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Sample records for equivalent photon method

  1. Accuracy limits of the equivalent field method for irregular photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, Dario Esteban

    2002-01-01

    A mathematical approach is developed to evaluate the accuracy of the equivalent field method using basic clinical photon beam data. This paper presents an analytical calculation of dose errors arising when field equivalencies, calculated at a certain reference depth, are translated to other depths. The phantom scatter summation is expressed as a Riemann-Stieltjes integral and two categories of irregular fields are introduced: uniform and multiform. It is shown that multiform fields produce errors whose magnitudes are nearly twice those corresponding to uniform fields in extreme situations. For uniform field shapes, the maximum, local, relative dose errors, when the equivalencies are calculated at 10 cm depth on the central axis and translated to a depth of 30 cm, are 3.8% and 8.8% for 6 MV and cobalt-60 photon beams, respectively. In terms of maximum dose those errors are within 1-2%. This supports the conclusion that the equivalencies between rectangular fields, which are examples of uniform fields, are applicable to dose ratio functions irrespective of beam energy. However, the magnitude of such errors could be of importance when assessing the exit dose for in vivo monitoring. This work provides a better understanding of the influence of the irregular field shapes on the accuracy of the equivalent field method. (author)

  2. DEEP code to calculate dose equivalents in human phantom for external photon exposure by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    1991-01-01

    The present report describes a computer code DEEP which calculates the organ dose equivalents and the effective dose equivalent for external photon exposure by the Monte Carlo method. MORSE-CG, Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is incorporated into the DEEP code to simulate photon transport phenomena in and around a human body. The code treats an anthropomorphic phantom represented by mathematical formulae and user has a choice for the phantom sex: male, female and unisex. The phantom can wear personal dosimeters on it and user can specify their location and dimension. This document includes instruction and sample problem for the code as well as the general description of dose calculation, human phantom and computer code. (author)

  3. A calculational method of photon dose equivalent based on the revised technical standards of radiological protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Suzuki, Tomoo

    1991-03-01

    The effective conversion factor for photons from 0.03 to 10 MeV were calculated to convert the absorbed dose in air to the 1 cm, 3 mm, and 70 μm depth dose equivalents behind iron, lead, concrete, and water shields up to 30 mfp thickness. The effective conversion factor changes slightly with thickness of the shields and becomes nearly constant at 5 to 10 mfp. The difference of the effective conversion factor was less than 2% between plane normal and point isotropic geometries. It is suggested that the present method, making the data base of the exposure buildup factors useful, would be very effective as compared to a new evaluation of the dose equivalent buildup factors. 5 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs

  4. Modification of equivalent photon approximation (EPA) for resolved photon processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drees, M.; Godbole, R.M.

    1995-05-01

    The authors propose a modification of the equivalent photon approximation (EPA) for processes which involve the parton content of the photon, to take into account the suppression of the photonic parton fluxes due to the virtuality of the photon. They present simple, physically motivated ansaetze to model this suppression and show that even though the parton content of the electron no longer factorizes into an electron flux function and photon structure function, it is still possible to express it as a single integral. They also show that for the TRISTAN (transposable ring intersecting storage accelerators in Nippon) experiments its effects can be numerically of the same size as that of the NLO corrections. Further, it is discussed a possible measurements at HERA (hadron electron ring an large), which can be provide an experimental handle on the effect the authors model through their ansaetze

  5. The radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy: Are ''photon-equivalent'' doses really photon-equivalent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Diaz, A.Z.; Ma, R.

    2001-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) produces a mixture of radiation dose components. The high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles are more damaging in tissue than equal doses of low-LET radiation. Each of the high-LET components can multiplied by an experimentally determined factor to adjust for the increased biological effectiveness and the resulting sum expressed in photon-equivalent units (Gy-Eq). BNCT doses in photon-equivalent units are based on a number of assumptions. It may be possible to test the validity of these assumptions and the accuracy of the calculated BNCT doses by 1) comparing the effects of BNCT in other animal or biological models where the effects of photon radiation are known, or 2) if there are endpoints reached in the BNCT dose escalation clinical trials that can be related to the known response to photons of the tissue in question. The calculated Gy-Eq BNCT doses delivered to dogs and to humans with BPA and the epithermal neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor were compared to expected responses to photon irradiation. The data indicate that Gy-Eq doses in brain may be underestimated. Doses to skin are consistent with the expected response to photons. Gy-Eq doses to tumor are significantly overestimated. A model system of cells in culture irradiated at various depths in a lucite phantom using the epithermal beam is under development. Preliminary data indicate that this approach can be used to detect differences in the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. The rat 9L gliosarcoma cell survival data was converted to photon-equivalent doses using the same factors assumed in the clinical studies. The results superimposed on the survival curve derived from irradiation with Cs-137 photons indicating the potential utility of this model system. (author)

  6. On the validity of the equivalent-photon approximation for virtual photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carimalo, C.; Kessler, P.; Parisi, J.

    1979-05-01

    For virtual photon-photon collisions in electron storage rings, one derive the equivalent-photon approximation from a helicity treatment, and present it in two forms, involving respectively (i) polarized transverse photons ('transverse-photon approximation') and (ii) unpolarized ones ('Williams-Weizsaecker approximation'). One first postulates the conditions of validity of the approximation on the basis of analytic considerations, and then check them numerically in the case of the process e e → e e μ + μ - . For this check, we consider the completely differentiated cross section as far as approximation (i) is concerned; and in the case of approximation (ii), the cross section differentiated with respect to all variables except the azimuthal angles. The results are given in the form of Tables showing the lower and higher limit of the error involved in the approximation for a large variety of kinematic configurations (i. e., energy losses and scattering angles of both electrons). Those Tables are discussed in detail, and conclusions are drawn as to the applicability of the equivalent-photon approximation to future experiments to be performed with high-energy electron storage rings

  7. The Source Equivalence Acceleration Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everson, Matthew S.; Forget, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a new acceleration method, the Source Equivalence Acceleration Method. • SEAM forms an equivalent coarse group problem for any spatial method. • Equivalence is also formed across different spatial methods and angular quadratures. • Testing is conducted using OpenMOC and performance is compared with CMFD. • Results show that SEAM is preferable for very expensive transport calculations. - Abstract: Fine-group whole-core reactor analysis remains one of the long sought goals of the reactor physics community. Such a detailed analysis is typically too computationally expensive to be realized on anything except the largest of supercomputers. Recondensation using the Discrete Generalized Multigroup (DGM) method, though, offers a relatively cheap alternative to solving the fine group transport problem. DGM, however, suffered from inconsistencies when applied to high-order spatial methods. While an exact spatial recondensation method was developed and provided full spatial consistency with the fine group problem, this approach substantially increased memory requirements for realistic problems. The method described in this paper, called the Source Equivalence Acceleration Method (SEAM), forms a coarse-group problem which preserves the fine-group problem even when using higher order spatial methods. SEAM allows recondensation to converge to the fine-group solution with minimal memory requirements and little additional overhead. This method also provides for consistency when using different spatial methods and angular quadratures between the coarse group and fine group problems. SEAM was implemented in OpenMOC, a 2D MOC code developed at MIT, and its performance tested against Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) acceleration on the C5G7 benchmark problem and on a 361 group version of the problem. For extremely expensive transport calculations, SEAM was able to outperform CMFD, resulting in speed-ups of 20–45 relative to the normal power

  8. Equivalence principle and quantum mechanics: quantum simulation with entangled photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, S

    2018-01-15

    Einstein's equivalence principle (EP) states the complete physical equivalence of a gravitational field and corresponding inertial field in an accelerated reference frame. However, to what extent the EP remains valid in non-relativistic quantum mechanics is a controversial issue. To avoid violation of the EP, Bargmann's superselection rule forbids a coherent superposition of states with different masses. Here we suggest a quantum simulation of non-relativistic Schrödinger particle dynamics in non-inertial reference frames, which is based on the propagation of polarization-entangled photon pairs in curved and birefringent optical waveguides and Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference measurement. The photonic simulator can emulate superposition of mass states, which would lead to violation of the EP.

  9. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1987-11-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. Critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 [1] methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed. The effective dose equivalent determined using ICRP-26 methods is significantly smaller than the dose equivalent determined by traditional methods. No existing personnel dosimeter or health physics instrument can determine effective dose equivalent. At the present time, the conversion of dosimeter response to dose equivalent is based on calculations for maximal or ''cap'' values using homogeneous spherical or cylindrical phantoms. The evaluated dose equivalent is, therefore, a poor approximation of the effective dose equivalent as defined by ICRP Publication 26. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Investigation of 1-cm dose equivalent for photons behind shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Hideo; Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1991-03-01

    The ambient dose equivalent at 1-cm depth, assumed equivalent to the 1-cm dose equivalent in practical dose estimations behind shielding slabs of water, concrete, iron or lead for normally incident photons having various energies was calculated by using conversion factors for a slab phantom. It was compared with the 1-cm depth dose calculated with the Monte Carlo code EGS4. It was concluded from this comparison that the ambient dose equivalent calculated by using the conversion factors for the ICRU sphere could be used for the evaluation of the 1-cm dose equivalent for the sphere phantom within 20% errors. Average and practical conversion factors are defined as the conversion factors from exposure to ambient dose equivalent in a finite slab or an infinite one, respectively. They were calculated with EGS4 and the discrete ordinates code PALLAS. The exposure calculated with simple estimation procedures such as point kernel methods can be easily converted to ambient dose equivalent by using these conversion factors. The maximum value between 1 and 30 mfp can be adopted as the conversion factor which depends only on material and incident photon energy. This gives the ambient dose equivalent on the safe side. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  11. The energy spectrum of 662 keV photons in a water equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akar Tarim, U.; Gurler, O.; Ozmutlu, E.N.; Yalcin, S.; Gundogdu, O.; Sharaf, J.M.; Bradley, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Investigation is made on the energy spectrum of photons originating from interactions of 662 keV primary gamma-ray photons emitted by a point source positioned at the centre of a water equivalent solid phantom of dimensions 19 cm×19 cm×24 cm. Peaks resulting from total energy loss (photopeak) and multiple and back scattering have been observed using a 51 mm×51 mm NaI(Tl) detector; good agreement being found between the measured and simulated response functions. The energy spectrum of the gamma photons obtained through the Monte Carlo simulation reveals local maxima at about 100 keV and 210 keV, being also observed in the experimental response function. Such spectra can be used as a method of testing the water equivalence of solid phantom media before their use for dosimetry measurements. - Highlights: ► Peaks resulting from total energy loss (photopeak) and multiple and back scattering were observed. ► Energy distribution of γ-ray photons from a point source at the centre of a water equivalent solid phantom. ► The method can be applied to various detector geometries.

  12. Equivalent Simplification Method of Micro-Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Cai Changchun; Cao Xiangqin

    2013-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the equivalent simplification method for the micro-grid system connection into distributed network. The equivalent simplification method proposed for interaction study between micro-grid and distributed network. Micro-grid network, composite load, gas turbine synchronous generation, wind generation are equivalent simplification and parallel connect into the point of common coupling. A micro-grid system is built and three phase and single phase grounded faults are per...

  13. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed

  14. 78 FR 67360 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Office of Research and Development; Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of the designation of five new equivalent methods for...) has designated, in accordance with 40 CFR Part 53, five new equivalent methods, one for measuring...

  15. 77 FR 60985 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of three new equivalent methods for monitoring ambient air quality. SUMMARY... equivalent methods, one for measuring concentrations of PM 2.5 , one for measuring concentrations of PM 10...

  16. 77 FR 32632 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION... accordance with 40 CFR Part 53, three new equivalent methods: One for measuring concentrations of nitrogen... INFORMATION: In accordance with regulations at 40 CFR Part 53, the EPA evaluates various methods for...

  17. Improving the equivalent-photon approximation in electron-positron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Schuler, G A

    1996-01-01

    The validity of the equivalent-photon approximation for two-photon processes in electron--positron collisions is critically examined. Commonly used forms to describe hadronic two-photon production are shown to lead to sizeable errors. An improved two-photon luminosity function is presented, which includes beyond-leading-logarithmic effects and scalar-photon contributions. Comparisons of various approximate expressions with the exact calculation in the case of the total hadronic cross section are given. Furthermore, effects of the poorly known low-Q2 behaviour of the virtual hadronic cross sections are discussed.

  18. Thevenin Equivalent Method for Dynamic Contingency Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jakob Glarbo; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Østergaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A method that exploits Thevenin equivalent representation for obtaining post-contingency steady-state nodal voltages is integrated with a method of detecting post-contingency aperiodic small-signal instability. The task of integrating stability assessment with contingency assessment is challenged...... by the cases of unstable post-contingency conditions. For unstable postcontingency conditions there exists no credible steady-state which can be used for basis of a stability assessment. This paper demonstrates how Thevenin Equivalent methods can be applied in algebraic representation of such bifurcation...... points which may be used in assessment of post-contingency aperiodic small-signal stability. The assessment method is introduced with a numeric example....

  19. A Photon Free Method to Solve Radiation Transport Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, B

    2006-01-01

    The multi-group discrete-ordinate equations of radiation transfer is solved for the first time by Newton's method. It is a photon free method because the photon variables are eliminated from the radiation equations to yield a N group XN direction smaller but equivalent system of equations. The smaller set of equations can be solved more efficiently than the original set of equations. Newton's method is more stable than the Semi-implicit Linear method currently used by conventional radiation codes

  20. On the calibration of photon dosemeters in the equivalent dose units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregadze, Yu.I.; Isaev, B.M.; Maslyaev, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    General aspects of transition from exposure dose of photo radiation to equivalent one are considered. By determination the equivalent dose is a function of point location in an irradiated object, that is why it is necessary to know equivalent dose distribution in the human body for uniform description of the risk degree. The international electrotechnical comission recommends to measure equivalent doses at 7 and 800 mg/cm 2 depths in a tissue-equivalent ball with 30 cm diameter, calling them skin equivalent dose and depth equivalent dose, respectively, and to compare them with the permissible 500 mZ and 50 mZ a year, respectively. Practical transition to using equivalent dose for evaluation of radiation danger of being in photon radiation field of low energy should include measures on regraduating already produced dose meters, graduating the dose meters under production and developing the system of their metrologic supply [ru

  1. A method for characterizing photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, J.J.; Hsu, H.H.; Hsieh, F.H.; Borak, T.B.

    1999-01-01

    Uncertainty in dosimetric and exposure rate measurements can increase in areas where multi-directional and low-energy photons (< 100 keV) exist because of variations in energy and angular measurement response. Also, accurate measurement of external exposures in spatially non-uniform fields may require multiple dosimetry. Therefore, knowledge of the photon fields in the workplace is required for full understanding of the accuracy of dosimeters and instruments, and for determining the need for multiple dosimeters. This project was designed to develop methods to characterize photon radiation fields in the workplace, and to test the methods in a plutonium facility. The photon field at selected work locations was characterized using TLDs and a collimated NaI(Tl) detector from which spatial variations in photon energy distributions were calculated from measured spectra. Laboratory results showed the accuracy and utility of the method. Field measurement results combined with observed work patterns suggested the following: (1) workers are exposed from all directions, but not isotropically, (2) photon energy distributions were directionally dependent, (3) stuffing nearby gloves into the glovebox reduced exposure rates significantly, (4) dosimeter placement on the front of the chest provided for a reasonable estimate of the average dose equivalent to workers' torsos, (5) justifiable conclusions regarding the need for multiple dosimetry can be made using this quantitative method, and (6) measurements of the exposure rates with ionization chambers pointed with open beta windows toward the glovebox provided the highest measured rates, although absolute accuracy of the field measurements still needs to be assessed

  2. Experiences of calibration in photon beams for the personal dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindborg, L.; Gullberg, O.

    1994-01-01

    The calibration quantity shall, according to ICRU, be the personal dose equivalent, H p (d), in a phantom having the composition of the ICRU tissue and the same shape and size as the recommended PMMA calibration phantom, 30 x 30 x 15 cm 3 . There exist differences in backscattering between PMMA and tissue that for certain photon energies could be of importance. This could either be treated as a systematic uncertainty or be incorporated in the definition. However, monoenergetic beams seldom appear in reality and the difference in backscatter is not thought to be important. The calibration quantity for photons was chosen as the absorbed dose to ICRU tissue (times a quality factor 1) at 10 mm depth in a tissue-equivalent slab phantom. In Sweden 13 different services run personal dosimetry. Their initial hesitation about the change of quantity disappeared after testing their photon energy responses. It was found that most TLD systems were measuring the new quantity better than the old one and that the film systems needed only minor corrections. Most TLD systems now report 5% larger dose equivalents for the same irradiation in a photon beam from a 137 Cs source. (author)

  3. Dosimetric properties of a Solid Water High Equivalency (SW557) phantom for megavoltage photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Fujio

    2017-07-01

    The dosimetric properties of the recently developed SW557 phantom have been investigated by comparison with those of the existing SW457 phantom in megavoltage photon beams. The electron fluence ratio φ pl w , and chamber ionization ratio k pl , of water to SW457 and water to SW557 for 4-15MV photons were calculated as a function of depth using Monte Carlo simulations, and compared with measured values. Values of φ pl w for SW457 were in the range of 1.004-1.014 for 4MV, and 1.014-1.018 for 15MV photons. The φ pl w for SW557 ranged from 1.005 to 1.008 for 4MV and from 1.010 to 1.015 for 15MV photons and the variation of φ pl w with depth for each beam energy was within ±0.5%. Values of k pl were obtained with a PTW 30013 Farmer-type ionization chamber. The k pl for SW457 ranged from 0.997 to 1.011 for 4-15MV photons. Values of k pl for SW557 were almost unity for 4 and 6MV photons, while in the case of 10 and 15MV photons they were less than 1.006, excepting the build-up region. The measured and calculated k pl values of water to SW557 were in the range of 0.997-1.002 and 1.000-1.006, respectively, for 4-15MV photons, at a depth of 10cm with a source-to-axis distance of 100cm. The measured and calculated k pl values were in agreement within their uncertainty ranges. As a water-equivalent phantom, SW557 can be used with a dosimetric difference within±0.6%, for 4-15MV photons, and is more water-equivalent than SW457 in megavoltage photon beams. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of two water-equivalent phantom materials for output calibration of photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lizhong; Prasad, Satish C.; Bassano, Daniel A.

    2003-01-01

    Two commercially available water-equivalent solid phantom materials were evaluated for output calibration in both photon (6-15 MV) and electron (6-20 MeV) beams. The solid water 457 and virtual water materials have the same chemical composition but differ in manufacturing process and density. A Farmer-type ionization chamber was used for measuring the output of the photon beams at 5- and 10-cm depth and electron beams at maximum buildup depth in the solid phantoms and in natural water. The water-equivalency correction factor for the solid materials is defined as the ratio of the chamber reading in natural water to that in the solid at the same linear depth. For photon beams, the correction factor was found to be independent of depth and was 0.987 and 0.993 for 6- and 15-MV beams, respectively, for solid water. For virtual water, the corresponding correction factors were 0.993 and 0.998 for 6- and 15-MV beams, respectively. For electron beams, the correction factors ranged from 1.013 to 1.007 for energies of 6 to 20 MeV for both solid materials. This indicated that the water-equivalency of these materials is within ± 1.3%, making them suitable substitutes for natural water in both photon and electron beam output measurements over a wide energy range. These correction factors are slightly larger than the manufacturers' advertised values (± 1.0% for solid water and ± 0.5% for virtual water). We suggest that these corrections are large enough in most cases and should be applied in the calculation of beam outputs

  5. A new concept of equivalent homogenization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Pogoskekyan, Leonid; Kim, Young Il; Ju, Hyung Kook; Chang, Moon Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    A new concept of equivalent homogenization is proposed. The concept employs new set of homogenized parameters: homogenized cross sections (XS) and interface matrix (IM), which relates partial currents at the cell interfaces. The idea of interface matrix generalizes the idea of discontinuity factors (DFs), proposed and developed by K. Koebke and K. Smith. The offered concept covers both those of K. Koebke and K. Smith; both of them can be simulated within framework of new concept. Also, the offered concept covers Siemens KWU approach for baffle/reflector simulation, where the equivalent homogenized reflector XS are derived from the conservation of response matrix at the interface in 1D simi-infinite slab geometry. The IM and XS of new concept satisfy the same assumption about response matrix conservation in 1D semi-infinite slab geometry. It is expected that the new concept provides more accurate approximation of heterogeneous cell, especially in case of the steep flux gradients at the cell interfaces. The attractive shapes of new concept are: improved accuracy, simplicity of incorporation in the existing codes, equal numerical expenses in comparison to the K. Smith`s approach. The new concept is useful for: (a) explicit reflector/baffle simulation; (b) control blades simulation; (c) mixed UO{sub 2}/MOX core simulation. The offered model has been incorporated in the finite difference code and in the nodal code PANDOX. The numerical results show good accuracy of core calculations and insensitivity of homogenized parameters with respect to in-core conditions. 9 figs., 7 refs. (Author).

  6. Two-photon equivalent weighting of spatial excimer laser beam profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva, Eric; Bauer, Harry H.; Metzger, K.; Pfeiffer, A.

    2001-04-01

    Damage in optical materials for semiconductor lithography applications caused by exposure to 248 or 193 nm light is usually two-photon driven, hence it is a nonlinear function of incident intensity. Materials should be tested with flat- topped temporal and spatial laser beam profiles to facilitate interpretation of data, but in reality this is hard to achieve. Sandstrom provided a formula that approximates any given temporal pulse shape with a two- photon equivalent rectangular pulse (Second Symposium on 193 nm Lithography, Colorado Springs 1997). Known as the integral-square pulse duration, this definition has been embraced as an industry standard. Originally faced with the problem of comparing results obtained with pseudo-Gaussian spatial profiles to literature data, we found that a general solution for arbitrarily inhomogeneous spatial beam profiles exists which results in a definition much similar to Sandstrom's. In addition, we proved the validity of our approach in experiments with intentionally altered beam profiles.

  7. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  8. On the equivalence of different regularization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzezowski, S.

    1985-01-01

    The R-circunflex-operation preceded by the regularization procedure is discussed. Some arguments are given, according to which the results may depend on the method of regularization, introduced in order to avoid divergences in perturbation calculations. 10 refs. (author)

  9. Photofission and electrofission by virtual photon methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onley, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    A survey on photofission and electrofission using virtual photon methods is presented. Some explicit calculations with these methods are shown and applications to heavy nucleus reactions followed of comparison with experiments, mostly electrofission, are also shown. (L.C.) [pt

  10. Validity of the equivalent-photon approximation for the production of massive spin-1 particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraman, T.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that the equivalent-photon approximation (EPA) for processes with massive spin-1 particles in the final state would have validity in a more restricted kinematic domain than for processes where it is commonly applied, viz., those with spin-1/2 or spin-0 particles in the final state. The criterion for the validity of EPA for the two-photon production of a pair of charged, massive, point-like spin-1 particles V ± , each of mass M and with a standard magnetic moment (k=1) is obtained. In a process in which one of the photons is real and the other virtual with four-momentum q, the condition for the validity of EPA is absolute value of q 2 2 , in addition to the usual condition absolute value of q 2 2 , W being the V + V - invariant mass. In a process in which both photons are virtual (with four-momenta q and q'), the condition is absolute value of q 2 absolute value of q' 2 W 4 8 , in addition to absolute value of q 2 2 , absolute value of q' 2 2 and absolute value of q 2 2 , absolute value of q' 2 2 . Even when these extra conditions permitting the use of EPA are not fulfilled, convenient approximate expressions may still be obtained assuming merely absolute value of q 2 2 and absolute value of q' 2 2 . It is also discussed how the extra conditions are altered when the vector bosons are incorporated in a spontaneously broken gauge theory. Examples of W boson production in Weinberg-Salam model are considered for which the condition absolute value of q 2 absolute value of q' 2 W 4 8 is shown to be removed. (author)

  11. Modified methods for growing 3-D skin equivalents: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Rebecca; Ambler, Carrie A

    2014-01-01

    Artificial epidermis can be reconstituted in vitro by seeding primary epidermal cells (keratinocytes) onto a supportive substrate and then growing the developing skin equivalent at the air-liquid interface. In vitro skin models are widely used to study skin biology and for industrial drug and cosmetic testing. Here, we describe updated methods for growing 3-dimensional skin equivalents using de-vitalized, de-epidermalized dermis (DED) substrates including methods for DED substrate preparation, cell seeding, growth conditions, and fixation procedures.

  12. Compound FDTD method for silicon photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Olyaee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Attempt to manufacture photonics devices on silicon requires theoretical and numerical prediction. This essay presents Compound FDTD (C-FDTD method for comprehensive simulation of silicon photonics devices. Although this method is comprehensive, it maintains conventional Yee algorithm. The method involves variation of refractive index due to nonlinear effects. With the help of this simulator, refractive index change due to free-carriers created through two photon absorption and Kerr effect in silicon waveguide is considered. Results indicate how to choose pump pulse shape to optimum operation of active photonics devices. Also conductivity variation of Si waveguide due to change in free-carrier density is studied. By considering variations in conductivity profile, we are able to design better schemes for sweep free carriers away with reverse bias or nonlinear photovoltaic effect for fast devices and Raman amplifiers.

  13. Analysis of equivalent antenna based on FDTD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-xing Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An equivalent microstrip antenna used in radio proximity fuse is presented. The design of this antenna is based on multilayer multi-permittivity dielectric substrate which is analyzed by finite difference time domain (FDTD method. Equivalent iterative formula is modified in the condition of cylindrical coordinate system. The mixed substrate which contains two kinds of media (one of them is airtakes the place of original single substrate. The results of equivalent antenna simulation show that the resonant frequency of equivalent antenna is similar to that of the original antenna. The validity of analysis can be validated by means of antenna resonant frequency formula. Two antennas have same radiation pattern and similar gain. This method can be used to reduce the weight of antenna, which is significant to the design of missile-borne antenna.

  14. The experimental method for neutron dose-equivalent detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong

    1992-01-01

    A new method, for getting neutron dose-equivalent Cd rode absorption method is described. The method adopts Cd-rode-swarm buck absorption, which greatly improved the neutron sensitivity and simplified the adjustment method. By this method, the author has developed BH3105 model neutron dose equivalent meter, the sensitivity of this instrument reach 10 cps/μSvh -1 . γ-ray depression rate reaches 4000:1, the measurement range is 0.1 μSv/h-10 6 μSv/h. The energy response is good (from thermal neutron-14 MeV neutron), this instrument can be used to measure the dose equivalent of the neutron areas

  15. Single photon imaging and timing array sensor apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Clayton

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for generating a three-dimension image of an object or target. The apparatus is comprised of a photon source for emitting a photon at a target. The emitted photons are received by a photon receiver for receiving the photon when reflected from the target. The photon receiver determines a reflection time of the photon and further determines an arrival position of the photon on the photon receiver. An analyzer is communicatively coupled to the photon receiver, wherein the analyzer generates a three-dimensional image of the object based upon the reflection time and the arrival position.

  16. Displacement damage analysis and modified electrical equivalent circuit for electron and photon-irradiated silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjhangmehr, Afshin; Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein

    2014-10-01

    Solar modules and arrays are the conventional energy resources of space satellites. Outside the earth's atmosphere, solar panels experience abnormal radiation environments and because of incident particles, photovoltaic (PV) parameters degrade. This article tries to analyze the electrical performance of electron and photon-irradiated mono-crystalline silicon (mono-Si) solar cells. PV cells are irradiated by mono-energetic electrons and poly-energetic photons and immediately characterized after the irradiation. The mean degradation of the maximum power (Pmax) of silicon solar cells is presented and correlated using the displacement damage dose (Dd) methodology. This method simplifies evaluation of cell performance in space radiation environments and produces a single characteristic curve for Pmax degradation. Furthermore, complete analysis of the results revealed that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) and the filling factor of mono-Si cells did not significantly change during the irradiation and were independent of the radiation type and fluence. Moreover, a new technique is developed that adapts the irradiation-induced effects in a single-cell equivalent electrical circuit and adjusts its elements. The "modified circuit" is capable of modeling the "radiation damage" in the electrical behavior of mono-Si solar cells and simplifies the designing of the compensation circuits.

  17. 77 FR 55832 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of a New Equivalent Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... automated monitoring method utilizing a measurement principle based on sample collection by filtration and... 58. Questions concerning the commercial availability or technical aspects of the method should be...

  18. Equivalent (uniform) square field sizes of flattening filter free photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    Various types of treatment units, such as CyberKnife, TomoTherapy and C-arm linear accelerators (LINACs) are operated using flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams. Their reference dosimetry, however, is currently based on codes of practice that provide data which were primarily developed and tested for high-energy photon beams with flattening filter (WFF). The aim of this work was to introduce equivalent uniform square field sizes of FFF beams to serve as a basis of a unified reference dosimetry procedure applicable to all aforementioned FFF machines. For this purpose, in-house determined experimental data together with published data of the ratio of doses at depths of 20 cm and 10 cm in water (D 20,10) were used to characterize the depth dose distribution of 6 and 10 MV WFF and FFF beams. These data were analyzed for field sizes ranging from 2  ×  2 cm2 to 40  ×  40 cm2. A scatter function that takes the lateral profiles of the individual beams into account was fitted to the experimental data. The lateral profiles of the WFF beams were assumed to be uniform, while those of the FFF beams were approximated using fourth or sixth order polynomials. The scatter functions of the FFF beams were recalculated using a uniform lateral profile (the same as the physical profile of the WFF beams), and are henceforth denoted as virtual uniform FFF beams (VUFFF). The field sizes of the VUFFF beams having the same scatter contribution as the corresponding FFF beams at a given field size were defined as the equivalent uniform square field (EQUSF) size. Data from four different LINACs with 18 different beams in total, as well as a CyberKnife beam, were analyzed. The average values of EQUSFs over all investigated LINACs of the conventional 10  ×  10 cm2 reference fields of 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams for C-arm LINACs and machine-specific reference fields for CyberKnife and TomoTherapy were 9.5 cm, 9 cm, 5.0 cm and 6.5 cm respectively. The

  19. Regional inter-comparison of measurements of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) using photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M.; Zahili, M.; Kharita, M.H.

    2012-11-01

    The overall objective is to verify performance and to improve the Individual Monitoring services (IMS). This can be achieved with the following specific objectives of the intercomparison:1. To assess the capabilities of the dosimetry services to measure the quantity H p (10) in photon (gamma and x-ray) fields. 2. To help the participating Member States in achieving sufficiently accurate dosimetry service and, if necessary, 3. To provide guidelines for improvements and not simply a test of the performance of the existing dosimetric service. Actually a significant improvement has been achieved by the participants in the accuracy of evaluating personal dose equivalent from 15% in the first phase to 5% in the second phase. Some participants used the results of the inter-comparison to verify the calibration and to improve their dosimetric procedures, but from the results it was clear that some participants need to a technical support especially in calibration and using their measuring system in the field of personal monitoring. The conclusion contains advises, solutions, propositions and evaluation for all situations which noticed during the intercomparison. (authors)

  20. Evaluation of equivalent doses in 18F PET/CT using the Monte Carlo method with MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinato, Walmir; Santos, William Souza; Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2017-01-01

    The present work used the Monte Carlo method (MMC), specifically the Monte Carlo NParticle - MCNPX, to simulate the interaction of radiation involving photons and particles, such as positrons and electrons, with virtual adult anthropomorphic simulators on PET / CT scans and to determine absorbed and equivalent doses in adult male and female patients

  1. SU-F-T-408: On the Determination of Equivalent Squares for Rectangular Small MV Photon Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, OA; Wegener, S; Exner, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It is common practice to tabulate dosimetric data like output factors, scatter factors and detector signal correction factors for a set of square fields. In order to get the data for an arbitrary field, it is mapped to an equivalent square, having the same scatter as the field of interest. For rectangular fields both, tabulated data and empiric formula exist. We tested the applicability of such rules for very small fields. Methods: Using the Monte-Carlo method (EGSnrc-doseRZ), the dose to a point in 10cm depth in water was calculated for cylindrical impinging fluence distributions. Radii were from 0.5mm to 11.5mm with 1mm thickness of the rings. Different photon energies were investigated. With these data a matrix was constructed assigning the amount of dose to the field center to each matrix element. By summing up the elements belonging to a certain field, the dose for an arbitrary point in 10cm depth could be determined. This was done for rectangles up to 21mm side length. Comparing the dose to square field results, equivalent squares could be assigned. The results were compared to using the geometrical mean and the 4Xperimeter/area rule. Results: For side length differences less than 2mm, the difference between all methods was in general less than 0.2mm. For more elongated fields, relevant differences of more than 1mm and up to 3mm for the fields investigated occurred. The mean square side length calculated from both empiric formulas fitted much better, deviating hardly more than 1mm and for the very elongated fields only. Conclusion: For small rectangular photon fields, deviating only moderately from square both investigated empiric methods are sufficiently accurate. As the deviations often differ regarding their sign, using the mean improves the accuracy and the useable elongation range. For ratios larger than 2, Monte-Carlo generated data are recommended. SW is funded by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SA481/10-1)

  2. SU-F-T-408: On the Determination of Equivalent Squares for Rectangular Small MV Photon Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, OA; Wegener, S; Exner, F [University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: It is common practice to tabulate dosimetric data like output factors, scatter factors and detector signal correction factors for a set of square fields. In order to get the data for an arbitrary field, it is mapped to an equivalent square, having the same scatter as the field of interest. For rectangular fields both, tabulated data and empiric formula exist. We tested the applicability of such rules for very small fields. Methods: Using the Monte-Carlo method (EGSnrc-doseRZ), the dose to a point in 10cm depth in water was calculated for cylindrical impinging fluence distributions. Radii were from 0.5mm to 11.5mm with 1mm thickness of the rings. Different photon energies were investigated. With these data a matrix was constructed assigning the amount of dose to the field center to each matrix element. By summing up the elements belonging to a certain field, the dose for an arbitrary point in 10cm depth could be determined. This was done for rectangles up to 21mm side length. Comparing the dose to square field results, equivalent squares could be assigned. The results were compared to using the geometrical mean and the 4Xperimeter/area rule. Results: For side length differences less than 2mm, the difference between all methods was in general less than 0.2mm. For more elongated fields, relevant differences of more than 1mm and up to 3mm for the fields investigated occurred. The mean square side length calculated from both empiric formulas fitted much better, deviating hardly more than 1mm and for the very elongated fields only. Conclusion: For small rectangular photon fields, deviating only moderately from square both investigated empiric methods are sufficiently accurate. As the deviations often differ regarding their sign, using the mean improves the accuracy and the useable elongation range. For ratios larger than 2, Monte-Carlo generated data are recommended. SW is funded by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SA481/10-1)

  3. The equivalent energy method: an engineering approach to fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    The equivalent energy method for elastic-plastic fracture evaluations was developed around 1970 for determining realistic engineering estimates for the maximum load-displacement or stress-strain conditions for fracture of flawed structures. The basis principles were summarized but the supporting experimental data, most of which were obtained after the method was proposed, have never been collated. This paper restates the original bases more explicitly and presents the validating data in graphical form. Extensive references are given. The volumetric energy ratio, a modelling parameter encompassing both size and temperature, is the fundamental parameter of the equivalent energy method. It is demonstrated that, in an engineering sense, the volumetric energy ratio is a unique material characteristic for a steel, much like a material property except size must be taken into account. With this as a proposition, the basic formula of the equivalent energy method is derived. Sufficient information is presented so that investigators and analysts may judge the viability and applicability of the method to their areas of interest. (author)

  4. Modelling of Airship Flight Mechanics by the Projection Equivalent Method

    OpenAIRE

    Frantisek Jelenciak; Michael Gerke; Ulrich Borgolte

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the projection equivalent method (PEM) as a specific and relatively simple approach for the modelling of aircraft dynamics. By the PEM it is possible to obtain a mathematic al model of the aerodynamic forces and momentums acting on different kinds of aircraft during flight. For the PEM, it is a characteristic of it that - in principle - it provides an acceptable regression model of aerodynamic forces and momentums which exhibits reasonable and plausible behaviour from a...

  5. A method to obtain new cross-sections transport equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmiotti, G.

    1988-01-01

    We present a method, that allows the calculation, by the mean of variational principle, of equivalent cross-sections in order to take into account the transport and mesh size effects on reactivity variation calculations. The method validation has been made in two and three dimensions geometries. The reactivity variations calculated in three dimensional hexagonal geometry with seven points by subassembly using two sets of equivalent cross-sections for control rods are in a very good agreement with the ones of a transport, extrapolated to zero mesh size, calculation. The difficulty encountered in obtaining a good flux distribution has lead to the utilisation of a single set of equivalent cross-sections calculated by starting from an appropriated R-Z model that allows to take into account also the axial transport effects for the control rod followers. The global results in reactivity variations are still satisfactory with a good performance for the flux distribution. The main interest of the proposed method is the possibility to simulate a full 3D transport calculation, with fine mesh size, using a 3D diffusion code, with a larger mesh size. The results obtained should be affected by uncertainties, which do not exceed ± 4% for a large LMFBR control rod worth and for very different rod configurations. This uncertainty is by far smaller than the experimental uncertainties. (author). 5 refs, 8 figs, 9 tabs

  6. A New Equivalence Theory Method for Doubly Heterogeneous Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Lee, Deokjung

    2014-01-01

    The unique characteristics cannot be handled easily by conventional computer code. A new methodology is being developed to treat resonance self-shielding in a doubly heterogeneous system. The method first homogenizes the material in the fuel compact region using an analytical approximation for the disadvantage factor based on equivalence theory. The disadvantage factor accounts for spatial self-shielding of the resonance flux within the fuel grains. The doubly-heterogeneous effects are accounted by using a modified definition of background cross section, which includes geometry parameters and the cross sections of both the fuel grain and fuel compact regions. For the verification, the new DH methodology was implemented in deterministic transport code TICTOC developed at UNIST which uses equivalence theory for resonance treatment and Method of Characteristics (MOC) for the ray tracing. In previous research, this new methodology was verified for several pin cell problems but further verification is required to confirm the validity of the methodology for various situations. Therefore, in this study, 9 cases for unit pin cell problems are designed and the accuracy of the new DH method is compared to the Monte Carlo code, McCARD. The new method for doubly-heterogeneous self-shielding using equivalence theory was summarized and calculation procedure was presented. The new methods use analytical expression for the disadvantage factor therefore additional complicated module is not required. The new method was verified for 9 pin cell models. As a result, TICTOC with the new DH method predicts the eigenvalues within about 200 pcm error compared with Monte Carlo results for the most of problems

  7. SU-E-T-336: Dosimetric Properties of a New Solid Water High Equivalency Phantom for High-Energy Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, F; Ohno, T; Onitsuka, R; Shimohigashi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric properties in high-energy photon beams for a Solid Water High Equivalency (SWHE, SW557) phantom (Gammex) which was newly developed as water mimicking material. Methods: The mass density of SWHE and SWHE/water electron density ratio are 1.032 g/cm 3 and 1.005 according to the manufacturer information, respectively. SWHE is more water equivalent material in physical characteristics and uniformity than conventional SW457. This study calculated the relative ionization ratio of water and SWHE as a function of depth from the cavity dose in PTW30013 and Exradin A19 Farmer-type ionization chambers using Monte Caro simulations. The simulation was performed with a 10 x 10 cm 2 field at SAD of 100 cm for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons. The ionization ratio was also measured with the PTW30013 chamber for 6 and 15 MV photons. In addition, the overall perturbation factor of both chambers was calculated for both phantoms. Results: The relative ionization ratio curves for water and SWHE was in good agreement for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE for both chambers was 0.999–1.002, 0.999–1.002, 1.001–1.004, 1.004–1.007, and 1.006–1.010 at depths of over the buildup region for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons, respectively. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE increased up to 1% with increasing the photon energy. The measured ionization ratio of water/SWHE for 6 and 15 MV photons agreed well with calculated values. The overall perturbation factor for both chambers was 0.983–0.988 and 0.978–0.983 for water and SWHE, respectively, in a range from 4 MV to 18 MV. Conclusion: The depth scaling factor of water/SWHE was equal to unity for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE at a reference depth was equal to unity for 4 and 6 MV and larger up to 0.7% than unity for 18 MV

  8. Ultra compact spectrometer apparatus and method using photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of photonic crystal formation, and to methods and apparatus for using such photonic crystals, particularly in conjunction with detector arrays. Photonic crystal parameters and detector array parameters are compared to optimize the selection and orientation of a photonic crystal shape. A photonic crystal is operatively positioned relative to a plurality of light sensors. The light sensors can be separated by a pitch distance and positioned within one half of the pitch distance of an exit surface of the photonic crystals.

  9. Experimental method research on neutron equal dose-equivalent detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong

    1995-10-01

    The design principles of neutron dose-equivalent meter for neutron biological equi-effect detection are studied. Two traditional principles 'absorption net principle' and 'multi-detector principle' are discussed, and on the basis of which a new theoretical principle for neutron biological equi-effect detection--'absorption stick principle' has been put forward to place high hope on both increasing neutron sensitivity of this type of meters and overcoming the shortages of the two traditional methods. In accordance with this new principle a brand-new model of neutron dose-equivalent meter BH3105 has been developed. Its neutron sensitivity reaches 10 cps/(μSv·h -1 ), 18∼40 times higher than that of all the same kinds of meters 0.23∼0.56 cps/(μSv·h -1 ), available today at home and abroad and the specifications of the newly developed meter reach or surpass the levels of the same kind of meters. Therefore the new theoretical principle of neutron biological equi-effect detection--'absorption stick principle' is proved to be scientific, advanced and useful by experiments. (3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.)

  10. Comment on ''Modified photon equation of motion as a test for the principle of equivalence''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nityananda, R.

    1992-01-01

    In a recent paper, a modification of the geodesic equation was proposed for spinning photons containing a spin-curvature coupling term. The difference in arrival times of opposite circular polarizations starting simultaneously from a source was computed, obtaining a result linear in the coupling parameter. It is pointed out here that this linear term violates causality and, more generally, Fermat's principle, implying calculational errors. Even if these are corrected, there is a violation of covariance in the way the photon spin was introduced. Rectifying this makes the effect computed vanish entirely

  11. Modelling of Airship Flight Mechanics by the Projection Equivalent Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek Jelenciak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the projection equivalent method (PEM as a specific and relatively simple approach for the modelling of aircraft dynamics. By the PEM it is possible to obtain a mathematic al model of the aerodynamic forces and momentums acting on different kinds of aircraft during flight. For the PEM, it is a characteristic of it that -in principle - it provides an acceptable regression model of aerodynamic forces and momentums which exhibits reasonable and plausible behaviour from a dynamics viewpoint. The principle of this method is based on applying Newton's mechanics, which are then combined with a specific form of the finite element method to cover additional effects. The main advantage of the PEM is that it is not necessary to carry out measurements in a wind tunnel for the identification of the model's parameters. The plausible dynamical behaviour of the model can be achieved by specific correction parameters, which can be determined on the basis of experimental data obtained during the flight of the aircraft. In this article, we present the PEM as applied to an airship as well as a comparison of the data calculated by the PEM and experimental flight data.

  12. An investigation into the equivalent parameter method for homogeneous transport equivalent parameters for use in fast reactor control assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullett, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    P Benoist has developed a method for calculating cross-sections for Fast Reactor control rods and their followers described by a single homogenised region (the Equivalent Parameter Method). When used in a diffusion theory calculation, these equivalent cross-sections should give the same rod worth as one would obtain from a transport theory calculation with a heterogeneous description of the control rod and the follower. In this report, Benoist's theory is described, and a comprehensive set of tests is presented. These tests show that the method gives very good results over a range of geometries and control rod positions for a model fast reactor core. (author)

  13. Measurement of californium-252 gamma photons depth dose distribution in tissue equivalent material. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadel, M A; El-Fiki, M A; Eissa, H M; Abdel-Hafez, A; Naguib, S H [National Institute of Standards, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Phantom of tissue equivalent material with and without bone was used measuring depth dose distribution of gamma-rays from californium-252 source. The source was positioned at center of perspex walled phantom. Depth dose measurements were recorded for X, Y and Z planes at different distances from source. TLD 700 was used for measuring the dose distribution. Results indicate that implantation of bone in tissue equivalent medium cause changes in the gamma depth dose distribution which varies according to variation in bone geometry. 9 figs.

  14. Modules and methods for all photonic computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, David R.; Ma, Chao Hung

    2001-01-01

    A method for all photonic computing, comprising the steps of: encoding a first optical/electro-optical element with a two dimensional mathematical function representing input data; illuminating the first optical/electro-optical element with a collimated beam of light; illuminating a second optical/electro-optical element with light from the first optical/electro-optical element, the second optical/electro-optical element having a characteristic response corresponding to an iterative algorithm useful for solving a partial differential equation; iteratively recirculating the signal through the second optical/electro-optical element with light from the second optical/electro-optical element for a predetermined number of iterations; and, after the predetermined number of iterations, optically and/or electro-optically collecting output data representing an iterative optical solution from the second optical/electro-optical element.

  15. First results from electron-photon damage equivalence studies on a generic ethylene-propylene rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckalew, W.H.

    1986-04-01

    As part of a simulator adequacy assessment program, the relative effectiveness of electrons and photons to produce damage in a generic ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) has been investigated. The investigation was limited in extent in that a single EPR material, in three thickness, was exposed to Cobalt-60 photons and three electron beam energies. Basing material damage on changes in the EPR mechanical properties elongation and tensile strength, we observed that EPR damage was a smoothly varying function of absorbed energy and independent of irradiating particle type. EPR damage tracked equally well as a function of both incident particle energy and material front surface dose. Based on these preliminary data, we tentatively concluded that a correlation between particle, particle energy, and material damage (as measured by changes in material elongation and/or tensile strength) has been demonstrated. 14 figs

  16. Water-equivalent one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter for measuring therapeutic photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jinsoo; Won Jang, Kyoung; Jae Yoo, Wook; Han, Ki-Tek; Park, Jang-Yeon; Lee, Bongsoo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter, which consists of 9 scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters, septa, and PMMA blocks for measuring surface and percentage depth doses of a therapeutic photon beam. Each dosimeter embedded in the 1-D scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter is composed of square type organic scintillators and plastic optical fibers. Also black PVC films are used as septa to minimize cross-talk between the scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters. To construct a dosimeter system, a 1-D scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter and a CMOS image sensor were combined with 20 m-length plastic optical fibers. Using the dosimeter system, we measured surface and percentage depth doses of 6 and 15 MV photon beams and compared the results with those of EBT films and an ionization chamber. - Highlights: ► Fabrication of a one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter. ► The one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter has 9 scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters. ► Measurements of surface and percentage depth doses of a therapeutic photon beam. ► The results were compared with those of EBT films and an ionization chamber.

  17. 75 FR 22126 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9142-1] Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of one new equivalent method for monitoring ambient air...

  18. 75 FR 9894 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ..., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711. Designation of this new equivalent method is intended to... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9121-6] Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental...

  19. 76 FR 15974 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ..., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711. Designation of these new equivalent methods is intended to... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9285-2] Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Four New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental...

  20. 76 FR 62402 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9476-7] Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods; Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of one new equivalent method for monitoring ambient air...

  1. 75 FR 51039 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ..., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711. Designation of these new equivalent methods is intended to... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9190-5] Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Two New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental...

  2. 75 FR 30022 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9156-1] Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of one new equivalent method for monitoring ambient air...

  3. Comparative study on diagonal equivalent methods of masonry infill panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalia, Aniendhita Rizki; Iranata, Data

    2017-06-01

    ratio of height to width of 1 to 1.5. Load used in the experiment was based on Uniform Building Code (UBC) 1991. Every method compared was calculated first to get equivalent diagonal strut width. The second step was modelling method using structure analysis software as a frame with a diagonal in a linear mode. The linear mode was chosen based on structure analysis commonly used by structure designers. The frame was loaded and for every model, its load and deformation values were identified. The values of load - deformation of every method were compared to those of experimental test specimen by Mehrabi and open frame. From comparative study performed, Holmes' and Bazan-Meli's equations gave results the closest to the experimental test specimen by Mehrabi. Other equations that gave close values within the limit (by comparing it to the open frame) are Saneinejad-Hobbs, Stafford-Smith, Bazan-Meli, Liauw Kwan, Paulay and Priestley, FEMA 356, Durani Luo, Hendry, Papia and Chen-Iranata.

  4. A refined method for calculating equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Andreas; Bönisch, Harald; Ostermöller, Jennifer; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Dhomse, Sandip; Jöckel, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Chlorine and bromine atoms lead to catalytic depletion of ozone in the stratosphere. Therefore the use and production of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) containing chlorine and bromine is regulated by the Montreal Protocol to protect the ozone layer. Equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC) has been adopted as an appropriate metric to describe the combined effects of chlorine and bromine released from halocarbons on stratospheric ozone. Here we revisit the concept of calculating EESC. We derive a refined formulation of EESC based on an advanced concept of ODS propagation into the stratosphere and reactive halogen release. A new transit time distribution is introduced in which the age spectrum for an inert tracer is weighted with the release function for inorganic halogen from the source gases. This distribution is termed the release time distribution. We show that a much better agreement with inorganic halogen loading from the chemistry transport model TOMCAT is achieved compared with using the current formulation. The refined formulation shows EESC levels in the year 1980 for the mid-latitude lower stratosphere, which are significantly lower than previously calculated. The year 1980 is commonly used as a benchmark to which EESC must return in order to reach significant progress towards halogen and ozone recovery. Assuming that - under otherwise unchanged conditions - the EESC value must return to the same level in order for ozone to fully recover, we show that it will take more than 10 years longer than estimated in this region of the stratosphere with the current method for calculation of EESC. We also present a range of sensitivity studies to investigate the effect of changes and uncertainties in the fractional release factors and in the assumptions on the shape of the release time distributions. We further discuss the value of EESC as a proxy for future evolution of inorganic halogen loading under changing atmospheric dynamics using simulations from

  5. Fluence to Effective Dose and Effective Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients for Photons from 50 KeV to 10 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pillon, M.

