major factors that cause cancer. The presence of thoron, 220 Rn, was often neglected because it was considered that the quantity of thoron in the environment is less than that of radon. However, recent studies have shown that a high thoron concentration was found in some regions and the exposure to 220 Rn and its progeny can equal or several time exceed that of 220 Rn and its progeny. The results of thoron and its progeny measurements in the houses of high background radiation area (HBRA) of the southeastern coast of Odisha (India)) presented here. This area is one of the high background radiation areas in India with a large deposit of monazite sand which is the probable source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurement of thoron and its progeny in cement, brick and mud houses in the study area. Thoron concentration was measured using RAD-7 and Raduet. A CR-39 track detector was employed for the measurement of environmental thoron progeny, both in active and passive modes. Thoron and its progeny concentrations were found to be comparatively high in the area. A comparison between the results obtained with various techniques is presented in this paper. (authors)

  11. Levels of thoron and progeny in high background radiation area of southeastern coast of Odisha (India))

    Ramola, R C; Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S [Dept. of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal Univ., Badshahi Thaul Campus, Tehri Garhwal 249199 (India); Sagar, D V [Health Physics Unit EAD, BARC, IRE, OSCOM, Matikhalo, Ganjam, Odisha 761 045 (India); Prasad, G; Shahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Omori, Y; Janik, M [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S [Inst. of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki Univ., Aomori 036-8564 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Exposure to radon, {sup 222}Rn, is assumed to be the most significant source of natural radiation to human beings in most cases. It is thought that radon and its progeny are major factors that cause cancer. The presence of thoron, {sup 220}Rn, was often neglected because it was considered that the quantity of thoron in the environment is less than that of radon. However, recent studies have shown that a high thoron concentration was found in some regions and the exposure to {sup 220}Rn and its progeny can equal or several time exceed that of {sup 220}Rn and its progeny. The results of thoron and its progeny measurements in the houses of high background radiation area (HBRA) of the southeastern coast of Odisha (India)) presented here. This area is one of the high background radiation areas in India with a large deposit of monazite sand which is the probable source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurement of thoron and its progeny in cement, brick and mud houses in the study area. Thoron concentration was measured using RAD-7 and Raduet. A CR-39 track detector was employed for the measurement of environmental thoron progeny, both in active and passive modes. Thoron and its progeny concentrations were found to be comparatively high in the area. A comparison between the results obtained with various techniques is presented in this paper. (authors)

  12. The HMGU thoron experimental house: A new tool for exposure assessment

    Tschiersch, J.; Meisenberg, O.

    2010-01-01

    A thoron experimental house was constructed in a laboratory room of Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen to perform exposure studies of thoron and its decay products under controlled conditions. The single room house (7.1 m 3 ) was built from unfired clay stones and clay plaster. For the plaster of the inner side, the clay was mixed with granite powder enriched with 232 Th. The thoron inventory increased by this means to about 1700 Bq and the progeny potential alpha energy to 130 μJ inside the room. The instrumentation of the experimental house includes active and passive devices for thoron and thoron decay product measurement including attached and unattached progeny, for aerosol particle number and size measurement and characterisation of the climatic conditions. Various parameters as ventilation rate and aerosol concentration can be adjusted. Experiments performed in the experimental house demonstrate the experimental power of this new tool for indoor thoron exposure assessment 2010. (authors)

  13. Thoron and associated risks in the handling of thorium compounds

    Pradel, J.; Billard, F.

    1959-01-01

    1. Thorium compounds continually give off thoron and its daughters and their radioactivity can constitute a danger for operators who may inhale them. 2. By analogy with radon the maximum admissible content in air of thoron and its daughters has been set at 10 -7 μc/cm 3 . However the differences in behaviour between radon and its active deposit on the one hand, and thoron and its daughters on the other, appear great enough to justify more thorough investigation. In fact it seemed probable that, contrary to what takes place with radon, the thoron + thorium A content at a given point may differ appreciable from the thorium B + thorium C + thorium C' + thorium C'' content at the same point, because of the considerable differences in half-life which allow a greater or lesser distribution. 3. To determine the relative concentrations it was necessary to develop a method for estimating thoron in equilibrium with thorium A, the measurement of thorium B and its daughters being carried out in the conventional way by counting the activity collected on a filter. 4. Another object of this study was to estimate the danger presented by thoron in equilibrium with thorium A in the immediate vicinity of thorium sources, in a plant extracting thorium from urano-thorianite. (author) [fr

  14. Study on radon and thoron progeny levels in Gudalore in South India

    Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sivakumar, R.; Mugunthamanikandan, N.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Santhanam, R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the important route of radiation exposure to man is through inhalation of air containing radioisotopes. A major contribution to inhalation dose comes from radon, thoron and its progenies. The indoor radon and thoron progeny levels are determined by two count method. In this method the radon and thoron progenies are collected on a glass fiber filter paper using volume air sampler (Staplex) and counted for alpha activity in ZnS (Ag) alpha counting system. It is observed that thoron working level is higher than the radon working level in all houses except few houses with stone walls and mosaic floor. Behavior of indoor radon and thoron working levels for different seasons at different houses are determined and discussed in detail. Radon and thoron working levels are measured high in winter, autumn, and low in summer and rainy seasons. Among all seasons highest value is measured in winter and low in summer and rainy seasons. Radon progeny working level varies from 1.659 to 6.675 mWL, whereas thoron progeny working level varies from 1.670 to 12.671 mWL. The geometric mean values of radon and thoron progeny concentration in the present study are 2.836 and 4.133 mWL. The high thoron progeny level observed in this is attributed to the high thorium content observed in soils of this area. (author)

  15. Radon and thoron measurements at special underground circumstances

    Kovacs, Tibor; Somlai, Janos; Szeiler, Gabor; Nemeth, Csaba; Tokonami, Shinji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    In this study a comparative integrating radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) survey executed at underground workplaces are discussed. Two types of solid state nuclear track detectors (Radopot and Raduet) were applied for survey at four sites: a manganese mine, a bauxite mine, a tourist cave and a hospital cave. Several numbers of detecting points were chosen at each site and 1-1 Raduet and Radopot detector were placed at each point. Both detector types contains two polycarbonate (CR-39) foils in different holders in order to determinate the radon as well as the thoron levels. The detectors were changed in 30-60 days periods (approximately monthly) and the survey continued for a year. This study had two aims: 1) To gain information about the radon and thoron concentrations at the chosen places including the seasonal variations; 2) To compare the performance of the two types of detectors and check their response in the special circumstances indicates by these underground places. Concerning the first point the radon concentrations were found to be as the expected ones at the given underground places and were similar to our former measurements. In the case of thoron the results are very variable and significant part of the detectors provides no data or unrealistic data. Concerning the second point there was only a little difference (<10%) between the radon results provided by the two types of detectors. In the case of thoron the two detector types showed high inconsistency. The study suggests that both types of detectors are fit for the integrating radon measurement at these special circumstances but it cannot be stated the same for the thoron measurement. The reason of the unreliability of the thoron measurement could be the high humidity (especially in the caves), the high aerosol concentration (especially in the mines) and the air change rate variation. To find the reasons needs further study. (author)

  16. Long-term variation of outdoor radon equilibrium equivalent concentration

    Hoetzl, H. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Winkler, R. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    1994-10-01

    Long-term variation of outdoor radon equilibrium equivalent concentration was investigated from 1982 to 1992 at a semi-natural location 10 km north of Munich, southern Germany. For this period the continuous measurement yielded a long-term average of 8.6 Bq.m{sup -3} (arithmetic mean) and 6.9 Bq.m{sup -3} (geometric mean), from which an average annual effective dose of 0.14 mSv due to outdoor radon can be derived. A long-term trend of the radon concentration was not detectable over the whole period of observation. However, by time series analysis, a long-term cyclic pattern was identified with two maxima (1984-1986, 1989-1991) and two minima (1982-1983, 1987-1988). The seasonal pattern is characterized by an autumn maximum and an early summer minimum. On average, the seasonal maximum in October was found to be higher by a factor of 2 than the June minimum. The diurnal variation of the radon concentration shows a maximum in the early morning and a minimum in the afternoon. On average, this maximum is a factor of 2 higher than the minimum. In the long term a seasonal pattern was observed for diurnal variation, with an average diurnal maximum to minimum ratio of 1.5 in winter compared with 3.5 in the summer months. The radon concentration is correlated with a meteorological parameter (stagnation index) which takes into account horizontal and vertical exchange processes and the wash-out of aerosols in the lower atmosphere. (orig.)

  17. Long-term variation of outdoor radon equilibrium equivalent concentration

    Hoetzl, H.; Winkler, R.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term variation of outdoor radon equilibrium equivalent concentration was investigated from 1982 to 1992 at a semi-natural location 10 km north of Munich, southern Germany. For this period the continuous measurement yielded a long-term average of 8.6 Bq.m -3 (arithmetic mean) and 6.9 Bq.m -3 (geometric mean), from which an average annual effective dose of 0.14 mSv due to outdoor radon can be derived. A long-term trend of the radon concentration was not detectable over the whole period of observation. However, by time series analysis, a long-term cyclic pattern was identified with two maxima (1984-1986, 1989-1991) and two minima (1982-1983, 1987-1988). The seasonal pattern is characterized by an autumn maximum and an early summer minimum. On average, the seasonal maximum in October was found to be higher by a factor of 2 than the June minimum. The diurnal variation of the radon concentration shows a maximum in the early morning and a minimum in the afternoon. On average, this maximum is a factor of 2 higher than the minimum. In the long term a seasonal pattern was observed for diurnal variation, with an average diurnal maximum to minimum ratio of 1.5 in winter compared with 3.5 in the summer months. The radon concentration is correlated with a meteorological parameter (stagnation index) which takes into account horizontal and vertical exchange processes and the wash-out of aerosols in the lower atmosphere. (orig.)

  18. Radon and Thoron Exhalation Rates from Surface Soil of Bangka - Belitung Islands, Indonesia

    Syarbaini Syarbaini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.2.1.35-42Radon and thoron exhalation rate from soil is one of the most important factors that can influence the radioactivity level in the environment. Radon and thoron gases are produced by the decay of the radioactive elements those are radium and thorium in the soil, where its concentration depends on the soil conditions and the local geological background. In this paper, the results of radon and thoron exhalation rate measurements from surface soil of Bangka Belitung Islands at thirty six measurement sites are presented. Exhalation rates of radon and thoron were measured by using an accumulation chamber equipped with a solid-state alpha particle detector. Furthermore, the correlations between radon and thoron exhalation rates with their parent nuclide (226Ra and 232Th concentrations in collected soil samples from the same locations were also evaluated. The result of the measurement shows that mostly the distribution of radon and thoron is similar to 226Ra and 232Th, eventhough it was not a good correlation between radon and thoron exhalation rate with their parent activity concentrations (226Ra and 232Th due to the environmental factors that can influence the radon and thoron mobilities in the soil. In comparison to a world average, Bangka Belitung Islands have the 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates higher than the world average value for the regions with normal background radiation.

  19. Radon and thoron progeny measurements using a portable radon sniffer

    Efendi, Z.; Jennings, P.

    1993-01-01

    A flexible version of the two-count method has been developed for use in rapid, inexpensive measurements of radon and thoron progeny working levels in residential and industrial premises in the Perth Metropolitan Area. The Method is adapted for use with a simple radon sniffer based on a low speed pump and an alpha counter. The flexibility of the method derives from the software, where some freedom is permitted in the selection of sampling times and post sampling analysis of the filters. This method has been tested on a variety of radioactive materials and it gives consistent, reliable results over a wide range of working levels. The results of a survey of Rn(222) and Rn(220) progeny levels in dwellings within the Perth Metropolitan Area are reported. This study shows that the mean concentration of indoor Rn(222) progeny was 4.7 mWL (17.4 Bq m -3 EEC) up to 23.3 mWL (86.4 Bq m -3 EEC). The mean thoron progeny concentration was 8.2 mWL (2.25 Bq m -3 EEC) with a range from 1 mWL (0.27 Bq m -3 EEC) to 64.5 mWL (17.74 Bq m -3 EEC). Using conversion factors of 0.061 mSv Bq -1 m -3 for Rn(222) progeny and 0.29 mSv Bq -1 m -3 for Rn(220) progeny respectively (UNSCEAR, 1982), it is estimated the average annual effective dose equivalent is 1.1 mSv for Rn(2220 and 0.6 mSv for Rn(220) respectively. 22 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  20. Measurement of outdoor radioactivities of radon and thoron by the passive radon-thoron monitor of cup type with cellulose nitrate film

    Ogawa, Y.; Kimura, Y.; Iida, T.; Yamasaki, K.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1993-01-01

    In order to get information as to effective dose of radon and thoron for the public, we investigated the dosimetry of the average outdoor concentrations of radon and thoron by the cup type radon/thoron monitor using cellulose nitrate film. To overcome the disadvantages of cup monitors which are the relatively low sensitivity and the relatively high detection limit, the present dosimetry is based on the usage of several pairs of cup monitors and the statistical treatments (significant test). Because the detection limit could be lowered using the present dosimetry, we could measure the outdoor concentration levels more precisely. (1 tab.)

  1. Microcystin-LR equivalent concentrations in fish tissue during a ...

    The effects of a decomposing cyanobacteria bloom on water quality and the accumulation of microcystin-LR equivalent toxin in fish at Loskop Dam were studied in May 2012. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] was used to confirm the presence of microcystin-LR equivalent in the water and to determine the ...

  2. 30 CFR 90.206 - Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved sampling devices; equivalent... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-COAL MINERS WHO HAVE EVIDENCE OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PNEUMOCONIOSIS Sampling Procedures § 90.206 Approved sampling devices; equivalent...

  3. Soil gas radon and thoron measurements in some Venezuelan oilfields

    Fernandez, Daniel Palacios; Yininber Avila; Teixeira, Diana; Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Greaves, Eduardo; Barros, Haydn; Fusella, Emidio; Salas, Johnny; Fernandez, Guillermo; Bolivar, Manuel; Regalado, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    Radon and thoron concentrations in soil gas were studied in some Venezuelan oilfields using passive and active methods. In some cases, investigations indicated a strong correlation between oil production areas and the intensity of radon signals, while in others a decrease in radon concentration was observed. This behavior was explained on the basis of different geological structures of the associated reservoir traps. Geological faults associated with petroleum systems were well recognized by the radon and thoron anomalies. Possible conduits and sources responsible for the occurrence of natural gas in a river and in an aquifer were identified and localized. (author)

  4. Field experience of indoor thoron gas measurements in a stable rural community in Yugoslavia

    Zunic, Z.S.; Fujimoto, K.; McLaughlin, J.P.; Birovljev, A.

    2000-01-01

    Attempts were made in Yugoslavia to identify rural populations receiving an elevated natural radiation exposure that might be a potential cohort for a planned future health study. In Gornja Stubla at Kosovo in southern Yugoslavia many houses are built mainly from local rock of trachyte which has a uranium content of the order of 25g/t, Th of 61 g/t and K-40 of 5.4%. Thoron and radon gas measurements were carried out in 49 locations in 23 houses in this rural community. Taking into account the short half-life of thoron passive alpha track dual radon-thoron detectors were placed within 10-20 cm from the walls, which were considered the potential source of thoron. Thoron concentrations were found to be extremely high in Gornja Stubla with a maximum measured value of 1,156 Bq/m -3 . Using another type of passive radon detector, designed by SSI/NRPB, annual indoor radon concentrations were measured. The highest indoor radon concentration of 9,591 Bq/m -3 was found in the same house, which had the highest thoron concentration. The absorbed dose rate in air, due to external penetrating radiation was also measured and the highest value found in Gornja Stubla was 430 nGy h -1 . Although high thoron concentrations were recorded it should be pointed out that due to its short half life large differences in thoron concentrations are to be expected as a function of the distance of the measuring point to the source. In addition, with the absence of information on thoron progeny concentration it is impossible to make any estimate of doses from the thoron series since the equilibrium factor between thoron and its progeny can vary greatly with time as well as location. However, the thoron measurements that have been performed in Gornja Stubla clearly indicate that the inhabitants there receive an elevated exposure not only from indoor radon and penetrating radiation but also from thoron. (author)

  5. Collaborative investigations on thoron and radon in some rural communities of Balkans

    Zunic, Z. S.; Celikovic, I.; Tokonami, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Ujic, P.; Onischenko, A.; Zhukovsky, M.; Milic, G.; Jakupi, B.; Cuknic, O.; Veselinovic, N.; Fujimoto, K.; Sahoo, S. K.; Yarmoshenko, I.

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the results of the first-field use in the Balkans, i.e. Serbia and Republic of Srpska (Bosnia and Herzegovina), of a passive polycarbonate Mark II type and poli-allyl-diglycol carbonate (Cr-39) alpha track detectors sensitive to thoron as well as to radon. Both types of solid state nuclear track detectors were designed and supplied by National Inst. of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba (Japan). The commercial names for these detectors which all have been field tested in Balkan rural communities are known as: UFO and RADUET passive discriminative radon/thoron detectors. No database of thoron and thoron progeny concentrations in dwellings in Serbia or Balkans region exist, and as a result, the level of exposure of the Serbian population to thoron and its progeny is unknown so far. (authors)

  6. Radon-thoron discrimination using a polythene foil: an application in uranium exploration

    Ramola, R.C.; Singh, M.; Sandhu, A.S.; Singh, S.; Virk, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Integrated measurements of radon concentrations in subsurface soil are being used extensively for uranium exploration and earthquake prediction. For uranium exploration only the radon signals are needed; however, a part of the α-activity may derive from thoron. To exclude thoron, a polythene foil has been used as an anti-thoron membrane to delay the entry of thoron into the detector system so that only the longer lived isotope 222 Rn survives to be measured. A long term integrated measurement has been carried out using LR-115 and CR-39 plastic track detectors. The observed track density has been determined as a function of foil thickness. It is found that a polythene foil of appropriate thickness could be successfully employed for the separation of radon and thoron in soil. (author)

  7. Thinking about Thoron and Thoron daughters: radiation studies and interpretations for a rare earths project

    Sonter, Mark; Hondros, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The emerging rare earths mining and processing industry involves projects which will invariably handle ores containing some levels of thorium, and to a lesser extent, uranium. The thorium levels which can be encountered range from tens of ppm up to percent levels. (Thorium content of pure monazite is in the range 5% to 8% or so.) This technical note focuses on the understanding of thoron releases into the air from thorium- bearing ores in situ and in process, and subsequent generation of thoron decay products in air, and the Potential Alpha Energy Concentration levels and dose estimations that result. It presents some theory, literature search results and a description of test work done on Nolans ore at Arafura's Darwin facility and in the field at Nolans Bore.

  8. Personal factors affecting thoron exhalation from occupationally acquired thorium body burdens

    Stebbings, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Thorium workers with thorium body burdens (primarily thoracic) above 0.7 nCi 224 Ra equivalent are shown to exhale about 15% of thoron produced in vivo, compared to 5% exhaled by subjects with body burdens in the range of 0.4 to 0.7 nCi 224 Ra. There was a false negative correlation between average adult daily cigarettes smoked and thoron exhalation. White blood cell counts that were about 85% of expected were observed in seven subjects exhaling greater than or equal to 100 pCi of thoron above predicted; no other variable examined showed a clear pattern of association. These differences in fractional thoron exhalation, and their consequences, are discussed. 3 references, 4 figures, 8 tables

  9. Soil gas radon–thoron monitoring in Dharamsala area of north-west ...

    2National Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering, NARL, Taipei 106, Taiwan. ... The study described here is based on the measurements of soil gas radon–thoron concentrations performed ..... Himachal Pradesh, India; Nat. Hazards ...

  10. A novel methodology for online measurement of thoron using Lucas scintillation cell

    Eappen, K.P.; Sapra, B.K.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2007-01-01

    The use of Lucas scintillation cell (LSC) technique for thoron estimation requires a modified methodology as opposed to radon estimation. While in the latter, the α counting is performed after a delay period varying between few hours to few days, in the case of thoron estimation the α counting has to be carried out immediately after sampling owing to the short half-life of thoron (55 s). This can be achieved best by having an on-line LSC sampling and counting system. However, half-life of the thoron decay product 212 Pb being 10.6 h, the background accumulates in LSC during online measurements and hence subsequent use of LSC is erroneous unless normal background level is achieved in the cell. This problem can be circumvented by correcting for the average background counts accumulated during the counting period which may be theoretically estimated. In this study, a methodology has been developed to estimate the true counts due to thoron. A linear regression between the counts obtained experimentally and the fractional decay in regular intervals of time is used to obtain the actual thoron concentration. The novelty of this approach is that the background of the cell is automatically estimated as the intercept of the regression graph. The results obtained by this technique compare well with the two filter method and the thoron concentration produced from a standard thoron source. However, the LSC as such cannot be used for environmental samples because the minimum detection level is comparable with that of thoron concentrations prevailing in normal atmosphere

  11. Spatial and vertical distribution of radon and thoron in a typical Indian dwelling

    Vinay Kumar Reddy, K.; Gopal Reddy, Ch.; Yadagiri Reddy, P.; Rama Reddy, K.

    2012-01-01

    Radon and thoron have been identified as potential radiological health hazard and the dose estimation due to their exposure is an important task. Understanding their behavior in indoor environment helps in calculating the inhalation doses due to them. Present study aims at the distribution of radon and thoron concentrations in a typical Indian dwelling. Solid state nuclear track detectors are employed in the study. The concentration of radon is found to be invariant in indoor environment. The thoron concentration is found to decrease exponentially as a function of distance from the source (wall/floor). Solution of one dimensional diffusion equation is used for regression fittings for thoron variation, from which the diffusion constants and the exhalation rates were calculated. The diffusion constants varied from 0.00195 to 0.00540 m 2 s -1 . (author)

  12. Study on radon and thoron levels in different types of granitic work industries around Tumkur city

    Nagabhushan, S.R.; Ningappa, C.; Srilatha; Shekar, Usha; Sannappa, J.

    2011-01-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive noble gas generated by the decay of uranium and thorium bearing minerals in rocks, soils and building materials. Radon and decay products are the major contributors to human exposure from natural radiation sources. Epidemiological evidence indicates that indoor radon and thoron were responsible for a substantial number of lung cancer in publics. UNSCEAR reported recently indicates that there is a remarkable coherence between the risk estimates developed from epidemiological studies from miners and residential case-control radon studies. Hence to select the study area for the estimation of dose due to radon and thoron to the publics and workers, concentration of radon, thoron and their progeny were measured by using SSNTD. Since, activity concentration in granite more, higher concentrations of radon and thoron have been observed in the dwellings near to granite industry and lesser concentration of radon and thoron have been observed in the dwellings near brick industries of Tumkur city. From the study, the concentration of radon and thoron varied from 31 to 70.4 Bq.m 3 and 11.6 to 46.3 Bq.m 3 , respectively. Corresponding progeny level varied from 0.11 to 2.5 mWL and 1.1 to 3.4 mWL, respectively. (author)

  13. Indoor thoron studies along the northeast coast of Andhra Pradesh, India

    Vinay Kumar Reddy, K.; Sudarshan, A.; Gopal Reddy, Ch.; Yadagiri Reddy, P.; Rama Reddy, K.

    2013-01-01

    The beach sands of the northeast coast of Andhra Pradesh are well known for heavy metal mineralization. The process of extraction of the metals can enhance the natural background radiation levels and hence it is essential to establish the radiological base-line data to take necessary remedial action to preserve and protect the coastal environment. The assessment of indoor radioactivity levels has been carried out by choosing 13 villages long the northeast coast of Andhra Pradesh covering around 150 km from Vishakapattanam to Kalingapattanam. The present paper discusses the indoor thoron levels in the areas along the northeast coast of Andhra Pradesh. The SSNTD based twin chamber dosimeters were employed for the assessment of the concentration of thoron and its progeny levels. The average indoor thoron concentrations in this area are found to be 44.1 ± 28.2 Bq.m -3 . The inhalation dose due to thoron has been evaluated using equilibrium factors and discussed in detail. (author)

  14. Dosimetry of inhaled radon and thoron progeny

    James, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This chapter reviews recent developments in modeling doses received by lung tissues, with particular emphasis on application of ICRP's new dosimetric model of the respiratory tract for extrapolating to other environments the established risks from exposure to radon progeny in underground mines. Factors discussed include: (1) the influence of physical characteristics of radon progeny aerosols on dose per unit exposure, e.g., the unattached fraction, and the activity-size distributions of clustered and attached progeny; (2) the dependence of dose on breathing rate, and on the exposed subject (man, woman or child); (3) the variability of dose per unit exposure in a home when exposure is expressed in terms of potential α energy or radon gas concentration; (4) the comparative dosimetry of thoron progeny; and (5) the effects of air-cleaning on lung dose. Also discussed is the apparent discrepancy between lung cancer risk estimates derived purely from dosimetry and the lung cancer incidence observed in the epidemiological studies of radon-exposed underground miners. Application of ICRP's recommended risk factors appears to overestimate radon lung-cancer risk for miners by a factor of three. ''Normalization'' of the calculated effective dose is therefore needed, at least for α dose from radon and thoron progeny, in order to obtain a realistic estimate of lung cancer risk

  15. Thoron-in-breath monitoring at CRNL

    Peterman, B.F.

    1985-04-01

    This report contains a description of the thoron-in-breath monitor (TIBM) developed at CRNL. This monitor can be used to estimate the amount of thorium (Th-232 and/or Th-228) in humans. Thoron-in-breath monitoring is based on the fact that thoron (Rn-220) is a decay product of thorium, and hence deposited thorium produces thoron in vivo, a fraction of which will be exhaled. Experiences with the TIBM indicate that the monitoring is easy to perform and the results in terms of contaminated vs uncontaminated subjects can be easily interpreted. Work on relationships between thoron exhaled and deposited thorium and hence between thoron exhaled and dose, is continuing

  16. The Thoron Issue: Monitoring Activities, Measuring Techniques and Dose Conversion Factors (invited paper)

    Nuccetelli, C.; Bochicchio, F.

    1998-01-01

    The health risk due to the presence of thoron indoors is usually neglected because of its generally low concentration in indoor environments, which is essentially caused by its short half-life. However, in certain not uncommon situations, such as when thorium-rich building materials are used, thoron ( 220 Rn) may represent a significant source of radioactive exposure. In recent years, renewed interest has led to more intensive monitoring of thoron gas and its decay products. A tentatively comprehensive summary of these measurement results and a review of the most innovative measurement techniques for 220 Rn are here presented. Finally, dose-exposure conversion factors currently used for thoron decay products are analysed, highlighting the poorer basis of such factors, when compared to those for radon. (author)

  17. Radon and thoron monitoring in the environment of Kumaun Himalayas: survey and outcomes

    Ramola, R.C.; Negi, M.S.; Choubey, V.M.

    2005-01-01

    Monitoring of radon, thoron and their daughter products was carried out in houses of Kumaun Himalaya, India using LR-115 plastic track detectors. The measurements were made in residential houses from June 1999 to May 2000 at a height of 2.5 m from ground level using a twin chamber radon dosimeter. The twin chamber radon dosimeter can record the values of radon, thoron and their decay products separately. Maximum and minimum indoor radon and thoron concentrations were evaluated and activity concentrations of radon and thoron daughters were estimated. The resulting dose rates due to radon, thoron and their decay products varied from 0.04 to 1.89 μSv/h. A detailed analysis of the distribution of radon, thoron and their decay products inside the house is also reported. The observed dose rates inside the houses of Kumaun Himalaya were found to be lower than the ICRP recommended value of 200 Bq/m 3 and thus are within safe limits

  18. Environmental radon and thoron monitor

    Thomas, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    A large two-filter type monitor (ERM-3) has been developed for measuring environmental levels of radon and thoron to within several picocuries per cubic meter. The inlet filters of the monitor remove daughter activity from the entering air stream but permit radon and thoron to pass. Daughter activity formed in the 0.9 m 3 decay chamber is collected by the fixed exit filter. The alpha activity of the filter is detected with a zinc sulfide scintillator and a 12 cm phototube, counted with an automatic timer and scaler, and is printed out on a teletypewriter for predetermined counting intervals. The teletypewriter also punches a tape to provide computer-compatible readout

  19. In vitro-in vivo extrapolation: estimation of human serum concentrations of chemicals equivalent to cytotoxic concentrations in vitro

    Guelden, Michael; Seibert, Hasso

    2003-01-01

    In the present study an extrapolation model for estimating serum concentrations of chemicals equivalent to in vitro effective concentrations is developed and applied to median cytotoxic concentrations (EC 50 ) determined in vitro. Nominal concentrations of a chemical in serum and in vitro are regarded as equivalent, if they result in the same aqueous concentration of the unbound form. The algorithm used is based on equilibrium distribution and requires albumin binding data, the octanol-water partition coefficient (K ow ), and the albumin concentrations and lipid volume fractions in vitro and in serum. The chemicals studied cover wide ranges of cytotoxic potency (EC 50 : 2.5-530000 μM) and lipophilicity (log K ow : -5 to 7). Their albumin binding characteristics have been determined by means of an in vitro cytotoxicity test as described previously. The equivalent serum concentrations of 19 of the 33 compounds investigated, having high protein binding and/or lipophilicity, were substantially higher than the EC 50 -values, by factors of 2.5-58. Prominent deviations between the equivalent nominal concentrations in serum and in vitro were largely restricted to chemicals with higher cytotoxic potency (EC 50 ≤1000 μM). The results suggest that estimates of equivalent serum concentrations based on in vitro data are robust for chemicals with low lipophilicity (log K ow ≤2) and low potency (EC 50 >1000 μM). With more potent chemicals or those with higher lipophilicity partitioning into lipids and/or binding to serum proteins have to be taken into account when estimating in vivo serum concentrations equivalent to in vitro effective concentrations

  20. Age and sex dependent inhalation doses to members of the public from indoor thoron progeny

    Bi, L; Tschiersch, J [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, D-85764, Neuherberg (Germany); Li, W B [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Department of Medical Radiation Physics and Diagnostics, D-85764, Neuherberg (Germany); Li, J L, E-mail: bilei1983@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-12-01

    The increased indoor thoron level in Europe, North America and Asia has shown that the exposure to thoron and its decay products cannot be ignored in some environments. The contribution of thoron and its progeny can be a significant component of the total exposure from radon and thoron. In the present paper, radiation dose assessment of members of the public of different age and sex exposed to {sup 220}Rn progeny under different daily life activities is performed through a dosimetric approach. Dose conversion coefficients under typical indoor conditions were estimated to be in the range of 107 nSv (Bq h m{sup -3}){sup -1} for infant to 81.7 nSv (Bq h m{sup -3}){sup -1} for adult. The results of this work emphasized that small children receive a radiation dose of 25% more than adults under the same conditions, and people performing exercise receive a radiation dose 100% more than when sleeping. The results of this work are appropriate to the risk assessment of thoron exposure to members of the public who live in areas with high radon and thoron concentrations.

  1. Variation of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in different outdoor and indoor environments

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Janevik, Emilija; Taleski, Vaso [Goce Delcev University, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Stip (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Boev, Blazo [Goce Delcev University, Faculty of Natural and Technical Sciences, Stip (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Zunic, Zora S. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' ' Vinca' ' , Belgrade (Serbia); Ivanova, Kremena; Tsenova, Martina [National Center of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria); Ristova, Mimoza [University in Ss. Cyril and Methodius, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematic, Institute of Physics, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Ajka, Sorsa [Croatian Geological Survey, Zagreb (Croatia); Bossew, Peter [German Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Subject of this study is an investigation of the variations of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in outdoor and indoor environments of 40 dwellings, 31 elementary schools and five kindergartens. The buildings are located in three municipalities of two, geologically different, areas of the Republic of Macedonia. Indoor radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track detectors, deployed in the most occupied room of the building, between June 2013 and May 2014. During the deploying campaign, indoor and outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were measured simultaneously at the same location. It appeared that the measured values varied from 22 to 990 Bq/m{sup 3} for indoor radon concentrations, from 50 to 195 nSv/h for outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates, and from 38 to 184 nSv/h for indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. The geometric mean value of indoor to outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates was found to be 0.88, i.e. the outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were on average higher than the indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. All measured can reasonably well be described by log-normal distributions. A detailed statistical analysis of factors which influence the measured quantities is reported. (orig.)

  2. Radon and thoron levels, their spatial and seasonal variations in adobe dwellings - a case study at the great Hungarian plain.

    Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Jordan, Gyozo; Szabó, Csaba; Horváth, Ákos; Holm, Óskar; Kocsy, Gábor; Csige, István; Szabó, Péter; Homoki, Zsolt

    2014-06-01

    Radon and thoron isotopes are responsible for approximately half of the average annual effective dose to humans. Although the half-life of thoron is short, it can potentially enter indoor air from adobe walls. Adobe was a traditional construction material in the Great Hungarian Plain. Its major raw materials are the alluvial sediments of the area. Here, seasonal radon and thoron activity concentrations were measured in 53 adobe dwellings in 7 settlements by pairs of etched track detectors. The results show that the annual average radon and thoron activity concentrations are elevated in these dwellings and that the proportions with values higher than 300 Bq m(-3) are 14-17 and 29-32% for radon and thoron, respectively. The calculated radon inhalation dose is significantly higher than the world average value, exceeding 10 mSv y(-1) in 7% of the dwellings of this study. Thoron also can be a significant contributor to the inhalation dose with about 30% in the total inhalation dose. The changes of weather conditions seem to be more relevant in the variation of measurement results than the differences in the local sedimentary geology. Still, the highest values were detected on clay. Through the year, radon follows the average temperature changes and is affected by the ventilation, whereas thoron rather seems to follow the amount of precipitation.

  3. Dosimetry, measurement and properties of radon daughters and thoron daughters

    Phillips, C.R.

    1982-03-01

    Various properties of radon and thoron daughter products are examined. Dosimeter methods and instrumentation (TLD and personal alpha dosimeters) are investigated as to performance under varying conditions such as humidity and pure or mixed atmospheric conditions. Optimized counting schemes are determined for the daughters of radon and thoron. An optimized counting scheme was experimentally examined under mine conditions. The optimization procedure takes into account the uncertainties associated with concentration, flow rate and radioactive decay. Measurements were made in two uranium mines at Elliot Lake, Ontario of the charged and unattached fractions of radon daughters in the mines. The physicochemical state of 218 Po in air was determined by measurement of rate of neutralization, diffusion coefficient and fraction born charge. Careful control of experimental conditions made it possible to obtain more precise and detailed quantitative data than previously possible

  4. In situ measurements of thoron exhalation rate in Okinawa (Japan)

    Shiroma, Y.; Isa, N.; Hosoda, M.; Sorimachi, A.; Ishikawa, T.; Tokonami, S.; Furukawa, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thoron exhalation rates from the ground surface were measured at 57 sites on Okinawa Island (Japan), using a ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector equipped with photomultiplier. The arithmetic means ± SD, median ± SD, minimum and maximum of the rates (unit: Bq m -2 s -1 ) were estimated to be 1.9 ± 1.4, 1.6 ± 0.3, 0.04 and 6.2, respectively. The soils distributed on the island are generally classified into dark red soils, residual regosols, as well as red and yellow soils. While it was assumed that the soils were originated from the bedrock, recent studies suggested that the main material of dark red soils is the East Asian eolian dust. In the dark red soils area, the exhalation rate is relatively higher than that in the other areas. This suggested that the eolian dust was an enhancer for the environmental thoron concentration on Okinawa Island. (authors)

  5. Diffusion coefficients of decay products of radon and thoron

    Raghunath, B.; Kotrappa, P.

    1979-01-01

    The diffusion coefficients of the decay products of radon and thoron have relevance in the evaluation of inhalation hazards in uranium and thorium processing industries. A recently developed diffusion sampler, based on Mercer's theory of diffusional deposition between the concentric circular plates, has been used for determining the diffusion coefficients of the unattached decay products of radon and thoron (RaA, RaB, RaC and ThB). Experiments were conducted at different ventilation rates (6 and 60 changes/hr) at different relative humidities (10 and 90%) and both in air and argon atmospheres. Diffusion coefficients were found to increase with increasing ventilation rates and were found to decrease at higher relative humidities, the effect being more marked at lower ventilation rates. Both of these effects were less pronounced in argon than in air. Results are discussed in light of the known properties of these decay products. (author)

  6. Study of radon, thoron and toxic elements in some textile dyes

    Abel-Ghany, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Elemental analysis of textile dyes may provide valuable information concerning the content and concentrations of element, especially the toxic ones. Such information monitors the safety of handling and using these dyes in textile industry. In addition to the safety of wearing of clothes stained with these dyes. In the present work, the specific activity of both radon and thoron were measured in nine textile dyes by using alpha emitters registration which are emitted from radon and thoron gases in CR-39 nuclear track detectors. Unexpectedly, the results obtained reports a high concentration of both radon and thoron gases in some samples (samples D5 and D9). Also the concentration of toxic elements (Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Cd and Cr) in textile dyes were determined by flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. (author)

  7. Thoron and associated risks in the handling of thorium compounds; Le thoron et les risques associes dans la manipulation des composes du thorium

    Pradel, J; Billard, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    1. Thorium compounds continually give off thoron and its daughters and their radioactivity can constitute a danger for operators who may inhale them. 2. By analogy with radon the maximum admissible content in air of thoron and its daughters has been set at 10{sup -7} {mu}c/cm{sup 3}. However the differences in behaviour between radon and its active deposit on the one hand, and thoron and its daughters on the other, appear great enough to justify more thorough investigation. In fact it seemed probable that, contrary to what takes place with radon, the thoron + thorium A content at a given point may differ appreciable from the thorium B + thorium C + thorium C' + thorium C'' content at the same point, because of the considerable differences in half-life which allow a greater or lesser distribution. 3. To determine the relative concentrations it was necessary to develop a method for estimating thoron in equilibrium with thorium A, the measurement of thorium B and its daughters being carried out in the conventional way by counting the activity collected on a filter. 4. Another object of this study was to estimate the danger presented by thoron in equilibrium with thorium A in the immediate vicinity of thorium sources, in a plant extracting thorium from urano-thorianite. (author) [French] 1. Le thoron et ses descendants se degagent constamment des composes du thorium et leur radioactivite peut presenter un danger pour les personnes qui sont amenees a les respirer. 2. Par analogie avec le radon, la teneur maximum admissible dans l'air de thoron et de ses descendants a ete fixee a 10{sup -7} {mu}c/cm{sup 3}. Mais, les differences de comportement du radon et de son depot actif d'une part, du thoron et de ses descendants d'autre part, ont paru suffisantes pour justifier une etude plus complete. Il semblait en effet probable, contrairement a ce qui se produit pour le radon, qu'en un meme point, la teneur en thoron + thorium A puisse differer notablement de la teneur en

  8. Thoron and associated risks in the handling of thorium compounds; Le thoron et les risques associes dans la manipulation des composes du thorium

    Pradel, J.; Billard, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    1. Thorium compounds continually give off thoron and its daughters and their radioactivity can constitute a danger for operators who may inhale them. 2. By analogy with radon the maximum admissible content in air of thoron and its daughters has been set at 10{sup -7} {mu}c/cm{sup 3}. However the differences in behaviour between radon and its active deposit on the one hand, and thoron and its daughters on the other, appear great enough to justify more thorough investigation. In fact it seemed probable that, contrary to what takes place with radon, the thoron + thorium A content at a given point may differ appreciable from the thorium B + thorium C + thorium C' + thorium C'' content at the same point, because of the considerable differences in half-life which allow a greater or lesser distribution. 3. To determine the relative concentrations it was necessary to develop a method for estimating thoron in equilibrium with thorium A, the measurement of thorium B and its daughters being carried out in the conventional way by counting the activity collected on a filter. 4. Another object of this study was to estimate the danger presented by thoron in equilibrium with thorium A in the immediate vicinity of thorium sources, in a plant extracting thorium from urano-thorianite. (author) [French] 1. Le thoron et ses descendants se degagent constamment des composes du thorium et leur radioactivite peut presenter un danger pour les personnes qui sont amenees a les respirer. 2. Par analogie avec le radon, la teneur maximum admissible dans l'air de thoron et de ses descendants a ete fixee a 10{sup -7} {mu}c/cm{sup 3}. Mais, les differences de comportement du radon et de son depot actif d'une part, du thoron et de ses descendants d'autre part, ont paru suffisantes pour justifier une etude plus complete. Il semblait en effet probable, contrairement a ce qui se produit pour le radon, qu'en un meme point, la teneur en thoron + thorium A puisse

  9. Radon-thoron levels and inhalation dose distribution patterns in India dwellings

    Ramachandran, T.V.; Eappen, K.P.; Nair, R.N.; Mayya, Y.S.; Sadasivan, S.

    2003-09-01

    A countrywide survey on radon and thoron levels has been carried out in Indian dwellings under a Coordinated Research Project sponsored by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences (BRNS), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). Eight universities and a few research institutions from different parts of the country participated in this project. Under this project, radon and thoron levels were measured using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) -spark counter based passive technique. A plastic twin chamber radon -thoron dosimeter was developed and standardized for the survey. This radon-thoron discriminating dosimeter uses three SSNTDs; two of which are exposed in cup modes and the third one is exposed in bare mode. Calibration factors (CF) are obtained for cup and bare mode SSNTDs through controlled experiments in a calibration facility. Calibration factors obtained from experiments showed very good agreement with the calibration factors derived from theoretical models. Four nodal centres were set up each at Kalpakkam, Jodhpur, Jaduguda and Mumbai for calibration and standardization of the dosimeter system. Inter calibration of the dosimeters were also carried out for comparison purpose. Nearly 4500 measurements in about 1400 dwellings were made during the survey period. An analysis of the data shows that the indoor radon gas concentrations at different locations vary between 4.6 and 147.0 Bq.m -3 with a geometric mean of 23.0 Bq.m -3 (GSD 2.61). Indoor thoron gas concentrations, in general, are found to be less than the radon concentrations and vary from 3.6 to 42.8 Bq.m -3 with a geometric mean of 12.2 Bq.m -3 (GSD 3.22). The mean annual inhalation dose rate due to radon, thoron and their progeny in the dwellings is estimated to be 0.97 mSv.y -1 (GSD 2.49). It is observed that the major contribution to the indoor inhalation dose is due to radon and its progeny. However, the contribution due to thoron and its progeny is not trivial as it is about 20 % of the total

  10. Dose estimation by simultaneous measurement of the radon/thoron concentration and the equilibrium factors in air using a passive dosemeter

    Urban, M.

    1984-03-01

    Responsible for an increased radiation exposure is the inhalation of radon and its short lived daughters. A time integrating passive dosemeter was developed to determine the concentrations of the radon isotopes as well as their equilibrium factors. The α energy spectrum inside a dosemeter is measured by means of a nuclear track detector. The concentrations in air and the equilibrium factors are calculated by using a new mathematical dosemeter model. A small pilot study in houses was done to test the dosemeter. (orig.) [de

  11. Measurement of radon and thoron present in the environment using nuclear track etch detector technique

    Ramachandran, T.V.; Lalit, B.Y.; Mishra, U.C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) is one of the most convenient techniques to assess the average radiation levels of alpha activities in the environment. This technique has been used to assess the radon and thoron concentrations in some high background areas of South India and underground non-uranium mines in Bihar State. Exposed SSNTD films are chemically etched in an alkali solution and the alpha tracks are evaluated under an optical microscope. The detailed procedure for this study and the calibration of the etched films for conversion of alpha track density to radon and thoron concentrations in pCi l -1 are given in this paper. It was found that 1.9 tracks cm -2 day -1 and 6.2 tracks cm -2 day -1 were produced by exposing the LR-115 foils to 1 pCi l -1 of thoron and radon respectively. (author)

  12. STUDY OF RADIATION EXPOSURE DUE TO RADON, THORON AND THEIR PROGENY IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT OF RAJPUR REGION OF UTTARAKHAND HIMALAYA.

    Kandari, Tushar; Aswal, Sunita; Prasad, Mukesh; Pant, Preeti; Bourai, A A; Ramola, R C

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, the measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations have been carried out in the Rajpur region of Uttarakhand, Himalaya, India by using LR-115 solid-state nuclear track detector-based time-integrated techniques. The gas concentrations have been measured by single-entry pin-hole dosemeter technique, while for the progeny concentrations, deposition-based Direct Thoron and Radon Progeny Sensor technique has been used. The radiation doses due to the inhalation of radon, thoron and progeny have also been determined by using obtained concentrations of radon, thoron and their progeny in the study area. The average radon concentration varies from 75 to 123 Bq m -3 with an overall average of 89 Bq m -3 The average thoron concentration varies from 29 to 55 Bq m -3 with an overall average of 38 Bq m -3 The total annual effective dose received due to radon, thoron and their progeny varies from 2.4 to 4.1 mSv y -1 with an average of 2.9 mSv y -1 While the average equilibrium factor for radon and its progeny was found to be 0.39, for thoron and its progeny, it was 0.06. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Development of a PIN diode based on-line measurement system for Radon (222Rn) and Thoron (220Rn) in environment

    Ashokkumar, P.; Chaudhury, Probal; Sumesh, C.G.; Sahoo, B.K.; Gaware, J.J.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2014-01-01

    Radon, thoron and their progenies are universally present in outdoor air, and can reach higher levels in indoor air due to poor ventilation. Several instruments have been developed for accurate measurement of radon and thoron in the environment. Semiconductor detector based system employing spectroscopic method has been proved to be the best among them. A PIN diode based electrostatic collection type online real-time instrument has been developed in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron in an environment while both 222 Rn and 220 Rn are present. This system can be used for determination of radon and thoron concentrations at residence or workplace. Furthermore, since the 222 Rn and 220 Rn are differentiated from each other through spectroscopy, this monitor can be used even in a mixed radon/thoron environment

  14. Epidemiological potentials of radon- and thoron-prone area in China

    Sun, Quanfu; Hou, Changsong; Tokonami, Shinji

    2004-01-01

    In order to explore the feasibility of an epidemiological study on lung cancer in areas with elevated indoor radon and thoron exposures, 202 residences including loess caves, brick caves, stone caves, and ordinary houses in twenty villages were selected from Yan'an and Luliang areas in the Chinese loess plateau, and indoor levels of thoron and its progeny as well as radon were determined with passive radon-thoron discriminative detectors and thoron progeny deposition rate devices. The indoor radon concentration in loess cave ranged from 17 to 179 Bq m -3 , with geometric means of 73 Bq m -3 and 71 Bq m -3 in Luliang and Yan'an, respectively. Geometric mean of EEC Tn was estimated to be 1.6 Bq m -3 in Luliang and 2.2 Bq m -3 in Yan'an. The study also revealed that the air pollution in Yan'an was small compared with that in Luliang. Residential migration was very low in Yan'an area: 86% of the subjects had no migration, mean number of houses for the family master was estimated to be 1, ranged from 1 to 3. It would be expected to have several hundreds of lung cancer cases diagnosed with pathological evidences in 3-5 years. Yan'an and surrounding area are suitable for conducting an epidemiological study on residential exposure to radon, thoron and lung cancer risk. (author)

  15. Variability of radon and thoron equilibrium factors in indoor environment of Garhwal Himalaya.

    Prasad, Mukesh; Rawat, Mukesh; Dangwal, Anoop; Kandari, Tushar; Gusain, G S; Mishra, Rosaline; Ramola, R C

    2016-01-01

    The measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations have been carried out in the dwellings of Uttarkashi and Tehri districts of Garhwal Himalaya, India using LR-115 detector based pin-hole dosimeter and DRPS/DTPS techniques. The equilibrium factors for radon, thoron and their progeny were calculated by using the values measured with these techniques. The average values of equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny have been found to be 0.44, 0.39, 0.39 and 0.28 for rainy, autumn, winter and summer seasons, respectively. For thoron and its progeny, the average values of equilibrium factor have been found to be 0.04, 0.04, 0.04 and 0.03 for rainy, autumn, winter and summer seasons, respectively. The equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny has been found to be dependent on the seasonal changes. However, the equilibrium factor for thoron and progeny has been found to be same for rainy, autumn and winter seasons but slightly different for summer season. The annual average equilibrium factors for radon and thoron have been found to vary from 0.23 to 0.80 with an average of 0.42 and from 0.01 to 0.29 with an average of 0.07, respectively. The detailed discussion of the measurement techniques and the explanation for the results obtained is given in the paper. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The German thoron progeny chamber-Concept and application

    Roettger, Annette; Honig, Anja; Arnold, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Following completion of the project 'Generation and characterisation of reference atmospheres of thoron decay products for the calibration of measuring devices for thoron decay products', the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) now operates a thoron progeny chamber in which 220 Rn (thoron), 222 Rn and its progenies can be made available under almost all ambient conditions. This allows all measuring systems to be calibrated under realistic climatic conditions with an accuracy unique worldwide.