    1996-07-01

    Effective dose equivalent and effective dose per unit photon fluence have been calculated by the FLUKA code for various geometrical conditions of irradiation of an anthropomorphic phantom placed in a vacuum. Calculations have been performed for monoenergetic photons of energy ranging from 50 keV to 10 GeV. The agreement with the results of other authors, when existing, is generally very satisfactory

  6. The equidosemeter ED-02 as a device for dose equivalent measurements in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrosimov, A.I.; Alekseev, A.G.; Antipov, V.A.; Golovachik, V.T.

    1985-01-01

    The equidosemeter ED-02 is to be used for simultaneous measurements of the dose equivalent, absorbed dose, and mean quality factor of mixed radiations. The detector is a tissue equivalent spherical low-pressure proportional counter tube the signal of which is simultaneously recorded in two channels - a current channel and a pulse one. The current channel is linear and its response proportional to the absorbed dose. The pulse channel includes a nonlinear pulse amplitude converter the characteristic of which, taking into account the required dependence of the mean quality factor on linear energy transfer, has been chosen in such a way that in final counting the pulse channel response is proportional to the difference between dose equivalent and absorbed dose. On the basis of calculations of event spectra in the sensitive volume of the detector, the energy dependence of the dosemeter sensitivity is analysed for neutron energies up to 20 MeV. The characteristic of the nonlinear converter has been calculated on the basis of the construction parameters of the detector and optimized with respect to a representative sample of neutron spectra beyond the shields of nuclear plants. The heterogeneity of the detector, i.e. the difference between the atomic composition of wall and filling and the composition of soft biological tissue as well as the effect of the conducting coating of the case cathode, has been taken into consideration. Moreover, the test results of the device in mixed neutron-photon fields of 60 Co, 239 Pu-α-Be and 252 Cf radioisotope sources are presented. The main measuring error of dose characteristics is shown to be less than 20% in the dose range 1 x 10 -3 to 4 x 10 -3 Sv/h. (author)

  7. MATLAB-aided teaching and learning in optics and photonics using the methods of computational photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhili; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Daqing; Pu, Jixiong

    2017-08-01

    Due to the nature of light fields of laser waves and pulses as vector quantities with complex spatial distribution and temporal dependence, the optics and photonics courses have always been difficult to teach and learn without the support of graphical visualization, numerical simulations and hands-on experiments. One of the state-of-the-art method of computational photonics, the finite-difference time-domain(FDTD) method, is applied with MATLAB simulations to model typical teaching cases in optics and photonics courses. The obtained results with graphical visualization in the form of animated pictures allow students to more deeply understand the dynamic process of light interaction with classical optical structures. The discussed teaching methodology is aimed to enhance the teaching effectiveness of optics and photonics courses and arousing the students' learning interest.

  8. Advanced photon counting applications, methods, instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Kapusta, Peter; Erdmann, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    This volume focuses on Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC), a powerful tool allowing luminescence lifetime measurements to be made with high temporal resolution, even on single molecules. Combining spectrum and lifetime provides a "fingerprint" for identifying such molecules in the presence of a background. Used together with confocal detection, this permits single-molecule spectroscopy and microscopy in addition to ensemble measurements, opening up an enormous range of hot life science applications such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and measurement of Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) for the investigation of protein folding and interaction. Several technology-related chapters present both the basics and current state-of-the-art, in particular of TCSPC electronics, photon detectors and lasers. The remaining chapters cover a broad range of applications and methodologies for experiments and data analysis, including the life sciences, defect centers in diamonds, super-resolution micr...

  9. Ecological Equivalence Assessment Methods: What Trade-Offs between Operationality, Scientific Basis and Comprehensiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezombes, Lucie; Gaucherand, Stéphanie; Kerbiriou, Christian; Reinert, Marie-Eve; Spiegelberger, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    In many countries, biodiversity compensation is required to counterbalance negative impacts of development projects on biodiversity by carrying out ecological measures, called offset when the goal is to reach "no net loss" of biodiversity. One main issue is to ensure that offset gains are equivalent to impact-related losses. Ecological equivalence is assessed with ecological equivalence assessment methods taking into account a range of key considerations that we summarized as ecological, spatial, temporal, and uncertainty. When equivalence assessment methods take into account all considerations, we call them "comprehensive". Equivalence assessment methods should also aim to be science-based and operational, which is challenging. Many equivalence assessment methods have been developed worldwide but none is fully satisfying. In the present study, we examine 13 equivalence assessment methods in order to identify (i) their general structure and (ii) the synergies and trade-offs between equivalence assessment methods characteristics related to operationality, scientific-basis and comprehensiveness (called "challenges" in his paper). We evaluate each equivalence assessment methods on the basis of 12 criteria describing the level of achievement of each challenge. We observe that all equivalence assessment methods share a general structure, with possible improvements in the choice of target biodiversity, the indicators used, the integration of landscape context and the multipliers reflecting time lags and uncertainties. We show that no equivalence assessment methods combines all challenges perfectly. There are trade-offs between and within the challenges: operationality tends to be favored while scientific basis are integrated heterogeneously in equivalence assessment methods development. One way of improving the challenges combination would be the use of offset dedicated data-bases providing scientific feedbacks on previous offset measures.

  10. Determination of the neutron and photon dose equivalent at work places in nuclear facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 2: Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, D. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Drake, P. [Vattenfall AB, Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Lindborg, L. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Klein, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Schmitz, Th. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Tichy, M

    1999-06-01

    Various mixed neutron-photon fields at workplaces in the containment of pressurised water reactors and in the vicinity of transport containers with spent fuel elements were investigated with spectrometers and dosimeters. The spectral neutron fluences evaluated from measurements with multisphere systems were recommended to be used for the calculation of dosimetric reference values for comparison with the readings of the dosemeters applied simultaneously. It turned out that most of the moderator based area dosemeters overestimated, while the TEPC systems generally underestimated the ambient dose equivalent (DE) values of the rather soft neutron fields encountered at these workplaces. The discrepancies can, however, be explained on the basis of energy dependent responses of the instruments used. The ambient DE values obtained with recently developed area dosemeters based on superheated drop detectors and with track etch based personal dosemeters on phantoms, however, were in satisfying agreement with the reference data. Sets of personal dosemeters simultaneously irradiated on a phantom allowed to roughly estimate the directional dependence of the neutron fluence. Hence, personal and limiting dose equivalent quantities could also be calculated. The personal and ambient DE values were always conservative estimates of the limiting quantities. Unexpectedly, discrepancies were observed for photon DE data measured with GM counters and TEPC systems. The up to 50 % higher readings of the GM counters may be explained by a considerable contribution of high energy photons to the total photon dose equivalent, but photon spectrometry is necessary for final clarification.

  11. Determination of the neutron and photon dose equivalent at work places in nuclear facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 2: Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, D.; Drake, P.; Lindborg, L.; Klein, H.; Schmitz, Th.; Tichy, M.

    1999-06-01

    Various mixed neutron-photon fields at workplaces in the containment of pressurised water reactors and in the vicinity of transport containers with spent fuel elements were investigated with spectrometers and dosimeters. The spectral neutron fluences evaluated from measurements with multisphere systems were recommended to be used for the calculation of dosimetric reference values for comparison with the readings of the dosemeters applied simultaneously. It turned out that most of the moderator based area dosemeters overestimated, while the TEPC systems generally underestimated the ambient dose equivalent (DE) values of the rather soft neutron fields encountered at these workplaces. The discrepancies can, however, be explained on the basis of energy dependent responses of the instruments used. The ambient DE values obtained with recently developed area dosemeters based on superheated drop detectors and with track etch based personal dosemeters on phantoms, however, were in satisfying agreement with the reference data. Sets of personal dosemeters simultaneously irradiated on a phantom allowed to roughly estimate the directional dependence of the neutron fluence. Hence, personal and limiting dose equivalent quantities could also be calculated. The personal and ambient DE values were always conservative estimates of the limiting quantities. Unexpectedly, discrepancies were observed for photon DE data measured with GM counters and TEPC systems. The up to 50 % higher readings of the GM counters may be explained by a considerable contribution of high energy photons to the total photon dose equivalent, but photon spectrometry is necessary for final clarification

  12. Calculation of dose equivalents for photon skyshine production; Calculo da dose equivalente para fotons decorrente da producao de skyshine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frota, Marco A.; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Geral. Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria (LARARA)]. E-mail: egbakel@vm.uff.br

    2005-07-01

    Some radiation facilities are designed with little shielding in the ceiling above the accelerator. A problem may then arise as a result of the radiation scattered by the atmosphere to points at ground level outside the treatment room. Stray radiation of this type is referred to as skyshine, and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 51 (NCRP 1977) gives methods for the calculation of skyshine for accelerator facilities. McGinley (1993) has compared skyshine measurements made at an 18 MeV medical accelerator facility with values calculated using the techniques presented in NCRP Report No. 51. Measurements were made of the photon levels outside a treatment room housing a Varian 2100 deg C. The roof above the accelerator was designed for weather protection only and offered little shielding for the primary beam and scattered radiation. The distance from the treatment room floor to the roof was 4.27 m, and the primary walls were constructed of concrete 2.0 m thick.The secondary walls were fabricated of concrete 0.99 m thick. The results for the photon skyshine rate dose as a function of distance from the isocenter using Monte Carlo code, are compared with those in NCRP publication 74 and measured obtained. The photon skyshine dose rates simulated for real clinic spectra transmitted through roof range from 4.7 to 14.6 nSv.s{sup -1}. (author)

  13. Method to deterministically study photonic nanostructures in different experimental instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husken, B.H.; Woldering, L.A.; Blum, Christian; Tjerkstra, R.W.; Vos, Willem L.

    2009-01-01

    We describe an experimental method to recover a single, deterministically fabricated nanostructure in various experimental instruments without the use of artificially fabricated markers, with the aim to study photonic structures. Therefore, a detailed map of the spatial surroundings of the

  14. A kinematic fit method for all-photon events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Shuxian; Yuan Changzheng; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2006-01-01

    An improved kinematic fit method is developed for analyzing all-photon events, where the interaction point is unknown. The fitting algorithm is checked with Monte Carlo samples to ensure that the fitting program works properly. This is applied to the Monte Carlo simulated ψ(2S) decays. A higher efficiency is achieved. This method can be generally applied to analyzing all-photon events at electron-positron collider. (authors)

  15. Intercomparison of measurements of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) in photon fields in the West Asia Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In accordance with its statutory function, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been assisting its Member States in establishing and upgrading their radiation protection infrastructures, including activities in occupation radiation protection. Individual external dosimetry services for photon radiation have been under establishment or upgrading with support through the Technical Cooperation Model Projects RAW/9/006, Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure (concluded in 2000), and RAW/9/008, Development of Technical Capabilities for Sustainable Radiation and Waste Safety Infrastructure (2001-2004), in all the participating countries in the West Asia Region. Two regional training courses were organized by the IAEA, in Germany in 1998, on Design, Implementation and Management of Individual Monitoring Services (IMS), and in the Syrian Arabic Republic in 2001, on Assessment of Occupational Exposure due to External Sources, under the above stated projects. However, no performance testing has yet been carried out and no regional intercomparisons have been established before in this region. Only two Member States from the region (the Syrian Arab Republic and Lebanon) participated in the interregional Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring of Radiological Measurements for Purposes of Monitoring Personal Dose Equivalent Hp(10) in 1999

  16. Statistical method for resolving the photon-photoelectron-counting inversion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jinlong; Li Tiejun; Peng, Xiang; Guo Hong

    2011-01-01

    A statistical inversion method is proposed for the photon-photoelectron-counting statistics in quantum key distribution experiment. With the statistical viewpoint, this problem is equivalent to the parameter estimation for an infinite binomial mixture model. The coarse-graining idea and Bayesian methods are applied to deal with this ill-posed problem, which is a good simple example to show the successful application of the statistical methods to the inverse problem. Numerical results show the applicability of the proposed strategy. The coarse-graining idea for the infinite mixture models should be general to be used in the future.

  17. Equivalence of ten different discounted cash flow valuation methods

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows that ten methods of company valuation using discounted cash flows (WACC; equity cash flow; capital cash flow; adjusted present value; residual income; EVA; business's risk-adjusted equity cash flow; business's risk-adjusted free cash flow; risk-free-adjusted equity cash flow; and risk-free-adjusted free cash flow) always give the same value when identical assumptions are used. This result is logical, since all the methods analyze the same reality using the same assumptions; t...

  18. Equivalence of the generalized and complex Kohn variational methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J N; Armour, E A G [School of Mathematical Sciences, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Plummer, M, E-mail: pmxjnc@googlemail.co [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-30

    For Kohn variational calculations on low energy (e{sup +} - H{sub 2}) elastic scattering, we prove that the phase shift approximation, obtained using the complex Kohn method, is precisely equal to a value which can be obtained immediately via the real-generalized Kohn method. Our treatment is sufficiently general to be applied directly to arbitrary potential scattering or single open channel scattering problems, with exchange if required. In the course of our analysis, we develop a framework formally to describe the anomalous behaviour of our generalized Kohn calculations in the regions of the well-known Schwartz singularities. This framework also explains the mathematical origin of the anomaly-free singularities we reported in a previous article. Moreover, we demonstrate a novelty: that explicit solutions of the Kohn equations are not required in order to calculate optimal phase shift approximations. We relate our rigorous framework to earlier descriptions of the Kohn-type methods.

  19. Equivalence of the generalized and complex Kohn variational methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J N; Armour, E A G; Plummer, M

    2010-01-01

    For Kohn variational calculations on low energy (e + - H 2 ) elastic scattering, we prove that the phase shift approximation, obtained using the complex Kohn method, is precisely equal to a value which can be obtained immediately via the real-generalized Kohn method. Our treatment is sufficiently general to be applied directly to arbitrary potential scattering or single open channel scattering problems, with exchange if required. In the course of our analysis, we develop a framework formally to describe the anomalous behaviour of our generalized Kohn calculations in the regions of the well-known Schwartz singularities. This framework also explains the mathematical origin of the anomaly-free singularities we reported in a previous article. Moreover, we demonstrate a novelty: that explicit solutions of the Kohn equations are not required in order to calculate optimal phase shift approximations. We relate our rigorous framework to earlier descriptions of the Kohn-type methods.

  20. Specific absorbed fractions of energy at various ages from internal photon sources: 1, Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1987-04-01

    Specific absorbed fractions (PHI's) in various organs of the body (target organs) from sources of monoenergetic photons in various other organs (source organs) are tabulated. This volume outlines various methods used to compute the PHI-values and describes how the ''best'' estimates recommended by us are chosen. These PHI-values can be used in calculating the photon component of the dose-equivalent rate in a given target organ from a given radionuclide that is present in a given source organ. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recognizes that the endosteal, or bone surface, cells are the tissue at risk for bone cancer. We have applied the dosimetry methods that Spiers and co-workers developed for beta-emitting radionuclides deposited in bone to follow the transport of secondary electrons that were freed by photon interactions through the microscopic structure of the skeleton. With these methods we can estimate PHI in the endosteal cells and can better estimate PHI in the active marrow; the latter is overestimated with the methods at photon energies below 200 keV. 41 refs., 25 figs., 23 tabs

  1. X-ray photon-in/photon-out methods for chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Matthew A.

    2010-03-24

    Most interesting materials in nature are heterogeneous, so it is useful to have analytical techniques with spatial resolution sufficient to resolve these heterogeneities.This article presents the basics of X-ray photon-in/photon-out chemical imaging. This family of methods allows one to derive images reflectingthe chemical state of a given element in a complex sample, at micron or deep sub-micron scale. X-ray chemical imaging is relatively non-destructiveand element-selective, and requires minimal sample preparation. The article presents the basic concepts and some considerations of data takingand data analysis, along with some examples.

  2. Dispersive photonic crystals from the plane wave method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara-Cabrera, E.; Palomino-Ovando, M.A. [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Apdo. Post. 165, Puebla, Pue. 72000, México (Mexico); Flores-Desirena, B., E-mail: bflores@fcfm.buap.mx [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Apdo. Post. 165, Puebla, Pue. 72000, México (Mexico); Gaspar-Armenta, J.A. [Departamento de Investigación en Física de la Universidad de Sonora Apdo, Post 5-088, Hermosillo Sonora 83190, México (Mexico)

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays photonic crystals are widely used in many different applications. One of the most used methods to compute their band structure is the plane wave method (PWM). However, it can only be applied directly to non-dispersive media and be extended to systems with a few model dielectric functions. We explore an extension of the PWM to photonic crystals containing dispersive materials, that solves an eigenvalue equation for the Bloch wave vectors. First we compare our calculation with analytical results for one dimensional photonic crystals containing Si using experimental values of its optical parameters, and obtainig very well agreement, even for the spectrum region with strong absorption. Then, using the same method, we computed the band structure for a two dimensional photonic crystal without absorption, formed by an square array of MgO cylinders in air. The optical parameters for MgO were modeled with the Lorentz dielectric function. Finally, we studied an array of MgO cylinders in a metal, using Drude model without absorption, for the metal dielectric function. For this last case, we study the gap–midgap ratio as a function of the filling fraction for both the square and triangular lattice. The gap–midgap ratio is larger for the triangular lattice, with a maximum value of 10% for a filling fraction of 0.6. Our results show that the method can be applied to dispersive materials, and then to a wide range of applications where photonic crystals can be used.

  3. Comparison of different dose calculation methods for irregular photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, G.A.; Schuette, W.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, 4 calculation methods (Wrede method, Clarskon method of sector integration, beam-zone method of Quast and pencil-beam method of Ahnesjoe) are introduced to calculate point doses in different irregular photon fields. The calculations cover a typical mantle field, an inverted Y-field and different blocked fields for 4 and 10 MV photon energies. The results are compared to those of measurements in a water phantom. The Clarkson and the pencil-beam method have been proved to be the methods of equal standard in relation to accuracy. Both of these methods are being distinguished by minimum deviations and applied in our clinical routine work. The Wrede and beam-zone methods deliver useful results to central beam and yet provide larger deviations in calculating points beyond the central axis. (orig.) [de

  4. Measuring instruments of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt for realization of the units of the dosimetric quantities standard ion dose, photon-equivalent dose and air-kerma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelke, B.A.; Oetzmann, W.; Struppek, G.

    1988-08-01

    The realization of the units of the dosimetric quantities exposure, air-kerma and photon-equivalent dose is an important task of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The report describes the measuring instruments and other technical equipment as well as the determination of the numerous corrections needed. All data and correction factors required for the realization of the units mentioned above are given in many diagrams and tables. (orig.) [de

  5. The performance of low pressure tissue-equivalent chambers and a new method for parameterising the dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of Rossi-type spherical tissue-equivalent chambers with equivalent diameters between 0.5 μm and 2 μm was tested experimentally using monoenergetic and polyenergetic neutron sources in the energy region of 10 keV to 14.5 MeV. In agreement with theoretical predictions both chambers failed to provide LET information at low neutron energies. A dose equivalent algorithm was derived that utilises the event distribution but does not attempt to correlate event size with LET. The algorithm was predicted theoretically and confirmed by experiment. The algorithm that was developed determines the neutron dose equivalent, from the data of the 0.5 μm chamber, to better than +-20% over the energy range of 30 keV to 14.5 MeV. The same algorithm also determines the dose equivalent from the data of the 2 μm chamber to better than +-20% over the energy range of 60 keV to 14.5 MeV. The efficiency of the chambers is 33 counts per μSv, or equivalently about 10 counts s -1 per mSv.h -1 . This efficiency enables the measurement of dose equivalent rates above 1 mSv.h -1 for an integration period of 3 s. Integrated dose equivalents can be measured as low as 1 μSv. (author)

  6. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  7. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  8. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  9. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  10. Numerical methods for modeling photonic-crystal VCSELs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dems, Maciej; Chung, Il-Sug; Nyakas, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We show comparison of four different numerical methods for simulating Photonic-Crystal (PC) VCSELs. We present the theoretical basis behind each method and analyze the differences by studying a benchmark VCSEL structure, where the PC structure penetrates all VCSEL layers, the entire top-mirror DBR...... to the effective index method. The simulation results elucidate the strength and weaknesses of the analyzed methods; and outline the limits of applicability of the different models....

  11. On Equivalence between Optimality Criteria and Projected Gradient Methods with Application to Topology Optimization Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Ananiev, Sergey

    2006-01-01

    The paper demonstrates the equivalence between the optimality criteria (OC) method, initially proposed by Bendsoe & Kikuchi for topology optimization problem, and the projected gradient method. The equivalence is shown using Hestenes definition of Lagrange multipliers. Based on this development, an alternative formulation of the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) condition is suggested. Such reformulation has some advantages, which will be also discussed in the paper. For verification purposes the modi...

  12. Periodic equivalence ratio modulation method and apparatus for controlling combustion instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, George A.; Janus, Michael C.; Griffith, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The periodic equivalence ratio modulation (PERM) method and apparatus significantly reduces and/or eliminates unstable conditions within a combustion chamber. The method involves modulating the equivalence ratio for the combustion device, such that the combustion device periodically operates outside of an identified unstable oscillation region. The equivalence ratio is modulated between preselected reference points, according to the shape of the oscillation region and operating parameters of the system. Preferably, the equivalence ratio is modulated from a first stable condition to a second stable condition, and, alternatively, the equivalence ratio is modulated from a stable condition to an unstable condition. The method is further applicable to multi-nozzle combustor designs, whereby individual nozzles are alternately modulated from stable to unstable conditions. Periodic equivalence ratio modulation (PERM) is accomplished by active control involving periodic, low frequency fuel modulation, whereby low frequency fuel pulses are injected into the main fuel delivery. Importantly, the fuel pulses are injected at a rate so as not to affect the desired time-average equivalence ratio for the combustion device.

  13. Computational methods of electron/photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    A review of computational methods simulating the non-plasma transport of electrons and their attendant cascades is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linearized formalisms at electron energies above 1 keV. The effectiveness of various metods is discussed including moments, point-kernel, invariant imbedding, discrete-ordinates, and Monte Carlo. Future research directions and the potential impact on various aspects of science and engineering are indicated

  14. Equivalent linearization method for limit cycle flutter analysis of plate-type structure in axial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Li; Yang Yiren

    2009-01-01

    The responses and limit cycle flutter of a plate-type structure with cubic stiffness in viscous flow were studied. The continuous system was dispersed by utilizing Galerkin Method. The equivalent linearization concept was performed to predict the ranges of limit cycle flutter velocities. The coupled map of flutter amplitude-equivalent linear stiffness-critical velocity was used to analyze the stability of limit cycle flutter. The theoretical results agree well with the results of numerical integration, which indicates that the equivalent linearization concept is available to the analysis of limit cycle flutter of plate-type structure. (authors)

  15. Open-air ionisation chambers with walls of soft-tissue equivalent material for measuring photon doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vialettes, H.; Anceau, J.C.; Grand, M.; Petit, G.

    1968-01-01

    The ionisation chambers presented in this report constitute a contribution to research into methods of carrying out correct determinations in the field of health physics. The use of a mixture of teflon containing 42.5 per cent by weight of carbon for the chamber walls makes it possible to measure directly the dose absorbed in air through 300 mg/cm 2 of soft tissue and, consequently, the dose absorbed in the soft tissues with a maximum error of 10 per cent for photon energies of between 10 keV and 10 MeV. Furthermore since this material does not contain hydrogen, the chamber has a sensitivity to neutrons which is much less than other chambers in current use. Finally the shape of these chambers has been studied with a view to obtaining a satisfactory measurement from the isotropy point of view; for example for gamma radiation of 27 keV, the 3 litre chamber is isotropic to within 10 per cent over 270 degrees, and the 12 litre chamber is isotropic to within 10 per cent over 300 degrees; for 1.25 MeV gamma radiation this range is extended over 330 degrees for the 3 litre chamber, and 360 degrees for the 12 litre chamber. This report presents the measurements carried out with these chambers as well as the results obtained. These results are then compared to those obtained with other chambers currently used in the field of health physics. (authors) [fr

  16. Detecting overpressure using the Eaton and Equivalent Depth methods in Offshore Nova Scotia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernanda; Primasty, A. Q. T.; Akbar, K. A.

    2018-03-01

    Overpressure is an abnormal high subsurface pressure of any fluids which exceeds the hydrostatic pressure of column of water or formation brine. In Offshore Nova Scotia Canada, the values and depth of overpressure zone are determined using the eaton and equivalent depth method, based on well data and the normal compaction trend analysis. Since equivalent depth method is using effective vertical stress principle and Eaton method considers physical property ratio (velocity). In this research, pressure evaluation only applicable on Penobscot L-30 well. An abnormal pressure is detected at depth 11804 feet as possibly overpressure zone, based on pressure gradient curve and calculation between the Eaton method (7241.3 psi) and Equivalent Depth method (6619.4 psi). Shales within Abenaki formation especially Baccaro Member is estimated as possible overpressure zone due to hydrocarbon generation mechanism.

  17. Improved algorithm based on equivalent enthalpy drop method of pressurized water reactor nuclear steam turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hu; Qi Guangcai; Li Shaohua; Li Changjian

    2011-01-01

    Because it is difficulty to accurately determine the extraction steam turbine enthalpy and the exhaust enthalpy, the calculated result from the conventional equivalent enthalpy drop method of PWR nuclear steam turbine is not accurate. This paper presents the improved algorithm on the equivalent enthalpy drop method of PWR nuclear steam turbine to solve this problem and takes the secondary circuit thermal system calculation of 1000 MW PWR as an example. The results show that, comparing with the design value, the error of actual thermal efficiency of the steam turbine cycle obtained by the improved algorithm is within the allowable range. Since the improved method is based on the isentropic expansion process, the extraction steam turbine enthalpy and the exhaust enthalpy can be determined accurately, which is more reasonable and accurate compared to the traditional equivalent enthalpy drop method. (authors)

  18. Neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors: a comparison of data sets and interpolation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, C.S.; Killough, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Various segments of the health physics community advocate the use of different sets of neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors as a function of energy and different methods of interpolation between discrete points in those data sets. The major data sets and interpolation methods are used to calculate the spectrum average fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors for five spectra associated with the various shielded conditions of the Health Physics Research Reactor. The results obtained by use of the different data sets and interpolation methods are compared and discussed. (author)

  19. Antipsychotic dose equivalents and dose-years: a standardized method for comparing exposure to different drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Nancy C; Pressler, Marcus; Nopoulos, Peg; Miller, Del; Ho, Beng-Choon

    2010-02-01

    A standardized quantitative method for comparing dosages of different drugs is a useful tool for designing clinical trials and for examining the effects of long-term medication side effects such as tardive dyskinesia. Such a method requires establishing dose equivalents. An expert consensus group has published charts of equivalent doses for various antipsychotic medications for first- and second-generation medications. These charts were used in this study. Regression was used to compare each drug in the experts' charts to chlorpromazine and haloperidol and to create formulas for each relationship. The formulas were solved for chlorpromazine 100 mg and haloperidol 2 mg to derive new chlorpromazine and haloperidol equivalents. The formulas were incorporated into our definition of dose-years such that 100 mg/day of chlorpromazine equivalent or 2 mg/day of haloperidol equivalent taken for 1 year is equal to one dose-year. All comparisons to chlorpromazine and haloperidol were highly linear with R(2) values greater than .9. A power transformation further improved linearity. By deriving a unique formula that converts doses to chlorpromazine or haloperidol equivalents, we can compare otherwise dissimilar drugs. These equivalents can be multiplied by the time an individual has been on a given dose to derive a cumulative value measured in dose-years in the form of (chlorpromazine equivalent in mg) x (time on dose measured in years). After each dose has been converted to dose-years, the results can be summed to provide a cumulative quantitative measure of lifetime exposure. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 75 FR 45627 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... Research and Development on March 30, 2010. The analytical procedure of this method has been tested in... Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711. Designation of this new equivalent method is... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9184-5] Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air...

  1. Method to fabricate a tilted logpile photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John D.; Sweatt, William C.

    2010-10-26

    A method to fabricate a tilted logpile photonic crystal requires only two lithographic exposures and does not require mask repositioning between exposures. The mask and photoresist-coated substrate are spaced a fixed and constant distance apart using a spacer and the stack is clamped together. The stack is then tilted at a crystallographic symmetry angle (e.g., 45 degrees) relative to the X-ray beam and rotated about the surface normal until the mask is aligned with the X-ray beam. The stack is then rotated in plane by a small stitching angle and exposed to the X-ray beam to pattern the first half of the structure. The stack is then rotated by 180.degree. about the normal and a second exposure patterns the remaining half of the structure. The method can use commercially available DXRL scanner technology and LIGA processes to fabricate large-area, high-quality tilted logpile photonic crystals.

  2. Characterization of Fabricated Photonic Crystal Fibers Using Effective Index Method

    OpenAIRE

    Faramarz E. Seraji

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), which have been experimentally determined in the last few years in Iran's Telecom Research Center are analyzed and compared theoretically using an effective index method. The PCFs under investigation are fabricated with a high speed drawing process that has not yet been reported elsewhere. It was shown that at higher wavelengths in PCFs; the light field is confined in the core where in shorter wavelengths the field spread...

  3. Advanced Numerical and Theoretical Methods for Photonic Crystals and Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felbacq, Didier

    2016-11-01

    This book provides a set of theoretical and numerical tools useful for the study of wave propagation in metamaterials and photonic crystals. While concentrating on electromagnetic waves, most of the material can be used for acoustic (or quantum) waves. For each presented numerical method, numerical code written in MATLAB® is presented. The codes are limited to 2D problems and can be easily translated in Python or Scilab, and used directly with Octave as well.

  4. A method for calculating equivalent diameter of fiber in self-compacting fiber reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, R.; Spiesz, P.R.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Fischer, H.-B.; Bode, K.-A.; Beuthan, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a method for calculating the equivalent diameter of fiber in self-compacting fiber reinforced concrete (SCFRC). The key idea is to utilize a small amount of particles with a narrow particle size distribution to replace the fibers by the same volume, without causing any obvious

  5. New equivalent-electrical circuit model and a practical measurement method for human body impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Koyu; Kinjo, Ichiko; Zamami, Aki; Irei, Kotoyo; Nagayama, Kanako

    2015-01-01

    Human body impedance analysis is an effective tool to extract electrical information from tissues in the human body. This paper presents a new measurement method of impedance using armpit electrode and a new equivalent circuit model for the human body. The lowest impedance was measured by using an LCR meter and six electrodes including armpit electrodes. The electrical equivalent circuit model for the cell consists of resistance R and capacitance C. The R represents electrical resistance of the liquid of the inside and outside of the cell, and the C represents high frequency conductance of the cell membrane. We propose an equivalent circuit model which consists of five parallel high frequency-passing CR circuits. The proposed equivalent circuit represents alpha distribution in the impedance measured at a lower frequency range due to ion current of the outside of the cell, and beta distribution at a high frequency range due to the cell membrane and the liquid inside cell. The calculated values by using the proposed equivalent circuit model were consistent with the measured values for the human body impedance.

  6. Absorbed dose determination in photon fields using the tandem method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques Pachas, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an alternative method to determine the absorbed dose and effective energy of photons with unknown spectral distributions. It includes a 'tandem' system that consists of two thermoluminescent dosemeters with different energetic dependence. LiF: Mg, Ti, CaF 2 : Dy thermoluminescent dosemeters and a Harshaw 3500 reading system are employed. Dosemeters are characterized with 90 Sr- 90 Y, calibrated with the energy of 60 Co and irradiated with seven different qualities of x-ray beams, suggested by ANSI No. 13 and ISO 4037. The answers of each type of dosemeter are adjusted to a function that depends on the effective energy of photons. The adjustment is carried out by means of the Rosenbrock minimization algorithm. The mathematical model used for this function includes five parameters and has a gauss and a straight line. Results show that the analytical functions reproduce the experimental data of the answers, with a margin of error of less than 5%. The reason of the answers of the CaF 2 : Dy and LiF: Mg, Ti, according to the energy of the radiation, allows us to establish the effective energy of photons and the absorbed dose, with a margin of error of less than 10% and 20% respectively

  7. Wind-Induced Fatigue Analysis of High-Rise Steel Structures Using Equivalent Structural Stress Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Fang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Welded beam-to-column connections of high-rise steel structures are susceptive to fatigue damage under wind loading. However, most fatigue assessments in the field of civil engineering are mainly based on nominal stress or hot spot stress theories, which has the disadvantage of dependence on the meshing styles and massive curves selected. To address this problem, in this paper, the equivalent structural stress method with advantages of mesh-insensitive quality and capability of unifying different stress-life curves (S-N curves into one is introduced to the wind-induced fatigue assessment of a large-scale complicated high-rise steel structure. The multi-scale finite element model is established and the corresponding wind loading is simulated. Fatigue life assessments using equivalent structural stress method, hot spot stress method and nominal stress method are performed, and the results are verified and comparisons are made. The mesh-insensitive quality is also verified. The results show that the lateral weld toe of the butt weld connecting the beam flange plate and the column is the location where fatigue damage most likely happens. Nominal stress method considers fatigue assessment of welds in a more global way by averaging all the stress on the weld section while in equivalent structural stress method and hot spot method local stress concentration can be taken into account more precisely.

  8. A general method to quantify quasi-equivalence in icosahedral viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, K V; Reddy, Vijay S; Johnson, John E; Brooks, Charles L

    2002-12-06

    A quantitative, atom-based, method is described for comparing protein subunit interfaces in icosahedral virus capsids with quasi-equivalent surface lattices. An integrated, normalized value (between 0 and 1) based on equivalent residue contacts (Q-score) is computed for every pair of subunit interactions and scores that are significantly above zero readily identify interfaces that are quasi-equivalent to each other. The method was applied to all quasi-equivalent capsid structures (T=3, 4, 7 and 13) in the Protein Data Bank and the Q-scores were interpreted in terms of their structural underpinnings. The analysis allowed classification of T=3 structures into three groups with architectures that resemble different polyhedra with icosahedral symmetry. The preference of subunits to form dimers in the T=4 human Hepatitis B virus capsid (HBV) was clearly reflected in high Q-scores of quasi-equivalent dimers. Interesting differences between the classical T=7 capsid and polyoma-like capsids were also identified. Application of the method to the outer-shell of the T=13 Blue tongue virus core (BTVC) highlighted the modest distortion between the interfaces of the general trimers and the strict trimers of VP7 subunits. Furthermore, the method identified the quasi 2-fold symmetry in the inner capsids of the BTV and reovirus cores. The results show that the Q-scores of various quasi-symmetries represent a "fingerprint" for a particular virus capsid architecture allowing particle classification into groups based on their underlying structural and geometric features.

  9. Comparison of preconditioned generalized conjugate gradient methods to two-dimensional neutron and photon transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.S.; Yang, D.Y.

    1998-01-01

    We apply and compare the preconditioned generalized conjugate gradient methods to solve the linear system equation that arises in the two-dimensional neutron and photon transport equation in this paper. Several subroutines are developed on the basis of preconditioned generalized conjugate gradient methods for time-independent, two-dimensional neutron and photon transport equation in the transport theory. These generalized conjugate gradient methods are used: TFQMR (transpose free quasi-minimal residual algorithm) CGS (conjugate gradient square algorithm), Bi-CGSTAB (bi-conjugate gradient stabilized algorithm) and QMRCGSTAB (quasi-minimal residual variant of bi-conjugate gradient stabilized algorithm). These subroutines are connected to computer program DORT. Several problems are tested on a personal computer with Intel Pentium CPU. The reasons to choose the generalized conjugate gradient methods are that the methods have better residual (equivalent to error) control procedures in the computation and have better convergent rate. The pointwise incomplete LU factorization ILU, modified pointwise incomplete LU factorization MILU, block incomplete factorization BILU and modified blockwise incomplete LU factorization MBILU are the preconditioning techniques used in the several testing problems. In Bi-CGSTAB, CGS, TFQMR and QMRCGSTAB method, we find that either CGS or Bi-CGSTAB method combined with preconditioner MBILU is the most efficient algorithm in these methods in the several testing problems. The numerical solution of flux by preconditioned CGS and Bi-CGSTAB methods has the same result as those from Cray computer, obtained by either the point successive relaxation method or the line successive relaxation method combined with Gaussian elimination

  10. Characterization of tissues equivalent to the human body by the Monte Carlo method for X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega R, J.; Huamani T, Y.; Mullisaca P, A. F.; Yauri C, L.

    2017-10-01

    There is a need to have materials equivalent to the human body that have the appropriate characteristics to be used as a substitute tissue in the clinical practices of radio-diagnosis, radiotherapy. In Arequipa, Peru, there are two health centers in radiotherapy applications, one with a Theratron Co-60 gamma irradiator and another with Elekta Linac; the Medical Physics Area of the School of Physics of the National University of San Agustin de Arequipa, were four equivalent materials based on epoxy resin, phenolitic spheres, calcium carbonate, etc. were built, such as bone tissue, soft tissue, adipose and lung tissue compared with water, whit the purpose of studying and applying them in future clinical applications. In this work we describe its physical and dosimetric characterization to determine its use as an equivalent material or manikin. The materials are 1 cm thick and 30 cm in diameter, the materials are non-malleable solids, they do not degrade, they have stability in their consistency due to temperature and irradiation, they are not toxic in their use, determining densities from 0.32 g/cm 3 for the lung tissue to 1.8 g/cm 3 for the bone material. These materials were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, giving the percentages by weight of the elements found to determine their effective atomic number, the physical analysis to determine their mass absorption and energy coefficients, which were studied for energy photons between 1 KeV at 20 MeV. The simulation of the equivalent materials and the physical and dosimetric study were found using the code Penelope 2008 Monte Carlo method and validated by the Nist database. The results obtained according to their coefficients of mass attenuation of each material, show lung, bone, soft and adipose tissue with differences with respect to the same Nist materials. The range maximum and minimum Rd deviation found was 35.65 - 3.16 for bone, 28.5 - 6.74 for lung, 33.78 - 9.06 for soft tissue and 86.42 - 1.28 for

  11. An Equivalent Source Method for Modelling the Lithospheric Magnetic Field Using Satellite and Airborne Magnetic Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kother, Livia Kathleen; Hammer, Magnus Danel; Finlay, Chris

    . Advantages of the equivalent source method include its local nature and the ease of transforming to spherical harmonics when needed. The method can also be applied in local, high resolution, investigations of the lithospheric magnetic field, for example where suitable aeromagnetic data is available......We present a technique for modelling the lithospheric magnetic field based on estimation of equivalent potential field sources. As a first demonstration we present an application to magnetic field measurements made by the CHAMP satellite during the period 2009-2010. Three component vector field...... for the remaining lithospheric magnetic field consists of magnetic point sources (monopoles) arranged in an icosahedron grid with an increasing grid resolution towards the airborne survey area. The corresponding source values are estimated using an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm that includes model...

  12. Method to deterministically study photonic nanostructures in different experimental instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husken, B H; Woldering, L A; Blum, C; Vos, W L

    2009-01-01

    We describe an experimental method to recover a single, deterministically fabricated nanostructure in various experimental instruments without the use of artificially fabricated markers, with the aim to study photonic structures. Therefore, a detailed map of the spatial surroundings of the nanostructure is made during the fabrication of the structure. These maps are made using a series of micrographs with successively decreasing magnifications. The graphs reveal intrinsic and characteristic geometric features that can subsequently be used in different setups to act as markers. As an illustration, we probe surface cavities with radii of 65 nm on a silica opal photonic crystal with various setups: a focused ion beam workstation; a scanning electron microscope (SEM); a wide field optical microscope and a confocal microscope. We use cross-correlation techniques to recover a small area imaged with the SEM in a large area photographed with the optical microscope, which provides a possible avenue to automatic searching. We show how both structural and optical reflectivity data can be obtained from one and the same nanostructure. Since our approach does not use artificial grids or markers, it is of particular interest for samples whose structure is not known a priori, like samples created solely by self-assembly. In addition, our method is not restricted to conducting samples.

  13. An equivalent ground thermal test method for single-phase fluid loop space radiator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianwen Ning

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal vacuum test is widely used for the ground validation of spacecraft thermal control system. However, the conduction and convection can be simulated in normal ground pressure environment completely. By the employment of pumped fluid loops’ thermal control technology on spacecraft, conduction and convection become the main heat transfer behavior between radiator and inside cabin. As long as the heat transfer behavior between radiator and outer space can be equivalently simulated in normal pressure, the thermal vacuum test can be substituted by the normal ground pressure thermal test. In this paper, an equivalent normal pressure thermal test method for the spacecraft single-phase fluid loop radiator is proposed. The heat radiation between radiator and outer space has been equivalently simulated by combination of a group of refrigerators and thermal electrical cooler (TEC array. By adjusting the heat rejection of each device, the relationship between heat flux and surface temperature of the radiator can be maintained. To verify this method, a validating system has been built up and the experiments have been carried out. The results indicate that the proposed equivalent ground thermal test method can simulate the heat rejection performance of radiator correctly and the temperature error between in-orbit theory value and experiment result of the radiator is less than 0.5 °C, except for the equipment startup period. This provides a potential method for the thermal test of space systems especially for extra-large spacecraft which employs single-phase fluid loop radiator as thermal control approach.

  14. Water-equivalent solid sources prepared by means of two distinct methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinas, Marina F.; Yamazaki, Ione M.; Potiens Junior, Ademar

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Metrology Laboratory at IPEN is involved in developing radioactive water-equivalent solid sources prepared from an aqueous solution of acrylamide using two distinct methods for polymerization. One of them is the polymerization by high dose of 60 Co irradiation; in the other method the solid matrix-polyacrylamide is obtained from an aqueous solution composed by acrylamide, catalyzers and an aliquot of a radionuclide. The sources have been prepared in cylindrical geometry. In this paper, the study of the distribution of radioactive material in the solid sources prepared by both methods is presented. (author)

  15. On the equivalence of LIST and DIIS methods for convergence acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garza, Alejandro J. [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Scuseria, Gustavo E. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892, USA and Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-04-28

    Self-consistent field extrapolation methods play a pivotal role in quantum chemistry and electronic structure theory. We, here, demonstrate the mathematical equivalence between the recently proposed family of LIST methods [Wang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 134, 241103 (2011); Y. K. Chen and Y. A. Wang, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 3045 (2011)] and the general form of Pulay’s DIIS [Chem. Phys. Lett. 73, 393 (1980); J. Comput. Chem. 3, 556 (1982)] with specific error vectors. Our results also explain the differences in performance among the various LIST methods.

  16. Experimental determination of the angular dependence factor for the dose equivalent for photons in calibration phantoms of PMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, E.; Carlsson, C.A.; Pernicka, F.

    1994-01-01

    The conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent at a depth of 10 mm in both a spherical and a slab phantom of PMMA have been determined for the X ray qualities: 40, 80 and 295 kV, ISO 'narrow' spectra; and for 137 Cs γ rays. The angular dependence factors have been experimentally determined for the same qualities and for different angles between 0 o and 180 o . The absorbed doses have been measured with thermoluminescence LiF dosemeters. The conversion coefficients and the angular dependence factors are generally found to agree well with calculated ones. Some minor discrepancies are found for the angular dependence factors and the 30 x 30 x 15 cm 3 PMMA slab phantom. (Author)

  17. System and method for clock synchronization and position determination using entangled photon pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yanhua (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method for clock synchronization and position determination using entangled photon pairs is provided. The present invention relies on the measurement of the second order correlation function of entangled states. Photons from an entangled photon source travel one-way to the clocks to be synchronized. By analyzing photon registration time histories generated at each clock location, the entangled states allow for high accuracy clock synchronization as well as high accuracy position determination.

  18. An Equivalent Source Method for Modelling the Global Lithospheric Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kother, Livia Kathleen; Hammer, Magnus Danel; Finlay, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We present a new technique for modelling the global lithospheric magnetic field at Earth's surface based on the estimation of equivalent potential field sources. As a demonstration we show an application to magnetic field measurements made by the CHAMP satellite during the period 2009-2010 when...... are also employed to minimize the influence of the ionospheric field. The model for the remaining lithospheric magnetic field consists of magnetic point sources (monopoles) arranged in an icosahedron grid. The corresponding source values are estimated using an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm...... in the CHAOS-4 and MF7 models using more conventional spherical harmonic based approaches. Advantages of the equivalent source method include its local nature, allowing e.g. for regional grid refinement, and the ease of transforming to spherical harmonics when needed. Future applications will make use of Swarm...

  19. Current matrix element in HAL QCD's wavefunction-equivalent potential method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kai; Ishii, Noriyoshi

    2018-04-01

    We give a formula to calculate a matrix element of a conserved current in the effective quantum mechanics defined by the wavefunction-equivalent potentials proposed by the HAL QCD collaboration. As a first step, a non-relativistic field theory with two-channel coupling is considered as the original theory, with which a wavefunction-equivalent HAL QCD potential is obtained in a closed analytic form. The external field method is used to derive the formula by demanding that the result should agree with the original theory. With this formula, the matrix element is obtained by sandwiching the effective current operator between the left and right eigenfunctions of the effective Hamiltonian associated with the HAL QCD potential. In addition to the naive one-body current, the effective current operator contains an additional two-body term emerging from the degrees of freedom which has been integrated out.

  20. Examination of the equivalence of self-report survey-based paper-and-pencil and internet data collection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigold, Arne; Weigold, Ingrid K; Russell, Elizabeth J

    2013-03-01

    Self-report survey-based data collection is increasingly carried out using the Internet, as opposed to the traditional paper-and-pencil method. However, previous research on the equivalence of these methods has yielded inconsistent findings. This may be due to methodological and statistical issues present in much of the literature, such as nonequivalent samples in different conditions due to recruitment, participant self-selection to conditions, and data collection procedures, as well as incomplete or inappropriate statistical procedures for examining equivalence. We conducted 2 studies examining the equivalence of paper-and-pencil and Internet data collection that accounted for these issues. In both studies, we used measures of personality, social desirability, and computer self-efficacy, and, in Study 2, we used personal growth initiative to assess quantitative equivalence (i.e., mean equivalence), qualitative equivalence (i.e., internal consistency and intercorrelations), and auxiliary equivalence (i.e., response rates, missing data, completion time, and comfort completing questionnaires using paper-and-pencil and the Internet). Study 1 investigated the effects of completing surveys via paper-and-pencil or the Internet in both traditional (i.e., lab) and natural (i.e., take-home) settings. Results indicated equivalence across conditions, except for auxiliary equivalence aspects of missing data and completion time. Study 2 examined mailed paper-and-pencil and Internet surveys without contact between experimenter and participants. Results indicated equivalence between conditions, except for auxiliary equivalence aspects of response rate for providing an address and completion time. Overall, the findings show that paper-and-pencil and Internet data collection methods are generally equivalent, particularly for quantitative and qualitative equivalence, with nonequivalence only for some aspects of auxiliary equivalence. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all

  1. Bone-and-muscle-equivalent solid chemical dose meters for photon and electron doses above one kilorad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Rosenstein, M.; Levine, H.

    1975-01-01

    Conventional solid dose meters, such as plastic films, powders, emulsions, glasses, ceramics and gels, have a response to ionizing photons and electrons that varies markedly over a broad spectrum when compared with the absorption characteristics of biological tissues. New radiochromic dyed plastic dose meters have been developed with X- and gamma ray and electron energy absorption cross-sections (calculated) and radiation energy responses (experimental) corresponding approximately to those for human muscle and bone, for a spectrum from a few keV to at least 10 MeV. Three-dimensional solid dose meters useful over the absorbed dose range of 10 3 to 10 6 rad are formed by thermosetting a selected combination of monomers containing the radiochromic dye in solution. Thin-film dose meters for the dose range 10 5 to 10 7 rad are formed by casting on optically flat surfaces strippable layers of special combinations of polymers and dyes in solution. The response of these systems to X- and gamma rays and electrons has been studied over various radiation spectra, dose-rates and temperatures during irradiation. (author)

  2. Equivalent circuit study of beam-loading using a moment method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T.F.; Machida, S.; Mori, Y.; Ohmori, C.