  17. Thoron exhalation rate monitor with absorber

    Xiao Detao; Zhao Guizhi

    2003-01-01

    A measurement method of thoron exhalation rate is developed based on the characteristic of thorium C' which emits a α particle with higher energy than those of α particles released from radon and radon progenies. The principles of discriminating radon and realizing thoron exhalation rate measurement on the material surface with absorber, the passive and integrated thoron exhalation rate monitor studied, and its calibration coefficient determination method are introduced. The effectiveness of mitigating thoron exhalation rate of wall surface by depressurization inside wall and thoron exhalation rates on some materials surfaces were measured by using the studied monitors. The calibration coefficient of the studied monitor is R=0.246 cm -2 ·(kBq·m -3 ·h) -1 . The lower limit of detection is LLD=18.4 mBq·m -2 ·s -1 when the sampling period is 7 days and the standard deviation of background track densities of the adopted CR-39 SSNTD is s T =1.6 cm -2

  18. Assessment of thorium and thoron decay products in air - thorium plant

    Dhandayutham, R.; Gohel, C.O.; Shetty, P.N.; Savant, P.B.; Rao, D.V.V.

    1977-01-01

    For the evaluation of radiation dose to the lungs in a thorium plant, it is necessary to estimate the concentration of thorium, thoron and its daughter products in air. Methods employed in estimating thorium and its decay products and 'working level' are presented. (M.G.B.)

  19. Measurement of thoron exhalation rates from building materials.

    de With, G; de Jong, P; Röttger, A

    2014-09-01

    Thoron (220Rn) exhalation from building materials has become increasingly recognized as a potential source for radiation exposure in dwellings. However, contrary to radon (220Rn), limited information on thoron exposure is available. The purpose of this study is to develop a test method for the determination of the thoron exhalation rate from building materials. The method is validated, and subsequently the thoron exhalation rates from 10 widely-applied concretes, gypsums, brick, limestone, and mortar are determined. The measured thoron exhalation rates of these materials range from 0.01 Bq m-2 s-1 to 0.43 Bq m-2 s-1, with relative standard uncertainties between 6% to 14%.

  20. Variability of radon and thoron equilibrium factors in indoor environment of Garhwal Himalaya

    Prasad, Mukesh; Rawat, Mukesh; Dangwal, Anoop; Kandari, Tushar; Gusain, G.S.; Mishra, Rosaline; Ramola, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    The measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations have been carried out in the dwellings of Uttarkashi and Tehri districts of Garhwal Himalaya, India using LR-115 detector based pin-hole dosimeter and DRPS/DTPS techniques. The equilibrium factors for radon, thoron and their progeny were calculated by using the values measured with these techniques. The average values of equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny have been found to be 0.44, 0.39, 0.39 and 0.28 for rainy, autumn, winter and summer seasons, respectively. For thoron and its progeny, the average values of equilibrium factor have been found to be 0.04, 0.04, 0.04 and 0.03 for rainy, autumn, winter and summer seasons, respectively. The equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny has been found to be dependent on the seasonal changes. However, the equilibrium factor for thoron and progeny has been found to be same for rainy, autumn and winter seasons but slightly different for summer season. The annual average equilibrium factors for radon and thoron have been found to vary from 0.23 to 0.80 with an average of 0.42 and from 0.01 to 0.29 with an average of 0.07, respectively. The detailed discussion of the measurement techniques and the explanation for the results obtained is given in the paper. - Highlights: • Equilibrium factors for indoor radon, thoron and their progeny were measured. • Recently developed passive detector techniques were used for measurements. • The values of equilibrium factors are comparable with world's average values. • Equilibrium factor should be measured separately for individual dwelling. • Separate values of equilibrium factors are useful to produce actual radiation dose.

  1. An approach to discriminatively determine thoron and radon emanation rates for a granular material with a scintillation cell

    Sakoda, Akihiro; Meisenberg, Oliver; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    A powder sandwich technique was applied to determine thoron ("2"2"0Rn) and radon ("2"2"2Rn) emanation rates for a granular material. The feature of this technique is the sample preparation, in which a granular material is put and fixed between two membrane filters. Airflow is directly given to this sandwich sample, will include thoron and radon emanated from the material, and then is transferred to the detector. This method makes sure that thoron and radon emanated are not retained in pore space within the sample volume, which is crucial for the appropriate emanation test. This technique was first introduced by Kanse et al. (2013) with the intention to measure the emanation of thoron - but not of radon - from materials having much higher "2"2"4Ra activity than "2"2"6Ra. In the present study, the methodology for the discriminative determination of thoron and radon emanation rates from a granular material has been examined using a flow-through scintillation cell and sandwich sample. The mathematical model was developed to differentiate total alpha counts into thoron- and radon-associated counts. With a sample of uranium ore, this model was experimentally validated by comparison between the scintillation cell and a reference detector that can discriminatively measure thoron and radon concentrations. Furthermore, the detection limits and uncertainties were evaluated to discuss the characteristics of this method. Key parameters for improving the determination of thoron and radon emanations were found to be the background radon concentration and the leakage of radon from the measurement system, respectively. It was concluded that the present method is advantageous to a sample that has much higher "2"2"6Ra activity than "2"2"4Ra. - Highlights: • The methodology of appropriate and discriminative measurement of thoron and radon emanation is presented. • Measurement of thoron and radon emanated from a sample was made using a scintillation cell. • Detection limits and

  2. Variability in dose-equivalent assessments for inhaled U3O8 concentrations

    Hewson, G.; Blyth, D.I.

    1985-01-01

    A potentially significant radiological hazard exists in the packaging area of uranium mills through the inhalation of airborne uranium octoxide (U 3 O 8 ). The Radiation Protection (Mining and Milling Code (1980) requires the measurement and assessment of quarterly, annual and cumulative dose equivalents for employees working in these areas. Arising through differences which exist between the abovementioned Code and ICRP 30, and assumptions of particle size and dust concentration distributions, confusion exists within Australia regarding the methods which can be used to make the required assessments. Exposure data were collected during routine monitoring at an operating mill facility and were interpreted using different methods and a range of assumptions. Results indicated the dust at this facility is characterised by an AMAD greater than 10 μ, and dust concentrations were distributed lognormally. Assumptions of a normal distribution may result in an overestimate of the dose equivalent. The importance of particle size in dose assessments using ICRP 30 techniques was highlighted. Information was masked when employee data was grouped to provide work category dose assessments. The use of ICRP 30 methods were recommended to provide uniformity throughout Australia

  3. A study of indoor radon, thoron and their exhalation rates in the environment of Fazilka district, Punjab, India

    Narang, Saurabh; Kumar, Deepak; Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Kumar, Ajay

    2018-02-01

    Over the last few decades, the study of radioactive radon gas has gained huge momentum due to its possible role in health related hazards. In the present work, pin-hole twin chamber single entrance dosimeters have been used for track measurements of radon and thoron. The annual average radon concentration varies from 50.3 to 204 Bq/m3 at all locations. Almost all the values are below the safe range provided by ICRP. Radon concentration is found to be higher in winter as compared to other seasons. Variation of radon with quality of dwellings is also discussed. The values of annual effective dose due to radon and thoron are also well within the range provided by ICRP and WHO. Radon and thoron exhalation rates are measured using SMART RnDuo monitor. The radon mass exhalation rates ranged from 11 to 71 mBq/kg/h while the thoron surface values ranged from 36 to 2048 Bq/m2/h. All the values are on the lower side. A weak correlation is found between radon and thoron concentrations and their exhalation rates. When compared with the values of other parts of northern India, the values of present investigation are on higher side.

  4. Concentrations and Toxic Equivalency of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Polish Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents.

    Urbaniak, Magdalena; Kiedrzyńska, Edyta

    2015-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are widely recognized as important sources of toxic contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). An example is given in the present paper, where concentrations of 12 dioxin-like PCBs (dl-PCBs) congeners were investigated in effluents from 14 WWTPs of different sizes, using gas chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry. The results obtained demonstrate that the smallest WWTPs are characterized by the highest total dl-PCB concentration of 102.69 pg/L, roughly twice those of medium-size and large WWTPs, i.e. 41.14 and 48.29 pg/L, respectively. In all cases, the concentrations obtained were generated mostly by increased contributions of PCB-77, PCB-105 and PCB-118 which constituted 48 %-59 % of the mean dl-PCB concentration. The results also reveal a predominance of mono-ortho over non-ortho PCBs. All three types of WWTP effluent were found to have similar toxic equivalency (TEQ) values, ranging from 0.31 for large to 0.37 pg TEQ/L for medium WWTPs.

  5. Refinement of a thoron insensitive alpha track detector for environmental radon monitoring

    Davey, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    Olympic Dam Operations, a Copper/Uranium mine in the north of South Australia, currently monitors environmental radon (Rn 222) concentrations at a total of 17 sites in the area surrounding the mining lease and Roxby Downs township. During 1990 a commercial alpha track radon detector service was replaced with an on-site system resulting in lower costs, greater confidence in detector calibration, and reduction in processing time. Alpha track detectors (ATD's) are placed in triplicate at each of the 17 sites. Flow-through scintillation cell continuous radon monitors are also operated at two of these sites. Comparison of results from the two different types of monitor has raised the question of a possible thoron (Rn 220) contribution in the alpha track detectors. Laboratory experiments revealed that the diffusion membranes used in the ATD's were in fact 'transparent' to thoron. A new membrane was tested which effectively excluded thoron from the detector cup without affecting the sensitivity to radon. Field comparisons of the different membranes revealed that the thoron component was significant. Since there is only a very minor Rn220 emission from the mining operation, it is important that the monitoring be specific only to Rn222, the primary source term. The use of the new membrane will result in more accurate measurements of Rn222. 4 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  6. Measurement of Radon, Thoron, Isotopic Uranium and Thorium to Determine Occupational and Environmental Exposure and Risk at Fernald Feed Material Production Center

    Harley, Naomi H.

    2004-01-01

    To develop a new and novel area and personal radon/thoron detector for both radon isotopes to better measure the exposure to low airborne concentrations of these gases at Fernald. These measurements are to be used to determine atmospheric dispersion and exposure to radon and thoron prior to and during retrieval and removal of the 4000 Ci of radium in the two silos at Fernald

  7. Exhalation of radon and thoron from ground surface

    Megumi, Kazuko

    1978-01-01

    When radon and thoron in the environment are considered, the exhalations of radon and thoron from the ground surface are important. The following matters are described: a method of measuring directly the quantities of radon and thoron exhaled from the ground surface, the respective quantities measured by the method in summer and winter, and the dependence of the exhalations upon soil particle sizes. In this direct method, to obtain the exhalation quantities, radon and thoron from the ground surface are adsorbed in granular active carbon, and the γ-ray spectra are measured. The method is capable of measuring radon and thoron simultaneously in direct and inexpensive manner. For continuous measurement, however, it needs further improvement. The measurements by the method revealed the difference between summer and winter, the effect of rainfall, the dependence on soil particle size and on soil moisture of radon and thoron exhalations. (J.P.N.)

  8. Study on seasonal variation of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny levels in Hassan District of Karnataka, India

    Srinivasa, E.; Rangswamy, D.R.; Sannappa, J.

    2015-01-01

    Radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations have been measured in different types of buildings at different locations for different seasons in Hassan city using time-integrated passive radon dosimeters containing LR-115 Type II solid state nuclear track detector exposed for four seasons of 3 months each covering a period of one year from October 2012 to September 2013. The radon and thoron activity concentration in summer season in the corresponding dwellings has been found to vary from 7.4 to 45.7 Bq m -3 and 5.4 to 34.9 Bqm -3 with a median of 23.59±11 Bqm -3 and 1447±8 Bq -3 respectively. The radon progeny concentrations varies from 0.4 to 4.1 mWL with an average value of 1.83±1 mWL, while thoron progeny concentrations vary from 0.3 to 3.2 mWL with an average value of 1.12±0.7 mWL respectively. The annual effective dose received due to radon, thoron and its progeny by the inhabitants in the dwellings under study has also been calculated which is found to vary from 0.320±0.4 to 1.860 ±1.1 mSv y -1 with an average value of 0.9576 ± 0.8 mSv y -1 . In general, the level of radon-thoron was observed highest in winter and lowest in summer. A detail analysis of radon and thoron distribution in different houses with seasonal variation is presented in this paper. From this study it is observed that, bathrooms and kitchens have significantly higher radon concentrations as compared to other rooms in the dwellings. (author)

  9. A field method for monitoring thoron-daughter working level

    Khan, A.H.; Dhandayatham, R.; Raghavayya, M.; Nambiar, P.P.V.J.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of working level, generally used for radon daughters, has been extended to the daughter products of thoron. Accordingly, thorondaughter working level (TWL) has been defined as the alpha energy released from the ultimate decay of 100 pCi/1 each of the short-lived decay products of thoron. In order to facilitate the evaluation of inhalation hazard in thorium handling areas, a simple field method has been suggested to measure the thoron-daughter working level. A comparison of the potential alpha energies from radon-daughters and that from thoron-daughter is included. (K.B.)

  10. Exhalation of radon and thoron from phosphogypsum uses as building material

    Vanmarcke, H.

    1996-01-01

    The radioactive properties of two types of phosphogypsum, were determined. Gypsum plates with different thickness were produced. The 226 Ra and 232 Th concentrations were measured by means of high resolution gamma spectrometry. The results are for type 1 226 Ra: 75 Bq/kg and 232 Th 230 Bq/kg and for type 2 226 Ra: 155 Bq/kg and 232 Th: 160 Bq/kg. The radon ( 222 Rn) exhalation rate was evaluated by closing the plates in airtight barrels and measuring the radon concentration. The exhalation rate of type 1 is 1.2 10-5 Bq/(kg s) and type 2 4.7 10-5 Bq/(kg s). In combination with the 226 Ra concentration an emanating fraction of respectively 7.6% and 14% is obtained. The 222 Rn (thoron) exhalation of the plates was determined by measuring the concentration of the decay products in a chamber of 1 m 3 with normal aerosol concentrations. The exhalation rate was found to be independent of the thickness of the plates, as expected from the short half-life of 220 Rn. Covering the entire surface of the plates with two layers of a common Latex paint decreased the thoron exhalation by a factor of 10 to 20. The laboratory results for the radon and thoron exhalation were converted using realistic assumptions for a room. The contribution of phosphogypsum to the average radon concentration in a room is found to be about 1 Bq/m 3 for type 1 and 4 Bq/m 3 for type 2 resulting in an annual effective dose of the order of 0.1 mSv/year. The contribution to the effective dose from the thoron exhalation is much greater, namely, 1.8 mSv/year for type I and 0.9 mSv/year for type 2. Painting the gypsum lowers the thoron dose by a factor of 10 to 20 making the thoron dose comparable to that of radon. (author)

  11. Calibration of alpha-track monitors for measurement of thoron

    Pearson, M.D.

    1990-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology established the Technical Measurements Center (TMC) at the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) to provide standardization, calibration, verification of data, quality assurance, and cost-effectiveness for environmental measurements associated with the various DOE remedial action programs. The GJPO Radon Laboratory has conducted a number of studies evaluating the precision and accuracy of alpha-track monitors for the measurement of airborne radon (Rn-222) concentration. These studies have demonstrated the usefulness of using alpha-track monitors to measure radon. Alpha-track devices have also been proposed for estimating concentrations of thoron (Rn-220). 9 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Assessment of sediment quality based on toxic equivalent benzo[a]Pyrene concentration

    King, T.L.; Lee, K.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) as an indicator and its thresholds for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in sediments. The indicator, based on toxicity and carcinogenic effects, was selected to assess the marine environment and changes in marine environmental quality (MEQ) in Sydney Harbour, Nova Scotia. It was shown that the bioavailability of B[a]P and other PAHs is greatly affected by the quality and quantity of dissolved organic matter and organic carbon content. Two coal coke facilities were constructed on the shore of Sydney Harbour in the 19th century. For many years, the coke-ovens discharged toxic liquid effluent through the Tar Ponds into the harbour, contaminating the ground and surface water with arsenic, lead and other toxins. It also led to the accumulation of PAHs and polychlorinated biphenyls. A recent assessment of PAH contamination of Sydney Harbour has focused on the exposure of organisms to contaminants as well as the biological effects on the organisms. All samples collected from the South Arm of Sydney Harbour exceeded the upper threshold of established regulatory guidelines. Samples from the Northwest Arm were within regulatory limits, suggesting that industrial and municipal sources were the primary sources of pollution. PAH concentrations were used to identify sediments that exceed effects thresholds based on MEQ guidelines. The results were compared to actual observations of biological effects. Toxic equivalency factors were established for B[a]P and other PAHs in order to estimate cumulative exposure levels. The concentrations can be compared to regulatory sediment quality guidelines established in Canada and the United States for the protection of marine life. 34 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs

  13. Comparison of different methods for thoron progeny measurement

    Bi Lei; Zhu Li; Shang Bing; Cui Hongxing; Zhang Qingzhao

    2009-01-01

    Four popular methods for thoron progeny measurement were discussed, including the aspects of detector,principle, precondition, calculation advantages and disadvantages. Comparison experiments were made in mine and houses with high background in Yunnan Province. Since indoor thoron progeny changes with time obviously and with no rule, α track method is recommended in the area of radiation protection for environmental detection and assessment. (authors)

  14. An intercomparison between gross α counting and gross β counting for grab-sampling determination of airborne radon progeny and thoron progeny

    Papp, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The instantaneous values of the airborne activity concentrations of radon progeny and thoron progeny have been determined 34 times in a closed and windowless room in a cellar using two independent grab-sampling methods in order to compare the performance of the methods. The activity concentration of radon ( 222 Rn) was also measured and it varied between 200 and 650 Bq m -3 . Two samples of radon and thoron progeny were collected simultaneously from roughly the same air volume by filtering. For the first method, the isotopes were collected on membrane filter and gross α counting was applied over several successive time intervals. This method was a slightly improved version of the methods that are applied generally for this reason for decades. For the second method, the isotopes were collected on glass-fibre filter and gross β counts were registered over several time intervals. This other method was developed a few years ago and the above series of measurements was the first opportunity to make an intercomparison between it and another similar method based on α counting. Individual radon progeny and thoron progeny activity concentrations (for the isotopes 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 212 Pb) were evaluated by both methods. The detailed investigation of the results showed that the systematic deviation of the methods is small but significant and isotope-dependent. The weighted averages of the β/α activity concentration ratios for 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi, EEDC 222 (Equilibrium-Equivalent Decay-product Concentration of radon progeny) and 212 Pb were 0.99±0.03, 0.90±0.02, 1.03±0.02, 0.96±0.02 and 0.80±0.03, respectively. The source of the systematic deviation is probably the inaccurate knowledge of the counting efficiencies mainly in the case of the α-counting method. A significant random-type difference between the results obtained with the two methods has also been revealed. For example, the β/α ratio for EEDC 222 varied between 0.81±0.01 and 1.22±0

  15. Development of an electronic monitor for the determination of individual radon and thoron exposure

    Irlinger, Josef

    2015-06-11

    The carcinogenic effect of the radio isotope {sup 222}Rn of the noble gas radon and its progeny, as well as its residential distribution, are well studied. In contrast, the knowledge about the effects and average dwelling concentration levels of its radio isotope {sup 220}Rn (thoron) is still limited. Generally, this isotope has been assumed to be a negligible contributor to the effective annual dose. However, only recently it has been pointed out in several international studies, that the dose due to thoron exceeds the one from {sup 222}Rn under certain conditions. Additionally, radon monitors may show a considerable sensitivity towards thoron which was also not accounted for in general. Therefore a reliable, inexpensive exposimeter, which allows to distinguish between decays of either radon and thoron, is required to conduct further studies. The scope of this thesis was to develop an electronic radon/thoron exposimeter which features small size, low weight and minimal power consumption. The design is based on the diffusion chamber principle and employs state-of-the-art alpha particle spectroscopy to measure activity concentrations. The device was optimized via inlet layout and filter selection for high thoron diffusion. Calibration measurements showed a similar sensitivity of the monitor towards radon and thoron, with a calibration factor of cf{sup {sub 2}{sub 2}{sub 2Rn}} = 16.2 ± 0.9 Bq m{sup -3}/cph and cf{sup {sub 2}{sub 2}{sub 0Rn}} = 14.4 ± 0.8 Bq m{sup -3}/cph, respectively. Thus, the radon sensitivity of the device was enhanced by a factor two compared to a previous prototype. The evaluation method developed in this work, in accordance with ISO 11665 standards, was validated by intercomparison measurements. The detection limits for radon and thoron were determined to be C{sup {sub 2}{sub 2}{sub 2Rn}} = 44.0 Bq m{sup -3} and C{sup {sub 2}{sub 2}{sub 0Rn}} = 40.0 Bq m{sup -3}, respectively, in case of a low radon environment, a one-hour measurement

  16. Development of an electronic monitor for the determination of individual radon and thoron exposure

    Irlinger, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The carcinogenic effect of the radio isotope 222 Rn of the noble gas radon and its progeny, as well as its residential distribution, are well studied. In contrast, the knowledge about the effects and average dwelling concentration levels of its radio isotope 220 Rn (thoron) is still limited. Generally, this isotope has been assumed to be a negligible contributor to the effective annual dose. However, only recently it has been pointed out in several international studies, that the dose due to thoron exceeds the one from 222 Rn under certain conditions. Additionally, radon monitors may show a considerable sensitivity towards thoron which was also not accounted for in general. Therefore a reliable, inexpensive exposimeter, which allows to distinguish between decays of either radon and thoron, is required to conduct further studies. The scope of this thesis was to develop an electronic radon/thoron exposimeter which features small size, low weight and minimal power consumption. The design is based on the diffusion chamber principle and employs state-of-the-art alpha particle spectroscopy to measure activity concentrations. The device was optimized via inlet layout and filter selection for high thoron diffusion. Calibration measurements showed a similar sensitivity of the monitor towards radon and thoron, with a calibration factor of cf 222 Rn = 16.2 ± 0.9 Bq m -3 /cph and cf 220 Rn = 14.4 ± 0.8 Bq m -3 /cph, respectively. Thus, the radon sensitivity of the device was enhanced by a factor two compared to a previous prototype. The evaluation method developed in this work, in accordance with ISO 11665 standards, was validated by intercomparison measurements. The detection limits for radon and thoron were determined to be C 2 22 Rn = 44.0 Bq m -3 and C 2 20 Rn = 40.0 Bq m -3 , respectively, in case of a low radon environment, a one-hour measurement interval, and a background count rate of zero. In contrast, in mixed radon/thoron concentrations where the 212 Po peak must

  17. Study of Indoor Radon /Thoron And Its Hazard Inside Kindergartens In Iraqi Kurdistan Using CR39 Nuclear Track Detectors

    Ismail, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    Indoor radon /thoron levels with potential alpha energy concentration PAEC), effective dose (H E ) and equilibrium factor (F) were measured using closed and open-can technique, containing CR-39 nuclear track detector. Measurements were carried during summer season inside different Kindergartens in three main regions (Erbil, Duhok and Sullimaniye) in Iraqi Kurdistan. We found that the radon and thoron densities range from (11 to 33 track.cm -2 .d -1 ) for radon and (8 to 29 track.cm -2 .d -1 ) for thoron, with the average radon concentration (96.81 26.939Bq/m 3 ) While an average (PAEC) and (H E ) was (7.68±2.298 mWL) , (2.306± 0.689 mSv/Y) respectively. On the other hands the average equilibrium factor was (0.291±0.01). Consequently, we believe that our results were done when we comparing them with the action levels were recommended by (lCRP 66). The results obtained indicate that various locations have different values of radon/thoron concentration. The differences can be ascribed to variations in grades of uranium at different locations and to some environmental factors such as ventilation, particle concentration, and the deposition of the progeny on surfaces or on the atmospheric aerosol

  18. Assessment of radon and thoron exhalation from Indian cement samples using smart radon and thoron monitors

    Sahoo, B.K.; Sapra, B.K; Agarwal, T.K.; Babu, D.A.R.

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that primarily, there exist two important sources that contribute to indoor radon/thoron namely, the exhalation from ground and building materials. The contribution from ground, although significant, is treated as a case of existing exposure. Then, the only source that can be controlled during the construction is the choice of building materials. Cement is an important building material used in the construction of houses and buildings in India. The housing sector is the largest cement consumer with 53% of the total Indian cement demand followed by the infrastructure sector. India with a production capacity of 165 million tones (MT) (in 2007), was the second largest cement producer in the world after China. The industry produces various types of cement like ordinary portland cement (OPC), Portland pozzolana cement (PPC), portland slag cement (PSC), rapid hardening portland cement (RHPC), sulphate resistant cement (SRC) and white cement (WC). Several studies have been undertaken on cement in various countries because it is commonly used in bulk quantities in the construction of houses and other civil structures. However, detailed information regarding the radon and thoron exhalation into indoor air from various types of cements produced in India is scarce. In the present work, an attempt has been made to systematically determine the radon and thoron exhalation from 50 cement samples (17 OPC, 15 PPC, 04 PSC, 06 RHPC, 04 WC and 04 SRC). The data thus obtained is used to calculate the indoor radon and thoron source term and the contributed inhalation dose based on a model room structure. The measured values of radon and thoron exhalation from cement samples were comparable with the reported values in other countries. This study showed that the cement samples used in civil constructions do not pose any radiological hazard to the Indian population. (author)

  19. Determination of radon and thoron permeability through some plastics by track technique

    Hafez, A.-F.; Somogyi, G.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the usefulness of several types of plastic foils as filter to separate radon and thoron. Time-integrated alpha-activity measurements have been carried out by using the so-called ''can-technique'' equipped with both LR-115 and CR-39 track detectors. The track density observed on the detectors, taken as a measure of radon activity concentration, has been determined as a function of the thickness of filter foils. The radon permeability and the thoron separation factors have been determined. It is shown that various plastic foils exhibit considerable differences in radon diffusion coefficient owing to their different chemical structures. Among the plastic foils investigated the polyethylene proved to have the highest gas diffusion coefficient.

  20. Characteristics of radon and thoron exhalation rates in Okinawa, subtropical region of Japan

    Shiroma, Y.; Kina, S.; Fujitani, T.; Hosoda, M.; Sorimachi, A.; Ishikawa, T.; Sahoo, S. K.; Tokonami, S.; Furukawa, M.

    2012-01-01

    Radon and thoron exhalation rates from the ground surface were estimated in three islands of Okinawa Prefecture, a subtropical region of Japan. In situ measurements of the exhalation rates were conducted at a total of 88 points using an accumulation technique with a ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector. The radon and thoron exhalation rates were calculated to be 1-137(arithmetic mean: 21) mBq m -2 s -1 and 32-6244 (1801) mBq m -2 s -1 , respectively. In the surface soil samples collected at 53 measurement points, 238 U and 232 Th series concentrations were estimated to be 17.9-254.0 (64.0) Bq kg -1 dry and 17.8-136.1 (58.8) Bq kg -1 dry, respectively. The maximum rates and concentrations were observed in the dark red soil area. Recent studies strongly suggest that the base material of the soils may be the eolian dust derived from the southeastern part of China, a high background radiation area. The eolian dust is, therefore, considered to be an enhancer for the radon and thoron exhalations in Okinawa. (authors)

  1. Study on radon and thoron levels in different types of dwellings of Lambapur area of Nalgonda District, A.P., India

    Vinay Kumar Reddy, K.; Gopal Reddy, Ch.; Yadagiri Reddy, P.; Rama Reddy, K.

    2006-01-01

    An attempt has been made to study the indoor radon and thoron concentration levels in different types of dwellings of Lambapur and Peddagattu proposed uranium mining areas. The dwellings with mud floors recorded a relatively higher concentrations compared to those with other type of floors. Similar studies have also been made with different types of walls. In this case, dwellings having brick walls with mud plastering showed relatively higher levels of radon and thoron concentrations. The average concentration levels of radon and thoron in this area is found to be 88.8 ± 66.7 Bq.m -3 and 118.3 ± 96.4 Bq.m -3 . (author)

  2. Estimation of ventilation rate in uranium or thorium handling laboratories using short-lived thoron daughter activity

    Shivade, R.K.; Deshpande, S.B.

    2016-01-01

    Natural uranium in oxide form is used as fuel in the Indian PHWR. Natural 238 U fuel contains 232 Th as an impurity to the extent of 50 - 60 ppm. This thorium impurity is converted to 232 U in reactor during irradiation. 232 U is converted to 224 Ra by alpha decays, 224 Ra further decays to 220 Rn by alpha decays. 220 Rn decays to stable 208 Pb by emitting alpha, beta particles and gamma rays. 220 Rn is inert gas but its daughter products are in particulate form. Effective half-life of Tn decay series is 10.6 hrs and four days are required to reduce the air borne activity concentration to negligible level on a filter paper sample. Uranium or thorium is handled remotely in the glove boxes with proper shielding. Glove boxes are under optimum negative pressure. Exhausts from glove boxes are connected to stack with proper filtration. Amber ares of the Lab is also supplied with conditioned air supply for human comfort and to keep the atmospheric thoron daughter concentration under control. Even after using proper engineering safety features, thoron that is in the gaseous form can came out from glove boxes due to holes on the neoprene gloves of micro or nano dimensions. Probability of thoron gas leakage is more during bagging out or bagging in operations. This gives rise to thoron daughter activity in the working atmosphere of Lab constantly and workers should be protected adequately

  3. Estimation of annual dose equivalent (internal and external) for new thorium plant workers of IRE OSCOM, Orissa

    Vidya Sagar, D.; Tripathy, S.K.; Khan, A.H.; Maharana, L.N.

    2001-01-01

    In addition to thoron, thoron daughters and gamma radiation, the New Thorium Plant workers are exposed to long lived alpha emitters due to inhalation of thorium fine dust present in the working environment. Air samplers were used for measurement of thoron daughters and long lived alpha concentration. Each sample was counted for 3-4 hours for alpha activity and the long lived alpha concentration was calculated after taking the self absorption effect of the deposit on the filter paper into account. Internal dose of individual workers due to thoron daughter concentration and long lived alpha concentration was determined using time weighted factors. Based on the results, it is observed that contribution of thoron daughters, long lived alpha and external gamma is about 2 mSv /y, 1 mSv /y and 5 mSv/y, respectively, to total dose to the workers. (author)

  4. ALOAD - a code to determine the concentrated forces equivalent with a distributed pressure field for a FEM analysis

    Nicolae APOSTOLESCU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to describe a code for calculating an equivalent systemof concentrate loads for a FEM analysis. The tables from the Aerodynamic Department containpressure field for a whole bearing surface, and integrated quantities both for the whole surface andfor fixed and mobile part. Usually in a FEM analysis the external loads as concentrated loadsequivalent to the distributed pressure field are introduced. These concentrated forces can also be usedin static tests. Commercial codes provide solutions for this problem, but what we intend to develop isa code adapted to the user’s specific needs.

  5. Assessment of dose due to exposure to indoor radon and thoron progeny

    Prasad Ganesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The components of the effective dose through inhalation from radon and its progeny are important for human health since they contribute to more than 50% of the total radiation dose from natural sources. As a consequence, radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Radon and its short lived decay products (218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi, 214Po present in dwellings are a radiation hazard, particularly if such sources are concentrated in the enclosed areas like poorly ventilated houses and underground mines. The indoor radon, thoron, and progeny concentrations were measured in a small hilly town of Budhakedar and the surrounding area of Tehri Garhwal, India, by using LR-115 Type II plastic track detector in a twin cup radon dosimeter. The concentrations of radon progeny were measured as the highest in winter and the lowest in summer while the thoron progeny concentration was found maximum in rainy season and minimum in autumn. The annual exposure to the potential alpha energy of radon and thoron were found to vary from 0.04 WLM to 0.69 WLM with an average value of 0.29 WLM, and 0.03 WLM to 0.37 WLM with an aver- age value of 0.16 WLM, respectively. The annual effective dose due to the exposure to indoor radon and progeny in Budhakedar homes was found to vary from 0.16 mSv to 2.72 mSv with an average value of 1.14 mSv and the effective dose due to the exposure to thoron and progeny was found to vary from 0.18 mSv to 2.49 mSv with an average value of 1.05 mSv. The results of systematic study have been obtained by considering the room as a space in which the radon and thoron levels are directly related to the dynamic and static parameters.

  6. Improved automated analysis of radon (222Rn) and thoron (220Rn) in natural waters.

    Dimova, Natasha; Burnett, William C; Lane-Smith, Derek

    2009-11-15

    Natural radon ((222)Rn) and thoron ((220)Rn) can be used as tracers of various chemical and physical processes in the environment. We present here results from an extended series of laboratory experiments intended to improve the automated analysis of (222)Rn and (220)Rn in water using a modified RAD AQUA (Durridge Inc.) system. Previous experience with similar equipment showed that it takes about 30-40 min for the system to equilibrate to radon-in-water concentration increases and even longer for the response to return to baseline after a sharp spike. While the original water/gas exchanger setup was built only for radon-in-water measurement, our goal here is to provide an automated system capable of high resolution and good sensitivity for both radon- and thoron-in-water detections. We found that faster water flow rates substantially improved the response for both isotopes while thoron is detected most efficiently at airflow rates of 3 L/min. Our results show that the optimum conditions for fastest response and sensitivity for both isotopes are at water flow rates up to 17 L/min and an airflow rate of 3 L/min through the detector. Applications for such measurements include prospecting for naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in pipelines and locating points of groundwater/surface water interaction.

  7. Radon and radon daughter monitoring (including thoron daughter monitoring)

    Leach, V.A.; Grealy, G.; Gan, W.

    1982-01-01

    Radon/radon daughter and thoron daughter measurement techniques are outlined. The necessary precautions and critical assessments of each method are also presented with a view to providing a better understanding of the various measurement methods

  8. Multi-parametric approach towards the assessment of radon and thoron progeny exposures

    Mishra, Rosaline, E-mail: rosaline@barc.gov.in, E-mail: rosaline.mishra@gmail.com; Sapra, B. K. [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mayya, Y. S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai (India)

    2014-02-15

    Conventionally, the dosimetry is carried out using radon and thoron gas concentration measurements and doses have been assigned using assumed equilibrium factors for the progeny species, which is inadequate pertaining to the variations in equilibrium factors and possibly due to significant thoron. In fact, since the true exposures depend upon the intricate mechanisms of progeny deposition in the lung, therefore an integrated approach for the assessment of progeny is essential. In this context, the recently developed deposition based progeny concentration measurement techniques (DTPS: Direct Thoron progeny sensors and DRPS: Direct Radon progeny sensors) appear to be best suited for radiological risk assessments both among occupational workers and general study populations. DTPS and DRPS consist of aluminized mylar mounted LR115 type passive detectors, which essentially detects the alpha particles emitted from the deposited progeny atoms on the detector surface. It gives direct measure of progeny activity concentrations in air. DTPS has a lower limit of detection limit of 0.1 Bq/m{sup 3} whereas that for DRPS is 1 Bq/m{sup 3}, hence are perfectly suitable for indoor environments. These DTPS and DRPS can be capped with 200-mesh type wire-screen to measure the coarse fraction of the progeny concentration and the corresponding coarse fraction deposition velocities as well as the time integrated fine fraction. DTPS and DRPS can also be lodged in an integrated sampler wherein the wire-mesh and filter-paper are arranged in an array in flow-mode, to measure the fine and coarse fraction concentration separately and simultaneously. The details are further discussed in the paper.

  9. Radon in air concentrations arising from storage of articles containing radium or thorium

    Slater, M.; Gooding, M.

    2006-01-01

    A major component of public and occupational radiation exposure worldwide arises from the inhalation of radon and thoron gases, produced during the decay of naturally occurring uranium and thorium respectively. Whilst radon and thoron exposures are normally associated with the natural environment, there may also be a risk associated with sources, manufactured articles and waste produced through refining and concentration of naturally occurring radioactive material. Sources and articles manufactured from refined uranium do not normally give rise to the release of radon as the uranium progeny are largely removed during production and, if removed, will take thousands of years to reach full equilibrium with the uranium parent isotopes. Exposure to radon -222 ( 222 Rn) may, however, arise in areas where the uranium-238 ( 238 U) daughter radium-226 ( 226 Ra) is concentrated, for example in the form of sources, luminous articles or low-specific activity (LSA) scale. Exposure to radon- 220 ( 220 Rn), otherwise known as thoron, may occur in areas where thorium isotopes are concentrated, for example as manufactured laboratory thorium compounds. This paper explores the issues affecting radon and thoron release from manufactured articles containing uranium and thorium and their progeny. A methodology is provided for the calculation of 222 Rn and 220 Rn in air concentrations likely to arise as a result of the storage and use of articles containing radium-226 ( 226 Ra) or thorium-232 ( 232 Th). The methodology provided in the document allows derivation of the equilibrium equivalent radon concentration and the radon exposure rate in circumstances where the ventilation rate and volume of the facility can be reliably estimated and the quantities of 226 Ra or 232 Th held are known. A critical variable in the calculation is the release fraction (i.e. the proportion of radon generated that is release to atmosphere), and this paper considers methods for estimating this parameter

  10. Invited Article: In situ comparison of passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors at subsurface workplaces in Hungary

    Kávási, Norbert, E-mail: norbert@fml.nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Social Organization for Radioecological Cleanliness, Veszprém (Hungary); Vigh, Tamás [Social Organization for Radioecological Cleanliness, Veszprém (Hungary); Manganese Mining Process Ltd., Úrkút (Hungary); Németh, Csaba [Social Organization for Radioecological Cleanliness, Veszprém (Hungary); University of Pannonia, Veszprém (Hungary); Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Janik, Miroslaw; Yonehara, Hidenori [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    During a one-year long measurement period, radon and thoron data obtained by two different passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors were compared at subsurface workplaces in Hungary, such as mines (bauxite and manganese ore) and caves (medical and touristic). These workplaces have special environmental conditions, such as, stable and high relative humidity (100%), relatively stable temperature (12°C–21°C), low or high wind speed (max. 2.4 m s{sup −1}) and low or elevated aerosol concentration (130–60 000 particles m{sup −3}). The measured radon and thoron concentrations fluctuated in a wide range among the different workplaces. The respective annual average radon concentrations and their standard deviations (in brackets) measured by the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with cellulose filter (CF) and the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with sponge filter (SF) were: 350(321) Bq m{sup −3} and 550(497) Bq m{sup −3} in the bauxite mine; 887(604) Bq m{sup −3} and 1258(788) Bq m{sup −3} in the manganese ore mine; 2510(2341) Bq m{sup −3} and 3403(3075) Bq m{sup −3} in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 6239(2057) Bq m{sup −3} and 8512(1955) Bq m{sup −3} in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). The respective average thoron concentrations and their standard deviation (in brackets) measured by CF and SF monitors were: 154(210) Bq m{sup −3} and 161(148) Bq m{sup −3} in the bauxite mine; 187(191) Bq m{sup −3} and 117(147) Bq m{sup −3} in the manganese-ore mine; 360(524) Bq m{sup −3} and 371(789) Bq m{sup −3} in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 1420(1184) Bq m{sup −3} and 1462(3655) Bq m{sup −3} in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). Under these circumstances, comparison of the radon data for the SF and CF monitors showed the former were consistently 51% higher in the bauxite mine, 38% higher in the manganese ore mine, and 34% higher in the caves

  11. Invited Article: In situ comparison of passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors at subsurface workplaces in Hungary

    Kávási, Norbert; Vigh, Tamás; Németh, Csaba; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Janik, Miroslaw; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    During a one-year long measurement period, radon and thoron data obtained by two different passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors were compared at subsurface workplaces in Hungary, such as mines (bauxite and manganese ore) and caves (medical and touristic). These workplaces have special environmental conditions, such as, stable and high relative humidity (100%), relatively stable temperature (12°C–21°C), low or high wind speed (max. 2.4 m s −1 ) and low or elevated aerosol concentration (130–60 000 particles m −3 ). The measured radon and thoron concentrations fluctuated in a wide range among the different workplaces. The respective annual average radon concentrations and their standard deviations (in brackets) measured by the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with cellulose filter (CF) and the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with sponge filter (SF) were: 350(321) Bq m −3 and 550(497) Bq m −3 in the bauxite mine; 887(604) Bq m −3 and 1258(788) Bq m −3 in the manganese ore mine; 2510(2341) Bq m −3 and 3403(3075) Bq m −3 in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 6239(2057) Bq m −3 and 8512(1955) Bq m −3 in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). The respective average thoron concentrations and their standard deviation (in brackets) measured by CF and SF monitors were: 154(210) Bq m −3 and 161(148) Bq m −3 in the bauxite mine; 187(191) Bq m −3 and 117(147) Bq m −3 in the manganese-ore mine; 360(524) Bq m −3 and 371(789) Bq m −3 in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 1420(1184) Bq m −3 and 1462(3655) Bq m −3 in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). Under these circumstances, comparison of the radon data for the SF and CF monitors showed the former were consistently 51% higher in the bauxite mine, 38% higher in the manganese ore mine, and 34% higher in the caves. Consequently, correction is required on previously obtained radon data acquired by CF

  12. Invited Article: In situ comparison of passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors at subsurface workplaces in Hungary

    Kávási, Norbert; Vigh, Tamás; Németh, Csaba; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Janik, Miroslaw; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-02-01

    During a one-year long measurement period, radon and thoron data obtained by two different passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors were compared at subsurface workplaces in Hungary, such as mines (bauxite and manganese ore) and caves (medical and touristic). These workplaces have special environmental conditions, such as, stable and high relative humidity (100%), relatively stable temperature (12°C-21°C), low or high wind speed (max. 2.4 m s-1) and low or elevated aerosol concentration (130-60 000 particles m-3). The measured radon and thoron concentrations fluctuated in a wide range among the different workplaces. The respective annual average radon concentrations and their standard deviations (in brackets) measured by the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with cellulose filter (CF) and the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with sponge filter (SF) were: 350(321) Bq m-3 and 550(497) Bq m-3 in the bauxite mine; 887(604) Bq m-3 and 1258(788) Bq m-3 in the manganese ore mine; 2510(2341) Bq m-3 and 3403(3075) Bq m-3 in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 6239(2057) Bq m-3 and 8512(1955) Bq m-3 in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). The respective average thoron concentrations and their standard deviation (in brackets) measured by CF and SF monitors were: 154(210) Bq m-3 and 161(148) Bq m-3 in the bauxite mine; 187(191) Bq m-3 and 117(147) Bq m-3 in the manganese-ore mine; 360(524) Bq m-3 and 371(789) Bq m-3 in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 1420(1184) Bq m-3 and 1462(3655) Bq m-3 in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). Under these circumstances, comparison of the radon data for the SF and CF monitors showed the former were consistently 51% higher in the bauxite mine, 38% higher in the manganese ore mine, and 34% higher in the caves. Consequently, correction is required on previously obtained radon data acquired by CF monitors at subsurface workplaces to gain comparable data for SF monitors. In the

  13. Thoron (220Rn) in the indoor atmospheric environment

    Ramachandran, T.V.

    2006-01-01

    rate arising from 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their short-lived progenies. This survey has been carried out using a twin cup radon-thoron dosimeter with solid state nuclear track based dosimeter developed and standardized at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai using LR- 115 Type - II, of 12 μm thick cellulose nitrate film as a detector. In this paper the contribution from 220 Rn and its progenies to the inhalation component is presented. Measurements in dwellings spread over 45 location, covering 1425 houses of different types of concentration were carried out using the above dosimeter. Estimated 220 Rn levels varied from 5.7 to 42.4 Bq.m -3 at with a GM of 12.2 Bq.m -3 (GSD 3.22). Annual inhalation dose rate due to 220 Rn and its progeny vary from 0.047 to 0.39 mSv.y -1 with a GM of 0.14 mSv.y -1 (GSD 1.36). Present study reveals that 220 Rn and its progeny contributes nearly 20% of the total dose rate due to radon, thoron and their progenies Paper presents the method of measurements and the results obtained. Data available in literature is also compared. (author)

  14. Thoron (RN-220) interference in the determination of RN-222 exhalation rate of soils

    Amaral, Déric S.; Farias, Emerson E.G.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Silva, Karolayne E.M.; Hazin, Clovis A.; França, Elvis J., E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Souza Neto, João A., E-mail: adauto@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Geologia

    2017-07-01

    The transport of Rn-222 from the soil to the atmosphere known as exhalation is influenced by meteorological conditions and soil geophysical parameters. In closed and poorly ventilated rooms, this radioactive gas can reach high activity concentrations, in which the energy of alpha particles released by this radionuclide and its progeny is the second leading cause of lung cancer. Soil exhalation rate is an important parameter for assessing human health risks associated with radon. For radon determination using an exhalation chamber, an ionization chamber detector is used to count the electrical pulses generated by the interaction between the alpha particles produced by Rn-222 and its progeny and the air inside the chamber. In this work, the interference of thoron (Rn-220) in the determination of soil exhalation rate of Rn-222 was studied. For this, the RadonBOX exhalation chamber and the AlphaGuard ionization chamber detector were utilized for analyzing the same soil during two hours on different days under similar meteorological conditions. From zero up to approximately 2,400 s, the radon activity concentrations decreased. After 40 minutes, the radon concentrations started to increase, thereby allowing the calculation of soil exhalation rate. This initial decreasing could be explained by a high Rn-220 than Rn-222 presence in the soil, in which, because of its short half-life, after 40 minutes, most thoron present in the chamber has undergone so that the main alpha emitter become Rn-222. In order to confirm this, Rn-220 activity was estimated by the Ra-228 concentration in the soil determined after 30 days using High Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometry with HPGe detectors. Therefore, the thoron interference in the determination of soil radon exhalation rate was considered negligible after 40 minutes of measurement time for the analyzed soil. (author)

  15. Estimating back to front ratio of wire screen for measurement of thoron decay products

    Koli, Amruta; Khandare, Pallavi; Joshi, Manish; Mariam; Khan, Arshad; Sapra, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Wire screens are widely used for measuring the fine fraction of radon/thoron decay products. Their capture efficiencies are generally defined at low aerosol concentration conditions as well as at low sampling flow rates. Effect of changes in sampling flow rate and aerosol concentration on wire screen capture efficiencies and counting correction factor has been studied in this work. Controlled experiments have been conducted using two different mesh sizes at two different aerosol concentration conditions. Experimental results were compared with the existing theories for capture efficiencies of wire screens given by Cheng and Yeh (1980) and Alonso et al. (2001); and semi empirical relation for the front to total ratio given by Solomon and Ren (1992). Theoretical predictions have been found to be relatively close to the experimental findings for moderate aerosol conditions but disagreement was observed in case of high aerosol concentration. The possible reasons for these differences have been discussed in this work. - Highlights: • Effect of Fiber Reynolds number on capture efficiency and back to front ratio of wire screen. • Experiments with Thoron decay products at moderate and elevated aerosol concentrations. • Comparison with theoretical estimates. • Fair agreement observed for moderate aerosol concentration.