    1997-01-01

    In this work, we present a formalism by considering the perturbations in the moments of a bunched beam for the equivalent circuit model to include all harmonics of the synchroton oscillation in a beam-cavity interaction system. The linear coupling among all longitudinal modes under the influence of narrow-band impedance can be naturally incorporated in this new approach. We used this method to re-examine the coupling between the dipole and the quadrupole modes. The dispersion relation obtained by this new method was compared with that derived from the linearized Vlasov equation up to the second harmonic of the synchrotron motion. We found excellent qualitative agreements between two approaches

  3. Application of the personnel photographic monitoring method to determine equivalent radiation dose beyond proton accelerator shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gel'fand, E.K.; Komochkov, M.M.; Man'ko, B.V.; Salatskaya, M.I.; Sychev, B.S.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations of regularities to form radiation dose beyond proton accelerator shielding are carried out. Numerical data on photographic monitoring dosemeter in radiation fields investigated are obtained. It was shown how to determine the total equivalent dose of radiation fields beyond proton accelerator shielding by means of the photographic monitoring method by introduction into the procedure of considering nuclear emulsions of division of particle tracks into the black and grey ones. A comparison of experimental and calculational data has shown the applicability of the used calculation method for modelling dose radiation characteristics beyond proton accelerator shielding [ru

  4. Modification of equivalent charge method for the Roben three-dimensional problem in electrostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsukov, A.B.; Surenskij, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    The approach of the Roben problem solution for the calculation of the potential of intermediate electrode of accelerating structure with HFQ focusing is considered. The solution is constructed on the basis of variational formulation of the equivalent charge method, where electrostatic problem is reduced to equations of root-mean-square residuals on the system conductors. The technique presented permits to solve efficiently the three-dimensional problems of electrostatics for rather complicated from geometrical viewpoint systems of electrodes. Processing time is comparable with methods of integral equations. 5 refs.; 2 figs

  5. Modeling photonic crystal waveguides with noncircular geometry using green function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uvarovaa, I.; Tsyganok, B.; Bashkatov, Y.; Khomenko, V.

    2012-01-01

    Currently in the field of photonics is an acute problem fast and accurate simulation photonic crystal waveguides with complex geometry. This paper describes an improved method of Green's functions for non-circular geometries. Based on comparison of selected efficient numerical method for finding the eigenvalues for the Green's function method for non-circular holes chosen effective method for our purposes. Simulation is realized in Maple environment. The simulation results confirmed experimentally. Key words: photonic crystal, waveguide, modeling, Green function, complex geometry

  6. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kılıç, Emre; Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained

  7. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kılıç, Emre, E-mail: emre.kilic@tum.de; Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  8. THE RISKS’ ASSESSMENT IN INNOVATIVE PROJECTS BY THE METHOD OF VERIFIED EQUIVALENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анатолій Валентинович ШАХОВ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the concept of "risk of innovation", identified the causes of the risk and the methods of eliminating of negative manifestations of the risk situations in innovative projects. The advantages and disadvantages of the method of correction of the discount rate and the method of equivalent annuities are considered. The methodical approach in assessing the expected effect of the innovative project based on the concept of probability-interval uncertainty is proposed in the article. It was established that the analyzed approaches can be used for the accounting of the risk of innovative projects. Project manager makes his choice using any method of risk assessment individually, depending on the extent and characteristics of the project, the degree of novelty and scale introduction of innovative products, the number of participants and the level of requirements of the foundation of project efficiency and other factors.

  9. On the equivalence between the discrete ordinates and the spherical harmonics methods in radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barichello, L.B.; Siewert, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    In this work concerning steady-state radiative-transfer calculations in plane-parallel media, the equivalence between the discrete ordinates method and the spherical harmonics method is proved. More specifically, it is shown that for standard radiative-transfer problems without the imposed restriction of azimuthal symmetry the two methods yield identical results for the radiation intensity when the quadrature scheme for the discrete ordinates method is defined by the zeros of the associated Legendre functions and when generalized Mark boundary conditions are used to define the spherical harmonics solution. It is also shown that, with these choices for a quadrature scheme and for the boundary conditions, the two methods can be formulated so as to require the same computational effort. Finally a justification for using the generalized Mark boundary conditions in the spherical harmonics solution is given

  10. Base Isolation for Seismic Retrofitting of a Multiple Building Structure: Evaluation of Equivalent Linearization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Ferraioli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the most commonly used isolation systems exhibit nonlinear inelastic behaviour, the equivalent linear elastic analysis is commonly used in the design and assessment of seismic-isolated structures. The paper investigates if the linear elastic model is suitable for the analysis of a seismically isolated multiple building structure. To this aim, its computed responses were compared with those calculated by nonlinear dynamic analysis. A common base isolation plane connects the isolation bearings supporting the adjacent structures. In this situation, the conventional equivalent linear elastic analysis may have some problems of accuracy because this method is calibrated on single base-isolated structures. Moreover, the torsional characteristics of the combined system are significantly different from those of separate isolated buildings. A number of numerical simulations and parametric studies under earthquake excitations were performed. The accuracy of the dynamic response obtained by the equivalent linear elastic model was calculated by the magnitude of the error with respect to the corresponding response considering the nonlinear behaviour of the isolation system. The maximum displacements at the isolation level, the maximum interstorey drifts, and the peak absolute acceleration were selected as the most important response measures. The influence of mass eccentricity, torsion, and high-modes effects was finally investigated.

  11. The equivalence of information-theoretic and likelihood-based methods for neural dimensionality reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross S Williamson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stimulus dimensionality-reduction methods in neuroscience seek to identify a low-dimensional space of stimulus features that affect a neuron's probability of spiking. One popular method, known as maximally informative dimensions (MID, uses an information-theoretic quantity known as "single-spike information" to identify this space. Here we examine MID from a model-based perspective. We show that MID is a maximum-likelihood estimator for the parameters of a linear-nonlinear-Poisson (LNP model, and that the empirical single-spike information corresponds to the normalized log-likelihood under a Poisson model. This equivalence implies that MID does not necessarily find maximally informative stimulus dimensions when spiking is not well described as Poisson. We provide several examples to illustrate this shortcoming, and derive a lower bound on the information lost when spiking is Bernoulli in discrete time bins. To overcome this limitation, we introduce model-based dimensionality reduction methods for neurons with non-Poisson firing statistics, and show that they can be framed equivalently in likelihood-based or information-theoretic terms. Finally, we show how to overcome practical limitations on the number of stimulus dimensions that MID can estimate by constraining the form of the non-parametric nonlinearity in an LNP model. We illustrate these methods with simulations and data from primate visual cortex.

  12. Development of an experimental method for the determination of the dose equivalent indices for low - and medium energy X- and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Estrada, J.J. da.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental method was developed to measure Dose Equivalent Indices for low and medium energy X-rays. A sphere was constructed to simulate the human body in accordance with ICRU Report 19 but using plexiglass instead of tissue equivalent material of density 1 g.cm -3 . Experimentally it was demonstrated that for the purpose of applied radiation protection both materials are equivalent in spite of a 18% higher density of plexiglass. CaF 2 :Mn and LiF:Mg might be utilized to determine the absorbed dose distribution within the sphere. Measurements indicate that the effective energy can be determined with an accuracy better than 15% for the energy range under consideration. Depth dose curves measured with ionization chamber compared with those of LiF:Mg showed an agreement better than 12% and in the case of CaF 2 :Mn better than 11% for all irradiation conditions used. Conversion factors in units rad R -1 measured with TLD and compared with those obtained from the literature based upon Monte Carlo calculation showed an agreement better than 23% for CaF 2 :Mn and 19% for LiF:Mg. It is concluded from these experiments that the system plexiglass sphere-TLD dosimeters might be used to measure Dose Equivalent Indices for low and medium energy photons. (Author) [pt

  13. A nonlinear equivalent circuit method for analysis of passive intermodulation of mesh reflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Jie

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Passive intermodulation (PIM has gradually become a serious electromagnetic interference due to the development of high-power and high-sensitivity RF/microwave communication systems, especially large deployable mesh reflector antennas. This paper proposes a field-circuit coupling method to analyze the PIM level of mesh reflectors. With the existence of many metal–metal (MM contacts in mesh reflectors, the contact nonlinearity becomes the main reason for PIM generation. To analyze these potential PIM sources, an equivalent circuit model including nonlinear components is constructed to model a single MM contact so that the transient current through the MM contact point induced by incident electromagnetic waves can be calculated. Taking the electric current as a new electromagnetic wave source, the far-field scattering can be obtained by the use of electromagnetic numerical methods or the communication link method. Finally, a comparison between simulation and experimental results is illustrated to verify the validity of the proposed method.

  14. Condensed history Monte Carlo methods for photon transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhan, Katherine; Spanier, Jerome

    2007-01-01

    We study methods for accelerating Monte Carlo simulations that retain most of the accuracy of conventional Monte Carlo algorithms. These methods - called Condensed History (CH) methods - have been very successfully used to model the transport of ionizing radiation in turbid systems. Our primary objective is to determine whether or not such methods might apply equally well to the transport of photons in biological tissue. In an attempt to unify the derivations, we invoke results obtained first by Lewis, Goudsmit and Saunderson and later improved by Larsen and Tolar. We outline how two of the most promising of the CH models - one based on satisfying certain similarity relations and the second making use of a scattering phase function that permits only discrete directional changes - can be developed using these approaches. The main idea is to exploit the connection between the space-angle moments of the radiance and the angular moments of the scattering phase function. We compare the results obtained when the two CH models studied are used to simulate an idealized tissue transport problem. The numerical results support our findings based on the theoretical derivations and suggest that CH models should play a useful role in modeling light-tissue interactions

  15. Improved Thévenin equivalent methods for real-time voltage stability assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Angel; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Østergaard, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    An improved Thévenin equivalent method for real-time voltage stability assessment that uses wide-area information from synchrophasors is proposed. The improvements are a better modeling of the limited synchronous generators, and a processing that anticipates the effect of field current limiters......, before the latter are activated. Several study cases using detailed dynamic simulations of the Nordic test system have been used to assess the performance of the proposed improvements. Their effectiveness is analyzed and, based on the results, their possible application in combination...

  16. Evaluation of enhancements to Thevenin equivalent based methods for real-time voltage stability assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Angel; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Østergaard, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The possibilities offered by the use of Phasor Measurement Units (PMU) in real - time monitoring provide interesting ways to ensure secure operation of power systems. This paper studies the specific case of voltage stability and the possible improvements to the Thevenin equivalent methods, which...... is applied generally with local measurements. This paper uses the PMU measurements to calculate the grid transformation coefficients to obtain wide - area information. This is achieved by studying the generator's electromo tive force estimated using values in the coefficient transformation matrix...

  17. Creep behavior of bone cement: a method for time extrapolation using time-temperature equivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R L; Farrar, D F; Rose, J; Forster, H; Morgan, I

    2003-04-01

    The clinical lifetime of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement is considerably longer than the time over which it is convenient to perform creep testing. Consequently, it is desirable to be able to predict the long term creep behavior of bone cement from the results of short term testing. A simple method is described for prediction of long term creep using the principle of time-temperature equivalence in polymers. The use of the method is illustrated using a commercial acrylic bone cement. A creep strain of approximately 0.6% is predicted after 400 days under a constant flexural stress of 2 MPa. The temperature range and stress levels over which it is appropriate to perform testing are described. Finally, the effects of physical aging on the accuracy of the method are discussed and creep data from aged cement are reported.

  18. A Scrutiny of the Equivalent Static Lateral Load Method of Design for Multistory Masonry Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touqan, A. R.; Helou, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    Building structures with a soft storey are gaining widespread popularity in urban areas due to the scarcity of land and due to the pressing need for wide open spaces at the entrance level. In earthquake prone zones dynamic analysis based on the Equivalent Static Lateral Load method is attractive to the novice and the design codes leave the choice of the analysis procedure up to the discretion of the designer. The following is a comparison of the said method with the more elaborate Response Spectrum Method of analysis as they apply to a repertoire of different structural models. The results clearly show that the former provides similar results of response in structures with gradual change in storey stiffness; while it is over conservative for a bare frame structure. It is however less conservative for structures with a soft storey

  19. Comparison of evaluation results of piping thermal fatigue evaluation method based on equivalent stress amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Kasahara, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, reports have increased about failure cases caused by high cycle thermal fatigue both at light water reactors and fast breeder reactors. One of the reasons of the cases is a turbulent mixing at a Tee-junction, where hot and cold temperature fluids are mixed, in a coolant system. In order to prevent thermal fatigue failures at Tee-junctions. The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers published the guideline which is an evaluation method of high cycle thermal fatigue damage at nuclear pipes. In order to justify safety margin and make the procedure of the guideline concise, this paper proposes a new evaluation method of thermal fatigue damage with use of the 'equivalent stress amplitude.' Because this new method makes procedure of evaluation clear and concise, it will contribute to improving the guideline for thermal fatigue evaluation. (author)

  20. Single-photon source engineering using a Modal Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels

    Solid-state sources of single indistinguishable photons are of great interest for quantum information applications. The semiconductor quantum dot embedded in a host material represents an attractive platform to realize such a single-photon source (SPS). A near-unity efficiency, defined as the num...... nanowire SPSs...

  1. The improvement of the method of equivalent cross section in HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, J.; Li, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Method of Equivalence Cross-Sections (MECS) is a combined transport-diffusion method. By appropriately adjusting the diffusion coefficient of homogenized absorber region, the diffusion theory could yield satisfactory results for the full core model with strong neutron absorber material, for example the control rod in High temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR). Original implementation of MECS based on 1-D cell transport model has some limitation on accuracy and applicability, a new implementation of MECS based on 2-D transport model are proposed and tested in this paper. This improvement can extend the MECS to the calculation of twin small absorber ball system which have a non-circular boring in graphite reflector and different radial position. A least-square algorithm for the calculation of equivalent diffusion coefficient is adopted, and special treatment for diffusion coefficient for higher energy group is proposed in the case that absorber is absent. Numerical results to adopt MECS into control rod calculation in HTR are encouraging. However, there are some problems left. (authors)

  2. Efficacy of aprons equivalent to 0.5 mm of lead in PET procedures using the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, R.B.; Amaral, A.; Campos, L.

    2012-01-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET), health staff is exposed to 511-keV photons, which is a result of the positron annihilation process. This energy is about four times greater than the 140 keV commonly found in studies based on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Besides this different level of energy, 0.5 mm lead-equivalent aprons have being used either in SPECT or PET procedures. In this context, this work was designed for evaluating the effectiveness of such aprons in individual radioprotection of health professionals involved in positron emission tomography. For this, by using MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo simulations, the average energy delivered per particle to the regions corresponding to operational quantities Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) were calculated for two conditions of individual exposures: wearing and not wearing a 0.05 mm lead-equivalent apron. The results obtained pointed out that Hp(10) has similar value in both situations. On the other hand, for the region corresponding to Hp(0.07), wearing this lead apron will improve this dose in about 26%. On the basis of this work, 0.5 mm lead equivalent aprons do not offer adequate protection for medical staff working on positron emission tomography. (author)

  3. Method for universal detection of two-photon polarization entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Horodecki, Paweł; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Życzkowski, Karol

    2015-03-01

    Detecting and quantifying quantum entanglement of a given unknown state poses problems that are fundamentally important for quantum information processing. Surprisingly, no direct (i.e., without quantum tomography) universal experimental implementation of a necessary and sufficient test of entanglement has been designed even for a general two-qubit state. Here we propose an experimental method for detecting a collective universal witness, which is a necessary and sufficient test of two-photon polarization entanglement. It allows us to detect entanglement for any two-qubit mixed state and to establish tight upper and lower bounds on its amount. A different element of this method is the sequential character of its main components, which allows us to obtain relatively complicated information about quantum correlations with the help of simple linear-optical elements. As such, this proposal realizes a universal two-qubit entanglement test within the present state of the art of quantum optics. We show the optimality of our setup with respect to the minimal number of measured quantities.

  4. Network 'small-world-ness': a quantitative method for determining canonical network equivalence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Humphries

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many technological, biological, social, and information networks fall into the broad class of 'small-world' networks: they have tightly interconnected clusters of nodes, and a shortest mean path length that is similar to a matched random graph (same number of nodes and edges. This semi-quantitative definition leads to a categorical distinction ('small/not-small' rather than a quantitative, continuous grading of networks, and can lead to uncertainty about a network's small-world status. Moreover, systems described by small-world networks are often studied using an equivalent canonical network model--the Watts-Strogatz (WS model. However, the process of establishing an equivalent WS model is imprecise and there is a pressing need to discover ways in which this equivalence may be quantified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We defined a precise measure of 'small-world-ness' S based on the trade off between high local clustering and short path length. A network is now deemed a 'small-world' if S>1--an assertion which may be tested statistically. We then examined the behavior of S on a large data-set of real-world systems. We found that all these systems were linked by a linear relationship between their S values and the network size n. Moreover, we show a method for assigning a unique Watts-Strogatz (WS model to any real-world network, and show analytically that the WS models associated with our sample of networks also show linearity between S and n. Linearity between S and n is not, however, inevitable, and neither is S maximal for an arbitrary network of given size. Linearity may, however, be explained by a common limiting growth process. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have shown how the notion of a small-world network may be quantified. Several key properties of the metric are described and the use of WS canonical models is placed on a more secure footing.

  5. Effect of background dielectric on TE-polarized photonic bandgap of metallodielectric photonic crystals using Dirichlet-to-Neumann map method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedghi, Aliasghar; Rezaei, Behrooz

    2016-11-20

    Using the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map method, we have calculated the photonic band structure of two-dimensional metallodielectric photonic crystals having the square and triangular lattices of circular metal rods in a dielectric background. We have selected the transverse electric mode of electromagnetic waves, and the resulting band structures showed the existence of photonic bandgap in these structures. We theoretically study the effect of background dielectric on the photonic bandgap.

  6. Research of time-domain equivalent circuit method in solving dispersion of coupled-cavity traveling-wave tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjun; China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang; Xu Zhou; Li Ming; Yang Xingfan; Chen Yanan; Liu Jie; Jin Xiao; Lin Yuzheng

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a time-domain equivalent circuit method is applied to solve dispersion of coupled-cavity travelling-wave tube (CCTWT). First, the time-domain circuit equations of CCTWT coupled-cavity chain are deduced from the equivalent circuit model. Then, the equations are solved numerically by fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and a program CTTDCP is developed using MATLAB. Last, a L-band CCTWT is calculated using CTTDCP and the cavity pass-band of this tube is computed to be 1.08-1.48 GHz, which is consistent with the experimental results and the simulation results of electromagnetic code and demonstrates the validity of the time-domain equivalent circuit method. In addition, a new design method which uses the equivalent circuit method and electromagnetic simulation together to optimize the cold cavity characteristics of CCTWT is proposed. (authors)

  7. Metallic dielectric photonic crystals and methods of fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Jeffrey Brian; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2016-12-20

    A metallic-dielectric photonic crystal is formed with a periodic structure defining a plurality of resonant cavities to selectively absorb incident radiation. A metal layer is deposited on the inner surfaces of the resonant cavities and a dielectric material fills inside the resonant cavities. This photonic crystal can be used to selectively absorb broadband solar radiation and then reemit absorbed radiation in a wavelength band that matches the absorption band of a photovoltaic cell. The photonic crystal can be fabricated by patterning a sacrificial layer with a plurality of holes, into which is deposited a supporting material. Removing the rest of the sacrificial layer creates a supporting structure, on which a layer of metal is deposited to define resonant cavities. A dielectric material then fills the cavities to form the photonic crystal.

  8. Metallic dielectric photonic crystals and methods of fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Jeffrey Brian; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2017-12-05

    A metallic-dielectric photonic crystal is formed with a periodic structure defining a plurality of resonant cavities to selectively absorb incident radiation. A metal layer is deposited on the inner surfaces of the resonant cavities and a dielectric material fills inside the resonant cavities. This photonic crystal can be used to selectively absorb broadband solar radiation and then reemit absorbed radiation in a wavelength band that matches the absorption band of a photovoltaic cell. The photonic crystal can be fabricated by patterning a sacrificial layer with a plurality of holes, into which is deposited a supporting material. Removing the rest of the sacrificial layer creates a supporting structure, on which a layer of metal is deposited to define resonant cavities. A dielectric material then fills the cavities to form the photonic crystal.

  9. The method of impedance transformation for electromagnetic waves propagating in one-dimension plasma photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jingfeng; Yuan, Chengxun, E-mail: yuancx@hit.edu.cn, E-mail: zhouzx@hit.edu.cn; Gao, Ruilin; Jia, Jieshu; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Zhongxiang, E-mail: yuancx@hit.edu.cn, E-mail: zhouzx@hit.edu.cn; Wang, Xiaoou [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wu, Jian [National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment (LEME), China Research Institute of Radio Wave Propagation, Beijing 102206 (China); Li, Hui [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment (LEME), China Research Institute of Radio Wave Propagation, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2016-08-15

    This study focuses on the transmission of normal-incidence electromagnetic waves in one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals. Using the Maxwell's equations in a medium, a method that is based on the concept of impendence is employed to perform the simulation. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by simulating a one-layer plasma and conventional photonic crystal. In frequency-domain, the transmission and reflection coefficients in the unmagnetized plasma photonic crystal were calculated, and the influence factors on plasma photonic crystals including dielectric constants of dielectric, spatial period, filling factor, plasma frequency, and collision frequency were studied.

  10. Numerical Methods for the Design and Analysis of Photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2008-01-01

    The numerical methods available for calculating the electromagnetic mode properties of photonic crystal fibres are reviewed. The preferred schemes for analyzing TIR guiding and band gap guiding fibres are contrasted.......The numerical methods available for calculating the electromagnetic mode properties of photonic crystal fibres are reviewed. The preferred schemes for analyzing TIR guiding and band gap guiding fibres are contrasted....

  11. Method to map individual electromagnetic field components inside a photonic crystal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denis, T.; Reijnders, B.; Lee, J.H.H.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Vos, Willem L.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to map the absolute electromagnetic field strength inside photonic crystals. We apply the method to map the dominant electric field component Ez of a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab at microwave frequencies. The slab is placed between two mirrors to select Bloch standing

  12. A novel method for polarization squeezing with Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milanovic, Josip; Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2010-01-01

    Photonic Crystal Fibers can be tailored to increase the effective Kerr nonlinearity, while producing smaller amounts of excess noise compared to standard silicon fibers. Using these features of Photonic Crystal Fibers we create polarization squeezed states with increased purity compared to standa...... Stokes parameter squeezing of −3.9 ±0.3dB and anti-squeezing of 16.2 ±0.3dB....

  13. Applicability of the lattice Boltzmann method to determine the ohmic resistance in equivalent resistor connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Andaluz, Mayken; Barzola, Julio; Guarochico-Moreira, Víctor H.; Andersson, Martin

    2017-12-01

    Knowing the ohmic resistance in the materials allow to know in advance its electrical behavior when a potential difference is applied, and therefore the prediction of the electrical performance can be achieved in a most certain manner. Although the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been applied to solve several physical phenomena in complex geometries, it has only been used to describe the fluid phase, but applicability studies of LBM on the solid-electric-conducting material have not been carried out yet. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the accuracy of calculating the equivalent resistor connections using LBM. Several series and parallel resistor connections are effected. All the computations are carried out with 3D models, and the domain materials are designed by the authors.

  14. Adjusting the Parameters of Metal Oxide Gapless Surge Arresters’ Equivalent Circuits Using the Harmony Search Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Christodoulou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate circuit modeling of metal oxide gapless surge arresters is critical for insulation coordination studies. Metal oxide arresters present a dynamic behavior for fast front surges; namely, their residual voltage is dependent on the peak value, as well as the duration of the injected impulse current, and should therefore not only be represented by non-linear elements. The aim of the current work is to adjust the parameters of the most frequently used surge arresters’ circuit models by considering the magnitude of the residual voltage, as well as the dissipated energy for given pulses. In this aim, the harmony search method is implemented to adjust parameter values of the arrester equivalent circuit models. This functions by minimizing a defined objective function that compares the simulation outcomes with the manufacturer’s data and the results obtained from previous methodologies.

  15. Cleaning method of aluminium surface by argon discharge for photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Watabe, Hiromi; Horikoshi, Gen-ichi; Mathewson, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    In the Photon Factory program of High Energy Research Laboratory, in which the electron storage ring as a photon source stores the electron beam of 2.5 GeV and 500 mA, beam intensity the probability of gas discharge from the inner surface of doughnut wall due to electron bombardment (for 100 eV electorns) must be limited to 1 x 10 -6 or less, according to the estimation by A.G. Mathewson and others. The pressure inside the ring can be maintained at 1 x 10 -9 Torr only with the above probability value. The standard surface treatment of degreasing and evacuation for 24 hours with heating at 150 deg. C can be of no practical use. Since the ion bombardment of surfaces by argon glow discharge is effective for decreasing the probability, the reduction of the probability by argon discharge cleaning was measured with the surface of aluminium, which is planned to be used as the doughnut material. Two methods were employed for the measurement; the one is analysis of gases being discharged, by introducting them to the analyzing chamber during argon discharge and the other is the measurement of the probability when bombardment with electrons of 100 eV is applied, after stopping argon introduction and evacuating after argon discharge had been performed for a definite period. As a result, the probability of approximately 2 x 10 -5 at the beginning of electron beam incidence was obtained by adding argon discharge cleaning to the standard method. This is estimated to correspondent to approximately 25 mA of beam intensity, which is equivalent to 1/20 of the planned value. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Three-dimensional ordered particulate structures: Method to retrieve characteristics from photonic band gap data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miskevich, Alexander A.; Loiko, Valery A.

    2015-01-01

    A method to retrieve characteristics of ordered particulate structures, such as photonic crystals, is proposed. It is based on the solution of the inverse problem using data on the photonic band gap (PBG). The quasicrystalline approximation (QCA) of the theory of multiple scattering of waves and the transfer matrix method (TMM) are used. Retrieval of the refractive index of particles is demonstrated. Refractive indices of the artificial opal particles are estimated using the published experimental data. - Highlights: • A method to retrieve characteristics of photonic crystals is proposed. • The method is based on the inverse problem solution using the photonic band gap data. • Retrieval of the refractive index of photonic crystal particles is demonstrated. • Retrieval results show inhomogeneous distribution of synthetic opal particle pores

  17. Fabrication of photonic crystals on several kinds of semiconductor materials by using focused-ion beam method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xingsheng; Chen Hongda; Xiong Zhigang; Jin Aizi; Gu Changzhi; Cheng Bingying; Zhang Daozhong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we introduced the fabrication of photonic crystals on several kinds of semiconductor materials by using focused-ion beam machine, it shows that the method of focused-ion beam can fabricate two-dimensional photonic crystal and photonic crystal device efficiently, and the quality of the fabricated photonic crystal is high. Using the focused-ion beam method, we fabricate photonic crystal wavelength division multiplexer, and its characteristics are analyzed

  18. Equivalent Method of Solving Quantum Efficiency of Reflection-Mode Exponential Doping GaAs Photocathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Niu; Zhi, Yang; Ben-Kang, Chang

    2009-01-01

    The mathematical expression of the electron diffusion and drift length L DE of exponential doping photocathode is deduced. In the quantum efficiency equation of the reffection-mode uniform doping cathode, substituting L DE for L D , the equivalent quantum efficiency equation of the reffection-mode exponential doping cathode is obtained. By using the equivalent equation, theoretical simulation and experimental analysis shows that the equivalent index formula and formula-doped cathode quantum efficiency results in line. The equivalent equation avoids complicated calculation, thereby simplifies the process of solving the quantum efficiency of exponential doping photocathode

  19. Silicon-based photonic crystals fabricated using proton beam writing combined with electrochemical etching method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Zhiya; Breese, Mark Bh; Recio-Sánchez, Gonzalo; Azimi, Sara; Song, Jiao; Liang, Haidong; Banas, Agnieszka; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Martín-Palma, Raúl José

    2012-07-23

    A method for fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) silicon nanostructures based on selective formation of porous silicon using ion beam irradiation of bulk p-type silicon followed by electrochemical etching is shown. It opens a route towards the fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) and 3D silicon-based photonic crystals with high flexibility and industrial compatibility. In this work, we present the fabrication of 2D photonic lattice and photonic slab structures and propose a process for the fabrication of 3D woodpile photonic crystals based on this approach. Simulated results of photonic band structures for the fabricated 2D photonic crystals show the presence of TE or TM gap in mid-infrared range.

  20. Photonic polymer-blend structures and method for making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Michael D.

    2004-06-29

    The present invention comprises the formation of photonic polymer-blend structures having tunable optical and mechanical properties. The photonic polymer-blend structures comprise monomer units of spherical microparticles of a polymer-blend material wherein the spherical microparticles have surfaces partially merged with one another in a robust inter-particle bond having a tunable inter-particle separation or bond length sequentially attached in a desired and programmable architecture. The photonic polymer-blend structures of the present invention can be linked by several hundred individual particles sequentially linked to form complex three-dimensional structures or highly ordered two-dimensional arrays of 3D columns with 2D spacing.

  1. Almost real photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, H.

    1977-01-01

    High energy photon-proton scattering is expected to bring an important information on strong and electromagnetic interaction, and is discussed in this paper. When the ''mass'' of the photon is less than that of the lightest hadron, it is said ''the photon is almost real''. The photon energy is sufficiently high to check the energy dependence of the gamma-proton total cross section, even in the first stage of TRISTAN. The tagging system consists of four multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) and a lead glass Cerenkov counter. The energy of scattered electrons is determined with the Cerenkov counter. The equivalent-photon approximation is a useful method to obtain the counting rates. The estimation of the counting rate was made under the expected value of the total cross section. The estimated counting rate is strong enough for the experiment of the gamma-proton total cross section measurement. (Kato, T.)

  2. Comparison of Different Numerical Methods for Quality Factor Calculation of Nano and Micro Photonic Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghizadeh, Alireza; Mørk, Jesper; Chung, Il-Sug

    2014-01-01

    Four different numerical methods for calculating the quality factor and resonance wavelength of a nano or micro photonic cavity are compared. Good agreement was found for a wide range of quality factors. Advantages and limitations of the different methods are discussed.......Four different numerical methods for calculating the quality factor and resonance wavelength of a nano or micro photonic cavity are compared. Good agreement was found for a wide range of quality factors. Advantages and limitations of the different methods are discussed....

  3. Numerical divergence effects of equivalence theory in the nodal expansion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zika, M.R.; Downar, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate solutions of the advanced nodal equations require the use of discontinuity factors (DFs) to account for the homogenization errors that are inherent in all coarse-mesh nodal methods. During the last several years, nodal equivalence theory (NET) has successfully been implemented for the Cartesian geometry and has received widespread acceptance in the light water reactor industry. The extension of NET to other reactor types has had limited success. Recent efforts to implement NET within the framework of the nodal expansion method have successfully been applied to the fast breeder reactor. However, attempts to apply the same methods to thermal reactors such as the Modular High-Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) have led to numerical divergence problems that can be attributed directly to the magnitude of the DFs. In the work performed here, it was found that the numerical problems occur in the inner and upscatter iterations of the solution algorithm. These iterations use a Gauss-Seidel iterative technique that is always convergent for problems with unity DFs. However, for an MHTGR model that requires large DFs, both the inner and upscatter iterations were divergent. Initial investigations into methods for bounding the DFs have proven unsatisfactory as a means of remedying the convergence problems. Although the DFs could be bounded to yield a convergent solution, several cases were encountered where the resulting flux solution was less accurate than the solution without DFs. For the specific case of problems without upscattering, an alternate numerical method for the inner iteration, an LU decomposition, was identified and shown to be feasible

  4. Multiple resonance compensation for betatron coupling and its equivalence with matrix method

    CERN Document Server

    De Ninno, G

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of betatron coupling can be broadly divided into two categories: the matrix approach that decouples the single-turn matrix to reveal the normal modes and the hamiltonian approach that evaluates the coupling in terms of the action of resonances in perturbation theory. The latter is often regarded as being less exact but good for physical insight. The common opinion is that the correction of the two closest sum and difference resonances to the working point is sufficient to reduce the off-axis terms in the 4X4 single-turn matrix, but this is only partially true. The reason for this is explained, and a method is developed that sums to infinity all coupling resonances and, in this way, obtains results equivalent to the matrix approach. The two approaches is discussed with reference to the dynamic aperture. Finally, the extension of the summation method to resonances of all orders is outlined and the relative importance of a single resonance compared to all resonances of a given order is analytically desc...

  5. Efficient Power-Transfer Capability Analysis of the TET System Using the Equivalent Small Parameter Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanzhen Wu; Hu, A P; Budgett, D; Malpas, S C; Dissanayake, T

    2011-06-01

    Transcutaneous energy transfer (TET) enables the transfer of power across the skin without direct electrical connection. It is a mechanism for powering implantable devices for the lifetime of a patient. For maximum power transfer, it is essential that TET systems be resonant on both the primary and secondary sides, which requires considerable design effort. Consequently, a strong need exists for an efficient method to aid the design process. This paper presents an analytical technique appropriate to analyze complex TET systems. The system's steady-state solution in closed form with sufficient accuracy is obtained by employing the proposed equivalent small parameter method. It is shown that power-transfer capability can be correctly predicted without tedious iterative simulations or practical measurements. Furthermore, for TET systems utilizing a current-fed push-pull soft switching resonant converter, it is found that the maximum energy transfer does not occur when the primary and secondary resonant tanks are "tuned" to the nominal resonant frequency. An optimal turning point exists, corresponding to the system's maximum power-transfer capability when optimal tuning capacitors are applied.

  6. A high-performance liquid chromatography method for the serotonin release assay is equivalent to the radioactive method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sono-Koree, N K; Crist, R A; Frank, E L; Rodgers, G M; Smock, K J

    2016-02-01

    The serotonin release assay (SRA) is considered the gold standard laboratory test for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). The historic SRA method uses platelets loaded with radiolabeled serotonin to evaluate platelet activation by HIT immune complexes. However, a nonradioactive method is desirable. We report the performance characteristics of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) SRA method. We validated the performance characteristics of an HPLC-SRA method, including correlation with a reference laboratory using the radioactive method. Serotonin released from reagent platelets was quantified by HPLC using fluorescent detection. Results were expressed as % release and classified as positive, negative, or indeterminate based on previously published cutoffs. Serum samples from 250 subjects with suspected HIT were tested in the HPLC-SRA and with the radioactive method. Concordant classifications were observed in 230 samples (92%). Sera from 41 healthy individuals tested negative. Between-run imprecision studies showed standard deviation of performance characteristics, equivalent to the historic radioactive method, but avoids the complexities of working with radioactivity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Processing multiphoton states through operation on a single photon: Methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Qing; He Bing; Bergou, Janos A.; Ren, Yuhang

    2009-01-01

    Multiphoton states are widely applied in quantum information technology. By the methods presented in this paper, the structure of a multiphoton state in the form of multiple single-photon qubit products can be mapped to a single-photon qudit, which could also be in a separable product with other photons. This makes possible the manipulation of such multiphoton states by processing single-photon states. The optical realization of unknown qubit discrimination [B. He, J. A. Bergou, and Y.-H. Ren, Phys. Rev. A 76, 032301 (2007)] is simplified with the transformation methods. Another application is the construction of quantum logic gates, where the inverse transformations back to the input state spaces are also necessary. We especially show that the modified setups to implement the transformations can realize the deterministic multicontrol gates (including Toffoli gate) operating directly on the products of single-photon qubits.

  8. Calculation of reaction forces in the boiler supports using the method of equivalent stiffness of membrane wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertić, Josip; Kozak, Dražan; Samardžić, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    The values of reaction forces in the boiler supports are the basis for the dimensioning of bearing steel structure of steam boiler. In this paper, the application of the method of equivalent stiffness of membrane wall is proposed for the calculation of reaction forces. The method of equalizing displacement, as the method of homogenization of membrane wall stiffness, was applied. On the example of "Milano" boiler, using the finite element method, the calculation of reactions in the supports for the real geometry discretized by the shell finite element was made. The second calculation was performed with the assumption of ideal stiffness of membrane walls and the third using the method of equivalent stiffness of membrane wall. In the third case, the membrane walls are approximated by the equivalent orthotropic plate. The approximation of membrane wall stiffness is achieved using the elasticity matrix of equivalent orthotropic plate at the level of finite element. The obtained results were compared, and the advantages of using the method of equivalent stiffness of membrane wall for the calculation of reactions in the boiler supports were emphasized.

  9. Calculation of Reaction Forces in the Boiler Supports Using the Method of Equivalent Stiffness of Membrane Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Sertić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The values of reaction forces in the boiler supports are the basis for the dimensioning of bearing steel structure of steam boiler. In this paper, the application of the method of equivalent stiffness of membrane wall is proposed for the calculation of reaction forces. The method of equalizing displacement, as the method of homogenization of membrane wall stiffness, was applied. On the example of “Milano” boiler, using the finite element method, the calculation of reactions in the supports for the real geometry discretized by the shell finite element was made. The second calculation was performed with the assumption of ideal stiffness of membrane walls and the third using the method of equivalent stiffness of membrane wall. In the third case, the membrane walls are approximated by the equivalent orthotropic plate. The approximation of membrane wall stiffness is achieved using the elasticity matrix of equivalent orthotropic plate at the level of finite element. The obtained results were compared, and the advantages of using the method of equivalent stiffness of membrane wall for the calculation of reactions in the boiler supports were emphasized.

  10. Analysis of Monte Carlo methods for the simulation of photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, G.A.; Kusoffsky, L.

    1975-01-01

    In connection with the transport of low-energy photons (30 - 140 keV) through layers of water of different thicknesses, various aspects of Monte Carlo methods are examined in order to improve their effectivity (to produce statistically more reliable results with shorter computer times) and to bridge the gap between more physical methods and more mathematical ones. The calculations are compared with results of experiments involving the simulation of photon transport, using direct methods and collision density ones (J.S.)

  11. Criteria and methods for estimating external effective dose equivalent from personnel monitoring results: EDE implementation guide. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, D.

    1998-09-01

    Title 10 Part 20 of the Code of Federal regulations requires that nuclear power plant licensees evaluate worker radiation exposure using a risk-based methodology termed the effective dose equivalent (EDE). EDE is a measure of radiation exposure that represents an individual's risk of stochastic injury from their exposure. EPRI has conducted research into how photons interact with the body. These results have been coupled with information on how the body's organs differ in their susceptibility to radiation injury, to produce a methodology for assessing the effective dose equivalent. The research and the resultant methodology have been described in numerous technical reports, scientific journal articles, and technical meetings. EPRI is working with the Nuclear Energy Institute to have the EPRI effective dose equivalent methodology accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for use at US nuclear power plants. In order to further familiarize power plant personnel with the methodology, this report summarizes the EDE research and presents some simple guidelines for its implementing the methodology

  12. An equivalent method for optimization of particle tuned mass damper based on experimental parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoyi; Zhou, Ying

    2018-04-01

    A particle tuned mass damper (PTMD) is a creative combination of a widely used tuned mass damper (TMD) and an efficient particle damper (PD) in the vibration control area. The performance of a one-storey steel frame attached with a PTMD is investigated through free vibration and shaking table tests. The influence of some key parameters (filling ratio of particles, auxiliary mass ratio, and particle density) on the vibration control effects is investigated, and it is shown that the attenuation level significantly depends on the filling ratio of particles. According to the experimental parametric study, some guidelines for optimization of the PTMD that mainly consider the filling ratio are proposed. Furthermore, an approximate analytical solution based on the concept of an equivalent single-particle damper is proposed, and it shows satisfied agreement between the simulation and experimental results. This simplified method is then used for the preliminary optimal design of a PTMD system, and a case study of a PTMD system attached to a five-storey steel structure following this optimization process is presented.

  13. Method to account for dose fractionation in analysis of IMRT plans: Modified equivalent uniform dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Clinton S.; Kim, Yongbok; Lee, Nancy; Bucci, Kara M.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Verhey, Lynn J.; Xia Ping

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) to account for dose fractionation using the biologically effective dose without losing the advantages of the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) and to report the calculated mEUD and gEUD in clinically used intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. Methods and Materials: The proposed mEUD replaces the dose to each voxel in the gEUD formulation by a biologically effective dose with a normalization factor. We propose to use the term mEUD D o /n o that includes the total dose (D o ) and number of fractions (n o ) and to use the term mEUD o that includes the same total dose but a standard fraction size of 2 Gy. A total of 41 IMRT plans for patients with nasopharyngeal cancer treated at our institution between October 1997 and March 2002 were selected for the study. The gEUD and mEUD were calculated for the planning gross tumor volume (pGTV), planning clinical tumor volume (pCTV), parotid glands, and spinal cord. The prescription dose for these patients was 70 Gy to >95% of the pGTV and 59.4 Gy to >95% of the pCTV in 33 fractions. Results: The calculated average gEUD was 72.2 ± 2.4 Gy for the pGTV, 54.2 ± 7.1 Gy for the pCTV, 26.7 ± 4.2 Gy for the parotid glands, and 34.1 ± 6.8 Gy for the spinal cord. The calculated average mEUD D o /n o using 33 fractions was 71.7 ± 3.5 Gy for mEUD 70/33 of the pGTV, 49.9 ± 7.9 Gy for mEUD 59.5/33 of the pCTV, 27.6 ± 4.8 Gy for mEUD 26/33 of the parotid glands, and 32.7 ± 7.8 Gy for mEUD 45/33 of the spinal cord. Conclusion: The proposed mEUD, combining the gEUD with the biologically effective dose, preserves all advantages of the gEUD while reflecting the fractionation effects and linear and quadratic survival characteristics

  14. Equivalent glycemic load (EGL: a method for quantifying the glycemic responses elicited by low carbohydrate foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spolar Matt

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycemic load (GL is used to quantify the glycemic impact of high-carbohydrate (CHO foods, but cannot be used for low-CHO foods. Therefore, we evaluated the accuracy of equivalent-glycemic-load (EGL, a measure of the glycemic impact of low-CHO foods defined as the amount of CHO from white-bread (WB with the same glycemic impact as one serving of food. Methods Several randomized, cross-over trials were performed by a contract research organization using overnight-fasted healthy subjects drawn from a pool of 63 recruited from the general population by newspaper advertisement. Incremental blood-glucose response area-under-the-curve (AUC elicited by 0, 5, 10, 20, 35 and 50 g CHO portions of WB (WB-CHO and 3, 5, 10 and 20 g glucose were measured. EGL values of the different doses of glucose and WB and 4 low-CHO foods were determined as: EGL = (F-B/M, where F is AUC after food and B is y-intercept and M slope of the regression of AUC on grams WB-CHO. The dose-response curves of WB and glucose were used to derive an equation to estimate GL from EGL, and the resulting values compared to GL calculated from the glucose dose-response curve. The accuracy of EGL was assessed by comparing the GL (estimated from EGL values of the 4 doses of oral-glucose with the amounts actually consumed. Results Over 0–50 g WB-CHO (n = 10, the dose-response curve was non-linear, but over the range 0–20 g the curve was indistinguishable from linear, with AUC after 0, 5, 10 and 20 g WB-CHO, 10 ± 1, 28 ± 2, 58 ± 5 and 100 ± 6 mmol × min/L, differing significantly from each other (n = 48. The difference between GL values estimated from EGL and those calculated from the dose-response curve was 0 g (95% confidence-interval, ± 0.5 g. The difference between the GL values of the 4 doses of glucose estimated from EGL, and the amounts of glucose actually consumed was 0.2 g (95% confidence-interval, ± 1 g. Conclusion EGL, a measure of the glycemic impact of

  15. Equivalent non-Gaussian excitation method for response moment calculation of systems under non-Gaussian random excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Takahiro; Kimura, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Equivalent non-Gaussian excitation method is proposed to obtain the moments up to the fourth order of the response of systems under non-Gaussian random excitation. The excitation is prescribed by the probability density and power spectrum. Moment equations for the response can be derived from the stochastic differential equations for the excitation and the system. However, the moment equations are not closed due to the nonlinearity of the diffusion coefficient in the equation for the excitation. In the proposed method, the diffusion coefficient is replaced with the equivalent diffusion coefficient approximately to obtain a closed set of the moment equations. The square of the equivalent diffusion coefficient is expressed by the second-order polynomial. In order to demonstrate the validity of the method, a linear system to non-Gaussian excitation with generalized Gaussian distribution is analyzed. The results show the method is applicable to non-Gaussian excitation with the widely different kurtosis and bandwidth. (author)

  16. Response moments of dynamic systems under non-Gaussian random excitation by the equivalent non-Gaussian excitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Takahiro; Kimura, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Equivalent non-Gaussian excitation method is proposed to obtain the response moments up to the 4th order of dynamic systems under non-Gaussian random excitation. The non-Gaussian excitation is prescribed by the probability density and the power spectrum, and is described by an Ito stochastic differential equation. Generally, moment equations for the response, which are derived from the governing equations for the excitation and the system, are not closed due to the nonlinearity of the diffusion coefficient in the equation for the excitation even though the system is linear. In the equivalent non-Gaussian excitation method, the diffusion coefficient is replaced with the equivalent diffusion coefficient approximately to obtain a closed set of the moment equations. The square of the equivalent diffusion coefficient is expressed by a quadratic polynomial. In numerical examples, a linear system subjected to nonGaussian excitations with bimodal and Rayleigh distributions is analyzed by using the present method. The results show that the method yields the variance, skewness and kurtosis of the response with high accuracy for non-Gaussian excitation with the widely different probability densities and bandwidth. The statistical moments of the equivalent non-Gaussian excitation are also investigated to describe the feature of the method. (paper)

  17. Investigation of real tissue water equivalent path lengths using an efficient dose extinction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Baer, Esther; Jee, Kyung-Wook; Sharp, Gregory C.; Flanz, Jay; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2017-07-01

    For proton therapy, an accurate conversion of CT HU to relative stopping power (RSP) is essential. Validation of the conversion based on real tissue samples is more direct than the current practice solely based on tissue substitutes and can potentially address variations over the population. Based on a novel dose extinction method, we measured water equivalent path lengths (WEPL) on animal tissue samples to evaluate the accuracy of CT HU to RSP conversion and potential variations over a population. A broad proton beam delivered a spread out Bragg peak to the samples sandwiched between a water tank and a 2D ion-chamber detector. WEPLs of the samples were determined from the transmission dose profiles measured as a function of the water level in the tank. Tissue substitute inserts and Lucite blocks with known WEPLs were used to validate the accuracy. A large number of real tissue samples were measured. Variations of WEPL over different batches of tissue samples were also investigated. The measured WEPLs were compared with those computed from CT scans with the Stoichiometric calibration method. WEPLs were determined within  ±0.5% percentage deviation (% std/mean) and  ±0.5% error for most of the tissue surrogate inserts and the calibration blocks. For biological tissue samples, percentage deviations were within  ±0.3%. No considerable difference (extinction measurement took around 5 min to produce ~1000 WEPL values to be compared with calculations. This dose extinction system measures WEPL efficiently and accurately, which allows the validation of CT HU to RSP conversions based on the WEPL measured for a large number of samples and real tissues.

  18. Application of equivalent electrodes method to analysis of interaction between ELF-LF electric fields and human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceselkoska, Vesna C.; Velickovic, Dragutin M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the use of equivalent electrodes method, numerical method, based on surface-charge equation to quantify the interaction of low frequencies electric fields with various models of human body. The evaluation of the electric field intensity on the body surface is performed for a realistic model of the human body. Several examples for different postures of the model are given. (Author)

  19. Photon detector configured to employ the Gunn effect and method of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cich, Michael J

    2015-03-17

    Embodiments disclosed herein relate to photon detectors configured to employ the Gunn effect for detecting high-energy photons (e.g., x-rays and gamma rays) and methods of use. In an embodiment, a photon detector for detecting high-energy photons is disclosed. The photon detector includes a p-i-n semiconductor diode having a p-type semiconductor region, an n-type semiconductor region, and a compensated i-region disposed between the p-type semiconductor region and the n-type semiconductor region. The compensated i-region and has a width of about 100 .mu.m to about 400 .mu.m and is configured to exhibit the Gunn effect when the p-i-n semiconductor diode is forward biased a sufficient amount. The compensated i-region is doped to include a free carrier concentration of less than about 10.sup.10 cm.sup.-3.

  20. Well logging method and apparatus using a continuous energy spectrum photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    In accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, a method and apparatus for logging an earth formation of interest is disclosed in which repetitive bursts of a continuous energy spectrum of photons are emitted that penetrate the media surrounding a borehole traversing the earth formation. Thereafter, indications of photons resulting from the interaction of the emitted photons and the surrounding media are obtained, each indication being obtained at a different separation from the source along the axis of the borehole. Finally, the indications are compared to determine representations of a characteristic of the media surrounding the borehole. According to one aspect of the present invention, at least one of the indications is the result of annihilation photons produced by the interaction of the emitted photons and the surrounding media

  1. Comparison of equivalent linear and non linear methods on ground response analysis: case study at West Bangka site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eko Rudi Iswanto; Eric Yee

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of identifying NPP sites, site surveys are performed in West Bangka (WB), Bangka-Belitung Island Province. Ground response analysis of a potential site has been carried out using peak strain profiles and peak ground acceleration. The objective of this research is to compare Equivalent Linear (EQL) and Non Linear (NL) methods of ground response analysis on the selected NPP site (West Bangka) using Deep Soil software. Equivalent linear method is widely used because requires soil data in simple way and short time of computational process. On the other hand, non linear method is capable of representing the actual soil behaviour by considering non linear soil parameter. The results showed that EQL method has similar trends to NL method. At surface layer, the acceleration values for EQL and NL methods are resulted as 0.425 g and 0.375 g respectively. NL method is more reliable in capturing higher frequencies of spectral acceleration compared to EQL method. (author)

  2. Three-dimensional ordered particulate structures: Method to retrieve characteristics from photonic band gap data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskevich, Alexander A.; Loiko, Valery A.

    2015-01-01

    A method to retrieve characteristics of ordered particulate structures, such as photonic crystals, is proposed. It is based on the solution of the inverse problem using data on the photonic band gap (PBG). The quasicrystalline approximation (QCA) of the theory of multiple scattering of waves and the transfer matrix method (TMM) are used. Retrieval of the refractive index of particles is demonstrated. Refractive indices of the artificial opal particles are estimated using the published experimental data.

  3. Finite element method analysis of band gap and transmission of two-dimensional metallic photonic crystals at terahertz frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degirmenci, Elif; Landais, Pascal

    2013-10-20

    Photonic band gap and transmission characteristics of 2D metallic photonic crystals at THz frequencies have been investigated using finite element method (FEM). Photonic crystals composed of metallic rods in air, in square and triangular lattice arrangements, are considered for transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. The modes and band gap characteristics of metallic photonic crystal structure are investigated by solving the eigenvalue problem over a unit cell of the lattice using periodic boundary conditions. A photonic band gap diagram of dielectric photonic crystal in square lattice array is also considered and compared with well-known plane wave expansion results verifying our FEM approach. The photonic band gap designs for both dielectric and metallic photonic crystals are consistent with previous studies obtained by different methods. Perfect match is obtained between photonic band gap diagrams and transmission spectra of corresponding lattice structure.

  4. Photonic band structures solved by a plane-wave-based transfer-matrix method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yuan; Lin, Lan-Lan

    2003-04-01

    Transfer-matrix methods adopting a plane-wave basis have been routinely used to calculate the scattering of electromagnetic waves by general multilayer gratings and photonic crystal slabs. In this paper we show that this technique, when combined with Bloch's theorem, can be extended to solve the photonic band structure for 2D and 3D photonic crystal structures. Three different eigensolution schemes to solve the traditional band diagrams along high-symmetry lines in the first Brillouin zone of the crystal are discussed. Optimal rules for the Fourier expansion over the dielectric function and electromagnetic fields with discontinuities occurring at the boundary of different material domains have been employed to accelerate the convergence of numerical computation. Application of this method to an important class of 3D layer-by-layer photonic crystals reveals the superior convergency of this different approach over the conventional plane-wave expansion method.

  5. Photonic band structures solved by a plane-wave-based transfer-matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhiyuan; Lin Lanlan

    2003-01-01

    Transfer-matrix methods adopting a plane-wave basis have been routinely used to calculate the scattering of electromagnetic waves by general multilayer gratings and photonic crystal slabs. In this paper we show that this technique, when combined with Bloch's theorem, can be extended to solve the photonic band structure for 2D and 3D photonic crystal structures. Three different eigensolution schemes to solve the traditional band diagrams along high-symmetry lines in the first Brillouin zone of the crystal are discussed. Optimal rules for the Fourier expansion over the dielectric function and electromagnetic fields with discontinuities occurring at the boundary of different material domains have been employed to accelerate the convergence of numerical computation. Application of this method to an important class of 3D layer-by-layer photonic crystals reveals the superior convergency of this different approach over the conventional plane-wave expansion method

  6. Distribution of Snow and Maximum Snow Water Equivalent Obtained by LANDSAT Data and Degree Day Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, K.; Ochiai, H.; Takeuchi, S.

    1985-01-01

    Maximum snow water equivalence and snowcover distribution are estimated using several LANDSAT data taken in snowmelting season over a four year period. The test site is Okutadami-gawa Basin located in the central position of Tohoku-Kanto-Chubu District. The year to year normalization for snowmelt volume computation on the snow line is conducted by year to year correction of degree days using the snowcover percentage within the test basin obtained from LANDSAT data. The maximum snow water equivalent map in the test basin is generated based on the normalized snowmelt volume on the snow line extracted from four LANDSAT data taken in a different year. The snowcover distribution on an arbitrary day in snowmelting of 1982 is estimated from the maximum snow water equivalent map. The estimated snowcover is compared with the snowcover area extracted from NOAA-AVHRR data taken on the same day. The applicability of the snow estimation using LANDSAT data is discussed.

  7. A Monte Carlo method using octree structure in photon and electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, K.; Maeda, S.

    1995-01-01

    Most of the early Monte Carlo calculations in medical physics were used to calculate absorbed dose distributions, and detector responses and efficiencies. Recently, data acquisition in Single Photon Emission CT (SPECT) has been simulated by a Monte Carlo method to evaluate scatter photons generated in a human body and a collimator. Monte Carlo simulations in SPECT data acquisition are generally based on the transport of photons only because the photons being simulated are low energy, and therefore the bremsstrahlung productions by the electrons generated are negligible. Since the transport calculation of photons without electrons is much simpler than that with electrons, it is possible to accomplish the high-speed simulation in a simple object with one medium. Here, object description is important in performing the photon and/or electron transport using a Monte Carlo method efficiently. The authors propose a new description method using an octree representation of an object. Thus even if the boundaries of each medium are represented accurately, high-speed calculation of photon transport can be accomplished because the number of voxels is much fewer than that of the voxel-based approach which represents an object by a union of the voxels of the same size. This Monte Carlo code using the octree representation of an object first establishes the simulation geometry by reading octree string, which is produced by forming an octree structure from a set of serial sections for the object before the simulation; then it transports photons in the geometry. Using the code, if the user just prepares a set of serial sections for the object in which he or she wants to simulate photon trajectories, he or she can perform the simulation automatically using the suboptimal geometry simplified by the octree representation without forming the optimal geometry by handwriting

  8. A novel method of rapidly modeling optical properties of actual photonic crystal fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Wen, Wang; Shu-Qin, Lou; Wei-Guo, Chen; Hong-Lei, Li

    2010-01-01

    The flexible structure of photonic crystal fibre not only offers novel optical properties but also brings some difficulties in keeping the fibre structure in the fabrication process which inevitably cause the optical properties of the resulting fibre to deviate from the designed properties. Therefore, a method of evaluating the optical properties of the actual fibre is necessary for the purpose of application. Up to now, the methods employed to measure the properties of the actual photonic crystal fibre often require long fibre samples or complex expensive equipments. To our knowledge, there are few studies of modeling an actual photonic crystal fibre and evaluating its properties rapidly. In this paper, a novel method, based on the combination model of digital image processing and the finite element method, is proposed to rapidly model the optical properties of the actual photonic crystal fibre. Two kinds of photonic crystal fibres made by Crystal Fiber A/S are modeled. It is confirmed from numerical results that the proposed method is simple, rapid and accurate for evaluating the optical properties of the actual photonic crystal fibre without requiring complex equipment. (rapid communication)

  9. Quantum entanglement and phase transition in a two-dimensional photon-photon pair model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianjun; Yuan Jianhui; Zhang Junpei; Cheng Ze

    2013-01-01

    We propose a two-dimensional model consisting of photons and photon pairs. In the model, the mixed gas of photons and photon pairs is formally equivalent to a two-dimensional system of massive bosons with non-vanishing chemical potential, which implies the existence of two possible condensate phases. Using the variational method, we discuss the quantum phase transition of the mixed gas and obtain the critical coupling line analytically. Moreover, we also find that the phase transition of the photon gas can be interpreted as enhanced second harmonic generation. We then discuss the entanglement between photons and photon pairs. Additionally, we also illustrate how the entanglement between photons and photon pairs can be associated with the phase transition of the system.

  10. CONFERENCE: Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Despite being difficult to observe, photon-photon collisions have opened up a range of physics difficult, or even impossible, to access by other methods. The progress which has been made in this field was evident at the fifth international workshop on photon-photon collisions, held in Aachen from 13-16 April and attended by some 120 physicists

  11. Separation of non-stationary multi-source sound field based on the interpolated time-domain equivalent source method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Chuan-Xing; Geng, Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Zheng

    2016-05-01

    In the sound field with multiple non-stationary sources, the measured pressure is the sum of the pressures generated by all sources, and thus cannot be used directly for studying the vibration and sound radiation characteristics of every source alone. This paper proposes a separation model based on the interpolated time-domain equivalent source method (ITDESM) to separate the pressure field belonging to every source from the non-stationary multi-source sound field. In the proposed method, ITDESM is first extended to establish the relationship between the mixed time-dependent pressure and all the equivalent sources distributed on every source with known location and geometry information, and all the equivalent source strengths at each time step are solved by an iterative solving process; then, the corresponding equivalent source strengths of one interested source are used to calculate the pressure field generated by that source alone. Numerical simulation of two baffled circular pistons demonstrates that the proposed method can be effective in separating the non-stationary pressure generated by every source alone in both time and space domains. An experiment with two speakers in a semi-anechoic chamber further evidences the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Application of a value-based equivalency method to assess environmental damage compensation under the European Environmental Liability Directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin-Ortega, J.; Brouwer, R.; Aiking, H.

    2011-01-01

    The Environmental Liability Directive (ELD) establishes a framework of liability based on the 'polluter-pays' principle to prevent and remedy environmental damage. The ELD requires the testing of appropriate equivalency methods to assess the scale of compensatory measures needed to offset damage.

  13. A new method for generating distributions of biomonitoring equivalents to support exposure assessment and prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Martin B; Sobus, Jon R; George, Barbara J; Isaacs, Kristin; Conolly, Rory; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2014-08-01

    Biomonitoring data are now available for hundreds of chemicals through state and national health surveys. Exposure guidance values also exist for many of these chemicals. Several methods are frequently used to evaluate biomarker data with respect to a guidance value. The "biomonitoring equivalent" (BE) approach estimates a single biomarker concentration (called the BE) that corresponds to a guidance value (e.g., Maximum Contaminant Level, Reference Dose, etc.), which can then be compared with measured biomarker data. The resulting "hazard quotient" estimates (HQ=biomarker concentration/BE) can then be used to prioritize chemicals for follow-up examinations. This approach is used exclusively for population-level assessments, and works best when the central tendency of measurement data is considered. Complementary approaches are therefore needed for assessing individual biomarker levels, particularly those that fall within the upper percentiles of measurement distributions. In this case study, probabilistic models were first used to generate distributions of BEs for perchlorate based on the point-of-departure (POD) of 7μg/kg/day. These distributions reflect possible biomarker concentrations in a hypothetical population where all individuals are exposed at the POD. A statistical analysis was then performed to evaluate urinary perchlorate measurements from adults in the 2001 to 2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Each NHANES adult was assumed to have experienced repeated exposure at the POD, and their biomarker concentration was interpreted probabilistically with respect to a BE distribution. The HQ based on the geometric mean (GM) urinary perchlorate concentration was estimated to be much lower than unity (HQ≈0.07). This result suggests that the average NHANES adult was exposed to perchlorate at a level well below the POD. Regarding individuals, at least a 99.8% probability was calculated for all but two NHANES adults that a higher

  14. Semi-empirical equivalent field method for dose determination in midline block fields for cobalt - 60 beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagoe, S.N.A.; Nani, E.K.; Yarney, J.; Edusa, C.; Quayson-Sackey, K.; Nyamadi, K.M.; Sasu, E.

    2012-01-01

    For teletherapy treatment time calculations, midline block fields are resolved into two fields, but neglecting scattering from other fields, the effective equivalent square field size of the midline block is assumed to the resultant field. Such approach is underestimation, and may be detrimental in achieving the recommended uncertainty of ± 5 % for patient's radiation dose delivery. By comparison, the deviations of effective equivalent square field sizes by calculations and experiments were within 13.2 % for cobalt 60 beams of GWGP80 cobalt 60 teletherapy. Therefore, a modified method incorporating the scatter contributions was adopted to estimate the effective equivalent square field size for midline block field. The measured outputs of radiation beams with the block were compared with outputs of square fields without the blocks (only the block tray) at depths of 5 and 10 cm for the teletherapy machine employing isocentric technique, and the accuracy was within ± 3 % for the cobalt 60 beams. (au)

  15. K-edge energy-based calibration method for photon counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yongshuai; Ji, Xu; Zhang, Ran; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, potential applications of energy-resolved photon counting detectors (PCDs) in the x-ray medical imaging field have been actively investigated. Unlike conventional x-ray energy integration detectors, PCDs count the number of incident x-ray photons within certain energy windows. For PCDs, the interactions between x-ray photons and photoconductor generate electronic voltage pulse signals. The pulse height of each signal is proportional to the energy of the incident photons. By comparing the pulse height with the preset energy threshold values, x-ray photons with specific energies are recorded and sorted into different energy bins. To quantitatively understand the meaning of the energy threshold values, and thus to assign an absolute energy value to each energy bin, energy calibration is needed to establish the quantitative relationship between the threshold values and the corresponding effective photon energies. In practice, the energy calibration is not always easy, due to the lack of well-calibrated energy references for the working energy range of the PCDs. In this paper, a new method was developed to use the precise knowledge of the characteristic K-edge energy of materials to perform energy calibration. The proposed method was demonstrated using experimental data acquired from three K-edge materials (viz., iodine, gadolinium, and gold) on two different PCDs (Hydra and Flite, XCounter, Sweden). Finally, the proposed energy calibration method was further validated using a radioactive isotope (Am-241) with a known decay energy spectrum.

  16. Evaluation of equivalent doses in {sup 18}F PET/CT using the Monte Carlo method with MCNPX code; Avaliação de doses equivalentes em PET/CT com {sup 18}F utilizando o Método Monte Carlo com código MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, Walmir [Instituto Federal de Bahia (IFBA), Vitória da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Santos, William Souza; Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira [Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU), Uberlândia, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Física; Caldas, Linda V. E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza, Divanizia N. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The present work used the Monte Carlo method (MMC), specifically the Monte Carlo NParticle - MCNPX, to simulate the interaction of radiation involving photons and particles, such as positrons and electrons, with virtual adult anthropomorphic simulators on PET / CT scans and to determine absorbed and equivalent doses in adult male and female patients.

  17. A method to generate equivalent energy spectra and filtration models based on measurement for multidetector CT Monte Carlo dosimetry simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Adam C.; Zhang Di; Kim, Hyun J.; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna D.; Stevens, Donna M.; Primak, Andrew N.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a method for generating x-ray source models for performing Monte Carlo (MC) radiation dosimetry simulations of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. These so-called ''equivalent'' source models consist of an energy spectrum and filtration description that are generated based wholly on the measured values and can be used in place of proprietary manufacturer's data for scanner-specific MDCT MC simulations. Required measurements include the half value layers (HVL 1 and HVL 2 ) and the bowtie profile (exposure values across the fan beam) for the MDCT scanner of interest. Using these measured values, a method was described (a) to numerically construct a spectrum with the calculated HVLs approximately equal to those measured (equivalent spectrum) and then (b) to determine a filtration scheme (equivalent filter) that attenuates the equivalent spectrum in a similar fashion as the actual filtration attenuates the actual x-ray beam, as measured by the bowtie profile measurements. Using this method, two types of equivalent source models were generated: One using a spectrum based on both HVL 1 and HVL 2 measurements and its corresponding filtration scheme and the second consisting of a spectrum based only on the measured HVL 1 and its corresponding filtration scheme. Finally, a third type of source model was built based on the spectrum and filtration data provided by the scanner's manufacturer. MC simulations using each of these three source model types were evaluated by comparing the accuracy of multiple CT dose index (CTDI) simulations to measured CTDI values for 64-slice scanners from the four major MDCT manufacturers. Comprehensive evaluations were carried out for each scanner using each kVp and bowtie filter combination available. CTDI experiments were performed for both head (16 cm in diameter) and body (32 cm in diameter) CTDI phantoms using both central and peripheral measurement positions. Both equivalent source model types

  18. Method for measuring and evaluation dose equivalent rate from fast neutrons in mixed gamma-neutron fields around particles accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruceru, I.; Sandu, M.; Cruceru, M.

    1994-01-01

    A method for measuring and evaluation of doses and dose equivalent rate in mixed gamma- neutron fields is discussed in this paper. The method is basedon a double detector system consist of an ionization chamber with components made from a plastic scintillator, coupled to on photomultiplier. Generally the radiation fields around accelerators are complex, often consisting of many different ionizing radiations extending over a broad range of energies. This method solve two major difficulties: determination of response functions of radiation detectors; interpretation of measurement and determination of accuracy. The discrimination gamma-fast neutrons is assured directly without a pulse shape discrimination circuit. The method is applied to mixed fields in which particle energies are situated in the energy range under 20 MeV and an izotropic emision (Φ=10 4 -10 11 n.s -1 ). The dose equivalent rates explored is 0.01mSV--0.1SV

  19. Assessment of physician and patient (child and adult) equivalent doses during renal angiography by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimian, A.; Nikparvar, B.; Jabbari, I.

    2014-01-01

    Renal angiography is one of the medical imaging methods in which patient and physician receive high equivalent doses due to long duration of fluoroscopy. In this research, equivalent doses of some radiosensitive tissues of patient (adult and child) and physician during renal angiography have been calculated by using adult and child Oak Ridge National Laboratory phantoms and Monte Carlo method (MCNPX). The results showed, in angiography of right kidney in a child and adult patient, that gall bladder with the amounts of 2.32 and 0.35 mSv, respectively, has received the most equivalent dose. About the physician, left hand, left eye and thymus absorbed the most amounts of doses, means 0.020 mSv. In addition, equivalent doses of the physician's lens eye, thyroid and knees were 0.023, 0.007 and 7.9 - 4 mSv, respectively. Although these values are less than the reported thresholds by ICRP 103, it should be noted that these amounts are related to one examination. (authors)

  20. Seismic analysis of equipment system with non-linearities such as gap and friction using equivalent linearization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, H.; Hirai, T.; Nakata, M.; Kobori, T.; Mizukoshi, K.; Takenaka, Y.; Miyagawa, N.

    1989-01-01

    Many of the equipment systems of nuclear power plants contain a number of non-linearities, such as gap and friction, due to their mechanical functions. It is desirable to take such non-linearities into account appropriately for the evaluation of the aseismic soundness. However, in usual design works, linear analysis method with rough assumptions is applied from engineering point of view. An equivalent linearization method is considered to be one of the effective analytical techniques to evaluate non-linear responses, provided that errors to a certain extent are tolerated, because it has greater simplicity in analysis and economization in computing time than non-linear analysis. The objective of this paper is to investigate the applicability of the equivalent linearization method to evaluate the maximum earthquake response of equipment systems such as the CANDU Fuelling Machine which has multiple non- linearities

  1. Calculation of dose distribution for 252Cf fission neutron source in tissue equivalent phantoms using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Gang; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng; Zhang Wenzhong

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To provide useful parameters for neutron radiotherapy, the author presents results of a Monte Carlo simulation study investigating the dosimetric characteristics of linear 252 Cf fission neutron sources. Methods: A 252 Cf fission source and tissue equivalent phantom were modeled. The dose of neutron and gamma radiations were calculated using Monte Carlo Code. Results: The dose of neutron and gamma at several positions for 252 Cf in the phantom made of equivalent materials to water, blood, muscle, skin, bone and lung were calculated. Conclusion: The results by Monte Carlo methods were compared with the data by measurement and references. According to the calculation, the method using water phantom to simulate local tissues such as muscle, blood and skin is reasonable for the calculation and measurements of dose distribution for 252 Cf

  2. Application of the equivalent radiator method for radiative corrections to the spectra of elastic electron scattering by nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Timchenko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For calculating the radiative tails in the spectra of inelastic electron scattering by nuclei, the approximation, namely, the equivalent radiator method (ERM, is used. However, the applicability of this method for evaluating the radiative tail from the elastic scattering peak has been little investigated, and therefore, it has become the subject of the present study for the case of light nuclei. As a result, spectral regions were found, where a significant discrepancy between the ERM calculation and the exact-formula calculation was observed. A link was established between this phenomenon and the diffraction minimum of the squared form-factor of the nuclear ground state. Varieties of calculations were carried out for different kinematics of electron scattering by nuclei. The analysis of the calculation results has shown the conditions, at which the equivalent radiator method can be applied for adequately evaluating the radiative tail of the elastic scattering peak.

  3. Classical reconstruction of interference patterns of position-wave-vector-entangled photon pairs by the time-reversal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuhisa; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Tomita, Akihisa

    2018-02-01

    The quantum interference of entangled photons forms a key phenomenon underlying various quantum-optical technologies. It is known that the quantum interference patterns of entangled photon pairs can be reconstructed classically by the time-reversal method; however, the time-reversal method has been applied only to time-frequency-entangled two-photon systems in previous experiments. Here, we apply the time-reversal method to the position-wave-vector-entangled two-photon systems: the two-photon Young interferometer and the two-photon beam focusing system. We experimentally demonstrate that the time-reversed systems classically reconstruct the same interference patterns as the position-wave-vector-entangled two-photon systems.

  4. Comparison of Five Computational Methods for Computing Q Factors in Photonic Crystal Membrane Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2017-01-01

    Five state-of-the-art computational methods are benchmarked by computing quality factors and resonance wavelengths in photonic crystal membrane L5 and L9 line defect cavities. The convergence of the methods with respect to resolution, degrees of freedom and number of modes is investigated. Specia...

  5. Photon-photon and photon-hadron processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, N.C.

    1993-11-01

    Photon-photon and photon-hadron interactions in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the framework of the impact parameter dependent equivalent photon approximation. Improvements of this method, like formfactor inclusion and geometrical modifications are developed. In disruptive relativistic heavy ion collisions where the heavy ions overlapp during the collision, electromagnetic processes are an important background to other mechanisms. In peripheral (non-disruptive) relativistic heavy ion collisions where the ions pass each other without strong interactions, the electromagnetic processes can be studied in their pure form. The lepton pair production is an important diagnostic tool in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The coherent γγ lepton pair production is therefore extensively studied in disruptive but also in non-disruptive collisions. The effects of strong interactions on the coherent γγ lepton pair production in disruptive collisions are discussed in terms of a simple stopping model. Coherent γγ dielectron production contributes to the dilepton production in high energy hadron-hadron collisions. As an example, the coherent dielectron production in π - p collisions is studied in terms of the equivalent photon approximation. Peripheral ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions open up new possibilities for γγ physics. Taking into account γA background reactions, typical γγ processes in the relevant invariant mass ranges are discussed. The extreme high energy part of the equivalent photon spectrum leads to hard photon-parton reactions. As a potential tool to investigate the gluon distribution function of nucleons, thee q anti q production via the γg fusion in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is studied. It is the purpose of this work to investigate how photon-photon and photon-hadron reactions in relativistic heavy ion collisions may contribute to the understanding of QCD and the standard model. (orig.) [de

  6. The moment of inertia method to calculate equivalent ranges in non-proportional tension–torsion histories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Meggiolaro

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue in multiaxial damage calculation in non-proportional (NP histories is to find the equivalent stress or strain ranges and mean components associated with each rainflow-counted cycle of the stress (or strain path. A traditional way to find such ranges is to use enclosing surface methods, which search for convex enclosures, such as balls or prisms, of the entire history path in stress or strain diagrams. These methods only work for relatively simple load histories, since the enclosing surfaces lose information of the original history. This work presents an approach to evaluate equivalent stress and strain ranges in NP histories, called the moment of inertia (MOI method. It is an integral approach that assumes the path contour in the stress diagram is a homogeneous wire with a unit mass. The center of mass of such wire gives then the mean component of the path, while the moments of inertia of the wire can be used to obtain the equivalent stress or strain ranges. Experimental results obtained from the literature for 13 different multiaxial histories prove the effectiveness of the MOI method to predict fatigue lives.

  7. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  8. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of α/sub s/ and Λ/sup ms/ from the γ*γ → π 0 form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from γγ → H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub γγ/ from exclusive channels at low W/sub γγ/, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z 0 and W +- beams from e → eZ 0 and e → nu W will become important. 44 references

  9. Radiation protection measurements with the variance-covariance method in the stray radiation fields from photon and proton therapy facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillhök, J.; Persson, L.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2017-01-01

    , the dose-average lineal energy, the dose-average quality factor and the dose equivalent. The neutron component measured by the detectors at the proton beam was studied through Monte Carlo simulations using the code MCNP6. In the photon beam the stray absorbed dose ranged between 0.3 and 2.4 μGy per monitor...

  10. On the formal equivalence of the TAP and thermodynamic methods in the SK model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Parisi, Giorgio; Mezard, Marc

    2003-01-01

    We revisit two classic Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) studies of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model (Bray A J and Moore M A 1980 J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 13 L469; De Dominicis C and Young A P 1983 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16 2063). By using the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) supersymmetry, we prove the general equivalence of TAP and replica partition functions, and show that the annealed calculation of the TAP complexity is formally identical to the quenched thermodynamic calculation of the free energy at one step level of replica symmetry breaking. The complexity we obtain by means of the BRST symmetry turns out to be considerably smaller than the previous non-symmetric value

  11. A simplified, improved method for making amplifier equivalent noise charge measurements using a new generation digitizing oscilloscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, T.

    1990-10-01

    Historically a variety of methods have been used to measure the equivalent noise charge (ENC) of amplifier/shaper systems for high energy physics. Some of these methods require several pieces of special test equipment and a fair amount of effort. The advent of digitizing oscilloscopes with statistics capabilities makes it possible to perform certain types of noise measurements accurately with very little effort. This paper describes the noise measurement method of a time invariant amplifier/shaper and of a time variant correlated sampling system, using a Tektronix DSA602 Digitizing Signal Analyzer. 4 figs

  12. Attenuation correction method for single photon emission CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozumi, Tatsuru; Nakajima, Masato [Keio Univ., Yokohama (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology; Ogawa, Koichi; Yuta, Shinichi

    1983-10-01

    A correction method (Modified Correction Matrix method) is proposed to implement iterative correction by exactly measuring attenuation constant distribution in a test body, calculating a correction factor for every picture element, then multiply the image by these factors. Computer simulation for the comparison of the results showed that the proposed method was specifically more effective to an application to the test body, in which the rate of attenuation constant change is large, than the conventional correction matrix method. Since the actual measurement data always contain quantum noise, the noise was taken into account in the simulation. However, the correction effect was large even under the noise. For verifying its clinical effectiveness, the experiment using an acrylic phantom was also carried out. As the result, the recovery of image quality in the parts with small attenuation constant was remarkable as compared with the conventional method.

  13. Two-photon or higher-order absorbing optical materials and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Seth (Inventor); Perry, Joseph (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Compositions capable of simultaneous two-photon absorption and higher order absorptivities are provided. Compounds having a donor-pi-donor or acceptor-pi-acceptor structure are of particular interest, where the donor is an electron donating group, acceptor is an electron accepting group, and pi is a pi bridge linking the donor and/or acceptor groups. The pi bridge may additionally be substituted with electron donating or withdrawing groups to alter the absorptive wavelength of the structure. Also disclosed are methods of generating an excited state of such compounds through optical stimulation with light using simultaneous absorption of photons of energies individually insufficient to achieve an excited state of the compound, but capable of doing so upon simultaneous absorption of two or more such photons. Applications employing such methods are also provided, including controlled polymerization achieved through focusing of the light source(s) used.

  14. The validity of the density scaling method in primary electron transport for photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, M.K.; Cunningham, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    In the convolution/superposition method of photon beam dose calculations, inhomogeneities are usually handled by using some form of scaling involving the relative electron densities of the inhomogeneities. In this paper the accuracy of density scaling as applied to primary electrons generated in photon interactions is examined. Monte Carlo calculations are compared with density scaling calculations for air and cork slab inhomogeneities. For individual primary photon kernels as well as for photon interactions restricted to a thin layer, the results can differ significantly, by up to 50%, between the two calculations. However, for realistic photon beams where interactions occur throughout the whole irradiated volume, the discrepancies are much less severe. The discrepancies for the kernel calculation are attributed to the scattering characteristics of the electrons and the consequent oversimplified modeling used in the density scaling method. A technique called the kernel integration technique is developed to analyze the general effects of air and cork inhomogeneities. It is shown that the discrepancies become significant only under rather extreme conditions, such as immediately beyond the surface after a large air gap. In electron beams all the primary electrons originate from the surface of the phantom and the errors caused by simple density scaling can be much more significant. Various aspects relating to the accuracy of density scaling for air and cork slab inhomogeneities are discussed

  15. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Research results of hard photon technology have been summarized as a part of novel technology development highly utilizing the quantum nature of photon. Hard photon technology refers to photon beam technologies which use photon in the 0.1 to 200 nm wavelength region. Hard photon has not been used in industry due to the lack of suitable photon sources and optical devices. However, hard photon in this wavelength region is expected to bring about innovations in such areas as ultrafine processing and material synthesis due to its atom selective reaction, inner shell excitation reaction, and spatially high resolution. Then, technological themes and possibility have been surveyed. Although there are principle proposes and their verification of individual technologies for the technologies of hard photon generation, regulation and utilization, they are still far from the practical applications. For the photon source technology, the laser diode pumped driver laser technology, laser plasma photon source technology, synchrotron radiation photon source technology, and vacuum ultraviolet photon source technology are presented. For the optical device technology, the multi-layer film technology for beam mirrors and the non-spherical lens processing technology are introduced. Also are described the reduction lithography technology, hard photon excitation process, and methods of analysis and measurement. 430 refs., 165 figs., 23 tabs.

  16. Study on heat transfer and hydraulic model of spiral-fin fuel rods based on equivalent annulus method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dan; Liu Changwen; Lu Jianchao

    2011-01-01

    Tight lattice fuel assembly usually adopts spiral-fin fuel elements. Compared with the traditional PWR fuel rods, the closely packed and spiral fin spacers make the heat transfer and hydraulic phenomena in sub-channels very complicated, and: there was no suitable model and correlation to study it. This paper studied the effect of spiral spacers on the channel geometry in the equivalent annulus and physical performance based on the Rehme equivalent annulus methods, and the heat transfer of the spiral fin fuel rods and hydraulic model were obtained. The new model was verified with the traditional one, and the verification showed that two new models agreed well, which could provide certain theoretical explanation to the effect of the spiral spacer on the thermal hydraulics. (authors)

  17. New BRDF Model for Desert and Gobi Using Equivalent Mirror Plane Method, Establishment and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Rong, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) is a key parameter that affects the vicarious calibration accuracy of visible channel remote sensing instrument. In the past 30 years, many studies have been made and a variety of models have been established. Among them, the Ross-li model was highly approved and widely used. Unfortunately, the model doesn't suitable for desert and Gobi quite well because of the scattering kernel it contained, needs the factors such as plant height and plant spacing. A new BRDF model for surface without vegetation, which is mainly used in remote sensing vicarious calibration, is established. That was called Equivalent Mirror Plane (EMP) BRDF. It is used to characterize the bidirectional reflectance of the near Lambertian surface. The accuracy of the EMP BRDF model is validated by the directional reflectance data measured on the Dunhuang Gobi and compared to the Ross-li model. Results show that the regression accuracy of the new model is 0.828, which is similar to the Ross-li model (0.825). Because of the simple form (contains only four polynomials) and simple principle (derived by the Fresnel reflection principle, don't include any vegetation parameters), it is more suitable for near Lambertian surface, such as Gobi, desert, Lunar and reference panel. Results also showed that the new model could also maintain a high accuracy and stability in sparse observation, which is very important for the retrieval requirements of daily updating BRDF remote sensing products.

  18. Uncertainty in real-time voltage stability assessment methods based on Thevenin equivalent due to PMU’s accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Angel; Møller, Jakob Glarbo; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur

    2014-01-01

    This article studies the influence of PMU’s accuracy in voltage stability assessment, considering the specific case of Th ́ evenin equivalent based methods that include wide-area information in its calculations. The objective was achieved by producing a set of synthesized PMU measurements from...... a time domain simulation and using the Monte Carlo method to reflect the accuracy for the PMUs. This is given by the maximum value for the Total Vector Error defined in the IEEE standard C37.118. Those measurements allowed to estimate the distribution pa- rameters (mean and standard deviation...

  19. Thermoluminescence dosemeter for personal dose equivalent assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.A. da; Rosa, L.A.R. da; Campos, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility was investigated of utilising a Brazilian thermoluminescence individual dosemeter, usually calibrated in terms of photon dose equivalent, for the assessment of the personal dose equivalent, H p (d), at depths of 0.07 and 10 mm. The dosemeter uses four CaSO 4 :Dy thermoluminescent detectors, between different filters, as the sensitive materials. It was calibrated in gamma and X radiation fields in the energy range from 17 to 1250 keV. Linear combinations of the responses of three detectors, in this energy range, allow the evaluation of H p (0.07) and H p (10), for radiation incidence angles varying from 0 to 60 degrees, with an accuracy better than 35%. The method is not applicable to mixed photon-beta fields. (author)

  20. Application of the Arbitrarily High Order Method to Coupled Electron Photon Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duo, Jose Ignacio

    2004-01-01

    This work is about the application of the Arbitrary High Order Nodal Method to coupled electron photon transport.A Discrete Ordinates code was enhanced and validated which permited to evaluate the advantages of using variable spatial development order per particle.The results obtained using variable spatial development and adaptive mesh refinement following an a posteriori error estimator are encouraging.Photon spectra for clinical accelerator target and, dose and charge depositio profiles are simulated in one-dimensional problems using cross section generated with CEPXS code.Our results are in good agreement with ONELD and MCNP codes

  1. Principle and methods for measurement of snow water equivalent by detection of natural gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrestoel, G O [Institutt for Atomenergi, Kjeller (Norway)

    1979-01-01

    The underlying principles for snow cover determination by use of terrestrial gamma radiation are presented. Several of the methods that have been proposed to exploit the effect are discussed, and some of the more important error sources for the different methods are listed. In conclusion an estimate of the precision that can be obtained by these methods is given.

  2. Principle and methods for measurement of snow water equivalent by detection of natural gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrestol, G O

    1979-01-01

    The underlying principles for snow cover determination by use of terrestrial gamma radiation are presented. Several of the methods that have been proposed to exploit the effect are discussed, and some of the more important error sources for the different methods are listed. In conclusion estimates of the precision that can be obtained by these methods are given.

  3. Photonic arbitrary waveform generator based on Taylor synthesis method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shasha; Ding, Yunhong; Dong, Jianji

    2016-01-01

    Arbitrary waveform generation has been widely used in optical communication, radar system and many other applications. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) on chip optical arbitrary waveform generator, which is based on Taylor synthesis method. In our scheme......, a Gaussian pulse is launched to some cascaded microrings to obtain first-, second- and third-order differentiations. By controlling amplitude and phase of the initial pulse and successive differentiations, we can realize an arbitrary waveform generator according to Taylor expansion. We obtain several typical...... waveforms such as square waveform, triangular waveform, flat-top waveform, sawtooth waveform, Gaussian waveform and so on. Unlike other schemes based on Fourier synthesis or frequency-to-time mapping, our scheme is based on Taylor synthesis method. Our scheme does not require any spectral disperser or large...

  4. Degeneracy relations in QCD and the equivalence of two systematic all-orders methods for setting the renormalization scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Yu Bi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC eliminates QCD renormalization scale-setting uncertainties using fundamental renormalization group methods. The resulting scale-fixed pQCD predictions are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme and show rapid convergence. The coefficients of the scale-fixed couplings are identical to the corresponding conformal series with zero β-function. Two all-orders methods for systematically implementing the PMC-scale setting procedure for existing high order calculations are discussed in this article. One implementation is based on the PMC-BLM correspondence (PMC-I; the other, more recent, method (PMC-II uses the Rδ-scheme, a systematic generalization of the minimal subtraction renormalization scheme. Both approaches satisfy all of the principles of the renormalization group and lead to scale-fixed and scheme-independent predictions at each finite order. In this work, we show that PMC-I and PMC-II scale-setting methods are in practice equivalent to each other. We illustrate this equivalence for the four-loop calculations of the annihilation ratio Re+e− and the Higgs partial width Γ(H→bb¯. Both methods lead to the same resummed (‘conformal’ series up to all orders. The small scale differences between the two approaches are reduced as additional renormalization group {βi}-terms in the pQCD expansion are taken into account. We also show that special degeneracy relations, which underly the equivalence of the two PMC approaches and the resulting conformal features of the pQCD series, are in fact general properties of non-Abelian gauge theory.

  5. Distribution of photon strength in nuclei by a method of two-step cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becvar, F.; Cejnar, P.; Kopecky, J.

    1990-01-01

    The applicability of sum-coincidence measurements of two-step cascade γ-ray spectra to the determination of photon strength functions at intermediate γ-ray energies (3 or 4 MeV) is discussed. An experiment based on thermal neutron capture in Nd was undertaken at the Brookhaven National Laboratory High Flux Beam Reactor to test this model. To understand the role of various uncertainties in similar experiments a series of model calculations was performed. We present an analysis of our experimental data which demonstrates the high sensitivity of the method to E1 and M1 photon strength functions. Our experimental data are in sharp contradiction to those expected from an E1 photon strength distributed according to the classical Lorentzian form with an energy invariant damping width. An alternative distribution of Kadmenskij et al., which violates Brink's Hypothesis, is strongly preferred. 13 refs., 5 figs

  6. PREFACE: I International Scientific School Methods of Digital Image Processing in Optics and Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurov, I. P.; Kozlov, S. A.

    2014-09-01

    The first international scientific school "Methods of Digital Image Processing in Optics and Photonics" was held with a view to develop cooperation between world-class experts, young scientists, students and post-graduate students, and to exchange information on the current status and directions of research in the field of digital image processing in optics and photonics. The International Scientific School was managed by: Saint Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University) - Saint Petersburg (Russia) Chernyshevsky Saratov State University - Saratov (Russia) National research nuclear University "MEPHI" (NRNU MEPhI) - Moscow (Russia) The school was held with the participation of the local chapters of Optical Society of America (OSA), the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) and IEEE Photonics Society. Further details, including topics, committees and conference photos are available in the PDF

  7. Method for calculating individual equivalent doses and cumulative dose of population in the vicinity of nuclear power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namestek, L.; Khorvat, D; Shvets, J.; Kunz, Eh.

    1976-01-01

    A method of calculating the doses of external and internal person irradiation in the nuclear power plant vicinity under conditions of normal operation and accident situations has been described. The main difference between the above method and methods used up to now is the use of a new antropomorphous representation of a human body model together with all the organs. The antropomorphous model of human body and its organs is determined as a set of simple solids, coordinates of disposistion of the solids, sizes, masses, densities and composition corresponding the genuine organs. The use of the Monte-Carlo method is the second difference. The results of the calculations according to the model suggested can be used for determination: a critical group of inhabitans under conditions of normal plant operation; groups of inhabitants most subjected to irradiation in the case of possible accident; a critical sector with a maximum collective dose in the case of an accident; a critical radioisotope favouring the greatest contribution to an individual equivalent dose; critical irradiation ways promoting a maximum contribution to individual equivalent doses; cumulative collective doses for the whole region or for a chosen part of the region permitting to estimate a population dose. The consequent method evoluation suggests the development of separate units of the calculationg program, critical application and the selection of input data of physical, plysiological and ecological character and improvement of the calculated program for the separate concrete events [ru

  8. Comparison of different methods to retrieve optical-equivalent snow grain size in central Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Carlsen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The optical-equivalent snow grain size affects the reflectivity of snow surfaces and, thus, the local surface energy budget in particular in polar regions. Therefore, the specific surface area (SSA, from which the optical snow grain size is derived, was observed for a 2-month period in central Antarctica (Kohnen research station during austral summer 2013/14. The data were retrieved on the basis of ground-based spectral surface albedo measurements collected by the COmpact RAdiation measurement System (CORAS and airborne observations with the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART. The snow grain size and pollution amount (SGSP algorithm, originally developed to analyze spaceborne reflectance measurements by the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, was modified in order to reduce the impact of the solar zenith angle on the retrieval results and to cover measurements in overcast conditions. Spectral ratios of surface albedo at 1280 and 1100 nm wavelength were used to reduce the retrieval uncertainty. The retrieval was applied to the ground-based and airborne observations and validated against optical in situ observations of SSA utilizing an IceCube device. The SSA retrieved from CORAS observations varied between 27 and 89 m2 kg−1. Snowfall events caused distinct relative maxima of the SSA which were followed by a gradual decrease in SSA due to snow metamorphism and wind-induced transport of freshly fallen ice crystals. The ability of the modified algorithm to include measurements in overcast conditions improved the data coverage, in particular at times when precipitation events occurred and the SSA changed quickly. SSA retrieved from measurements with CORAS and MODIS agree with the in situ observations within the ranges given by the measurement uncertainties. However, SSA retrieved from the airborne SMART data slightly underestimated the ground-based results.

  9. Comparison of different methods to retrieve optical-equivalent snow grain size in central Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Tim; Birnbaum, Gerit; Ehrlich, André; Freitag, Johannes; Heygster, Georg; Istomina, Larysa; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Orsi, Anaïs; Schäfer, Michael; Wendisch, Manfred

    2017-11-01

    The optical-equivalent snow grain size affects the reflectivity of snow surfaces and, thus, the local surface energy budget in particular in polar regions. Therefore, the specific surface area (SSA), from which the optical snow grain size is derived, was observed for a 2-month period in central Antarctica (Kohnen research station) during austral summer 2013/14. The data were retrieved on the basis of ground-based spectral surface albedo measurements collected by the COmpact RAdiation measurement System (CORAS) and airborne observations with the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART). The snow grain size and pollution amount (SGSP) algorithm, originally developed to analyze spaceborne reflectance measurements by the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), was modified in order to reduce the impact of the solar zenith angle on the retrieval results and to cover measurements in overcast conditions. Spectral ratios of surface albedo at 1280 and 1100 nm wavelength were used to reduce the retrieval uncertainty. The retrieval was applied to the ground-based and airborne observations and validated against optical in situ observations of SSA utilizing an IceCube device. The SSA retrieved from CORAS observations varied between 27 and 89 m2 kg-1. Snowfall events caused distinct relative maxima of the SSA which were followed by a gradual decrease in SSA due to snow metamorphism and wind-induced transport of freshly fallen ice crystals. The ability of the modified algorithm to include measurements in overcast conditions improved the data coverage, in particular at times when precipitation events occurred and the SSA changed quickly. SSA retrieved from measurements with CORAS and MODIS agree with the in situ observations within the ranges given by the measurement uncertainties. However, SSA retrieved from the airborne SMART data slightly underestimated the ground-based results.

  10. Gas-kinetic analysis of multicomponent vacuum systems by the method of equivalent surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, B.D.; Sakaganskii, G.L.

    A method is proposed for the analysis of molecular flows in complicated vacuum systems. Essentially, it involves the transposition of solutions for a number of elemental structural components. The basic analytic relationships and tables are given and the method is illustrated by analyzing a specific system

  11. The equivalence of multi-criteria methods for radiotherapy plan optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Storchi, Pascal R M; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2009-01-01

    Several methods can be used to achieve multi-criteria optimization of radiation therapy treatment planning, which strive for Pareto-optimality. The property of the solution being Pareto optimal is desired, because it guarantees that no criteria can be improved without deteriorating another criteria. The most widely used methods are the weighted-sum method, in which the different treatment objectives are weighted, and constrained optimization methods, in which treatment goals are set and the algorithm has to find the best plan fulfilling these goals. The constrained method used in this paper, the 2pεc (2-phase ε-constraint) method is based on the ε-constraint method, which generates Pareto-optimal solutions. Both approaches are uniquely related to each other. In this paper, we will show that it is possible to switch from the constrained method to the weighted-sum method by using the Lagrange multipliers from the constrained optimization problem, and vice versa by setting the appropriate constraints. In general, the theory presented in this paper can be useful in cases where a new situation is slightly different from the original situation, e.g. in online treatment planning, with deformations of the volumes of interest, or in automated treatment planning, where changes to the automated plan have to be made. An example of the latter is given where the planner is not satisfied with the result from the constrained method and wishes to decrease the dose in a structure. By using the Lagrange multipliers, a weighted-sum optimization problem is constructed, which generates a Pareto-optimal solution in the neighbourhood of the original plan, but fulfills the new treatment objectives.

  12. Analysing Infinite-State Systems by Combining Equivalence Reduction and the Sweep-Line Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailund, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The sweep-line method is a state space exploration method for on-the-fly verification aimed at systems exhibiting progress. Presence of progress in the system makes it possible to delete certain states during state space generation, which reduces the memory used for storing the states. Unfortunat......The sweep-line method is a state space exploration method for on-the-fly verification aimed at systems exhibiting progress. Presence of progress in the system makes it possible to delete certain states during state space generation, which reduces the memory used for storing the states....... Unfortunately, the same progress that is used to improve memory performance in state space exploration often leads to an infinite state space: The progress in the system is carried over to the states resulting in infinitely many states only distinguished through the progress. A finite state space can...... property essential for the sweep-line method. We evaluate the new method on two case studies, showing significant improvements in performance, and we briefly discuss the new method in the context of Timed Coloured Petri Nets, where the “increasing global time” semantics can be exploited for more efficient...

  13. Mechanical modulation method for ultrasensitive phase measurements in photonics biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patskovsky, S; Maisonneuve, M; Meunier, M; Kabashin, A V

    2008-12-22

    A novel polarimetry methodology for phase-sensitive measurements in single reflection geometry is proposed for applications in optical transduction-based biological sensing. The methodology uses altering step-like chopper-based mechanical phase modulation for orthogonal s- and p- polarizations of light reflected from the sensing interface and the extraction of phase information at different harmonics of the modulation. We show that even under a relatively simple experimental arrangement, the methodology provides the resolution of phase measurements as low as 0.007 deg. We also examine the proposed approach using Total Internal Reflection (TIR) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) geometries. For TIR geometry, the response appears to be strongly dependent on the prism material with the best values for high refractive index Si. The detection limit for Si-based TIR is estimated as 10(-5) in terms Refractive Index Units (RIU) change. SPR geometry offers much stronger phase response due to a much sharper phase characteristics. With the detection limit of 3.2*10(-7) RIU, the proposed methodology provides one of best sensitivities for phase-sensitive SPR devices. Advantages of the proposed method include high sensitivity, simplicity of experimental setup and noise immunity as a result of a high stability modulation.

  14. On the absorbed dose determination method in high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, F.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Oane, M.; Mitru, E.; Avadanei, C.

    2008-01-01

    The absorbed dose determination method in water, based on standards of air kerma or exposure in high energy photon beams generated by electron with energies in the range of 1 MeV to 50 MeV is presented herein. The method is based on IAEA-398, AAPM TG-51, DIN 6800-2, IAEA-381, IAEA-277 and NACP-80 recommendations. The dosimetry equipment is composed of UNIDOS T 10005 electrometer and different ionization chambers calibrated in air kerma method in a Co 60 beam. Starting from the general formalism showed in IAEA-381, the determination of absorbed dose in water, under reference conditions in high energy photon beams, is given. This method was adopted for the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) in NILPRP-Bucharest

  15. Novel method for equivalent stiffness and Coulomb's damping ratio analyses of leaf spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jun, Wu; Yu, Xiang; Le Mei, Zhu; Li Jun, He

    2012-01-01

    The leaf spring is a representative type of laminated structure. Based on the linear theories of curve beams, the first derivatives of the leave's status vector of the leaf spring are provided. The first derivatives of the combination status-vector are obtained by properly dealing with the nonlinear interacted forces between adjacent leaves. Moreover, the precise integration technology and the transform matrix method are introduced to solve the equations. The force displacement curve of a leaf spring is then calculated separately by using the present method and the finite element software ANSYS. From the results, the precision and advantages of the present methods for analyzing the leaf spring are revealed. The Coulomb's damping ratio of the leaf spring is studied by using the present method

  16. A simple method to evaluate the composition of tissue-equivalent phantom materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geske, G.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of a method to calculate the composition of phantom materials with given density and radiation-physical parameters mixed of components, of which are known their chemical composition and their effective specific volumes. By an example of a simple composition with three components the method is illustrated. The results of this example and some experimental details that must be considered are discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Equivalence of ten different methods for valuing companies by cash flow discounting.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows that ten methods of company valuation using cash flow discounting (WACC; equity cash flow; capital cash flow; adjusted present value; residual income; EVA; business's risk-adjusted equity cash flow; business's risk-adjusted free cash flow; risk-free-adjusted equity cash flow; and risk-free-adjusted free cash flow) always give the same value when identical assumptions are used. This result is logical, since all the methods analyze the same reality based upon the same assumptio...

  18. Equivalent Lagrangians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojman, S.

    1982-01-01

    We present a review of the inverse problem of the Calculus of Variations, emphasizing the ambiguities which appear due to the existence of equivalent Lagrangians for a given classical system. In particular, we analyze the properties of equivalent Lagrangians in the multidimensional case, we study the conditions for the existence of a variational principle for (second as well as first order) equations of motion and their solutions, we consider the inverse problem of the Calculus of Variations for singular systems, we state the ambiguities which emerge in the relationship between symmetries and conserved quantities in the case of equivalent Lagrangians, we discuss the problems which appear in trying to quantize classical systems which have different equivalent Lagrangians, we describe the situation which arises in the study of equivalent Lagrangians in field theory and finally, we present some unsolved problems and discussion topics related to the content of this article. (author)

  19. Equivalent Method of Integrated Power Generation System of Wind, Photovoltaic and Energy Storage in Power Flow Calculation and Transient Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The integrated power generation system of wind, photovoltaic (PV) and energy storage is composed of several wind turbines, PV units and energy storage units. The detailed model of integrated generation is not suitable for the large-scale powe.r system simulation because of the model's complexity and long computation time. An equivalent method for power flow calculation and transient simulation of the integrated generation system is proposed based on actual projects, so as to establish the foundation of such integrated system simulation and analysis.