  16. ORION: a computer code for evaluating environmental concentrations and dose equivalent to human organs or tissue from airborne radionuclides

    Shinohara, K.; Nomura, T.; Iwai, M.

    1983-05-01

    The computer code ORION has been developed to evaluate the environmental concentrations and the dose equivalent to human organs or tissue from air-borne radionuclides released from multiple nuclear installations. The modified Gaussian plume model is applied to calculate the dispersion of the radionuclide. Gravitational settling, dry deposition, precipitation scavenging and radioactive decay are considered to be the causes of depletion and deposition on the ground or on vegetation. ORION is written in the FORTRAN IV language and can be run on IBM 360, 370, 303X, 43XX and FACOM M-series computers. 8 references, 6 tables

  17. Radon and Thoron emanation testwork on Nolans Rare Earths ores

    Sonter, Mark; Grose, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a series of experiments performed on two bulk ore samples for Arafura Resources' Nolans Rare Earths project, intended to derive information on radon (Rn222) and thoron (Rn220) emanation rates (fluxes) under various circumstances. This data is needed to enable development of predictions of Rn and Tn releases from exposed mine bench ore, ore stockpiles, and tailings, and thus assist in estimation of airborne concentrations within the areas of the future Mine and Processing plant. In turn these estimates will provide guidance on the quantitative risk and the necessity or otherwise of invoking specific control measures, either in design or in operating procedures. This testwork was carried out during the period 2nd to 15th July, at Arafura's Winnellie facility in Darwin. Conclusions are that for uncrushed ore, Rn flux numbers are around 1.0Bq/m"2/s, Tn numbers appear to cluster around 200-300 Bq/m"2/s. Crushing gave no change in Rn flux, Tn flux was doubled for calc-silicate material. Wetting gave significant reductions for both Rn and Tn for ores sampled, and clay capping reduced Rn flux marginally but Tn was reduced by a factor of 100.

  18. Estimation of radiological dose from radon, thoron and their progeny levels in the dwellings of Shivamogga district, Karnataka, India

    Rangaswamvi, D.R.; Sannappa, J.; Srinivasa, E.

    2018-01-01

    Among all natural radiation exposure to man, inhalation of radon, thoron and their progenies are the major contributor (50 %) to the dose from ionizing radiation received by the general population. Based on the results of epidemiological studies in Europe and North America, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended reducing the indoor radon reference level from 200 to 100 Bq.m -3 . In view of this, focus has now been given for simultaneous measurement of radon, thoron and their progeny concentration in indoor air and also to estimate radiological dose in the dwellings of the Shivamogga district. The geology of the Shivamogga district comprises different types of rock formation such as granites, schists, magnetites and gneisses, Meta basalt, laterites, quartz and chlorite schist, Graywacke etc. Present study was concentrating more in granite bed rock regions along with their surrounding regions

  19. Different concentrations and volumes of p-phenylenediamine in pet. (equivalent doses) are associated with similar patch test outcomes

    Andersen, Flemming; Hamann, Carsten R; Andersen, Klaus E

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concern about causing active sensitization when patch testing is performed with p-phenylenediamine (PPD) 1% pet. has led to a recommendation to use PPD 0.3% pet. as a potentially safer preparation. However, the dose per area of allergen delivered, and hence the risk of active...... sensitization, depend on the amount dispensed into the patch test chamber, which can vary widely. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether patch testing with equivalent doses of different concentrations of PPD in pet. is associated with similar outcomes. METHODS: Seventeen known PPD-sensitive subjects were patch tested...... with different volumes and concentrations of PPD in pet. that deliver the same allergen dose per unit area (6 mg of PPD 1% pet. and 20 mg of PPD 0.3% pet. in Finn Chambers®, both equivalent to ∼ 0.09 mg/cm2 ). RESULTS: Eleven patients (65%) had positive reactions to both doses; 4 patients (24%) had negative...

  20. Radon and thoron emanation measurements and the effect of ground water

    Carriveau, G.W.; Harbottle, G.

    1980-01-01

    In the past, corrections for annual dose rate calculations have used a qualitative approach to the effect of ground water saturation and radon and thoron loss. An example is presented of how this correction can now be precisely determined using natural gamma-ray activities to determine the amount of emanation from ceramic sherds and soil, both in a dry state and saturated with ground water. The experimental data also provide information concerning disequilibria in 234 Th and 226 Ra regions of the decay series. Additionally, approximate values of uranium and thorium concentrations (sufficiently accurate for authenticity work) are provided

  1. Experimental study of radon and thoron diffusion through barriers

    Durcik, M; Havlik, F [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, 83301 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The measurement results of diffusion parameters for radon (radon-222) and thoron (radon-220) through barriers, experimental equipment and theoretical background of diffusion are presented in this paper. The diffusion barriers are used for measuring radon and thoron by passive detectors in order to test the reduction techniques in houses. Six samples (filter paper, rubber, polyethylene, glass laminate, polypropylene) were studied for radon diffusion. The thickness barriers were from 0.012 mm to 2 mm, the diffusion area was 16 cm{sup 2} and the volume V{sub 2} was 30 dm{sup 3}. The diffusion constants D were obtained using given expressions and the data from measurements. The procedures used in experiments are useful for study of diffusion ability of radon and thoron in barriers and determination diffusion parameters from short term measurements. (J.K.). 2 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs.

  2. An overview of radon and thoron research in India

    Ramola, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    An overview of radon and thoron research in India is presented in this paper. World Health Organisation along with ICRP and UNSCEAR has identified radon as the second cause of lung cancer after smoking. Apart from the health effects of radon, it has also played a role in many scientific areas such as radiotherapy, meteorology and geophysics. Radon has been studied in India by various research groups for its environmental and geophysical applications. The findings of various research groups show that there is a basis to enhance radon and thoron research and practice in the country. To be more efficient, these activities need collaboration with various authorities of the country and with international teams working in the field. Major achievements in radon and thoron research in the country accomplished in the past three decades are highlighted here. (author)

  3. Experimental study of radon and thoron diffusion through barriers

    Durcik, M.; Havlik, F.

    1995-01-01

    The measurement results of diffusion parameters for radon (radon-222) and thoron (radon-220) through barriers, experimental equipment and theoretical background of diffusion are presented in this paper. The diffusion barriers are used for measuring radon and thoron by passive detectors in order to test the reduction techniques in houses. Six samples (filter paper, rubber, polyethylene, glass laminate, polypropylene) were studied for radon diffusion. The thickness barriers were from 0.012 mm to 2 mm, the diffusion area was 16 cm 2 and the volume V 2 was 30 dm 3 . The diffusion constants D were obtained using given expressions and the data from measurements. The procedures used in experiments are useful for study of diffusion ability of radon and thoron in barriers and determination diffusion parameters from short term measurements. (J.K.). 2 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs

  4. Implications in estimation of indoor thoron levels: season and ventilation effects

    Chauhan, R.P.; Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of radon and thoron in dwellings and workplaces are most important for general public health point. Due to short half life of thoron, sometimes its contribution to radiation doses is assumed to be negligible, but their role is important for areas containing higher thorium content in soil and building materials. The thoron levels in dwellings were determined by various SSNTD detector using different cup geometry and dimensions along with bare mode in past at National and International level. These exercises were carried out in dwellings constructed with different building materials, different ventilation rates and seasons. Most of the times the results of radon and thoron levels were found same in spite of having different diffusion length in air due to different half life. This causes increase in uncertainty in measurement of thoron levels in different season and ventilation. Thus the problem of relative variation of thoron levels in different season and ventilation still exist in radiation field. In this work the measurement of indoor thoron levels from some selected dwelling having different ventilation and in different seasons using Pin hole based radon thoron dosimeters are reported. The results show that indoor thoron value is slightly lower in case of dwellings with poor ventilation, which is contrary to the results published in literature. An effort was made to explain the variation of thoron level under different season and ventilation. Some protocol suggestions are also given at the end of this work for future reference to carry out the measurement and mapping of indoor thoron. (author)

  5. Critical assessment of the deposition based dosimetric technique for radon/thoron decay products

    Mayya, Y.S.

    2010-01-01

    Inhalation doses due to radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) are predominantly contributed by their decay products and not due to the gases themselves. Decay product measurements are being carried out essentially by either short-term active measurement like by air-sampling on a substrate followed by alpha or beta counting or by continuous active monitoring techniques based on silicon barrier detector. However, due to non-availability of satisfactory passive measurement techniques for the progeny species, it has been a usual practice to estimate the long time averaged progeny concentration from measured gas concentration using an assumed equilibrium factor. To be accurate, one is required to measure the equilibrium factor in situ along with the gas concentration. This being not practical, the assigned equilibrium factor (0.4 for indoor and 0.8 for outdoor for 222 Rn) approach has been an inevitable, though uncertain, part of the dosimetric strategies in both occupational and public domains. Further, in the case of thoron decay products however, equilibrium factor is of far more questionable validity. Thus, there is a need to shift from gas based dosimetric paradigm to that based on direct detection of progeny species

  6. Study of radiation exposure due to radon, thoron and progeny in the indoor environment of Yamuna and Tons valleys of Garhwal Himalaya

    Prasad, Mukesh; Rawat, Mukesh; Dangwal, Anoop; Ramola, R.C.; Prasad, Ganesh; Mishra, Rosaline

    2016-01-01

    Long-term measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations have been carried out in dwellings of Yamuna and Tons Valleys of Uttarkashi, Garhwal Himalaya to investigate the health risk associated with inhalation of radon, thoron and progeny. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and progeny concentrations were used to estimate the annual inhalation doses and annual effective doses. The annual inhalation dose has been found to vary from 0.8 to 3.9 mSv y -1 with an average of 1.8 mSv y -1 . The annual effective dose from the exposure to radon and its progeny in the study area has been found to vary from 0.1 to 2.4 mSv with an average of 1.2±0.6 mSv. Similarly, the annual effective dose due to thoron and its progeny has been found to vary from 0.2 to 1.5 mSv with an average of 0.6±0.4. The measurement techniques and results obtained are discussed in detail. (authors)

  7. STUDY OF RADIATION EXPOSURE DUE TO RADON, THORON AND PROGENY IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT OF YAMUNA AND TONS VALLEYS OF GARHWAL HIMALAYA.

    Prasad, Mukesh; Rawat, Mukesh; Dangwal, Anoop; Prasad, Ganesh; Mishra, Rosaline; Ramola, R C

    2016-10-01

    Long-term measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations have been carried out in dwellings of Yamuna and Tons Valleys of Uttarkashi, Garhwal Himalaya to investigate the health risk associated with inhalation of radon, thoron and progeny. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and progeny concentrations were used to estimate the annual inhalation doses and annual effective doses. The annual inhalation dose has been found to vary from 0.8 to 3.9 mSv y -1 with an average of 1.8 mSv y -1 The annual effective dose from the exposure to radon and its progeny in the study area has been found to vary from 0.1 to 2.4 mSv with an average of 1.2±0.6 mSv. Similarly, the annual effective dose due to thoron and its progeny has been found to vary from 0.2 to 1.5 mSv with an average of 0.6±0.4. The measurement techniques and results obtained are discussed in detail. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Environmental thoron (220Rn): a review

    Ramachandran, T.V.

    2013-01-01

    Ever since studies on uranium miners established the presence of a positive risk coefficient for the occurrence of lung cancer in miners exposed to elevated levels of 222 Rn and its progeny, there was a great upsurge of interest in the measurement of 222 Rn in the environment and considerable data is generated on the levels of 222 Rn in the environment across the worlds and is periodically reported by UNSCEAR. In contrast to this, data pertaining to 220 Rn in indoors and workplace environment is scare due to the general perception that its levels are negligible due to its shorter half life, and subsequently its contribution to the total inhalation dose is ignored, in the presence of other significant sources of natural radiation. Many locations have higher levels of natural background radiation due to elevated levels of primordial radio nuclides in the soil and their decay products like radon ( 222 Rn), and thoron ( 220 Rn) in the environment. It is estimated inhalation of 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their short lived progenies contribute more than 54 % of the total natural background radiation dose received by the general population. This component is not adequately estimated for any country so far on a national level. 220 Rn problem will also be a problem in industries which uses thorium nitrate. Including India lamps using thoriated gas mantles are being still used for indoor and outdoor lighting and hawkers in rural as well as urban areas. Considering the fact that large amount of thorium nitrate is being handled by these industries, contribution to the inhalation dose of workers from 220 Rn gas emanated and build up of the progeny in ambient air may also be quite significant. In this article current status of 220 Rn levels in the indoor environment workplaces as well as in other industries where large amount of 232 Th is being handled are being summarized. (author)

  9. Need for an integrated approach towards the assessment of radon, thoron and their progeny exposures

    Mayya, Y.S.

    2008-01-01

    Recent publications dealing with epidemiological studies on North American and European populations have indicated statistically significant lung cancer risk coefficients attributable to residential radon exposures. These are essentially based on radon gas itself as the quantitative measure of exposures. However, considering that true exposures depend upon the intricate mechanisms of decay product deposition in the lung, it is necessary to go for the assessment of decay products including their size distributions and deposition velocities. This approach is essential for assessing the risks of thoron and its decay products which is of considerable importance in the public domain and in the thorium fuel cycle. The recent development of deposition based progeny concentration measurement techniques appear to be best suited for radiological risk assessments both among occupational workers and general study populations. These provide an easy to wear alternative for radon inhalation dosimetry similar to TLDs for external gamma radiations. It is urgently required to characterize their performance under a variety of residential indoor and workplace conditions. This may be achieved through an integrated multi-parametric study programme involving measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations along with fine and coarse fractions and indoor source terms. This will not only in delineate the true exposure profiles and indoor parameters (e.g. deposition velocities and air exchange rates) in the country, but also will help in establishing deposition dosimetry as a basic technique for inhalation exposure estimations for occupational workers and subjects living in high background radiation areas

  10. International intercalibration and intercomparison programme for radon, thoron and daughters measuring equipment. Part. 1: Radon measurement

    Knutson, E.O.; Solomon, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    The International Intercalibration and Intercomparison Programme for Radon, Thoron and Daughters Monitoring Equipment, abbreviated IIIP, is a program organized jointly by Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the Radiation Protection Research Programme of the Commission of European Communities. The broad purpose of the IIIP is to determine if the somewhat diverse calibration procedures used in different countries are equivalent. The general approach was to select four regional reference laboratories and entrust them with the details of project definition and execution. The four selected laboratories are: Australian Radiation Laboratory, US DOE Environmental Measurements Laboratory, UK National Radiation Protection Board, US DOI Bureau of Mines. The Organizing Committee that selected the four laboratories remained intact and served an oversight function in all work to date

  11. Studies on thoron progeny implantation in different materials

    Cosma, C.; Flore, A.; Pop, I.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to obtain the alpha spectra for thoron daughters implanted at the surface of different materials and to show the possibility of this method to simulate the radon progeny implantation and thus to find some parameters used in the Jacobi model

  12. A study of the attachment of thoron decay products to aerosols using an aerosol centrifuge

    Menon, V.B.; Kotrappa, P.; Bhanti, D.P.

    1980-01-01

    An aerosol centrifuge is used for the study of the attachment of thoron decay products to aerosol particles under dynamic flow conditions. The number concentration of aerosols was kept high (10 5 to 10 6 particles cm -3 ) as compared to the number of decay product atoms (10 2 to 10 3 cm -3 ) as is usually the case in a mine atmosphere. The polydispersed aerosols flow in and out of a chamber containing a steady source of thoron and the aerosols tagged with the decay products were separated into different size groups by an aerosol centrifuge (Lovelace Aerosol Particle Separator). The average activity per particle was fitted as a power function of the radius in the form of Asub(p) = aRsup(b). The average value of b was found to be 1.08 +- 0.054 for particles in the radii range 0.25 to 1.35 μm and 1.34 +- 0.12 for particles in the radii range 0.1 to 0.33 μm. (author)

  13. An overview of thoron and its progeny in the indoor environment

    McLaughlin, J.

    2010-01-01

    An account is given of the behaviour of thoron and its progeny in the indoor environment. Emphasis is placed on the spatial distribution of these radionuclides in room air and on their interactions with indoor aerosols. How these aspects of thoron and progeny behaviour give rise to special problems for measuring them and assessing their radiological impact are described. Descriptions and comparisons are given of a range of thoron and progeny measurement techniques both passive and active. Recent progress in thoron dosimetry is described as well as compared with radon dosimetry. The results of some indoor thoron and progeny surveys carried out in different countries in recent years are given. As an example of this a summary account is presented of a recently concluded survey of thoron and its airborne progeny in over 200 houses in Ireland. (authors)

  14. Comparison of radon and thoron daughter behaviour in two underground uranium mine environments

    1985-09-01

    Measurements were made of aerosol concentration and size distribution in 5 locations downstream of working areas in two Canadian uranium mines which use track and trackless mining methods. In the track mining area the aerosol concentration ranged from 3x10 4 to 7x10 4 /cm 3 , averaging 5x10 4 /cm 3 . The highest values were associated with the passage of diesel equipment. The count median diameter of the aerosol varied from 32 to 94 nm, with the smaller sizes associated with the presence of diesel exhaust. The activity median diameter was measured for radon and thoron daughters in each environment. In the track mine the diameter of 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi averaged 54, 50, 54 nm respectively, and of 212 Pb averaged 70 nm. In the trackless mine, these diameters were 73, 70, 85 and 100 nm, respectively. The activity median diameter in terms of radon Total Potential Alpha Energy was found to be 89 nm

  15. Underground measurements of aerosol in radon and thoron progeny activity distributions

    Khan, A.; Bandi, F.; Phillips, C.R.; Duport, P.

    1990-01-01

    Aerosol and activity distributions of 218 Polonium, 214 Lead, 214 Bismuth, and 212 Lead were determined in two different underground mining environments by means of an optimized time-delay counting scheme and diffusion batteries. In one environment, diesel equipment was operating; and in the other, electrically powered equipment. The two environments differed significantly in total aerosol concentration. In the diesel environment, in particular, aerosol concentrations were unsteady, and fluctuated with vehicular traffic and mining activities. As measured by radon progeny disequilibrium, the age of the air ranged from about 25 to 60 minutes. Thoron working levels were of the same order as radon working levels. In this paper, comparisons are made between the aerosol and activity size distributions in both the diesel and electric mine

  16. Environmental thoron (220Rn): a review

    Ramachandran, T.V.

    2008-01-01

    Studies on natural background radiation is a topic, which evoked curiosity and concern between the scientist and layman alike in recent years due to the shift in focus of health effects due to exposure of radiation from acute high level to chronic low level. Ever since studies on uranium miners established the presence of a positive risk coefficient for the occurrence of lung cancer in miners exposed to elevated levels of 222 Rn and its progeny, there was a great upsurge of interest in the measurement of 222 Rn in the environment. Subsequently, considerable data is being generated on the levels of 222 Rn in the environment across the worlds and is being periodically reported by UNSCEAR reports. In contrast to this, data pertaining to 220 Rn in indoors and workplace environment is scare due to the general perception that its levels are negligible due to its shorter half life, and subsequently its contribution to the total inhalation dose is ignored, in the presence of other significant sources of natural radiation. This may not be true from the recent studies resulted in observing high 220 Rn levels in living environments and work places in various countries and it is increasingly felt that it may be necessary to have data on 220 Rn levels in environment for obtaining a complete picture of inhalation dose. Globally many locations have higher levels of natural background radiation due to elevated levels of primordial radio nuclides in the soil and their decay products, like radon ( 222 Rn), and thoron ( 220 Rn) in the environment. Of late, technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material has also contributed to the burden of background radiation. It is estimated inhalation of 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their short lived progenies contribute more than 54 % of the total natural background radiation dose received by the general population. Due to this it was necessary to supplement the external component with inhalation component. This component is not

  17. Automated radon-thoron monitoring for earthquake prediction research

    Shapiro, M.H.; Melvin, J.D.; Copping, N.A.; Tombrello, T.A.; Whitcomb, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes an automated instrument for earthquake prediction research which monitors the emission of radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) from rock. The instrument uses aerosol filtration techniques and beta counting to determine radon and thoron levels. Data from the first year of operation of a field prototype suggest an annual cycle in the radon level at the site which is related to thermoelastic strains in the crust. Two anomalous increases in the radon level of short duration have been observed during the first year of operation. One anomaly appears to have been a precursor for a nearby earthquake (2.8 magnitude, Richter scale), and the other may have been associated with changing hydrological conditions resulting from heavy rainfall

  18. A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system

    Sciocchetti, G.; Sciocchetti, A.; Giovannoli, P.; DeFelice, P.; Cardellini, F.; Cotellessa, G.; Pagliari, M.

    2010-01-01

    A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system has been developed for monitoring radon and thoron individually. It consists of a 'couple' of passive integrating devices with a CR39 nuclear track detector (NTD). The experimental prototype is based on the application of a new concept of NTD instrument developed at ENEA, named Alpha-PREM, acronym of piston radon exposure meter, which allows controlling the detector exposure with a patented sampling technique (Int. Eu. Pat. and US Pat.). The 'twin diffusion chambers system' was based on two A-PREM devices consisting of the standard device, named NTD-Rn, and a modified version, named NTD-Rn/Tn, which was set up to improve thoron sampling efficiency of the diffusion chamber, without changing the geometry and the start/stop function of the NTD-Rn device. Coupling devices fitted on each device allowed getting a system, which works as a double-chamber structure when deployed at the monitoring position. In this paper both technical and physical aspects are considered. (authors)

  19. A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system.

    Sciocchetti, G; Sciocchetti, A; Giovannoli, P; DeFelice, P; Cardellini, F; Cotellessa, G; Pagliari, M

    2010-10-01

    A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system has been developed for monitoring radon and thoron individually. It consists of a 'couple' of passive integrating devices with a CR39 nuclear track detector (NTD). The experimental prototype is based on the application of a new concept of NTD instrument developed at ENEA, named Alpha-PREM, acronym of piston radon exposure meter, which allows controlling the detector exposure with a patented sampling technique (Int. Eu. Pat. and US Pat.). The 'twin diffusion chambers system' was based on two A-PREM devices consisting of the standard device, named NTD-Rn, and a modified version, named NTD-Rn/Tn, which was set up to improve thoron sampling efficiency of the diffusion chamber, without changing the geometry and the start/stop function of the NTD-Rn device. Coupling devices fitted on each device allowed getting a system, which works as a double-chamber structure when deployed at the monitoring position. In this paper both technical and physical aspects are considered.

  20. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN HOMOLOGUE CONCENTRATIONS OF PCDD/FS AND TOXIC EQUIVALENCY VALUES IN LABORATORY-, PACKAGE BOILER-, AND FIELD-SCALE INCINERATORS

    The toxic equivalency (TEQ) values of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) are predicted with a model based on the homologue concentrations measured from a laboratory-scale reactor (124 data points), a package boiler (61 data points), and ...

  1. Measurment of radon, thoron and their progeny in indoor environment of Mohali, Punjab, Northern India, using pinhole dosimeters

    Mehta Vimal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The health hazards of radon and its decay products above certain levels are well known. However, for any preventive measures to be taken, we have to be aware of radon levels of that particular area. Measurement of radon and its decay products in indoor environments is an important aspect of assessing indoor air quality and health conditions associated with it. Keeping this in mind, measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were carried out in Mohali, Northern India, using pinhole-based twin cup dosimeters. Radon exhalation rates of soil samples in the dwellings/areas were measured via an active technique of a continuous radon monitor. The indoor radon concentration in Mohali varied from 15.03 ± 0.61 Bq/m3 to 39.21 ± 1.46 Bq/m3 with an average of 26.95 Bq/m3 ,while thoron concentration in the same dwellings varied from 9.62 ± 0.54 Bq/m3 to 52.84 ± 2.77 Bq/m3 with an average of 31.09 Bq/m3. Radon progeny levels in dwellings under study varied from 1.63 to 4.24 mWL, with an average of 2.94 mWL, while thoron progeny levels varied from 0.26 to 1.43 mWL , with an average of 0.84 mWL. The annual dose received by the inhabitants of dwellings under study varied from 0.78 to 2.36 mSv, with an average of 1.61 mSv. The in situ gamma dose rate varied from 0.12 to 0.32 mSv/h.

  2. Exposures to radon and thoron and their decay products. Annex D

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this Annex, which has over 400 references, is to provide information about the levels and doses of radon and thoron and their decay products, and about physical parameters influencing and causing these levels and doses. The detrimental effects of radon and thoron daughters are not dealt with in this Annex.

  3. Calibration of environmental monitors operating on time integrating principles for radon/thoron decay products

    Bigu, J.; Grenier, M.

    1982-03-01

    An environmental radiation monitor for radon decay products has been tested under laboratory controlled conditions. The instrument is of a quasi-time-integrating type and was tested in conjunction with a radon 'box' calibration facility. It has been found that the instrument appreciably underestimates the radon daughter Working Level (WL). This is attributed to plate-out of decay products in the monitor sampling head. The difference between monitor reading and the WL by grab-sampling was higher for low aerosol concentrations. Plate-out on the instrument detector and sampling head, and contamination effects have been observed for the thoron case. There is partial agreement between experimental results and theoretical expectation. The monitor is slow to react to sudden changes in radiation level. The instrument should prove quite useful in the routine monitoring of surface and underground environments provided some suggested changes in the instrument are introduced

  4. Microcystin-LR equivalent concentrations in fish tissue during a postbloom Microcystis exposure in Loskop Dam, South Africa

    Nchabeleng, T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a decomposing cyanobacteria bloom on water quality and the accumulation of microcystin-LR equivalent toxin in fish at Loskop Dam were studied in May 2012. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] was used to confirm the presence...

  5. Developments of quad channel pulse height analyzer for radon/thoron measurement

    Ashokkumar, P.; Raman, Anand; Babu, D.A.R.; Sharma, D.N.; Topkar, Anita; Mayya, Y.S.

    2011-01-01

    Radon and thoron are naturally occurring noble radioactive gases, the exposure to which has a linear relationship to lung cancer risk. This paper describes development of an automated Radon/Thoron measurement system using an indigenously developed silicon PIN diode. This system employs the 8051 core architecture based Si-lab microcontroller (C-8051F340) integrated with LCD display, hex key pad, non volatile flash memory besides I/O ports interfaced with humidity-temperature sensors and air sampling pump. Air is sampled through a dehumidifier by using a software controlled dc pump. The positively charged progeny atoms are electro statically collected over the detector surface and the deposited radioactivity is assessed by alpha pulse height discrimination technique. The ionization charges produced due to the interaction of alpha particles in the charge depletion region of the diode which is reverse biased at 40V are collected and measured. The measurement circuit uses a charge sensitive preamplifier developed around a low noise opamp IC. The pulses are further processed through a spectroscopy amplifier to obtain distinct pulse height levels for four of the alpha emitting progenies of Rn and Tn namely 210 Po, 214 Po, 216 Po and 212 Po. These signals are input to the quad channel analyzer which provides four individual TTL pulses corresponding to four nuclides mentioned above. The analyzer outputs are processed by the microcontroller module to obtain the Rn/Tn concentration in Bq/M 3 . This portable system stores one week hourly individual channel data along with the corresponding Rn/Tn concentrations, temperature, humidity and can be transferred to pc. Preliminary studies have indicated that sensitivity as low as 0.50 cph/Bq.m -3 can be achieved by this system. (author)

  6. Radon-thoron exposures in high background radiation areas: a review

    Nambi, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    The radon-thoron measurements reported in literature for the high background radiation areas (HBRAs) of the world are summarised here. The most important areas covered are the Radon Spas and the thorium bearing monazite deposits. Special mention is made of the ongoing programmes of radon-thoron survey in the monazite beach areas of India; preliminary measurements indicate significant levels of thoron exposures. The diurnal and seasonal variations are quite wide underscoring the importance of carrying out integrated measurements for meaningful assessments of population exposures. Radon-thoron inhalation dose rates upto 30 mSv/y have been measured in lran as well as India. It has been generally observed that the cumulative population doses due to radon-thoron inhalation are as high as those due to the external exposures in these HBRAs. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  7. Indoor inhalation dose estimates due to radon and thoron in some areas of South-Western Punjab (India))

    Kumar, S.; Singh, S.; Bajwa, B. S.; Singh, B.; Sabharwal, A. D.; Eappen, K. P.

    2008-01-01

    LR-115 (type II)-based radon-thoron discriminating twin-chamber dosemeters have been used for estimating radon 222 Rn) and thoron 220 Rn) concentrations in dwellings of south-western Punjab (India)). The present study region has shown pronounced cases of cancer incidents in the public [Thakur, Rao, Rajwanshi, Parwana and Kumar (Epidemiological study of high cancer among rural agricultural community of Punjab in Northern India. Int J Environ Res Public Health 2008; 5(5):399-407) and Kumar et al. (Risk assessment for natural uranium in subsurface water of Punjab state (India)). Hum Ecol Risk Assess 2011;17:381-93)]. Radon being a carcinogen has been monitored in some dwellings selected randomly in the study area. Results show that the values of radon 222 Rn) varied from 21 to 79 Bq m -3 , with a geometric mean of 45 Bq m -3 [geometric standard deviation (GSD 1.39)], and those of thoron 220 Rn) from minimum detection level to 58 Bq m -3 with a geometric mean of 19 Bq m -3 (GSD 1.88). Bare card data are used for computing the progeny concentration by deriving the equilibrium factor (F) using a root finding method [Mayya, Eappen and Nambi (Methodology for mixed field inhalation dosimetry in monazite areas using a twin-cup dosemeter with three track detectors. Radiat Prot Dosim 1998; 77(3): 177-84)]. Inhalation doses have been calculated and compared using UNSCEAR equilibrium factors and by using the calculated F-values. The results show satisfactory comparison between the values. (authors)

  8. An assessment method of dose equivalent due to indoor 220Rn progeny by using 220Rn concentration measured at a 20 cm distance from wall

    Iida, T.; Ikebe, Y.; Okamoto, K.; Guo, Q.; Yamasaki, T.

    1996-01-01

    A pair of passive cup monitors with a different air exchange openings was developed for measuring simultaneously 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations. Indoor 220 Rn concentrations were very high in traditional Japanese dwellings with soil walls. The 220 Rn concentration decreases exponentially with the distance from wall. The effective diffusion coefficient of 220 Rn in dwelling and the exhalation rate of 220 Rn from wall were evaluated from the distribution of the 220 Rn concentrations. Then, indoor 220 Rn progeny concentration could be estimated from the 220 Rn concentration at a 20 cm distance from wall. From the results of the surveys. the average annual effective dose equivalent due to 220 Rn progeny was expected to be 0.67 mSv/year in the traditional Japanese dwellings. (author)

  9. A study of the attachment of thoron decay products to aerosols using an aerosol centrifuge

    Balakrishnan, V.

    1979-01-01

    The physical attachment of radioactive decay products (particulate, not gas) to polydisperse fluorescein aerosal particles in two size ranges 0.1 μM-0.33 μM radius and 0.25 μM-1.35 μM radius has been studied under dynamic conditions with a view to find the fraction of thoron decay products attached to the aerosals and the particle size distribution of the host aerosols in the atmosphere of uranium mines. The experimental set-up and procedure are described. An aerosol cloud of fluorescein was introduced into a reaction chamber containing a steady source of thoron and decay products were allowed to interact and attach to the aerosols in the chamber. To simulate conditions normally encountered in uranium mining and milling operations, the concentration of aerosol particles was kept high as compared to the number of decay products. The Lovelace Aerosol Particle Separator, which is an advanced, continuous centrifugal aerosol separator, was used to sample and separate the tagged aerosols into various size groups. The radioactivity associated with each group was determined. The results show the same dependence of attachment of decay products on the size of aerosol particles as predicted by the diffusion theory proposed by Lassen and Rau (1960), even though the experimental conditions of the present study do not conform to those required to satisfy the above mentioned diffusion theory. The method employed in this work to study attachment is reproducible and simple and can be adopted in uranium and thorium mines and associated processing industries. (M.G.B.)

  10. Individual dosimeter for radon and thoron daughters

    Chapuis, A.M.; Duport, P.; Zettwoog, P.

    1979-01-01

    The dosimeter is designed for the continuous measurement of the concentration of α emitters from the uranium 238 and thorium 232 series. It enables the measurement of, firstly the aerosol concentration of 218 Po (Radium A), 214 Po (Radium C') and 212 Po (Thorium C') and secondly the activity of long-lived α emitters in aerosols coming from ore dusts. One light weight version of this dosimeter is autonomous for 18 hours and is designed to measure individual doses, due to inhalation, for workers employed in uranium mines and ore processing plants. An other version using the same sampling head allows the monitoring of air concentrations in working environments. Living quarters, or free air

  11. Seasonal levels of radon and thoron in the dwellings along southern coastal Orissa, Eastern India

    Sulekha Rao, N.; Sengupta, D.

    2010-01-01

    Inhalation of radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) are a major source of natural radiation exposure. Indoor radon-thoron study has been carried out in some dwellings of Ganjam district, southern coastal Orissa, India using LR-115 type II plastic track detectors. Seasonal variation of indoor radon and thoron shows high values in winter and low values in both summer and rainy. The inhalation dose lies in the range of 0-0.06 μSv h -1 and is not high from those found elsewhere in India.

  12. Seasonal levels of radon and thoron in the dwellings along southern coastal Orissa, Eastern India

    Sulekha Rao, N [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Sengupta, D. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India)], E-mail: dsgg@gg.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2010-01-15

    Inhalation of radon ({sup 222}Rn) and thoron ({sup 220}Rn) are a major source of natural radiation exposure. Indoor radon-thoron study has been carried out in some dwellings of Ganjam district, southern coastal Orissa, India using LR-115 type II plastic track detectors. Seasonal variation of indoor radon and thoron shows high values in winter and low values in both summer and rainy. The inhalation dose lies in the range of 0-0.06 {mu}Sv h{sup -1} and is not high from those found elsewhere in India.

  13. Working level measurement of radon daughters and thoron daughters by personal dosimetry and continuous monitoring

    Phillips, C.R.; Leung, H.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of personal alpha dosimeters in mixed radon daughter and thoron daughter atmospheres in Ontario uranium mines is described together with monitoring developments which enable the radon daughter working level to be determined separately. The theoretical bases for continuous and integrated working level measurements based on individual and gross counts are presented in terms of the weighting factor for combining the thoron daughter working level with the radon daughter working level, and in terms of the in-growth time of the air. Implications for the determination of working level in the presence of thoron daughters are discussed

  14. 220Radon (Thoron) and progeny exposures in the front-end of nuclear fuel cycle activities with special reference to radioactive minerals, thorium and rare earths processing

    Pillai, P.M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Radon is a major Source of radiation exposure both at home and work places due to its universal presence. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has always treated the radioactive noble gas radon ( 222 Rn) and its isotope thoron ( 220 Rn) as a separate subject. ICRP Publication 65 (ICRP, 1993) summarizes the current knowledge of health effects of inhaled radon and its decay products and gives recommendations/guidelines for the control of exposures due to high radon levels encountered in dwellings and work places. A major departure from earlier publications on the subject is the entirely epidemiological considerations for developing the recommendations. In work place monitoring the progeny concentrations are of primary concern than the gases themselves. However radon/thoron gas measurements may also be used provided reliable information on the equilibrium factors are available. Though many developments have taken place and many options are available for individual monitoring for radon (mainly progeny) exposures of occupational workers, a viable personal dosimeter for individual monitoring for thoron daughters is yet to materialize. The doses are mostly estimated by making use of work place monitoring data in combination with occupancy factors

  15. Determination of the characteristic limits and responses of nuclear track detectors in mixed radon and thoron atmospheres

    Röttger, Annette; Honig, Anja; Schrammel, Dieter; Strauss, Heinrich F.

    2016-01-01

    Closed nuclear track detectors are widely used for the determination of Rn-222 exposures. There are also partial open systems available, which are specially designed for the determination of the exposure to Rn-220, which is a relevant exposure in special workplaces or in specific regions of the world. This paper presents data and a detail analysis of how to determine the cross-correlation by calibration in pure Rn-222 and pure Rn-220 atm. By these means calibration coefficients for the analysis of real mixed atmospheres can be obtained. The respective decision threshold, detection limit and limits of the confidence interval were determined according to ISO 11929 (ISO 11929:2010, 2010). The exposure of detectors was performed at the radon reference chamber and the thoron progeny chamber of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). The analysis of track response was done at Parc RGM, while the analytical routines were developed in the Leibniz University Hanover, Institute Radioökologie und Strahlenschutz IRS at the working Group AK SIGMA (Arbeitskreis Nachweisgrenzen). - Highlights: • Analysis of exposure in reference atmospheres according ISO 11929. • Calibration of nuclear track detectors for 222 Rn and 220 Rn. • Calculation of cross-correlation by calibration in pure 222 Rn and 220 Rn atmospheres. • Thoron activity concentration should not be omitted in radon exposure determinations.

  16. IN-SITU MEASURING METHOD OF RADON AND THORON DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT IN SOIL

    V.S. Yakovleva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple and valid in-situ measurement method of effective diffusion coefficient of radon and thoron in soil and other porous materials was designed. The analysis of numerical investigation of radon and thoron transport in upper layers of soil revealed that thoron flux density from the earth surface does not depend on soil gas advective velocity and varies only with diffusion coefficient changes. This result showed the advantages of thoron using versus radon using in the suggested method. The comparison of the new method with existing ones previously developed. The method could be helpful for solving of problems of radon mass-transport in porous media and gaseous exchange between soil and atmosphere.

  17. Development of a brand-new radon-thoron discriminative detector

    Tokonami, S.; Hulber, E.

    2004-01-01

    A brand-new radon-thoron discriminative detector has been developed for the purposes of large-scope surveys. The configuration and features of this facility in comparison to our previous detector are described

  18. Optimization of the Timepix chip to measurement of radon, thoron and their progenies

    Janik, M.; Ploc, Ondřej; Fiederle, M.; Proc, S.; Kavasi, N.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 107, JAN (2016), s. 220-224 ISSN 0969-8043 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Radon * Thoron * Timepix * calibration Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.128, year: 2016

  19. Diffusion coefficients for unattached decay products of thoron - dependence on ventilation and relative humidity

    Kotrappa, P.; Bhanti, D.P.; Raghunath, B.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study of the diffusivity of unattached decay products of thoron with respect to air changes using a recently developed diffusion sampler are reported. The dependence of diffusivity of radon/thoron decay products on relative humidity has also been investigated by measurement of diffusion coefficients in an atmosphere where relative humidities varied from 5 to 90%. Results are shown tabulated. (U.K.)

  20. Optimisation of elevated radon concentration measurement by using electro-chemical etching of nuclear track detectors

    Celikovic, I.; Ujic, P.; Fujimoto, K.; Tommasino, L.; Demajo, A.; Zunic, Z.; Celikovic, I.)

    2007-01-01

    In the paper, two methods for adjusting of passive radon-thoron discriminative dosimeters (UFO detector) for enhanced radon concentration measurement are presented. Achieved upper limit of detection is 5.94 MBq m-3 d [sr

  1. Intercomparisons for integrating the radon-thoron detector of NIRP, China with NIRS, Japan

    Wu, Yunyun; Cui, Hongxing; Zhang, Qingzhao; Shang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Intercomparisons play an important role in maintaining a reasonable and accurate standard of measurement and quality. Integrating the radon-thoron detector of the National Institute for Radiological Protection (NIRP), China has continuously been a subject of four rounds of international intercomparisons organised by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan during 2007-12. The intercomparisons were held at NIRS. The exercises included different exposures for both radon and thoron. The results of the intercomparison for the detectors of NIRP for both radon and thoron exposures were in the range of ±20 % from the reference value and were categorised as 'Category I' in the intercomparison carried out in 2011. The radon and thoron results of the LD-P detector in four rounds of intercomparison exercises were summarised, and uncertainties of all the radon and thoron results of NIRP were within the acceptable range of 30 % in environment. Radon and thoron measurement results between NIRP and NIRS were basically in agreement. (authors)

  2. Thoron (220Rn) decay products removal in poorly ventilated environments using unipolar ionizers: Dosimetric implications

    Joshi, M.; Sapra, B.K.; Khan, A.; Kothalkar, P.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2010-01-01

    Ionizers are proven to be effective in reducing the activity concentration of radon/thoron decay products in workplace environments. However, limited studies have been conducted on understanding the mechanism of removal and the related size dependency. This study demonstrates the feasibility of reducing the activity concentrations in small chambers and in room environments up to a factor of about 7. Field experiments in an uncontrolled ventilation area such as a thorium oxalate storage shed have also shown promising results with a possible concentration reduction by a factor of 4. However, these reductions have been necessarily associated with an increase (3-5 times) in the unattached fraction of the decay products which is a significant contributor to the lung dose. Owing to this, aspersions have been cast on the capability of the ionizers in reducing the effective dose. An attempt has been made here to estimate the effective doses over a wide range of parameters such as the initial unattached fraction, activity reduction ratio and the change in the unattached fraction, which get altered due to the use of ionizers. The study proves that for realistically achievable activity reduction ratios of about 3-5 with the employment of ionizers, the inhalation dose in workplace environments can be reduced by a factor of at least 4, as indicated by model calculations.

  3. Thoron ({sup 220}Rn) decay products removal in poorly ventilated environments using unipolar ionizers: Dosimetric implications

    Joshi, M.; Sapra, B.K.; Khan, A.; Kothalkar, P.; Mayya, Y.S., E-mail: bsapra@barc.gov.in [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400085 (India)

    2010-11-01

    Ionizers are proven to be effective in reducing the activity concentration of radon/thoron decay products in workplace environments. However, limited studies have been conducted on understanding the mechanism of removal and the related size dependency. This study demonstrates the feasibility of reducing the activity concentrations in small chambers and in room environments up to a factor of about 7. Field experiments in an uncontrolled ventilation area such as a thorium oxalate storage shed have also shown promising results with a possible concentration reduction by a factor of 4. However, these reductions have been necessarily associated with an increase (3-5 times) in the unattached fraction of the decay products which is a significant contributor to the lung dose. Owing to this, aspersions have been cast on the capability of the ionizers in reducing the effective dose. An attempt has been made here to estimate the effective doses over a wide range of parameters such as the initial unattached fraction, activity reduction ratio and the change in the unattached fraction, which get altered due to the use of ionizers. The study proves that for realistically achievable activity reduction ratios of about 3-5 with the employment of ionizers, the inhalation dose in workplace environments can be reduced by a factor of at least 4, as indicated by model calculations.

  4. Methodology and monitoring of radon, thoron and their daughters

    Townsend, M.G.

    1984-02-01

    Methods are described for monitoring radon and thoron gases and their daughter products in occupational and non-occupational environments. Grab-sampling, continuous monitoring, integrated measurements and personal dosimetry are discussed. Errors in different measurement methods are compared. Calibration aspects of measurement techniques are described and procedures for interlaboratory calibration are suggested. An account of unattached fraction and plateout of radon daughters is included. Sampling strategies for occupational and non-occupational environments are discussed and a table of regulations and recommendations for monitoring radiation in countries of the OECD is provided. Radiation protection training requirements are identified. Where sufficient information and consensus of opinion exist, guidelines on apparatus, methods and procedures for monitoring are developed

  5. Equivalent Lagrangians

    Hojman, S.

    1982-01-01

    We present a review of the inverse problem of the Calculus of Variations, emphasizing the ambiguities which appear due to the existence of equivalent Lagrangians for a given classical system. In particular, we analyze the properties of equivalent Lagrangians in the multidimensional case, we study the conditions for the existence of a variational principle for (second as well as first order) equations of motion and their solutions, we consider the inverse problem of the Calculus of Variations for singular systems, we state the ambiguities which emerge in the relationship between symmetries and conserved quantities in the case of equivalent Lagrangians, we discuss the problems which appear in trying to quantize classical systems which have different equivalent Lagrangians, we describe the situation which arises in the study of equivalent Lagrangians in field theory and finally, we present some unsolved problems and discussion topics related to the content of this article. (author)

  6. Present status of ambient dose equivalent rate and radioactive substance concentration measurements in working environment. (3) Measuring instruments for ionizing radiation in working environments

    Matsubara, Shohei

    2006-01-01

    In order to measure the airborne radioactive substance concentration in working environments, some kinds of sampler such as dust sampler and iodine sampler, measuring instruments (alpha and beta spectrometer, and liquid scintillation counter), monitor (dust-, iodine- and gas-monitor), survey meter for measuring gamma ray dose rate are stated. The measurement method of α, β and γ-ray nuclides and ambient dose-equivalent at 10 mm was explained. Some examples of the list of dust sampler, filter, tritium sampler, dust monitor, iodine monitor, gas monitor, and survey meter on the market are shown. There are so many kinds of measuring instruments for ionizing radiation in working environment that the best instrument for measurement should be selected. The environment conditions such as sample form, temperature and humidity have to be considered in order to evaluate the measurement values. (S.Y.)

  7. Evaluation of Ra-226, Th-232 and K-40 activities concentrations and radium equivalent index in several Brazilian economic wall paints

    Fonseca, Leandro M.; Pecequilo, Brigitte R.S.

    2015-01-01

    The titanium dioxide used as the white pigment in paints is produced from the processing of ilmenite minerals. As monazite, the main ilmenite radioactive contaminant, contains 1 to 20% thorium dioxide and also some uranium traces, so, eventually, wall paints can contain radioactivity. Activity concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K were determined in 15 Brazilian economic wall paints samples, by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The activities concentrations in the studied samples ranged from 1.3 ± 0.2 Bq/kg to 23.4 ± 0.7 Bq/kg for 226 Ra; from 2.5 ± 0.4 Bq/kg to 45.8 ± 1.5 Bq/kg for 232 Th and from 5.8 ± 2.1 Bq/kg to 157 ± 22 Bq/kg for 40 K. The radium equivalent index, calculated from the 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K concentrations, varied from 1.30 Bq/kg up to 95.9 Bq/kg, below the value of 370 Bq/kg recommended by OECD for a safety use in residential building applications. (author)

  8. CANALPH-3: a portable three-channel alpha spectrometer for measuring the daughter products of radon and thoron

    Carson, D.W.

    1979-07-01

    A portable three-channel alpha spectrometer for the measurment of radon and thoron daughters in uranium mines or homes is described. The computer programs for analysing the data to give the working levels of radon and thoron by both the alpha spectrometric and modified Kusnetz methods are included along with some typical results

  9. Deposition Pattern of Inhaled Thoron Progeny Size Distribution in Human Lung

    Mohamed, A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the important factors controlling the distribution of radiation dose to the different portions of the human respiratory tract is the deposition pattern of thoron progeny containing aerosol. Based on the activity size distribution parameters of thoron progeny, which were measured in El-Minia University, the deposition behavior of thoron progeny (attached and unattached) has been studied by using a stochastic deposition model. The measurements were performed with a wire screen diffusion battery and a low pressure cascade impactor (type Berner). The bronchial deposition efficiencies of particles in the size range of attached thoron progeny were found to be lower than those of unattached progeny. The effect of thoron progeny deposition by adult male has been also studied for various levels of physical exertion. An increase in the breathing rate was found to decrease the efficiencies with which inhaled progeny were deposited in the bronchi. As the ventilation rate increases from 0.54 to 1.5 m3 h-1, the average deposition efficiencies of airway generation 1 through 8 are expected to decrease by 22 % for 1.4 nm particles and by 38 % for 150 nm particles

  10. The measurement of radon and thoron by solid state nuclear track detectors

    Khan, H.A.; Akhwand, R.A.; Bukhari, K.M.; Saddarudin, A.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to study a) the development and annealing properties of the latent damage trails produced by radon/thoron alpha particles in plastic Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs), and b) the diffusion properties of radon and thoron in various media by using SSNTDs. The information thus obtained has been employed for a) the optimization of the conditions for the construction of radon/thoron dosimeters for uranium/thorium mines, and b) the use of SSNTDs for the prospection and estimation of uranium and thorium. The results indicate that these gases can diffuse even through rocks, and cellulose nitrate detectors, LR-115 and CA80-15, can be profitably employed in dosimetry, prospection, and for the discrimination between uranium and thorium deposits. (orig.) [de

  11. Metrology and monitoring of radon, thoron and their daughter products

    1985-01-01

    The principles of measurement and monitoring are described as applied to radon- and thoron gases and their daughter products in occupational and non-occupational environments. Various methods of measurement, such as grab-sampling, continuous monitoring, integrated measurements and personal dosimetry are discussed. Uncertainties in different measurement methods are compared. An account of unattached fraction and plateout of radon daughters is included. General principles and guidelines for monitoring are presented for the purposes of practical radiation protection as well as research applications. Calibration aspects of measurement instruments are described and procedures for interlaboratory calibration are suggested. Sampling strategies for occupational and non-occupational environments are discussed and radiation protection training requirements are identified. Where sufficient information and consensus exist, guidelines on apparatus, methods and procedures for monitoring are provided. A summary of regulations in force or being developed and recommendations for monitoring radiation exposure to radon and its decay products in countries of the OECD is provided, together with cost estimates for national indoor radon surveys

  12. AGE-DEPENDENT INHALATION DOSE DUE TO EXPOSURE OF SHORT LIVED PROGENY OF RADON AND THORON FOR DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS IN JAMMU & KASHMIR, HIMALAYAS.

    Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Mehra, Rohit

    2018-05-16

    Dosimetric approach is used in this study for the assessment of doses due to inhalation of short lived radon/thoron progeny to the inhabitants of Udhampur district of Jammu & Kashmir. This paper also presents the activity concentrations and unattached fraction of radon and thoron progeny. The observed annual concentration of attached and unattached 222Rn and 220Rn progeny has been found to vary from 8 to 32 and 0.09 to 14 Bq/m3, 0.75 to 3.16 and 0.01 to 1.13 Bq/m3, respectively. The inhalation doses from radon progeny to different body organs of different age groups have been calculated by using the age dependent biokinetic model. The attachment rate of 222Rn and indoor aerosol concentration of 222Rn and 220Rn have been estimated and their relation between them has also been studied. The dose conversion factor for mouth and nasal breathing to different exposure conditions has been obtained from Porstendorfer model.

  13. Gyrokinetic equivalence

    Parra, Felix I; Catto, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We compare two different derivations of the gyrokinetic equation: the Hamiltonian approach in Dubin D H E et al (1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3524) and the recursive methodology in Parra F I and Catto P J (2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 065014). We prove that both approaches yield the same result at least to second order in a Larmor radius over macroscopic length expansion. There are subtle differences in the definitions of some of the functions that need to be taken into account to prove the equivalence.

  14. A radon (thoron) daughter personal alpha-dosimeter of the passive type using a diffused-junction detector and an electrostatic collector

    Bigu, J.; Frattini, A.

    1984-05-01

    A solid-state alpha-dosimeter has been designed and found to be suitable for personal and environmental radon-thoron daughter monitoring. The dosimeter basically consists of an electrostatic collector and an alpha-particle counting system with spectroscopy capabilities. The sensitive volume (∼20 cm 3 ) of the electrostatic collector consists of a cylindrically-shaped metal wire screen and a diffused-junction silicon alpha-detector covered with a thin aluminized mylar sheet. A DC voltage (∼450 V) is applied between the wire screen and the mylar sheet, the latter held at negative potential relative to the metal screen. Data can be retrieved during or after sampling by means of a micro-computer (Epson HX20) via a RS-232 communcation interface unit. The dosimeter has been calibrated in a large (26 m 3 ) radon/thoron test facility. A linear relationship was found between radon gas concentration and radon daughter Working Level, and the dosimeter's alpha-count. The dosimeter is mounted on top of an ordinary miner's cap lamp battery and is ideally suited for personal monitoring in underground uranium mines and other working areas. The dosimeter presented here is a considerably improved version of an earlier prototype

  15. Short- and long-term monitoring of radon, thoron and carbon dioxide in soil-gas at Altos de pipe, Venezuela

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Cordoves, P.R.

    2004-01-01

    Radon and thoron activities in soil-gases have been measured since July 9, 1997 Cariaco earthquake (Mw=6.9) until the end of 2000. Carbon dioxide concentrations were also monitored between 1998-2000. The soil-gas was collected between 50-55 cm depths at two sampling points at Altos de pipe (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas-IVIC) near Caracas, Venezuela. The radon and thoron measurements were performed daily employing radiation monitors with scintillation cells and the carbon dioxide was monitored with portable gas analyzers. Average weekly and monthly values were calculated and plotted for this three-four year period. In general, both the radon and carbon dioxide values showed sinusoidal trends due to seasonal changes. During the dry season the radon and carbon dioxide values decreased, while the radon activity was relative constant (flat) during the rainy season at one of the sampling points. Only two monthly radon values were seen to be anomalous in the graphs in respect to seven anomalous periods for the average weekly values. No anomalous periods were clearly seen for carbon dioxide. Finally, it was difficult to try to relate these radon anomalous periods with specific earthquakes due to the large number of minor earthquakes during these years, but it seem that the minor earthquake (Mb=5.9) of October 4, 2000 could be associated with the radon anomalous period in September, when there were no other minor earthquakes (Mb≥4.0). (author)

  16. Thoron (220Rn) in the indoor environment and work places

    Ramachandran, T. V.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2009-08-01

    Ever since studies on uranium miners established the presence of a positive risk coefficient for the occurrence of lung cancer in miners exposed to elevated levels of 222Rn and its progeny, there was a great upsurge of interest in the measurement of 222Rn in the environment. Subsequently, considerable data is being generated on the levels of 222Rn in the environment across the worlds and is being periodically reported by UNSCEAR reports. In contrast to this, data pertaining to 220Rn in indoors and workplace environment is scaree due to the genral perception that its levels are negligible due to its shorter half life, and subsequently its contribution to the total inhalation dose is ignored, in the presence of other significant sources of natural radiation. This may not be true. Globally many locations have higher levels of natural background radiation due to elevated levels of primordial radio nuclides in the soil and their decay products like radon (222Rn), and thoron (220Rn) in the environment. Of late, technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material has also contributed to the burden of background radiation. It is estimated that inhalation of 222Rn, 220Rn and their short lived progenies contribute more than 54% of the total natural background radiation dose received by the general population. 220Rn problem exists in industries which use thorium nitrate. Including India, lamps using thoriated gas mantles are still being used for indoor and outdoor lighting and by hawkers in rural as well as urban areas. Considering the fact that large amount of thorium nitrate is being handled by these industries, contribution to the inhalation dose of workers from 220Rn gas emanated and build up of the progeny in ambient air may also be quite significant. In this paper current status of 220Rn levels in the indoor environment and workplaces as well as in other industries where large amount of 232Th is being handled is being summarized. Methods of measurement and

  17. Thoron (220Rn) in the indoor environment and work places

    Ramchandran, T.V.; Sahoo, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Ever since studies on uranium miners established the presence of a positive risk coefficient for the occurrence of lung cancer in miners exposed to elevated levels of 222 Rn and its progeny, there was a great upsurge of interest in the measurement of 222 Rn in the environment. Subsequently, considerable data is being generated on the levels of 222 Rn in the environment across the worlds and is being periodically reported by UNSCEAR reports. In contrast to this, data pertaining to 220 Rn in indoors and workplace environment is scaree due to the general perception that its levels are negligible due to its shorter half life, and subsequently its contribution to the total inhalation dose is ignored, in the presence of other significant sources of natural radiation. This may not be true. Globally many locations have higher levels of natural background radiation due to elevated levels of primordial radio nuclides in the soil and their decay products like radon ( 222 Rn), and thoron ( 220 Rn) in the environment. Of late, technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material has also contributed to the burden of background radiation. It is estimated that inhalation of 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their short lived progenies contribute more than 54% of the total natural background radiation dose received by the general population. 220 Rn problem exists in industries which use thorium nitrate. Including India, lamps using thoriated gas mantles are still being used for indoor and outdoor lighting and by hawkers in rural as well as urban areas. Considering the fact that large amount of thorium nitrate is being handled by these industries, contribution to the inhalation dose of workers from 220 Rn gas emanated and build up of the progeny in ambient air may also be quite significant. In this paper current status of 220 Rn levels in the indoor environment and workplaces as well as in other industries where large amount of 232 Th is being handled is being summarized. Methods of

  18. Measurement of radon and thoron progeny size distributions and dose assessments at the mineral treatment industry in Thailand

    Chutima Kranrod; Supitcha Chanyotha; Nares Chankow

    2013-01-01

    A new portable type cascade impactor has been developed to determine the activity size distribution of radon and thoron progeny in a natural environment more efficiently. The modified impactor consists of 4 stages with a back up filter stage for the collection of aerosol samples. The aerosol cut points in the impactor are set for 10, 2.5, 1 and 0.5 μm at a flow rate of 4 L min -1 . Five CR-39 chips were used as alpha detectors for each stage. In order to separate α particles emitted from radon and thoron progeny, CR-39 detectors are covered with aluminum-vaporized Mylar films. The thickness of each film is adjusted to allow α particles emitted from radon and thoron progeny to reach the CR-39 detectors. The technique has been successfully tested in field studies, particularly inside a mineral treatment industry in Thailand to estimate doses in the working environment. The dose calculations by lung dose evaluation program showed that activity median aerodynamic diameters played a significant role in determining the particle size distributions of the attached radon and thoron progeny. The dose conversion factor determined from short term measurements due to exposure from the inhalation of thoron and its progeny was found to be 4 times higher than comparable values for radon and its progeny. The effective dose for workers exposed to radon is about 4-6 times higher than thoron. (author)

  19. An Alpha spectrometer for measuring radon daughter individual activity concentration

    Berico, M.; Formignani, M.; Mariotti, F.

    2001-01-01

    In the frame of the program of the Institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA, related to the evaluation of dose from radon and thoron progeny, an alpha spectrometer for the continuous air monitoring (CAM type) of radon and thoron has been realized. The constructive characteristics of the device are here presented together with energy and efficiency calibration. The device allows, by means of a screen type diffusion battery and a filter, to determinate the single radioactivity of each radionuclide of the progeny selecting them in relation to their diffusive behaviour (dichotomous particle size selection). The three-count filter method has been employed to measure the concentrations of 218 Po, 214 Pb and 214 Bi in air. Radon and thoron effective doses using a dosimetric, instead of an epidemiologic approach, will be then evaluated [it

  20. Determination of the exhalation rate of radon and thoron from building materials by detectors Cr-39

    Vasidov, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The building materials (BM) such as granite, bricks, sand, cement etc., contain uranium and thorium in various amounts. Therefore the knowledge of true value exhalation rate of Rn and Tn from BM represents scientific and practical interest in environmental radiation protection. In present work, we have used calibrated plastic cups with two detectors Cr-39. The detected surface of the cup is situated in perpendicular position surface BM and were exposed for 20-30 days. The first detector fixed the bottom on distance from surface of BM and records alpha particles from Rn-222 only. The second detector records alpha particles of the thoron and radon. After exposition, the detectors chemically etched and analyzed. The values of the exhalation rate per unit area of the granite, concrete, fired and unfired bricks, sand, cement, alabaster varied 0.091 - 0.1 Bq m -2 h -1 for the radon, 200 - 5800 Bq m -2 h - 1 for the thoron, accordingly

  1. Development on high precision monitoring technique of radon and thoron in environment

    Imaizumi, Masayuki; Hamada, Hiromasa; Goto, Masahiro; Nakazato, Hiroomi; Mori, Mitsuhiro

    1999-01-01

    In a field of the environmental management, many technical research and developments such as monitoring on drainage section and flowing speed change of groundwater, analysis on alternating flow phenomenon between surface water and groundwater, analysis on water leakage at a dam, forecasting of landslide, safety evaluation on ground due to detection of faults, have conducted. And, an application to analysis on gas flowing phenomenon from underground to atmosphere as a part of study on evaluation of effect of gas emitted from earth surface on the earth environment was investigated. This study aimed to elucidate behaviors of radon and thoron at environment and to develop a high precision monitoring technique on radon and thoron required to conduct an advanced application to a tracer in hydrology, applied geology, and environment engineering. (G.K.)

  2. Estimation of thorium lung burden in mineral separation plant workers by thoron-in-breath measurements

    Radhakrishnan, Sujata; Sreekumar, K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Puranik, V.D.; Selvan, Esai

    2010-01-01

    The Minerals Separation Plant (MSP) of M/s Indian Rare Earths Ltd. (IREL) at Manavalakurichi in Tamil Nadu is engaged in the processing of beach sands to separate ilmenite, monazite, rutile, sillimanite, garnet, and zircon. The present study has been carried out on nearly 200 workers of the mineral separation plant who are chronically exposed to the radiation hazards. Measurement of thoron in the exhaled breath of the worker is an indirect method of estimating the body burden with regard to Th

  3. The influence of thoron on measurement results of radon exhalation rate

    Xiao De Tao; Ling Qiu; Leung, J K C

    2002-01-01

    Because of thoron exhalation, the measurement results of radon exhalation rate using a local still method is usually larger than the true value of radon flux rate of the monitored material surface. The influence of sup 2 sup 1 sup 6 Po(ThA) on radon exhalation rate can be eliminated for sensitive radon monitors. Theoretical evaluations of the influence of sup 2 sup 1 sup 2 Bi(ThC) and sup 2 sup 1 sup 2 Po(ThC')on radon exhalation rate are carried out in a sampler with diameter of 188 mm, and height of 125 mm, and supplied electrostatic field inside (generated by high voltage and electret) under following conditions: the sampling time are 1, 2, 3 h, respectively, thoron exhalation rate is 100 times of radon's. The calculation results indicate that the measurement results of radon flux rate are possibly 35.5% larger than true value due to the influence of thoron for fast and multifunctional radon monitors with electret, high voltage, respectively and using CR-39 SSNTD as detector, but this influence is negligib...

  4. Radiological safety assessment of Thoron inhalation hazards during DDU handling at UMP, Trombay

    Shailesh, M.; Belhe, M.S.; Malti; Narayani, K.; Satpati, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium Extraction Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai has been producing nuclear grade uranium metal from Ammonium di-uranate received from IRE to meet the fuel requirement of research reactors of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Uranium Metal Plant (UMP) in Trombay. In UMP, uranium oxide powder (U 3 O 8 and UO 3 ) is first reduced to uranium dioxide in reduction reactor and is converted to uranium tetra fluoride in hydro fluorination reactor. After removing moisture and acid vapour in expulsion area, reduction of uranium tetrafluoride is carried out with magnesium in magnesio-thermic reduction (MTR) reactor, pure uranium metal ingot with magnesium fluoride slag is produced. Finally natural uranium ingot is separated from slag in ingot discharging area. However deeply depleted uranium (DDU) metal was produced from uranium oxide (reprocessed uranium) received from PREFRE, Tarapur, as a special campaign. External radiation hazards are not dominant during the processing of natural uranium in uranium metal Plant. However it was observed that during processing of DDU metal, external and internal hazards are significant because of daughter products of thoron. Inhalation dose due to thoron was found less during charging of UO 3 powder operation than ingot discharge operation because of pneumatic powder transport system used for charging operation. It is estimated that after introduction of new blower system in different powder handling operation areas, the potential effective inhalation dose due to thoron inhalation may get reduced by 60% - 80%

  5. Metal screen retention for thoron daughter free atoms and atoms attached to condensation nuclei

    Cash, W.; Webb, J.; Fitts, D.; Skrable, K.W.; Chabot, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    Metal support screens available in a 47 mm commercial filter holder (model F3052-4, available from Scientific Products, Bedford, MA) assembly were tested for retention of thoron daughter atoms and atoms attached to condensation nuclei as a function of the flow rate of the carrier air stream. Sources of Pb-212 were generated on the surface of a metal disk by exposing the disk to thoron emanation generated from a special preparation of Th-228. This source of Pb-212, in transient equilibrium with its daughters, was placed in a flow through chamber connected in series to two of the metal screens backed by a glass fiber filter. Most of the recoil product radioactivity emitted from the Pb-212 source and collected on the screens was due to single atoms of Tl-208, which is born by alpha decay of Bi-212 with a recoil energy of 116 keV. Some free atoms of Bi-212 were also observed. Alpha autoradiographs of Filter samples placed on the downstream side of the two metal screens gave proof of the existence of Pb-212 aggregates through their alpha star images. These aggregate recoil particles were found to have a much higher penetration through the screens than free atoms of Tl-208 and Bi-212. Penetration of Tl-208 atoms and ions decreased exponentially as the inverse of the carrier air flow rate. Penetration varied from 0.047 at 0.088 cfm to 0.661 at 2.47 cfm. Atoms of Pb-212 attached to condensation nuclei were obtained by passing thoron into a reaction chamber containing naturally occurring condensation nuclei from the laboratory. The retention for these attached species varied both as a function of the flow rate and the age of the aerosol. The maximum retention varied from 0.525% at 6.38 cfm to 3.5% at 0.636 cfm for respective delay times of 120 and 30 minutes post the introduction of the thoron into the reaction chamber. A system consisting of a single screen backed by a glass fiber filter may be used to obtain the numbers of radon or thoron daughter free atoms and attached

  6. Investigation on the movements and the distributions of radon, thoron and their decay nuclides on the life circumstances

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko

    2001-03-01

    UNSCEAR (2000) reported that the effective doses due to the inhalation of radon and its decay nuclides account on average of the all world for about one-half of all natural sources of radiation. These have great influences on various forms as the sources of terrecial environmental γ radiation and of radon on our life circumstances. Radon and thoron, which are natural gaseous radioactive nuclides released out of rocks and soil etc. are chemical inert and electrically uncharged, but they in the air can spontaneously decay to other metal atoms. And they made a wide fluctuation seasonally and spatially on the environment, but these are not uniformly. We have selected and observed on Misasa spa district, Tottori pref., Kawanishi-shi, Hyogo pref. and Masutomi spa, Yamanashi pref., for HBRA, and Higashi-osaka-shi, Osaka pref., for CA. We have carried out the study on the environmental movement and distribution of natural radioactive nuclides containing radon, thoron and their decay nuclides, and reported these results on following; (1) Radon measurements have been carried using a small pico-rad detector and many sampling points and Pilon scintillation-cell with 300 ml volume by grub sampling. Mean radon concentrations of get briefly for 24 hours are measured to be available on draw of the concentration distribution map. (2) We continued time cource variation of mean radon concentrations on same private house of Misasa spa district. Mean radon concentrations in air for 6 years were fluctuated 6.7-50 Bq/m 3 and 23-170 Bq/m 3 indoor. The mean concentrations on summer and rain season is low level at open-door situation and that on winter is high, as same as these on Kawanishi Hyogo pref.. It was shown that radon outdoor concentrations variation in time course almost have a similar tendency with indoor and the life situation of air ventilation and conditioning are more influenced than variation on area condition. (3) Radon concentrations on Masutomi spa districts, Yamanashi

  7. Attached, unattached fraction of progeny concentrations and equilibrium factor for dose assessments from {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn

    Singh, Parminder; Saini, Komal; Bajwa, Bikramjit Singh [Guru Nanak Dev University, Department of Physics, Amritsar, Punjab (India); Mishra, Rosaline; Sahoo, Bijay Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Mumbai (India)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, measurements of indoor radon ({sup 222}Rn), thoron ({sup 220}Rn) and their equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) were carried out in 96 dwellings from 22 different villages situated in Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh, India, by using LR-115 type II-based pinhole twin cup dosimeters and deposition-based progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS). The annual average indoor {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn concentrations observed in these dwellings were 63.82 and 89.59 Bq/m{sup 3}, respectively, while the average EEC (attached + unattached) for {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn was 29.28 and 2.74 Bq/m{sup 3}. For {sup 222}Rn (f{sub Rn}) and {sup 220}Rn (f{sub Tn}), the average values of unattached fraction were 0.11 and 0.09, respectively. The equilibrium factors for radon (F{sub Rn}) and thoron (F{sub Tn}) varied from 0.12 to 0.77 with an average of 0.50, and from 0.01 to 0.34 with an average of 0.05, respectively. The annual inhalation dose due to mouth and nasal breathing was calculated using dose conversion factors and unattached fractions. The indoor annual effective doses for {sup 222}Rn (AEDR) and {sup 220}Rn (AEDT) were found to be 1.92 and 0.83 mSv a{sup -1}, respectively. The values of {sup 222}Rn/{sup 220}Rn concentrations and annual effective doses obtained in the present study are within the safe limits as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for indoor dwelling exposure conditions. (orig.)

  8. Thoron Mitigation System based on charcoal bed for applications in thorium fuel cycle facilities (part 2): Development, characterization, and performance evaluation.

    Sudeep Kumara, K; Sahoo, B K; Gaware, J J; Sapra, B K; Mayya, Y S; Karunakara, N

    2017-06-01

    Exposure due to thoron ( 220 Rn) gas and its decay products in a thorium fuel cycle facility handling thorium or 232 U/ 233 U mixture compounds is an important issue of radiological concern requiring control and mitigation. Adsorption in a flow-through charcoal bed offers an excellent method of alleviating the release of 220 Rn into occupational and public domain. In this paper, we present the design, development, and characterization of a Thoron Mitigation System (TMS) for industrial application. Systematic experiments were conducted in the TMS for examining the 220 Rn mitigation characteristics with respect to a host of parameters such as flow rate, pressure drop, charcoal grain size, charcoal mass and bed depth, water content, and heat of the carrier gas. An analysis of the experimental data shows that 220 Rn attenuation in a flow through charcoal bed is not exponential with respect to the residence time, L/U a (L: bed depth; U a : superficial velocity), but follows a power law behaviour, which can be attributed to the occurrence of large voids due to wall channeling in a flow through bed. The study demonstrates the regeneration of charcoal adsorption capacity degraded due to moisture adsorption, by hot air blowing technique. It is found that the mitigation factor (MF), which is the ratio of the inlet 220 Rn concentration (C in ) to the outlet 220 Rn concentration (C out ), of more than 10 4 for the TMS is easily achievable during continuous operation (>1000 h) at a flow rate of 40 L min -1 with negligible (evaluated for its long-term performance and overall effectiveness in mitigating 220 Rn levels in the workplace. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MEASUREMENT OF INDOOR RADON-THORON IN AIR AND EXHALATION FROM SOIL IN THE ENVIRONMENT OF WESTERN HARYANA, INDIA.

    Mann, Nisha; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Sushil; Chauhan, R P

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of indoor radon and thoron is important because the inhalation of radon-thoron and their daughters contributes more than 50 % of the total dose from natural sources. One of the important parameters to find out the contribution of soil and building materials towards indoor radon is radon exhalation rates, which can be used for estimation of indoor radon levels. The indoor radon and thoron levels from the air and radon exhalation rates from soil samples collected from two districts (Hisar and Fatehabad) of Western Haryana are measured using pin-hole-based radon-thoron dosimeter and LR-115 solid-state nuclear track detector by canister technique. The results show that the indoor radon and thoron levels from Hisar district varied from 11 to 112 and 11 to 80 Bq m -3 , while for Fatehabad district from 5 to 24 and 59 to 105 Bq m -3 , respectively, in summer season. In winter season, indoor radon and thoron levels from Hisar district varied from 15 to 43 and 32 to 102 Bq m -3 , while for Fatehabad district from 18 to 31 and 11 to 80 Bq m -3 , respectively. The indoor radon levels of 95 % locations lie well below the limit recommended by International Commission of Radiation Protection, 2011. The radon mass exhalation rate varied from 6 to 56 mBq kg -1 h -1 The radon mass exhalation rates from the soil samples were lower than the worldwide average, i.e. 56 mBq kg -1 h -1 There exists a poor correlation between indoor radon and exhalation rates. More investigations of measurement of radionuclide contents from rock and stone of study area can improve the understanding. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Risk assessment of exposure to radon concentration in indoor atmosphere and drinking water of Shimoga city, Karnataka, India

    Rangaswamy, D.R.; Sannappa, J.; Srinivasa, E.

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of population to natural sources of radiation has become an important issue in terms of radiological protection. The major contribution of dose from natural radiation in normal background regions arises due to inhalation of alpha-emitting radon and thoron, and their progenies, which are ubiquitous in both indoor and outdoor environs. The aim of the present study is to measure indoor radon, thoron and their progeny levels in the dwellings of Shimoga city and radon concentration in drinking water and to estimate the annual effective dose. The indoor concentration of radon, thoron and their progeny was measured using Solid-State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) based twin chamber dosimeter cups. The 222 Rn concentration in drinking water was estimated by the Emanometry technique

  11. Cellular lung dosimetry for inhaled thoron progeny: comparison with radon progeny

    Abd El-Hady, M.; Hofmann, W.; Balashazy, I.

    1998-01-01

    Recently an analytical method was developed to compute radiation doses deposited by 222 Rn progeny alpha particles in 1 μm spheres located at different depths in bronchial epithelium. The same method was now applied to alpha particles emitted from 220 Rn progeny deposited in bronchial airway surfaces. Results of the computations are presented in graphs. The mean cellular doses imparted by 220 Rn progeny to basal and secretory cell nuclei were compared with those produced by 222 Rn progeny; due to differences in alpha energies, radon progeny doses were found to be generally higher than those for thoron progeny. (A.K.)

  12. Radon and thoron in cave dwellings (Yan'an, China)

    Wiegand, J.; Feige, S.; Xie Quingling; Schreiber, U.; Wieditz, K.; Wittmann, C.; Luo Xiarong

    2000-01-01

    222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations were measured in cave dwellings and brick houses in the region of Yan'an (China) during summer 1997. The underground dwellings are built into Quaternary loess, and all investigated houses are founded on it. The median values of indoor 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations are 42 (n = 18) and 77Bq m -3 (n = 15) for brick houses and 92 (n = 23) and 215 (n = 17) Bq m -3 for cave dwellings. To classify the dwellings in respect to their cave-character, the fraction of walls having a direct contact to the loess is calculated for each dwelling. While the 222 Rn concentrations are increasing with higher fractions, the 220 Rn concentrations are not correlated with this fraction. On the other hand, due to the short half-life of 220 Rn the distance from the measuring point to the walls is negatively correlated with the 220 Rn concentration, while there is no correlation with the 222 Rn concentration. Therefore, concentric isolines of 220 Rn concentrations showing a strong gradient were detected in cave dwellings. An influence of the ventilation rate is distinct for 222 Rn but weak for 220 Rn. The effective dose rates for 222 Rn and 220 Rn and their progenies are calculated for brick houses (2.7 mSv y -1 ), cave dwellings (7.1 mSv y -1 ), and for traditional cave dwellings with a bed foundation built with loess (16.7 mSv y -1 ). These calculations are based on summer measurements only. It is expected that the true effective dose rates will be significantly higher

  13. A case study of radon-thoron concentrations in dwellings around uranium deposit sites in Meghalaya

    Shaikh, A.N.; Ramachandran, T.V.; Eappen, K.P.; Mayya, Y.S.; Khan, A.H.; Puranik, V.D.; Hoda, S.Q.

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of 222 Rn and 220 Rn were carried out in a few houses of different construction types selected at 21 locations around uranium deposit sites at Meghalaya using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) based dosimeter developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). It comprises of two cylindrical cups with slots for placing the detector films. The cups are designed for 222 Rn and 220 Rn gas estimations. Detector film used is 12 mm thick cellulose nitrate (LR -115 Type -II), of Kodak pathe. 222 Rn levels in these dwellings varied from 4.6 to 117.0 Bq m -3 with a GM of 19.4 Bq. m -3 (GSD 4.5), while 220 Rn varied from 5.0 to 123.0 Bq. m -3 with al GM of 16.6 Bqm -3 (GSD 2.0). The higher values were observed in building housing geological laboratories. (author)

  14. Automatic colorimetric determination of low concentrations of sulphate for measuring sulphur dioxide in ambient air

    Persson, G A

    1966-01-01

    An automatic colorimetric method for the determination of low concentrations of sulphate (0-10 microgram/ml) using the thoron indicator is described. Total amounts of sulphate as small as 0.3 micrograms can be determined. The sulphate is precipitated with barium perchlorate and the excess of barium is indicated with 1-(o-arsenophenylazo)-2-naphthol-3-6-disulfonic acid(thoron). The procedure is worked out primarily for the determination of sulphur dioxide in air after absorption in diluted hydrogen peroxide.

  15. Politico-economic equivalence

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime and a st......Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime...... their use in the context of several applications, relating to social security reform, tax-smoothing policies and measures to correct externalities....

  16. Radiation exposure in homes through radon and thoron daughter products

    Schmier, H.

    1984-01-01

    In a random selection of about 6000 homes in the Federal Republic of Germany, the radon concentration in room air has been measured using a simple dosemeter developed by Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. The mean radon concentration has been determined to be approximately 40-50 Bqu/m 3 . If this experiment is taken as a representative survey for the FRG, the mean dose contributed by the natural radiation exposure through radon and its short-lived decay products to the effective annual dose to the lungs can be computed to be about 1 mSv (100 mrem), using the internationally accepted conversion factors. Apart from this survey, special radon measuring programmes have been carried out, including simultaneous recording of meteorological data, in order to obtain information on the parameters to be taken into account when describing the daily variations of radon concentrations. (orig./DG) [de

  17. Comparative Measurements of Radon Concentration in Soil Using Passive and Active Methods in High Level Natural Radiation Area (HLNRA of Ramsar

    Amanat B

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radon and its daughters are amongst the most important sources of natural exposure in the world. Soil is one of the signifcant sources of radon/thoron due to both radium and thorium so that the emanated thoron from it may cause in creased uncertainties in radon measurements. Recently, a diffusion chamber has been designed and optimized for passive discriminative measurements of radon/thoron concentrations in soil. Objective: In order to evaluate the capability of the passive method, some com parative measurements (with active methods have been performed. Method: The method is based upon measurements by a diffusion chamber, includ ing two Lexan polycarbonate SSNTDs, which can discriminate the emanated radon/ thorn from the soil by delay method. The comparative measurements have been done in ten selected points of HLNRA of Ramsar in Iran. The linear regression and cor relation between the results of two methods have been studied. Results: The results show that the radon concentrations are within the range of 12.1 to 165 kBq/m3 values. The correlation between the results of active and passive methods was measured by 0.99 value. As well, the thoron concentrations have been measured between 1.9 to 29.5 kBq/m3 values at the points. Conclusion: The sensitivity as well as the strong correlation with active mea surements shows that the new low-cost passive method is appropriate for accurate seasonal measurements of radon and thoron concentration in soil.

  18. 77 FR 60985 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    2012-10-05

    ... Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of three new equivalent methods for monitoring ambient air quality. SUMMARY... equivalent methods, one for measuring concentrations of PM 2.5 , one for measuring concentrations of PM 10...

  19. Interference from radon-thoron daughters in plutonium channel of a continuous plutonium-in-air monitor

    Pendharkar, K.A.; Krishnamony, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarises the results of a study conducted to define the extent of interference from the daughter products of radon/thoron to the plutonium channel of a continuous plutonium-in-air monitor. The effect on the detection limits of the instrument due to chemical form (transportable or non-transportable) and isotopic composition of plutonium aerosol are briefly discussed. (author)

  20. Determination of the thoron daughter working level by a one gross alpha-count

    Bigu, J.; Lau, W.K.

    1983-02-01

    A study has been done on the determination of the thoron daughter Working Level, WL(Tn), by a one gross α-count. The relationship between the gross α-count rate per unit of volume of air sampled and WL(Tn), denoted the F-factor, has been investigated as a function of sampling time, elapsed time from the end of the sampling period, i.e., waiting time, and the thoron daughter disequilibrium ratio [ThC]/[ThB]. It has been found that F depends on both the waiting time and [ThC]/[ThB]. If α-count measurements are made at least 300 min after the end of sampling, F changes by less than 10 percent over the full range of theoretical values of [ThC]/[ThB], i.e., from 0 to 1. The F-factor is independent of [ThC]/[ThB] at approximately 215 min after the end of sampling. This feature can be used to determine WL(Tn) with higher accuracy and at least 1.5 hr earlier than is commonly done using other one gross α-count methods reported in the literature

  1. Radon, thoron and their progeny levels in some dwellings of Union Territory Chandigarh, India using SSNTDs

    Mehta, Vimal; Kumar, Amit; Chauhan, R.P.; Mudahar, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    Indoor air quality is an important issue for protection against adverse health effects caused by the inhalation of pollutants because most individuals spend 90% of their time indoors and that indoor air quality is deteriorated by a large variety of sources. Out of these sources radon is a major pollutant and is an important global problem of radiation hygiene. Radon and its progeny are the major contributors in the radiation dose received by general population of the world. Next to cigarette smoking, the inhalation of radon gas and the products of its radioactive disintegration are considered the most significant cause of lung cancer. Due to the potentially serious public health implications of exposure to high levels of radon, the environmental monitoring of radon, thoron and their progeny in some dwellings of Chandigarh, union territory of India has been carried out. The radon-thoron twin dosimeter cups were used for the study. The aim of the study is the possible health risk assessment in the dwellings under consideration. (author)

  2. Characterization of CR 39 nuclear track detector for use as a radon/thoron dosemeter

    Kandaiya, S.

    1988-02-01

    For the estimation of radon, thoron and their short-lived daughter products in air radon diffusion chambers with passive α-track etch detectors have been used. The report describes the properties of CR 39 track etch detectors in particular with respect to the spectrometric detection of α-particles in the energy range up to 8.77 MeV using chemical and a combination of chemical-electrochemical etching technique. In order to optimize the etching conditions for an α-energy discrimination in the energy range up to 8.77 MeV, the ECE track size diameter and the track density have been investigated as a function of the chemical pre-etching time using three electrical field strengths. In a mixed α-spectrum the contributions of various α-particles with energies between 4.6 to 8.77 MeV have been determined experimentally in CR 39 and compared with the spectral measurement using a surface barrier detector and the same irradiation geometry. Beside CR 39 detectors etched chemically and electrochemically, in addition surface barrier detectors and a Monte Carlo calculation have been used to evaluate the α-energy spectrum for thoron and its daughter products emitted by α-decays in the air volume and the plate-out of daughters at the inner surface on the diffusion chamber. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Investigation of radon, thoron, and their progeny near the earth's surface. Final report, 1 January 1994 - 31 December 1997

    Schery, S.D.; Wasiolek, P.T.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for DOE Grant DE-FG03-94ER6178, covering a performance period of 1 January 1994 through 31 December 1997. The DOE award amount for this period was $547,495. The objective of the project as stated in its proposal was open-quotes to improve our understanding of the physical processes controlling the concentration of radon, thoron, and their progeny in the atmospheric environment.close quotes The original project was directed at developing underlying science that would help with evaluation of the health hazard from indoor radon in the United States and implementation of corrective measures that might be employed to reduce the health hazard. As priorities within the Office of Health and Environment (OHER) changed, and the radon research program was phased out, emphasis of the project was shifted somewhat to be also relevant to other interests of the OHER, namely global pollution and climate change and pollution resulting from energy production. This final report is brief, since by reference it can direct the reader to the comprehensive research publications that have been generated by the project. In section 2, we summarize the main accomplishments of the project and reference the primary publications. There were seven students who received support from the project and their names are listed in section 3. One of these students (Fred Yarger, Ph.D. candidate) continues to work on research initiated through this project. No post-docs received support from the project, although one of the co-principal investigators (Dr. Piotr Wasiolek) received the majority of his salary from the project. The project also provided part-time support for a laboratory manager (Dr. Maryla Wasiolek). Section 4 lists chronologically the reports and publications resulting from the project (references 1 through 12), and the Appendix provides abstracts of major publications and reports

  4. Asian/Australasian region intercalibration and intercomparison programme for radon, thoron and daughters. Asian/Australasian region radon intercomparison, September 1987 - September 1988

    Peggie, J.R.; Gan, Tianghong; Solomon, S.B.

    1993-05-01

    The International Intercalibration and Intercomparison Programme for radon, thoron and daughters monitoring equipment, abbreviated IIIP, was a programme organized jointly by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the Radiation Protection Research Programme of the Commission of European Communities. The broad purpose of the IIIP was to determine if the diverse calibration procedures used in different countries were equivalent. The general approach was to select four regional reference laboratories and entrust then with the details of project definition and execution. The Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) was selected to co-ordinate IIIP activities between OECD member countries in the Pacific region. As the regional programme precluded the participation of non-OECD member countries in the Western Pacific Region, an intercomparison series for radon was initiated by ARL in 1987 between twenty eight laboratories from nine countries in the Asian/Australasian region. The methodology and protocols for grab sampler, solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) and charcoal measurements are described in this report. Generally the results showed reasonable agreement between the majority of laboratories for grab sampler measurements consistent with previous intercomparison. However there were large systematic differences in the results of the passive monitors for some laboratories. For all samplers, it was found that the overall random uncertainty or replication error, which included random uncertainties associated with the counting and calibration, were the main sources of variability between individual measurements of participants and the ARL reference value, with calibration uncertainties predominating. 23 tabs.

  5. Asian/Australasian region intercalibration and intercomparison programme for radon, thoron and daughters. Asian/Australasian region radon intercomparison, September 1987 - September 1988

    Peggie, J.R.; Gan, Tianghong; Solomon, S.B.

    1993-05-01

    The International Intercalibration and Intercomparison Programme for radon, thoron and daughters monitoring equipment, abbreviated IIIP, was a programme organized jointly by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the Radiation Protection Research Programme of the Commission of European Communities. The broad purpose of the IIIP was to determine if the diverse calibration procedures used in different countries were equivalent. The general approach was to select four regional reference laboratories and entrust then with the details of project definition and execution. The Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) was selected to co-ordinate IIIP activities between OECD member countries in the Pacific region. As the regional programme precluded the participation of non-OECD member countries in the Western Pacific Region, an intercomparison series for radon was initiated by ARL in 1987 between twenty eight laboratories from nine countries in the Asian/Australasian region. The methodology and protocols for grab sampler, solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) and charcoal measurements are described in this report. Generally the results showed reasonable agreement between the majority of laboratories for grab sampler measurements consistent with previous intercomparison. However there were large systematic differences in the results of the passive monitors for some laboratories. For all samplers, it was found that the overall random uncertainty or replication error, which included random uncertainties associated with the counting and calibration, were the main sources of variability between individual measurements of participants and the ARL reference value, with calibration uncertainties predominating. 23 tabs

  6. Radiological impact of exposure to radon-thoron and their progeny present in the environment of fly ash dumping site in Faridabad (Haryana)

    Gupta, Nitin; Kant, Krishan; Garg, Maneesha

    2013-01-01

    Radon-Thoron and their Progeny monitoring was carried out in dwellings near fly ash dumping sites in Faridabad (Haryana), as it is very important from health and hygiene point of view of the occupants. For the measurements, the track etch technique was used. The dosimeter employed for the measurement consisted of twin chamber systems with LR-115 Type II SSNTDs placed on the two sides of the central partition inside the cup and a bare film placed outside it. The detectors were exposed in the mixed field of radon-thoron in the environment of dwellings. The detectors were placed in about 100 dwellings and the choice of the dwelling was random. The value of PAEC, radon concentration, annual exposure, annual effective dose in the dwellings near fly ash dumping sites in District Faridabad (Haryana) varied from 1.34 mWL to 14.05 mWL with an average value of (4.95 0.85) mWL, 12.41 Bqm -3 to 129.91 Bqm -3 with an average value of (45.77 7.87) Bqm -3 , 0.55 10 -1 WLM to 5.83 10 -1 WLM with an average value of (2.04 0.28) 10 -1 WLM and 0.21 mSv to 2.23 mSv with an average value of (0.79 0.13) mSv. The value of PAEC, thoron concentration, annual exposure, annual effective dose in the dwellings near fly ash dumping sites in District Faridabad (Haryana) varied from 1.34 mWL to 14.0 SmWL with an average value of (4.95 0.85) mWL, 1.16 Bq/m 3 to 65.08 Bq/m 3 with an average value of (32.77 7.87) Bqm -3 , 0.55 10 -1 WLM to 5.83 10 -1 WLM with an average value of (2.04 0.28) 10 -1 WLM and 0.21 mSv to 2.23 mSv with an average value of (0.79 0.13) mSv. The measurements indicate that the radon concentration was below the safety levels (action levels) as recommended by various regulatory bodies. The maximum value of 129.91 Bqm -3 was found in a cave inside a temple, where there was no ventilation. The different values of radon concentrations are due to different ventilation conditions and house structures. The radon concentration was found to decrease with the increase in distance of the

  7. A study on thoron decay products in the air

    Ahmed, A A; Abul-Hussein, A; Mahmoud, M [Physics Dept. Faculty of Science, El-minia Univ., El-Minia (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    Low pressure Berner cascade impactor technique was used as sampling device to determine the concentration ansd activity size distribution of {sup 212}Pb in the open air. The collected activity in each stage of the impactor was measured by a {gamma} spectrometer with 5 x 5 Nal(tl)detector. The activity size distribution of {sup 212}Pb was described by one long-normal distribution. The mean AMAD was 345 nm with {alpha}{sub 9}=2.7 o. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. A new method for studying the transport of radon and thoron in various building materials using CR-39 and LR-115 solid state nuclear track detectors

    Misdaq, M.A.; Ktata, A.; Bakhchi, A.

    2000-01-01

    Radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) α-activities per unit volume were measured inside and outside different building materials by using two types of solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) (CR-39 and LR-115 type II). In addition, the radon and thoron emanation coefficients of the studied materials were evaluated. Based on these data, the transport of radon and thoron across parallelepipedic blocks of the building materials could be investigated and radon and thoron global α-activities per unit volume outside different building material blocks were determined. Moreover, the diffusion length and the effective diffusion coefficient of radon in the building materials were evaluated and the total alpha activity due to radon in the atmospheres of different rooms consisting of different building materials was studied

  9. Radon concentrations in residential housing in hiroshima and nagasaki

    Aoyama, Takashi; Radford, E.P.; Yonehara, Hidenori; Kato, Hiroo; Sakanoue, Masanobu.

    1993-05-01

    A survey of indoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was carried out to assess the range of exposures expected among atomic-bomb survivors. Two hundred dwellings (100 from each city), chiefly of members of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study, were selected for this survey. We used two types of etched-track alpha-particle detectors: a Terradex detector (type SF) and an improved bare-track detector. Comparative measurements showed that although there was an adequate correlation between the values obtained using the two detectors, the geometric mean value for the bare-track detector was 45% lower than that for the Terradex detector. This difference was considered to be due to differences in the calibration methods and in the sensitivities of the detectors to thoron ( 220 Rn). The geometric mean values of the radon concentrations for 193 locations in Hiroshima and 192 locations in Nagasaki measured by Terradex SF detectors were 51.8 Bq/m 3 and 26.5 Bq/m 3 , respectively. The large difference is attributable to the different geological environments of the two cities. Factors correlating with the indoor radon concentrations were also studied. The geometric mean concentration was significantly higher in wooden houses with clay walls than in other types of house. This tendency was especially strong in Hiroshima. The difference between the estimated dose equivalents for exposure to radon decay products in dwellings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki during the last 30 years might amount to 0.8 Sv; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in lung-cancer mortality in the low-dose range in either city. Nevertheless, the indoor radon concentrations estimated in this survey could have a significant influence on the dose-response relationship for atomic-bomb exposure. (author)

  10. Determination of the concentration of {alpha} emitting radioactive aerosols; Mesure de la concentration des aerosols radioactifs emetteurs {alpha}

    Labeyrie, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1953-06-15

    In the first part of this work the techniques used for the quantitative measurement of the concentrations of aerosols carrying short lived (radon or thoron daughters) or long lived (uranium) {alpha} radioactive emitters are described. In the second part the author investigates the problem of the determination of radon concentration in air by means of activity determinations on airborne dusts. Special reference is made to the measurement of the radon active deposit on two types of dusts (iron oxide (yellow) and uranium oxide) in small chambers (6 liters). In the third part are given data resulting from determinations of radon and thoron concentrations in atmospheric air in the south of Paris area using this method. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie de ce travail on expose les techniques utilisees pour la mesure quantitative des concentrations d'aerosols contenant des emetteurs radioactifs {alpha}, tant pour ceux a vie courte (derives du radon ou du thoron) que pour ceux a vie longue (uranium). Dans la seconde partie on traite le probleme de la determination de la concentration de l'air en radon par la mesure de l'activite des poussieres ayant sejourne dans cet air. En particulier, on indique pour de petits volumes (6 litres) la proportion de depot actif du radon qui est fixee sur deux types de poussieres (limonite et oxyde d'uranium) en fonction de la concentration de celles-ci. Dans la troisieme partie on donne quelques exemples de mesure par cette methode de la concentration en radon et en thoron de l'atmosphere de la region parisienne. (auteur)

  11. The establishment of a portable high sensitivity exhaled thoron activity measurement system

    Chen, Xing-an; Cheng, Yong-e

    2008-01-01

    A portable system, using electrostatic collection, for the measurement of exhaled thoron activity in humans is described, together with the basic theory, equipment, calibration procedures, measurement and the preliminary use. The portable system built on experience at the Argonne National Laboratory to achieve a reduction in measurement time from 30 hours to 200 minutes, and to increase the total efficiency of the system from 50%(ANL) to 55% with a minimum detection limit decreased to 0.007 Bq (zero activity± σ). The total standard error of this system is 47% for a thorium lung burden of 0.22 Bq. The average background of this scintillation detector was 0.003 counts/min. (author)

  12. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  13. Vertical variability of aerosol single-scattering albedo and equivalent black carbon concentration based on in-situ and remote sensing techniques during the iAREA campaigns in Ny-Ålesund

    Markowicz, K. M.; Ritter, C.; Lisok, J.; Makuch, P.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Cappelletti, D.; Mazzola, M.; Chilinski, M. T.

    2017-09-01

    This work presents a methodology for obtaining vertical profiles of aerosol single scattering properties based on a combination of different measurement techniques. The presented data were obtained under the iAREA (Impact of absorbing aerosols on radiative forcing in the European Arctic) campaigns conducted in Ny-Ålesund (Spitsbergen) during the spring seasons of 2015-2017. The retrieval uses in-situ observations of black carbon concentration and absorption coefficient measured by a micro-aethalometer AE-51 mounted onboard a tethered balloon, as well as remote sensing data obtained from sun photometer and lidar measurements. From a combination of the balloon-borne in-situ and the lidar data, we derived profiles of single scattering albedo (SSA) as well as absorption, extinction, and aerosol number concentration. Results have been obtained in an altitude range from about 400 m up to 1600 m a.s.l. and for cases with increased aerosol load during the Arctic haze seasons of 2015 and 2016. The main results consist of the observation of increasing values of equivalent black carbon (EBC) and absorption coefficient with altitude, and the opposite trend for aerosol concentration for particles larger than 0.3 μm. SSA was retrieved with the use of lidar Raman and Klett algorithms for both 532 and 880 nm wavelengths. In most profiles, SSA shows relatively high temporal and altitude variability. Vertical variability of SSA computed from both methods is consistent; however, some discrepancy is related to Raman retrieval uncertainty and absorption coefficient estimation from AE-51. Typically, very low EBC concentration in Ny-Ålesund leads to large error in the absorbing coefficient. However, SSA uncertainty for both Raman and Klett algorithms seems to be reasonable, e.g. SSA of 0.98 and 0.95 relate to an error of ±0.01 and ± 0.025, respectively.

  14. Radon concentrations in residential housing in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Yonehara, Hidenori; Aoyama, Takashi; Radford, E.P.; Kato, Hiroo; Sakanoue, Masanobu.