  20. The use of photon correlation spectroscopy method for determining diffusion coefficient in brine and herring flesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumanova M.V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The process fish salting has been studied by the method of photon correlation spectroscopy; the distribution of salt concentration in the solution and herring flesh with skin has been found, diffusion coefficients and salt concentrations used for creating a mathematical model of the salting technology have been worked out; the possibility of determination by this method the coefficient of dynamic viscosity of solutions and different media (minced meat etc. has been considered

  1. Comparison between different dispersion engineering methods in slow light photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares the performance of different dispersion engineering methods in slow light photonic crystal waveguides, i.e., geometrical parameter optimization and topology optimization. In both methods, the design robustness is enforced by considering the dilated, intermediate and eroded...... that waveguides with optimized hole sizes and positions can be efficient for dispersion engineering but that large improvements are possible if irregular geometries are allowed using topology optimization....

  2. Dose calculation methods in photon beam therapy using energy deposition kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnesjoe, A.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of calculating accurate dose distributions in treatment planning of megavoltage photon radiation therapy has been studied. New dose calculation algorithms using energy deposition kernels have been developed. The kernels describe the transfer of energy by secondary particles from a primary photon interaction site to its surroundings. Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport have been used for derivation of kernels for primary photon energies form 0.1 MeV to 50 MeV. The trade off between accuracy and calculational speed has been addressed by the development of two algorithms; one point oriented with low computional overhead for interactive use and one for fast and accurate calculation of dose distributions in a 3-dimensional lattice. The latter algorithm models secondary particle transport in heterogeneous tissue by scaling energy deposition kernels with the electron density of the tissue. The accuracy of the methods has been tested using full Monte Carlo simulations for different geometries, and found to be superior to conventional algorithms based on scaling of broad beam dose distributions. Methods have also been developed for characterization of clinical photon beams in entities appropriate for kernel based calculation models. By approximating the spectrum as laterally invariant, an effective spectrum and dose distribution for contaminating charge particles are derived form depth dose distributions measured in water, using analytical constraints. The spectrum is used to calculate kernels by superposition of monoenergetic kernels. The lateral energy fluence distribution is determined by deconvolving measured lateral dose distributions by a corresponding pencil beam kernel. Dose distributions for contaminating photons are described using two different methods, one for estimation of the dose outside of the collimated beam, and the other for calibration of output factors derived from kernel based dose calculations. (au)

  3. System reliability with correlated components: Accuracy of the Equivalent Planes method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roscoe, K.; Diermanse, F.; Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    Computing system reliability when system components are correlated presents a challenge because it usually requires solving multi-fold integrals numerically, which is generally infeasible due to the computational cost. In Dutch flood defense reliability modeling, an efficient method for computing

  4. System reliability with correlated components : Accuracy of the Equivalent Planes method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roscoe, K.; Diermanse, F.; Vrouwenvelder, T.

    2015-01-01

    Computing system reliability when system components are correlated presents a challenge because it usually requires solving multi-fold integrals numerically, which is generally infeasible due to the computational cost. In Dutch flood defense reliability modeling, an efficient method for computing

  5. 40 CFR 53.3 - General requirements for an equivalent method determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... part. (6) ISO 9001. All designated FEMs for PM2.5 or PM10−2.5 must be manufactured in an ISO 9001... candidate method. (4) All designated FEM for PM2.5 or PM10−2.5 must be manufactured in an ISO 9001...

  6. Comparison of preconditioned generalized conjugate gradient methods to two-dimensional neutron and photon transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    We apply and compare the preconditioned generalized conjugate gradient methods to solve the linear system equation that arises in the two-dimensional neutron and photon transport equation in this paper. Several subroutines are developed on the basis of preconditioned generalized conjugate gradient methods for time-independent, two-dimensional neutron and photon transport equation in the transport theory. These generalized conjugate gradient methods are used. TFQMR (transpose free quasi-minimal residual algorithm), CGS (conjuage gradient square algorithm), Bi-CGSTAB (bi-conjugate gradient stabilized algorithm) and QMRCGSTAB (quasi-minimal residual variant of bi-conjugate gradient stabilized algorithm). These sub-routines are connected to computer program DORT. Several problems are tested on a personal computer with Intel Pentium CPU. (author)

  7. An equivalent method of mixed dielectric constant in passive microwave/millimeter radiometric measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jinlong; Tian, Yan; Hu, Fei; Gui, Liangqi; Cheng, Yayun; Peng, Xiaohui

    2017-10-01

    Dielectric constant is an important role to describe the properties of matter. This paper proposes This paper proposes the concept of mixed dielectric constant(MDC) in passive microwave radiometric measurement. In addition, a MDC inversion method is come up, Ratio of Angle-Polarization Difference(RAPD) is utilized in this method. The MDC of several materials are investigated using RAPD. Brightness temperatures(TBs) which calculated by MDC and original dielectric constant are compared. Random errors are added to the simulation to test the robustness of the algorithm. Keywords: Passive detection, microwave/millimeter, radiometric measurement, ratio of angle-polarization difference (RAPD), mixed dielectric constant (MDC), brightness temperatures, remote sensing, target recognition.

  8. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency using an equivalent circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin [Kenosha, WI; Habetler, Thomas G [Snellville, GA

    2011-06-07

    A system and method for determining electric motor efficiency includes a monitoring system having a processor programmed to determine efficiency of an electric motor under load while the electric motor is online. The determination of motor efficiency is independent of a rotor speed measurement. Further, the efficiency is based on a determination of stator winding resistance, an input voltage, and an input current. The determination of the stator winding resistance occurs while the electric motor under load is online.

  9. Calculation of equivalent dose index for electrons from 5,0 to 22,0 MeV by the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    The index of equivalent dose in depth and in a sphere surface of a soft tissue equivalent material were determined by Monte Carlo method for electron irradiations from 5,0 to 22.00 MeV. The effect of different irradiation geometries which simulate the incidence of onedirectional opposite rotational and isotropic beams was studied. It is also shown that the detector of wall thickness with 0.5g/cm 2 and isotropic response com be used to measure index of equivalent dose for fast electrons. The alternative concept of average equivalent dose for radiation protection is discussed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  10. Studies on Methods for Detection of Salmonella SP. in Meat with Regard to Equivalency and Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, P.; Smulders, F. J.M. [Institute for Meat Hygiene, Meat Technology and Food Science, University for Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Girma, Z. [Addis Ababa University, Debre Zeit (Ethiopia); Farghaly, R. [South Valley University, Qena (Egypt)

    2005-01-15

    This contribution summarizes research activities on the evaluation of methods for detection of Salmonella in meat, especially poultry. The following items were under study: (1) studies on motility media for detection of Salmonella spp.: evaluation of MSRV media of different manufacturers; evaluation of novobiocine supplementation to MSRV and DIASALM media; abuse studies of incubation temperature; comparison of DIASALM medium vs. MSRV; (2) Salmonella antigen detection by a commercial EIA (Vidas System). The findings and information from other sources (references, technical papers) are to be combined in a database to give a comprehensive overview on the currently applied methodology. Basic considerations on the structure of this database are demonstrated. (author)

  11. Application of the Monte Carlo method in calculation of energy-time distribution from a pulsed photon source in homogeneous air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, R.D.; Vojvodic, V.I.; Orlic, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    The stochastic nature of photon interactions with matter and the characteristics of photon transport through real materials, are very well suited for applications of the Monte Carlo method in calculations of the energy-space distribution of photons. Starting from general principles of the Monte Carlo method, physical-mathematical model of photon transport from a pulsed source is given for the homogeneous air environment. Based on that model, a computer program is written which is applied in calculations of scattered photons delay spectra and changes of the photon energy spectrum. Obtained results provide the estimation of the timespace function of the electromagnetic field generated by photon from a pulsed source. (author)

  12. Disposable photonic integrated circuits for evanescent wave sensors by ultra-high volume roll-to-roll method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikio, Sanna; Hiltunen, Jussi; Hiitola-Keinänen, Johanna; Hiltunen, Marianne; Kontturi, Ville; Siitonen, Samuli; Puustinen, Jarkko; Karioja, Pentti

    2016-02-08

    Flexible photonic integrated circuit technology is an emerging field expanding the usage possibilities of photonics, particularly in sensor applications, by enabling the realization of conformable devices and introduction of new alternative production methods. Here, we demonstrate that disposable polymeric photonic integrated circuit devices can be produced in lengths of hundreds of meters by ultra-high volume roll-to-roll methods on a flexible carrier. Attenuation properties of hundreds of individual devices were measured confirming that waveguides with good and repeatable performance were fabricated. We also demonstrate the applicability of the devices for the evanescent wave sensing of ambient refractive index. The production of integrated photonic devices using ultra-high volume fabrication, in a similar manner as paper is produced, may inherently expand methods of manufacturing low-cost disposable photonic integrated circuits for a wide range of sensor applications.

  13. Semi-supervised spectral algorithms for community detection in complex networks based on equivalence of clustering methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoke; Wang, Bingbo; Yu, Liang

    2018-01-01

    Community detection is fundamental for revealing the structure-functionality relationship in complex networks, which involves two issues-the quantitative function for community as well as algorithms to discover communities. Despite significant research on either of them, few attempt has been made to establish the connection between the two issues. To attack this problem, a generalized quantification function is proposed for community in weighted networks, which provides a framework that unifies several well-known measures. Then, we prove that the trace optimization of the proposed measure is equivalent with the objective functions of algorithms such as nonnegative matrix factorization, kernel K-means as well as spectral clustering. It serves as the theoretical foundation for designing algorithms for community detection. On the second issue, a semi-supervised spectral clustering algorithm is developed by exploring the equivalence relation via combining the nonnegative matrix factorization and spectral clustering. Different from the traditional semi-supervised algorithms, the partial supervision is integrated into the objective of the spectral algorithm. Finally, through extensive experiments on both artificial and real world networks, we demonstrate that the proposed method improves the accuracy of the traditional spectral algorithms in community detection.

  14. Space-Varying Iterative Restoration of Diffuse Optical Tomograms Reconstructed by the Photon Average Trajectories Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravtsenyuk Olga V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of improving the spatial resolution of diffuse optical tomograms reconstructed by the photon average trajectories (PAT method is substantiated. The PAT method recently presented by us is based on a concept of an average statistical trajectory for transfer of light energy, the photon average trajectory (PAT. The inverse problem of diffuse optical tomography is reduced to a solution of an integral equation with integration along a conditional PAT. As a result, the conventional algorithms of projection computed tomography can be used for fast reconstruction of diffuse optical images. The shortcoming of the PAT method is that it reconstructs the images blurred due to averaging over spatial distributions of photons which form the signal measured by the receiver. To improve the resolution, we apply a spatially variant blur model based on an interpolation of the spatially invariant point spread functions simulated for the different small subregions of the image domain. Two iterative algorithms for solving a system of linear algebraic equations, the conjugate gradient algorithm for least squares problem and the modified residual norm steepest descent algorithm, are used for deblurring. It is shown that a gain in spatial resolution can be obtained.

  15. Space-Varying Iterative Restoration of Diffuse Optical Tomograms Reconstructed by the Photon Average Trajectories Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Lyubimov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of improving the spatial resolution of diffuse optical tomograms reconstructed by the photon average trajectories (PAT method is substantiated. The PAT method recently presented by us is based on a concept of an average statistical trajectory for transfer of light energy, the photon average trajectory (PAT. The inverse problem of diffuse optical tomography is reduced to a solution of an integral equation with integration along a conditional PAT. As a result, the conventional algorithms of projection computed tomography can be used for fast reconstruction of diffuse optical images. The shortcoming of the PAT method is that it reconstructs the images blurred due to averaging over spatial distributions of photons which form the signal measured by the receiver. To improve the resolution, we apply a spatially variant blur model based on an interpolation of the spatially invariant point spread functions simulated for the different small subregions of the image domain. Two iterative algorithms for solving a system of linear algebraic equations, the conjugate gradient algorithm for least squares problem and the modified residual norm steepest descent algorithm, are used for deblurring. It is shown that a 27% gain in spatial resolution can be obtained.

  16. Analysis of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures using the FDTD method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Cheng, M.; Lu, Y.L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a number of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures, which are formed by periodic circuit elements printed oil transmission-line circuits, are studied by using a well-known numerical method, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results validate the band-stop filter...... behavior of these structures, and the computed results generally match well with ones published in the literature. It is also found that the FDTD method is a robust, versatile, and powerful numerical technique to perform such numerical studies. The proposed PBG filter structures may be applied in microwave...

  17. Determination of dose equivalent with tissue-equivalent proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, G.; Schuhmacher, H.; Menzel, H.G.

    1989-01-01

    Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are instruments based on the cavity chamber principle and provide spectral information on the energy loss of single charged particles crossing the cavity. Hence such detectors measure absorbed dose or kerma and are able to provide estimates on radiation quality. During recent years TEPC based instruments have been developed for radiation protection applications in photon and neutron fields. This was mainly based on the expectation that the energy dependence of their dose equivalent response is smaller than that of other instruments in use. Recently, such instruments have been investigated by intercomparison measurements in various neutron and photon fields. Although their principles of measurements are more closely related to the definition of dose equivalent quantities than those of other existing dosemeters, there are distinct differences and limitations with respect to the irradiation geometry and the determination of the quality factor. The application of such instruments for measuring ambient dose equivalent is discussed. (author)

  18. Quasi-spin method in the case of j-j coupling in a shell of equivalent atomic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savichyus, E.G.; Kanyauskas, Yu.M.; Rudzikas, Z.B.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical apparatus of the theory of multielectronic atoms and ions in the case of j-j coupling in a shell of equivalent electrons is built. Quasi-spin method is used. The scheme of the investigation is the following: 1. Tensorial properties of the operators in quasi-spin space are considered. 2. Matrix elements of these operators are built and with the help of Wigner-Eckart theorem the dependence of the matrix elements upon the projection, including the quasi-spin projection, of the quantity of electrons in jj-subshell, is determined. 3. Subgenealogical coefficients (genealogical coefficients presented in quasi-spin space) are determined and some of their properties are investigated. The tables of subgenealogical coefficients for j=5/2, 7/2 are presented

  19. A new method for detecting hemoglobin directly in whole blood using photon attenuation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medhat, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is focused on measuring iron concentration directly in whole blood as tool for estimating hemoglobin and anemic conditions in patients across the world. The investigated method depends on theory of photon attenuation through transmission of low energy in whole blood sample. The mathematical expressions for calculating hemoglobin and iron deficit on blood using photon attenuation are derived. Calculations are carried out for estimating concentration of iron in blood samples taken from children, adults and old patients and therefore measuring their hemoglobin and iron deficit from normal values. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficient values were obtained using the XCOM program. A high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry based on high purity germanium detector was employed to measure attenuation of strongly collimated monoenergetic gamma beam through blood samples. (author)

  20. A novel method for patient exit and entrance dose prediction based on water equivalent path length measured with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuma, Awusi; Glegg, Martin; Metwaly, Mohamed; Currie, Garry; Elliott, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry is one of the quality assurance tools used in radiotherapy to monitor the dose delivered to the patient. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for a set of solid water phantoms of varying thicknesses were acquired and the data fitted onto a quadratic equation, which relates the reduction in photon beam intensity to the attenuation coefficient and material thickness at a reference condition. The quadratic model is used to convert the measured grey scale value into water equivalent path length (EPL) at each pixel for any material imaged by the detector. For any other non-reference conditions, scatter, field size and MU variation effects on the image were corrected by relative measurements using an ionization chamber and an EPID. The 2D EPL is linked to the percentage exit dose table, for different thicknesses and field sizes, thereby converting the plane pixel values at each point into a 2D dose map. The off-axis ratio is corrected using envelope and boundary profiles generated from the treatment planning system (TPS). The method requires field size, monitor unit and source-to-surface distance (SSD) as clinical input parameters to predict the exit dose, which is then used to determine the entrance dose. The measured pixel dose maps were compared with calculated doses from TPS for both entrance and exit depth of phantom. The gamma index at 3% dose difference (DD) and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA) resulted in an average of 97% passing for the square fields of 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm. The exit dose EPID dose distributions predicted by the algorithm were in better agreement with TPS-calculated doses than phantom entrance dose distributions.

  1. Open-air ionisation chambers with walls of soft-tissue equivalent material for measuring photon doses; Chambres d'ionisation d'ambiance a parois en materiau equivalent aux tissus mous pour la mesure des doses absorbees dues aux photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vialettes, H.; Anceau, J.C.; Grand, M.; Petit, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The ionisation chambers presented in this report constitute a contribution to research into methods of carrying out correct determinations in the field of health physics. The use of a mixture of teflon containing 42.5 per cent by weight of carbon for the chamber walls makes it possible to measure directly the dose absorbed in air through 300 mg/cm{sup 2} of soft tissue and, consequently, the dose absorbed in the soft tissues with a maximum error of 10 per cent for photon energies of between 10 keV and 10 MeV. Furthermore since this material does not contain hydrogen, the chamber has a sensitivity to neutrons which is much less than other chambers in current use. Finally the shape of these chambers has been studied with a view to obtaining a satisfactory measurement from the isotropy point of view; for example for gamma radiation of 27 keV, the 3 litre chamber is isotropic to within 10 per cent over 270 degrees, and the 12 litre chamber is isotropic to within 10 per cent over 300 degrees; for 1.25 MeV gamma radiation this range is extended over 330 degrees for the 3 litre chamber, and 360 degrees for the 12 litre chamber. This report presents the measurements carried out with these chambers as well as the results obtained. These results are then compared to those obtained with other chambers currently used in the field of health physics. (authors) [French] Les chambres d'ionisation presentees dans ce rapport apportent une contribution a la recherche de moyens dosimetriques adaptes aux mesures a effectuer pour assurer une dosimetrie correcte dans le domaine de la radioprotection. L'utilisation d'un melange de teflon charge a 42.5 pour cent en masse de carbone comme materiau constituant les parois de la chambre permet de realiser un dosimetre mesurant directement la dose absorbee dans l'air sous 3OO mg/cm{sup 2} de tissu mou et, par consequent, la dose absorbee dans les tissus mous avec une erreur maximale de 10 pour cent, pour des photons d

  2. Polarizable Embedded RI-CC2 Method for Two-Photon Absorption Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hršak, Dalibor; Khah, Alireza Marefat; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel polarizable embedded resolution-of-identity coupled cluster singles and approximate doubles (PERI-CC2) method for calculation of two-photon absorption (TPA) spectra of large molecular systems. The method was benchmarked for three types of systems: a water-solvated molecule...... of formamide, a uracil molecule in aqueous solution, and a set of mutants of the channelrhodopsin (ChR) protein. The first test case shows that the PERI-CC2 method is in excellent agreement with the PE-CC2 method and in good agreement with the PE-CCSD method. The uracil test case indicates that the effects...... of hydrogen bonding on the TPA of a chromophore with the nearest environment is well-described with the PERI-CC2 method. Finally, the ChR calculation shows that the PERI-CC2 method is well-suited and efficient for calculations on proteins with medium-sized chromophores....

  3. Equivalence of the equilibrium and the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods for thermal conductivity calculations: From bulk to nanowire silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haikuan; Fan, Zheyong; Shi, Libin; Harju, Ari; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations play an important role in studying heat transport in complex materials. The lattice thermal conductivity can be computed either using the Green-Kubo formula in equilibrium MD (EMD) simulations or using Fourier's law in nonequilibrium MD (NEMD) simulations. These two methods have not been systematically compared for materials with different dimensions and inconsistencies between them have been occasionally reported in the literature. Here we give an in-depth comparison of them in terms of heat transport in three allotropes of Si: three-dimensional bulk silicon, two-dimensional silicene, and quasi-one-dimensional silicon nanowire. By multiplying the correlation time in the Green-Kubo formula with an appropriate effective group velocity, we can express the running thermal conductivity in the EMD method as a function of an effective length and directly compare it to the length-dependent thermal conductivity in the NEMD method. We find that the two methods quantitatively agree with each other for all the systems studied, firmly establishing their equivalence in computing thermal conductivity.

  4. Simple and efficient methods for the accurate evaluation of patterning effects in ultrafast photonic switches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jing; Ding, Yunhong; Peucheret, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Although patterning effects (PEs) are known to be a limiting factor of ultrafast photonic switches based on semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs), a simple approach for their evaluation in numerical simulations and experiments is missing. In this work, we experimentally investigate and verify...... as well as the operation bit rate. Furthermore, a simple and effective method for probing the maximum PEs is demonstrated, which may relieve the computational effort or the experimental difficulties associated with the use of long PRBSs for the simulation or characterization of SOA-based switches. Good...... agrement with conventional PRBS characterization is obtained. The method is suitable for quick and systematic estimation and optimization of the switching performance....

  5. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma using a sitting and standing female adult voxel simulators exposure to photons in antero-posterior irradiation geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, F.R.; Galeano, D.C.; Carvalho Júnior, A.B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the difficulty in implementing invasive techniques for calculations of dose for some exposure scenarios, computational simulators have been created to represent as realistically as possible the structures of the human body and through radiation transport simulations to obtain conversion coefficients (CCs) to estimate dose. In most published papers simulators are implemented in the standing posture and this may not describe a real scenario of exposure. In this work we developed exposure scenarios in the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code using a female simulator in standing and sitting postures. The simulator was irradiated in the antero-posterior (AP) geometry by a plane source of monoenergetic photons with energy from 10 keV to 2 MeV. The conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (H T /K air ) were calculated for both scenarios and compared. The results show that the percentage difference of CCs for the organs of the head and thorax was not significant (less than 5%) since the anatomic position of the organs is the same in both postures. The percentage difference is more significant to the ovaries (71% for photon energy of 20 keV), to the bladder (39% at 60 keV) and to the uterus (37% at 100 keV) due to different processes of radiation interactions in the legs of the simulator when its posture is changed. For organs and tissues that are distributed throughout the entire body, such as bone (21% at 100 keV) and muscle (30% at 80 keV) the percentage difference of CCs reflects a reduction of interaction of photons with the legs of the simulator. Therefore, the calculation of conversion coefficients using simulators in the sitting posture is relevant for a more accurate dose estimation in real exposures to radiation. - Highlights: ► Scenarios of external photon exposures were performed in VMC code. ► The FAX simulator was irradiated in sitting and standing postures. ► The irradiation geometry used was the antero-posterior (AP). ► The

  6. Analysis of Leaky Modes in Photonic Crystal Fibers Using the Surface Integral Equation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Sheng Chiang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A fully vectorial algorithm based on the surface integral equation method for the modelling of leaky modes in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs by solely solving the complex propagation constants of characteristic equations is presented. It can be used for calculations of the complex effective index and confinement losses of photonic crystal fibers. As complex root examination is the key technique in the solution, the new algorithm which possesses this technique can be used to solve the leaky modes of photonic crystal fibers. The leaky modes of solid-core PCFs with a hexagonal lattice of circular air-holes are reported and discussed. The simulation results indicate how the confinement loss by the imaginary part of the effective index changes with air-hole size, the number of rings of air-holes, and wavelength. Confinement loss reductions can be realized by increasing the air-hole size and the number of air-holes. The results show that the confinement loss rises with wavelength, implying that the light leaks more easily for longer wavelengths; meanwhile, the losses are decreased significantly as the air-hole size d/Λ is increased.

  7. Performance of the discrete ordinates method-like neutron transport computation with equivalent group condensation and angle-collapsing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Han Jong; Won, Jong Hyuck; Cho, Nam Zin

    2011-01-01

    In computational studies of neutron transport equations, the fine-group to few-group condensation procedure leads to equivalent total cross section that becomes angle dependent. The difficulty of this angle dependency has been traditionally treated by consistent P or extended transport approximation in the literature. In a previous study, we retained the angle dependency of the total cross section and applied directly to the discrete ordinates equation, with additional concept of angle-collapsing, and tested in a one-dimensional slab problem. In this study, we provide further results of this discrete ordinates-like method in comparison with the typical traditional methods. In addition, IRAM acceleration (based on Krylov subspace method) is tested for the purpose of further reducing the computational burden of few-group calculation. From the test results, it is ascertained that the angle-dependent total cross section with angle-collapsing gives excellent estimation of k_e_f_f and flux distribution and that IRAM acceleration effectively reduces the number of outer iterations. However, since IRAM requires sufficient convergence in inner iterations, speedup in total computer time is not significant for problems with upscattering. (author)

  8. Statistical noise with the weighted backprojection method for single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hideo; Tanaka, Eiichi; Toyama, Hinako.

    1985-01-01

    The weighted backprojection (WBP) method and the radial post-correction (RPC) method were compared with other several attenuation correction methods for single photon emission computed tomography by computer simulation. These methods are the pre-correction method with arithmetic means of opposing projections, the post-correction method with a correction matrix, and the inverse attenuated Randon transform method. Statistical mean square noise in a reconstructed image was formulated, and was displayed two-dimensionally for typical simulated phantoms. The noise image for the WBP method was dependent on several parameters, namely, size of an attenuating object, distribution of activity, the attenuation coefficient, and choise of the reconstruction index, k and position of the reconstruction origin. The noise image for the WBP method with k=0 was almost the same for the RPC method. It has been shown that position of the reconstruction origin has to be chosen appropriately in order to improve the noise properties of the reconstructed image for the WBP method as well as the RPC method. Comparision of the different attenuation correction methods accomplished by using both the reconstructed images and the statistical noise images with the same mathematical phantom and convolving function concluded that the WBP method and the RPC method were more amenable to any radioisotope distributions than the other methods, and had the advantage of flexibility to improve image noise of any local positions. (author)

  9. Detector Motion Method to Increase Spatial Resolution in Photon-Counting Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Daehee; Park, Kyeongjin; Lim, Kyung Taek; Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Medical imaging requires high spatial resolution of an image to identify fine lesions. Photoncounting detectors in medical imaging have recently been rapidly replacing energy-integrating detectors due to the former's high spatial resolution, high efficiency and low noise. Spatial resolution in a photon counting image is determined by the pixel size. Therefore, the smaller the pixel size, the higher the spatial resolution that can be obtained in an image. However, detector redesigning is required to reduce pixel size, and an expensive fine process is required to integrate a signal processing unit with reduced pixel size. Furthermore, as the pixel size decreases, charge sharing severely deteriorates spatial resolution. To increase spatial resolution, we propose a detector motion method using a large pixel detector that is less affected by charge sharing. To verify the proposed method, we utilized a UNO-XRI photon-counting detector (1-mm CdTe, Timepix chip) at the maximum X-ray tube voltage of 80 kVp. A similar spatial resolution of a 55-μm-pixel image was achieved by application of the proposed method to a 110-μm-pixel detector with a higher signal-to-noise ratio. The proposed method could be a way to increase spatial resolution without a pixel redesign when pixels severely suffer from charge sharing as pixel size is reduced.

  10. Sentinel lymph node detection by an optical method using scattered photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Franklin; Ravelo, Rasata; Simon, Hervé; Chabrier, Renée; Steibel, Jérôme; Poulet, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    We present a new near infrared optical probe for the sentinel lymph node detection, based on the recording of scattered photons. A two wavelengths setup was developed to improve the detection threshold of an injected dye: the Patent Blue V dye. The method used consists in modulating each laser diode at a given frequency. A Fast Fourier Transform of the recorded signal separates both components. The signal amplitudes are used to compute relative Patent Blue V concentration. Results on the probe using phantoms model and small animal experimentation exhibit a sensitivity threshold of 3.2 µmol/L, which is thirty fold better than the eye visible threshold. PMID:21258517

  11. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma for photons using a male adult voxel simulator in sitting and standing posture with geometry of irradiation antero-posterior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeano, D.C.; Cavalcante, F.R.; Carvalho, A.B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-01-01

    The dose conversion coefficient (DCC) is important to quantify and assess effective doses associated with medical, professional and public exposures. The calculation of DCCs using anthropomorphic simulators and radiation transport codes is justified since in-vivo measurement of effective dose is extremely difficult and not practical for occupational dosimetry. DCCs have been published by the ICRP using simulators in a standing posture, which is not always applicable to all exposure scenarios, providing an inaccurate dose estimation. The aim of this work was to calculate DCCs for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (H/Kair) using the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code and the VOXTISS8 adult male voxel simulator in sitting and standing postures. In both postures, the simulator was irradiated by a plane source of monoenergetic photons in antero-posterior (AP) geometry. The photon energy ranged from 15 keV to 2 MeV. The DCCs for both postures were compared and the DCCs for the standing simulator were higher. For certain organs, the difference of DCCs were more significant, as in gonads (48% higher), bladder (16% higher) and colon (11% higher). As these organs are positioned in the abdominal region, the posture of the anthropomorphic simulator modifies the form in which the radiation is transported and how the energy is deposited. It was also noted that the average percentage difference of conversion coefficients was 33% for the bone marrow, 11% for the skin, 13% for the bone surface and 31% for the muscle. For other organs, the percentage difference of the DCCs for both postures was not relevant (less than 5%) due to no anatomical changes in the organs of the head, chest and upper abdomen. We can conclude that is important to obtain DCCs using different postures from those present in the scientific literature. - Highlights: • Scenarios of external photon exposures were performed in VMC code. • The VOXTISS8 simulator was irradiated in standing and sitting postures.

  12. Equivalent circuit method research of resonant magnetoelectric characteristic in magnetoelectric laminate composites using nonlinear magnetostrictive constitutive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hao-Miao; Li, Chao; Xuan, Li-Ming; Zhao, Ji-Xiang; Wei, Jing

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the magnetoelectric (ME) response around the resonance frequency in the magnetostrictive/piezoelectric/magnetostrictive (MPM) magnetoelectric laminate composites. Following the equivalent circuit method and considering the mechanical loss, we select the nonlinear magnetostrictive constitutive model to present a novel explicit nonlinear expression for the resonant magnetoelectric (ME) coefficient of the magnetoelectric laminate composites. Compared with the experimental results, the predicted resonant ME coefficient of the explicit expression shows a good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively. Also, when the electromechanical coupling factor of the piezoelectric material, k 31 p , is small, this explicit expression can be reduced to the existing model. On this basis, this paper considers and predicts the magnetoelectric conversion characteristics of the magnetoelectric laminate composites, calculates and analyzes the influences of the thickness ratio of magnetostrictive layer and piezoelectric material, bias magnetic field, and saturation magnetostrictive coefficient on the resonant ME coefficient. This research can provide a theoretical basis for the preparation of magnetoelectric devices with good magnetoelectric conversion characteristics, such as magnetoelectric sensors, energy harvesting transducers, microwave devices etc

  13. Ecosystems, ecological restoration, and economics: does habitat or resource equivalency analysis mean other economic valuation methods are not needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, W Douglass; Wlodarz, Marta

    2013-09-01

    Coastal and other area resources such as tidal wetlands, seagrasses, coral reefs, wetlands, and other ecosystems are often harmed by environmental damage that might be inflicted by human actions, or could occur from natural hazards such as hurricanes. Society may wish to restore resources to offset the harm, or receive compensation if this is not possible, but faces difficult choices among potential compensation projects. The optimal amount of restoration efforts can be determined by non-market valuation methods, service-to-service, or resource-to-resource approaches such as habitat equivalency analysis (HEA). HEA scales injured resources and lost services on a one-to-one trade-off basis. Here, we present the main differences between the HEA approach and other non-market valuation approaches. Particular focus is on the role of the social discount rate, which appears in the HEA equation and underlies calculations of the present value of future damages. We argue that while HEA involves elements of economic analysis, the assumption of a one-to-one trade-off between lost and restored services sometimes does not hold, and then other non-market economic valuation approaches may help in restoration scaling or in damage determination.

  14. A novel method for identification of lithium-ion battery equivalent circuit model parameters considering electrochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Lu, Jinling; Yuan, Shifei; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Xuan

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposes a novel parameter identification method for the lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery equivalent circuit model (ECM) considering the electrochemical properties. An improved pseudo two-dimension (P2D) model is established on basis of partial differential equations (PDEs), since the electrolyte potential is simplified from the nonlinear to linear expression while terminal voltage can be divided into the electrolyte potential, open circuit voltage (OCV), overpotential of electrodes, internal resistance drop, and so on. The model order reduction process is implemented by the simplification of the PDEs using the Laplace transform, inverse Laplace transform, Pade approximation, etc. A unified second order transfer function between cell voltage and current is obtained for the comparability with that of ECM. The final objective is to obtain the relationship between the ECM resistances/capacitances and electrochemical parameters such that in various conditions, ECM precision could be improved regarding integration of battery interior properties for further applications, e.g., SOC estimation. Finally simulation and experimental results prove the correctness and validity of the proposed methodology.

  15. Gyrokinetic equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I; Catto, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We compare two different derivations of the gyrokinetic equation: the Hamiltonian approach in Dubin D H E et al (1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3524) and the recursive methodology in Parra F I and Catto P J (2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 065014). We prove that both approaches yield the same result at least to second order in a Larmor radius over macroscopic length expansion. There are subtle differences in the definitions of some of the functions that need to be taken into account to prove the equivalence.

  16. Mechanical properties investigation on single-wall ZrO2 nanotubes: A finite element method with equivalent Poisson's ratio for chemical bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Li, Huijian; Hu, Minzheng; Liu, Zeliang; Wärnå, John; Cao, Yuying; Ahuja, Rajeev; Luo, Wei

    2018-04-01

    A method to obtain the equivalent Poisson's ratio in chemical bonds as classical beams with finite element method was proposed from experimental data. The UFF (Universal Force Field) method was employed to calculate the elastic force constants of Zrsbnd O bonds. By applying the equivalent Poisson's ratio, the mechanical properties of single-wall ZrNTs (ZrO2 nanotubes) were investigated by finite element analysis. The nanotubes' Young's modulus (Y), Poisson's ratio (ν) of ZrNTs as function of diameters, length and chirality have been discussed, respectively. We found that the Young's modulus of single-wall ZrNTs is calculated to be between 350 and 420 GPa.

  17. Nuclear-optical methods for production of polarized photons with energies of a few hundred GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ispiryan, K.A.; Ispiryan, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of linearly polarized photons passing through a crystal in parallel to its crystallographic planes are calculated. The methods of determination of the obtainable degree of polarization as well as of the intensity losses for the cases when non-polarized photon beams pass through various crystals in parallel to the planes (110) are described. The energy dependence of the thickness of the quarter-wave plate crystals transforming the linear polarization of the beam into circular one is obtained

  18. Analysis of reproducibility of the single photon tomography reconstruction by the method of singular value decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaux, J.Y.; Mazelier, L.; Lefkopoulos, D.

    1997-01-01

    We have earlier shown that the method of singular value decomposition (SVD) allows the image reconstruction in single-photon-tomography with precision higher than the classical method of filtered back-projections. Actually, the establishing of an elementary response matrix which incorporates both the photon attenuation phenomenon, the scattering, the translation non-invariance principle and the detector response, allows to take into account the totality of physical parameters of acquisition. By an non-consecutive optimized truncation of the singular values we have obtained a significant improvement in the efficiency of the regularization of bad conditioning of this problem. The present study aims at verifying the stability of this truncation under modifications of acquisition conditions. Two series of parameters were tested, first, those modifying the geometry of acquisition: the influence of rotation center, the asymmetric disposition of the elementary-volume sources against the detector and the precision of rotation angle, and secondly, those affecting the correspondence between the matrix and the space to be reconstructed: the effect of partial volume and a noise propagation in the experimental model. For the parameters which introduce a spatial distortion, the alteration of reconstruction has been, as expected, comparable to that observed with the classical reconstruction and proportional with the amplitude of shift from the normal one. In exchange, for the effect of partial volume and of noise, the study of truncation signature revealed a variation in the optimal choice of the conserved singular values but with no effect on the global precision of reconstruction

  19. The Use Of Optical Properties Of Cr-39 In Alpha Particle Equivalent Dose Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shnishin, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, optical properties of alpha irradiated Cr-39 were measured as a function of optical photon wavelength from 200-1100 nm. Optical energy gap and optical absorption at finite wavelength was also calculated and correlated to alpha fluence and dose equivalent. Alpha doses were calculated from the corresponding irradiation fluence and specific energy loss using TRIM computer program. It was found that, the optical absorption of unattached Cr-39 was varied with alpha fluence and corresponding equivalent doses. Also the optical energy gab was varied with fluence and dose equivalent of alpha particles. This work introduces a reasonably simple method for the Rn dose equivalent calculation by Cr-39 track

  20. Method to optimize optical switch topology for photonic network-on-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Jia, Hao

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to optimize the optical switch by substituting optical waveguide crossings for optical switching units and an optimizing algorithm to complete the optimization automatically. The functionality of the optical switch remains constant under optimization. With this method, we simplify the topology of optical switch, which means the insertion loss and power consumption of the whole optical switch can be effectively minimized. Simulation result shows that the number of switching units of the optical switch based on Spanke-Benes can be reduced by 16.7%, 20%, 20%, 19% and 17.9% for the scale from 4 × 4 to 8 × 8 respectively. As a proof of concept, the experimental demonstration of an optimized six-port optical switch based on Spanke-Benes structure by means of silicon photonics chip is reported.

  1. Recent amendments of the KTA 2101.2 fire barrier resistance rating method for German NPP and comparison to the Eurocode t-equivalent method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forell, Burkhard [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The German nuclear standard KTA2101 on ''Fire Protection in Nuclear Power Plants'', Part 2: ''Fire Protection of Structural Plant Components'' includes a simplified method for the fire resistance rating of fire barrier elements based on the t-equivalent approach. The method covers the specific features of compartments in nuclear power plant buildings in terms of the boundary conditions which have to be expected in the event of fire. The method has proven to be relatively simple and straightforward to apply. The paper gives an overview of amendments with respect to the rating method made within the regular review of the KTA 2101.2. A comparison to the method of the non-nuclear Eurocode 1 is also provided. The Eurocode method is closely connected to the German standard DIN 18230 on structural fire protection in industrial buildings. Special emphasis of the comparison is given to the ventilation factor, which has a large impact on the required fire resistance.

  2. Sub-bandgap photonic base current method for characterization of interface states at heterointerfaces in heterojunction bipolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, H. T.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel photonic base current analysis method to characterize the interface states in heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) by using the photonic I-V characteristics under sub-bandgap photonic excitation. For the photonic current-voltage characterization of HBTs, an optical source with a photon energy less than the bandgap energy of Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 As and GaAs (E ph = 0.95 eV g,AlGaAs = 1.79 eV, E g,GaAs = 1.45 eV) is employed for the characterization of the interface states distributed in the photo-responsive energy band (E C - 0.95 ≤ E it ≤ E C ) in emitter-base heterojunction at HBTs. The proposed novel method, which is applied to bipolar junction transistors for the first time, is simple, and an accurate analysis of interface traps in HBTs is possible. By using the photonic base-current and the dark-base-current, we qualitatively analyze the interface trap at the Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 As/GaAs heterojunction interface in HBTs.

  3. An analysis of MCNP cross-sections and tally methods for low-energy photon emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, John J; Wallace, Robert E; Boedeker, Kirsten

    2002-04-21

    Monte Carlo calculations are frequently used to analyse a variety of radiological science applications using low-energy (10-1000 keV) photon sources. This study seeks to create a low-energy benchmark for the MCNP Monte Carlo code by simulating the absolute dose rate in water and the air-kerma rate for monoenergetic point sources with energies between 10 keV and 1 MeV. The analysis compares four cross-section datasets as well as the tally method for collision kerma versus absorbed dose. The total photon attenuation coefficient cross-section for low atomic number elements has changed significantly as cross-section data have changed between 1967 and 1989. Differences of up to 10% are observed in the photoelectric cross-section for water at 30 keV between the standard MCNP cross-section dataset (DLC-200) and the most recent XCOM/NIST tabulation. At 30 keV, the absolute dose rate in water at 1.0 cm from the source increases by 7.8% after replacing the DLC-200 photoelectric cross-sections for water with those from the XCOM/NIST tabulation. The differences in the absolute dose rate are analysed when calculated with either the MCNP absorbed dose tally or the collision kerma tally. Significant differences between the collision kerma tally and the absorbed dose tally can occur when using the DLC-200 attenuation coefficients in conjunction with a modern tabulation of mass energy-absorption coefficients.

  4. Calculation by the Monte Carlo method of the equivalent dose received by a human fetus from gamma sources localized in the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segreto, V.S.A.

    1979-01-01

    New uterus positions are proposed and worked out in detail to evaluate the exposure of the human fetus to radiation originated in the gastrointestinal-tract during the pregnancy period. In our evaluation each organ in the gastrointestinal-tract namely stomach, small intestine, transverse colon, ascendent colon, descendent colon, sigmoid and rectum was individually considered. Changes in the position of each of these organs were studied as a function of the uterus growth. There were evaluated cases in which the uterus was in three, six and nine month pregnancy for photon energies of 0.02, 0.05, 0.10, 0.50 and 4 MeV. The average equivalent doses (H) of the uterus, in the uterine wall and in each one of the twelve compartiments which we considered as sub-divisions of the uterus were also determined and discussed. (Auhor) [pt

  5. Discrimination of Inrush from Fault Currents in Power Transformers Based on Equivalent Instantaneous Inductance Technique Coupled with Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamali

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of magnetizing inrush is a transient condition, which occurs primarily when a transformer is energized. The magnitude of inrush current may be as high as ten times or more times of transformer rated current that causes malfunction of protection system. So, for safe running of a transformer, it is necessary to distinguish inrush current from fault currents. In this paper, an equivalent instantaneous inductance (EII technique is used to discriminate inrush current from fault currents. For this purpose, a three-phase power transformer has been simulated in Maxwell software that is based on finite elements. This three-phase power transformer has been used to simulate different conditions. Then, the results have been used as inputs in MATLAB program to implement the equivalent instantaneous inductance technique. The results show that in the case of inrush current, the equivalent instantaneous inductance has a drastic variation, while it is almost constant in the cases of fault conditions.

  6. Voxel-Based Spatial Filtering Method for Canopy Height Retrieval from Airborne Single-Photon Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Tang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Airborne single-photon lidar (SPL is a new technology that holds considerable potential for forest structure and carbon monitoring at large spatial scales because it acquires 3D measurements of vegetation faster and more efficiently than conventional lidar instruments. However, SPL instruments use green wavelength (532 nm lasers, which are sensitive to background solar noise, and therefore SPL point clouds require more elaborate noise filtering than other lidar instruments to determine canopy heights, particularly in daytime acquisitions. Histogram-based aggregation is a commonly used approach for removing noise from photon counting lidar data, but it reduces the resolution of the dataset. Here we present an alternate voxel-based spatial filtering method that filters noise points efficiently while largely preserving the spatial integrity of SPL data. We develop and test our algorithms on an experimental SPL dataset acquired over Garrett County in Maryland, USA. We then compare canopy attributes retrieved using our new algorithm with those obtained from the conventional histogram binning approach. Our results show that canopy heights derived using the new algorithm have a strong agreement with field-measured heights (r2 = 0.69, bias = 0.42 m, RMSE = 4.85 m and discrete return lidar heights (r2 = 0.94, bias = 1.07 m, RMSE = 2.42 m. Results are consistently better than height accuracies from the histogram method (field data: r2 = 0.59, bias = 0.00 m, RMSE = 6.25 m; DRL: r2 = 0.78, bias = −0.06 m and RMSE = 4.88 m. Furthermore, we find that the spatial-filtering method retains fine-scale canopy structure detail and has lower errors over steep slopes. We therefore believe that automated spatial filtering algorithms such as the one presented here can support large-scale, canopy structure mapping from airborne SPL data.

  7. A midway forward-adjoint coupling method for neutron and photon Monte Carlo transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serov, I.V.; John, T.M.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The midway Monte Carlo method for calculating detector responses combines a forward and an adjoint Monte Carlo calculation. In both calculations, particle scores are registered at a surface to be chosen by the user somewhere between the source and detector domains. The theory of the midway response determination is developed within the framework of transport theory for external sources and for criticality theory. The theory is also developed for photons, which are generated at inelastic scattering or capture of neutrons. In either the forward or the adjoint calculation a so-called black absorber technique can be applied; i.e., particles need not be followed after passing the midway surface. The midway Monte Carlo method is implemented in the general-purpose MCNP Monte Carlo code. The midway Monte Carlo method is demonstrated to be very efficient in problems with deep penetration, small source and detector domains, and complicated streaming paths. All the problems considered pose difficult variance reduction challenges. Calculations were performed using existing variance reduction methods of normal MCNP runs and using the midway method. The performed comparative analyses show that the midway method appears to be much more efficient than the standard techniques in an overwhelming majority of cases and can be recommended for use in many difficult variance reduction problems of neutral particle transport

  8. Field analysis of TE and TM modes in photonic crystal Bragg fibers by transmission matrix method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hosseini Farzad

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we considered the field analysis in photonic crystal Bragg fibers. We apply the method of transmission matrix to calculater the dispersion curves, the longitudinal wave number over wave number versus incident wavelength, and the field distributions of TE and TM modes in the Bragg fiber. Our analysis shows that the field of guided modes is confined in the core and can exist only in particular wavelength bands corresponding to the band-gap of the periodic structure of the clad. From another point of view, light confinement is due to Bragg reflection from high-and low-refractive index layers of the clad. Also, the diagram of average angular frequency with respect to average longitudinal wave number is plotted so that the band gap regions of the clad are clearly observed.

  9. Application of combined TLD and CR-39 PNTD method for measurement of total dose and dose equivalent on ISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, E.R.; Deme, S.; Apathy, I.

    2006-01-01

    To date, no single passive detector has been found that measures dose equivalent from ionizing radiation exposure in low-Earth orbit. We have developed the I.S.S. Passive Dosimetry System (P.D.S.), utilizing a combination of TLD in the form of the self-contained Pille TLD system and stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (P.N.T.D.) oriented in three mutually orthogonal directions, to measure total dose and dose equivalent aboard the International Space Station (I.S.S.). The Pille TLD system, consisting on an on board reader and a large number of Ca 2 SO 4 :Dy TLD cells, is used to measure absorbed dose. The Pille TLD cells are read out and annealed by the I.S.S. crew on orbit, such that dose information for any time period or condition, e.g. for E.V.A. or following a solar particle event, is immediately available. Near-tissue equivalent CR-39 P.N.T.D. provides Let spectrum, dose, and dose equivalent from charged particles of LET ∞ H 2 O ≥ 10 keV/μm, including the secondaries produced in interactions with high-energy neutrons. Dose information from CR-39 P.N.T.D. is used to correct the absorbed dose component ≥ 10 keV/μm measured in TLD to obtain total dose. Dose equivalent from CR-39 P.N.T.D. is combined with the dose component <10 keV/μm measured in TLD to obtain total dose equivalent. Dose rates ranging from 165 to 250 μGy/day and dose equivalent rates ranging from 340 to 450 μSv/day were measured aboard I.S.S. during the Expedition 2 mission in 2001. Results from the P.D.S. are consistent with those from other passive detectors tested as part of the ground-based I.C.C.H.I.B.A.N. intercomparison of space radiation dosimeters. (authors)

  10. Occurrence of two-photon absorption saturation in Ag nanocolloids, prepared by chemical reduction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahulan, K. Mani, E-mail: krahul.au@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai (India); Ganesan, S. [Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai (India); Aruna, P., E-mail: aruna@annauniv.edu [Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai (India)

    2012-09-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag nanocolloids were synthesized via chemical reduction method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The molecules of PVP play an important role in growth and agglomeration of silver nanocolloids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Saturation behaviour followed by two photon absorption was responsible for good optical limiting characteristics in these nanocolloids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nonlinear optical parameters calculated from the data showed that these materials could be used as efficient optical limiters. - Abstract: Silver nanocolloids stabilized with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) have been prepared from (AgNO{sub 3}) by a chemical reduction method, involving the intermediate preparation of (Ag{sub 2}O) colloidal dispersions in the presence of sodium dodecycle sulfate as a surfactant and formaldehyde as reducing agent. The molecules of PVP play an important role in growth and agglomeration of silver nanocolloids. The formation of Ag nanocolloids was studied from the UV-vis absorption characteristics. An energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrum and X-ray diffraction peak of the nanoparticles showed the highly crystalline nature of silver structure. The particle size was found to be 40 nm as analyzed from Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The nonlinear optical and optical limiting properties of these nanoparticle dispersions were studied by using the Z-scan technique at 532 nm. Experimental results show that the Ag nanocolloids possess strong optical limiting effect, originated from absorption saturation followed by two-photon mechanism. The data show that Ag nanocolloids have great potential for nonlinear optical devices.

  11. Determination of the equivalent of environmental dose, H*(d), in a radiotherapy installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, M.A.F.; Borges, J.C.; Mota, H.C.