    1992-01-01

    A measurement of indoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was carried out to examine an effect of the exposure on atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. Two hundred dwellings (100 from each city), chiefly of members of the Life Span Study population which is a fixed cohort studied by Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), were selected for this survey. We used two types of alpha-track detector: a Terradex detector type SF and a bare-track detector improved by Yonehara et al. Comparative measurements showed that although there was an adequate correlation between the values obtained using the two detectors, the geometric mean value for the bare-track detector was 45% of that for the Terradex detector. This difference was considered to be due to differences in the calibration methods and sensitivities of the detectors to thoron ( 220 Rn). The arithmetic mean values of the radon concentrations for 193 locations in Hiroshima and 192 locations in Nagasaki measured by Terradex SF detector were 103 Bq m -3 and 40.6 Bq m -3 , respectively. The values at 100 locations in Hiroshima and at 93 locations in Nagasaki measured by the bare detector were 43.1. Bq m -3 and 13.6 Bq m -3 , respectively. The significant difference between the geometric mean values of the concentration in Hiroshima and Nagasaki measured by both methods was observed. The difference might be attributable to the different geological environments of the two cities. The difference between the estimated dose equivalents for exposure to radon daughters in dwellings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki over the last 30 years might amount to 0.4 or 0.8 Sv; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in lung cancer mortality in the low-dose range in either city. Nevertheless, the indoor-radon concentrations estimated in this survey could significantly influence the dose-response relationships for A-bomb exposure. (author)

  15. Studies on the diffusional and electrical transport of the daughter aerosols of radon and thoron in moving gases

    Mayya, Y.S.; Sahni, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents a detailed theoretical study of the transport characteristics of the daughter products of radon and thoron gases in channel flow devices. Specific aspects examined include: (i) development of the Green's function of the convective-diffusion operator and its boundary layer forms with and without axial diffusion, (ii) transport probabilities of recoil atoms (RaB) emitted into stagnant and moving gases, due to alpha decays of the parent atoms (RaA) deposited on surfaces, (iii) a comprehensive theory of double filter systems and (iv) microscopic theory of particle transport in moving fluids based on the Fokker-Planck equation. Both uniform and parabolic velocity profiles are considered. Various applications of the solutions in interpreting the measured data are presented. Chief among them is the application of the advanced theory of double-filter systems employed in Trombay studies for the measurements of thoron in the exhaled breath of thorium workers. (author). 130 refs., 4 figs

  16. High sensitivity two filter radon/thoron detectors with a wire or nylon screen as a second filter

    Whittlestone, S.; Zahorowski, W.; Wasiolek, P.

    1994-12-01

    A study is made of the use of wire and nylon screens as a second filter in two radon or thoron detectors. It is shown that acceptable detection efficiency is obtained at flow rates comparable to those used in detectors in which other types of filter are used. The main advantage of the screens is their very low flow impedance. Several designs of detector which exploit this feature are discussed. Details are given of the performance of three prototypes: a 32 L radon detector with a limit of detection of 0.0027 Bq m -3 and power consumption of 25 watts; and a portable thoron emanometer capable of detecting fluxes as low as 1 m Bq m -2 s -1 . The radon detectors are rugged and simple. They can operate with no routine maintenance and are suited to remote locations where only infrequent technical support is available. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs

  17. The effect of time-dependent ventilation and radon (thoron) gas emanation rates in underground uranium mines

    Bigu, J.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical radiation mine model, suitable for underground uranium mines, has been investigated. In this model, the rate of ventilation and/or the radon (thoron) gas emanation from mine walls are time-dependent. Several cases of practical interest have been investigated including sinusoidal, linear, exponential, stepwise, or a combination of two or more of the above. Analytical solutions were obtained for the time-dependent radon (thoron) gas emanation rate. However, because of the extreme analytical complexity of the solutions corresponding to the time-dependent ventilation rate case, numerical solutions were found using a special Runge-Kutta procedure and the Hamming's modified predictor-corrector method for the solution of linear initial-value problems. The mine model makes provisions for losses of radioactivity, other than by ventilation and radioactive decay, by, say, plate-out on mine walls, and by other mechanisms. Radioactivity data, i.e., radon, thoron, and their progeny, obtained with the above mine model for a number of ventilation and emanation conditions, are presented. Experimental data obtained in an inactive stope of an underground uranium mine for a time-dependent air flow case are shown. Air flow conditions (ventilation rate) were determined by tracer gas techniques using SF 6

  18. Equivalent Simplification Method of Micro-Grid

    Cai Changchun; Cao Xiangqin

    2013-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the equivalent simplification method for the micro-grid system connection into distributed network. The equivalent simplification method proposed for interaction study between micro-grid and distributed network. Micro-grid network, composite load, gas turbine synchronous generation, wind generation are equivalent simplification and parallel connect into the point of common coupling. A micro-grid system is built and three phase and single phase grounded faults are per...

  19. Study of radon and thoron gas behaviour in the air at the commercial centers in Rio de Janeiro and Pocos de Caldas city

    Castro, Carlos A.C.; Cardoso, Domingos D.

    2005-01-01

    The radon is a radioactive gas. It occurs naturally in the atmosphere coming from the decay of radium, with emission of alpha particles. There are three radon isotopes more known, of which the most important under the environmental point of view is the Rn-222, whose half life is 3.82 days. The radon and their descendants are responsible by more than 40 % of the natural radioactive dose received for the human beings inside the building. In doses above 4 pCi/l, given as occupational dose, can cause among other diseases, the lung cancer. The main source of radon inside the building is the soil. The incidence of radon inside the building varies according to the soil composition, the materials employed in its construction, the inside air temperature and humidity, time during the day, season and the ventilation process designed. The work was realized at the commercial centers in Rio de Janeiro and Pocos de Caldas, for methodology confirmation. It was utilized the passive (track detectors) and active (two filters technique. Kusnetz technique, Tsivoglou technique and alpha spectrometry technique) methods. The objective of this work was to analyze the radon and thoron concentrations levels in order to supply parameters upon the quality of the air in those commercial centers. (author)

  20. 222Rn and 220Rn concentrations measured in various natural honey samples by using nuclear track detectors and resulting radiation doses to the members of the rural populations in Morocco

    Misdaq, M. A.; Mortassim, A.

    2008-01-01

    Radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) concentrations were measured in sixteen natural honey material samples collected from different regions in Morocco by using CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The concentrations of these radionuclides were also measured in nectar solutions corresponding to the studied honey samples. The measured concentrations of 222 Rn and 220 Rn in honey samples ranged from (2.3 ± 0.2) to (8.1 ± 0.6) Bq.l -1 and (1.8 ± 0.1) to (3.9 ± 0.3) Bq.l -1 , respectively. Committed equivalent doses due to annual intakes of 222 Rn were evaluated in the human gastrointestinal tract compartments of adult members of the Moroccan populations from the ingestion of studied honey samples. The influence of the target tissue mass and activities due to 222 Rn on the annual committed equivalent doses in the compartments of the human gastrointestinal tract was investigated. (authors)

  1. Effective dose equivalent

    Huyskens, C.J.; Passchier, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent is a quantity which is used in the daily practice of radiation protection as well as in the radiation hygienic rules as measure for the health risks. In this contribution it is worked out upon which assumptions this quantity is based and in which cases the effective dose equivalent can be used more or less well. (H.W.)

  2. Characterization of revenue equivalence

    Heydenreich, B.; Müller, R.; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, R.

    2009-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called revenue equivalence. We give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The characterization holds

  3. Characterization of Revenue Equivalence

    Heydenreich, Birgit; Müller, Rudolf; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, Rakesh

    2008-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called \\emph{revenue equivalence}. In this paper we give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The

  4. On the operator equivalents

    Grenet, G.; Kibler, M.

    1978-06-01

    A closed polynomial formula for the qth component of the diagonal operator equivalent of order k is derived in terms of angular momentum operators. The interest in various fields of molecular and solid state physics of using such a formula in connection with symmetry adapted operator equivalents is outlined

  5. Measurement of microenvironmental ozone concentrations in Durham, North Carolina, using a 2B Technologies 205 Federal Equivalent Method monitor and an interference-free 2B Technologies 211 monitor.

    Johnson, Ted; Capel, Jim; Ollison, Will

    2014-03-01

    During August and September of 2012, researchers conducted a microenvironmental (ME) monitoring study in Durham, North Carolina, using two 2B Technologies O3 monitors: a dual-beam model 205 Federal Equivalent Method (FEM) 254 nm photometer and a newly developed model 211 interference-free dual-beam photometer. The two monitors were mounted in a wheeled, fan-cooled suitcase together with a battery, a disposable N2O cartridge for the model 211 monitor and filtered sample lines. A scripted technician made paired O3 measurements in a variety of MEs within 2 miles of a fixed-site FEM O3 photometer at the Durham National GuardArmory. The ratio of the 211 to Armory O3 concentrations tended to be lowest (0.8) for 104 outdoor MEs. The mean values of the ratio for in-vehicle MEs tended to fall between 0.2 and 0.7--the mean for all 27 in-car tests was 0.3. The ratio values for indoor MEs tended to be higher when the enclosure was well ventilated. The outdoor ratios tended to be lower when the measurement was made downwind of nearby roadways, likely due to exhaust NO. The in-vehicle ratios tended to be larger with windows open than closed; the smallest occurred with closed windows, active air conditioning, and vent recirculation. The 205 - 211 measurement differences were generally small, with 94% of the 176 sample differences below 5 ppb. Five differences were above 10 ppb with the largest values (173.9 and 63.6 ppb) occurring inside a violin repair shop. Roadway proximity tended to increase the differences for outdoor locations. The largest in-vehicle difference (6 ppb) occurred at a convenience store service station. As addressed in regulatory models, such differences may reduce estimated population O3 exposure by 30-50% in indoor and in-vehicle MEs where individuals spend more than 80% of their time. Computer models used to estimate exposures of human populations-such as the Air Pollution Exposure Model (APEX) developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-can be

  6. Final survey reports on radon concentration in Japan

    1997-03-01

    In order to grasp the present state of indoor radon concentration all over Japan, this survey was conducted in five years from Heisei 4 FY to 8 FY. Measurements were conducted using a radon and thoron separation apparatus so as to enable to develop radon and thoron separately. This was only one survey all over Japan obtained the only radon concentration by removing thoron perfectly. However, it was planned to obtain the mean indoor radon concentration all over Japan by limiting 20 houses for measurement aim because of limitation on numbers of the apparatus. In this survey, no extremely high region of the radon concentration was found. However, it was comparatively higher in Chugoku, Kinki and Kyushu-Okinawa areas, but was comparatively low in Kanto area. These results showed the same tendency as those of γ-ray level from the ground, and the radon concentration also showed temperature difference of a tendency of higher west and lower east. In this survey, seasonal variation of the radon concentration was found. In the third quarter (from October to December) maximum radon concentration (mean value: 15 Bq/cu m) and in the second quarter, the minimum concentration (mean value: 9 Bq/cu m) were observed, respectively. On comparing the indoor radon concentration of each housing structure used in enquete survey, concrete block house showed higher radon concentration. On its arithmetic mean, the radon concentration was high in order of concrete, steel frame, and wood constructions, and lowest in prefabricated house. The radon concentration of the concrete construction showed about 1.8 times higher than that of the wood construction. (G.K.)

  7. Performance test of passive radon–thoron discriminative detectors on environmental parameters

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how humidity, wind and ambient aerosols in air influence the detection responses of passive detectors. Two types of alpha track detectors based on a passive radon ( 222 Rn)–thoron ( 220 Rn) discriminative measurement technique were used: the Raduet and Radopot detectors that were developed and calibrated by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. The initial experiment showed that the infiltration rate of 220 Rn onto sponges with a high air exchange rate for the Raduet detectors was one third lower than that onto filters for the Radopot detectors. Little distinct dependence on humidity was observed for the 222 Rn detection responses of both detectors. For 220 Rn, the detection responses of both detectors for the high air exchange rate seemed to decrease slightly at high humidity conditions. The 220 Rn detection responses of the Radopot detectors had little influence from wind speed. The 220 Rn detection responses of the Raduet detectors for the high air exchange rate seemed to decrease at low wind speeds. Furthermore, there was little difference between the detection responses in the presence and absence of ambient aerosol particles because the ambient aerosols were filtered out during their passive diffusion through the sponges and filters for the Raduet and Radopot detectors, respectively.

  8. Equivalent Dynamic Models.

    Molenaar, Peter C M

    2017-01-01

    Equivalences of two classes of dynamic models for weakly stationary multivariate time series are discussed: dynamic factor models and autoregressive models. It is shown that exploratory dynamic factor models can be rotated, yielding an infinite set of equivalent solutions for any observed series. It also is shown that dynamic factor models with lagged factor loadings are not equivalent to the currently popular state-space models, and that restriction of attention to the latter type of models may yield invalid results. The known equivalent vector autoregressive model types, standard and structural, are given a new interpretation in which they are conceived of as the extremes of an innovating type of hybrid vector autoregressive models. It is shown that consideration of hybrid models solves many problems, in particular with Granger causality testing.

  9. Inhalation exposures due to radon and thoron ((222)Rn and (220)Rn): Do they differ in high and normal background radiation areas in India?

    Mishra, Rosaline; Sapra, B K; Prajith, R; Rout, R P; Jalaluddin, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-09-01

    In India, High Background Radiation Areas (HBRAs) due to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil (thorium and, to a lesser extent, uranium), are located along some parts of the coastal tracts viz. the coastal belt of Kerala, Tamilnadu and Odisha. It is conjectured that these deposits will result in higher emissions of radon isotopes ((222)Rn and (220)Rn) and their daughter products as compared to Normal Background Radiation Areas (NBRAs). While the annual external dose rates contributed by gamma radiations in these areas are about 5-10 times higher, the extent of increase in the inhalation dose rates attributable to (222)Rn and (220)Rn and their decay products is not well quantified. Towards this, systematic indoor surveys were conducted wherein simultaneous measurements of time integrated (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay product concentrations was carried out in around 800 houses in the HBRAs of Kerala and Odisha to estimate the inhalation doses. All gas measurements were carried out using pin-hole cup dosimeters while the progeny measurements were with samplers and systems based on the Direct radon/thoron Progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS). To corroborate these passive measurements of decay products concentrations, active sampling was also carried out in a few houses. The results of the surveys provide a strong evidence to conclude that the inhalation doses due to (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay products in these HBRAs are in the same range as observed in the NBRAs in India. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Transcriptomics

    Baudo, María Marcela; Powers, Stephen J.; Mitchell, Rowan A. C.; Shewry, Peter R.

    Regulatory authorities in Western Europe require transgenic crops to be substantially equivalent to conventionally bred forms if they are to be approved for commercial production. One way to establish substantial equivalence is to compare the transcript profiles of developing grain and other tissues of transgenic and conventionally bred lines, in order to identify any unintended effects of the transformation process. We present detailed protocols for transcriptomic comparisons of developing wheat grain and leaf material, and illustrate their use by reference to our own studies of lines transformed to express additional gluten protein genes controlled by their own endosperm-specific promoters. The results show that the transgenes present in these lines (which included those encoding marker genes) did not have any significant unpredicted effects on the expression of endogenous genes and that the transgenic plants were therefore substantially equivalent to the corresponding parental lines.

  11. 77 FR 32632 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    2012-06-01

    ... Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION... accordance with 40 CFR Part 53, three new equivalent methods: One for measuring concentrations of nitrogen... INFORMATION: In accordance with regulations at 40 CFR Part 53, the EPA evaluates various methods for...

  12. The principle of equivalence

    Unnikrishnan, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    Principle of equivalence was the fundamental guiding principle in the formulation of the general theory of relativity. What are its key elements? What are the empirical observations which establish it? What is its relevance to some new experiments? These questions are discussed in this article. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs

  13. Radioactive waste equivalence

    Orlowski, S.; Schaller, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    The report reviews, for the Member States of the European Community, possible situations in which an equivalence concept for radioactive waste may be used, analyses the various factors involved, and suggests guidelines for the implementation of such a concept. Only safety and technical aspects are covered. Other aspects such as commercial ones are excluded. Situations where the need for an equivalence concept has been identified are processes where impurities are added as a consequence of the treatment and conditioning process, the substitution of wastes from similar waste streams due to the treatment process, and exchange of waste belonging to different waste categories. The analysis of factors involved and possible ways for equivalence evaluation, taking into account in particular the chemical, physical and radiological characteristics of the waste package, and the potential risks of the waste form, shows that no simple all-encompassing equivalence formula may be derived. Consequently, a step-by-step approach is suggested, which avoids complex evaluations in the case of simple exchanges

  14. Equivalent Colorings with "Maple"

    Cecil, David R.; Wang, Rongdong

    2005-01-01

    Many counting problems can be modeled as "colorings" and solved by considering symmetries and Polya's cycle index polynomial. This paper presents a "Maple 7" program link http://users.tamuk.edu/kfdrc00/ that, given Polya's cycle index polynomial, determines all possible associated colorings and their partitioning into equivalence classes. These…

  15. Correspondences. Equivalence relations

    Bouligand, G.M.

    1978-03-01

    We comment on sections paragraph 3 'Correspondences' and paragraph 6 'Equivalence Relations' in chapter II of 'Elements de mathematique' by N. Bourbaki in order to simplify their comprehension. Paragraph 3 exposes the ideas of a graph, correspondence and map or of function, and their composition laws. We draw attention to the following points: 1) Adopting the convention of writting from left to right, the composition law for two correspondences (A,F,B), (U,G,V) of graphs F, G is written in full generality (A,F,B)o(U,G,V) = (A,FoG,V). It is not therefore assumed that the co-domain B of the first correspondence is identical to the domain U of the second (EII.13 D.7), (1970). 2) The axiom of choice consists of creating the Hilbert terms from the only relations admitting a graph. 3) The statement of the existence theorem of a function h such that f = goh, where f and g are two given maps having the same domain (of definition), is completed if h is more precisely an injection. Paragraph 6 considers the generalisation of equality: First, by 'the equivalence relation associated with a map f of a set E identical to (x is a member of the set E and y is a member of the set E and x:f = y:f). Consequently, every relation R(x,y) which is equivalent to this is an equivalence relation in E (symmetrical, transitive, reflexive); then R admits a graph included in E x E, etc. Secondly, by means of the Hilbert term of a relation R submitted to the equivalence. In this last case, if R(x,y) is separately collectivizing in x and y, theta(x) is not the class of objects equivalent to x for R (EII.47.9), (1970). The interest of bringing together these two subjects, apart from this logical order, resides also in the fact that the theorem mentioned in 3) can be expressed by means of the equivalence relations associated with the functions f and g. The solutions of the examples proposed reveal their simplicity [fr

  16. Active and passive measurements of radon/thoron exhalation from coal and flyash samples collected from various thermal power plants of Delhi, India

    Singh, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Rajesh; Sahoo, B.K.; Sapra, B.K.; Rajendra Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of radon ( 222 Rn) exhalation from coal, flyash and soil samples was carried out using active (Scintillation based Smart Radon Monitor) as well as passive technique (SSNTD based Can technique). In addition, thoron ( 220 Rn) exhalation measurements were also made for the above samples using Scintillation based Smart Thoron Monitor. To the best of our knowledge, thoron exhalation measurement is first of its kind in India. In this study, a total of 26 samples collected from Badarpur Thermal Power Station, Badarpur and Rajghat Power Station, Rajghat, Delhi were analysed. Thoron surface exhalation rate measured by Scintillation based Thoron Monitor for Badarpur Thermal Power Station varied from 327.8 Bq/m 2 /h to 874.2 Bq/m 2 /h and for Rajghat Thermal Power Station it varied from 176.0 Bq/m 2 /h to 781.1 Bq/m 2 /h. Similarly, the radon mass exhalation rate measured by active technique varied from 12.13 mBq/Kg/h to 118.08 mBq/Kg/h for the samples collected from Badarpur Thermal Power Station; while it varied from 15.00 Bq/Kg/h to 168.07 mBq/Kg/h for the samples collected from Rajghat Thermal Power station. On the other hand, result of measurements made by the conventional Can technique were significantly lower varying from 0.44 mBq/Kg/h to 2.34 mBq/Kg/h for Rajghat Thermal Power Station and from 0.78 mBq/Kg/h to 2.88 mBq/Kg/h for Badarpur Thermal Power Station. This vast variation in the results obtained by active and passive techniques is due to the fact that the active technique accounts for the effect of back-diffusion and possible leakage from the chamber in the process of least square fitting of exponential model while it is not so in the case of SSNTD based Can technique. In view of this, results of active technique are more reliable as compared to the passive technique. More importantly, there was no thoron interference in the radon measurement by the active technique. Further experiments are being carried out using controlled radon and thoron

  17. Removal of rhodamine B (a basic dye) and thoron (an acidic dye) from dilute aqueous solutions and wastewater simulants by ion flotation.

    Shakir, Kamal; Elkafrawy, Ahmed Faouzy; Ghoneimy, Hussein Fouad; Elrab Beheir, Shokry Gad; Refaat, Mamdoh

    2010-03-01

    The present work deals with removal, by ion flotation, of two dyes: a basic dye (rhodamine B (RB)) and an acidic one (thoron (TH)) from dilute aqueous solutions and simulated wastewaters. These dyes are widely used for analytical and biological staining purposes. Besides, RB is commonly used in dyeing of various industrial products. Therefore, wastewaters emanating from chemical and radiochemical laboratories, and biomedical and biological research laboratories may be contaminated with RB and TH. Ion flotation of these dyes has been investigated over a wide range of pH using the anionic surfactant, sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS) and the cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as collectors. Successful removals could be achieved for RB and TH with the anionic collector, NaLS, and the cationic collector, CTAB, respectively. In addition to the effects of pH and type of collector on the efficiency of removal of each dye, the effects of collector and dye concentrations, frother dosage, ionic strength, bubbling time period and presence of foreign salts were investigated and the optimal removal conditions have been established. Removals exceeding 99.5 % and 99.9% could be achieved for RB and TH, respectively. The results obtained are discussed with respect to dissociation of dye, type of collector, ionic strength and sign and magnitude of charge of added foreign ions. Kinetics of flotation were also studied. Further studies demonstrate that under optimum conditions the developed flotation processes can be applied for the treatment of dye-contaminated wastewaters simulated to those generated at dyeing industries and radiochemical laboratories. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The equivalence theorem

    Veltman, H.

    1990-01-01

    The equivalence theorem states that, at an energy E much larger than the vector-boson mass M, the leading order of the amplitude with longitudinally polarized vector bosons on mass shell is given by the amplitude in which these vector bosons are replaced by the corresponding Higgs ghosts. We prove the equivalence theorem and show its validity in every order in perturbation theory. We first derive the renormalized Ward identities by using the diagrammatic method. Only the Feynman-- 't Hooft gauge is discussed. The last step of the proof includes the power-counting method evaluated in the large-Higgs-boson-mass limit, needed to estimate the leading energy behavior of the amplitudes involved. We derive expressions for the amplitudes involving longitudinally polarized vector bosons for all orders in perturbation theory. The fermion mass has not been neglected and everything is evaluated in the region m f ∼M much-lt E much-lt m Higgs

  19. Equivalence, commensurability, value

    Albertsen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Deriving value in Capital Marx uses three commensurability arguments (CA1-3). CA1 establishes equivalence in exchange as exchangeability with the same third commodity. CA2 establishes value as common denominator in commodities: embodied abstract labour. CA3 establishes value substance...... as commonality of labour: physiological labour. Tensions between these logics have permeated Marxist interpretations of value. Some have supported value as embodied labour (CA2, 3), others a monetary theory of value and value as ‘pure’ societal abstraction (ultimately CA1). They all are grounded in Marx....

  20. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    Freeman, Rebecca D. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)

    2012-07-01

    by the Secretary of Energy in January of 2006 based on proposed processing techniques with the expectation that it could be revised as new processing capabilities became viable. Once signed, however, it became evident that any changes would require lengthy review and another determination signed by the Secretary of Energy. With the maturation of additional salt removal technologies and the extension of the SWPF start-up date, it becomes necessary to define 'equivalency' to the processes laid out in the original determination. For the purposes of SRS, any waste not processed through Interim Salt Processing must be processed through SWPF or an equivalent process, and therefore a clear statement of the requirements for a process to be equivalent to SWPF becomes necessary. (authors)

  1. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  2. Quantification of the equivalence principle

    Epstein, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative relationships illustrate Einstein's equivalence principle, relating it to Newton's ''fictitious'' forces arising from the use of noninertial frames, and to the form of the relativistic time dilatation in local Lorentz frames. The equivalence principle can be interpreted as the equivalence of general covariance to local Lorentz covariance, in a manner which is characteristic of Riemannian and pseudo-Riemannian geometries

  3. New recommendations for dose equivalent

    Bengtsson, G.

    1985-01-01

    In its report 39, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), has defined four new quantities for the determination of dose equivalents from external sources: the ambient dose equivalent, the directional dose equivalent, the individual dose equivalent, penetrating and the individual dose equivalent, superficial. The rationale behind these concepts and their practical application are discussed. Reference is made to numerical values of these quantities which will be the subject of a coming publication from the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP. (Author)

  4. Radon and daughters in cigarette smoke measured with SSNTD and corresponding committed equivalent dose to respiratory tract

    Misdaq, M.A.; Flata, K.

    2003-01-01

    Uranium ( 238 U) and Thorium ( 232 Th) contents were measured inside various tobacco samples by using a method based on determining detection efficiencies of the CR-39 and LR-115 II solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) for the emitted alpha particles. Alpha and beta activities per unit volume, due to radon ( 222 Rn), thoron ( 220 Rn) and their decay products, were evaluated inside cigarette smokes of tobacco samples studied. Annual committed equivalent doses due to short-lived radon decay products from the inhalation of various cigarette smokes were determined in the thoracic and extrathoracic regions of the respiratory tract. Three types of cigarettes made in Morocco of black tobacco show higher annual committed equivalent doses in the extrathoracic and thoracic regions of the respiratory tract than the other studied cigarettes (except one type of cigarettes made in France of yellow tobacco); their corresponding annual committed equivalent dose ratios are larger than 1.8. Measured annual committed equivalent doses ranged from 1.8x10 -9 to 1.10x10 -3 Sv yr -1 in the extrathoracic region and from 1.3x10 -10 to 7.6x10 -6 Sv yr -1 in the thoracic region of the respiratory tract for a smoker consuming 20 cigarettes a day

  5. System equivalent model mixing

    Klaassen, Steven W. B.; van der Seijs, Maarten V.; de Klerk, Dennis

    2018-05-01

    This paper introduces SEMM: a method based on Frequency Based Substructuring (FBS) techniques that enables the construction of hybrid dynamic models. With System Equivalent Model Mixing (SEMM) frequency based models, either of numerical or experimental nature, can be mixed to form a hybrid model. This model follows the dynamic behaviour of a predefined weighted master model. A large variety of applications can be thought of, such as the DoF-space expansion of relatively small experimental models using numerical models, or the blending of different models in the frequency spectrum. SEMM is outlined, both mathematically and conceptually, based on a notation commonly used in FBS. A critical physical interpretation of the theory is provided next, along with a comparison to similar techniques; namely DoF expansion techniques. SEMM's concept is further illustrated by means of a numerical example. It will become apparent that the basic method of SEMM has some shortcomings which warrant a few extensions to the method. One of the main applications is tested in a practical case, performed on a validated benchmark structure; it will emphasize the practicality of the method.

  6. DC cancellation as a method of generating a t2-response and of solving the radial position error in a concentric free-falling two-sphere equivalence-principle experiment in a drag-free satellite

    Lange, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for doing a free-fall equivalence-principle (EP) experiment in a satellite at ambient temperature which solves two problems that have previously blocked this approach. By using large masses to change the gravity gradient at the proof masses, the orbit dynamics of a drag-free satellite may be changed in such a way that the experiment can mimic a free-fall experiment in a constant gravitational field on the earth. An experiment using a sphere surrounded by a spherical shell both completely unsupported and free falling has previously been impractical because (1) it is not possible to distinguish between a small EP violation and a slight difference in the semi-major axes of the orbits of the two proof masses and (2) the position difference in the orbit due to an EP violation only grows as t whereas the largest disturbance grows as t 3/2 . Furthermore, it has not been known how to independently measure the positions of a shell and a solid sphere with sufficient accuracy. The measurement problem can be solved by using a two-color transcollimator (see the main text), and since the radial-position-error and t-response problems arise from the earth's gravity gradient and not from its gravity field, one solution is to modify the earth's gravity gradient with local masses fixed in the satellite. Since the gravity gradient at the surface of a sphere, for example, depends only on its density, the gravity gradients of laboratory masses and of the earth unlike their fields are of the same order of magnitude. In a drag-free satellite spinning perpendicular to the orbit plane, two fixed spherical masses whose connecting line parallels the satellite spin axis can generate a dc gravity gradient at test masses located between them which cancels the combined gravity gradient of the earth and differential centrifugal force. With perfect cancellation, the position-error problem vanishes and the response grows as t 2 along a line which always points toward

  7. Change in concentration distribution and equivalent rate constant with flow velocity in a boundary layer around a catalyst of non-uniform surface activity; Kotai shokubai taihyomen no kassei no fukin`itsusei ni motozuku kankyo sonai nodo bunpu oyobi toka hanno sokudo teisu no ryusoku ni yoru henka

    Konno, J [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-09-25

    In a flow system for vapor/solid catalytic reactions, there is a concentration distribution along the external catalyst surface, observed in the vicinity of the surface. Change in the reaction rate constant is followed for the case where the concentration distribution varies by flow. A 2-dimensional numerical model in which flow field and property conditions are simplified is used to analyze the change on the assumption that high-activity and low-activity sites are regularly distributed over the external catalyst surface. The transport equations for the reactants are numerically solved for given flow fields. It is found that the concentration distribution shape and equivalent reaction rate constant are almost the same as those in a stationary system at Pecret number of around 10 or lower, the concentration distribution gradually becomes uniform whereas equivalent rate constant increases as flow rate increases at Pecret number in a range from around 10 to 10{sup 6}, and they are almost constant at Pecret number beyond around 10{sup 6}. 3 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The equivalence principle

    Smorodinskij, Ya.A.

    1980-01-01

    The prerelativistic history of the equivalence principle (EP) is presented briefly. Its role in history of the general relativity theory (G.R.T.) discovery is elucidated. A modern idea states that the ratio of inert and gravitational masses does not differ from 1 at least up to the 12 sign after comma. Attention is paid to the difference of the gravitational field from electromagnetic one. The difference is as follows, the energy of the gravitational field distributed in space is the source of the field. These fields always interact at superposition. Electromagnetic fields from different sources are put together. On the basis of EP it is established the Sun field interact with the Earth gravitational energy in the same way as with any other one. The latter proves the existence of gravitation of the very gravitational field to a heavy body. A problem on gyroscope movement in the Earth gravitational field is presented as a paradox. The calculation has shown that gyroscope at satellite makes a positive precession, and its axis turns in an angle equal to α during a turn of the satellite round the Earth, but because of the space curvature - into the angle two times larger than α. A resulting turn is equal to 3α. It is shown on the EP basis that the polarization plane in any coordinate system does not turn when the ray of light passes in the gravitational field. Together with the historical value of EP noted is the necessity to take into account the requirements claimed by the EP at description of the physical world

  9. Radon concentration distribution mapping in a small detached house

    Muellerova, Monika; Moravcsik, Attila; Holy, Karol; Hutka, Miroslav; Hola, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Radon activity concentration was investigated in an older, single storey detached house. The rooms of the house are in contact with the bedrock. The house is fitted with plastic windows and populated mostly during the summer. Integral (Raduet) and continuous (AlphaGUARD) methods were used to measure the radon activity concentration. Average radon and thoron activity concentrations in the house were 150 Bq/m 3 and 40 Bq/m 3 , respectively. The impact of the house occupancy on radon activity concentration was significant only during the summer months when a decrease of radon activity concentration was recorded due to an increased ventilation rate. In the autumn and winter months, the impact of the house occupancy on radon activity concentration was relatively small - up to 20 %. The increases in radon activity concentration after the room had been thoroughly ventilated were analysed in order to estimate the ventilation rate and the rate of radon supply into the house. (orig.)

  10. Logically automorphically equivalent knowledge bases

    Aladova, Elena; Plotkin, Tatjana

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge bases theory provide an important example of the field where applications of universal algebra and algebraic logic look very natural, and their interaction with practical problems arising in computer science might be very productive. In this paper we study the equivalence problem for knowledge bases. Our interest is to find out how the informational equivalence is related to the logical description of knowledge. Studying various equivalences of knowledge bases allows us to compare d...

  11. Testing statistical hypotheses of equivalence

    Wellek, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Equivalence testing has grown significantly in importance over the last two decades, especially as its relevance to a variety of applications has become understood. Yet published work on the general methodology remains scattered in specialists' journals, and for the most part, it focuses on the relatively narrow topic of bioequivalence assessment.With a far broader perspective, Testing Statistical Hypotheses of Equivalence provides the first comprehensive treatment of statistical equivalence testing. The author addresses a spectrum of specific, two-sided equivalence testing problems, from the

  12. Radon in a Karstic Region School: Concentrations in Soil Gas and Indoors

    Vaupotic, J.; Kobal, I.; Barisic, D.; Lulic, S.

    1998-01-01

    The school presented in this paper exceeded instantaneous indoor radon concentration of 1000 Bqm -3 , obtained within the Slovene radon programme. Thus, additional measurements were performed and the radiation doses of teachers and pupils estimated. Radon concentrations between 1000 and 3000 Bqm -3 during teaching hours were found and the yearly effective doses from 0.75 to 1.1 mSv for the pupils and from 1.1 to 4.2 mSv for the teachers were calculated. In the soil gas radon and thoron concentration ranging from 70 to 150 kBqm -3 were obtained. The school was mitigated during summer 1998. (author)

  13. SAPONIFICATION EQUIVALENT OF DASAMULA TAILA

    Saxena, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are very useful for the technical and analytical work. It gives the mean molecular weight of the glycerides and acids present in Dasamula Taila. Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are reported in different packings.

  14. Saponification equivalent of dasamula taila.

    Saxena, R B

    1994-07-01

    Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are very useful for the technical and analytical work. It gives the mean molecular weight of the glycerides and acids present in Dasamula Taila. Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are reported in different packings.

  15. A study on lead equivalent

    Lin Guanxin

    1991-01-01

    A study on the rules in which the lead equivalent of lead glass changes with the energy of X rays or γ ray is described. The reason of this change is discussed and a new testing method of lead equivalent is suggested

  16. Performance of broiler chickens offered nutritionally-equivalent diets based on two red grain sorghums with quantified kafirin concentrations as intact pellets or re-ground mash following steam-pelleting at 65 or 97°C conditioning temperatures

    Ha H. Truong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Liverpool Plains is a fertile agricultural region in New South Wales, Australia. Two sorghums from the 2009 Liverpool Plains harvest, sorghums #3 and #5, were extensively characterised which included concentrations of kafirin and phenolic compounds plus rapid visco-analysis (RVA starch pasting profiles. Diets based on these two sorghums were formulated to be iso-nitrogenous and iso-energetic and were offered to male Ross 308 broiler chicks from 7 to 28 days post--hatch as either intact pellets or reground mash following steam-pelleting at conditioning temperatures of either 65 or 97°C. Thus the feeding study consisted of a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial array of dietary treatments: two sorghum varieties, two feed forms and two conditioning temperatures. Each of the eight treatments was replicated six times with six birds per replicate cage. Assessed parameters included growth performance, nutrient utilisation, apparent starch and protein (N digestibility coefficients and disappearance rates from the distal jejunum and distal ileum. Intact pellets supported higher (P < 0.001 feed intakes and weight gains by 9.83 and 9.08%, respectively, than reground mash diets. Feed conversion ratios of broilers offered diets steam-conditioned at 97°C were 2.46% inferior (P < 0.001 in comparison to 65°C diets and both apparent metabolizable energy (AME and N-corrected AME (AMEn were compromised. Broilers offered sorghum #3-based diets significantly (P < 0.001 outperformed their sorghum #5 counterparts in terms of weight gain by 3.75% (1,334 versus 1,223 g/bird, FCR by 4.81% (1.524 versus 1.601, AME by 1.06 MJ (13.61 versus 12.55 MJ/kg, ME:GE ratio (ME:GE by 4.81% (0.806 versus 0.769 and AMEn by 1.03 MJ (12.38 versus 11.35 MJ/kg. The inferiority of sorghum #5 appeared to be associated with higher concentrations of kafirin (61.5 versus 50.7 g/kg and conjugated phenolic acids, including ferulic acid (31.1 versus 25.6 µg/g. There were no significant differences in

  17. Determination of dose equivalent with tissue-equivalent proportional counters

    Dietze, G.; Schuhmacher, H.; Menzel, H.G.

    1989-01-01

    Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are instruments based on the cavity chamber principle and provide spectral information on the energy loss of single charged particles crossing the cavity. Hence such detectors measure absorbed dose or kerma and are able to provide estimates on radiation quality. During recent years TEPC based instruments have been developed for radiation protection applications in photon and neutron fields. This was mainly based on the expectation that the energy dependence of their dose equivalent response is smaller than that of other instruments in use. Recently, such instruments have been investigated by intercomparison measurements in various neutron and photon fields. Although their principles of measurements are more closely related to the definition of dose equivalent quantities than those of other existing dosemeters, there are distinct differences and limitations with respect to the irradiation geometry and the determination of the quality factor. The application of such instruments for measuring ambient dose equivalent is discussed. (author)

  18. What is correct: equivalent dose or dose equivalent

    Franic, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In Croatian language some physical quantities in radiation protection dosimetry have not precise names. Consequently, in practice either terms in English or mathematical formulas are used. The situation is even worse since the Croatian language only a limited number of textbooks, reference books and other papers are available. This paper compares the concept of ''dose equivalent'' as outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations No. 26 and newest, conceptually different concept of ''equivalent dose'' which is introduced in ICRP 60. It was found out that Croatian terminology is both not uniform and unprecise. For the term ''dose equivalent'' was, under influence of Russian and Serbian languages, often used as term ''equivalent dose'' even from the point of view of ICRP 26 recommendations, which was not justified. Unfortunately, even now, in Croatia the legal unit still ''dose equivalent'' defined as in ICRP 26, but the term used for it is ''equivalent dose''. Therefore, in Croatian legislation a modified set of quantities introduced in ICRP 60, should be incorporated as soon as possible

  19. The effect of RTP (Radon Thoron Progeny) and dust loading on the design of an alarm system for airborne plutonium particulates

    Pai, H.L.; Sun, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    If the alpha method is adopted, the main problem for determining airborne plutonium particulates is the overlapping of the alpha spectrum between Pu and RTF (radon thoron progeny). The order of magnitude estimation establishes that RTP is more than 20 times higher than Pu. Therefore a method of discriminating RTP is required. The primary methods of discrimination are the aerosol size and the alpha spectrum methods. If the alpha spectrum method is adopted, the formation of the low energy tail of RTP should be investigated. Preliminary study indicates that the low energy tail is related to the air gap and dust loading. (author)

  20. Analysis of errors in the measurement of unattached fractions of radon and thoron progeny in a Canadian uranium mine using wire screen methods

    Khan, A.; Phillips, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The unattached fraction of radon/thoron progeny in uranium mines is generally small and therefore difficult to measure accurately. The simple wire screen method provides a direct estimate of the unattached fraction from the screen count, or an indirect estimate from the difference between the reference and back-up filter counts. Wire screen method results are often difficult to analyse, especially when the unattached activity is small. Experimental data obtained in Canadian uranium mines are presented here, together with a detailed error analysis. The method consisting of counting the wire screen and the back-up filter is found to be the most precise method for unattached fraction determination. (author)

  1. PO.RA project. An analysis on gas radon concentrations in soil versus fluctuations in the groundwater table

    Serentha', C.; Torretta, M.

    2001-01-01

    Man is daily exposed to natural radiation, mainly due to cosmic rays and natural radioactive elements, whose most important radioactive daughters are 222 Rn (radon) and 220 Rn (thoron). Being these ones gaseous, they can spread through the ground, reaching the atmosphere and accumulating in rooms, where their concentrations may be very high. As radon exhalation is strongly connected with the hydrogeological features of the environment, this study tried to find a relationship between fluctuations in the groundwater table and gas radon concentrations in soil, in order to try estimates of indoor radon concentrations [it

  2. Symmetries of dynamically equivalent theories

    Gitman, D.M.; Tyutin, I.V. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-03-15

    A natural and very important development of constrained system theory is a detail study of the relation between the constraint structure in the Hamiltonian formulation with specific features of the theory in the Lagrangian formulation, especially the relation between the constraint structure with the symmetries of the Lagrangian action. An important preliminary step in this direction is a strict demonstration, and this is the aim of the present article, that the symmetry structures of the Hamiltonian action and of the Lagrangian action are the same. This proved, it is sufficient to consider the symmetry structure of the Hamiltonian action. The latter problem is, in some sense, simpler because the Hamiltonian action is a first-order action. At the same time, the study of the symmetry of the Hamiltonian action naturally involves Hamiltonian constraints as basic objects. One can see that the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian actions are dynamically equivalent. This is why, in the present article, we consider from the very beginning a more general problem: how the symmetry structures of dynamically equivalent actions are related. First, we present some necessary notions and relations concerning infinitesimal symmetries in general, as well as a strict definition of dynamically equivalent actions. Finally, we demonstrate that there exists an isomorphism between classes of equivalent symmetries of dynamically equivalent actions. (author)

  3. Matching of equivalent field regions

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen; Rengarajan, S.B.

    2005-01-01

    In aperture problems, integral equations for equivalent currents are often found by enforcing matching of equivalent fields. The enforcement is made in the aperture surface region adjoining the two volumes on each side of the aperture. In the case of an aperture in a planar perfectly conducting...... screen, having the same homogeneous medium on both sides and an impressed current on one aide, an alternative procedure is relevant. We make use of the fact that in the aperture the tangential component of the magnetic field due to the induced currents in the screen is zero. The use of such a procedure...... shows that equivalent currents can be found by a consideration of only one of the two volumes into which the aperture plane divides the space. Furthermore, from a consideration of an automatic matching at the aperture, additional information about tangential as well as normal field components...

  4. Teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity

    González, P. A.; Vásquez, Yerko

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing interest in modified gravity theories based on torsion, as these theories exhibit interesting cosmological implications. In this work inspired by the teleparallel formulation of general relativity, we present its extension to Lovelock gravity known as the most natural extension of general relativity in higher-dimensional space-times. First, we review the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity and Gauss-Bonnet gravity, and then we construct the teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity. In order to achieve this goal, we use the vielbein and the connection without imposing the Weitzenböck connection. Then, we extract the teleparallel formulation of the theory by setting the curvature to null.

  5. Attainment of radiation equivalency principle

    Shmelev, A.N.; Apseh, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Problems connected with the prospects for long-term development of the nuclear energetics are discussed. Basic principles of the future large-scale nuclear energetics are listed, primary attention is the safety of radioactive waste management of nuclear energetics. The radiation equivalence principle means close of fuel cycle and management of nuclear materials transportation with low losses on spent fuel and waste processing. Two aspects are considered: radiation equivalence in global and local aspects. The necessity of looking for other strategies of fuel cycle management in full-scale nuclear energy on radioactive waste management is supported [ru

  6. Design and development of a computer-based continuous monitor for the determination of the short-lived decay products of radon and thoron

    Bigu, J [Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, Elliot Lake, Ontario (Canada). Elliot Lake Lab.; Raz, R; Golden, K; Dominguez, P [Alpha-NUCLEAR, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1984-08-15

    A portable, rugged, monitor has been designed and built for measuring the short-lived decay products of radon and thoron. The monitor is computer-based and employs a continuous filter strip which can be advanced at programmable time intervals to allow unattended continuous operation with automatic sampling, analysis and recording of radiation levels. Radionuclide analysis is carried out by two silicon diffused-junction alpha-detectors and electronic circuitry with multichannel spectral analysis capabilities. Standard gross ..cap alpha..-count methods and ..cap alpha..-spectroscopy methods can easily be implemented. The built-in computer performs a variety of operations via a specially designed interface module, including control and data recording functions, and computations, program storage and display functions. Programs and data are stored in the built-in casette tape drive and the computer integrated CRT display and keyboard allow simple, prompted menu-type operation of standard software. Graphical presentation of ..cap alpha..-spectra can be shown on the computer CRT and printed when required on the computer built-in thermal printer. In addition, to implementing the specially developed radionuclide analysis software, the operator can interact and modify existing software, and program new ones, through BASIC language programming, or employ the computer in a totally unrelated, general purpose model. Although the monitor is ideally suited for environmental radon (thoron) daughter monitoring, it could also be used in the determination of other airborne radionuclides provided adequate analytical procedures are developed or included in the already existing computer software.

  7. Probing the application of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for assessment of deposited flux of Radon and Thoron progeny in high exposure conditions

    Mishra, R., E-mail: rosaline@barc.gov.in; Sapra, B.K.; Rout, R.P.; Prajith, R.

    2016-12-01

    Direct measurement of Radon and Thoron progeny in the atmosphere and occupational environments such as Uranium mines, Uranium and Thorium handling facilities has gained importance because of its radiological significance in inhalation dose assessment. In this regard, Radon and Thoron Progeny sensors (DTPS and DRPS) are the only passive solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD, LR115) based devices which are being extensively used for time integrated direct progeny measurements. An essential component of the analysis is the chemical etching of the detectors, followed by spark counting of tracks and then estimation of the inhalation dose using appropriate calibration factors. Alternatively, the tracks may be counted using image analysis techniques. However, under high exposure conditions, both these methods have inherent limitations and errors arising due to increased frequency of tracks. In the present work, we probe the use of Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy to analyse the deposited fluence of the progeny particulates based on change in transmittance of the nitric group vibrational bands of the LR115. A linear relationship between the transmittance and the deposited fluence was observed, which can be used to estimate the deposited fluence rate and the inhalation dose. This alternative method of analysis will provide a faster and non-destructive technique for inhalation dose assessment, specially for routine large scale measurements. - Highlights: • An alternative method of inhalation dose assessment. • Linearity between the transmittance of nitric goup bands and the deposited fluence. • Faster and non-destructive technique for high exposure scenarios.

  8. Design and development of a computer-based continuous monitor for the determination of the short-lived decay products of radon and thoron

    Bigu, J.

    1984-01-01

    A portable, rugged, monitor has been designed and built for measuring the short-lived decay products of radon and thoron. The monitor is computer-based and employs a continuous filter strip which can be advanced at programmable time intervals to allow unattended continuous operatin with automatic sampling, analysis and recording of radiation levels. Radionuclide analysis is carried out by two silicon diffused-junction alpha-detectors and electronic circuitry with multichannel spectral analysis capabilities. Standard gross α-count methods and α-spectroscopy methods can easily be implemented. The built-in computer performs a variety of operations via a specially designed interface module, including control and data recording functions, and computations, program storage and display functions. Programs and data are stored in the built-in casette tape drive and the computer integrated CRT display and keyboard allow simple, prompted menu-type operation of standard software. Graphical presentation of α-spectra can be shown on the computer CRT and printed when required on the computer built-in thermal printer. In addition, to implementing the specially developed radionuclide analysis software, the operator can interact and modify existing software, and program new ones, through BASIC language programming, or employ the computer in a totally unrelated, general purpose model. Although the monitor is ideally suited for environmental radon (thoron) daughter monitoring, it could also be used in the determination of other airborne radionuclides provided adequate analytical procedures are developed or included in the already existing computer software. (orig.)

  9. Measurements of parameters for determining the radon load in the framework of the Dutch national research program SAWORA

    Groen, G.C.H.; Groot, T.J.H. de; Nyqvist, R.G.; Keverling Buisman, A.S.; Stoute, J.R.D.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes a series of measurements related to the indoor exposure to daughters of radon and thoron. Important parameters are the Potential Alpha Energy Concentration (PAEC) and the Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD). The results for indoor atmosphere are presented leading to an order of magnitude estimate of the effective dose-equivalent rate of 500 μSv/y. The thoron daughter concentrations are relatively high with respect to those of radon daughters. (Auth.)

  10. Comments on field equivalence principles

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1987-01-01

    It is pointed Out that often-used arguments based on a short-circuit concept in presentations of field equivalence principles are not correct. An alternative presentation based on the uniqueness theorem is given. It does not contradict the results obtained by using the short-circuit concept...

  11. EQUIVALENCE VERSUS NON-EQUIVALENCE IN ECONOMIC TRANSLATION

    Cristina, Chifane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at highlighting the fact that “equivalence” represents a concept worth revisiting and detailing upon when tackling the translation process of economic texts both from English into Romanian and from Romanian into English. Far from being exhaustive, our analysis will focus upon the problems arising from the lack of equivalence at the word level. Consequently, relevant examples from the economic field will be provided to account for the following types of non-equivalence at word level: culturespecific concepts; the source language concept is not lexicalised in the target language; the source language word is semantically complex; differences in physical and interpersonal perspective; differences in expressive meaning; differences in form; differences in frequency and purpose of using specific forms and the use of loan words in the source text. Likewise, we shall illustrate a number of translation strategies necessary to deal with the afore-mentioned cases of non-equivalence: translation by a more general word (superordinate; translation by a more neutral/less expressive word; translation by cultural substitution; translation using a loan word or loan word plus explanation; translation by paraphrase using a related word; translation by paraphrase using unrelated words; translation by omission and translation by illustration.

  12. Biomonitoring Equivalents for interpretation of urinary fluoride.

    Aylward, L L; Hays, S M; Vezina, A; Deveau, M; St-Amand, A; Nong, A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to fluoride is widespread due to its natural occurrence in the environment and addition to drinking water and dental products for the prevention of dental caries. The potential health risks of excess fluoride exposure include aesthetically unacceptable dental fluorosis (tooth mottling) and increased skeletal fragility. Numerous organizations have conducted risk assessments and set guidance values to represent maximum recommended exposure levels as well as recommended adequate intake levels based on potential public health benefits of fluoride exposure. Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) are estimates of the average biomarker concentrations corresponding to such exposure guidance values. The literature on daily urinary fluoride excretion rates as a function of daily fluoride exposure was reviewed and BE values corresponding to the available US and Canadian exposure guidance values were derived for fluoride in urine. The derived BE values range from 1.1 to 2.1mg/L (1.2-2.5μg/g creatinine). Concentrations of fluoride in single urinary spot samples from individuals, even under exposure conditions consistent with the exposure guidance values, may vary from the predicted average concentrations by several-fold due to within- and across-individual variation in urinary flow and creatinine excretion rates and due to the rapid elimination kinetics of fluoride. Thus, the BE values are most appropriately applied to screen population central tendency estimates for biomarker concentrations rather than interpretation of individual spot sample concentrations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Measurement of radon concentration in dwellings in the region of highest lung cancer incidence in India

    Zoliana, B.; Rohmingliana, P.C.; Sahoo, B.K.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of radon exhalation from soil and its concentration in indoor is found to be helpful in many investigations such as health risk assessment and others as radiation damage to bronchial cells which eventually can be the second leading cause of lung cancer next to smoking. The fact that Aizawl District, Mizoram, India has the highest lung cancer incidence rates among males and females in Age Adjusted Rate (AAR) in India as declared by Population Based Cancer Registry Report 2008 indicates the need for quantification of radon and its anomalies attached to it. Measurement of radon concentration had been carried out inside the dwellings in Aizawl district, Mizoram. A time integrated method of measurement was employed by using a solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) type (LR-115 films) kept in a twin cup dosimeter for measurement of concentration of radon and thoron. The dosimeters were suspended over bed rooms or living rooms in selected dwellings. They were deployed for a period of about 120 days at a time in 63 houses which were selected according to their place of location viz. fault region, places where fossil remains were found and geologically unidentified region. After the desired period of exposure, the detectors were retrieved and chemically etched which were then counted by using a spark counter. The recorded nuclear tract densities are then converted into air concentrations of Radon and Thoron

  14. The Source Equivalence Acceleration Method

    Everson, Matthew S.; Forget, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a new acceleration method, the Source Equivalence Acceleration Method. • SEAM forms an equivalent coarse group problem for any spatial method. • Equivalence is also formed across different spatial methods and angular quadratures. • Testing is conducted using OpenMOC and performance is compared with CMFD. • Results show that SEAM is preferable for very expensive transport calculations. - Abstract: Fine-group whole-core reactor analysis remains one of the long sought goals of the reactor physics community. Such a detailed analysis is typically too computationally expensive to be realized on anything except the largest of supercomputers. Recondensation using the Discrete Generalized Multigroup (DGM) method, though, offers a relatively cheap alternative to solving the fine group transport problem. DGM, however, suffered from inconsistencies when applied to high-order spatial methods. While an exact spatial recondensation method was developed and provided full spatial consistency with the fine group problem, this approach substantially increased memory requirements for realistic problems. The method described in this paper, called the Source Equivalence Acceleration Method (SEAM), forms a coarse-group problem which preserves the fine-group problem even when using higher order spatial methods. SEAM allows recondensation to converge to the fine-group solution with minimal memory requirements and little additional overhead. This method also provides for consistency when using different spatial methods and angular quadratures between the coarse group and fine group problems. SEAM was implemented in OpenMOC, a 2D MOC code developed at MIT, and its performance tested against Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) acceleration on the C5G7 benchmark problem and on a 361 group version of the problem. For extremely expensive transport calculations, SEAM was able to outperform CMFD, resulting in speed-ups of 20–45 relative to the normal power

  15. Equivalent statistics and data interpretation.

    Francis, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    Recent reform efforts in psychological science have led to a plethora of choices for scientists to analyze their data. A scientist making an inference about their data must now decide whether to report a p value, summarize the data with a standardized effect size and its confidence interval, report a Bayes Factor, or use other model comparison methods. To make good choices among these options, it is necessary for researchers to understand the characteristics of the various statistics used by the different analysis frameworks. Toward that end, this paper makes two contributions. First, it shows that for the case of a two-sample t test with known sample sizes, many different summary statistics are mathematically equivalent in the sense that they are based on the very same information in the data set. When the sample sizes are known, the p value provides as much information about a data set as the confidence interval of Cohen's d or a JZS Bayes factor. Second, this equivalence means that different analysis methods differ only in their interpretation of the empirical data. At first glance, it might seem that mathematical equivalence of the statistics suggests that it does not matter much which statistic is reported, but the opposite is true because the appropriateness of a reported statistic is relative to the inference it promotes. Accordingly, scientists should choose an analysis method appropriate for their scientific investigation. A direct comparison of the different inferential frameworks provides some guidance for scientists to make good choices and improve scientific practice.

  16. Equivalent nozzle in thermomechanical problems

    Cesari, F.

    1977-01-01

    When analyzing nuclear vessels, it is most important to study the behavior of the nozzle cylinder-cylinder intersection. For the elastic field, this analysis in three dimensions is quite easy using the method of finite elements. The same analysis in the non-linear field becomes difficult for designs in 3-D. It is therefore necessary to resolve a nozzle in two dimensions equivalent to a 3-D nozzle. The purpose of the present work is to find an equivalent nozzle both with a mechanical and thermal load. This has been achieved by the analysis in three dimensions of a nozzle and a nozzle cylinder-sphere intersection, of a different radius. The equivalent nozzle will be a nozzle with a sphere radius in a given ratio to the radius of a cylinder; thus, the maximum equivalent stress is the same in both 2-D and 3-D. The nozzle examined derived from the intersection of a cylindrical vessel of radius R=191.4 mm and thickness T=6.7 mm with a cylindrical nozzle of radius r=24.675 mm and thickness t=1.350 mm, for which the experimental results for an internal pressure load are known. The structure was subdivided into 96 finite, three-dimensional and isoparametric elements with 60 degrees of freedom and 661 total nodes. Both the analysis with a mechanical load as well as the analysis with a thermal load were carried out on this structure according to the Bersafe system. The thermal load consisted of a transient typical of an accident occurring in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, with a peak of the temperature (540 0 C) for the sodium inside the vessel with an insulating argon temperature constant at 525 0 C. The maximum value of the equivalent tension was found in the internal area at the union towards the vessel side. The analysis of the nozzle in 2-D consists in schematizing the structure as a cylinder-sphere intersection, where the sphere has a given relation to the

  17. 21 CFR 26.9 - Equivalence determination.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equivalence determination. 26.9 Section 26.9 Food... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.9 Equivalence determination... document insufficient evidence of equivalence, lack of opportunity to assess equivalence or a determination...

  18. Information Leakage from Logically Equivalent Frames

    Sher, Shlomi; McKenzie, Craig R. M.

    2006-01-01

    Framing effects are said to occur when equivalent frames lead to different choices. However, the equivalence in question has been incompletely conceptualized. In a new normative analysis of framing effects, we complete the conceptualization by introducing the notion of information equivalence. Information equivalence obtains when no…

  19. Wijsman Orlicz Asymptotically Ideal -Statistical Equivalent Sequences

    Bipan Hazarika

    2013-01-01

    in Wijsman sense and present some definitions which are the natural combination of the definition of asymptotic equivalence, statistical equivalent, -statistical equivalent sequences in Wijsman sense. Finally, we introduce the notion of Cesaro Orlicz asymptotically -equivalent sequences in Wijsman sense and establish their relationship with other classes.

  20. Equivalence relations of AF-algebra extensions

    In this paper, we consider equivalence relations of *-algebra extensions and describe the relationship between the isomorphism equivalence and the unitary equivalence. We also show that a certain group homomorphism is the obstruction for these equivalence relations to be the same.

  1. Mixed field dose equivalent measuring instruments

    Brackenbush, L.W.; McDonald, J.C.; Endres, G.W.R.; Quam, W.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, separate instruments have been used to monitor dose equivalent from neutrons and gamma rays. It has been demonstrated that it is now possible to measure simultaneously neutron and gamma dose with a single instrument, the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). With appropriate algorithms dose equivalent can also be determined from the TEPC. A simple ''pocket rem meter'' for measuring neutron dose equivalent has already been developed. Improved algorithms for determining dose equivalent for mixed fields are presented. (author)

  2. Derived equivalences for group rings

    König, Steffen

    1998-01-01

    A self-contained introduction is given to J. Rickard's Morita theory for derived module categories and its recent applications in representation theory of finite groups. In particular, Broué's conjecture is discussed, giving a structural explanation for relations between the p-modular character table of a finite group and that of its "p-local structure". The book is addressed to researchers or graduate students and can serve as material for a seminar. It surveys the current state of the field, and it also provides a "user's guide" to derived equivalences and tilting complexes. Results and proofs are presented in the generality needed for group theoretic applications.

  3. The OECD/NEA programme on radon and thoron dosimetry and monitoring: its contribution to the assessment of public exposure to natural radiation

    Ilari, O.; Steinhaeusler, F.

    1984-01-01

    Inhalation of radon, thoron and their daughters is recognised to be the most important pathway to exposure of mankind to natural radiation sources. The progressive understanding of the increasing role of this exposure in the overall radiation detriment to the public and the workers produced an increasing concern in several countries about the problems of dosimetry and measurement of these nuclides. This trend was readily appreciated by NEA, which began an active programme in this field in 1976. The effort of NEA focussed on two main areas, namely (a) development of dosimetric models and study of correlation between exposure and dose (Phase I), and (b) review of principles and techniques of metrology and development of guidance on monitoring (Phase II). (author)

  4. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1987-11-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. Critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 [1] methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed. The effective dose equivalent determined using ICRP-26 methods is significantly smaller than the dose equivalent determined by traditional methods. No existing personnel dosimeter or health physics instrument can determine effective dose equivalent. At the present time, the conversion of dosimeter response to dose equivalent is based on calculations for maximal or ''cap'' values using homogeneous spherical or cylindrical phantoms. The evaluated dose equivalent is, therefore, a poor approximation of the effective dose equivalent as defined by ICRP Publication 26. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Thoron Mitigation System based on charcoal bed for applications in thorium fuel cycle facilities (part 1): Development of theoretical models for design considerations.

    Sahoo, B K; Sudeep Kumara, K; Karunakara, N; Gaware, J J; Sapra, B K; Mayya, Y S

    2017-06-01

    Regulating the environmental discharge of 220 Rn (historically known as thoron) and its decay products from thorium processing facilities is important for protection of environment and general public living in the vicinities. Activated charcoal provides an effective solution to this problem because of its high adsorption capacity to gaseous element like radon. In order to design and develop a charcoal based Thoron Mitigation System, a mathematical model has been developed in the present work for studying the 220 Rn transport and adsorption in a flow through charcoal bed and estimating the 220 Rn mitigation factor (MF) as a function of system and operating parameters. The model accounts for inter- and intra-grain diffusion, advection, radioactive decay and adsorption processes. Also, the effects of large void fluctuation and wall channeling on the mitigation factor have been included through a statistical model. Closed form solution has been provided for the MF in terms of adsorption coefficient, system dimensions, grain size, flow rate and void fluctuation exponent. It is shown that the delay effects due to intra grain diffusion plays a significant role thereby rendering external equilibrium assumptions unsuitable. Also, the application of the statistical model clearly demonstrates the transition from the exponential MF to a power-law form and shows how the occurrence of channels with low probability can lower mitigation factor by several orders of magnitude. As a part of aiding design, the model is further extended to optimise the bed dimensions in respect of pressure drop and MF. The application of the results for the design and development of a practically useful charcoal bed is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Editorial: New operational dose equivalent quantities

    Harvey, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The ICRU Report 39 entitled ''Determination of Dose Equivalents Resulting from External Radiation Sources'' is briefly discussed. Four new operational dose equivalent quantities have been recommended in ICRU 39. The 'ambient dose equivalent' and the 'directional dose equivalent' are applicable to environmental monitoring and the 'individual dose equivalent, penetrating' and the 'individual dose equivalent, superficial' are applicable to individual monitoring. The quantities should meet the needs of day-to-day operational practice, while being acceptable to those concerned with metrological precision, and at the same time be used to give effective control consistent with current perceptions of the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiations. (U.K.)

  7. Foreword: Biomonitoring Equivalents special issue.

    Meek, M E; Sonawane, B; Becker, R A

    2008-08-01

    The challenge of interpreting results of biomonitoring for environmental chemicals in humans is highlighted in this Foreword to the Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) special issue of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology. There is a pressing need to develop risk-based tools in order to empower scientists and health professionals to interpret and communicate the significance of human biomonitoring data. The BE approach, which integrates dosimetry and risk assessment methods, represents an important advancement on the path toward achieving this objective. The articles in this issue, developed as a result of an expert panel meeting, present guidelines for derivation of BEs, guidelines for communication using BEs and several case studies illustrating application of the BE approach for specific substances.

  8. Radiological equivalent of chemical pollutants

    Medina, V.O.

    1982-01-01

    The development of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy has caused continued effort toward public safety through radiation health protection measures and nuclear management practices. However, concern has not been focused on the development specifically in the operation of chemical pestrochemical industries as well as other industrial processes brought about by technological advancements. This article presents the comparison of the risk of radiation and chemicals. The methods used for comparing the risks of late effects of radiation and chemicals are considered at three levels. (a) as a frame of reference to give an impression of resolving power of biological tests; (b) as methods to quantify risks; (c) as instruments for an epidemiological survey of human populations. There are marked dissimilarities between chemicals and radiation and efforts to interpret chemical activity may not be achieved. Applicability of the concept of rad equivalence has many restrictions and as pointed out this approach is not an established one. (RTD)

  9. Tissue equivalence in neutron dosimetry

    Nutton, D.H.; Harris, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the essential features of neutron tissue equivalence for radiotherapy and gives the results of a computation of relative absorbed dose for 14 MeV neutrons, using various tissue models. It is concluded that for the Bragg-Gray equation for ionometric dosimetry it is not sufficient to define the value of W to high accuracy and that it is essential that, for dosimetric measurements to be applicable to real body tissue to an accuracy of better than several per cent, a correction to the total absorbed dose must be made according to the test and tissue atomic composition, although variations in patient anatomy and other radiotherapy parameters will often limit the benefits of such detailed dosimetry. (U.K.)

  10. Expanding the Interaction Equivalency Theorem

    Brenda Cecilia Padilla Rodriguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although interaction is recognised as a key element for learning, its incorporation in online courses can be challenging. The interaction equivalency theorem provides guidelines: Meaningful learning can be supported as long as one of three types of interactions (learner-content, learner-teacher and learner-learner is present at a high level. This study sought to apply this theorem to the corporate sector, and to expand it to include other indicators of course effectiveness: satisfaction, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations. A large Mexican organisation participated in this research, with 146 learners, 30 teachers and 3 academic assistants. Three versions of an online course were designed, each emphasising a different type of interaction. Data were collected through surveys, exams, observations, activity logs, think aloud protocols and sales records. All course versions yielded high levels of effectiveness, in terms of satisfaction, learning and return on expectations. Yet, course design did not dictate the types of interactions in which students engaged within the courses. Findings suggest that the interaction equivalency theorem can be reformulated as follows: In corporate settings, an online course can be effective in terms of satisfaction, learning, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations, as long as (a at least one of three types of interaction (learner-content, learner-teacher or learner-learner features prominently in the design of the course, and (b course delivery is consistent with the chosen type of interaction. Focusing on only one type of interaction carries a high risk of confusion, disengagement or missed learning opportunities, which can be managed by incorporating other forms of interactions.

  11. The influence of the soil and plant natures and pollution on the radon and thoron alpha-activities inside various herbal infusions by using solid state nuclear track detectors

    Misdaq, M.A.; Nouh, F.A.; Bourzik, W.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium and thorium contents were determined in samples of various plants in the soils in which the plants were grown, and in herbal infusions made by boiling the plants in potable water, using CR-39 and LR-115 solid state nuclear track detectors. In addition, radon and thoron alpha-activities per unit volume inside the plants, soils and herbal infusions were measured. These measurements were completed by an investigation of the radon transfer between soils and plants and that between plants and herbal infusions, and also by the investigation of the influence of pollution due to different material dusts on the radon and thoron alpha activities inside the plants and their infusions. (author)

  12. Study of the influence of the soil and plant natures and pollution on the radon and thoron alpha activities inside various herbal infusions by using solid state nuclear track detectors

    Misdaq, M.A.; Ait nouh, F.; Bourzik, W.; Lamine, J.

    2000-01-01

    Different medicinal plant, spinach and cereal samples have been analysed by using neutron activation analysis and radiochemical separation. The solid state nuclear track detectors technique was utilized for uranium and thorium contents determination as well as for alpha, beta, and gamma dose rates evaluation in various geological and ceramic samples. In this study, uranium and thorium contents have been determined in different plant samples, soils in which they have been grown and in herbal infusions made by boiling the studied plants in potable water by using CR-39 and LR-115 solid state nuclear track detectors. Radon and thoron alpha activities per unit volume inside the plants, soils and herbal infusions studied have been evaluated. The radon transfers between soils and plants as well as between plants and herbal infusions have been investigated. The influence of pollution due to different material dusts on radon and thoron alpha activities inside the plants and their corresponding infusions has been studied. (author)

  13. Equivalent damage of loads on pavements

    Prozzi, JA

    2009-05-26

    Full Text Available This report describes a new methodology for the determination of Equivalent Damage Factors (EDFs) of vehicles with multiple axle and wheel configurations on pavements. The basic premise of this new procedure is that "equivalent pavement response...

  14. Investigation of Equivalent Circuit for PEMFC Assessment

    Myong, Kwang Jae

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions occurring in a PEMFC are dominated by the physical conditions and interface properties, and the reactions are expressed in terms of impedance. The performance of a PEMFC can be simply diagnosed by examining the impedance because impedance characteristics can be expressed by an equivalent electrical circuit. In this study, the characteristics of a PEMFC are assessed using the AC impedance and various equivalent circuits such as a simple equivalent circuit, equivalent circuit with a CPE, equivalent circuit with two RCs, and equivalent circuit with two CPEs. It was found in this study that the characteristics of a PEMFC could be assessed using impedance and an equivalent circuit, and the accuracy was highest for an equivalent circuit with two CPEs

  15. 46 CFR 175.540 - Equivalents.

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Management (ISM) Code (IMO Resolution A.741(18)) for the purpose of determining that an equivalent... Organization (IMO) “Code of Safety for High Speed Craft” as an equivalent to compliance with applicable...

  16. Study of the equivalent diameter concept for heat transfer by forced convection in annular channels

    Mendez T, D.

    1994-01-01

    This work describes a comparative analysis between experimental values of heat transfer coefficients in fully developed turbulent flow for a concentric annular channel, and those calculated with the empirical correlations obtained for tubes by Dittus-Boelter, Sieder and Tate, a modified Colburn equation, and that proposed by Gnielinski which applies the analogy between friction and heat transfer. The coefficients were calculated by means of two different equivalent diameters: 1) The hydraulic equivalent diameter; and 2) The heated equivalent diameter. It was concluded that the hydraulic equivalent diameter gives much better results than the heated equivalent diameter. (Author)

  17. Some spectral equivalences between Schroedinger operators

    Dunning, C; Hibberd, K E; Links, J

    2008-01-01

    Spectral equivalences of the quasi-exactly solvable sectors of two classes of Schroedinger operators are established, using Gaudin-type Bethe ansatz equations. In some instances the results can be extended leading to full isospectrality. In this manner we obtain equivalences between PT-symmetric problems and Hermitian problems. We also find equivalences between some classes of Hermitian operators

  18. The definition of the individual dose equivalent

    Ehrlich, Margarete

    1986-01-01

    A brief note examines the choice of the present definition of the individual dose equivalent, the new operational dosimetry quantity for external exposure. The consequences of the use of the individual dose equivalent and the danger facing the individual dose equivalent, as currently defined, are briefly discussed. (UK)

  19. Biomonitoring Equivalents for bisphenol A (BPA).

    Krishnan, Kannan; Gagné, Michelle; Nong, Andy; Aylward, Lesa L; Hays, Sean M

    2010-10-01

    Recent efforts worldwide have resulted in a growing database of measured concentrations of chemicals in blood and urine samples taken from the general population. However, few tools exist to assist in the interpretation of the measured values in a health risk context. Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) are defined as the concentration or range of concentrations of a chemical or its metabolite in a biological medium (blood, urine, or other medium) that is consistent with an existing health-based exposure guideline. BE values are derived by integrating available data on pharmacokinetics with existing chemical risk assessments. This study reviews available health-based exposure guidance values for bisphenol A (BPA) from Health Canada, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). BE values were derived based on data on BPA urinary excretion in humans. The BE value corresponding to the oral provisional tolerable daily intake (pTDI) of 25 microg/kg-d from Health Canada is 1mg/L (1.3mg/g creatinine); value corresponding to the US EPA reference dose (RfD) and EFSA tolerable daily intake (TDI) estimates (both of which are equal to 50 microg/kg-d) is 2mg/L (2.6 mg/g creatinine). These values are estimates of the 24-h average urinary BPA concentrations that are consistent with steady-state exposure at the respective exposure guidance values. These BE values may be used as screening tools for evaluation of central tendency measures of population biomonitoring data for BPA in a risk assessment context and can assist in prioritization of the potential need for additional risk assessment efforts for BPA relative to other chemicals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharmaceutical equivalence of gabapentin tablets with various extragranular binders Pharmaceutical equivalence of gabapentin tablets with various extragranular binders

    SWATI C. JAGDALE

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Gabapentin is a high-dose drug widely used as an oral anti-epilepticagent. Due to high crystalline and has poor compaction properties it is difficult to form tablets by direct compression. The aim of this study was to develop gabapentin tablets, pharmaceutically equivalent to the reference product Neurontin (marketed in USA. Gabapentin 800mg tablets were produced by wet granulation by keeping intragranular binder as well as its concentration constant and by changing with various extragranular binders with its concentration (A = PVPK 30, B = HPMC 15 cps, C = Kollidon VA 64, D =Klucel EXF.The tablet having no weight, thickness and hardness variation and having appropriate, friability as well as disintegration profile were coated with a 3% film coating solution .Seven formulations F1 (A in lower concentration F2 (A in higher concentration, F3 (B in lower concentration and F4 (B in higher concentration, F5 (C in lower concentration, F6 (C in higher concentration, F7 (D in lower concentration were formulated. Among them F6 demonstrated adequate hardness, friability, disintegration, uniformity of content, and total drug dissolution after 45minutes. The dissimilarity factor (f1 is 5.93 and the similarity factor (f2 is 67.85. So F6 was found to be equivalent to Neurontin.Gabapentin is widely used as an oral anti-epileptic agent. However, owing to its high crystallinity and poor compaction properties, it is difficult to form tablets of this drug by direct compression. The aim of this study was to develop gabapentin tablets, pharmaceutically equivalent to the brand-name pioneer product Neurontin® (marketed in USA. Gabapentin 800mg tablets were produced by wet granulation with a constant concentration of intragranular binder and a varying concentration of extragranular binders (A = polyvinylpyrrolidone K30, B = hydroxypropylmethylcellulose 15 cps, C = Kollidon VA64, D =Klucel EXF. The tablets that did not vary in weight, thickness or hardness and had

  1. Study of radon and thoron gas behaviour in the air at the commercial centers in Rio de Janeiro and Pocos de Caldas city; Estudo do comportamento dos gases radonio e toronio presentes no ar em centro comercial do Rio de Janeiro e Pocos de Caldas

    Castro, Carlos A.C. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Robotica, Soldagem e Simulacao; Morales, Rudnei K; Santos, Victor C. dos . [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); br, victorcs@ime eb; Cardoso, Domingos D [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The radon is a radioactive gas. It occurs naturally in the atmosphere coming from the decay of radium, with emission of alpha particles. There are three radon isotopes more known, of which the most important under the environmental point of view is the Rn-222, whose half life is 3.82 days. The radon and their descendants are responsible by more than 40 % of the natural radioactive dose received for the human beings inside the building. In doses above 4 pCi/l, given as occupational dose, can cause among other diseases, the lung cancer. The main source of radon inside the building is the soil. The incidence of radon inside the building varies according to the soil composition, the materials employed in its construction, the inside air temperature and humidity, time during the day, season and the ventilation process designed. The work was realized at the commercial centers in Rio de Janeiro and Pocos de Caldas, for methodology confirmation. It was utilized the passive (track detectors) and active (two filters technique. Kusnetz technique, Tsivoglou technique and alpha spectrometry technique) methods. The objective of this work was to analyze the radon and thoron concentrations levels in order to supply parameters upon the quality of the air in those commercial centers. (author)

  2. Review of Recent Development of Dynamic Wind Farm Equivalent Models Based on Big Data Mining

    Wang, Chenggen; Zhou, Qian; Han, Mingzhe; Lv, Zhan’ao; Hou, Xiao; Zhao, Haoran; Bu, Jing

    2018-04-01

    Recently, the big data mining method has been applied in dynamic wind farm equivalent modeling. In this paper, its recent development with present research both domestic and overseas is reviewed. Firstly, the studies of wind speed prediction, equivalence and its distribution in the wind farm are concluded. Secondly, two typical approaches used in the big data mining method is introduced, respectively. For single wind turbine equivalent modeling, it focuses on how to choose and identify equivalent parameters. For multiple wind turbine equivalent modeling, the following three aspects are concentrated, i.e. aggregation of different wind turbine clusters, the parameters in the same cluster, and equivalence of collector system. Thirdly, an outlook on the development of dynamic wind farm equivalent models in the future is discussed.

  3. Reassessment of calculation of effective dose equivalent for the CRCN-CO Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program

    Carneiro, L.B.; Dourado, M.A.; Barbosa, R.C.

    2017-01-01

    To reassess the calculations of the effective dose equivalent to obtain data of dosimetry and the accomplishment of the analysis comparing the data of several techniques that record doses of radiation originating from the cosmogenic and terrestrial contributions that make up the so-called background radiation. the basic information to be obtained is the contribution of the difference between the terrestrial dose equivalents, even the lowest concentration of primordial radionuclides, and that of the dose equivalent, deduced from TLD readings. (author)

  4. Relationship between equivalent chromium content and irradiation-induced swelling in 316 stainless steel

    Bates, J.F.; Guthrie, G.L.

    1974-12-01

    A correlation is noted between equivalent chromium content and resistance to irradiation induced swelling in various 316 stainless steel specimens which have slightly different chemical compositions. Several examples are cited where an increased concentration of an α-stabilizing minor constituent results in decreased swelling. It is shown that the relative swelling resistance of alloys having the same carbon and equivalent nickel contents is higher for those alloys with the higher equivalent chromium content

  5. Reassessment of calculation of effective dose equivalent for the CRCN-CO Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program

    Carneiro, L.B.; Dourado, M.A.; Barbosa, R.C., E-mail: research.photonics@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Centro-Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goiás, GO (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    To reassess the calculations of the effective dose equivalent to obtain data of dosimetry and the accomplishment of the analysis comparing the data of several techniques that record doses of radiation originating from the cosmogenic and terrestrial contributions that make up the so-called background radiation. the basic information to be obtained is the contribution of the difference between the terrestrial dose equivalents, even the lowest concentration of primordial radionuclides, and that of the dose equivalent, deduced from TLD readings. (author)

  6. The Complexity of Identifying Large Equivalence Classes

    Skyum, Sven; Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    1999-01-01

    We prove that at least 3k−4/k(2k−3)(n/2) – O(k)equivalence tests and no more than 2/k (n/2) + O(n) equivalence tests are needed in the worst case to identify the equivalence classes with at least k members in set of n elements. The upper bound is an improvement by a factor 2 compared to known res...

  7. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed

  8. Equivalences of real submanifolds in complex space.

    ZAITSEV, DMITRI

    2001-01-01

    PUBLISHED We show that for any real-analytic submanifold M in CN there is a proper real-analytic subvariety V contained in M such that for any p ? M \\ V , any real-analytic submanifold M? in CN, and any p? ? M?, the germs of the submanifolds M and M? at p and p? respectively are formally equivalent if and only if they are biholomorphically equivalent. More general results for k-equivalences are also stated and proved.

  9. Relations of equivalence of conditioned radioactive waste

    Kumer, L.; Szeless, A.; Oszuszky, F.

    1982-01-01

    A compensation for the wastes remaining with the operator of a waste management center, to be given by the agent having caused the waste, may be assured by effecting a financial valuation (equivalence) of wastes. Technically and logically, this equivalence between wastes (or specifically between different waste categories) and financial valuation has been established as reasonable. In this paper, the possibility of establishing such equivalences are developed, and their suitability for waste management concepts is quantitatively expressed

  10. Behavioural equivalence for infinite systems - Partially decidable!

    Sunesen, Kim; Nielsen, Mogens

    1996-01-01

    languages with two generalizations based on traditional approaches capturing non-interleaving behaviour, pomsets representing global causal dependency, and locality representing spatial distribution of events. We first study equivalences on Basic Parallel Processes, BPP, a process calculus equivalent...... of processes between BPP and TCSP, not only are the two equivalences different, but one (locality) is decidable whereas the other (pomsets) is not. The decidability result for locality is proved by a reduction to the reachability problem for Petri nets....

  11. Equivalence in Bilingual Lexicography: Criticism and Suggestions*

    Herbert Ernst Wiegand

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: A reminder of general problems in the formation of terminology, as illustrated by theGerman Äquivalence (Eng. equivalence and äquivalent (Eng. equivalent, is followed by a critical discussionof the concept of equivalence in contrastive lexicology. It is shown that especially the conceptof partial equivalence is contradictory in its different manifestations. Consequently attemptsare made to give a more precise indication of the concept of equivalence in the metalexicography,with regard to the domain of the nominal lexicon. The problems of especially the metalexicographicconcept of partial equivalence as well as that of divergence are fundamentally expounded.In conclusion the direction is indicated to find more appropriate metalexicographic versions of theconcept of equivalence.

    Keywords: EQUIVALENCE, LEXICOGRAPHIC EQUIVALENT, PARTIAL EQUIVALENCE,CONGRUENCE, DIVERGENCE, CONVERGENCE, POLYDIVERGENCE, SYNTAGM-EQUIVALENCE,ZERO EQUIVALENCE, CORRESPONDENCE

    Abstrakt: Äquivalenz in der zweisprachigen Lexikographie: Kritik und Vorschläge.Nachdem an allgemeine Probleme der Begriffsbildung am Beispiel von dt. Äquivalenzund dt. äquivalent erinnert wurde, wird zunächst auf Äquivalenzbegriffe in der kontrastiven Lexikologiekritisch eingegangen. Es wird gezeigt, dass insbesondere der Begriff der partiellen Äquivalenzin seinen verschiedenen Ausprägungen widersprüchlich ist. Sodann werden Präzisierungenzu den Äquivalenzbegriffen in der Metalexikographie versucht, die sich auf den Bereich der Nennlexikbeziehen. Insbesondere der metalexikographische Begriff der partiellen Äquivalenz sowie derder Divergenz werden grundsätzlich problematisiert. In welche Richtung man gehen kann, umangemessenere metalexikographische Fassungen des Äquivalenzbegriffs zu finden, wird abschließendangedeutet.

    Stichwörter: ÄQUIVALENZ, LEXIKOGRAPHISCHES ÄQUIVALENT, PARTIELLE ÄQUIVALENZ,KONGRUENZ, DIVERGENZ, KONVERGENZ, POLYDIVERGENZ

  12. Ventilation systems as an effective tool for control of radon daughter concentration in mines

    Dory, A.B.

    1981-10-01

    Introduced with a brief discussion of the key role of ventilation in controlling mine atmospheres, the effects of the design of the ventilation system on the control of radon daughter concentrations are illustrated with specific reference to Alcan's Director Mine, St-Lawrence, Nfld. (This fluorspar mine was found to have high radon concentrations due to mine water bringing in dissolved radon.) After a discussion of the health physics history of the mine, the various phases of the ventilation system design and the general results are detailed. The author draws some conclusions having general application to the design of any mine with a radon or thoron daughter concentration. These include minimizing the 'age' of the air; the need for continuous ventilation in all areas; the value of remote control and monitoring; and the benefits of mine pressurization

  13. Limitations on the concentration of radioactive substances (natural or enhanced by human activity) in building materials - a draft proposal for Israeli regulations

    Schlesinger, T.; Hareuveny, R.; Margaliot, M.

    1996-01-01

    Natural radioactive elements occurring in building materials constitute a major source of exposure of the public to ionizing radiation. Of the radionuclides that contribute to this exposure, members of the 238 U and 232 nd series and 40 K are of special interest, because usually they occur in building materials in the highest concentration (relative to other radionuclides). 40 K and part of the radionuclides of the two above mentioned series cause external exposure while the inhalation of and 222 Rn Thoron ( 220 Rn) , emitted from these radionuclides, and their short lived progeny lead to internal exposure of the respiratory tract to mainly alpha particles (authors)

  14. Limitations on the concentration of radioactive substances (natural or enhanced by human activity) in building materials - a draft proposal for Israeli regulations

    Schlesinger, T; Hareuveny, R; Margaliot, M [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Yavne (Israel). Soreq Nuclear Research Center

    1996-12-01

    Natural radioactive elements occurring in building materials constitute a major source of exposure of the public to ionizing radiation. Of the radionuclides that contribute to this exposure, members of the {sup 238}U and {sup 232}nd series and {sup 40}K are of special interest, because usually they occur in building materials in the highest concentration (relative to other radionuclides). {sup 40}K and part of the radionuclides of the two above mentioned series cause external exposure while the inhalation of and {sup 222}Rn Thoron ({sup 220}Rn) , emitted from these radionuclides, and their short lived progeny lead to internal exposure of the respiratory tract to mainly alpha particles (authors).

  15. Equivalent drawbead performance in deep drawing simulations

    Meinders, Vincent T.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han

    1999-01-01

    Drawbeads are applied in the deep drawing process to improve the control of the material flow during the forming operation. In simulations of the deep drawing process these drawbeads can be replaced by an equivalent drawbead model. In this paper the usage of an equivalent drawbead model in the

  16. On uncertainties in definition of dose equivalent

    Oda, Keiji

    1995-01-01

    The author has entertained always the doubt that in a neutron field, if the measured value of the absorbed dose with a tissue equivalent ionization chamber is 1.02±0.01 mGy, may the dose equivalent be taken as 10.2±0.1 mSv. Should it be 10.2 or 11, but the author considers it is 10 or 20. Even if effort is exerted for the precision measurement of absorbed dose, if the coefficient being multiplied to it is not precise, it is meaningless. [Absorbed dose] x [Radiation quality fctor] = [Dose equivalent] seems peculiar. How accurately can dose equivalent be evaluated ? The descriptions related to uncertainties in the publications of ICRU and ICRP are introduced, which are related to radiation quality factor, the accuracy of measuring dose equivalent and so on. Dose equivalent shows the criterion for the degree of risk, or it is considered only as a controlling quantity. The description in the ICRU report 1973 related to dose equivalent and its unit is cited. It was concluded that dose equivalent can be considered only as the absorbed dose being multiplied by a dimensionless factor. The author presented the questions. (K.I.)

  17. Orientifold Planar Equivalence: The Chiral Condensate

    Armoni, Adi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino

    2008-01-01

    The recently introduced orientifold planar equivalence is a promising tool for solving non-perturbative problems in QCD. One of the predictions of orientifold planar equivalence is that the chiral condensates of a theory with $N_f$ flavours of Dirac fermions in the symmetric (or antisymmetric...

  18. 7 CFR 1005.54 - Equivalent price.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1005.54 Section 1005.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1005.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  19. 7 CFR 1126.54 - Equivalent price.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1126.54 Section 1126.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1126.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  20. 7 CFR 1001.54 - Equivalent price.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1001.54 Section 1001.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1001.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  1. 7 CFR 1032.54 - Equivalent price.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1032.54 Section 1032.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1032.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  2. 7 CFR 1124.54 - Equivalent price.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1124.54 Section 1124.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Class Prices § 1124.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  3. 7 CFR 1030.54 - Equivalent price.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1030.54 Section 1030.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1030.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. ...

  4. 7 CFR 1033.54 - Equivalent price.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1033.54 Section 1033.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1033.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  5. 7 CFR 1131.54 - Equivalent price.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1131.54 Section 1131.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1131.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  6. 7 CFR 1006.54 - Equivalent price.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1006.54 Section 1006.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1006.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  7. 7 CFR 1007.54 - Equivalent price.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1007.54 Section 1007.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1007.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  8. 7 CFR 1000.54 - Equivalent price.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1000.54 Section 1000.54 Agriculture... Prices § 1000.54 Equivalent price. If for any reason a price or pricing constituent required for computing the prices described in § 1000.50 is not available, the market administrator shall use a price or...

  9. Finding small equivalent decision trees is hard

    Zantema, H.; Bodlaender, H.L.

    2000-01-01

    Two decision trees are called decision equivalent if they represent the same function, i.e., they yield the same result for every possible input. We prove that given a decision tree and a number, to decide if there is a decision equivalent decision tree of size at most that number is NPcomplete. As

  10. What is Metaphysical Equivalence? | Miller | Philosophical Papers

    Theories are metaphysically equivalent just if there is no fact of the matter that could render one theory true and the other false. In this paper I argue that if we are judiciously to resolve disputes about whether theories are equivalent or not, we need to develop testable criteria that will give us epistemic access to the obtaining ...

  11. EQUIVALENT MODELS IN COVARIANCE STRUCTURE-ANALYSIS

    LUIJBEN, TCW

    1991-01-01

    Defining equivalent models as those that reproduce the same set of covariance matrices, necessary and sufficient conditions are stated for the local equivalence of two expanded identified models M1 and M2 when fitting the more restricted model M0. Assuming several regularity conditions, the rank

  12. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  13. Beyond Language Equivalence on Visibly Pushdown Automata

    Srba, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    We study (bi)simulation-like preorder/equivalence checking on the class of visibly pushdown automata and its natural subclasses visibly BPA (Basic Process Algebra) and visibly one-counter automata. We describe generic methods for proving complexity upper and lower bounds for a number of studied...... preorders and equivalences like simulation, completed simulation, ready simulation, 2-nested simulation preorders/equivalences and bisimulation equivalence. Our main results are that all the mentioned equivalences and preorders are EXPTIME-complete on visibly pushdown automata, PSPACE-complete on visibly...... one-counter automata and P-complete on visibly BPA. Our PSPACE lower bound for visibly one-counter automata improves also the previously known DP-hardness results for ordinary one-counter automata and one-counter nets. Finally, we study regularity checking problems for visibly pushdown automata...

  14. 78 FR 67360 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods

    2013-11-12

    ... Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Office of Research and Development; Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of the designation of five new equivalent methods for...) has designated, in accordance with 40 CFR Part 53, five new equivalent methods, one for measuring...

  15. Analytical and numerical construction of equivalent cables.

    Lindsay, K A; Rosenberg, J R; Tucker, G

    2003-08-01

    The mathematical complexity experienced when applying cable theory to arbitrarily branched dendrites has lead to the development of a simple representation of any branched dendrite called the equivalent cable. The equivalent cable is an unbranched model of a dendrite and a one-to-one mapping of potentials and currents on the branched model to those on the unbranched model, and vice versa. The piecewise uniform cable, with a symmetrised tri-diagonal system matrix, is shown to represent the canonical form for an equivalent cable. Through a novel application of the Laplace transform it is demonstrated that an arbitrary branched model of a dendrite can be transformed to the canonical form of an equivalent cable. The characteristic properties of the equivalent cable are extracted from the matrix for the transformed branched model. The one-to-one mapping follows automatically from the construction of the equivalent cable. The equivalent cable is used to provide a new procedure for characterising the location of synaptic contacts on spinal interneurons.

  16. Geometry of the local equivalence of states

    Sawicki, A; Kus, M, E-mail: assawi@cft.edu.pl, E-mail: marek.kus@cft.edu.pl [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland)

    2011-12-09

    We present a description of locally equivalent states in terms of symplectic geometry. Using the moment map between local orbits in the space of states and coadjoint orbits of the local unitary group, we reduce the problem of local unitary equivalence to an easy part consisting of identifying the proper coadjoint orbit and a harder problem of the geometry of fibers of the moment map. We give a detailed analysis of the properties of orbits of 'equally entangled states'. In particular, we show connections between certain symplectic properties of orbits such as their isotropy and coisotropy with effective criteria of local unitary equivalence. (paper)

  17. Radon concentration of waters in Greece and Cyprus

    Nikolopoulos, D.; Vogiannis, E.; Louizi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Alpha Guard are connected via plastic radon proof tubes. Forced degassing of radon gas is performed by circulating the air in the set up with the use of a pump. Water sampling (to avoid radon escape) was driven by a strict protocol. Water taps were opened for 10 minutes before drawing the sample. Glass storage vessels of 200 to 1000 ml, with adjustment glass stoppers with standard NS 29/32 grounding, as well as sealing rings and granted security clamps for taper grounding, were completely filled slowly and immediately closed (to avoid the formation of air bubbles). Similar procedure (except tap opening) was followed for underground and surface waters. Laboratory measurements were performed at least one hour after drawing the sample in order to assure the full decay of any thoron content and to the minimum achievable time interval, so as the radon content to be the highest possible to allow higher precision. For the measurement the glass stopper was removed and immediately exchanged with the degassing cap. Afterwards water quantity was reduced to about half and measured. From the measurements, the mean annual equivalent dose rate (aEDr) delivered to stomach due to ingestion and the contribution to aEDr due to inhalation of radon in drinking water were calculated as using the EURATOM 2001 dose conversion factor (0.00144 mSv/Bq). Radon concentrations in drinking waters ranged between (1.1+/-0.5) Bq/L and (15+/4) Bq/L. Only three samples collected from the radon prone area of Arnea Chalkidikis presented high radon concentrations (120+/20 Bq/L, 320+/-40 Bq/L, 410+/-50 Bq/L). Radon concentrations in underground waters ranged between (1.2+/-0.7) Bq/L and (14.7+/-1.1) Bq/L. The corresponding concentration range in surface waters was (2.7+/-0.8) Bq/L and (24+/-6) Bq/L. The radon concentrations in thermal waters (some of which are used for drinking) were quite higher (in the range of (220+/-20) to (340+/-40) Bq/L). In both countries, no correlation of radon in underground waters

  18. Quantum equivalence principle without mass superselection

    Hernandez-Coronado, H.; Okon, E.

    2013-01-01

    The standard argument for the validity of Einstein's equivalence principle in a non-relativistic quantum context involves the application of a mass superselection rule. The objective of this work is to show that, contrary to widespread opinion, the compatibility between the equivalence principle and quantum mechanics does not depend on the introduction of such a restriction. For this purpose, we develop a formalism based on the extended Galileo group, which allows for a consistent handling of superpositions of different masses, and show that, within such scheme, mass superpositions behave as they should in order to obey the equivalence principle. - Highlights: • We propose a formalism for consistently handling, within a non-relativistic quantum context, superpositions of states with different masses. • The formalism utilizes the extended Galileo group, in which mass is a generator. • The proposed formalism allows for the equivalence principle to be satisfied without the need of imposing a mass superselection rule

  19. On the equivalence of chaos control systems

    Wang Xiaofan

    2003-01-01

    For a given chaotic system, different control systems can be constructed depending on which parameter is tuned or where the external input is added. We prove that two different feedback control systems are qualitatively equivalent if they are feedback linearizable

  20. Equivalence relations and the reinforcement contingency.

    Sidman, M

    2000-07-01

    Where do equivalence relations come from? One possible answer is that they arise directly from the reinforcement contingency. That is to say, a reinforcement contingency produces two types of outcome: (a) 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, or n-term units of analysis that are known, respectively, as operant reinforcement, simple discrimination, conditional discrimination, second-order conditional discrimination, and so on; and (b) equivalence relations that consist of ordered pairs of all positive elements that participate in the contingency. This conception of the origin of equivalence relations leads to a number of new and verifiable ways of conceptualizing equivalence relations and, more generally, the stimulus control of operant behavior. The theory is also capable of experimental disproof.

  1. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  2. ON THE EQUIVALENCE OF THE ABEL EQUATION

    2006-01-01

    This article uses the reflecting function of Mironenko to study some complicated differential equations which are equivalent to the Abel equation. The results are applied to discuss the behavior of solutions of these complicated differential equations.

  3. interpratation: of equivalences and cultural untranslatability

    jgmweri

    translatability in cultural diversity in terms equivalences such as –Vocabulary or lexical ..... A KSL interpreter who does not understand this English idiom may literally interpret it .... Nida, E.A. (1958) Analysis of meaning and dictionary making.

  4. Equivalence Principle, Higgs Boson and Cosmology

    Mauro Francaviglia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss here possible tests for Palatini f(R-theories together with their implications for different formulations of the Equivalence Principle. We shall show that Palatini f(R-theories obey the Weak Equivalence Principle and violate the Strong Equivalence Principle. The violations of the Strong Equivalence Principle vanish in vacuum (and purely electromagnetic solutions as well as on short time scales with respect to the age of the universe. However, we suggest that a framework based on Palatini f(R-theories is more general than standard General Relativity (GR and it sheds light on the interpretation of data and results in a way which is more model independent than standard GR itself.

  5. The gauge principle vs. the equivalence principle

    Gates, S.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Within the context of field theory, it is argued that the role of the equivalence principle may be replaced by the principle of gauge invariance to provide a logical framework for theories of gravitation

  6. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  7. S-equivalents lagrangians in generalized mechanics

    Negri, L.J.; Silva, Edna G. da.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of s-equivalent lagrangians is considered in the realm of generalized mechanics. Some results corresponding to the ordinary (non-generalized) mechanics are extended to the generalized case. A theorem for the reduction of the higher order lagrangian description to the usual order is found to be useful for the analysis of generalized mechanical systems and leads to a new class of equivalence between lagrangian functions. Some new perspectives are pointed out. (Author) [pt

  8. Determination of dose equivalent and risk in thorium cycle

    Ney, C.L.V.N.