    1998-01-01

    In order to put into practice radiological protection has been required conversion factors for environmental dose equivalent determination to air kerma value for different kinds of photon and electron beams, such dose values have been determined in a spheric phantom of 30 cm diameter in a alignment field and expanded in a depth of this sphere. Details will be given for determining of equivalent dose distribution calculation using Monte Carlo computational method (ESG4) following the recommendations of ICRU. (Author)

  12. Bowel sparing in pediatric cranio-spinal radiotherapy: a comparison of combined electron and photon and helical TomoTherapy techniques to a standard photon method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harron, Elizabeth; Lewis, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dose to organs at risk (OARs) from different craniospinal radiotherapy treatment approaches available at the Northern Centre for Cancer Care (NCCC), with a particular emphasis on sparing the bowel. Method: Treatment plans were produced for a pediatric medulloblastoma patient with inflammatory bowel disease using 3D conformal 6-MV photons (3DCP), combined 3D 6-MV photons and 18-MeV electrons (3DPE), and helical photon TomoTherapy (HT). The 3DPE plan was a modification of the standard 3DCP technique, using electrons to treat the spine inferior to the level of the diaphragm. The plans were compared in terms of the dose-volume data to OARs and the nontumor integral dose. Results: The 3DPE plan was found to give the lowest dose to the bowel and the lowest nontumor integral dose of the 3 techniques. However, the coverage of the spine planning target volume (PTV) was least homogeneous using this technique, with only 74.6% of the PTV covered by 95% of the prescribed dose. HT was able to achieve the best coverage of the PTVs (99.0% of the whole-brain PTV and 93.1% of the spine PTV received 95% of the prescribed dose), but delivered a significantly higher integral dose. HT was able to spare the heart, thyroid, and eyes better than the linac-based techniques, but other OARs received a higher dose. Conclusions: Use of electrons was the best method for reducing the dose to the bowel and the integral dose, at the expense of compromised spine PTV coverage. For some patients, HT may be a viable method of improving dose homogeneity and reducing selected OAR doses.

  13. Overview of experimental progress on understanding photon strength functions with an emphasis of the Oslo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krticka, Milan

    2015-10-01

    The so-called Photon Strength Functions (PSFs) for different multipolarities are, together with the Nuclear Level Density (NLD) the key entities describing the statistical γ-decay of nucleus. It is well known that PSFs at energies above the threshold for particle emission are well described by the Lorentzian shape of the Giant Electric Dipole Resonance (GEDR). On the other hand, shapes of RSFs at the low-energy tail of GEDR are known rather poorly. Information on the PSFs at the GEDR tail can be obtained from several different experimental techniques. They will be summarized and the most important ones briefly introduced in this contribution. Special emphasis will be put on the so-called Oslo method which allows simultaneous extraction of the NLD and the PSFs from particle- γ coincidence measurements. This method has been used for determining the NLD and the PSFs in many nuclei in A ~ 45- 240 range during past years. Examples of the most interesting results obtained with this method will be shown. The results will be compared to information on the PSFs available from other experimental techniques. The strengths and the weaknesses of the method will be thoroughly discussed.

  14. Application of the high-temperature ratio method for evaluation of the depth distribution of dose equivalent in a water-filled phantom on board space station Mir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, T.; Hajek, M.; Schoener, W.; Fugger, M.; Vana, N.; Akatov, Y.; Shurshakov, V.; Arkhangelsky, V.; Kartashov, D.

    2002-01-01

    A water-filled tissue equivalent phantom with a diameter of 35 cm was developed at the Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia. It contains four channels perpendicular to each other, where dosemeters can be exposed at different depths. Between May 1997 and February 1999 the phantom was installed at three different locations on board the Mir space station. Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were exposed at various depths inside the phantom either parallel or perpendicular to the hull of the spacecraft. The high-temperature ratio (HTR) method was used for the evaluation of the TLDs. The method was developed at the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna, Austria, and has already been used for measurements in mixed radiation fields on earth and in space with great success. It uses the changes of peak height ratios in LiF:Mg,Ti glow curves in dependence on the linear energy transfer (LET), and therefore allows determination of an 'averaged' LET as well as measurement of the absorbed dose. A mean quality factor and, subsequently, the dose equivalent can be calculated according to the Q(LET ( ) relationship proposed by the ICRP. The small size of the LiF dosemeters means that the HTR method can be used to determine the gradient of absorbed dose and dose equivalent inside the tissue equivalent body. (author)

  15. A method, using ICRP 26 weighting factors, to determine effective dose equivalent due to nonuniform external exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, S.G.

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has recently implemented a methodology and supporting procedures to calculate effective dose equivalent for external exposures. The calculations are based on ICRP 26 methodology and are used to evaluate exposures when multibadging is used. The methodology is based upon the concept of open-quotes whole bodyclose quotes compartmentalization (i.e., the whole body is separated into seven specific regions of radiological concern and weighted accordingly). The highest dose measured in each compartment is used to determine the weighted dose to that compartment. Benefits of determining effective dose equivalent are compliance with DOE Orders, more accurate dose assessments, and the opportunity for improved worker protection through new ALARA opportunities

  16. Four-layer DOI PET detectors using a multi-pixel photon counter array and the light sharing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) provide many advantages for PET detectors, such as their high internal gain, high photon detection efficiency and insensitivity to magnetic fields. The number of detectable scintillation photons of SiPMs, however, is limited by the number of microcells. Therefore, pulse height of PET detectors using SiPMs is saturated when large numbers of scintillation photons enter the SiPM pixels. On the other hand, we previously presented a depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding method that is based on the light sharing method. Since our encoding method detects scintillation photons with multiple readout pixels, the saturation effect can be suppressed. We constructed two prototype four-layer DOI detectors using a SiPM array and evaluated their performances. The two prototype detectors consisted of four layers of a 6×6 array of Lu 2(1−x) Y 2x SiO 5 (LYSO) crystals and a SiPM (multi-pixel photon detector, MPPC, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.) array of 4×4 pixels. The size of each LYSO crystal element was 1.46 mm×1.46 mm×4.5 mm and all surfaces of the crystal elements were chemically etched. We used two types of MPPCs. The first one had 3600 microcells and high photon detection efficiency (PDE). The other one had 14,400 microcells and lower PDE. In the evaluation experiment, all the crystals of the detector using the MPPC which had the high PDE were clearly identified. The respective energy and timing resolutions of lower than 15% and 1.0 ns were achieved for each crystal element. No saturation of output signals was observed in the 511 keV energy region due to suppression of the saturation effect by detecting scintillation photons with several MPPC pixels by the light sharing method. -- Highlights: •We constructed and evaluated four-layer DOI detectors by the light sharing method using a MPPC array. •The detectors using two types of the MPPC array were compared. •The energy and timing resolutions of lower than 15% and 1.0 ns were achieved for

  17. Four-layer DOI PET detectors using a multi-pixel photon counter array and the light sharing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko, E-mail: funis@nirs.go.jp; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-21

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) provide many advantages for PET detectors, such as their high internal gain, high photon detection efficiency and insensitivity to magnetic fields. The number of detectable scintillation photons of SiPMs, however, is limited by the number of microcells. Therefore, pulse height of PET detectors using SiPMs is saturated when large numbers of scintillation photons enter the SiPM pixels. On the other hand, we previously presented a depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding method that is based on the light sharing method. Since our encoding method detects scintillation photons with multiple readout pixels, the saturation effect can be suppressed. We constructed two prototype four-layer DOI detectors using a SiPM array and evaluated their performances. The two prototype detectors consisted of four layers of a 6×6 array of Lu{sub 2(1−x)}Y{sub 2x}SiO{sub 5} (LYSO) crystals and a SiPM (multi-pixel photon detector, MPPC, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.) array of 4×4 pixels. The size of each LYSO crystal element was 1.46 mm×1.46 mm×4.5 mm and all surfaces of the crystal elements were chemically etched. We used two types of MPPCs. The first one had 3600 microcells and high photon detection efficiency (PDE). The other one had 14,400 microcells and lower PDE. In the evaluation experiment, all the crystals of the detector using the MPPC which had the high PDE were clearly identified. The respective energy and timing resolutions of lower than 15% and 1.0 ns were achieved for each crystal element. No saturation of output signals was observed in the 511 keV energy region due to suppression of the saturation effect by detecting scintillation photons with several MPPC pixels by the light sharing method. -- Highlights: •We constructed and evaluated four-layer DOI detectors by the light sharing method using a MPPC array. •The detectors using two types of the MPPC array were compared. •The energy and timing resolutions of lower than 15% and 1.0 ns were

  18. Fiber transport of spatially entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, W.; Eliel, E. R.; Woerdman, J. P.; Euser, T. G.; Scharrer, M.; Russell, P.

    2012-03-01

    High-dimensional entangled photons pairs are interesting for quantum information and cryptography: Compared to the well-known 2D polarization case, the stronger non-local quantum correlations could improve noise resistance or security, and the larger amount of information per photon increases the available bandwidth. One implementation is to use entanglement in the spatial degree of freedom of twin photons created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, which is equivalent to orbital angular momentum entanglement, this has been proven to be an excellent model system. The use of optical fiber technology for distribution of such photons has only very recently been practically demonstrated and is of fundamental and applied interest. It poses a big challenge compared to the established time and frequency domain methods: For spatially entangled photons, fiber transport requires the use of multimode fibers, and mode coupling and intermodal dispersion therein must be minimized not to destroy the spatial quantum correlations. We demonstrate that these shortcomings of conventional multimode fibers can be overcome by using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, which follows the paradigm to mimic free-space transport as good as possible, and are able to confirm entanglement of the fiber-transported photons. Fiber transport of spatially entangled photons is largely unexplored yet, therefore we discuss the main complications, the interplay of intermodal dispersion and mode mixing, the influence of external stress and core deformations, and consider the pros and cons of various fiber types.

  19. Photonic time crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Chengen; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Yuting; Zeng, Jing; Song, Runxia

    2017-12-07

    When space (time) translation symmetry is spontaneously broken, the space crystal (time crystal) forms; when permittivity and permeability periodically vary with space (time), the photonic crystal (photonic time crystal) forms. We proposed the concept of photonic time crystal and rewritten the Maxwell's equations. Utilizing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, we simulated electromagnetic wave propagation in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal, the simulation results show that more intensive scatter fields can obtained in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal.

  20. Experimental method for investigating γd→pn photodisintegration reaction on the linearly polarized photon beam of the Erevan synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agababyan, K.Sh.; Adamyan, F.V.; Ajrapetyan, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental method for measuring the asymmetry of the γd → pn photodisintegration reaction on the linearly polarized photon beam of the Erevan synchrotron is described. The results of Monte Carlo calculations, the calibration of apparatus, the procedure of measurements and experimental data processing are repored

  1. Comparison of four computational methods for computing Q factors and resonance wavelengths in photonic crystal membrane cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Burger, Sven

    2016-01-01

    We benchmark four state-of-the-art computational methods by computing quality factors and resonance wavelengths in photonic crystal membrane L5 and L9 line defect cavities.The convergence of the methods with respect to resolution, degrees of freedom and number ofmodes is investigated. Special att...... attention is paid to the influence of the size of the computational domain. Convergence is not obtained for some of the methods, indicating that some are moresuitable than others for analyzing line defect cavities....

  2. A simplified spherical harmonic method for coupled electron-photon transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josef, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    In this thesis we have developed a simplified spherical harmonic method (SP N method) and associated efficient solution techniques for 2-D multigroup electron-photon transport calculations. The SP N method has never before been applied to charged-particle transport. We have performed a first time Fourier analysis of the source iteration scheme and the P 1 diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) scheme applied to the 2-D SP N equations. Our theoretical analyses indicate that the source iteration and P 1 DSA schemes are as effective for the 2-D SP N equations as for the 1-D S N equations. Previous analyses have indicated that the P 1 DSA scheme is unstable (with sufficiently forward-peaked scattering and sufficiently small absorption) for the 2-D S N equations, yet is very effective for the 1-D S N equations. In addition, we have applied an angular multigrid acceleration scheme, and computationally demonstrated that it performs as well for the 2-D SP N equations as for the 1-D S N equations. It has previously been shown for 1-D S N calculations that this scheme is much more effective than the DSA scheme when scattering is highly forward-peaked. We have investigated the applicability of the SP N approximation to two different physical classes of problems: satellite electronics shielding from geomagnetically trapped electrons, and electron beam problems. In the space shielding study, the SP N method produced solutions that are accurate within 10% of the benchmark Monte Carlo solutions, and often orders of magnitude faster than Monte Carlo. We have successfully modeled quasi-void problems and have obtained excellent agreement with Monte Carlo. We have observed that the SP N method appears to be too diffusive an approximation for beam problems. This result, however, is in agreement with theoretical expectations

  3. On a new method to compute photon skyshine doses around radiotherapy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, R.; Facure, A. [Comissao Nacional de Eenrgia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Xavier, A. [PEN/Coppe -UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Nowadays, in a great number of situations constructions are raised around radiotherapy facilities. In cases where the constructions would not be in the primary x-ray beam, 'skyshine' radiation is normally accounted for. The skyshine method is commonly used to to calculate the dose contribution from scattered radiation in such circumstances, when the roof shielding is projected considering there will be no occupancy upstairs. In these cases, there will be no need to have the usual 1,5-2,0 m thick ceiling, and the construction costs can be considerably reduced. The existing expression to compute these doses do not accomplish to explain mathematically the existence of a shadow area just around the outer room walls, and its growth, as we get away from these walls. In this paper we propose a new method to compute photon skyshine doses, using geometrical considerations to find the maximum dose point. An empirical equation is derived, and its validity is tested using M.C.N.P. 5 Monte Carlo calculation to simulate radiotherapy rooms configurations. (authors)

  4. Two-Photon Polymerization Metrology: Characterization Methods of Mechanisms and Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N. LaFratta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to create complex three-dimensional microstructures has reached an unprecedented level of sophistication in the last 15 years. For the most part, this is the result of a steady development of the additive manufacturing technique named two-photon polymerization (TPP. In a short amount of time, TPP has gone from being a microfabrication novelty employed largely by laser specialists to a useful tool in the hands of scientists and engineers working in a wide range of research fields including microfluidics. When used in combination with traditional microfabrication processes, TPP can be employed to add unique three-dimensional components to planar platforms, thus enabling the realization of lab-on-a-chip solutions otherwise impossible to create. To take full advantage of TPP, an in-depth understanding is required of the materials photochemistry and the fabricated microstructures’ mechanical and chemical properties. Thus, we review methods developed so far to investigate the underling mechanism involved during TPP and analytical methods employed to characterize TPP microstructures. Furthermore, we will discuss potential opportunities for using optofluidics and lab-on-a-chip systems for TPP metrology.

  5. Single photon emission computed tomography using a regularizing iterative method for attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussaline, Francoise; Cao, A.; Lecoq, G.

    1981-06-01

    An analytically exact solution to the attenuated tomographic operator is proposed. Such a technique called Regularizing Iterative Method (RIM) belongs to the iterative class of procedures where a priori knowledge can be introduced on the evaluation of the size and shape of the activity domain to be reconstructed, and on the exact attenuation distribution. The relaxation factor used is so named because it leads to fast convergence and provides noise filtering for a small number of iteractions. The effectiveness of such a method was tested in the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) reconstruction problem, with the goal of precise correction for attenuation before quantitative study. Its implementation involves the use of a rotating scintillation camera based SPECT detector connected to a mini computer system. Mathematical simulations of cylindical uniformly attenuated phantoms indicate that in the range of a priori calculated relaxation factor a fast converging solution can always be found with a (contrast) accuracy of the order of 0.2 to 4% given that numerical errors and noise are or not, taken into account. The sensitivity of the (RIM) algorithm to errors in the size of the reconstructed object and in the value of the attenuation coefficient μ was studied, using the same simulation data. Extreme variations of +- 15% in these parameters will lead to errors of the order of +- 20% in the quantitative results. Physical phantoms representing a variety of geometrical situations were also studied

  6. Analyzing the photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure based on the Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng, E-mail: hanlor@163.com [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, 210023 ,China (China); Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics (Nanjing Univ. Aeronaut. Astronaut.), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, 210016 (China); Liu, Shao-Bin [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics (Nanjing Univ. Aeronaut. Astronaut.), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, 210016 (China)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional plasma-dielectric photonic crystals (2D PPCs) under a transverse-magnetic (TM) wave are theoretically investigated by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method where Monte Carlo method is introduced. The proposed PWE method can be used to calculate the band structures of 2D PPCs which possess arbitrary-shaped filler and any lattice. The efficiency and convergence of the present method are discussed by a numerical example. The configuration of 2D PPCs is the square lattices with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure whose constituents are homogeneous and isotropic. The type-1 PPCs is filled with the dielectric cylinders in the plasma background, while its complementary structure is called type-2 PPCs, in which plasma cylinders behave as the fillers in the dielectric background. The calculated results reveal that the enough accuracy and good convergence can be obtained, if the number of random sampling points of Monte Carlo method is large enough. The band structures of two types of PPCs with different fractal orders of Sierpinski gasket structure also are theoretically computed for a comparison. It is demonstrate that the PBGs in higher frequency region are more easily produced in the type-1 PPCs rather than in the type-2 PPCs. Sierpinski gasket structure introduced in the 2D PPCs leads to a larger cutoff frequency, enhances and induces more PBGs in high frequency region. The effects of configurational parameters of two types of PPCs on the PBGs are also investigated in detail. The results show that the PBGs of the PPCs can be easily manipulated by tuning those parameters. The present type-1 PPCs are more suitable to design the tunable compacted devices.

  7. Method of neutronic calculations for a spherical cell equivalent to cylindrical one for using computer codes in light water reactors in the fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, V.; Sefidvash, F.; Rastogi, E.P.; Huria, H.C.; Krishnani, P.D.

    1989-01-01

    In order to use the existing light water reactor cell calculation codes for fluidized bed nuclear reactor having spherical fuel cells, an equivalence method has been developed. This method is shown to be adequate in calculation of the Dancoff factor. This method also was applicable in LEOPARD code and the results obtained in calculation of K ∞ was compared with the obtained using the DTF IV code, the results showed that the method is adequate for the calculations neutronics of the fluidized bed nuclear reactor. (author) [pt

  8. Photon-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief summary of the present status of photon-photon interactions is presented. Stress is placed on the use of two-photon collisions to test present ideas on the quark constituents of hadrons and on the theory of strong interactions

  9. Characterization of tissues equivalent to the human body by the Monte Carlo method for X-rays; Caracterizacion de tejidos equivalentes al cuerpo humano mediante el metodo Monte Carlo para rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega R, J.; Huamani T, Y.; Mullisaca P, A. F.; Yauri C, L., E-mail: josevegaramirez@yahoo.es [Universidad Nacional de San Agustin de Arequipa, Av. Independencia s/n, 04000 Arequipa (Peru)

    2017-10-15

    There is a need to have materials equivalent to the human body that have the appropriate characteristics to be used as a substitute tissue in the clinical practices of radio-diagnosis, radiotherapy. In Arequipa, Peru, there are two health centers in radiotherapy applications, one with a Theratron Co-60 gamma irradiator and another with Elekta Linac; the Medical Physics Area of the School of Physics of the National University of San Agustin de Arequipa, were four equivalent materials based on epoxy resin, phenolitic spheres, calcium carbonate, etc. were built, such as bone tissue, soft tissue, adipose and lung tissue compared with water, whit the purpose of studying and applying them in future clinical applications. In this work we describe its physical and dosimetric characterization to determine its use as an equivalent material or manikin. The materials are 1 cm thick and 30 cm in diameter, the materials are non-malleable solids, they do not degrade, they have stability in their consistency due to temperature and irradiation, they are not toxic in their use, determining densities from 0.32 g/cm{sup 3} for the lung tissue to 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} for the bone material. These materials were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, giving the percentages by weight of the elements found to determine their effective atomic number, the physical analysis to determine their mass absorption and energy coefficients, which were studied for energy photons between 1 KeV at 20 MeV. The simulation of the equivalent materials and the physical and dosimetric study were found using the code Penelope 2008 Monte Carlo method and validated by the Nist database. The results obtained according to their coefficients of mass attenuation of each material, show lung, bone, soft and adipose tissue with differences with respect to the same Nist materials. The range maximum and minimum Rd deviation found was 35.65 - 3.16 for bone, 28.5 - 6.74 for lung, 33.78 - 9.06 for soft tissue and 86.42 - 1

  10. INTERCOMPARISON ON THE MEASUREMENT OF THE QUANTITY PERSONAL DOSE EQUIVALENT HP(10) IN PHOTON FIELDS. LINEARITY DEPENDENCE, LOWER LIMIT OF DETECTION AND UNCERTAINTY IN MEASUREMENT OF DOSIMETRY SYSTEMS OF INDIVIDUAL MONITORING SERVICES IN GABON AND GHANA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondo Meye, P; Schandorf, C; Amoako, J K; Manteaw, P O; Amoatey, E A; Adjei, D N

    2017-12-01

    An inter-comparison study was conducted to assess the capability of dosimetry systems of individual monitoring services (IMSs) in Gabon and Ghana to measure personal dose equivalent Hp(10) in photon fields. The performance indicators assessed were the lower limit of detection, linearity and uncertainty in measurement. Monthly and quarterly recording levels were proposed with corresponding values of 0.08 and 0.025 mSv, and 0.05 and 0.15 mSv for the TLD and OSL systems, respectively. The linearity dependence of the dosimetry systems was performed following the requirement given in the Standard IEC 62387 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The results obtained for the two systems were satisfactory. The procedure followed for the uncertainty assessment is the one given in the IEC technical report TR62461. The maximum relative overall uncertainties, in absolute value, expressed in terms of Hp(10), for the TL dosimetry system Harshaw 6600, are 44. 35% for true doses below 0.40 mSv and 36.33% for true doses ≥0.40 mSv. For the OSL dosimetry system microStar, the maximum relative overall uncertainties, in absolute value, are 52.17% for true doses below 0.40 mSv and 37.43% for true doses ≥0.40 mSv. These results are in good agreement with the requirements for accuracy of the International Commission on Radiological protection. When expressing the uncertainties in terms of response, comparison with the IAEA requirements for overall accuracy showed that the uncertainty results were also acceptable. The values of Hp(10) directly measured by the two dosimetry systems showed a significant underestimation for the Harshaw 6600 system, and a slight overestimation for the microStar system. After correction for linearity of the measured doses, the two dosimetry systems gave better and comparable results. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The physics of photons and neutrons with applications of deuterium labeling methods to polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wignall, G.D.

    1986-12-01

    Over the past decade small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), has found numerous applications in the fields of biology, polymer science, physical chemistry, materials science, metallurgy, colloids, and solid state physics. A number of excellent references are available which contain basic neutron scattering theory though these text books reflect the origins of the technique and the examples are largely drawn from physics e.g., single crystals, simple liquids, monatomic gases, liquid metals, magnetic materials, etc. in view of the large numbers of nonspecialists who are increasingly using neutron scattering, the need has become apparent for presentations which can provide rapid access to the method without unnecessary detail and mathematical rigor. This article is meant to serve as a general introduction to the symposium ''Scattering Deformation and Fracture in Polymers,'' and is intended to aid potential users who have a general scientific background, but no specialist knowledge of scattering, to apply the technique to provide new information in areas of their own particular interests. In view of space limitations, the general theory will be given in the case for neutron scattering and analogies and differences with photon scattering (x-rays) will be pointed out at the appropriate point. 90 refs., 6 figs

  12. Bandgap optimization of two-dimensional photonic crystals using semidefinite programming and subspace methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Men, H.; Nguyen, N.C.; Freund, R.M.; Parrilo, P.A.; Peraire, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the optimal design of photonic crystal structures for two-dimensional square lattices. The mathematical formulation of the bandgap optimization problem leads to an infinite-dimensional Hermitian eigenvalue optimization problem parametrized by the dielectric material and the wave vector. To make the problem tractable, the original eigenvalue problem is discretized using the finite element method into a series of finite-dimensional eigenvalue problems for multiple values of the wave vector parameter. The resulting optimization problem is large-scale and non-convex, with low regularity and non-differentiable objective. By restricting to appropriate eigenspaces, we reduce the large-scale non-convex optimization problem via reparametrization to a sequence of small-scale convex semidefinite programs (SDPs) for which modern SDP solvers can be efficiently applied. Numerical results are presented for both transverse magnetic (TM) and transverse electric (TE) polarizations at several frequency bands. The optimized structures exhibit patterns which go far beyond typical physical intuition on periodic media design.

  13. Neutron radiography imaging with 2-dimensional photon counting method and its problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Niwa, T.; Kataoka, T.

    1988-01-01

    A ultra sensitive neutron imaging system has been deviced with a 2-dimensional photon counting camara (ARGUS 100). The imaging system is composed by a 2-dimensional single photon counting tube and a low background vidicon followed with an image processing unit and frame memories. By using the imaging system, electronic neutron radiography (NTV) has been possible under the neutron flux less than 3 x 10 4 n/cm 2 ·s. (author)

  14. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-4 Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and...

  15. Analysis of the equivalent indenter concept used to extract Young’s modulus from a nano-indentation test: some new insights into the Oliver–Pharr method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito; Thorborg, Jesper; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2017-01-01

    is initially used to prove that the shape of the axisymmetric equivalent indenter can be regarded as a material property, provided that size-effects are negligible. Subsequently, it is shown that such shape can effectively be employed to describe the nano-indentation unloading stage by means of Sneddon....... This provides a new physical explanation for the relatively good accuracy of the method even in presence of a non-negligible residual contact impression on the sample....

  16. properties of the SN - equivalent integral transport operator in slab geometry and the iterative acceleration of neutron transport methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massimiliano, Rosa; Azmy, Y.Y.; Morel, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    The general expressions for the matrix elements of the discrete Sn-equivalent integral transport operator have been derived in slab geometry. Their asymptotic behavior has been investigated both for a homogeneous slab and for a heterogeneous slab characterized by a periodic material discontinuity wherein each optically thick cell is surrounded by two optically thin cells in a repeating pattern. In the case of a homogeneous slab, the asymptotic analysis conducted in a diffusive limit obtained as the thick limit of computational cell size for a highly scattering medium, has shown that the discretized integral transport operator is approximated by a sparse matrix characterized by a tri-diagonal diffusion-like coupling stencil. Also, the tri-diagonal matrix structure, characteristic of the diffusion coupling stencil, is approached at a fast exponential rate. In the case of periodically heterogeneous slab configurations, the asymptotic behavior investigated is that in which the cells' optical thicknesses are pushed apart, i.e. the thick is made thicker while the thin is made thinner at a prescribed rate. It has been shown that in this limit the discretized integral transport operator is approximated by a penta-diagonal structure. Notwithstanding, the discrete operator is amenable to algebraic transformations leading to a matrix representation still asymptotically approaching a tri-diagonal structure at a fast exponential rate. The existence of a low order tri-diagonal approximation to the full discrete integral transport operator in the case of a periodically heterogeneous slab might provide a basic understanding of the superior convergence properties of diffusion-based acceleration schemes observed in slab geometry, even in the presence of sharp material discontinuities. The obtained results also suggest that a sparse approximation to the S n -equivalent integral transport operator might itself be used as the low-order operator in an acceleration scheme for the

  17. Application of the Monte Carlo method to the study of the response of an organic liquid scintillator irradiated by photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupre, Corinne.

    1982-10-01

    The Monte Carlo method was applied to simulate the transport of a photon beam in an organic liquid scintillation detector. The interactions of secondary gamma rays and electrons with the detector and its peripheral materials components such as the pyrex glass container are included. The pulse height spectra and the detectors efficiency are compared with calculated and measured results. Calculations and programmation methods are presented in the same way as results concerning cobalt and cesium sources [fr

  18. A conversion method of air-kerma from the primary, scatter and leakage radiations to ambient dose equivalent for calculating the mamography x-ray shielding barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharrati, H.

    2005-01-01

    The primary, scatter, and leakage doses(in Gy), which constitute the data base for calculating shielding requirements for x-ray facilities, are often converted to the equivalent dose (in sievert) by using a constant of conversion of 1.145Sv/Gy. This constant is used for diagnostic radiology as well as for mammography spectra, and is derived by considering an exposure of 1 R corresponds to an air kerma of 8.73 m Gy, which renders by tradition an equivalent dose of 10 mSv. However, this conversion does not take into account the energy dependence of the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to the equivalent dose as described in ICRU report. Moreover, current radiation protection standards propose the use of the quantity ambient dose equivalent in order to qualify the efficiently of given radiation shielding. Therefore, in this study, a new approach has been introduced for derivation ambient dose equivalent from air kerma to calculate shielding requirements in mammography facilities. This new approach has been used to compute the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to ambient dose equivalent for mammography reference beam series of the Netherlands Metrology Institute Van Swinden Laboratorium (NMi), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and International Atomic Energy Agency (AIEA) laboratories. The calculation has been performed by the means of two methods which show a maximum deviation less than 10%2 for the primary, scatter, and leakage radiations. The results show that the conversion coefficients vary from 0.242 Sv/ Gy to 0.692 Sv/Gy with an average value of 0.436 Sv/Gy for the primary and the scatter radiations, and form 0.156 Sv/Gy to 1.329 Sv/Gy with an average value of 0.98 Sv/Gy for the leakage radiation. Simpkin et al. using an empirical approach propose a conversion value of 0.50 Sv/Gy for the mammography x-ray spectra. This value approximately coincides with the average conversion value of 0.436 Sv/Gy obtained in this work for

  19. Derivation, evidence and physical validity of a weighted beam-zone method for dose determination in blocked photon fields of arbitrary shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, L.; Quast, U.

    1981-01-01

    A simple, practical procedure for dose determination at any point of an arbitrarily shaped field has been derived: Square-field photon beams are sectioned into a set of pyramid-shell-like parts (beam zones), nested into each other around the smallest realizable square field, of different sizes but with equal dose contributions (thus weighted) with respect to a central dose reference point. The dose at any reference point in an irregular field can be determined simply by counting the number of non-shielded dose-contributing zones (or zone fractions), leading to the associated order of square-field size (with the same number of zones), the equivalent field with known dose. For experimental evidence of the validity of the weighted beam-zone method, measurements were carried out with different high-energy photon beams with one or more beam zones shielded by absorbing blocks. Measurements were made at points in unshielded and shielded parts of the field, on and off the beam axis and at different depths in a phantom. Calculations and measurements were compared. While relative depth doses were shown to be equal to within +-2% over a range of 5 cm ahead of and behind the dose reference point, the absolute dose deviations were within +-4%. The sources of error were analysed. They were mainly determined by scattered radiation from the beam limiting device and the partial shielding deriving from the shielding blocks. The same errors also occur in most of the known methods of dose calculation in irregular fields. (author)

  20. Fabrication method to create high-aspect ratio pillars for photonic coupling of board level interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaes, C.; Van Erps, J.; Karppinen, M.; Hiltunen, J.; Suyal, H.; Last, A.; Lee, M. G.; Karioja, P.; Taghizadeh, M.; Mohr, J.; Thienpont, H.; Glebov, A. L.

    2008-04-01

    An important challenge that remains to date in board level optical interconnects is the coupling between the optical waveguides on printed wiring boards and the packaged optoelectronics chips, which are preferably surface mountable on the boards. One possible solution is the use of Ball Grid Array (BGA) packages. This approach offers a reliable attachment despite the large CTE mismatch between the organic FR4 board and the semiconductor materials. Collimation via micro-lenses is here typically deployed to couple the light vertically from the waveguide substrate to the optoelectronics while allowing for a small misalignment between board and package. In this work, we explore the fabrication issues of an alternative approach in which the vertical photonic connection between board and package is governed by a micro-optical pillar which is attached both to the board substrate and to the optoelectronic chips. Such an approach allows for high density connections and small, high-speed detector footprints while maintaining an acceptable tolerance between board and package. The pillar should exhibit some flexibility and thus a high-aspect ratio is preferred. This work presents and compares different fabrication methods and applies different materials for such high-aspect ratio pillars. The different fabrication methods are: photolithography, direct laser writing and deep proton writing. The selection of optical materials that was investigated is: SU8, Ormocers, PU and a multifunctional acrylate polymer. The resulting optical pillars have diameters ranging from 20um up to 80um, with total heights ranging between 30um and 100um (symbol for micron). The aspect-ratio of the fabricated structures ranges from 1.5 to 5.

  1. A Numerical Method for Calculating the Wave Drag of a Configuration from the Second Derivative of the Area Distribution of a Series of Equivalent Bodies of Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Lionel L., Jr.; Yoshikawa, Kenneth K.

    1959-01-01

    A method based on linearized and slender-body theories, which is easily adapted to electronic-machine computing equipment, is developed for calculating the zero-lift wave drag of single- and multiple-component configurations from a knowledge of the second derivative of the area distribution of a series of equivalent bodies of revolution. The accuracy and computational time required of the method to calculate zero-lift wave drag is evaluated relative to another numerical method which employs the Tchebichef form of harmonic analysis of the area distribution of a series of equivalent bodies of revolution. The results of the evaluation indicate that the total zero-lift wave drag of a multiple-component configuration can generally be calculated most accurately as the sum of the zero-lift wave drag of each component alone plus the zero-lift interference wave drag between all pairs of components. The accuracy and computational time required of both methods to calculate total zero-lift wave drag at supersonic Mach numbers is comparable for airplane-type configurations. For systems of bodies of revolution both methods yield similar results with comparable accuracy; however, the present method only requires up to 60 percent of the computing time required of the harmonic-analysis method for two bodies of revolution and less time for a larger number of bodies.

  2. A Method for Identification of the Equivalent Inductance and Resistance in the Plant Model of Current-Controlled Grid-Tied Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Ana; Yepes, Alejandro G.; Fernandez, Francisco Daniel Freijedo

    2015-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the plant time constant L=R is essential to perform a thorough analysis and design of the current control loop in voltage source converters (VSCs). From the perspective of the current controller dynamics in the low frequency range, such plant time constant is also suitable...... for most cases in which an LCL filter is used. As the loop behavior can be significantly influenced by the VSC working conditions, the effects associated to converter losses should be included in the model, through an equivalent series resistance. In addition, the plant inductance may also present...... important uncertainties with respect to the value of the VSC L/LCL interface filter measured at rated conditions. Thus, in this work, a method is presented to estimate both parameters of the plant time constant, i.e., the equivalent inductance and resistance in the plant model of current-controlled VSCs...

  3. Water equivalence of polymer gel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellakumar, P.; James Jebaseelan Samuel, E.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the water equivalence and radiation transport properties of polymer gel dosimeters over the wide range of photon and electron energies 14 different types of polymer gels were considered. Their water equivalence was evaluated in terms of effective atomic number (Z eff ), electron density (ρ e ), photon mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), photon mass energy absorption coefficient (μ en /ρ) and total stopping power (S/ρ) tot of electrons using the XCOM and the ESTAR database. The study showed that the effective atomic number of polymer gels were very close ( en /ρ for all polymer gels were in close agreement ( tot of electrons in polymer gel dosimeters were within 1% agreement with that of water. From the study we conclude that at lower energy (<80keV) the polymer gel dosimeters cannot be considered water equivalent and study has to be carried out before using the polymer gel for clinical application

  4. Thermal field theory in a layer: Applications of thermal field theory methods to the propagation of photons in a two-dimensional electron sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieves, Jose F.

    2010-01-01

    We apply the thermal field theory methods to study the propagation of photons in a plasma layer, that is a plasma in which the electrons are confined to a two-dimensional plane sheet. We calculate the photon self-energy and determine the appropriate expression for the photon propagator in such a medium, from which the properties of the propagating modes are obtained. The formulas for the photon dispersion relations and polarization vectors are derived explicitly in some detail for some simple cases of the thermal distributions of the charged particle gas, and appropriate formulas that are applicable in more general situations are also given.

  5. Reshaping of computational system for dosimetry in neutron and photons radiotherapy based in stochastic methods - SISCODES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trindade, Bruno Machado

    2011-02-01

    This work shows the remodeling of the Computer System for Dosimetry of Neutrons and Photons in Radiotherapy Based on Stochastic Methods . SISCODES. The initial description and status, the alterations and expansions (proposed and concluded), and the latest system development status are shown. The SISCODES is a system that allows the execution of a 3D computational planning in radiation therapy, based on MCNP5 nuclear particle transport code. The SISCODES provides tools to build a patient's voxels model, to define a treatment planning, to simulate this planning, and to view the results of the simulation. The SISCODES implements a database of tissues, sources and nuclear data and an interface to access then. The graphical SISCODES modules were rewritten or were implemented using C++ language and GTKmm library. Studies about dose deviations were performed simulating a homogeneous water phantom as analogue of the human body in radiotherapy planning and a heterogeneous voxel phantom, pointing out possible dose miscalculations. The Soft-RT and PROPLAN computer codes that do interface with SISCODES are described. A set of voxels models created on the SISCODES are presented with its respective sizes and resolutions. To demonstrate the use of SISCODES, examples of radiation therapy and dosimetry simulations for prostate and heart are shown. Three protocols were simulated on the heart voxel model: Sm-153 filled balloon and P-32 stent, to prevent angioplasty restenosis; and Tl-201 myocardial perfusion, to imaging. Teletherapy with 6MV and 15MV beams were simulated to the prostate, and brachytherapy with I-125 seeds. The results of these simulations are shown on isodose curves and on dose-volume histograms. The SISCODES shows to be a useful tool for research of new radiation therapy treatments and, in future, can also be useful in medical practice. At the end, future improvements are proposed. I hope this work can contribute to develop more effective radiation therapy

  6. Implementation of a Monte Carlo method to model photon conversion for solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canizo, C. del; Tobias, I.; Perez-Bedmar, J.; Pan, A.C.; Luque, A.

    2008-01-01

    A physical model describing different photon conversion mechanisms is presented in the context of photovoltaic applications. To solve the resulting system of equations, a Monte Carlo ray-tracing model is implemented, which takes into account the coupling of the photon transport phenomena to the non-linear rate equations describing luminescence. It also separates the generation of rays from the two very different sources of photons involved (the sun and the luminescence centers). The Monte Carlo simulator presented in this paper is proposed as a tool to help in the evaluation of candidate materials for up- and down-conversion. Some application examples are presented, exploring the range of values that the most relevant parameters describing the converter should have in order to give significant gain in photocurrent

  7. Qualitative Simulation of Photon Transport in Free Space Based on Monte Carlo Method and Its Parallel Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueli Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, Monte Carlo method has obtained wide applications in optical imaging to simulate photon transport process inside tissues. However, this method has not been effectively extended to the simulation of free-space photon transport at present. In this paper, a uniform framework for noncontact optical imaging is proposed based on Monte Carlo method, which consists of the simulation of photon transport both in tissues and in free space. Specifically, the simplification theory of lens system is utilized to model the camera lens equipped in the optical imaging system, and Monte Carlo method is employed to describe the energy transformation from the tissue surface to the CCD camera. Also, the focusing effect of camera lens is considered to establish the relationship of corresponding points between tissue surface and CCD camera. Furthermore, a parallel version of the framework is realized, making the simulation much more convenient and effective. The feasibility of the uniform framework and the effectiveness of the parallel version are demonstrated with a cylindrical phantom based on real experimental results.

  8. Photon and proton activation analysis of iron and steel standards using the internal standard method coupled with the standard addition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumoto, K.; Hara, M.; Hasegawa, D.; Iino, E.; Yagi, M.

    1997-01-01

    The internal standard method coupled with the standard addition method has been applied to photon activation analysis and proton activation analysis of minor elements and trace impurities in various types of iron and steel samples issued by the Iron and Steel Institute of Japan (ISIJ). Samples and standard addition samples were once dissolved to mix homogeneously, an internal standard and elements to be determined and solidified as a silica-gel to make a similar matrix composition and geometry. Cerium and yttrium were used as an internal standard in photon and proton activation, respectively. In photon activation, 20 MeV electron beam was used for bremsstrahlung irradiation to reduce matrix activity and nuclear interference reactions, and the results were compared with those of 30 MeV irradiation. In proton activation, iron was removed by the MIBK extraction method after dissolving samples to reduce the radioactivity of 56 Co from iron via 56 Fe(p, n) 56 Co reaction. The results of proton and photon activation analysis were in good agreement with the standard values of ISIJ. (author)

  9. The equivalence theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltman, H.

    1990-01-01

    The equivalence theorem states that, at an energy E much larger than the vector-boson mass M, the leading order of the amplitude with longitudinally polarized vector bosons on mass shell is given by the amplitude in which these vector bosons are replaced by the corresponding Higgs ghosts. We prove the equivalence theorem and show its validity in every order in perturbation theory. We first derive the renormalized Ward identities by using the diagrammatic method. Only the Feynman-- 't Hooft gauge is discussed. The last step of the proof includes the power-counting method evaluated in the large-Higgs-boson-mass limit, needed to estimate the leading energy behavior of the amplitudes involved. We derive expressions for the amplitudes involving longitudinally polarized vector bosons for all orders in perturbation theory. The fermion mass has not been neglected and everything is evaluated in the region m f ∼M much-lt E much-lt m Higgs

  10. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e#betta# scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by #betta##betta# collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F 2 /sup #betta#/(x,Q 2 ) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved

  11. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haissinski, J.

    1986-06-01

    The discussions presented in this paper deal with the following points: distinctive features of gamma-gamma collisions; related processes; photon-photon elastic scattering in the continuum and γγ →gg; total cross section; γγ → V 1 V 2 (V=vector meson); radiative width measurements and light meson spectroscopy; exclusive channels at large /t/; jets and inclusive particle distribution in γγ collisions; and, the photon structure function F γ 2

  12. Photon-photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R ampersand D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy

  13. A study on lead equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Guanxin

    1991-01-01

    A study on the rules in which the lead equivalent of lead glass changes with the energy of X rays or γ ray is described. The reason of this change is discussed and a new testing method of lead equivalent is suggested

  14. Photon Differentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Erleben, Kenny

    2007-01-01

    illumination features. This is often not desirable as these may lose clarity or vanish altogether. We present an accurate method for reconstruction of indirect illumination with photon mapping. Instead of reconstructing illumination using classic density estimation on finite points, we use the correlation...

  15. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  16. Multi-Photon Absorption Spectra: A Comparison Between Transmittance Change and Fluorescence Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0134 multi-photon absorption spectra Cleber Mendonca INSTITUTO DE FISICA DE SAO CARLOS Final Report 05/21/2015 DISTRIBUTION A...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos - Universidade de Sao Paulo Av

  17. A solution algorithm for calculating photon radiation fields with the aid of the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zappe, D.

    1978-04-01

    The MCTEST program and its subroutines for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation is presented. The program renders possible to calculate photon radiation fields of point or plane gamma sources. After changing two subroutines the calculation can also be carried out for the case of directed incidence of radiation on plane shields of iron or concrete. (author)

  18. Photon strength function in the Hf-181 nucleus by method of two-step cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Hong Khiem

    2003-01-01

    The applicability of sum-coincidence measurements of two-step cascade gamma ray spectra determining Photon Strength Function (PSF) of Hf-181 induced from Hf-180 (n,2γ) Hf-181 reaction is presented. Up to 80% intensity of the primary gamma ray transitions in a wide energy range have been deduced and compared to model calculation. (author)

  19. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  20. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  1. Determination of the growth restriction factor and grain size for aluminum alloys by a quasi-binary equivalent method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrašinović, A.M.; Robles Hernández, F.C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new method to determine the growth restricting factor. (Q) is proposed ► The proposed method is highly accurate (R 2 = 0.99) and simple. ► A major novelty of this method is the determination of Q for non-dilute samples. ► The method proposed herein is based on quasi-binary phase diagrams and composition. ► This method can be easily implemented industrially or as a research tool. - Abstract: In the present research paper is suggested a new methodology to determine the growth restricting factor (Q) and grain size (GS) for various Al-alloys. The present method combines a thermodynamical component based on the liquidus behavior of each alloying element that is later incorporated into the well known growth restricting models for multi-component alloys. This approach that can be used to determine Q and/or GS based on the chemical composition and the slope of the liquidus temperature of any Al-alloy solidified in close to equilibrium conditions. This method can be modified further in order to assess the effect of cooling rate or thermomechanical processing on growth restricting factor and grain size. In the present paper is proposed a highly accurate (R 2 = 0.99) and validated model for Al–Si alloys, but it can be modified for any other Al–X alloying system. The present method can be used for alloys with relatively high solute content and due to the use of the thermodynamics of liquidus this system considers the poisoning effects of single and multi-component alloying elements.

  2. Development of dose equivalent meters based on microdosimetric principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booz, J.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, the employment of microdosimetric dose-equivalent meters in radiation protection is described considering the advantages of introducing microdosimetric methods into radiation protection, the technical suitability of such instruments for measuring dose equivalent, and finally technical requirements, constraints and solutions together with some examples of instruments and experimental results. The advantage of microdosimetric methods in radiation protection is illustrated with the evaluation of dose-mean quality factors in radiation fields of unknown composition and with the methods of evaluating neutron- and gamma-dose fractions. - It is shown that there is good correlation between dose-mean lineal energy, anti ysub(anti D), and the ICRP quality factor. - Neutron- and gamma-dose fractions of unknown radiation fields can be evaluated with microdosimetric proportional counters without recurrence to other instruments and methods. The problems of separation are discussed. The technical suitability of microdosimetric instruments for measuring dose equivalent is discussed considering the energy response to neutrons and photons and the sensitivity in terms of dose-equivalent rate. Then, considering technical requirements, constraints, and solutions, the problem of the large dynamic range in LET, the large dynamic range in pulse rate, geometry of sensitive volume and electrodes, evaluation of dose-mean quality factors, calibration methods, and uncertainties are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Politico-economic equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime and a st......Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime...... their use in the context of several applications, relating to social security reform, tax-smoothing policies and measures to correct externalities....

  4. Equivalence between the methods involving Fourier series and the Poisson's summation formula and evaluation of a class of lattice sums in arbitrary dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.; Chaba, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    The similarities between the Fourier series method and the Poisson's summation formula method are brought out by evaluating the lattice sum g(r) sup(→) identical to Σ sub(tau) sup(→) exp(-lambda [r sup(→) - t sup(→)])/[r sup(→) - tau sup(→)] over a Bravais lattice [tau sup(→)] in three dimensions, lambda and r sup(→) being independent of tau sup(→). It is shown that the two approaches are actually equivalent by proving that the Poisson's summation formula (in any dimensionality) can, itself, be derived from the Fourier series method. An expression is also presented, ready for quick user, for a class of lattice sums Σ sub(tau) sup(→) F([r sup(→) - tau sup(→)]) over a Brafais lattice [r sup(→)] in arbitrary dimensions. (Author) [pt

  5. An improved method to simulate water and biological tissues in relation to linear interactions with photons and fast electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geske, G.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation physical problems in clinical dosimetry often need for their experimental solution the linear coefficients of interaction between radiation and irradiated matter. Using modified material parameters (the products of mass density and the earlier defined effective material parameters) it was possible to derive an improved method to calculate the composition of an equivalent for a material to be substituted. The method is described and its usefulness demonstrated by some examples. A geometric analogue facilitates the solution if a computer is not available. Some comparisons are made between this method and the basic data method of White. (orig.) [de

  6. Application of discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo methods to transport of photons from environmental sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryman, J.C.; Eckerman, K.F.; Shultis, J.K.; Faw, R.E.; Dillman, L.T.

    1996-01-01

    Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. Although the dose coefficients of this report are based on previously developed dosimetric methodologies, they are derived from new, detailed calculations of energy and angular distributions of the radiations incident on the body and the transport of these radiations within the body. Effort was devoted to expanding the information available for assessment of radiation dose from radionuclides distributed on or below the surface of the ground. A companion paper (External Exposure to Radionuclides in Air, Water, and Soil) discusses the significance of the new tabulations of coefficients and provides detiled comparisons to previously published values. This paper discusses details of the photon transport calculations

  7. Methods and devices for maintaining a resonant wavelength of a photonic microresonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adam; Zortman, William A.

    2015-07-14

    A photonic microresonator incorporates a localized heater element within a section of an optical bus waveguide that is in proximity to the resonator structure. The application of an adjustable control voltage to the heater element provides a localized change in the refractive index value of the bus waveguide, compensating for temperature-induced wavelength drift and maintaining a stabilized value of the microresonator's resonant wavelength.

  8. Considering soil-structure interaction effects in the equivalent static analysis method of the Iranian of the Iranian seismic building code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakib, H.; Dehghani Ashkezari, G.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, based on the equivalent static analysis method of the Iranian seismic code, an algorithm is presented to consider the soil-structure interaction (SSI) effects. Modifications of free field motion and structural properties like period and damping due to soil situation are considered in the proposed algorithm. An increase for fundamental period of structure and a modification (usually increase) for it's effective damping are observed. The increase of period is due to the flexibility of the soil foundation and modification of damping is due to the dissipating energy in soil. In order to propose the relative expressions in the presented algorithm, the soil-structure analyses of 8, 10, 13 and 16 stories frames are carried out. By considering the NEHRP soil-structure interaction algorithm and findings of soil-structure interaction analyses carried out in this study, the algorithm based on the equivalent static analysis method of the Iranian seismic building code to consider the effect of soil-structure interaction

  9. An Iterative Method to Derive the Equivalent Centrifugal Compressor Performance at Various Operating Conditions: Part I: Modelling of Suction Parameters Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Albusaidi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new iterative method to predict the equivalent centrifugal compressor performance at various operating conditions. The presented theoretical analysis and empirical correlations provide a novel approach to derive the entire compressor map corresponding to various suction conditions without a prior knowledge of the detailed geometry. The efficiency model was derived to reflect the impact of physical gas properties, Mach number, and flow and work coefficients. One of the main features of the developed technique is the fact that it considers the variation in the gas properties and stage efficiency which makes it appropriate with hydrocarbons. This method has been tested to predict the performance of two multistage centrifugal compressors and the estimated characteristics are compared with the measured data. The carried comparison revealed a good matching with the actual values, including the stable operation region limits. Furthermore, an optimization study was conducted to investigate the influences of suction conditions on the stage efficiency and surge margin. Moreover, a new sort of presentation has been generated to obtain the equivalent performance characteristics for a constant discharge pressure operation at variable suction pressure and temperature working conditions. A further validation is included in part two of this study in order to evaluate the prediction capability of the derived model at various gas compositions.