    1988-01-01

    In these report are presented the calculations of dose equivalent and risk, utilizing the dosimetric model described in publication 30 of the International Comission on Radiological Protection. This information was obtained by the workers of the thorium cycle, employed at the Praia and Santo Amaro Facilities, by assessing the quantity and concentration of thorium in the air. The samples and the number of measurements were established through design of experiments techniques, and the results were evaluated with the aid of variance analysis. The estimater of dose equivalent for internal and external radiation exposure and risk associated were compared with the maximum recommended limits. The results indicate the existence of operation areas whose values were above those limits, requiring so an improvement in the procedures and services in order to meet the requirements of the radiological protetion. (author) [pt

  9. An Alpha spectrometer for measuring radon daughter individual activity concentration; Spettrometro Alfa per la misura delle concentrazioni individuali in attivita' della progenie del radon

    Berico, M.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Div. Protezione dell' Uomo e degli Ecosistemi, Centro Ricerche E. Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Mariotti, F. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2001-07-01

    In the frame of the program of the Institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA, related to the evaluation of dose from radon and thoron progeny, an alpha spectrometer for the continuous air monitoring (CAM type) of radon and thoron has been realized. The constructive characteristics of the device are here presented together with energy and efficiency calibration. The device allows, by means of a screen type diffusion battery and a filter, to determinate the single radioactivity of each radionuclide of the progeny selecting them in relation to their diffusive behaviour (dichotomous particle size selection). The three-count filter method has been employed to measure the concentrations of {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi in air. Radon and thoron effective doses using a dosimetric, instead of an epidemiologic approach, will be then evaluated. [Italian] Presso l'Istituto per la Radioprotezione, nell'ambito del programma di valutazione di dose da radon e' stato progettato e realizzato uno spettrometro alfa per il monitoraggio continuo in aria (CAM) della progenie del radon e del toron. Le caratteristiche costruttive dello strumento permettono, tramite l'utilizzo di batterie a diffusione a reti, di determinare l'attivita' individuale della progenie per diverse dimensioni granulometriche in particolare per la frazione attaccata e non al particolato amosferico con un taglio granulometrico di qualche nanometro. E' stato inoltre applicato un metodo spettrometrico a tre conteggi per il calcolo delle concentrazioni individuali della progenie del radon, {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi, effettuando un conteggio alfa di {sup 218}Po e due conteggi alfa di {sup 214}Po. Tale informazione consentira' una valutazione della dose di radon utilizzando il modello dosimetrico in alternativa a quello epidemiologico.

  10. The principle of equivalence reconsidered: assessing the relevance of the principle of equivalence in prison medicine.

    Jotterand, Fabrice; Wangmo, Tenzin

    2014-01-01

    In this article we critically examine the principle of equivalence of care in prison medicine. First, we provide an overview of how the principle of equivalence is utilized in various national and international guidelines on health care provision to prisoners. Second, we outline some of the problems associated with its applications, and argue that the principle of equivalence should go beyond equivalence to access and include equivalence of outcomes. However, because of the particular context of the prison environment, third, we contend that the concept of "health" in equivalence of health outcomes needs conceptual clarity; otherwise, it fails to provide a threshold for healthy states among inmates. We accomplish this by examining common understandings of the concepts of health and disease. We conclude our article by showing why the conceptualization of diseases as clinical problems provides a helpful approach in the delivery of health care in prison.

  11. Equivalence of Szegedy's and coined quantum walks

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2017-09-01

    Szegedy's quantum walk is a quantization of a classical random walk or Markov chain, where the walk occurs on the edges of the bipartite double cover of the original graph. To search, one can simply quantize a Markov chain with absorbing vertices. Recently, Santos proposed two alternative search algorithms that instead utilize the sign-flip oracle in Grover's algorithm rather than absorbing vertices. In this paper, we show that these two algorithms are exactly equivalent to two algorithms involving coined quantum walks, which are walks on the vertices of the original graph with an internal degree of freedom. The first scheme is equivalent to a coined quantum walk with one walk step per query of Grover's oracle, and the second is equivalent to a coined quantum walk with two walk steps per query of Grover's oracle. These equivalences lie outside the previously known equivalence of Szegedy's quantum walk with absorbing vertices and the coined quantum walk with the negative identity operator as the coin for marked vertices, whose precise relationships we also investigate.

  12. Quantum mechanics and the equivalence principle

    Davies, P C W

    2004-01-01

    A quantum particle moving in a gravitational field may penetrate the classically forbidden region of the gravitational potential. This raises the question of whether the time of flight of a quantum particle in a gravitational field might deviate systematically from that of a classical particle due to tunnelling delay, representing a violation of the weak equivalence principle. I investigate this using a model quantum clock to measure the time of flight of a quantum particle in a uniform gravitational field, and show that a violation of the equivalence principle does not occur when the measurement is made far from the turning point of the classical trajectory. The results are then confirmed using the so-called dwell time definition of quantum tunnelling. I conclude with some remarks about the strong equivalence principle in quantum mechanics

  13. Water equivalence of polymer gel dosimeters

    Sellakumar, P.; James Jebaseelan Samuel, E.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the water equivalence and radiation transport properties of polymer gel dosimeters over the wide range of photon and electron energies 14 different types of polymer gels were considered. Their water equivalence was evaluated in terms of effective atomic number (Z eff ), electron density (ρ e ), photon mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), photon mass energy absorption coefficient (μ en /ρ) and total stopping power (S/ρ) tot of electrons using the XCOM and the ESTAR database. The study showed that the effective atomic number of polymer gels were very close ( en /ρ for all polymer gels were in close agreement ( tot of electrons in polymer gel dosimeters were within 1% agreement with that of water. From the study we conclude that at lower energy (<80keV) the polymer gel dosimeters cannot be considered water equivalent and study has to be carried out before using the polymer gel for clinical application

  14. Using frequency equivalency in stability calculations

    Gruzdev, I.A.; Temirbulatov, R.A.; Tereshko, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    A methodology for calculating oscillatory instability that involves using frequency equivalency is employed in carrying out the following proceedures: dividing an electric power system into subgroups; determining the adjustments to the automatic excitation control in each subsystem; simplifying the mathematical definition of the separate subsystems by using frequency equivalency; gradually re-tuning the automatic excitation control in the separate subsystems to account for neighboring subsystems by using their equivalent frequency characteristics. The methodology is to be used with a computer program to determine the gain in the stabilization channels of the automatic excitation control unit in which static stability of the entire aggregate of normal and post-breakdown conditions acceptable damping of transient processes are provided. The possibility of reducing the equation series to apply to chosen regions of the existing range of frequencies is demonstrated. The use of the methodology is illustrated in a sample study on stability in a Siberian unified power system.

  15. Effect of epoxide equivalent on microstructure of epoxy/rectorite nanocomposite studied by positrons

    Liu, L.M.; Fang, P.F.; Zhang, S.P.; Wang, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    The epoxy/rectorite nanocomposites with different epoxide equivalent ranging from 188 to 1110 were prepared and the effects of epoxide equivalent on microstructure of materials were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscope (PALS). In nanocomposites, the formation of exfoliated structure was observed from XRD pattern at epoxide equivalent >263. The PALS measurements reveal that the fractional free volume in nanocomposites was strongly affected by epoxide equivalent, in particular, the free-volume concentration was dramatically decreased with the increasing epoxide equivalent from 188 to 263, and the S parameter indicates the rectorite structure change and the high sensitivity of positron annihilation to the entry of rectorite into epoxy. These results indicate that positron annihilation characteristics are useful for study the microstructure of epoxy/rectorite nanocomposites

  16. The equivalence problem for LL- and LR-regular grammars

    Nijholt, Antinus; Gecsec, F.

    It will be shown that the equivalence problem for LL-regular grammars is decidable. Apart from extending the known result for LL(k) grammar equivalence to LLregular grammar equivalence, we obtain an alternative proof of the decidability of LL(k) equivalence. The equivalence prob]em for LL-regular

  17. GUM approach to uncertainty estimations for online 220Rn concentration measurements using Lucas scintillation cell

    Sathyabama, N.

    2014-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that, when all of the known or suspected components of errors have been evaluated and corrected, there still remains an uncertainty, that is, a doubt about how well the result of the measurement represents the value of the quantity being measured. Evaluation of measurement data - Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) is a guidance document, the purpose of which is to promote full information on how uncertainty statements are arrived at and to provide a basis for the international comparison of measurement results. In this paper, uncertainty estimations following GUM guidelines have been made for the measured values of online thoron concentrations using Lucas scintillation cell to prove that the correction for disequilibrium between 220 Rn and 216 Po is significant in online 220 Rn measurements

  18. A review of instrumentation for determination of radon and its daughters concentration

    Kurosawa, Ryuhei

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the review is to provide the aid for selection and understanding of the radon and its daughters measurement techniques which have been developed for radiation protection activities in various environments such as working of living environment. The practical purpose of the measurement for surveillance in environmental situation is the dose estimation for the public due to the inhalation of natural occurring radioactive materials. The techniques for the determination of radon and thoron concentratin by the active methods with the grab and continuous sampling, and also structures of radon monitors of various passive type are described. Explanation was made on the typical instruments for the determination of the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) of radon daughters by the various detecting systems such as solid state detector, and for the estimation of integrated PAEC in the various environments by the PAEC monitors using the cellulose nitrate film or TLD elements (author)

  19. Fiscal adjustments in Europe and Ricardian equivalence

    V. DE BONIS

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the ‘Ricardian’ equivalence hypothesis, consumption is dependent on permanent disposable income and current deficits are equivalent to future tax payments. This hypothesis is tested on 14 European countries in the 1990s. The relationships between private sector savings and general government deficit, and the GDP growth rate and the unemployment rate are determined. The results show the change in consumers' behaviour with respect to government deficit, and that expectations of an increase in future wealth are no longer associated with a decrease in deficit.

  20. Equivalent circuit analysis of terahertz metamaterial filters

    Zhang, Xueqian

    2011-01-01

    An equivalent circuit model for the analysis and design of terahertz (THz) metamaterial filters is presented. The proposed model, derived based on LMC equivalent circuits, takes into account the detailed geometrical parameters and the presence of a dielectric substrate with the existing analytic expressions for self-inductance, mutual inductance, and capacitance. The model is in good agreement with the experimental measurements and full-wave simulations. Exploiting the circuit model has made it possible to predict accurately the resonance frequency of the proposed structures and thus, quick and accurate process of designing THz device from artificial metamaterials is offered. ©2011 Chinese Optics Letters.

  1. Topological equivalence of nonlinear autonomous dynamical systems

    Nguyen Huynh Phan; Tran Van Nhung

    1995-12-01

    We show in this paper that the autonomous nonlinear dynamical system Σ(A,B,F): x' = Ax+Bu+F(x) is topologically equivalent to the linear dynamical system Σ(A,B,O): x' = Ax+Bu if the projection of A on the complement in R n of the controllable vectorial subspace is hyperbolic and if lipschitz constant of F is sufficiently small ( * ) and F(x) = 0 when parallel x parallel is sufficiently large ( ** ). In particular, if Σ(A,B,O) is controllable, it is topologically equivalent to Σ(A,B,F) when it is only that F satisfy ( ** ). (author). 18 refs

  2. A neutron dose equivalent meter at CAEP

    Tian Shihai; Lu Yan; Wang Heyi; Yuan Yonggang; Chen Xu

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of neutron dose equivalent has been a widespread need in industry and research. In this paper, aimed at improving the accuracy of neutron dose equivalent meter: a neutron dose counter is simulated with MCNP5, and the energy response curve is optimized. The results show that the energy response factor is from 0.2 to 1.8 for neutrons in the energy range of 2.53×10 -8 MeV to 10 MeV Compared with other related meters, it turns that the design of this meter is right. (authors)

  3. Measurements of the personal dose equivalent

    Scarlat, F.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Badita, E.; Oane, M.; Mitru, E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents the results of measurements related to the personal dose equivalent in the rooms adjacent to NILPRP 7 MeV linear accelerator, by means of the secondary standard chamber T34035 Hp(10). The chamber was calibrated by PTB at S- 137 Cs (E av = 661.6 keV, T 1/2 11050 days) and has N H = 3.17x10 6 Sv/C calibration factor for the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), at a depth of 10 mm in climatic reference conditions. The measurements were made for the two operation mode of the 7 MeV linac: electrons and bremsstrahlung

  4. Measurement of indoor radon concentration by CR-39 track detector

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Yoneda, Shigeru; Nakanishi, Takashi.

    1990-01-01

    A convenient and cheap method for measuring indoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentration with a CR-39 track detector is described. The detector consisted of two sheets of CR-39 enclosed separately in two plastic pots : one covered by a filter (cup method) and another no covering (bare method). The bare method was used here to supplement the cup method. To compare with the result of the CR-39 detector, alpha-ray spectrometry was carried out with a Si(Au) detector in a controlled radon exposure chamber. Indoor radon concentration measured in 133 houses in several districts of Ishikawa Prefecture have been found to range from 6 Bq/m 3 to as high as 113 Bq/m 3 with a median value of 24 Bq/m 3 . The problems to measure indoor radon concentration using the CR-39 detector are also discussed with emphasis on the position of setting the detector in the room and the possible thoron contribution to the detector. (author)

  5. Sample size determination for equivalence assessment with multiple endpoints.

    Sun, Anna; Dong, Xiaoyu; Tsong, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Equivalence assessment between a reference and test treatment is often conducted by two one-sided tests (TOST). The corresponding power function and sample size determination can be derived from a joint distribution of the sample mean and sample variance. When an equivalence trial is designed with multiple endpoints, it often involves several sets of two one-sided tests. A naive approach for sample size determination in this case would select the largest sample size required for each endpoint. However, such a method ignores the correlation among endpoints. With the objective to reject all endpoints and when the endpoints are uncorrelated, the power function is the production of all power functions for individual endpoints. With correlated endpoints, the sample size and power should be adjusted for such a correlation. In this article, we propose the exact power function for the equivalence test with multiple endpoints adjusted for correlation under both crossover and parallel designs. We further discuss the differences in sample size for the naive method without and with correlation adjusted methods and illustrate with an in vivo bioequivalence crossover study with area under the curve (AUC) and maximum concentration (Cmax) as the two endpoints.

  6. Assessment of Effective Dose Equivalent of Indoor 222Rn Daughters in Inchass

    Ali, E.M.; Taha, T.M.; Gomaa, M.A.; El-Hussein, A.M.; Ahmad, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The dominant component of natural radiation dose for the general population comes from the radon gas 222 Rn and its short-lived decay products, Ra A ( 214 Po), Ra B ( 214 Pb), Ra C ( 214 Bi), Ra C( 214 Po) in the breathing air. The objective of the present work is to assess the affective dose equivalent of the inhalation exposure of indoor 222 Rn for occupational workers. Average indon concentrations (Bqm -3 ) were monitored in several departments in Nuclear Research Center by radon monitor. We have calculated the lung dose equivalent and the effective dose equivalent for the Egyptian workers due to inhalation exposure of an equilibrium equivalent concentrations of radon daughters which varies from 0.27 to 2.5 mSvy -1 and 0.016 to 0.152mSvy -1 respectively. The annual effective doses obtained are within the accepted range of ICRP recommendations

  7. Confluence Modulo Equivalence in Constraint Handling Rules

    Christiansen, Henning; Kirkeby, Maja Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Previous results on confluence for Constraint Handling Rules, CHR, are generalized to take into account user-defined state equivalence relations. This allows a much larger class of programs to enjoy the advantages of confluence, which include various optimization techniques and simplified...

  8. Free Fall and the Equivalence Principle Revisited

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Free fall is commonly discussed as an example of the equivalence principle, in the context of a homogeneous gravitational field, which is a reasonable approximation for small test masses falling moderate distances. Newton's law of gravity provides a generalisation to larger distances, and also brings in an inhomogeneity in the gravitational field.…

  9. Chemical equivalence assessment of three brands of ...

    Assay for content of active ingredients is a critical test of drug quality; failure to meet up the standard for content of active ingredients will result to sub therapeutic quantities. Three brands (A, B and C) of carbamazepine were assayed to determine their chemical equivalence as well as their anticonvulsant activities. This was ...

  10. On Behavioral Equivalence of Rational Representations

    Trentelman, Harry L.; Willems, JC; Hara, S; Ohta, Y; Fujioka, H

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the equivalence of representations of behaviors of linear differential systems In general. the behavior of a given linear differential system has many different representations. In this paper we restrict ourselves to kernel representations and image representations Two kernel

  11. Visual Equivalence and Amodal Completion in Cuttlefish.

    Lin, I-Rong; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Modern cephalopods are notably the most intelligent invertebrates and this is accompanied by keen vision. Despite extensive studies investigating the visual systems of cephalopods, little is known about their visual perception and object recognition. In the present study, we investigated the visual processing of the cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis , including visual equivalence and amodal completion. Cuttlefish were trained to discriminate images of shrimp and fish using the operant conditioning paradigm. After cuttlefish reached the learning criteria, a series of discrimination tasks were conducted. In the visual equivalence experiment, several transformed versions of the training images, such as images reduced in size, images reduced in contrast, sketches of the images, the contours of the images, and silhouettes of the images, were used. In the amodal completion experiment, partially occluded views of the original images were used. The results showed that cuttlefish were able to treat the training images of reduced size and sketches as the visual equivalence. Cuttlefish were also capable of recognizing partially occluded versions of the training image. Furthermore, individual differences in performance suggest that some cuttlefish may be able to recognize objects when visual information was partly removed. These findings support the hypothesis that the visual perception of cuttlefish involves both visual equivalence and amodal completion. The results from this research also provide insights into the visual processing mechanisms used by cephalopods.

  12. Possibility and necessity measures and integral equivalence

    Chen, T.; Mesiar, Radko; Li, J.; Stupňanová, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 1 (2017), s. 62-72 ISSN 0888-613X Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Integral equivalence * Necessity measure * Possibility measure * Survival function * Universal integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 2.845, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/E/mesiar-0477092.pdf

  13. Fuel Cell Equivalent Electric Circuit Parameter Mapping

    Jeppesen, Christian; Zhou, Fan; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    In this work a simple model for a fuel cell is investigated for diagnostic purpose. The fuel cell is characterized, with respect to the electrical impedance of the fuel cell at non-faulty conditions and under variations in load current. Based on this the equivalent electrical circuit parameters can...

  14. Weak equivalence classes of complex vector bundles

    Le, Hong-Van

    LXXVII, č. 1 (2008), s. 23-30 ISSN 0862-9544 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : chern classes * complex Grassmannians weak equivalence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  15. Violation of Equivalence Principle and Solar Neutrinos

    Gago, A.M.; Nunokawa, H.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.

    2001-01-01

    We have updated the analysis for the solution to the solar neutrino problem by the long-wavelength neutrino oscillations induced by a tiny breakdown of the weak equivalence principle of general relativity, and obtained a very good fit to all the solar neutrino data

  16. Bilingual Dictionaries and Communicative Equivalence for a ...

    This implies that a bilingual dictionary becomes a poly functional instrument, presenting more information than just translation equivalents. ... With the emphasis on the user perspective, metalexicographical criteria are used to investigate problems regarding the access structure and the addressing procedures in Afrikaans ...

  17. Equivalent operator preconditioning for elliptic problems

    Axelsson, Owe; Karátson, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2009), s. 297-380 ISSN 1017-1398 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Elliptic problem * Conjugate gradient method * preconditioning * equivalent operators * compact operators Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.716, year: 2009 http://en.scientificcommons.org/42514649

  18. Superstring field theory equivalence: Ramond sector

    Kroyter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We prove that the finite gauge transformation of the Ramond sector of the modified cubic superstring field theory is ill-defined due to collisions of picture changing operators. Despite this problem we study to what extent could a bijective classical correspondence between this theory and the (presumably consistent) non-polynomial theory exist. We find that the classical equivalence between these two theories can almost be extended to the Ramond sector: We construct mappings between the string fields (NS and Ramond, including Chan-Paton factors and the various GSO sectors) of the two theories that send solutions to solutions in a way that respects the linearized gauge symmetries in both sides and keeps the action of the solutions invariant. The perturbative spectrum around equivalent solutions is also isomorphic. The problem with the cubic theory implies that the correspondence of the linearized gauge symmetries cannot be extended to a correspondence of the finite gauge symmetries. Hence, our equivalence is only formal, since it relates a consistent theory to an inconsistent one. Nonetheless, we believe that the fact that the equivalence formally works suggests that a consistent modification of the cubic theory exists. We construct a theory that can be considered as a first step towards a consistent RNS cubic theory.

  19. Equivalence Scales for the Former West Germany

    Charlier, E.

    1997-01-01

    Equivalence scales provide answers to questions like how much a household with four children needs to spend compared to a household with two children or how much a childless couple needs to spend compared to a single person household to attain the same welfare level. These are important questions

  20. Confluence Modulo Equivalence in Constraint Handling Rules

    Christiansen, Henning; Kirkeby, Maja Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Previous results on confluence for Constraint Handling Rules, CHR, are generalized to take into account user-defined state equivalence relations. This allows a much larger class of programs to enjoy the ad- vantages of confluence, which include various optimization techniques and simplified...

  1. Equivalence of rational representations of behaviors

    Gottimukkala, Sasanka; Fiaz, Shaik; Trentelman, H.L.

    This article deals with the equivalence of representations of behaviors of linear differential systems. In general, the behavior of a given linear differential system has many different representations. In this paper we restrict ourselves to kernel and image representations. Two kernel

  2. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    Yao Dezhong; He Bin

    2003-01-01

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping

  3. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    Yao Dezhong [School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu City, 610054, Sichuan Province (China); He Bin [The University of Illinois at Chicago, IL (United States)

    2003-11-07

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping.

  4. Cross-Ethnic Measurement Equivalence of the RCMAS in Latino and Caucasian Youth with Anxiety Disorders

    Pina, Armando A.; Little, Michelle; Knight, George P.; Silverman, Wendy K.

    2009-01-01

    The measurement equivalence of the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS) was examined in a sample of 667 Caucasian and Latino youth referred to an anxiety disorders specialty clinic. Findings supported the factorial invariance of the Physiological Anxiety, Worry/Oversensitivity, and Social Concerns/Concentration subscales as well as the construct validity equivalence of the Total Anxiety scale. These findings suggest that the RCMAS can be used with Latino youth in cross-ethnic res...

  5. Composition of MRI phantom equivalent to human tissues

    Kato, Hirokazu; Kuroda, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Koichi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Shibuya, Koichi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2005-01-01

    We previously developed two new MRI phantoms (called the CAG phantom and the CAGN phantom), with T1 and T2 relaxation times equivalent to those of any human tissue at 1.5 T. The conductivity of the CAGN phantom is equivalent to that of most types of human tissue in the frequency range of 1 to 130 MHz. In this paper, the relaxation times of human tissues are summarized, and the composition of the corresponding phantoms are provided in table form. The ingredients of these phantoms are carrageenan as the gelling agent, GdCl 3 as a T1 modifier, agarose as a T2 modifier, NaCl (CAGN phantom only) as a conductivity modifier, NaN 3 as an antiseptic, and distilled water. The phantoms have T1 values of 202-1904 ms and T2 values of 38-423 ms when the concentrations of GdCl 3 and agarose are varied from 0-140 μmol/kg, and 0%-1.6%, respectively, and the CAGN phantom has a conductivity of 0.27-1.26 S/m when the NaCl concentration is varied from 0%-0.7%. These phantoms have sufficient strength to replicate a torso without the use of reinforcing agents, and can be cut by a knife into any shape. We anticipate the CAGN phantom to be highly useful and practical for MRI and hyperthermia-related research

  6. On the equivalence of GPD representations

    Müller, Dieter; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenological representations of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) implementing the non-trivial field theoretical requirements are employed in the present day strategies for extracting of hadron structure information encoded in GPDs from the observables of hard exclusive reactions. Showing out the equivalence of various GPD representations can help to get more insight into GPD properties and allow to build up flexible GPD models capable of satisfactory description of the whole set of available experimental data. Below we review the mathematical aspects of establishing equivalence between the the double partial wave expansion of GPDs in the conformal partial waves and in the t-channel SO(3) partial waves and the double distribution representation of GPDs

  7. Developing equivalent circuits for radial distribution networks

    Prada, Ricardo; Coelho, Agnelo; Rodrigues, Anselmo [Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Electrical Engineering], Emails: prada@ele.puc-rio.br, agnelo@ele.puc-rio.br, nebulok_99@yahoo.com; Silva, Maria da Guia da [Federal University of Maranhao, Sao Luiz, MA (Brazil). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a method for evaluating External Equivalent in Electric Distribution Networks (EDN).The proposed method has as its main objectives the reduction of the computational costs in distribution network reconfiguration, investigation of the optimal allocation of banks of capacitors, investigation of the allocation of distributed generation, etc. In these sorts of problems a large number of alternative projects must be assessed in order to identify the optimal solution. The optimal solution comes up with the voltage level in the load points within specified limits. Consequently, the EDN must retain the external network load points but without major increasing in the dimension of the equivalent circuit. The proposed method has been tested and validated in a substation of the Electricity Utility of Maranhao - CEMAR, in Brazil. (author)

  8. Thermoluminescence dosemeter for personal dose equivalent assessment

    Silva, T.A. da; Rosa, L.A.R. da; Campos, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility was investigated of utilising a Brazilian thermoluminescence individual dosemeter, usually calibrated in terms of photon dose equivalent, for the assessment of the personal dose equivalent, H p (d), at depths of 0.07 and 10 mm. The dosemeter uses four CaSO 4 :Dy thermoluminescent detectors, between different filters, as the sensitive materials. It was calibrated in gamma and X radiation fields in the energy range from 17 to 1250 keV. Linear combinations of the responses of three detectors, in this energy range, allow the evaluation of H p (0.07) and H p (10), for radiation incidence angles varying from 0 to 60 degrees, with an accuracy better than 35%. The method is not applicable to mixed photon-beta fields. (author)

  9. Thevenin Equivalent Method for Dynamic Contingency Assessment

    Møller, Jakob Glarbo; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Østergaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A method that exploits Thevenin equivalent representation for obtaining post-contingency steady-state nodal voltages is integrated with a method of detecting post-contingency aperiodic small-signal instability. The task of integrating stability assessment with contingency assessment is challenged...... by the cases of unstable post-contingency conditions. For unstable postcontingency conditions there exists no credible steady-state which can be used for basis of a stability assessment. This paper demonstrates how Thevenin Equivalent methods can be applied in algebraic representation of such bifurcation...... points which may be used in assessment of post-contingency aperiodic small-signal stability. The assessment method is introduced with a numeric example....

  10. The Logic of Equivalence in Academic Discourse?

    Madsen, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    of discourse to distinguish between the scientific field, where interrelationships among academic disciplines are taken as an object of research, and the widespread uses of ‘interdisciplinary’ and ‘interdisciplinarity’ in academic discourse more generally, typically for legitimation purposes. The assumption......-discourses meet. It is suggested that the logics of signification, and the tension between difference and equivalence, may be important tools for theorizing this borderland. It is argued that whereas the logic of equivalence and the production of empty signifiers appears to be of marginal interest...... to the scientific field, the logic of difference as a more complex articulation of elements, seems to be more in line with the ideals of academic discourse....

  11. On equivalent resistance of electrical circuits

    Kagan, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    While the standard (introductory physics) way of computing the equivalent resistance of nontrivial electrical circuits is based on Kirchhoff's rules, there is a mathematically and conceptually simpler approach, called the method of nodal potentials, whose basic variables are the values of the electric potential at the circuit's nodes. In this paper, we review the method of nodal potentials and illustrate it using the Wheatstone bridge as an example. We then derive a closed-form expression for the equivalent resistance of a generic circuit, which we apply to a few sample circuits. The result unveils a curious interplay between electrical circuits, matrix algebra, and graph theory and its applications to computer science. The paper is written at a level accessible by undergraduate students who are familiar with matrix arithmetic. Additional proofs and technical details are provided in appendices.

  12. Symmetry adaptation, operator equivalents and magnetic resonance

    Kibler, M.; Chatterjee, R.

    1977-12-01

    Basic quantities for symmetry adaptation are discussed in connection with molecular and solid state physics. This gives rise to a formalism whose the central elements are operator equivalents adapted to a point group. Such symmetry adapted operator equivalents are defined in terms of Schwinger operators so that they cover the off-diagonal and diagonal cases. Special emphasis is put on the applications of the formalism to magnetic resonance. More specifically, it is shown how to apply the formalism to the construction, the study of the transformation properties, and the determination of the eigenstates of a generalized spin hamiltonian. Numerous examples are given as well as key tables relative to the chain SO(3) for making easy the application of the formalism to electron paramagnetic resonance [fr

  13. A Logical Characterisation of Static Equivalence

    Hüttel, Hans; Pedersen, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    -order logic for frames with quantification over environment knowledge which, under certain general conditions, characterizes static equivalence and is amenable to construction of characteristic formulae. The logic can be used to reason about environment knowledge and can be adapted to a particular application...... by defining a suitable signature and associated equational theory. The logic can furthermore be extended with modalities to yield a modal logic for e.g. the Applied Pi calculus....

  14. Global equivalent magnetization of the oceanic lithosphere

    Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Hamoudi, M.; Lesur, V.; Thebault, E.

    2015-11-01

    As a by-product of the construction of a new World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map over oceanic areas, we use an original approach based on the global forward modeling of seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies and their comparison to the available marine magnetic data to derive the first map of the equivalent magnetization over the World's ocean. This map reveals consistent patterns related to the age of the oceanic lithosphere, the spreading rate at which it was formed, and the presence of mantle thermal anomalies which affects seafloor spreading and the resulting lithosphere. As for the age, the equivalent magnetization decreases significantly during the first 10-15 Myr after its formation, probably due to the alteration of crustal magnetic minerals under pervasive hydrothermal alteration, then increases regularly between 20 and 70 Ma, reflecting variations in the field strength or source effects such as the acquisition of a secondary magnetization. As for the spreading rate, the equivalent magnetization is twice as strong in areas formed at fast rate than in those formed at slow rate, with a threshold at ∼40 km/Myr, in agreement with an independent global analysis of the amplitude of Anomaly 25. This result, combined with those from the study of the anomalous skewness of marine magnetic anomalies, allows building a unified model for the magnetic structure of normal oceanic lithosphere as a function of spreading rate. Finally, specific areas affected by thermal mantle anomalies at the time of their formation exhibit peculiar equivalent magnetization signatures, such as the cold Australian-Antarctic Discordance, marked by a lower magnetization, and several hotspots, marked by a high magnetization.

  15. Visual Equivalence and Amodal Completion in Cuttlefish

    Lin, I-Rong; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Modern cephalopods are notably the most intelligent invertebrates and this is accompanied by keen vision. Despite extensive studies investigating the visual systems of cephalopods, little is known about their visual perception and object recognition. In the present study, we investigated the visual processing of the cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis, including visual equivalence and amodal completion. Cuttlefish were trained to discriminate images of shrimp and fish using the operant conditioning pa...

  16. Canonizing certain Borel equivalences for Silver forcing

    Doucha, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 13 (2012), s. 2973-2979 ISSN 0166-8641. [Prague Symposium on General Topology and its Relations to Modern Analysis and Algebra /11./. Prague, 07.08.2011-12.08.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Borel equivalence relations * silver ideal * canonical Ramsey theorem Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.562, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166864112002180#

  17. Quantum mechanics from an equivalence principle

    Faraggi, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    The authors show that requiring diffeomorphic equivalence for one-dimensional stationary states implies that the reduced action S 0 satisfies the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the Planck constant playing the role of a covariantizing parameter. The construction shows the existence of a fundamental initial condition which is strictly related to the Moebius symmetry of the Legendre transform and to its involutive character. The universal nature of the initial condition implies the Schroedinger equation in any dimension

  18. Equivalency of two-dimensional algebras

    Santos, Gildemar Carneiro dos; Pomponet Filho, Balbino Jose S.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Let us consider a vector z = xi + yj over the field of real numbers, whose basis (i,j) satisfy a given algebra. Any property of this algebra will be reflected in any function of z, so we can state that the knowledge of the properties of an algebra leads to more general conclusions than the knowledge of the properties of a function. However structural properties of an algebra do not change when this algebra suffers a linear transformation, though the structural constants defining this algebra do change. We say that two algebras are equivalent to each other whenever they are related by a linear transformation. In this case, we have found that some relations between the structural constants are sufficient to recognize whether or not an algebra is equivalent to another. In spite that the basis transform linearly, the structural constants change like a third order tensor, but some combinations of these tensors result in a linear transformation, allowing to write the entries of the transformation matrix as function of the structural constants. Eventually, a systematic way to find the transformation matrix between these equivalent algebras is obtained. In this sense, we have performed the thorough classification of associative commutative two-dimensional algebras, and find that even non-division algebra may be helpful in solving non-linear dynamic systems. The Mandelbrot set was used to have a pictorial view of each algebra, since equivalent algebras result in the same pattern. Presently we have succeeded in classifying some non-associative two-dimensional algebras, a task more difficult than for associative one. (author)

  19. Cryogenic test of the equivalence principle

    Worden, P.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The weak equivalence principle is the hypothesis that the ratio of internal and passive gravitational mass is the same for all bodies. A greatly improved test of this principle is possible in an orbiting satellite. The most promising experiments for an orbital test are adaptations of the Galilean free-fall experiment and the Eotvos balance. Sensitivity to gravity gradient noise, both from the earth and from the spacecraft, defines a limit to the sensitivity in each case. This limit is generally much worse for an Eotvos balance than for a properly designed free-fall experiment. The difference is related to the difficulty of making a balance sufficiently isoinertial. Cryogenic technology is desirable to take full advantage of the potential sensitivity, but tides in the liquid helium refrigerant may produce a gravity gradient that seriously degrades the ultimate sensitivity. The Eotvos balance appears to have a limiting sensitivity to relative difference of rate of fall of about 2 x 10 -14 in orbit. The free-fall experiment is limited by helium tide to about 10 -15 ; if the tide can be controlled or eliminated the limit may approach 10 -18 . Other limitations to equivalence principle experiments are discussed. An experimental test of some of the concepts involved in the orbital free-fall experiment is continuing. The experiment consists in comparing the motions of test masses levitated in a superconducting magnetic bearing, and is itself a sensitive test of the equivalence principle. At present the levitation magnets, position monitors and control coils have been tested and major noise sources identified. A measurement of the equivalence principle is postponed pending development of a system for digitizing data. The experiment and preliminary results are described

  20. Extended equivalent dipole model for radiated emissions

    Obiekezie, Chijioke S.

    2016-01-01

    This work is on the characterisation of radiated fields from electronic devices. An equivalent dipole approach is used. Previous work showed that this was an effective approach for single layer printed circuit boards where an infinite ground plane can be assumed. In this work, this approach is extended for the characterisation of more complex circuit boards or electronic systems.\\ud For complex electronic radiators with finite ground planes, the main challenge is characterising field diffract...

  1. Equivalence of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian BRST quantizations

    Grigoryan, G.V.; Grigoryan, R.P.; Tyutin, I.V.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches to the quantization of gauge theories using BRST symmetry are widely used nowadays: the Lagrangian quantization, developed in (BV-quantization) and Hamiltonian quantization, formulated in (BFV-quantization). For all known examples of field theory (Yang-Mills theory, gravitation etc.) both schemes give equivalent results. However the equivalence of these approaches in general wasn't proved. The main obstacle in comparing of these formulations consists in the fact, that in Hamiltonian approach the number of ghost fields is equal to the number of all first-class constraints, while in the Lagrangian approach the number of ghosts is equal to the number of independent gauge symmetries, which is equal to the number of primary first-class constraints only. This paper is devoted to the proof of the equivalence of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian quantizations for the systems with first-class constraints only. This is achieved by a choice of special gauge in the Hamiltonian approach. It's shown, that after integration over redundant variables on the functional integral we come to effective action which is constructed according to rules for construction of the effective action in Lagrangian quantization scheme

  2. Energy conservation and the principle of equivalence

    Haugan, M.P.

    1979-01-01

    If the equivalence principle is violated, then observers performing local experiments can detect effects due to their position in an external gravitational environment (preferred-location effects) or can detect effects due to their velocity through some preferred frame (preferred frame effects). We show that the principle of energy conservation implies a quantitative connection between such effects and structure-dependence of the gravitational acceleration of test bodies (violation of the Weak Equivalence Principle). We analyze this connection within a general theoretical framework that encompasses both non-gravitational local experiments and test bodies as well as gravitational experiments and test bodies, and we use it to discuss specific experimental tests of the equivalence principle, including non-gravitational tests such as gravitational redshift experiments, Eoetvoes experiments, the Hughes-Drever experiment, and the Turner-Hill experiment, and gravitational tests such as the lunar-laser-ranging ''Eoetvoes'' experiment, and measurements of anisotropies and variations in the gravitational constant. This framework is illustrated by analyses within two theoretical formalisms for studying gravitational theories: the PPN formalism, which deals with the motion of gravitating bodies within metric theories of gravity, and the THepsilonμ formalism that deals with the motion of charged particles within all metric theories and a broad class of non-metric theories of gravity

  3. Concentrated Ownership

    Rose, Caspar

    2014-01-01

    This entry summarizes the main theoretical contributions and empirical findings in relation to concentrated ownership from a law and economics perspective. The various forms of concentrated ownership are described as well as analyzed from the perspective of the legal protection of investors......, especially minority shareholders. Concentrated ownership is associated with benefits and costs. Concentrated ownership may reduce agency costs by increased monitoring of top management. However, concentrated ownership may also provide dominating owners with private benefits of control....

  4. Gauge equivalence of the Gross Pitaevskii equation and the equivalent Heisenberg spin chain

    Radha, R.; Kumar, V. Ramesh

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we construct an equivalent spin chain for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with quadratic potential and exponentially varying scattering lengths using gauge equivalence. We have then generated the soliton solutions for the spin components S3 and S-. We find that the spin solitons for S3 and S- can be compressed for exponentially growing eigenvalues while they broaden out for decaying eigenvalues.

  5. Equivalent models of wind farms by using aggregated wind turbines and equivalent winds

    Fernandez, L.M.; Garcia, C.A.; Saenz, J.R.; Jurado, F.

    2009-01-01

    As a result of the increasing wind farms penetration on power systems, the wind farms begin to influence power system, and therefore the modeling of wind farms has become an interesting research topic. In this paper, new equivalent models of wind farms equipped with wind turbines based on squirrel-cage induction generators and doubly-fed induction generators are proposed to represent the collective behavior on large power systems simulations, instead of using a complete model of wind farms where all the wind turbines are modeled. The models proposed here are based on aggregating wind turbines into an equivalent wind turbine which receives an equivalent wind of the ones incident on the aggregated wind turbines. The equivalent wind turbine presents re-scaled power capacity and the same complete model as the individual wind turbines, which supposes the main feature of the present equivalent models. Two equivalent winds are evaluated in this work: (1) the average wind from the ones incident on the aggregated wind turbines with similar winds, and (2) an equivalent incoming wind derived from the power curve and the wind incident on each wind turbine. The effectiveness of the equivalent models to represent the collective response of the wind farm at the point of common coupling to grid is demonstrated by comparison with the wind farm response obtained from the detailed model during power system dynamic simulations, such as wind fluctuations and a grid disturbance. The present models can be used for grid integration studies of large power system with an important reduction of the model order and the computation time

  6. A nationwide radon concentration survey project in Japan. Outdoor and workplaces

    Oikawa, S.; Kanno, N.; Ohashi, N.; Abukawa, J.

    2003-01-01

    Nationwide survey for outdoor and workplace radon ( 222 Rn) concentration in Japan were carried out to evaluate the effective dose to the general public due to 222 Rn and its progeny. The 222 Rn concentration was measured by using passive-type radon/thoron discriminative monitor equipped with polycarbonate films. Concentration of 222 Rn was calculated from etch pit counts appeared on the polycarbonate film after chemical and electrochemical etching. For outdoor 222 Rn survey, the monitors were installed at about 700 points throughout Japan on every quarters of the fiscal year 1997 to 1999. The mean concentration of outdoor 222 Rn concentration was 6.1 Bq m -3 from the results of 696 measurement points. Seasonal variation of outdoor 222 Rn was found to be minimal in July to September, and maximal in October to December. For workplace 222 Rn survey, the monitors were installed at about 700 points in four categories (office, factory, school and hospital) on every quarters of the fiscal year 2000 to 2002. Nationwide mean 222 Rn concentration in workplaces was found to be 22.7 Bq m -3 for 2000 and 20.7 Bq m -3 for 2001, respectively. Seasonal variation of 222 Rn concentration measured at office, factory, school and hospital were also found to be minimal in July to September, and maximal in October to December. (author)

  7. Elliptical concentrators.

    Garcia-Botella, Angel; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio Alvarez; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2006-10-10

    Nonimaging optics is a field devoted to the design of optical components for applications such as solar concentration or illumination. In this field, many different techniques have been used to produce optical devices, including the use of reflective and refractive components or inverse engineering techniques. However, many of these optical components are based on translational symmetries, rotational symmetries, or free-form surfaces. We study a new family of nonimaging concentrators called elliptical concentrators. This new family of concentrators provides new capabilities and can have different configurations, either homofocal or nonhomofocal. Translational and rotational concentrators can be considered as particular cases of elliptical concentrators.

  8. Generating carbyne equivalents with photoredox catalysis

    Wang, Zhaofeng; Herraiz, Ana G.; Del Hoyo, Ana M.; Suero, Marcos G.

    2018-02-01

    Carbon has the unique ability to bind four atoms and form stable tetravalent structures that are prevalent in nature. The lack of one or two valences leads to a set of species—carbocations, carbanions, radicals and carbenes—that is fundamental to our understanding of chemical reactivity. In contrast, the carbyne—a monovalent carbon with three non-bonded electrons—is a relatively unexplored reactive intermediate; the design of reactions involving a carbyne is limited by challenges associated with controlling its extreme reactivity and the lack of efficient sources. Given the innate ability of carbynes to form three new covalent bonds sequentially, we anticipated that a catalytic method of generating carbynes or related stabilized species would allow what we term an ‘assembly point’ disconnection approach for the construction of chiral centres. Here we describe a catalytic strategy that generates diazomethyl radicals as direct equivalents of carbyne species using visible-light photoredox catalysis. The ability of these carbyne equivalents to induce site-selective carbon-hydrogen bond cleavage in aromatic rings enables a useful diazomethylation reaction, which underpins sequencing control for the late-stage assembly-point functionalization of medically relevant agents. Our strategy provides an efficient route to libraries of potentially bioactive molecules through the installation of tailored chiral centres at carbon-hydrogen bonds, while complementing current translational late-stage functionalization processes. Furthermore, we exploit the dual radical and carbene character of the generated carbyne equivalent in the direct transformation of abundant chemical feedstocks into valuable chiral molecules.

  9. Concentration risk

    Matić Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentration risk has been gaining a special dimension in the contemporary financial and economic environment. Financial institutions are exposed to this risk mainly in the field of lending, mostly through their credit activities and concentration of credit portfolios. This refers to the concentration of different exposures within a single risk category (credit risk, market risk, operational risk, liquidity risk.

  10. Equivalent conserved currents and generalized Noether's theorem

    Gordon, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    A generalized Noether theorem is presented, relating symmetries and equivalence classes of local) conservation laws in classical field theories; this is contrasted with the standard theorem. The concept of a ''Noether'' field theory is introduced, being a theory for which the generalized theorem applies; not only does this include the cases of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian field theories, these structures are ''derived'' from the Noether property in a natural way. The generalized theorem applies to currents and symmetries that contain derivatives of the fields up to an arbitrarily high order

  11. Gravitational leptogenesis, C, CP and strong equivalence

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry is one of the most important outstanding problems at the interface of particle physics and cosmology. Gravitational leptogenesis (baryogenesis) provides a possible mechanism through explicit couplings of spacetime curvature to appropriate lepton (or baryon) currents. In this paper, the idea that these strong equivalence principle violating interactions could be generated automatically through quantum loop effects in curved spacetime is explored, focusing on the realisation of the discrete symmetries C, CP and CPT which must be broken to induce matter-antimatter asymmetry. The related issue of quantum corrections to the dispersion relation for neutrino propagation in curved spacetime is considered within a fully covariant framework.

  12. European Equivalencies in Legal Interpreting and Translation

    Corsellis, Ann; Hertog, Erik; Martinsen, Bodil

    2002-01-01

    Within Europe there is increasing freedom of movement between countries and increasing inward migration. As a result, equivalent standards of legl interpreting and translation are required to allow reliable communication for judicial cooperation between member states, for criminal and civil matters...... which cross national borders and for the needs of multilingual populations. The European Convention of Human Rights (article 6, paragrph 3) is one of the main planks of relevant legislation. This international, two year project has been funded by the EU Grotius programme to set out what is required...

  13. Testing efficiency transfer codes for equivalence

    Vidmar, T.; Celik, N.; Cornejo Diaz, N.; Dlabac, A.; Ewa, I.O.B.; Carrazana Gonzalez, J.A.; Hult, M.; Jovanovic, S.; Lepy, M.-C.; Mihaljevic, N.; Sima, O.; Tzika, F.; Jurado Vargas, M.; Vasilopoulou, T.; Vidmar, G.

    2010-01-01

    Four general Monte Carlo codes (GEANT3, PENELOPE, MCNP and EGS4) and five dedicated packages for efficiency determination in gamma-ray spectrometry (ANGLE, DETEFF, GESPECOR, ETNA and EFFTRAN) were checked for equivalence by applying them to the calculation of efficiency transfer (ET) factors for a set of well-defined sample parameters, detector parameters and energies typically encountered in environmental radioactivity measurements. The differences between the results of the different codes never exceeded a few percent and were lower than 2% in the majority of cases.

  14. The equivalence principle in a quantum world

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. Emil J.; Donoghue, John F.; El-Menoufi, Basem Kamal

    2015-01-01

    the energy is small, we now have the tools to address this conflict explicitly. Despite the violation of some classical concepts, the EP continues to provide the core of the quantum gravity framework through the symmetry - general coordinate invariance - that is used to organize the effective field theory......We show how modern methods can be applied to quantum gravity at low energy. We test how quantum corrections challenge the classical framework behind the equivalence principle (EP), for instance through introduction of nonlocality from quantum physics, embodied in the uncertainty principle. When...

  15. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of Hysteresis Motors

    Nitao, J J; Scharlemann, E T; Kirkendall, B A

    2009-08-31

    We performed a literature review and found that many equivalent circuit models of hysteresis motors in use today are incorrect. The model by Miyairi and Kataoka (1965) is the correct one. We extended the model by transforming it to quadrature coordinates, amenable to circuit or digital simulation. 'Hunting' is an oscillatory phenomenon often observed in hysteresis motors. While several works have attempted to model the phenomenon with some partial success, we present a new complete model that predicts hunting from first principles.

  16. Money and bonds: an equivalence theorem

    Narayana R. Kocherlakota

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers four models in which immortal agents face idiosyncratic shocks and trade only a single risk-free asset over time. The four models specify this single asset to be private bonds, public bonds, public money, or private money respectively. I prove that, given an equilibrium in one of these economies, it is possible to pick the exogenous elements in the other three economies so that there is an outcome-equivalent equilibrium in each of them. (The term ?exogenous variables? ref...

  17. Gravitational leptogenesis, C, CP and strong equivalence

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M. [Department of Physics, Swansea University,Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-12

    The origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry is one of the most important outstanding problems at the interface of particle physics and cosmology. Gravitational leptogenesis (baryogenesis) provides a possible mechanism through explicit couplings of spacetime curvature to appropriate lepton (or baryon) currents. In this paper, the idea that these strong equivalence principle violating interactions could be generated automatically through quantum loop effects in curved spacetime is explored, focusing on the realisation of the discrete symmetries C, CP and CPT which must be broken to induce matter-antimatter asymmetry. The related issue of quantum corrections to the dispersion relation for neutrino propagation in curved spacetime is considered within a fully covariant framework.