  10. Thermal/optical methods for elemental carbon quantification in soils and urban dusts: equivalence of different analysis protocols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Han

    Full Text Available Quantifying elemental carbon (EC content in geological samples is challenging due to interferences of crustal, salt, and organic material. Thermal/optical analysis, combined with acid pretreatment, represents a feasible approach. However, the consistency of various thermal/optical analysis protocols for this type of samples has never been examined. In this study, urban street dust and soil samples from Baoji, China were pretreated with acids and analyzed with four thermal/optical protocols to investigate how analytical conditions and optical correction affect EC measurement. The EC values measured with reflectance correction (ECR were found always higher and less sensitive to temperature program than the EC values measured with transmittance correction (ECT. A high-temperature method with extended heating times (STN120 showed the highest ECT/ECR ratio (0.86 while a low-temperature protocol (IMPROVE-550, with heating time adjusted for sample loading, showed the lowest (0.53. STN ECT was higher than IMPROVE ECT, in contrast to results from aerosol samples. A higher peak inert-mode temperature and extended heating times can elevate ECT/ECR ratios for pretreated geological samples by promoting pyrolyzed organic carbon (PyOC removal over EC under trace levels of oxygen. Considering that PyOC within filter increases ECR while decreases ECT from the actual EC levels, simultaneous ECR and ECT measurements would constrain the range of EC loading and provide information on method performance. Further testing with standard reference materials of common environmental matrices supports the findings. Char and soot fractions of EC can be further separated using the IMPROVE protocol. The char/soot ratio was lower in street dusts (2.2 on average than in soils (5.2 on average, most likely reflecting motor vehicle emissions. The soot concentrations agreed with EC from CTO-375, a pure thermal method.

  11. Thermal/optical methods for elemental carbon quantification in soils and urban dusts: equivalence of different analysis protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongming; Chen, Antony; Cao, Junji; Fung, Kochy; Ho, Fai; Yan, Beizhan; Zhan, Changlin; Liu, Suixin; Wei, Chong; An, Zhisheng

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying elemental carbon (EC) content in geological samples is challenging due to interferences of crustal, salt, and organic material. Thermal/optical analysis, combined with acid pretreatment, represents a feasible approach. However, the consistency of various thermal/optical analysis protocols for this type of samples has never been examined. In this study, urban street dust and soil samples from Baoji, China were pretreated with acids and analyzed with four thermal/optical protocols to investigate how analytical conditions and optical correction affect EC measurement. The EC values measured with reflectance correction (ECR) were found always higher and less sensitive to temperature program than the EC values measured with transmittance correction (ECT). A high-temperature method with extended heating times (STN120) showed the highest ECT/ECR ratio (0.86) while a low-temperature protocol (IMPROVE-550), with heating time adjusted for sample loading, showed the lowest (0.53). STN ECT was higher than IMPROVE ECT, in contrast to results from aerosol samples. A higher peak inert-mode temperature and extended heating times can elevate ECT/ECR ratios for pretreated geological samples by promoting pyrolyzed organic carbon (PyOC) removal over EC under trace levels of oxygen. Considering that PyOC within filter increases ECR while decreases ECT from the actual EC levels, simultaneous ECR and ECT measurements would constrain the range of EC loading and provide information on method performance. Further testing with standard reference materials of common environmental matrices supports the findings. Char and soot fractions of EC can be further separated using the IMPROVE protocol. The char/soot ratio was lower in street dusts (2.2 on average) than in soils (5.2 on average), most likely reflecting motor vehicle emissions. The soot concentrations agreed with EC from CTO-375, a pure thermal method.

  12. Using Correlated Photons to Suppress Background Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Deborah; Hockney, George; Dowling, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    A proposed method of suppressing the effect of background noise in an optical communication system would exploit the transmission and reception of correlated photons at the receiver. The method would not afford any advantage in a system in which performance is limited by shot noise. However, if the performance of the system is limited by background noise (e.g., sunlight in the case of a free-space optical communication system or incoherently scattered in-band photons in the case of a fiber-optic communication system), then the proposed method could offer an advantage: the proposed method would make it possible to achieve a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) significantly greater than that of an otherwise equivalent background- noise-limited optical communication system based on the classical transmission and reception of uncorrelated photons. The figure schematically depicts a classical optical-communication system and a system according to the proposed method. In the classical system, a modulated laser beam is transmitted along an optical path to a receiver, the optics of which include a narrow-band-pass filter that suppresses some of the background noise. A photodetector in the receiver detects the laser-beam and background photons, most or all of which are uncorrelated. In the proposed system, correlated photons would be generated at the transmitter by making a modulated laser beam pass through a nonlinear parametric down-conversion crystal. The sum of frequencies of the correlated photons in each pair would equal the frequency of the incident photon from which they were generated. As in the classical system, the correlated photons would travel along an optical path to a receiver, where they would be band-pass filtered and detected. Unlike in the classical system, the photodetector in the receiver in this system would be one that intrinsically favors the detection of pairs of correlated photons over the detection of uncorrelated photons. Even though there would be no

  13. Simulation of neutron transport process, photons and charged particles within the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsenko, A.A.; Androsenko, P.A.; Artamonov, S.N.; Bolonkina, G.V.; Lomtev, V.L.; Pupko, S.V.

    1991-01-01

    Description is given to the program system BRAND designed for the accurate solution of non-stationary transport equation of neutrons, photons and charged particles in the conditions of real three-dimensional geometry. An extensive set of local and non-local estimates provides an opportunity of calculating a great set of linear functionals normally being of interest in the calculation of reactors, radiation protection and experiment simulation. The process of particle interaction with substance is simulated on the basis of individual non-group data on each isotope of the composition. 24 refs

  14. Processing method of images obtained during the TESIS/CORONAS-PHOTON experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, S. V.; Shestov, S. V.; Bogachev, S. A.; Pertsov, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Reva, A. A.

    2011-04-01

    In January 2009, the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft was successfully launched. It includes a set of telescopes and spectroheliometers—TESIS—designed to image the solar corona in soft X-ray and EUV spectral ranges. Due to features of the reading system, to obtain physical information from these images, it is necessary to preprocess them, i.e., to remove the background, correct the white field, level, and clean. The paper discusses the algorithms and software developed and used for the preprocessing of images.

  15. Modelling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shieldings by the Monte Carlo method - Version 2

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaite, A; Plukiene, R; Plukis, A

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC and ISIS-800 – high energy neutrons (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The results were then compared with experimental data.

  16. Specific absorbed fractions of electrons and photons for Rad-HUMAN phantom using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wen; Hu Liqin; Cheng Mengyun; Long Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    The specific absorbed fractions (SAF) for self- and cross-irradiation are effective tools for the internal dose estimation of inhalation and ingestion intakes of radionuclides. A set of SAFs of photons and electrons were calculated using the Rad-HUMAN phantom, which is a computational voxel phantom of a Chinese adult female that was created using the color photographic image of the Chinese Visible Human (CVH) data set by the FDS Team. The model can represent most Chinese adult female anatomical characteristics and can be taken as an individual phantom to investigate the difference of internal dose with Caucasians. In this study, the emission of mono-energetic photons and electrons of 10 keV to 4 MeV energy were calculated using the Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code MCNP. Results were compared with the values from ICRP reference and ORNL models. The results showed that SAF from the Rad-HUMAN have similar trends but are larger than those from the other two models. The differences were due to the racial and anatomical differences in organ mass and inter-organ distance. The SAFs based on the Rad-HUMAN phantom provide an accurate and reliable data for internal radiation dose calculations for Chinese females. (authors)

  17. The calibration method for personal dosimetry system in photon and neutron radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trousil, J; Plichta, J [CSOD, Prague (Czech Republic); Nikodemova, D [SOD, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The type testing of dosimetry system was performed with standard photon radiation fields within the energy range 15 keV to 1.25 MeV and electron radiation fields within the range 0.2 MeV to 3 MeV. For type testing of neutron dosimeters {sup 252}Cf and {sup 241}Am-Be radionuclide neutron sources was used, as well as a 14 MeV neutron generator. The neutron sources moderated by various moderating and absorbing materials was also used. The routine calibration of individual photon dosemeters was carried out using a {sup 137}Cs calibration source in the air kerma quality in the dose range 0.2 mGy to 6 Gy. The type testing of neutron dosemeters was performed in collaboration with Nueherberg laboratory on neutron generator with neutron energies -.57; 1.0;; 5.3 and 15.1 MeV. The fading and angular dependence testing was also included in the tests of both dosemeter systems. (J.K.).

  18. Classification Method to Define Synchronization Capability Limits of Line-Start Permanent-Magnet Motor Using Mesh-Based Magnetic Equivalent Circuit Computation Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Wymeersch

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Line start permanent magnet synchronous motors (LS-PMSM are energy-efficient synchronous motors that can start asynchronously due to a squirrel cage in the rotor. The drawback, however, with this motor type is the chance of failure to synchronize after start-up. To identify the problem, and the stable operation limits, the synchronization at various parameter combinations is investigated. For accurate knowledge of the operation limits to assure synchronization with the utility grid, an accurate classification of parameter combinations is needed. As for this, many simulations have to be executed, a rapid evaluation method is indispensable. To simulate the dynamic behavior in the time domain, several modeling methods exist. In this paper, a discussion is held with respect to different modeling methods. In order to include spatial factors and magnetic nonlinearities, on the one hand, and to restrict the computation time on the other hand, a magnetic equivalent circuit (MEC modeling method is developed. In order to accelerate numerical convergence, a mesh-based analysis method is applied. The novelty in this paper is the implementation of support vector machine (SVM to classify the results of simulations at various parameter combinations into successful or unsuccessful synchronization, in order to define the synchronization capability limits. It is explained how these techniques can benefit the simulation time and the evaluation process. The results of the MEC modeling correspond to those obtained with finite element analysis (FEA, despite the reduced computation time. In addition, simulation results obtained with MEC modeling are experimentally validated.

  19. Dose equivalent distribution during occupational exposure in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco H, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this work are presented the results of the radiological surveillance of occupationally exposed workers at the National Institute of Oncology and Radiology during 26 years. The incidence of the equivalent dose in the personal working with radiant sources and radioactive substances in areas of x rays diagnostic, teletherapy, brachytherapy, nuclear medicine and biomedical research was showed. The employed dosimetric system makes use of ORWO RD3/RD4 monitoring film with copper and lead filters inside a plastic cassette manufactured in Cuba. The experimental method is supported by the optical densitometric analysis of films together with a set of standard film calibrated in standard X and gamma photon beams by means of a secondary standard dosimeter, type NPL. Statistics show that except those workings with radium-226, manual brachytherapy or Mo-99/Tc-99 generator elution, the equivalent dose distribution in our workers has been kept in regions well down the annual permissible limit. (authors). 6 refs., 3 tabs

  20. Assessment of penetration of quantum dots through in vitro and in vivo human skin using the human skin equivalent model and the tape stripping method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jae Hwan; Yi, Sang Min; Lee, Jung Pyo; Kim, Jin Ho; Sohn, Kyung Hee; Park, Kui Lea; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Son, Sang Wook

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are rapidly emerging as an important class of nanoparticles (NPs) with potential applications in medicine. However, little is known about penetration of QDs through human skin. This study investigated skin penetration of QDs in both in vivo and in vitro human skin. Using the tape stripping method, this study demonstrates for the first time that QDs can actually penetrate through the stratum corneum (SC) of human skin. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy diverse X-ray (EDX) analysis showed accumulation of QDs in the SC of a human skin equivalent model (HSEM) after dermal exposure to QDs. These findings suggest possible transdermal absorption of QDs after dermal exposure over a relatively long period of time.

  1. Photon absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkema, R.; Blokland, J.A.K.; Papapoulos, S.E.; Bijvoet, O.L.M.; Pauwels, E.K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a significant health problem in the western world, with important medical, social and economical consequences. Prevention and treatment require reliable methods for in vivo monitoring of the bone mineral content (BMC) and its change in time. This paper presents an overview of currently used radiological methods, based on photon absorptiometry, and their clinical applications. With recent methods based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry accurate and precise measurements of axial BMC can be obtained. Whether this improvements allows reliable detection of small changes in BMC remains to be investigated. (Author). 95 refs.; 1 tab

  2. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The current status, both theoretical and experimental, of two photon collision physics is reviewed with special emphasis on recent experimental results from e + e - storage rings. After a complete presentation of the helicity amplitude formalism for the general process e + e - → Xe + e - , various approximations (transverse photon, Weisaecker Williams) are discussed. Beam polarisation effects and radiative corrections are also briefly considered. A number of specific processes, for which experimental results are now available, are then described. In each case existing theoretical prediction are confronted with experimental results. The processes described include single resonance production, lepton and hadron pair production, the structure functions of the photon, the production of high Psub(T) jets and the total photon photon cross section. In the last part of the review the current status of the subject is summarised and some comments are made on future prospects. These include both extrapolations of current research to higher energy machines (LEP, HERA) as well as a brief mention of both the technical realisation and the physics interest of the real γγ and eγ collisions which may be possible using linear electron colliders in the 1 TeV energy range

  3. 40 CFR Table E-1 to Subpart E of... - Summary of Test Requirements for Reference and Class I Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 and PM10-2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reference and Class I Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 E Table E-1 to Subpart E of Part 53..., Subpt. E, Table E-1 Table E-1 to Subpart E of Part 53—Summary of Test Requirements for Reference and Class I Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Subpart E procedure Performance test Performance...

  4. A method for photon beam Monte Carlo multileaf collimator particle transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Keall, Paul J.; Kim, Jong Oh; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms are recognized as the most accurate methodology for patient dose assessment. For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered with dynamic multileaf collimators (DMLCs), accurate dose calculation, even with MC, is challenging. Accurate IMRT MC dose calculations require inclusion of the moving MLC in the MC simulation. Due to its complex geometry, full transport through the MLC can be time consuming. The aim of this work was to develop an MLC model for photon beam MC IMRT dose computations. The basis of the MC MLC model is that the complex MLC geometry can be separated into simple geometric regions, each of which readily lends itself to simplified radiation transport. For photons, only attenuation and first Compton scatter interactions are considered. The amount of attenuation material an individual particle encounters while traversing the entire MLC is determined by adding the individual amounts from each of the simplified geometric regions. Compton scatter is sampled based upon the total thickness traversed. Pair production and electron interactions (scattering and bremsstrahlung) within the MLC are ignored. The MLC model was tested for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams by comparing it with measurements and MC simulations that incorporate the full physics and geometry for fields blocked by the MLC and with measurements for fields with the maximum possible tongue-and-groove and tongue-or-groove effects, for static test cases and for sliding windows of various widths. The MLC model predicts the field size dependence of the MLC leakage radiation within 0.1% of the open-field dose. The entrance dose and beam hardening behind a closed MLC are predicted within +/-1% or 1 mm. Dose undulations due to differences in inter- and intra-leaf leakage are also correctly predicted. The MC MLC model predicts leaf-edge tongue-and-groove dose effect within +/-1% or 1 mm for 95% of the points compared at 6 MV and 88% of the points compared at 18 MV

  5. A method for photon beam Monte Carlo multileaf collimator particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)]. E-mail: jsiebers@vcu.edu; Keall, Paul J.; Kim, Jong Oh; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2002-09-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms are recognized as the most accurate methodology for patient dose assessment. For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered with dynamic multileaf collimators (DMLCs), accurate dose calculation, even with MC, is challenging. Accurate IMRT MC dose calculations require inclusion of the moving MLC in the MC simulation. Due to its complex geometry, full transport through the MLC can be time consuming. The aim of this work was to develop an MLC model for photon beam MC IMRT dose computations. The basis of the MC MLC model is that the complex MLC geometry can be separated into simple geometric regions, each of which readily lends itself to simplified radiation transport. For photons, only attenuation and first Compton scatter interactions are considered. The amount of attenuation material an individual particle encounters while traversing the entire MLC is determined by adding the individual amounts from each of the simplified geometric regions. Compton scatter is sampled based upon the total thickness traversed. Pair production and electron interactions (scattering and bremsstrahlung) within the MLC are ignored. The MLC model was tested for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams by comparing it with measurements and MC simulations that incorporate the full physics and geometry for fields blocked by the MLC and with measurements for fields with the maximum possible tongue-and-groove and tongue-or-groove effects, for static test cases and for sliding windows of various widths. The MLC model predicts the field size dependence of the MLC leakage radiation within 0.1% of the open-field dose. The entrance dose and beam hardening behind a closed MLC are predicted within {+-}1% or 1 mm. Dose undulations due to differences in inter- and intra-leaf leakage are also correctly predicted. The MC MLC model predicts leaf-edge tongue-and-groove dose effect within {+-}1% or 1 mm for 95% of the points compared at 6 MV and 88% of the points compared at 18 MV

  6. Electron and Photon ID

    CERN Document Server

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The identification of prompt photons and the rejection of background coming mostly from photons from hadron decays relies on the high granularity of the ATLAS calorimeter. The electron identification used in ATLAS for run 2 is based on a likelihood discrimination to separate isolated electron candidates from candidates originating from photon conversions, hadron misidentification and heavy flavor decays. In addition, isolation variables are used as further handles to separate signal and background. Several methods are used to measure with data the efficiency of the photon identification requirements, to cover a broad energy spectrum. At low energy, photons from radiative Z decays are used. In the medium energy range, similarities between electrons and photon showers are exploited using Z->ee decays. At high energy, inclusive photon samples are used. The measurement of the efficiencies of the electron identification and isolation cuts are performed with the data using tag and probe techniques with large statis...

  7. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  8. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  9. The simultaneous neutron and photon interrogation method for fissile and non-fissile element separation in radioactive waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jallu, F.; Lyoussi, A.; Passard, C.; Payan, E.; Recroix, H.; Nurdin, G.; Buisson, A.; Allano, J.

    2000-01-01

    Measuring α-emitters such as ( 234,235,236,238 U, 238,239,240,242,244 Pu, 237 Np, 241,243 Am, ...), in solid radioactive waste allows us to quantify the α-activity in a drum and then to classify it. The simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation experiment (SIMPHONIE) method dealt with in this paper, combines both active neutron interrogation and induced photofission interrogation techniques simultaneously. Its purpose is to quantify fissile ( 235 U, 239,241 Pu, ...) and non-fissile ( 236,238 U, 238,240 Pu, ...) elements separately in only one measurement. This paper presents the principle of the method, the experimental setup, and the first experimental results obtained using the DGA/ETCA Linac and MiniLinatron pulsed linear electron accelerators located at Arcueil, France. First studies were carried out with U and Pu bare samples

  10. Band structure of one-dimensional doped photonic crystal with three level atoms using the Fresnel coefficients method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, A.; Rahmat, A.; Bakkeshizadeh, S.

    2018-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) composed of double-layered dielectrics. Electric permittivity and magnetic permeability of this crystal depends on the incident electromagnetic wave frequency. We suppose that three level atoms have been added to the second layer of each dielectric and this photonic crystal (PC) has been doped. These atoms can be added to the layer with different rates. In this paper, we have calculated and compared the band structure of the mentioned PC considering the effect of added atoms to the second layer with different rates through the Fresnel coefficients method. We find out that according to the effective medium theory, the electric permittivity of the second layer changes. Also the band structure of PC for both TE and TM polarizations changes, too. The width of bandgaps related to “zero averaged refractive index” and “Bragg” increases. Moreover, new gap branches appear in new frequencies at both TE and TM polarizations. In specific state, two branches of “zero permittivity” gap appear in the PC band structure related to TM polarization. With increasing the amount of the filling rate of total volume with three level atoms, we observe a lot of changes in the PC band structure.

  11. Angular dependence of depth doses in a tissue slab irradiated with monoenergetic photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, E.; Zankl, M.; Drexler, G.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents dose equivalents from external photon irradiation, normalised to air kerma free in air, on the central axis of a cuboid slab of ICRU tissue for various depths, photon energies and angles of beam incidence. The data were calculated by a Monte Carlo method using an idealised planar parallel source of monoenergetic photons. The data presented here aim at facilitating the calibration of individual dosimeters; they provide also an estimate of the quantity 'personal dose equivalent' defined by the ICRU. A detailed evaluation of the dependence of the calculated conversion coefficients on depth in the slab, photon energy and angle of incidence is given. A comparison with published measured an calculated values of angular dependence factors is made. (orig.)

  12. Application of structural symmetries in the plane-wave-based transfer-matrix method for three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhiyuan; Ho Kaiming

    2003-01-01

    The plane-wave-based transfer-matrix method (TMM) exhibits a peculiar advantage of being capable of solving eigenmodes involved in an infinite photonic crystal and electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in finite photonic crystal slabs or even semi-infinite photonic crystal structures within the same theoretical framework. In addition, this theoretical approach can achieve much improved numerical convergency in solution of photonic band structures than the conventional plane-wave expansion method. In this paper we employ this TMM in combination with a supercell technique to handle two important kinds of three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal waveguide structures. The first one is waveguides created in a 3D layer-by-layer photonic crystal that possesses a complete band gap, the other more popular one is waveguides built in a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab. These waveguides usually have mirror-reflection symmetries in one or two directions perpendicular to their axis. We have taken advantage of these structural symmetries to reduce the numerical burden of the TMM solution of the guided modes. The solution to the EM problems under these mirror-reflection symmetries in both the real space and the plane-wave space is discussed in a systematic way and in great detail. Both the periodic boundary condition and the absorbing boundary condition are employed to investigate structures with or without complete 3D optical confinement. The fact that the EM field components investigated in the TMM are collinear with the symmetric axes of the waveguide brings great convenience and clarity in exploring the eigenmode symmetry in both the real space and the plane-wave space. The classification of symmetry involved in the guided modes can help people to better understand the coupling of the photonic crystal waveguides with external channels such as dielectric slab or wire waveguides

  13. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 7. Organ doses due to parallel and environmental exposure geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zankl, M. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Drexler, G. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Petoussi-Henss, N. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Saito, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a tabulation of organ and tissue equivalent dose as well as effective dose conversion coefficients, normalised to air kerma free in air, for occupational exposures and environmental exposures of the public to external photon radiation. For occupational exposures, whole-body irradiation with idealised geometries, i.e. broad parallel beams and fully isotropic radiation incidence, is considered. The directions of incidence for the parallel beams are anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral and a full 360 rotation around the body`s longitudinal axis. The influence of beam divergence on the body doses is also considered as well as the dependence of effective dose on the angle of radiation incidence. Regarding exposure of the public to environmental sources, three source geometries are considered: exposure from a radioactive cloud, from ground contamination and from the natural radionuclides distributed homogeneously in the ground. The precise angular and energy distributions of the gamma rays incident on the human body were taken into account. The organ dose conversion coefficients given in this catalogue were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the photon transport in mathematical models of an adult male and an adult female, respectively. Conversion coefficients are given for the equivalent dose of 23 organs and tissues as well as for effective dose and the equivalent dose of the so-called `remainder`. The organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given separately for the adult male and female models and - as arithmetic mean of the conversion coefficients of both - for an average adult. Fitted data of the coefficients are presented in tables; the primary raw data as resulting from the Monte Carlo calculation are shown in figures together with the fitted data. (orig.)

  14. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 7. Organ doses due to parallel and environmental exposure geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zankl, M.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a tabulation of organ and tissue equivalent dose as well as effective dose conversion coefficients, normalised to air kerma free in air, for occupational exposures and environmental exposures of the public to external photon radiation. For occupational exposures, whole-body irradiation with idealised geometries, i.e. broad parallel beams and fully isotropic radiation incidence, is considered. The directions of incidence for the parallel beams are anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral and a full 360 rotation around the body's longitudinal axis. The influence of beam divergence on the body doses is also considered as well as the dependence of effective dose on the angle of radiation incidence. Regarding exposure of the public to environmental sources, three source geometries are considered: exposure from a radioactive cloud, from ground contamination and from the natural radionuclides distributed homogeneously in the ground. The precise angular and energy distributions of the gamma rays incident on the human body were taken into account. The organ dose conversion coefficients given in this catalogue were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the photon transport in mathematical models of an adult male and an adult female, respectively. Conversion coefficients are given for the equivalent dose of 23 organs and tissues as well as for effective dose and the equivalent dose of the so-called 'remainder'. The organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given separately for the adult male and female models and - as arithmetic mean of the conversion coefficients of both - for an average adult. Fitted data of the coefficients are presented in tables; the primary raw data as resulting from the Monte Carlo calculation are shown in figures together with the fitted data. (orig.)

  15. Implementation and development of methods for quantification of cerebral blood flow in absolute units using single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Moreno, Rogelio Manuel; Sanchez Catasus, Carlos; Aguila Ruiz, Angel; Samper, J; Llibre, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to implement the graphical and spectral methods of quantification of cerebral blood flow in absolute units with Single photon emission computered tomography and compare the results of its application. Also, a third method was developed to calculate blood flow, modifying the spectral method. The obtained flow values were 43.6 + 6.1 ml/min/100 g; 43.3+ 8.2 ml/min/100 g and 43.0+4.7 ml/min/100 g, respectively. We conclude that these methods are easy, non invasive and can be made in our country's technological conditions. The main innovation in this work was the modification of the spectral method, with which it is possible to avoid some of the difficulties arisen in the other methods. Also, the use of the software allows high reproducibility and efficiency on the process. These methods can become a valuable tool to enhance clinical diagnosis and important biomedical research. (Author)

  16. Equi-frequency contour of photonic crystals with the extended Dirichlet-to-Neumann wave vector eigenvalue equation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Bin; Zhang Yejing; Wang Yufei; Liu Anjin; Zheng Wanhua

    2012-01-01

    We present the extended Dirichlet-to-Neumann wave vector eigenvalue equation (DtN-WVEE) method to calculate the equi-frequency contour (EFC) of square lattice photonic crystals (PhCs). With the extended DtN-WVEE method and Snell's law, the effective refractive index of the mode with a circular EFC can be obtained, which is further validated with the refractive index weighted by the electric field or magnetic field. To further verify the EFC calculated by the DtN-WVEE method, the finite-difference time-domain method is also used. Compared with other wave vector eigenvalue equation methods that calculate EFC directly, the size of the eigenmatrix used in the DtN-WVEE method is much smaller, and the computation time is significantly reduced. Since the DtN-WVEE method solves wave vectors for given arbitrary frequencies, it can also find applications in studying the optical properties of a PhC with dispersive, lossy and magnetic materials. (paper)

  17. Quantification of Fissile Materials by Photon Activation Method in a Highly Shielded Enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dighe, P.M.; Pithawa, C.K.; Goswami, A.; Dixit, K.P.; Mittal, K.C.; Sunil, C.; Sarkar, P.K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Patil, R.K.; Srivastava, G.P.; Ganesan, S.; Venugopal, V.

    2010-01-01

    For active and non-destructive quantitative identification of heavily shielded fissile materials, photo fission is one of the most often used techniques. High energy photon beams can be conveniently generated with the help of electron LINACs. 10MeV energy electron LINACs are extensively used for various industrial applications such as food irradiation, X-ray radiography, etc. The radiological safety consideration favours the use of electron beam of upto 10 MeV energy. The photonuclear data available on 10 MeV end point energy is very scarce. The present paper gives the results of our initial experiments carried out using natural uranium samples at 10 MeV LINAC facility. Water cooled tantalum target converter was used to produce intense Bremsstrahlung to induce photofission in the samples. Neutron detection system consists of six numbers of high sensitivity Helium-3 proportional counters and gamma detection system consists of two numbers of 76 mm diameter BGO scintillators. Delayed neutron and delayed gamma radiations were measured and analyzed. The mass to count rate relationship has been established for both delayed neutron and gamma radiations. Delayed gamma decay constants of natural uranium have been derived for the 10 MeV end point energy. (author)

  18. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Rebecca D. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility encompassing approximately 800 square kilometers near Aiken, South Carolina which began operations in the 1950's with the mission to produce nuclear materials. The SRS contains fifty-one tanks (2 stabilized, 49 yet to be closed) distributed between two liquid radioactive waste storage facilities at SRS containing carbon steel underground tanks with storage capacities ranging from 2,800,000 to 4,900,000 liters. Treatment of the liquid waste from these tanks is essential both to closing older tanks and to maintaining space needed to treat the waste that is eventually vitrified or disposed of onsite. Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) provides the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), a methodology to determine that certain waste resulting from prior reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are not high-level radioactive waste if it can be demonstrated that the waste meets the criteria set forth in Section 3116(a) of the NDAA. The Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, signed a determination in January 2006, pursuant to Section 3116(a) of the NDAA, for salt waste disposal at the SRS Saltstone Disposal Facility. This determination is based, in part, on the Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site and supporting references, a document that describes the planned methods of liquid waste treatment and the resulting waste streams. The document provides descriptions of the proposed methods for processing salt waste, dividing them into 'Interim Salt Processing' and later processing through the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Interim Salt Processing is separated into Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) and Actinide Removal Process/Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU). The Waste Determination was signed

  19. Technical Note: Radiation properties of tissue- and water-equivalent materials formulated using the stoichiometric analysis method in charged particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohannes, Indra; Vasiliniuc, Stefan [Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Hild, Sebastian [Faculty of Medicine, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen 91054, Germany and Department of Biophysics, GSI - Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Langner, Oliver [QRM - Quality Assurance in Radiology and Medicine GmbH, Möhrendorf 91096 (Germany); Graeff, Christian [Department of Biophysics, GSI - Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Bert, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.bert@uk-erlangen.de [Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Faculty of Medicine, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Department of Biophysics, GSI - Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Five tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) mimicking ICRU real tissues have been formulated using a previously established stoichiometric analysis method (SAM) to be applied in charged particle therapy. The purpose of this study was an experimental verification of the TEMs-SAM against charged particle beam measurements and for different computed tomography (CT) scanners. The potential of the TEMs-SAM to be employed in the dosimetry was also investigated. Methods: Experimental verification with three CT scanners was carried out to validate the calculated Hounsfield units (HUs) of the TEMs. Water-equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) of the TEMs for proton (106.8 MeV/u), helium (107.93 MeV/u), and carbon (200.3 MeV/u) ions were measured to be compared with the computed relative stopping powers. HU calibration curves were also generated. Results: Differences between the measured HUs of the TEMs and the calculated HUs of the ICRU real tissues for all CT scanners were smaller than 4 HU except for the skeletal tissues which deviated up to 21 HU. The measured WEPLs verified the calculated WEPLs of the TEMs (maximum deviation was 0.17 mm) and were in good agreement with the calculated WEPLs of the ICRU real tissues (maximum deviation was 0.23 mm). Moreover, the relative stopping powers converted from the measured WEPLs differed less than 0.8% and 1.3% from the calculated values of the SAM and the ICRU, respectively. Regarding the relative nonelastic cross section per unit of volume for 200 MeV protons, the ICRU real tissues were generally well represented by the TEMs except for adipose which differed 3.8%. Further, the HU calibration curves yielded the mean and the standard deviation of the errors not larger than 0.5% and 1.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this investigation implied the potential of the TEMs formulated using the SAM to be employed for both, beam dosimetry and HU calibration in charged particle therapy.

  20. Technical Note: Radiation properties of tissue- and water-equivalent materials formulated using the stoichiometric analysis method in charged particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yohannes, Indra; Vasiliniuc, Stefan; Hild, Sebastian; Langner, Oliver; Graeff, Christian; Bert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Five tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) mimicking ICRU real tissues have been formulated using a previously established stoichiometric analysis method (SAM) to be applied in charged particle therapy. The purpose of this study was an experimental verification of the TEMs-SAM against charged particle beam measurements and for different computed tomography (CT) scanners. The potential of the TEMs-SAM to be employed in the dosimetry was also investigated. Methods: Experimental verification with three CT scanners was carried out to validate the calculated Hounsfield units (HUs) of the TEMs. Water-equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) of the TEMs for proton (106.8 MeV/u), helium (107.93 MeV/u), and carbon (200.3 MeV/u) ions were measured to be compared with the computed relative stopping powers. HU calibration curves were also generated. Results: Differences between the measured HUs of the TEMs and the calculated HUs of the ICRU real tissues for all CT scanners were smaller than 4 HU except for the skeletal tissues which deviated up to 21 HU. The measured WEPLs verified the calculated WEPLs of the TEMs (maximum deviation was 0.17 mm) and were in good agreement with the calculated WEPLs of the ICRU real tissues (maximum deviation was 0.23 mm). Moreover, the relative stopping powers converted from the measured WEPLs differed less than 0.8% and 1.3% from the calculated values of the SAM and the ICRU, respectively. Regarding the relative nonelastic cross section per unit of volume for 200 MeV protons, the ICRU real tissues were generally well represented by the TEMs except for adipose which differed 3.8%. Further, the HU calibration curves yielded the mean and the standard deviation of the errors not larger than 0.5% and 1.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this investigation implied the potential of the TEMs formulated using the SAM to be employed for both, beam dosimetry and HU calibration in charged particle therapy

  1. Photonic band gap engineering in 2D photonic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Applied Physics, Delhi College of Engineering, Faculty of Technology. (University of ... Photonic crystal; photonic band gap; plane-wave expansion method. PACS Nos 71.20 .... Numerical analysis and results. To obtain the ...

  2. Improved method for considering PMU’s uncertainty and its effect on real-time stability assessment methods based on Thevenin equivalent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Angel; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Østergaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    This article characterizes experimentally the relation between phase and magnitude error from Phasor Measurement Units (PMU) in steady state and study its effect on real-time stability assessment methods. This is achieved by a set of laboratory tests applied to four different devices, where...... a bivariate Gaussian mixture distribution was used to represent the error, obtained experimentally, and later include it in the synthesized PMU measurement using the Monte Carlo Method. Two models for including uncertainty are compared and the results show that taking into account the correlation between...

  3. System equivalent model mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Steven W. B.; van der Seijs, Maarten V.; de Klerk, Dennis

    2018-05-01

    This paper introduces SEMM: a method based on Frequency Based Substructuring (FBS) techniques that enables the construction of hybrid dynamic models. With System Equivalent Model Mixing (SEMM) frequency based models, either of numerical or experimental nature, can be mixed to form a hybrid model. This model follows the dynamic behaviour of a predefined weighted master model. A large variety of applications can be thought of, such as the DoF-space expansion of relatively small experimental models using numerical models, or the blending of different models in the frequency spectrum. SEMM is outlined, both mathematically and conceptually, based on a notation commonly used in FBS. A critical physical interpretation of the theory is provided next, along with a comparison to similar techniques; namely DoF expansion techniques. SEMM's concept is further illustrated by means of a numerical example. It will become apparent that the basic method of SEMM has some shortcomings which warrant a few extensions to the method. One of the main applications is tested in a practical case, performed on a validated benchmark structure; it will emphasize the practicality of the method.

  4. Low dose out-of-field radiotherapy, part 2: Calculating the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum from scattered radiation using Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrobala, A; Adamczyk, S; Kruszyna-Mochalska, M; Skórska, M; Konefał, A; Suchorska, W; Zaleska, K; Kowalik, A; Jackowiak, W; Malicki, J

    2017-08-01

    During radiotherapy, leakage from the machine head and collimator expose patients to out-of-field irradiation doses, which may cause secondary cancers. To quantify the risks of secondary cancers due to out-of-field doses, it is first necessary to measure these doses. Since most dosimeters are energy-dependent, it is essential to first determine the type of photon energy spectrum in the out-of-field area. The aim of this study was to determine the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum for a 6 MV photon beam using the GEANT 4-Monte Carlo method. A specially-designed large water phantom was simulated with a static field at gantry 0°. The source-to-surface distance was 92cm for an open field size of 10×10cm2. The photon energy spectra were calculated at five unique positions (at depths of 0.5, 1.6, 4, 6, 8, and 10cm) along the central beam axis and at six different off-axis distances. Monte Carlo simulations showed that mean radiation energy levels drop rapidly beyond the edge of the 6 MV photon beam field: at a distance of 10cm, the mean energy level is close to 0.3MeV versus 1.5MeV at the central beam axis. In some cases, the energy level actually increased even as the distance from the field edge increased: at a depth of 1.6cm and 15cm off-axis, the mean energy level was 0.205MeV versus 0.252MeV at 20cm off-axis. The out-of-field energy spectra and dose distribution data obtained in this study with Monte Carlo methods can be used to calibrate dosimeters to measure out-of-field radiation from 6MV photons. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Complex-envelope alternating-direction-implicit FDTD method for simulating active photonic devices with semiconductor/solid-state media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Ravi, Koustuban; Wang, Qian; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2012-06-15

    A complex-envelope (CE) alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach to treat light-matter interaction self-consistently with electromagnetic field evolution for efficient simulations of active photonic devices is presented for the first time (to our best knowledge). The active medium (AM) is modeled using an efficient multilevel system of carrier rate equations to yield the correct carrier distributions, suitable for modeling semiconductor/solid-state media accurately. To include the AM in the CE-ADI-FDTD method, a first-order differential system involving CE fields in the AM is first set up. The system matrix that includes AM parameters is then split into two time-dependent submatrices that are then used in an efficient ADI splitting formula. The proposed CE-ADI-FDTD approach with AM takes 22% of the time as the approach of the corresponding explicit FDTD, as validated by semiconductor microdisk laser simulations.

  6. Modeling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shields by using Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaitėa, A; Plukienė, R; Ridikas, D

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 (AVF cyclotron of Research Center of Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Japan) – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC (heavy-ion synchrotron of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan) and ISIS-800 (ISIS intensive spallation neutron source facility of the Rutherford Appleton laboratory, UK) – high energy neutron (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The calculation results were then compared with experimental data.compared with experimental data.

  7. A formulation of tissue- and water-equivalent materials using the stoichiometric analysis method for CT-number calibration in radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Indra; Kolditz, Daniel; Langner, Oliver; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-03-01

    Tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) are widely used in quality assurance and calibration procedures, both in radiodiagnostics and radiotherapy. In radiotherapy, particularly, the TEMs are often used for computed tomography (CT) number calibration in treatment planning systems. However, currently available TEMs may not be very accurate in the determination of the calibration curves due to their limitation in mimicking radiation characteristics of the corresponding real tissues in both low- and high-energy ranges. Therefore, we are proposing a new formulation of TEMs using a stoichiometric analysis method to obtain TEMs for the calibration purposes. We combined the stoichiometric calibration and the basic data method to compose base materials to develop TEMs matching standard real tissues from ICRU Report 44 and 46. First, the CT numbers of six materials with known elemental compositions were measured to get constants for the stoichiometric calibration. The results of the stoichiometric calibration were used together with the basic data method to formulate new TEMs. These new TEMs were scanned to validate their CT numbers. The electron density and the stopping power calibration curves were also generated. The absolute differences of the measured CT numbers of the new TEMs were less than 4 HU for the soft tissues and less than 22 HU for the bone compared to the ICRU real tissues. Furthermore, the calculated relative electron density and electron and proton stopping powers of the new TEMs differed by less than 2% from the corresponding ICRU real tissues. The new TEMs which were formulated using the proposed technique increase the simplicity of the calibration process and preserve the accuracy of the stoichiometric calibration simultaneously.

  8. Using gEUD based plan analysis method to evaluate proton vs. photon plans for lung cancer radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyan; Zou, Wei J; Chen, Ting; Yue, Ning J; Jabbour, Salma K; Parikh, Rahul; Zhang, Miao

    2018-03-01

    The goal of this study was to exam the efficacy of current DVH based clinical guidelines draw from photon experience for lung cancer radiation therapy on proton therapy. Comparison proton plans and IMRT plans were generated for 10 lung patients treated in our proton facility. A gEUD based plan evaluation method was developed for plan evaluation. This evaluation method used normal lung gEUD(a) curve in which the model parameter "a" was sampled from the literature reported value. For all patients, the proton plans delivered lower normal lung V 5 Gy with similar V 20 Gy and similar target coverage. Based on current clinical guidelines, proton plans were ranked superior to IMRT plans for all 10 patients. However, the proton and IMRT normal lung gEUD(a) curves crossed for 8 patients within the tested range of "a", which means there was a possibility that proton plan would be worse than IMRT plan for lung sparing. A concept of deficiency index (DI) was introduced to quantify the probability of proton plans doing worse than IMRT plans. By applying threshold on DI, four patients' proton plan was ranked inferior to the IMRT plan. Meanwhile if a threshold to the location of curve crossing was applied, 6 patients' proton plan was ranked inferior to the IMRT plan. The contradictory ranking results between the current clinical guidelines and the gEUD(a) curve analysis demonstrated there is potential pitfalls by applying photon experience directly to the proton world. A comprehensive plan evaluation based on radio-biological models should be carried out to decide if a lung patient would really be benefit from proton therapy. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Estimation of low-level neutron dose-equivalent rate by using extrapolation method for a curie level Am–Be neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gang; Xu, Jiayun; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Neutron radiation protection is an important research area because of the strong radiation biological effect of neutron field. The radiation dose of neutron is closely related to the neutron energy, and the connected relationship is a complex function of energy. For the low-level neutron radiation field (e.g. the Am–Be source), the commonly used commercial neutron dosimeter cannot always reflect the low-level dose rate, which is restricted by its own sensitivity limit and measuring range. In this paper, the intensity distribution of neutron field caused by a curie level Am–Be neutron source was investigated by measuring the count rates obtained through a 3 He proportional counter at different locations around the source. The results indicate that the count rates outside of the source room are negligible compared with the count rates measured in the source room. In the source room, 3 He proportional counter and neutron dosimeter were used to measure the count rates and dose rates respectively at different distances to the source. The results indicate that both the count rates and dose rates decrease exponentially with the increasing distance, and the dose rates measured by a commercial dosimeter are in good agreement with the results calculated by the Geant4 simulation within the inherent errors recommended by ICRP and IEC. Further studies presented in this paper indicate that the low-level neutron dose equivalent rates in the source room increase exponentially with the increasing low-energy neutron count rates when the source is lifted from the shield with different radiation intensities. Based on this relationship as well as the count rates measured at larger distance to the source, the dose rates can be calculated approximately by the extrapolation method. This principle can be used to estimate the low level neutron dose values in the source room which cannot be measured directly by a commercial dosimeter. - Highlights: • The scope of the affected area for

  10. Technical Note: Radiation properties of tissue- and water-equivalent materials formulated using the stoichiometric analysis method in charged particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Indra; Hild, Sebastian; Vasiliniuc, Stefan; Langner, Oliver; Graeff, Christian; Bert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Five tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) mimicking ICRU real tissues have been formulated using a previously established stoichiometric analysis method (SAM) to be applied in charged particle therapy. The purpose of this study was an experimental verification of the TEMs-SAM against charged particle beam measurements and for different computed tomography (CT) scanners. The potential of the TEMs-SAM to be employed in the dosimetry was also investigated. Experimental verification with three CT scanners was carried out to validate the calculated Hounsfield units (HUs) of the TEMs. Water-equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) of the TEMs for proton (106.8 MeV/u), helium (107.93 MeV/u), and carbon (200.3 MeV/u) ions were measured to be compared with the computed relative stopping powers. HU calibration curves were also generated. Differences between the measured HUs of the TEMs and the calculated HUs of the ICRU real tissues for all CT scanners were smaller than 4 HU except for the skeletal tissues which deviated up to 21 HU. The measured WEPLs verified the calculated WEPLs of the TEMs (maximum deviation was 0.17 mm) and were in good agreement with the calculated WEPLs of the ICRU real tissues (maximum deviation was 0.23 mm). Moreover, the relative stopping powers converted from the measured WEPLs differed less than 0.8% and 1.3% from the calculated values of the SAM and the ICRU, respectively. Regarding the relative nonelastic cross section per unit of volume for 200 MeV protons, the ICRU real tissues were generally well represented by the TEMs except for adipose which differed 3.8%. Further, the HU calibration curves yielded the mean and the standard deviation of the errors not larger than 0.5% and 1.9%, respectively. The results of this investigation implied the potential of the TEMs formulated using the SAM to be employed for both, beam dosimetry and HU calibration in charged particle therapy.

  11. One-loop calculations of photon splitting in a relativistic quantum plasma by the Green function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Lya Insera, V.; Ferrer, Eh.; Shabad, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    Homogeneous and isotopic plasma of electrons and positrons is considered. Coefficients of covariant expansion of three-photon vertex in one-loop approximation of a technique of the Green temperature functions have been calculated and as a result amplitudes of different processes probability with the participation of three photons giving the data on the polarization state probability of incoming and outgoing photons in the splitting process. Sequences of all exact symmetries, which must be accomplished for vertex tensor, have been checked from calculational results. A case of charge-symmetrical plasma and a special case of photon collinearity have been considered

  12. New all-optical method for measuring molecular permanent dipole moment difference using two-photon absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebane, A.; Drobizhev, M.; Makarov, N.S.; Beuerman, E.; Tillo, S.; Hughes, T.

    2010-01-01

    Stark effect, in combination with spectral hole burning and single-molecule spectroscopy, has been a fruitful technique to study permanent electric dipole moment of molecules in condensed phase. However, because measuring Stark shifts relies on external fields and narrow line- or hole-widths, the applicability of this method at ambient conditions required by most biological systems has remained limited. Here we demonstrate a new all-optical method for measuring the molecular dipole moment difference between ground and excited states using two-photon absorption (2PA) spectroscopy. We show that the value and orientation of the static dipole moment difference can be determined from the corresponding absolute 2PA cross-section. We use this new method to determine for the first time the strength of local electric field E loc =0.1-1.0x10 8 V/cm inside beta-barrel of Fruit series of red fluorescent proteins. Because our method does not rely on external field and is applicable in liquid solutions, it is well suited for the study of biological systems.

  13. Numerical method to optimize the polar-azimuthal orientation of infrared superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csete, Mária; Sipos, Áron; Najafi, Faraz; Hu, Xiaolong; Berggren, Karl K

    2011-11-01

    A finite-element method for calculating the illumination-dependence of absorption in three-dimensional nanostructures is presented based on the radio frequency module of the Comsol Multiphysics software package (Comsol AB). This method is capable of numerically determining the optical response and near-field distribution of subwavelength periodic structures as a function of illumination orientations specified by polar angle, φ, and azimuthal angle, γ. The method was applied to determine the illumination-angle-dependent absorptance in cavity-based superconducting-nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD) designs. Niobium-nitride stripes based on dimensions of conventional SNSPDs and integrated with ~ quarter-wavelength hydrogen-silsesquioxane-filled nano-optical cavity and covered by a thin gold film acting as a reflector were illuminated from below by p-polarized light in this study. The numerical results were compared to results from complementary transfer-matrix-method calculations on composite layers made of analogous film-stacks. This comparison helped to uncover the optical phenomena contributing to the appearance of extrema in the optical response. This paper presents an approach to optimizing the absorptance of different sensing and detecting devices via simultaneous numerical optimization of the polar and azimuthal illumination angles. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  14. Effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.; Passchier, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent is a quantity which is used in the daily practice of radiation protection as well as in the radiation hygienic rules as measure for the health risks. In this contribution it is worked out upon which assumptions this quantity is based and in which cases the effective dose equivalent can be used more or less well. (H.W.)

  15. Characterization of revenue equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, B.; Müller, R.; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, R.

    2009-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called revenue equivalence. We give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The characterization holds

  16. Characterization of Revenue Equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, Birgit; Müller, Rudolf; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, Rakesh

    2008-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called \\emph{revenue equivalence}. In this paper we give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The

  17. On the operator equivalents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenet, G.; Kibler, M.

    1978-06-01

    A closed polynomial formula for the qth component of the diagonal operator equivalent of order k is derived in terms of angular momentum operators. The interest in various fields of molecular and solid state physics of using such a formula in connection with symmetry adapted operator equivalents is outlined

  18. A robust method for determining the absorbed dose to water in a phantom for low-energy photon radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T, E-mail: thorsten.schneider@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-06-07

    The application of more and more low-energy photon radiation in brachytherapy-either in the form of low-dose-rate radioactive seeds such as Pd-103 or I-125 or in the form of miniature x-ray tubes-has induced greater interest in determining the absorbed dose to water in water in this energy range. As it seems to be hardly feasible to measure the absorbed dose with calorimetric methods in this low energy range, ionometric methods are the preferred choice. However, the determination of the absorbed dose to water in water by ionometric methods is difficult in this energy range. With decreasing energy, the relative uncertainty of the photon cross sections increases and as the mass energy transfer coefficients show a steep gradient, the spectra of the radiation field must be known precisely. In this work two ionometric methods to determine the absorbed dose to water are evaluated with respect to their sensitivity to the uncertainties of the spectra and of the atomic database. The first is the measurement of the air kerma free in air and the application of an MC-based conversion factor to the absorbed dose to water. The second is the determination of the absorbed dose to water by means of an extrapolation chamber as an integral part of a phantom. In the complementing MC-calculations, two assortments of spectra each of which is based on a separate unfolding procedure were used as well as two kinds of databases: the standard PEGS and the recently implemented NIST database of EGSnrc. Experimental results were obtained by using a parallel-plate graphite extrapolation chamber and a free-air chamber. In the case when the water kerma in a phantom is determined from the measurements of air kerma free in air, differences in the order of 10% were found, according to which the database or the kind of spectrum is used. In contrast to this, for the second method, the differences found were about 0.5%.