  18. Improvement of the equivalent sphere model for better estimates of skin or eye dose in space radiation environments

    Lin, Z.W.

    2011-01-01

    It is often useful to get a quick estimate of the dose or dose equivalent of an organ, such as blood-forming organs, the eye or the skin, in a radiation field. Sometimes an equivalent sphere is used to represent the organ for this purpose. For space radiation environments, recently it has been shown that the equivalent sphere model does not work for the eye or the skin in solar particle event environments. In this study, we improve the representation of the eye and the skin using a two-component equivalent sphere model. Motivated by the two-peak structure of the body organ shielding distribution for the eye and the skin, we use an equivalent sphere with two radius parameters, for example a partial spherical shell of a smaller thickness over a proper fraction of the full solid angle combined with a concentric partial spherical shell of a larger thickness over the rest of the full solid angle, to represent the eye or the skin. We find that using an equivalent sphere with two radius parameters instead of one drastically improves the accuracy of the estimates of dose and dose equivalent in space radiation environments. For example, in solar particle event environments the average error in the estimate of the skin dose equivalent using an equivalent sphere with two radius parameters is about 8%, while the average error of the conventional equivalent sphere model using one radius parameter is around 100%.

  19. Cosmology with equivalence principle breaking in the dark sector

    Keselman, Jose Ariel; Nusser, Adi; Peebles, P. J. E.

    2010-01-01

    A long-range force acting only between nonbaryonic particles would be associated with a large violation of the weak equivalence principle. We explore cosmological consequences of this idea, which we label ReBEL (daRk Breaking Equivalence principLe). A high resolution hydrodynamical simulation of the distributions of baryons and dark matter confirms our previous findings that a ReBEL force of comparable strength to gravity on comoving scales of about 1 h -1 Mpc causes voids between the concentrations of large galaxies to be more nearly empty, suppresses accretion of intergalactic matter onto galaxies at low redshift, and produces an early generation of dense dark-matter halos. A preliminary analysis indicates the ReBEL scenario is consistent with the one-dimensional power spectrum of the Lyman-Alpha forest and the three-dimensional galaxy autocorrelation function. Segregation of baryons and DM in galaxies and systems of galaxies is a strong prediction of ReBEL. ReBEL naturally correlates the baryon mass fraction in groups and clusters of galaxies with the system mass, in agreement with recent measurements.

  20. Concentrator Photovoltaics

    Luque, Antonio L

    2007-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar-energy conversion is one of the most promising technologies for generating renewable energy, and conversion of concentrated sunlight can lead to reduced cost for solar electricity. In fact, photovoltaic conversion of concentrated sunlight insures an efficient and cost-effective sustainable power resource. This book gives an overview of all components, e.g. cells, concentrators, modules and systems, for systems of concentrator photovoltaics. The authors report on significant results related to design, technology, and applications, and also cover the fundamental physics and market considerations. Specific contributions include: theory and practice of sunlight concentrators; an overview of concentrator PV activities; a description of concentrator solar cells; design and technology of modules and systems; manufacturing aspects; and a market study.

  1. Integrable topological billiards and equivalent dynamical systems

    Vedyushkina, V. V.; Fomenko, A. T.

    2017-08-01

    We consider several topological integrable billiards and prove that they are Liouville equivalent to many systems of rigid body dynamics. The proof uses the Fomenko-Zieschang theory of invariants of integrable systems. We study billiards bounded by arcs of confocal quadrics and their generalizations, generalized billiards, where the motion occurs on a locally planar surface obtained by gluing several planar domains isometrically along their boundaries, which are arcs of confocal quadrics. We describe two new classes of integrable billiards bounded by arcs of confocal quadrics, namely, non-compact billiards and generalized billiards obtained by gluing planar billiards along non-convex parts of their boundaries. We completely classify non-compact billiards bounded by arcs of confocal quadrics and study their topology using the Fomenko invariants that describe the bifurcations of singular leaves of the additional integral. We study the topology of isoenergy surfaces for some non-convex generalized billiards. It turns out that they possess exotic Liouville foliations: the integral trajectories of the billiard that lie on some singular leaves admit no continuous extension. Such billiards appear to be leafwise equivalent to billiards bounded by arcs of confocal quadrics in the Minkowski metric.

  2. Twisted conformal field theories and Morita equivalence

    Marotta, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Compl. universitario M. Sant' Angelo, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Naddeo, Adele [CNISM, Unita di Ricerca di Salerno and Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Salvador Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Compl. universitario M. Sant' Angelo, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)], E-mail: adelenaddeo@yahoo.it

    2009-04-01

    The Morita equivalence for field theories on noncommutative two-tori is analysed in detail for rational values of the noncommutativity parameter {theta} (in appropriate units): an isomorphism is established between an Abelian noncommutative field theory (NCFT) and a non-Abelian theory of twisted fields on ordinary space. We focus on a particular conformal field theory (CFT), the one obtained by means of the m-reduction procedure [V. Marotta, J. Phys. A 26 (1993) 3481; V. Marotta, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 13 (1998) 853; V. Marotta, Nucl. Phys. B 527 (1998) 717; V. Marotta, A. Sciarrino, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 13 (1998) 2863], and show that it is the Morita equivalent of a NCFT. Finally, the whole m-reduction procedure is shown to be the image in the ordinary space of the Morita duality. An application to the physics of a quantum Hall fluid at Jain fillings {nu}=m/(2pm+1) is explicitly discussed in order to further elucidate such a correspondence and to clarify its role in the physics of strongly correlated systems. A new picture emerges, which is very different from the existing relationships between noncommutativity and many body systems [A.P. Polychronakos, arXiv: 0706.1095].

  3. Planck Constant Determination from Power Equivalence

    Newell, David B.

    2000-04-01

    Equating mechanical to electrical power links the kilogram, the meter, and the second to the practical realizations of the ohm and the volt derived from the quantum Hall and the Josephson effects, yielding an SI determination of the Planck constant. The NIST watt balance uses this power equivalence principle, and in 1998 measured the Planck constant with a combined relative standard uncertainty of 8.7 x 10-8, the most accurate determination to date. The next generation of the NIST watt balance is now being assembled. Modification to the experimental facilities have been made to reduce the uncertainty components from vibrations and electromagnetic interference. A vacuum chamber has been installed to reduce the uncertainty components associated with performing the experiment in air. Most of the apparatus is in place and diagnostic testing of the balance should begin this year. Once a combined relative standard uncertainty of one part in 10-8 has been reached, the power equivalence principle can be used to monitor the possible drift in the artifact mass standard, the kilogram, and provide an accurate alternative definition of mass in terms of fundamental constants. *Electricity Division, Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory, Technology Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. Contribution of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, not subject to copyright in the U.S.

  4. Determination of equivalent mixing height and atmospheric stability assessment

    Simon, J.; Bulko, M.; Holy, K.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric stability is an indicator that reflects the intensity of boundary layer mixing processes. This feature of the atmosphere is especially important since it defines dispersive atmospheric conditions and provides information on how effectively the anthropogenic pollution will be transferred to the higher levels of the atmosphere. The assessment of atmospheric dispersiveness plays a crucial role in the protection of air quality and public health in big cities. The presented paper deals with determination of atmospheric stability via so called Equivalent Mixing Height (EMH) quantity using a radioactive noble gas 222 Rn. A method of deriving a link between 222 Rn activity concentration, eddy diffusion coefficient and EMH using fluid mechanics is also outlined in this work. (authors)

  5. The Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP)

    2004-01-01

    STEP will carry concentric test masses to Earth orbit to test a fundamental assumption underlying Einstein's theory of general relativity: that gravitational mass is equivalent to inertial mass. STEP is a 21st-century version of the test that Galileo is said to have performed by dropping a carnon ball and a musket ball simultaneously from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to compare their accelerations. During the STEP experiment, four pairs of test masses will be falling around the Earth, and their accelerations will be measured by superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS). The extended time sensitivity of the instruments will allow the measurements to be a million times more accurate than those made in modern ground-based tests.

  6. AN ANALYSIS OF WORD EQUIVALENCE IN TRANSLATION OF DOSTOEVSKY’S NOVEL “POOR FOLK”

    Sevil Demir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research work has been concentrated on equivalence in translation literary works into Turkish; we have laid stress on lexicological problems of the Turkish translations of "Poor Folk" by Dostoevsky also with the help of Russian-Turkish comparative literature.

  7. Pressure effect on rate of production of glucose-equivalent in plant ...

    Administrator

    C4 Green plants; rate of equivalent production; pressure effect. 1. Introduction ... the photosynthetic process, especially on the activa- tion and ... Section 4 deals with the effect ... the global concentrations of glyceraldehydes-3- ... chloroplast,9a a product of the maximum possible .... as soil, tissue, development stage, etc.

  8. Borel equivalence relations structure and classification

    Kanovei, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, the theory of Borel equivalence relations and related topics have been very active areas of research in set theory and have important interactions with other fields of mathematics, like ergodic theory and topological dynamics, group theory, combinatorics, functional analysis, and model theory. The book presents, for the first time in mathematical literature, all major aspects of this theory and its applications. This book should be of interest to a wide spectrum of mathematicians working in set theory as well as the other areas mentioned. It provides a systematic exposition of results that so far have been only available in journals or are even unpublished. The book presents unified and in some cases significantly streamlined proofs of several difficult results, especially dichotomy theorems. It has rather minimal overlap with other books published in this subject.

  9. Characterization of Destrins with Different Dextrose Equivalents

    Guanglei Li

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dextrins are widely used for their functional properties and prepared by partial hydrolysis of starch using acid, enzymes, or combinations of both. The physiochemical properties of dextrins are dependent on their molecular distribution and oligosaccharide profiles. In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, rapid viscoanalysis (RVA, high-performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC and gel permeation chromatography (GPC were used to characterize dextrins prepared by common neutral and thermostable α-amylase hydrolysis. The dextrin granules displayed irregular surfaces and were badly damaged by the enzyme treatment. They displayed A-type X-ray diffraction patterns with a decrease of intensity of the characteristic diffraction peaks. The RVA profiles showed that the viscosity of dextrin decreased with the increase of its Dextrose Equivalent (DE value. According to HPLC analysis, the molecular weight, degree of polymerization and the composition of oligosaccharides in dextrins were different.

  10. Multiplicities of states od equivalent fermion shells

    Savukinas, A.Yu.; Glembotskij, I.I.

    1980-01-01

    Classification of states of three or four equivalent fermions has been studied, i.e. possible terms and their multiplicities have been determined. For this purpose either the group theory or evident expressions for the fractional-parentage coefficients have been used. In the first approach the formulas obtained by other authors for the multiplicities of terms through the characters of the transformation matrices of bond moments have been used. This approach happens to be more general as compared with the second one, as expressions for the fractional-parentage coefficients in many cases are not known. The multiplicities of separate terms have been determined. It has been shown that the number of terms of any multiplicity becomes constant when l or j is increased [ru

  11. Sample size allocation in multiregional equivalence studies.

    Liao, Jason J Z; Yu, Ziji; Li, Yulan

    2018-06-17

    With the increasing globalization of drug development, the multiregional clinical trial (MRCT) has gained extensive use. The data from MRCTs could be accepted by regulatory authorities across regions and countries as the primary sources of evidence to support global marketing drug approval simultaneously. The MRCT can speed up patient enrollment and drug approval, and it makes the effective therapies available to patients all over the world simultaneously. However, there are many challenges both operationally and scientifically in conducting a drug development globally. One of many important questions to answer for the design of a multiregional study is how to partition sample size into each individual region. In this paper, two systematic approaches are proposed for the sample size allocation in a multiregional equivalence trial. A numerical evaluation and a biosimilar trial are used to illustrate the characteristics of the proposed approaches. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Equivalence principle and the baryon acoustic peak

    Baldauf, Tobias; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Simonović, Marko; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-08-01

    We study the dominant effect of a long wavelength density perturbation δ (λL) on short distance physics. In the nonrelativistic limit, the result is a uniform acceleration, fixed by the equivalence principle, and typically has no effect on statistical averages due to translational invariance. This same reasoning has been formalized to obtain a "consistency condition" on the cosmological correlation functions. In the presence of a feature, such as the acoustic peak at ℓBAO, this naive expectation breaks down for λLexplicitly applied to the one-loop calculation of the power spectrum. Finally, the success of baryon acoustic oscillation reconstruction schemes is argued to be another empirical evidence for the validity of the results.

  13. Development of air equivalent gamma dose monitor

    Alex, Mary; Bhattacharya, Sadhana; Karpagam, R.; Prasad, D.N.; Jakati, R.K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Patil, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes design and development of air equivalent gamma absorbed dose monitor. The monitor has gamma sensitivity of 84 pA/R/h for 60 Co source. The characterization of the monitor has been done to get energy dependence on gamma sensitivity and response to gamma radiation field from 1 R/hr to 5000 R/hr. The gamma sensitivity in the energy range of 0.06 to 1.25MeV relative to 137 Cs nuclide was within 2.5%. The linearity of the monitor response as a function of gamma field from 10 R/h to 3.8 kR/h was within 6%. The monitor has been designed for its application in harsh environment. It has been successfully qualified to meet environmental requirements of shock. (author)

  14. A new concept of equivalent homogenization method

    Kim, Young Jin; Pogoskekyan, Leonid; Kim, Young Il; Ju, Hyung Kook; Chang, Moon Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    A new concept of equivalent homogenization is proposed. The concept employs new set of homogenized parameters: homogenized cross sections (XS) and interface matrix (IM), which relates partial currents at the cell interfaces. The idea of interface matrix generalizes the idea of discontinuity factors (DFs), proposed and developed by K. Koebke and K. Smith. The offered concept covers both those of K. Koebke and K. Smith; both of them can be simulated within framework of new concept. Also, the offered concept covers Siemens KWU approach for baffle/reflector simulation, where the equivalent homogenized reflector XS are derived from the conservation of response matrix at the interface in 1D simi-infinite slab geometry. The IM and XS of new concept satisfy the same assumption about response matrix conservation in 1D semi-infinite slab geometry. It is expected that the new concept provides more accurate approximation of heterogeneous cell, especially in case of the steep flux gradients at the cell interfaces. The attractive shapes of new concept are: improved accuracy, simplicity of incorporation in the existing codes, equal numerical expenses in comparison to the K. Smith`s approach. The new concept is useful for: (a) explicit reflector/baffle simulation; (b) control blades simulation; (c) mixed UO{sub 2}/MOX core simulation. The offered model has been incorporated in the finite difference code and in the nodal code PANDOX. The numerical results show good accuracy of core calculations and insensitivity of homogenized parameters with respect to in-core conditions. 9 figs., 7 refs. (Author).

  15. Equivalence principle implications of modified gravity models

    Hui, Lam; Nicolis, Alberto; Stubbs, Christopher W.

    2009-01-01

    Theories that attempt to explain the observed cosmic acceleration by modifying general relativity all introduce a new scalar degree of freedom that is active on large scales, but is screened on small scales to match experiments. We demonstrate that if such screening occurs via the chameleon mechanism, such as in f(R) theory, it is possible to have order unity violation of the equivalence principle, despite the absence of explicit violation in the microscopic action. Namely, extended objects such as galaxies or constituents thereof do not all fall at the same rate. The chameleon mechanism can screen the scalar charge for large objects but not for small ones (large/small is defined by the depth of the gravitational potential and is controlled by the scalar coupling). This leads to order one fluctuations in the ratio of the inertial mass to gravitational mass. We provide derivations in both Einstein and Jordan frames. In Jordan frame, it is no longer true that all objects move on geodesics; only unscreened ones, such as test particles, do. In contrast, if the scalar screening occurs via strong coupling, such as in the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld model, equivalence principle violation occurs at a much reduced level. We propose several observational tests of the chameleon mechanism: 1. small galaxies should accelerate faster than large galaxies, even in environments where dynamical friction is negligible; 2. voids defined by small galaxies would appear larger compared to standard expectations; 3. stars and diffuse gas in small galaxies should have different velocities, even if they are on the same orbits; 4. lensing and dynamical mass estimates should agree for large galaxies but disagree for small ones. We discuss possible pitfalls in some of these tests. The cleanest is the third one where the mass estimate from HI rotational velocity could exceed that from stars by 30% or more. To avoid blanket screening of all objects, the most promising place to look is in

  16. 49 CFR 391.33 - Equivalent of road test.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equivalent of road test. 391.33 Section 391.33... AND LONGER COMBINATION VEHICLE (LCV) DRIVER INSTRUCTORS Tests § 391.33 Equivalent of road test. (a) In place of, and as equivalent to, the road test required by § 391.31, a person who seeks to drive a...

  17. A bicategorical approach to Morita equivalence for Von Neumann algebras

    R.M. Brouwer (Rachel)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe relate Morita equivalence for von Neumann algebras to the ``Connes fusion'' tensor product between correspondences. In the purely algebraic setting, it is well known that rings are Morita equivalent if and only if they are equivalent objects in a bicategory whose 1-cells are

  18. Problems of Equivalence in Shona- English Bilingual Dictionaries

    rbr

    Page 1 ... translation equivalents in Shona-English dictionaries where lexicographers will be dealing with divergent languages and cultures, traditional practices of lexicography and the absence of reliable ... ideal in translation is to achieve structural and semantic equivalence. Absolute equivalence between any two ...

  19. The equivalence principle in classical mechanics and quantum mechanics

    Mannheim, Philip D.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss our understanding of the equivalence principle in both classical mechanics and quantum mechanics. We show that not only does the equivalence principle hold for the trajectories of quantum particles in a background gravitational field, but also that it is only because of this that the equivalence principle is even to be expected to hold for classical particles at all.

  20. The one-dimensional normalised generalised equivalence theory (NGET) for generating equivalent diffusion theory group constants for PWR reflector regions

    Mueller, E.Z.

    1991-01-01

    An equivalent diffusion theory PWR reflector model is presented, which has as its basis Smith's generalisation of Koebke's Equivalent Theory. This method is an adaptation, in one-dimensional slab geometry, of the Generalised Equivalence Theory (GET). Since the method involves the renormalisation of the GET discontinuity factors at nodal interfaces, it is called the Normalised Generalised Equivalence Theory (NGET) method. The advantages of the NGET method for modelling the ex-core nodes of a PWR are summarized. 23 refs

  1. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  2. A study of environmental radon levels in rammed earth dwellings in the south west of Western Australia

    Walsh, M.; Jennings, P.

    2002-01-01

    Indoor radon and thoron progeny Equilibrium Equivalent Concentrations (EEC) were measured with a portable 'Radon Sniffer' in 10 rammed earth dwellings and 10 conventional dwellings in Margaret River in the South West of Western Australia. Natural background gamma radiation was also measured within the dwellings. The results of this study show that the mean indoor radon progeny concentrations in rammed earth and non-rammed earth dwellings was 24 Bq m -3 EEC and 9.3 Bq m -3 EEC respectively. The mean indoor thoron progeny concentrations in rammed earth and non-rammed earth dwellings was 3.9 Bq m -3 EEC and 0.8 Bq m -3 EEC respectively. The ranges of combined indoor radon and thoron progeny concentrations in rammed earth and non-rammed earth dwellings were between 2.1 and 76 Bq m -3 EEC and 2.0 and 27 Bq m -3 EEC respectively. The mean annual effective radiation dose equivalents from combined indoor radon and thoron progeny concentrations EEC using UNSCEAR's (1982) conversion factors in rammed earth and non-rammed earth dwellings were 4.1 mSv y -1 and 2.2 mSv y -1 respectively. Copyright (2002) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  3. A bicategorical approach to Morita equivalence for von Neumann algebras

    Brouwer, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    We relate Morita equivalence for von Neumann algebras to the ''Connes fusion'' tensor product between correspondences. In the purely algebraic setting, it is well known that rings are Morita equivalent if they are equivalent objects in a bicategory whose 1-cells are bimodules. We present a similar result for von Neumann algebras. We show that von Neumann algebras form a bicategory, having Connes's correspondences as 1-morphisms, and (bounded) intertwiners as 2-morphisms. Further, we prove that two von Neumann algebras are Morita equivalent iff they are equivalent objects in the bicategory. The proofs make extensive use of the Tomita-Takesaki modular theory

  4. Theoretical aspects of the equivalence principle

    Damour, Thibault

    2012-01-01

    We review several theoretical aspects of the equivalence principle (EP). We emphasize the unsatisfactory fact that the EP maintains the absolute character of the coupling constants of physics, while general relativity and its generalizations (Kaluza–Klein, …, string theory) suggest that all absolute structures should be replaced by dynamical entities. We discuss the EP-violation phenomenology of dilaton-like models, which is likely to be dominated by the linear superposition of two effects: a signal proportional to the nuclear Coulomb energy, related to the variation of the fine-structure constant, and a signal proportional to the surface nuclear binding energy, related to the variation of the light quark masses. We recall various theoretical arguments (including a recently proposed anthropic argument) suggesting that the EP be violated at a small, but not unmeasurably small level. This motivates the need for improved tests of the EP. These tests are probing new territories in physics that are related to deep, and mysterious, issues in fundamental physics. (paper)

  5. VERSE - Virtual Equivalent Real-time Simulation

    Zheng, Yang; Martin, Bryan J.; Villaume, Nathaniel

    2005-01-01

    Distributed real-time simulations provide important timing validation and hardware in the- loop results for the spacecraft flight software development cycle. Occasionally, the need for higher fidelity modeling and more comprehensive debugging capabilities - combined with a limited amount of computational resources - calls for a non real-time simulation environment that mimics the real-time environment. By creating a non real-time environment that accommodates simulations and flight software designed for a multi-CPU real-time system, we can save development time, cut mission costs, and reduce the likelihood of errors. This paper presents such a solution: Virtual Equivalent Real-time Simulation Environment (VERSE). VERSE turns the real-time operating system RTAI (Real-time Application Interface) into an event driven simulator that runs in virtual real time. Designed to keep the original RTAI architecture as intact as possible, and therefore inheriting RTAI's many capabilities, VERSE was implemented with remarkably little change to the RTAI source code. This small footprint together with use of the same API allows users to easily run the same application in both real-time and virtual time environments. VERSE has been used to build a workstation testbed for NASA's Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest) instrument flight software. With its flexible simulation controls and inexpensive setup and replication costs, VERSE will become an invaluable tool in future mission development.

  6. Challenging a culture of racial equivalence.

    Song, Miri

    2014-03-01

    We live at a time when our understandings and conceptualizations of 'racism' are often highly imprecise, broad, and used to describe a wide range of racialized phenomena. In this article, I raise some important questions about how the term racism is used and understood in contemporary British society by drawing on some recent cases of alleged racism in football and politics, many of which have been played out via new media technologies. A broader understanding of racism, through the use of the term 'racialization', has been helpful in articulating a more nuanced and complex understanding of racial incidents, especially of people's (often ambivalent) beliefs and behaviours. However, the growing emphasis upon 'racialization' has led to a conceptualization of racism which increasingly involves multiple perpetrators, victims, and practices without enough consideration of how and why particular interactions and practices constitute racism as such. The trend toward a growing culture of racial equivalence is worrying, as it denudes the idea of racism of its historical basis, severity and power. These frequent and commonplace assertions of racism in the public sphere paradoxically end up trivializing and homogenizing quite different forms of racialized interactions. I conclude that we need to retain the term 'racism', but we need to differentiate more clearly between 'racism' (as an historical and structured system of domination) from the broader notion of 'racialization'. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  7. Testing the equivalence principle on a trampoline

    Reasenberg, Robert D.; Phillips, James D.

    2001-07-01

    We are developing a Galilean test of the equivalence principle in which two pairs of test mass assemblies (TMA) are in free fall in a comoving vacuum chamber for about 0.9 s. The TMA are tossed upward, and the process repeats at 1.2 s intervals. Each TMA carries a solid quartz retroreflector and a payload mass of about one-third of the total TMA mass. The relative vertical motion of the TMA of each pair is monitored by a laser gauge working in an optical cavity formed by the retroreflectors. Single-toss precision of the relative acceleration of a single pair of TMA is 3.5×10-12 g. The project goal of Δg/g = 10-13 can be reached in a single night's run, but repetition with altered configurations will be required to ensure the correction of systematic error to the nominal accuracy level. Because the measurements can be made quickly, we plan to study several pairs of materials.

  8. Testing the equivalence principle on cosmological scales

    Bonvin, Camille; Fleury, Pierre

    2018-05-01

    The equivalence principle, that is one of the main pillars of general relativity, is very well tested in the Solar system; however, its validity is more uncertain on cosmological scales, or when dark matter is concerned. This article shows that relativistic effects in the large-scale structure can be used to directly test whether dark matter satisfies Euler's equation, i.e. whether its free fall is characterised by geodesic motion, just like baryons and light. After having proposed a general parametrisation for deviations from Euler's equation, we perform Fisher-matrix forecasts for future surveys like DESI and the SKA, and show that such deviations can be constrained with a precision of order 10%. Deviations from Euler's equation cannot be tested directly with standard methods like redshift-space distortions and gravitational lensing, since these observables are not sensitive to the time component of the metric. Our analysis shows therefore that relativistic effects bring new and complementary constraints to alternative theories of gravity.

  9. Ignition Delay of Combustible Materials in Normoxic Equivalent Environments

    McAllister, Sara; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Ruff, Gary; Urban, David

    2009-01-01

    Material flammability is an important factor in determining the pressure and composition (fraction of oxygen and nitrogen) of the atmosphere in the habitable volume of exploration vehicles and habitats. The method chosen in this work to quantify the flammability of a material is by its ease of ignition. The ignition delay time was defined as the time it takes a combustible material to ignite after it has been exposed to an external heat flux. Previous work in the Forced Ignition and Spread Test (FIST) apparatus has shown that the ignition delay in the currently proposed space exploration atmosphere (approximately 58.6 kPa and32% oxygen concentration) is reduced by 27% compared to the standard atmosphere used in the Space Shuttle and Space Station. In order to determine whether there is a safer environment in terms of material flammability, a series of piloted ignition delay tests using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was conducted in the FIST apparatus to extend the work over a range of possible exploration atmospheres. The exploration atmospheres considered were the normoxic equivalents, i.e. reduced pressure conditions with a constant partial pressure of oxygen. The ignition delay time was seen to decrease as the pressure was reduced along the normoxic curve. The minimum ignition delay observed in the normoxic equivalent environments was nearly 30% lower than in standard atmospheric conditions. The ignition delay in the proposed exploration atmosphere is only slightly larger than this minimum. Interms of material flammability, normoxic environments with a higher pressure relative to the proposed pressure would be desired.

  10. A Bayesian equivalency test for two independent binomial proportions.

    Kawasaki, Yohei; Shimokawa, Asanao; Yamada, Hiroshi; Miyaoka, Etsuo

    2016-01-01

    In clinical trials, it is often necessary to perform an equivalence study. The equivalence study requires actively denoting equivalence between two different drugs or treatments. Since it is not possible to assert equivalence that is not rejected by a superiority test, statistical methods known as equivalency tests have been suggested. These methods for equivalency tests are based on the frequency framework; however, there are few such methods in the Bayesian framework. Hence, this article proposes a new index that suggests the equivalency of binomial proportions, which is constructed based on the Bayesian framework. In this study, we provide two methods for calculating the index and compare the probabilities that have been calculated by these two calculation methods. Moreover, we apply this index to the results of actual clinical trials to demonstrate the utility of the index.

  11. Radiation equivalency: For the radiation recall phenomenon

    Stevens, R.H.; Cole, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental and clinico-epidemiological investigations have unequivocally established the risk of an offspring in later years developing cancer after experiencing an in utero carcinogenic insult. The present studies have focused upon identifying whether the biological effects of iodine-131 and the colon carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) when administered during pregnancy in the Fischer F344 inbred rat are remembered in the offsprings at a later age. The investigations have been based upon the premise that after exposure to a carcinogen ''foreign-like'' tumor cells develop which result in the host mounting active antitumor immune responses. The authors have now measured at 2 to 3 months post-exposure, the antitumor cell-mediated immunity (CMI) induced by intraperitoneal administration of the radionuclide or chemical at 16-18 days of gestation. Their findings indicate a positive sex relationship existing in those offsprings exposed to the radioiodine with the female being much less sensitive. In contrast, no such difference was observed between responsiveness of the males and females born from dams exposed to the DMH. Significantly, the dams exposed to either the radionuclide or DMH expressed no measurable CMI suggesting that either the fetus acted as a carcinogen trap or else the state of pregnancy altered the mother's immune system in such a fashion to no longer respond to the insult. A Radiation Equivalency value has now been determined for the transplacental DMH exposures with the calculations suggesting the fetus is significantly more sensitive (over 10 times) than the adult animals. The results of this study now demonstrate that carcinogenic memory remains for exposures to both the iodine-131 and DMH in the first offspring generation and suggest that the effects may be recalled at a later age with the expected overt results being the development of cancer

  12. Stochastic and Spatial Equivalences for PALOMA

    Paul Piho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We concentrate our study on a recent process algebra – PALOMA – intended to capture interactions between spatially distributed agents, for example in collective adaptive systems. New agent-based semantic rules for deriving the underlying continuous time Markov chain are given in terms of State to Function Labelled Transition Systems. Furthermore we define a bisimulation with respect to an isometric transformation of space allowing us to compare PALOMA models with respect to their relative rather than absolute locations.

  13. General Dynamic Equivalent Modeling of Microgrid Based on Physical Background

    Changchun Cai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microgrid is a new power system concept consisting of small-scale distributed energy resources; storage devices and loads. It is necessary to employ a simplified model of microgrid in the simulation of a distribution network integrating large-scale microgrids. Based on the detailed model of the components, an equivalent model of microgrid is proposed in this paper. The equivalent model comprises two parts: namely, equivalent machine component and equivalent static component. Equivalent machine component describes the dynamics of synchronous generator, asynchronous wind turbine and induction motor, equivalent static component describes the dynamics of photovoltaic, storage and static load. The trajectory sensitivities of the equivalent model parameters with respect to the output variables are analyzed. The key parameters that play important roles in the dynamics of the output variables of the equivalent model are identified and included in further parameter estimation. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO is improved for the parameter estimation of the equivalent model. Simulations are performed in different microgrid operation conditions to evaluate the effectiveness of the equivalent model of microgrid.

  14. Dose sculpting with generalized equivalent uniform dose

    Wu Qiuwen; Djajaputra, David; Liu, Helen H.; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Wu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    With intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a variety of user-defined dose distribution can be produced using inverse planning. The generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) has been used in IMRT optimization as an alternative objective function to the conventional dose-volume-based criteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of gEUD optimization to fine tune the dose distributions of IMRT plans. We analyzed the effect of gEUD-based optimization parameters on plan quality. The objective was to determine whether dose distribution to selected structures could be improved using gEUD optimization without adversely altering the doses delivered to other structures, as in sculpting. We hypothesized that by carefully defining gEUD parameters (EUD 0 and n) based on the current dose distributions, the optimization system could be instructed to search for alternative solutions in the neighborhood, and we could maintain the dose distributions for structures already satisfactory and improve dose for structures that need enhancement. We started with an already acceptable IMRT plan optimized with any objective function. The dose distribution was analyzed first. For structures that dose should not be changed, a higher value of n was used and EUD 0 was set slightly higher/lower than the EUD value at the current dose distribution for critical structures/targets. For structures that needed improvement in dose, a higher to medium value of n was used, and EUD 0 was set to the EUD value or slightly lower/higher for the critical structure/target at the current dose distribution. We evaluated this method in one clinical case each of head and neck, lung and prostate cancer. Dose volume histograms, isodose distributions, and relevant tolerance doses for critical structures were used for the assessment. We found that by adjusting gEUD optimization parameters, the dose distribution could be improved with only a few iterations. A larger value of n could lead to

  15. Experimental investigations into low concentrating line axis solar concentrators for CPV applications

    Singh, H; Sabry, M; Redpath, DAG

    2016-01-01

    Solar photovoltaic conversion systems with integrated, low concentration ratio, non-imaging reflective concentrators, could be on south facing building roofs used to generate power at a lower cost than currently available proprietary systems. The experimental investigation presented by this research provides information on the optical and energy conversion characteristics of two geometrically equivalent non-imaging concentrators; a compound parabolic concentrator and a V-trough reflector. The...

  16. The radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy: Are ''photon-equivalent'' doses really photon-equivalent?

    Coderre, J.A.; Diaz, A.Z.; Ma, R.

    2001-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) produces a mixture of radiation dose components. The high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles are more damaging in tissue than equal doses of low-LET radiation. Each of the high-LET components can multiplied by an experimentally determined factor to adjust for the increased biological effectiveness and the resulting sum expressed in photon-equivalent units (Gy-Eq). BNCT doses in photon-equivalent units are based on a number of assumptions. It may be possible to test the validity of these assumptions and the accuracy of the calculated BNCT doses by 1) comparing the effects of BNCT in other animal or biological models where the effects of photon radiation are known, or 2) if there are endpoints reached in the BNCT dose escalation clinical trials that can be related to the known response to photons of the tissue in question. The calculated Gy-Eq BNCT doses delivered to dogs and to humans with BPA and the epithermal neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor were compared to expected responses to photon irradiation. The data indicate that Gy-Eq doses in brain may be underestimated. Doses to skin are consistent with the expected response to photons. Gy-Eq doses to tumor are significantly overestimated. A model system of cells in culture irradiated at various depths in a lucite phantom using the epithermal beam is under development. Preliminary data indicate that this approach can be used to detect differences in the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. The rat 9L gliosarcoma cell survival data was converted to photon-equivalent doses using the same factors assumed in the clinical studies. The results superimposed on the survival curve derived from irradiation with Cs-137 photons indicating the potential utility of this model system. (author)

  17. Dynamic equivalence relation on the fuzzy measure algebras

    Roya Ghasemkhani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the present paper is to extend classical results from the measure theory and dynamical systems to the fuzzy subset setting. In this paper, the notion of  dynamic equivalence relation is introduced and then it is proved that this relation is an equivalence relation. Also, a new metric on the collection of all equivalence classes is introduced and it is proved that this metric is complete.

  18. Dose equivalent distributions in the AAEC total body nitrogen facility

    Allen, B.J.; Bailey, G.M.; McGregor, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The incident neutron dose equivalent in the AAEC total body nitrogen facility is measured by a calibrated remmeter. Dose equivalent rates and distributions are calculated by Monte Carlo techniques which take account of the secondary neutron flux from the collimator. Experiment and calculation are found to be in satisfactory agreement. The effective dose equivalent per exposure is determined by weighting organ doses, and the potential detriment per exposure is calculated from ICRP risk factors

  19. Equivalence principle violations and couplings of a light dilaton

    Damour, Thibault; Donoghue, John F.

    2010-01-01

    We consider possible violations of the equivalence principle through the exchange of a light 'dilaton-like' scalar field. Using recent work on the quark-mass dependence of nuclear binding, we find that the dilaton-quark-mass coupling induces significant equivalence-principle-violating effects varying like the inverse cubic root of the atomic number - A -1/3 . We provide a general parametrization of the scalar couplings, but argue that two parameters are likely to dominate the equivalence-principle phenomenology. We indicate the implications of this framework for comparing the sensitivities of current and planned experimental tests of the equivalence principle.

  20. Equivalent Sensor Radiance Generation and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters. Part 1; Equivalent Sensor Radiance Formulation

    Wind, Galina; DaSilva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating equivalent sensor radiances from variables output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probably density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The equivalent sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies. We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products.) We focus on clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions, because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  1. Development of solid water-equivalent radioactive certified reference materials

    Finke, E.; Greupner, H.; Groche, K.; Rittwag, R.; Geske, G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the development of solid water-equivalent beta volume radioactive certified reference materials. These certified reference materials were prepared for the beta fission nuclides 90 Sr/ 90 Y, 137 Cs, 147 Pm and 204 Tl. Comparative measurements of liquid and solid water-equivalent beta volume radioactive certified reference materials are discussed. (author)

  2. Equivalence of quantum states under local unitary transformations

    Fei Shaoming; Jing Naihuan

    2005-01-01

    In terms of the analysis of fixed point subgroup and tensor decomposability of certain matrices, we study the equivalence of quantum bipartite mixed states under local unitary transformations. For non-degenerate case an operational criterion for the equivalence of two such mixed bipartite states under local unitary transformations is presented

  3. 40 CFR 133.105 - Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment. 133.105 Section 133.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.105 Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment...

  4. Decompositional equivalence: A fundamental symmetry underlying quantum theory

    Fields, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Decompositional equivalence is the principle that there is no preferred decomposition of the universe into subsystems. It is shown here, by using simple thought experiments, that quantum theory follows from decompositional equivalence together with Landauer's principle. This demonstration raises within physics a question previously left to psychology: how do human - or any - observers agree about what constitutes a "system of interest"?

  5. Preparation of A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic films

    Saion, E.B.; Shaari, A.H.; Watt, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic is widely used as a wall material for tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCS) used in experimental microdosimetry. The objective of this note is to give a technical account of how A-150 TE plastic film can be fabricated in the laboratory from commercially available A-150 TE plastic. (author)

  6. Equivalence of several Chern-Simons matter models

    Chen, W.; Itoi, C.

    1994-01-01

    Chern-Simons (CS) coupling characterizes not only statistics, but also spin and scaling dimension of matter fields. We demonstrate spin transmutation in relativistic CS matter theory, and moreover show equivalence of several models. We study the CS vector model in some detail, which provides a consistent check to the assertion of the equivalence

  7. 29 CFR 4.170 - Furnishing fringe benefits or equivalents.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Furnishing fringe benefits or equivalents. 4.170 Section 4... Standards Compliance with Compensation Standards § 4.170 Furnishing fringe benefits or equivalents. (a) General. Fringe benefits required under the Act shall be furnished, separate from and in addition to the...

  8. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalized...

  9. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continuous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalize...

  10. Graphene-based THz modulator analyzed by equivalent circuit model

    Xiao, Binggang; Chen, Jing; Xie, Zhiyi

    2016-01-01

    A terahertz (THz) modulator based on graphene is proposed and analysed by use of equivalent transmission line of a homogeneous mediumand the local anisotropic model of the graphene conductivity. The result calculated by the equivalent circuit is consistent with that obtained byFresnel transfer...

  11. The lexicographical handling of grammatical equivalence: the case ...

    Lexicographers compiling translating dictionaries are not exclusively concerned with semantic equivalence when selecting translating equivalents for lemmata, but often include also grammatical information in illustrative examples when the lexical item to be translated does not have an exact grammatical counterpart in the ...

  12. Teaching Brain-Behavior Relations Economically with Stimulus Equivalence Technology

    Fienup, Daniel M.; Covey, Daniel P.; Critchfield, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Instructional interventions based on stimulus equivalence provide learners with the opportunity to acquire skills that are not directly taught, thereby improving the efficiency of instructional efforts. The present report describes a study in which equivalence-based instruction was used to teach college students facts regarding brain anatomy and…

  13. Foundations of gravitation theory: the principle of equivalence

    Haugan, M.P.

    1978-01-01

    A new framework is presented within which to discuss the principle of equivalence and its experimental tests. The framework incorporates a special structure imposed on the equivalence principle by the principle of energy conservation. This structure includes relations among the conceptual components of the equivalence principle as well as quantitative relations among the outcomes of its experimental tests. One of the most striking new results obtained through use of this framework is a connection between the breakdown of local Lorentz invariance and the breakdown of the principle that all bodies fall with the same acceleration in a gravitational field. An extensive discussion of experimental tests of the equivalence principle and their significance is also presented. Within the above framework, theory-independent analyses of a broad range of equivalence principle tests are possible. Gravitational redshift experiments. Doppler-shift experiments, the Turner-Hill and Hughes-Drever experiments, and a number of solar-system tests of gravitation theories are analyzed. Application of the techniques of theoretical nuclear physics to the quantitative interpretation of equivalence principle tests using laboratory materials of different composition yields a number of important results. It is found that current Eotvos experiments significantly demonstrate the compatibility of the weak interactions with the equivalence principle. It is also shown that the Hughes-Drever experiment is the most precise test of local Lorentz invariance yet performed. The work leads to a strong, tightly knit empirical basis for the principle of equivalence, the central pillar of the foundations of gravitation theory

  14. Calculation simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for dispersion nuclear fuel

    Cai Wei; Zhao Yunmei; Gong Xin; Ding Shurong; Huo Yongzhong

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion nuclear fuel was regarded as a kind of special particle composites. Assuming that the fuel particles are periodically distributed in the dispersion nuclear fuel meat, the finite element model to calculate its equivalent irradiation swelling was developed with the method of computational micro-mechanics. Considering irradiation swelling in the fuel particles and the irradiation hardening effect in the metal matrix, the stress update algorithms were established respectively for the fuel particles and metal matrix. The corresponding user subroutines were programmed, and the finite element simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for the fuel meat was performed in Abaqus. The effects of the particle size and volume fraction on the equivalent irradiation swelling were investigated, and the fitting formula of equivalent irradiation swelling was obtained. The results indicate that the main factors to influence equivalent irradiation swelling of the fuel meat are the irradiation swelling and volume fraction of fuel particles. (authors)

  15. On identifying name equivalences in digital libraries. Name equivalence, Surname matching, Author identification, Databases

    Dror G. Feitelson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The services provided by digital libraries can be much improved by correctly identifying variants of the same name. For example, this will allow for better retrieval of all the works by a certain author. We focus on variants caused by abbreviations of first names, and show that significant achievements are possible by simple lexical analysis and comparison of names. This is done in two steps: first a pairwise matching of names is performed, and then these are used to find cliques of equivalent names. However, these steps can each be performed in a variety of ways. We therefore conduct an experimental analysis using two real datasets to find which approaches actually work well in practice. Interestingly, this depends on the size of the repository, as larger repositories may have many more similar names.

  16. Measurements of indoor radon concentration in italian red cross workplaces: preliminary results

    Fontana, C.; Musumeci, R.G.; Valeriani, F.; Tonnarini, S.; Trevisi, R.

    2002-01-01

    In August 2000 in Italy the D.Lgs.241/00 law was passed to implement the 96/29 Euratom Directive (BSS Directive, EC 1996). D.Lgs.241/00 states that workers cannot be exposed to decay products of radon, thoron and gamma radiation at a level higher than action level. The law became effective January 1, 2001. Italian action level of 500 Bq/m3 is the annual average indoor radon concentration. Work activities in zones with greater probability of high indoor radon concentration have to be identified. According to the law, a Commission must establish criteria for clarifying areas at risk. The actual work of classification is then done by the regions. A three year time period was given to define areas at risk. As the normative still must be completed, the Italian Red Cross and the Italian National Institute for Occupational Prevention and Safety initiated this study both because the Red Cross has always been sensitive to health problems and also to offer the Commission further experimental data regarding radon in Italy

  17. Estimates of effective equivalent dose commitments for Slovene population following the Chernobyl accident

    Kanduc, M.; Jovanowic, O.; Kuhar, B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows the estimates of effective equivalent dose commitments for the two groups of Slovene population, 5 years old children and adults. Doses were calculated on the basis of the ICRP 30 methodology, first from the measurements of the concentrations of the radionuclides in air, water and food samples and then compared with the results of the measurements of radionuclides in composite samples of the prepared food, taken in the kindergarten nearby. Results show that there is certain degree of conservatism hidden in the calculation of the doses on the basis of measurements of the activity concentration in the elements of the biosphere and is estimated to be roughly 50%. (author)

  18. The performance of low pressure tissue-equivalent chambers and a new method for parameterising the dose equivalent

    Eisen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of Rossi-type spherical tissue-equivalent chambers with equivalent diameters between 0.5 μm and 2 μm was tested experimentally using monoenergetic and polyenergetic neutron sources in the energy region of 10 keV to 14.5 MeV. In agreement with theoretical predictions both chambers failed to provide LET information at low neutron energies. A dose equivalent algorithm was derived that utilises the event distribution but does not attempt to correlate event size with LET. The algorithm was predicted theoretically and confirmed by experiment. The algorithm that was developed determines the neutron dose equivalent, from the data of the 0.5 μm chamber, to better than +-20% over the energy range of 30 keV to 14.5 MeV. The same algorithm also determines the dose equivalent from the data of the 2 μm chamber to better than +-20% over the energy range of 60 keV to 14.5 MeV. The efficiency of the chambers is 33 counts per μSv, or equivalently about 10 counts s -1 per mSv.h -1 . This efficiency enables the measurement of dose equivalent rates above 1 mSv.h -1 for an integration period of 3 s. Integrated dose equivalents can be measured as low as 1 μSv. (author)

  19. Atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls in Indian cities: Levels, emission sources and toxicity equivalents

    Chakraborty, Paromita; Zhang, Gan; Eckhardt, Sabine; Li, Jun; Breivik, Knut; Lam, Paul K.S.; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Jones, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric concentration of Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured on diurnal basis by active air sampling during Dec 2006 to Feb 2007 in seven major cities from the northern (New Delhi and Agra), eastern (Kolkata), western (Mumbai and Goa) and southern (Chennai and Bangalore) parts of India. Average concentration of Σ 25 PCBs in the Indian atmosphere was 4460 (±2200) pg/m −3 with a dominance of congeners with 4–7 chlorine atoms. Model results (HYSPLIT, FLEXPART) indicate that the source areas are likely confined to local or regional proximity. Results from the FLEXPART model show that existing emission inventories cannot explain the high concentrations observed for PCB-28. Electronic waste, ship breaking activities and dumped solid waste are attributed as the possible sources of PCBs in India. Σ 25 PCB concentrations for each city showed significant linear correlation with Toxicity equivalence (TEQ) and Neurotoxic equivalence (NEQ) values. Highlights: •Unlike decreasing trend of PCBs in United States and European countries, high levels of PCBs remain in the Indian atmosphere. •Existing emission inventories cannot explain the high PCB concentrations in Indian atmosphere. •Electronic waste recycling, ship dismantling and open burning of municipal solid waste are implicated as potential sources. -- Measurement of atmospheric Polychlorinated biphenyls in seven major Indian cities

  20. Determination of equivalent copper thickness of patient equivalent phantoms in terms of attenuation, used in radiology

    Jansen, J.Th.M.; Suliman, I.I.; Zoetelief, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the radiation protection research programme of the European Union, as part of the DIMOND concerted action, constancy check protocols for fluoroscopic systems have been developed. For practical reasons copper filters are preferred to patients and tissue equivalent, water or PMMA, phantoms. The objectives are to derive patient entrance surface dose rates and the dose rate at the image intensifier input. The protocol states that copper sheets of either 1 mm or 1.5 mm thick may be used. The present study investigates the equivalent thickness of copper filters compared to PMMA phantoms in terms of attenuation for both geometries and different tube voltage and filter combinations. The geometry to determine the patient entrance surface dose is with the copper filter close to the image intensifier. The ionisation chamber is placed on the side of the copper sheet nearest to the X-ray tube. The inverse square law is used to correct for differences in position. Measurements are performed with different settings and with and without the use of an anti-scatter grid. The geometry to determine the air kerma rate at the image intensifier is with the copper filter attached to the X-ray tube diaphragm. The ionisation chamber is placed on the surface of the image intensifier housing. Again measurements are performed with different settings and with and without anti-scatter grid. If necessary, the inverse square law correction is applied. Two different radiation beam sizes are used, i.e., a small beam with a diameter of 0.10 m at a distance of 1.00 m from the focus and a large beam with a diameter of 0.23 m at a distance of 1.00 m from the focus. The applied tube voltages and PMMA phantom thickness combinations are 60 kV, 13 cm; 80 kV, 14 cm; 100 kV, 16 cm; 120 kV, 17 cm; 150 kV, 18 cm; 150 kV, 20 cm and 150 kV, 30 cm. The spectra for the different tube voltages are generated with the IPEM Report 78 software at an anode angle of 16 degree, 0% ripple and 2.5 mm added