  19. 风速波动下变速机组风电场的单机等值建模方法%Single machine equivalent modeling method of wind farms with variable speed wind turbines under wind speed fluctuations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏勋文; 秦浩宇; 杨荣峰; 岳红轩

    2017-01-01

    由于风电机组的输出功率滞后于风速波动,等值风计算不能反映实际工况,采用DIg-SILENT/Powerfactory搭建变速机组风电场详细模型和单机等值模型,研究风速波动下双馈机组和直驱永磁机组风电场模型的并网点输出特性.研究表明:对于双馈机组风电场,与详细模型相比,单机等值模型会出现一定误差;对于直驱永磁机组风电场,使用等值风的优于使用平均风的等值模型.利用单机表征法建立的风电场等值模型与详细模型的动态响应基本一致.该研究验证了单机等值方法的有效性和适用性.%This paper seeks to explore an efficient and simple wind farm equivalent modeling meth-od. The exploration involves the following process:providing the calculation method of the equivalent pa-rameters and equivalent wind in the single machine equivalent model; developing a detailed model of wind farm and a single machine equivalent model using the simulation software DIgSILENT/Powerfactory;investigating dynamic response at point of interconnection of wind farm with doubly fed induction genera-tor wind turbines and directly driven permanent magnet wind turbines under wind speed fluctuation. The results demonstrate that, in the case of wind farm with doubly fed induction generator wind turbines, where wind turbine operates at the output power lagging behind the wind speed fluctuation, equivalent wind calculation fails to reflect the actual operating conditions; there occurs a certain error in the single machine equivalent model compared;equivalent wind is better than the average wind for wind farm with directly driven permanent magnet wind turbines;and the dynamic response is basically same between the equivalent model of wind farm based on the single machine representation method and the detailed model of wind farm. The research verifies the validity and applicability of the single machine equivalent method.

  20. MVP/GMVP II, MC Codes for Neutron and Photon Transport Calc. based on Continuous Energy and Multigroup Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    A - Description of program or function: (1) Problems to be solved: MVP/GMVP can solve eigenvalue and fixed-source problems. The multigroup code GMVP can solve forward and adjoint problems for neutron, photon and neutron-photon coupled transport. The continuous-energy code MVP can solve only the forward problems. Both codes can also perform time-dependent calculations. (2) Geometry description: MVP/GMVP employs combinatorial geometry to describe the calculation geometry. It describes spatial regions by the combination of the 3-dimensional objects (BODIes). Currently, the following objects (BODIes) can be used. - BODIes with linear surfaces: half space, parallelepiped, right parallelepiped, wedge, right hexagonal prism; - BODIes with quadratic surface and linear surfaces: cylinder, sphere, truncated right cone, truncated elliptic cone, ellipsoid by rotation, general ellipsoid; - Arbitrary quadratic surface and torus. The rectangular and hexagonal lattice geometry can be used to describe the repeated geometry. Furthermore, the statistical geometry model is available to treat coated fuel particles or pebbles for high temperature reactors. (3) Particle sources: The various forms of energy-, angle-, space- and time-dependent distribution functions can be specified. (4) Cross sections: The ANISN-type PL cross sections or the double-differential cross sections can be used in the multigroup code GMVP. On the other hand, the specific cross section libraries are used in the continuous-energy code MVP. The libraries are generated from the evaluated nuclear data (JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI, JEF-3.0 etc.) by using the LICEM code. The neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance region are described by the probability table method. The neutron cross sections at arbitrary temperatures are available for MVP by just specifying the temperatures in the input data. (5) Boundary conditions: Vacuum, perfect reflective, isotropic reflective (white), periodic boundary conditions can be

  1. Mass of the photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, A.S.; Nieto, M.M.

    1976-01-01

    Several experiments are discussed for which results are equivalent to the catching and weighing of a photon. It is noted that none of the experiments has proved the rest mass to be zero and that such a proof may be impossible. It is shown by such experiments that the rest mass is less than the limit of accuracy of the experiment. These limits have approached ever closer to zero, and the most recent values are exceedingly small

  2. Polychromatic photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole

    2002-01-01

    train quantum electrodynamics. A brief description of particle (photon) position operators is given, and it is shown that photons usually are only algebraically confined in an emission process. Finally, it is demonstrated that the profile of the birth domain of a radio-frequency photon emitted...

  3. [Research on increasing X-ray protection capability based on photonic crystal technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Rui

    2014-06-01

    Light cannot be propagated within the range of photonic crystal band gaps. Based on this unique property, we proposed a method to improve anti-radiation capability through one-dimensional photonic crystal coating. Using transmission matrix method, we determined the appropriate dielectric materials, thickness and periodic numbers of photonic crystals through Matlab programming simulation. Then, compound one-dimensional photonic crystal coating was designed which was of high anti-radiation rate within the range of X-ray. As is shown through simulation experiments, the reflection rate against X-ray was higher than 90 percent, and the desired anti-radiation effect was achieved. Thus, this method is able to help solve the technical problems facing the inorganic lead glass such as thickness, weightiness, costliness, high lead equivalent, low transparency and high cost. This method has won China's national invention patent approval, and the patent number is 201220228549.2.

  4. On application of ion-photon emission method in spectral analysis of surface of different materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazhin, A.I.; Buravlev, Yu.M.; Ryzhov, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    Possibilities of application of ion-photom emission (IPE) method for determining element composition of the aluminium bronzes surface and profiles of distribution of hydrogen and helium implanted in metals (Mon Wn Cun Aln OKh18N10T steel) by ion bombardment have been studied. As ion source duoplasmatron which permits to obtain ions of inert (helium, argon) and active (hydrogenn oxygen) gases with current density 0.1-1 mA/cm 2 in the beam and energy from 5 to 25 keV has been applied. The photomultiplier PEM-79 has been used as a detector of optical radiation arising in the course of ion bombardment of the sample. For spectra recording the two-coordinate recorder has been used. Calibration charts which permit to determine the concentration of the investigated elements with 3-5% accuracy are obtained. The method sensitivity depends on excitation energy of transition observed in the spectrum. By known volumetric element concentration in the sample one can determine its concentration on a sUrface without resorting to a calibration chart in the coUrse of target sputtering. It has been found that the target impurity sputtering coefficient becomes nonselective to their relatiVe content. At wide incidence angles of ion beam. In contrast to other excitation methods (arc, spark) the IPE method possesses locality which constitutes 1 μm at a quite simple method of ion beam focussing (single lens)

  5. Volume integral method for investigation of plasmonic nanowaveguide structures and photonic crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lerer, A.M.; Donets, I.V.; Kalinchenko, Galina; Makhno, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2014), s. 31-37 ISSN 2327-9125 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : mathematical methods * subwavelength structures * nanostuctures Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  6. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for statistical analysis of RF photonic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piels, Molly; Zibar, Darko

    2016-01-01

    uncertainty is shown to give unsatisfactory and incorrect results due to the nonlinear relationship between the circuit parameters and the measured data. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are shown to provide superior results, both for individual devices and for assessing within-die variation...

  7. Photon activation method to the investigation of bioobjects content for juridical-biological examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikiy, N.P.; Dyachenko, A.F.; Lyashko, Yu.V.; Medvedeva, E.P.; Uvarov, V.L.; Borovlev, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    Possibilities of the use of nuclear-physical methods for definition of element composition of biological objects (hair of animals) with the target of receipt of additional evidentiary information at the decision of diagnostics and identification problems within the limits of forensic-biological examination are shown

  8. Photon contributions from the 252Cf and 241Am–Be neutron sources at the PSI Calibration Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoedlmoser, H.; Boschung, M.; Meier, K.; Stadtmann, H.; Hranitzky, C.; Figel, M.; Mayer, S.

    2012-01-01

    At the accredited PSI Calibration Laboratory neutron reference fields traceable to the national standards of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany are available for the calibration of ambient and personal dose equivalent (rate) meters and passive dosimeters. The photon contribution to the ambient dose equivalent in the neutron fields of the 252 Cf and 241 Am–Be sources was measured using various photon dose rate meters and active and passive dosimeters. Measuring photons from a neutron source usually involves considerable uncertainties due to the presence of neutron induced photons in the room, due to a non-zero neutron sensitivity of the photon detector, and last but not least due to the energy response of the photon detectors. Therefore eight independent detectors and methods were used to obtain a reliable estimate for the photon contribution of the two sources as an average of the individual methods. For the 241 Am–Be source a photon contribution of approximately 4.9% was determined and for the 252 Cf source a contribution of 3.6%.

  9. Non-destructive determination of nitrogen in malting barleys by instrumental photon activation analysis and its comparison with the Dumas method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krausová, Ivana; Mizera, Jiří; Dostálek, P.; Řanda, Zdeněk

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 1 (2018), s. 4-8 ISSN 0046-9750 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : nitrogen * instrumental photon activation analysis * Dumas method * malting barley Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing OBOR OECD: Food and beverages Impact factor: 0.859, year: 2016

  10. Correction method of nonlinearity due to logarithm operation for X-ray CT projection data with noise in photon-starved state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Shin-ichiro; Shiozaki, Akira

    2007-01-01

    In the acquisition of projection data of X-ray CT, logarithm operation is indispensable. But noise distribution is nonlinearly projected by the logarithm operation, and this deteriorates the precision of CT number. This influence becomes particularly remarkable when only a few photons are caught with a detector. It generates a strong streak artifact (SA) in a reconstructed image. Previously we have clarified the influence of the nonlinearity by statistical analysis and proposed a correction method for such nonlinearity. However, there is a problem that the compensation for clamp processing cannot be performed and that the suppression of SA is not enough in photon shortage state. In this paper, we propose a new technique for correcting the nonlinearity due to logarithm operation for noisy data by combining the previously presented method and an adaptive filtering method. The technique performs an adaptive filtering only when the number of captured photons is very few. Moreover we quantitatively evaluate the influence of noise on the reconstructed image in the proposed method by the experiment using numerical phantoms. The experimental results show that there is less influence on spatial resolution despite suppressing SA effectively and that CT number are hardly dependent on the number of the incident photons. (author)

  11. A simple method for the quantification of benzodiazepine receptors using iodine-123 iomazenil and single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Goto, Ryoui; Koyama, Masamichi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Ono, Shuichi; Sato, Kazunori; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    Iodine-123 iomazenil (Iomazenil) is a ligand for central type benzodiazepine receptors that is suitable for single-photon emission tomography (SPET). The purpose of this study was to develop a simple method for the quantification of its binding potential (BP). The method is based on a two-compartment model (K 1 , influx rate constant; k 2 ', efflux rate constant; V T '(=K 1 /k 2 '), the total distribution volumes relative to the total arterial tracer concentration), and requires two SPET scans and one blood sampling. For a given input function, the radioactivity ratio of the early to delayed scans can be considered to tabulate as a function of k 2 ', and a table lookup procedure provides the corresponding k 2 ' value, from which K 1 and V t ' values are then calculated. The arterial input function is obtained by calibration of the standard input function by the single blood sampling. SPET studies were performed on 14 patients with cerebrovascular diseases, dementia or brain tumours (mean age ±SD, 56.0±12.2). None of the patients had any heart, renal or liver disease. A dynamic SPET scan was performed following intravenous bolus injection of Iomazenil. A static SPET scan was performed at 180 min after injection. Frequent blood sampling from the brachial artery was performed on all subjects for determination of the arterial input function. Two-compartment model analysis was validated for calculation of the V T ' value of Iomazenil. Good correlations were observed between V T ' values calculated by three-compartment model analysis and those calculated by the present method, in which the scan time combinations (early scan/delayed scan) used were 15/180 min, 30/180 min or 45/180 min (all combinations: r=0.92), supporting the validity of this method. The present method is simple and applicable for clinical use. (orig.)

  12. Development and application of an automated analysis method for individual cerebral perfusion single photon emission tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluckie, Alice Jane

    2001-01-01

    Neurological images may be analysed by performing voxel by voxel comparisons with a group of control subject images. An automated, 3D, voxel-based method has been developed for the analysis of individual single photon emission tomography (SPET) scans. Clusters of voxels are identified that represent regions of abnormal radiopharmaceutical uptake. Morphological operators are applied to reduce noise in the clusters, then quantitative estimates of the size and degree of the radiopharmaceutical uptake abnormalities are derived. Statistical inference has been performed using a Monte Carlo method that has not previously been applied to SPET scans, or for the analysis of individual images. This has been validated for group comparisons of SPET scans and for the analysis of an individual image using comparison with a group. Accurate statistical inference was obtained independent of experimental factors such as degrees of freedom, image smoothing and voxel significance level threshold. The analysis method has been evaluated for application to cerebral perfusion SPET imaging in ischaemic stroke. It has been shown that useful quantitative estimates, high sensitivity and high specificity may be obtained. Sensitivity and the accuracy of signal quantification were found to be dependent on the operator defined analysis parameters. Recommendations for the values of these parameters have been made. The analysis method developed has been compared with an established method and shown to result in higher specificity for the data and analysis parameter sets tested. In addition, application to a group of ischaemic stroke patient SPET scans has demonstrated its clinical utility. The influence of imaging conditions has been assessed using phantom data acquired with different gamma camera SPET acquisition parameters. A lower limit of five million counts and standardisation of all acquisition parameters has been recommended for the analysis of individual SPET scans. (author)

  13. Studying the properties of photonic quasi-crystals by the scaling convergence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, I-Lin; Ng, Ming-Yaw; Mai, Chien Chin; Ko, Peng Yu; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2013-01-01

    This work introduces the iterative scaling (or inflation) method to systematically approach and analyse the infinite structure of quasi-crystals. The resulting structures preserve local geometric orderings in order to prevent artificial disclination across the boundaries of super-cells, with realistic quasi-crystals coming out under high iteration (infinite super-cell). The method provides an easy way for decorations of quasi-crystalline lattices, and for compact reliefs with a quasi-periodic arrangement to underlying applications. Numerical examples for in-plane and off-plane properties of square-triangle quasi-crystals show fast convergence during iteratively geometric scaling, revealing characteristics that do not appear on regular crystals. (paper)

  14. Bio-photonic detection method for morphological analysis of anthracnose disease and physiological disorders of Diospyros kaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Moon, Byungin; Jung, Hee-Young; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2017-04-01

    The pathological and physiological defects in various types of fruits lead to large amounts of economical waste. It is well recognized that internal fruit defects due to pathological infections and physiological disorders can be effectively visualized at an initial stage of the disease using a well-known bio-photonic detection method called optical coherence tomography (OCT). This work investigates the use of OCT for identifying the morphological variations of anthracnose (bitter rot) disease infected and physiologically disordered Diospyros kaki (Asian Persimmon) fruits. An experiment was conducted using fruit samples that were carefully selected from persimmon orchards. Depth-resolved images with a high axial resolution were acquired using 850-nm-based spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system. The obtained exemplary high-resolution two-dimensional and volumetric three-dimensional images revealed complementary morphological differences between healthy and defected samples. Moreover, the obtained depth-profile analysis results confirmed the disappearance of the healthy cell layers among the healthy-infected boundary regions. Thus, the proposed method has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy of the OCT technique used in agricultural plantations.

  15. Research of synchrotron radiation by virtual photon and compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xianzhu

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new theory to explain the synchrotron radiation. When charged particle does circular motion in the accelerator, the magnetic field of the accelerator can be taken as periodic, and equivalent to virtual photon. By Compton scattering of virtual photon and charged particle, the virtual photon can be transformed into photon to radiate out. According to this theory, the formula of photon wavelength in synchrotron radiation is found out, and the calculation results of wavelength is consonant with experimental data. (author)

  16. Limits on the photon mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, G.

    1996-03-01

    Is the photon mass strictly null as it is told in quantum electrodynamics. In fact, a coherent theory can be build with a massive photon. Experiences have been regularly led to try to make obvious an eventual non null photon mass. Superior limits more and more strict have been found. Here is given a general survey of the consequences of a non null photon mass, different methods to measure it and the achieved limits. (author). 30 refs., 1 fig

  17. Equivalent Dynamic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Peter C M

    2017-01-01

    Equivalences of two classes of dynamic models for weakly stationary multivariate time series are discussed: dynamic factor models and autoregressive models. It is shown that exploratory dynamic factor models can be rotated, yielding an infinite set of equivalent solutions for any observed series. It also is shown that dynamic factor models with lagged factor loadings are not equivalent to the currently popular state-space models, and that restriction of attention to the latter type of models may yield invalid results. The known equivalent vector autoregressive model types, standard and structural, are given a new interpretation in which they are conceived of as the extremes of an innovating type of hybrid vector autoregressive models. It is shown that consideration of hybrid models solves many problems, in particular with Granger causality testing.

  18. Assessing the effect of electron density in photon dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2006-01-01

    Photon dose calculation algorithms (such as the pencil beam and collapsed cone, CC) model the attenuation of a primary photon beam in media other than water, by using pathlength scaling based on the relative mass density of the media to water. In this study, we assess if differences in the electron density between the water and media, with different atomic composition, can influence the accuracy of conventional photon dose calculations algorithms. A comparison is performed between an electron-density scaling method and the standard mass-density scaling method for (i) tissues present in the human body (such as bone, muscle, etc.), and for (ii) water-equivalent plastics, used in radiotherapy dosimetry and quality assurance. We demonstrate that the important material property that should be taken into account by photon dose algorithms is the electron density, and not the mass density. The mass-density scaling method is shown to overestimate, relative to electron-density predictions, the primary photon fluence for tissues in the human body and water-equivalent plastics, where 6%-7% and 10% differences were observed respectively for bone and air. However, in the case of patients, differences are expected to be smaller due to the large complexity of a treatment plan and of the patient anatomy and atomic composition and of the smaller thickness of bone/air that incident photon beams of a treatment plan may have to traverse. Differences have also been observed for conventional dose algorithms, such as CC, where an overestimate of the lung dose occurs, when irradiating lung tumors. The incorrect lung dose can be attributed to the incorrect modeling of the photon beam attenuation through the rib cage (thickness of 2-3 cm in bone upstream of the lung tumor) and through the lung and the oversimplified modeling of electron transport in convolution algorithms. In the present study, the overestimation of the primary photon fluence, using the mass-density scaling method, was shown

  19. Calculation of Photonic decay width for meta-stable muonic symmetric ion in adiabatic representation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheisari, R.; Eskandari, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    Meta-stable symmetric ions ppμ * and ddμ * are formed in the collisions of the excited muonic atoms with the hydrogen isotopes. By dissociation of them, the muon transfers from 2s to 1s via the new channels. Considering the quantum electrodynamics field and employing the new wave functions, the matrix elements are simply integrated. In this method using the adiabatic representations, the photo-decay widths for the some of ppμ * and ddμ * states are variationally calculated. The decay rates for X-ray productions of the similar states are approximately same.

  20. Roadmap on biosensing and photonics with advanced nano-optical methods

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2016-05-10

    This roadmap, through the contributions of ten groups worldwide, contains different techniques, methods and materials devoted to sensing in nanomedicine. Optics is used in different ways in the detection schemes. Raman, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopies, plasmonics, second harmonic generation and optical tweezers are all used in applications from single molecule detection (both in highly diluted and in highly concentrated solutions) to single cell manipulation. In general, each optical scheme, through device miniaturization and electromagnetic field localization, exploits an intrinsic optical enhancement mechanism in order to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of the device with respect to the complex molecular construct. The materials used for detection include nanoparticles and nanostructures fabricated with different 2D and 3D lithographic methods. It is shown that sensitivity to a single molecule is already accessible whether the system under study is a single cell or a multitude of cells in a molecular mixture. Throughout the roadmap there is an attempt to foresee and to suggest future directions in this interdisciplinary field. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Roadmap on biosensing and photonics with advanced nano-optical methods

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Schlü cker, Sebastian; Wenger, Jé rô me; Regmi, Raju; Rigneault, Hervé ; Calafiore, Giuseppe; West, Melanie; Cabrini, Stefano; Fleischer, Monika; van Hulst, Niek F; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F; Pucci, Annemarie; Cojoc, Dan; Hauser, Charlotte; Ni, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This roadmap, through the contributions of ten groups worldwide, contains different techniques, methods and materials devoted to sensing in nanomedicine. Optics is used in different ways in the detection schemes. Raman, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopies, plasmonics, second harmonic generation and optical tweezers are all used in applications from single molecule detection (both in highly diluted and in highly concentrated solutions) to single cell manipulation. In general, each optical scheme, through device miniaturization and electromagnetic field localization, exploits an intrinsic optical enhancement mechanism in order to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of the device with respect to the complex molecular construct. The materials used for detection include nanoparticles and nanostructures fabricated with different 2D and 3D lithographic methods. It is shown that sensitivity to a single molecule is already accessible whether the system under study is a single cell or a multitude of cells in a molecular mixture. Throughout the roadmap there is an attempt to foresee and to suggest future directions in this interdisciplinary field. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Factors affecting volume calculation with single photon emission tomography (SPECT) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, T.H.; Lee, K.H.; Chen, D.C.P.; Ballard, S.; Siegel, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Several factors may influence the calculation of absolute volumes (VL) from SPECT images. The effect of these factors must be established to optimize the technique. The authors investigated the following on the VL calculations: % of background (BG) subtraction, reconstruction filters, sample activity, angular sampling and edge detection methods. Transaxial images of a liver-trunk phantom filled with Tc-99m from 1 to 3 μCi/cc were obtained in 64x64 matrix with a Siemens Rota Camera and MDS computer. Different reconstruction filters including Hanning 20,32, 64 and Butterworth 20, 32 were used. Angular samplings were performed in 3 and 6 degree increments. ROI's were drawn manually and with an automatic edge detection program around the image after BG subtraction. VL's were calculated by multiplying the number of pixels within the ROI by the slice thickness and the x- and y- calibrations of each pixel. One or 2 pixel per slice thickness was applied in the calculation. An inverse correlation was found between the calculated VL and the % of BG subtraction (r=0.99 for 1,2,3 μCi/cc activity). Based on the authors' linear regression analysis, the correct liver VL was measured with about 53% BG subtraction. The reconstruction filters, slice thickness and angular sampling had only minor effects on the calculated phantom volumes. Detection of the ROI automatically by the computer was not as accurate as the manual method. The authors conclude that the % of BG subtraction appears to be the most important factor affecting the VL calculation. With good quality control and appropriate reconstruction factors, correct VL calculations can be achieved with SPECT

  3. Antigravity Acts on Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2002-04-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity assumes that photons don't change frequency as they move from Sun to Earth. This assumption is correct in classical physics. All experiments proving the general relativity are in the domain of classical physics. This include the tests by Pound et al. of the gravitational redshift of 14.4 keV photons; the rocket experiments by Vessot et al.; the Galileo solar redshift experiments by Krisher et al.; the gravitational deflection of light experiments by Riveros and Vucetich; and delay of echoes of radar signals passing close to Sun as observed by Shapiro et al. Bohr's correspondence principle assures that quantum mechanical theory of general relativity agrees with Einstein's classical theory when frequency and gravitational field gradient approach zero, or when photons cannot interact with the gravitational field. When we treat photons as quantum mechanical particles; we find that gravitational force on photons is reversed (antigravity). This modified theory contradicts the equivalence principle, but is consistent with all experiments. Solar lines and distant stars are redshifted in accordance with author's plasma redshift theory. These changes result in a beautiful consistent cosmology.

  4. THE ADVERTISING-VALUE-EQUIVALENT (AVE METHOD IN QUANTIFYING ECONOMIC VALUES OF PUBLIC RELATIONS ACTIVITIES: EXPERIENCE OF A PUBLIC-LISTED COMPANY IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Abu Hassan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Why should public relations (PR not be evaluated for its economic value? Despite the point of its social or intangible values, the argument goes on and on in most management meetings where PR practitioners always face the challenges of justifying their worth – often in monetary terms. In an open dialogue with Grunig during his visit to Malaysia in 2004, this renowned PR guru also expressed the difficulty of quantifying the actual PR worth. It is best to qualify PR values by assessing its priceless relationships with the company’s stakeholders. However, in our routine business life, especially at the middle management level, the above question seems unavoidable. In enhancing excellence for PR and communication management, Ehling (1992 placed the logic underlying the economic values of PR on the relationship between benefits and costs associated with the implementation of a PR programme. The above question and problem serve as the main objective of this article. In exploring the solutions for the quantification of PR values in Malaysia, economic education is taken as a remedy for the absence of knowledge and skills in making intelligent decisions in the marketplace (Baskin et al., 1997; Lattimor et al., 2004. In this research context, the researchers (a combination of a practitioner and an academician respectively confined the scope to the experience of a selected public-listed company for its PR campaign implemented in 2004. Quantification was attempted by evaluating the assessment in print media exposures. All earned media coverage for that particular PR campaign was measured for the media type, space, position, and the corresponding advertising rate. Monetary value was assigned to every single piece of PR news in the way disbursements are made to paid media for advertising activities. The explication of this advertising-value-equivalent (AVE method in quantifying economic values for PR news with regard to the selected campaign was made

  5. Quantitative mineral salt evaluation in the calcaneous bone using computed tomography, 125I-photon absorption and chemical analysis to compare the value of the individual methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitzler, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    It was the aim of the study described here to verify the accuracy of two different methods for the quantitative evaluation of mineral salts, which were the 125I-photon absorption technique on the one hand and wholebody CT on the other hand. For this purpose, post-mortem examinations of 31 calcaneous bones were carried out to evaluate their individual mineral salt contents in vitro using either of the above-mentioned methods. The results obtained were subsequently contrasted with calcium concentrations determined by chemical analysis. A comparison of the individual mineral salt evaluations with the results from calcium analyses pointed to a highly significant correlation (p=0.001) for both methods under investigation. The same held for the correlation of findings from CT and the 125I-hydroxylapatite technique, where the level of significance was also p=0.001. The above statements must, however, be modified in as much as the mineral salt values measured by CT were consistently lower than those obtained on the basis of 125I-photon absorption. These deviations are chiefly attributable to the fact that the values provided by CT are more susceptible to influences from the fat contained in the bones. In 125I-photon absorption a special formula may be derived to allow for the bias occurring here, provided that the composition of the bone is known. To summarise, the relative advantages and drawbacks of CT and 125I-photon absorption are carefully balanced. Mineral salt evaluations by CT permit incipient losses to be ascertained even in the trunk. The 125I-photon absorption technique would appear to be the obvious method for any kind of follow-up examination in the peripheral skeleton, as it is easily reproducible and radiation exposure can be kept to minimum. (TRV) [de

  6. Facile control of silica nanoparticles using a novel solvent varying method for the fabrication of artificial opal photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Weihong; Rigout, Muriel; Owens, Huw

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Stöber process was applied to produce uniform silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in the meso-scale size range. The novel aspect of this work was to control the produced silica particle size by only varying the volume of the solvent ethanol used, whilst fixing the other reaction conditions. Using this one-step Stöber-based solvent varying (SV) method, seven batches of SNPs with target diameters ranging from 70 to 400 nm were repeatedly reproduced, and the size distribution in terms of the polydispersity index (PDI) was well maintained (within 0.1). An exponential equation was used to fit the relationship between the particle diameter and ethanol volume. This equation allows the prediction of the amount of ethanol required in order to produce particles of any target diameter within this size range. In addition, it was found that the reaction was completed in approximately 2 h for all batches regardless of the volume of ethanol. Structurally coloured artificial opal photonic crystals (PCs) were fabricated from the prepared SNPs by self-assembly under gravity sedimentation.

  7. Facile control of silica nanoparticles using a novel solvent varying method for the fabrication of artificial opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weihong; Rigout, Muriel; Owens, Huw

    2016-12-01

    In this work, the Stöber process was applied to produce uniform silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in the meso-scale size range. The novel aspect of this work was to control the produced silica particle size by only varying the volume of the solvent ethanol used, whilst fixing the other reaction conditions. Using this one-step Stöber-based solvent varying (SV) method, seven batches of SNPs with target diameters ranging from 70 to 400 nm were repeatedly reproduced, and the size distribution in terms of the polydispersity index (PDI) was well maintained (within 0.1). An exponential equation was used to fit the relationship between the particle diameter and ethanol volume. This equation allows the prediction of the amount of ethanol required in order to produce particles of any target diameter within this size range. In addition, it was found that the reaction was completed in approximately 2 h for all batches regardless of the volume of ethanol. Structurally coloured artificial opal photonic crystals (PCs) were fabricated from the prepared SNPs by self-assembly under gravity sedimentation.

  8. Facile control of silica nanoparticles using a novel solvent varying method for the fabrication of artificial opal photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Weihong [The University of Manchester, School of Materials (United Kingdom); Rigout, Muriel [University of Leeds, School of Design (United Kingdom); Owens, Huw, E-mail: Huw.Owens@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, School of Materials (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    In this work, the Stöber process was applied to produce uniform silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in the meso-scale size range. The novel aspect of this work was to control the produced silica particle size by only varying the volume of the solvent ethanol used, whilst fixing the other reaction conditions. Using this one-step Stöber-based solvent varying (SV) method, seven batches of SNPs with target diameters ranging from 70 to 400 nm were repeatedly reproduced, and the size distribution in terms of the polydispersity index (PDI) was well maintained (within 0.1). An exponential equation was used to fit the relationship between the particle diameter and ethanol volume. This equation allows the prediction of the amount of ethanol required in order to produce particles of any target diameter within this size range. In addition, it was found that the reaction was completed in approximately 2 h for all batches regardless of the volume of ethanol. Structurally coloured artificial opal photonic crystals (PCs) were fabricated from the prepared SNPs by self-assembly under gravity sedimentation.

  9. ON THE USE OF SHOT NOISE FOR PHOTON COUNTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas, E-mail: jonas@caltech.edu [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Lieu et al. have recently claimed that it is possible to substantially improve the sensitivity of radio-astronomical observations. In essence, their proposal is to make use of the intensity of the photon shot noise as a measure of the photon arrival rate. Lieu et al. provide a detailed quantum-mechanical calculation of a proposed measurement scheme that uses two detectors and conclude that this scheme avoids the sensitivity degradation that is associated with photon bunching. If correct, this result could have a profound impact on radio astronomy. Here I present a detailed analysis of the sensitivity attainable using shot-noise measurement schemes that use either one or two detectors, and demonstrate that neither scheme can avoid the photon bunching penalty. I perform both semiclassical and fully quantum calculations of the sensitivity, obtaining consistent results, and provide a formal proof of the equivalence of these two approaches. These direct calculations are furthermore shown to be consistent with an indirect argument based on a correlation method that establishes an independent limit to the sensitivity of shot-noise measurement schemes. Furthermore, these calculations are directly applicable to the regime of interest identified by Lieu et al. Collectively, these results conclusively demonstrate that the photon-bunching sensitivity penalty applies to shot-noise measurement schemes just as it does to ordinary photon counting, in contradiction to the fundamental claim made by Lieu et al. The source of this contradiction is traced to a logical fallacy in their argument.

  10. Hawking radiation due to photon and gravitino tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan; Samanta, Saurav

    2010-01-01

    Applying the Hamilton-Jacobi method we investigate the tunneling of photon across the event horizon of a static spherically symmetric black hole. The necessity of the gauge condition on the photon field, to derive the semiclassical Hawking temperature, is explicitly shown. Also, the tunneling of photon and gravitino beyond this semiclassical approximation are presented separately. Quantum corrections of the action for both cases are found to be proportional to the semiclassical contribution. Modifications to the Hawking temperature and Bekenstein-Hawking area law are thereby obtained. Using this corrected temperature and Hawking's periodicity argument, the modified metric for the Schwarzschild black hole is given. This corrected version of the metric, up to h order is equivalent to the metric obtained by including one loop back reaction effect. Finally, the coefficient of the leading order correction of entropy is shown to be related to the trace anomaly.

  11. Improving the Ar I and II branching ratio calibration method: Monte Carlo simulations of effects from photon scattering/reflecting in hollow cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, J. E.; Den Hartog, E. A.

    2018-03-01

    The Ar I and II branching ratio calibration method is discussed with the goal of improving the technique. This method of establishing a relative radiometric calibration is important in ongoing research to improve atomic transition probabilities for quantitative spectroscopy in astrophysics and other fields. Specific suggestions are presented along with Monte Carlo simulations of wavelength dependent effects from scattering/reflecting of photons in a hollow cathode.

  12. Photonic Hypercrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii E. Narimanov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new “universality class” of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  13. Equivalent complex conductivities representing the effects of T-tubules and folded surface membranes on the electrical admittance and impedance of skeletal muscles measured by external-electrode method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Katsuhisa

    2017-12-01

    In order to represent the effects of T-tubules and folded surface membranes on the electrical admittance and impedance of skeletal muscles measured by the external-electrode method, analytical relations for the equivalent complex conductivities of hypothetical smooth surface membranes were derived. In the relations, the effects of each tubule were represented by the admittance of a straight cable. The effects of the folding of a surface membrane were represented by the increased area of surface membranes. The equivalent complex conductivities were represented as summation of these effects, and the effects of the T-tubules were different between the transversal and longitudinal directions. The validity of the equivalent complex conductivities was supported by the results of finite-difference method (FDM) calculations made using three-dimensional models in which T-tubules and folded surface membranes were represented explicitly. FDM calculations using the equivalent complex conductivities suggested that the electrically inhomogeneous structure due to the existence of muscle cells with T-tubules was sufficient for explaining the experimental results previously obtained using the external-electrode method. Results of FDM calculations in which the structural changes caused by muscle contractions were taken into account were consistent with the reported experimental results.

  14. Microwave photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chi H

    2006-01-01

    Wireless, optical, and electronic networks continue to converge, prompting heavy research into the interface between microwave electronics, ultrafast optics, and photonic technologies. New developments arrive nearly as fast as the photons under investigation, and their commercial impact depends on the ability to stay abreast of new findings, techniques, and technologies. Presenting a broad yet in-depth survey, Microwave Photonics examines the major advances that are affecting new applications in this rapidly expanding field.This book reviews important achievements made in microwave photonics o

  15. Development of snow water equivalent survey methods using airborne gamma measurements. Research progress, January 1975--September 1975 and suggested directions for future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.; Jupiter, C.

    1975-01-01

    This is a summary of the progress made during the period March 1975 through September 1975 on EG and G's support of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for development of airborne techniques for measurement of the water equivalent of snow and soil moisture. The work included a series of snow and soil moisture surveys and development of a new detector and data acquisition system. The status of this work is summarized here together with a review of plans for the immediate future

  16. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Transcriptomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudo, María Marcela; Powers, Stephen J.; Mitchell, Rowan A. C.; Shewry, Peter R.

    Regulatory authorities in Western Europe require transgenic crops to be substantially equivalent to conventionally bred forms if they are to be approved for commercial production. One way to establish substantial equivalence is to compare the transcript profiles of developing grain and other tissues of transgenic and conventionally bred lines, in order to identify any unintended effects of the transformation process. We present detailed protocols for transcriptomic comparisons of developing wheat grain and leaf material, and illustrate their use by reference to our own studies of lines transformed to express additional gluten protein genes controlled by their own endosperm-specific promoters. The results show that the transgenes present in these lines (which included those encoding marker genes) did not have any significant unpredicted effects on the expression of endogenous genes and that the transgenic plants were therefore substantially equivalent to the corresponding parental lines.

  17. Neutron-induced photon production in MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, R.C.; Seamon, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    An improved method of neutron-induced photon production has been incorporated into the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. The new method makes use of all partial photon-production reaction data provided by ENDF/B evaluators including photon-production cross sections as well as energy and angular distributions of secondary photons. This faithful utilization of sophisticated ENDF/B evaluations allows more precise MCNP calculations for several classes of coupled neutron-photon problems

  18. Equivalent statistics and data interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    Recent reform efforts in psychological science have led to a plethora of choices for scientists to analyze their data. A scientist making an inference about their data must now decide whether to report a p value, summarize the data with a standardized effect size and its confidence interval, report a Bayes Factor, or use other model comparison methods. To make good choices among these options, it is necessary for researchers to understand the characteristics of the various statistics used by the different analysis frameworks. Toward that end, this paper makes two contributions. First, it shows that for the case of a two-sample t test with known sample sizes, many different summary statistics are mathematically equivalent in the sense that they are based on the very same information in the data set. When the sample sizes are known, the p value provides as much information about a data set as the confidence interval of Cohen's d or a JZS Bayes factor. Second, this equivalence means that different analysis methods differ only in their interpretation of the empirical data. At first glance, it might seem that mathematical equivalence of the statistics suggests that it does not matter much which statistic is reported, but the opposite is true because the appropriateness of a reported statistic is relative to the inference it promotes. Accordingly, scientists should choose an analysis method appropriate for their scientific investigation. A direct comparison of the different inferential frameworks provides some guidance for scientists to make good choices and improve scientific practice.

  19. Advanced processing methods to introduce and preserve dipole orientation in organic electro-optic materials for next generation photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Su

    Organic electro-optic (E-O) materials have attracted considerable research attention in the past 20 years due to their rising potentials in a lot of novel photonic applications, such as high-speed telecommunication, terahertz generation and ultra-fast optical interconnections. Chapter 2 of this dissertation focuses on a barrier layer approach to improve the poling efficiency of electro-optic polymers. First of all, high conduction current from excessive charge injection is identified as a fundamental challenge of effective poling. After analyzing the conduction mechanism, we introduce a sol-gel derived thin titanium dioxide (TiO2) layer that can significantly block excessive charge injection and reduce the leakage current during high field poling. Ultralarge E-O coefficients, up to 160-350 pm/V at 1310 nm have been achieved by poling with such a barrier, which are 26%-40% higher than the results poled without such a TiO2 layer. This enhancement is explained by the suppressed charge injection and space charge accumulation by the insertion of the high injection barrier from the TiO2 barrier layer. In Chapter 3, the impact of the inserted barrier layer on the temporal alignment stability of E-O polymers is discussed. Considerable stability enhancement is confirmed using both standard 500-hour temporal alignment stability test at 85 °C and thermally stimulated discharge method. We suggest that the enhancement comes from improved stability of the screening charge. During poling the additional barrier layer helps to lower the injection and thus the space charge accumulation. And this reduced space charge accumulation further helps to replace the space charge part in the total formulation of screening charge with more stable interface trapped charge. We thus expand this knowledge to a group of other materials that can also block excessive charge injection and suppressed space charge accumulation, including dielectric polymers polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), poly(4-vinylphenol

  20. Physics of photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Shun Lien

    2009-01-01

    The most up-to-date book available on the physics of photonic devices This new edition of Physics of Photonic Devices incorporates significant advancements in the field of photonics that have occurred since publication of the first edition (Physics of Optoelectronic Devices). New topics covered include a brief history of the invention of semiconductor lasers, the Lorentz dipole method and metal plasmas, matrix optics, surface plasma waveguides, optical ring resonators, integrated electroabsorption modulator-lasers, and solar cells. It also introduces exciting new fields of research such as:

  1. Strained Silicon Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf B. Wehrspohn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent progress in the field of strained silicon photonics is presented. The application of strain to waveguide and photonic crystal structures can be used to alter the linear and nonlinear optical properties of these devices. Here, methods for the fabrication of strained devices are summarized and recent examples of linear and nonlinear optical devices are discussed. Furthermore, the relation between strain and the enhancement of the second order nonlinear susceptibility is investigated, which may enable the construction of optically active photonic devices made of silicon.

  2. The polarization modulation and fabrication method of two dimensional silica photonic crystals based on UV nanoimprint lithography and hot imprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuai; Niu, Chunhui; Liang, Liang; Chai, Ke; Jia, Yaqing; Zhao, Fangyin; Li, Ya; Zou, Bingsuo; Liu, Ruibin

    2016-10-04

    Based on a silica sol-gel technique, highly-structurally ordered silica photonic structures were fabricated by UV lithography and hot manual nanoimprint efforts, which makes large-scale fabrication of silica photonic crystals easy and results in low-cost. These photonic structures show perfect periodicity, smooth and flat surfaces and consistent aspect ratios, which are checked by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In addition, glass substrates with imprinted photonic nanostructures show good diffraction performance in both transmission and reflection mode. Furthermore, the reflection efficiency can be enhanced by 5 nm Au nanoparticle coating, which does not affect the original imprint structure. Also the refractive index and dielectric constant of the imprinted silica is close to that of the dielectric layer in nanodevices. In addition, the polarization characteristics of the reflected light can be modulated by stripe nanostructures through changing the incident light angle. The experimental findings match with theoretical results, making silica photonic nanostructures functional integration layers in many optical or optoelectronic devices, such as LED and microlasers to enhance the optical performance and modulate polarization properties in an economical and large-scale way.

  3. The principle of equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnikrishnan, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    Principle of equivalence was the fundamental guiding principle in the formulation of the general theory of relativity. What are its key elements? What are the empirical observations which establish it? What is its relevance to some new experiments? These questions are discussed in this article. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs

  4. Radioactive waste equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Schaller, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    The report reviews, for the Member States of the European Community, possible situations in which an equivalence concept for radioactive waste may be used, analyses the various factors involved, and suggests guidelines for the implementation of such a concept. Only safety and technical aspects are covered. Other aspects such as commercial ones are excluded. Situations where the need for an equivalence concept has been identified are processes where impurities are added as a consequence of the treatment and conditioning process, the substitution of wastes from similar waste streams due to the treatment process, and exchange of waste belonging to different waste categories. The analysis of factors involved and possible ways for equivalence evaluation, taking into account in particular the chemical, physical and radiological characteristics of the waste package, and the potential risks of the waste form, shows that no simple all-encompassing equivalence formula may be derived. Consequently, a step-by-step approach is suggested, which avoids complex evaluations in the case of simple exchanges

  5. Equivalent Colorings with "Maple"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, David R.; Wang, Rongdong

    2005-01-01

    Many counting problems can be modeled as "colorings" and solved by considering symmetries and Polya's cycle index polynomial. This paper presents a "Maple 7" program link http://users.tamuk.edu/kfdrc00/ that, given Polya's cycle index polynomial, determines all possible associated colorings and their partitioning into equivalence classes. These…

  6. Correspondences. Equivalence relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouligand, G.M.

    1978-03-01

    We comment on sections paragraph 3 'Correspondences' and paragraph 6 'Equivalence Relations' in chapter II of 'Elements de mathematique' by N. Bourbaki in order to simplify their comprehension. Paragraph 3 exposes the ideas of a graph, correspondence and map or of function, and their composition laws. We draw attention to the following points: 1) Adopting the convention of writting from left to right, the composition law for two correspondences (A,F,B), (U,G,V) of graphs F, G is written in full generality (A,F,B)o(U,G,V) = (A,FoG,V). It is not therefore assumed that the co-domain B of the first correspondence is identical to the domain U of the second (EII.13 D.7), (1970). 2) The axiom of choice consists of creating the Hilbert terms from the only relations admitting a graph. 3) The statement of the existence theorem of a function h such that f = goh, where f and g are two given maps having the same domain (of definition), is completed if h is more precisely an injection. Paragraph 6 considers the generalisation of equality: First, by 'the equivalence relation associated with a map f of a set E identical to (x is a member of the set E and y is a member of the set E and x:f = y:f). Consequently, every relation R(x,y) which is equivalent to this is an equivalence relation in E (symmetrical, transitive, reflexive); then R admits a graph included in E x E, etc. Secondly, by means of the Hilbert term of a relation R submitted to the equivalence. In this last case, if R(x,y) is separately collectivizing in x and y, theta(x) is not the class of objects equivalent to x for R (EII.47.9), (1970). The interest of bringing together these two subjects, apart from this logical order, resides also in the fact that the theorem mentioned in 3) can be expressed by means of the equivalence relations associated with the functions f and g. The solutions of the examples proposed reveal their simplicity [fr

  7. Analysis of latent variance reduction methods in phase space Monte Carlo calculations for 6, 10 and 18 MV photons by using MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezzati, A.O.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, azimuthal particle redistribution (APR), and azimuthal particle rotational splitting (APRS) methods are implemented in MCNPX2.4 source code. First of all, the efficiency of these methods was compared to two tallying methods. The APRS is more efficient than the APR method in track length estimator tallies. However in the energy deposition tally, both methods have nearly the same efficiency. Latent variance reduction factors were obtained for 6, 10 and 18 MV photons as well. The APRS relative efficiency contours were obtained. These obtained contours reveal that by increasing the photon energies, the contours depth and the surrounding areas were further increased. The relative efficiency contours indicated that the variance reduction factor is position and energy dependent. The out of field voxels relative efficiency contours showed that latent variance reduction methods increased the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation efficiency in the out of field voxels. The APR and APRS average variance reduction factors had differences less than 0.6% for splitting number of 1000. -- Highlights: ► The efficiency of APR and APRS methods was compared to two tallying methods. ► The APRS is more efficient than the APR method in track length estimator tallies. ► In the energy deposition tally, both methods have nearly the same efficiency. ► Variance reduction factors of these methods are position and energy dependent.

  8. Comparison of in Situ and ex Situ Methods for Synthesis of Two-Photon Polymerization Polymer Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingchuan Guo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reports about nanocomposites, which refractive index is tuned by adding TiO2 nanoparticles. We compare in situ/ex situ preparation of nanocomposites. Preparation procedure is described, properties of nanocomposites are compared, and especially we examine the applicability of two-photon polymerization (2PP of synthesized nanocomposites. All prepared samples exhibit suitable optical transparency at specific laser wavelengths. Three-dimensional structures were generated by means of two-photon polymerization effect induced by a femtosecond laser.

  9. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  10. The study of electromagnetic wave propagation in photonic crystals via planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method with active gain material applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming

    In this dissertation, a set of numerical simulation tools are developed under previous work to efficiently and accurately study one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), 2D slab and three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal structures and their defects effects by means of spectrum (transmission, reflection, absorption), band structure (dispersion relation), and electric and/or magnetic fields distribution (mode profiles). Further more, the lasing property and spontaneous emission behaviors are studied when active gain materials are presented in the photonic crystal structures. First, the planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method (TMM) is described in every detail along with a brief review of photonic crystal history (Chapter 1 and 2). As a frequency domain method, TMM has the following major advantages over other numerical methods: (1) the planewave basis makes Maxwell's Equations a linear algebra problem and there are mature numerical package to solve linear algebra problem such as Lapack and Scalapack (for parallel computation). (2) Transfer (scattering) matrix method make 3D problem into 2D slices and link all slices together via the scattering matrix (S matrix) which reduces computation time and memory usage dramatically and makes 3D real photonic crystal devices design possible; and this also makes the simulated domain no length limitation along the propagation direction (ideal for waveguide simulation). (3) It is a frequency domain method and calculation results are all for steady state, without the influences of finite time span convolution effects and/or transient effects. (4) TMM can treat dispersive material (such as metal at visible light) naturally without introducing any additional computation; and meanwhile TMM can also deal with anisotropic material and magnetic material (such as perfectly matched layer) naturally from its algorithms. (5) Extension of TMM to deal with active gain material can be done through an iteration procedure with gain

  11. The one-dimensional normalised generalised equivalence theory (NGET) for generating equivalent diffusion theory group constants for PWR reflector regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, E.Z.

    1991-01-01

    An equivalent diffusion theory PWR reflector model is presented, which has as its basis Smith's generalisation of Koebke's Equivalent Theory. This method is an adaptation, in one-dimensional slab geometry, of the Generalised Equivalence Theory (GET). Since the method involves the renormalisation of the GET discontinuity factors at nodal interfaces, it is called the Normalised Generalised Equivalence Theory (NGET) method. The advantages of the NGET method for modelling the ex-core nodes of a PWR are summarized. 23 refs

  12. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the application of photon to industrial technologies, in particular, a hard photon technology was surveyed which uses photon beams of 0.1-200nm in wavelength. Its features such as selective atom reaction, dense inner shell excitation and spacial high resolution by quantum energy are expected to provide innovative techniques for various field such as fine machining, material synthesis and advanced inspection technology. This wavelength region has been hardly utilized for industrial fields because of poor development of suitable photon sources and optical devices. The developmental meaning, usable time and issue of a hard photon reduction lithography were surveyed as lithography in ultra-fine region below 0.1{mu}m. On hard photon analysis/evaluation technology, the industrial use of analysis, measurement and evaluation technologies by micro-beam was viewed, and optimum photon sources and optical systems were surveyed. Prediction of surface and surface layer modification by inner shell excitation, the future trend of this process and development of a vacuum ultraviolet light source were also surveyed. 383 refs., 153 figs., 17 tabs.

  13. Inverse photon-photon processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carimalo, C.; Crozon, M.; Kesler, P.; Parisi, J.

    1981-12-01

    We here consider inverse photon-photon processes, i.e. AB → γγX (where A, B are hadrons, in particular protons or antiprotons), at high energies. As regards the production of a γγ continuum, we show that, under specific conditions the study of such processes might provide some information on the subprocess gg γγ, involving a quark box. It is also suggested to use those processes in order to systematically look for heavy C = + structures (quarkonium states, gluonia, etc.) showing up in the γγ channel. Inverse photon-photon processes might thus become a new and fertile area of investigation in high-energy physics, provided the difficult problem of discriminating between direct photons and indirect ones can be handled in a satisfactory way

  14. Depth determination of low-energy photon emitter deposits in tissue by means of high-resolution X-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlueter, W.

    1982-01-01

    A method has been developed for ascertaining the depth of low-energy photon emitters deposited in wounds. It is based on the determination of the energy-dependent absorption of the emitted photons by the tissue separating source and detector. The method is applicable to counting for low-energy photon-emitting nuclides that can be characterized by more than one quantum energy. Attenuation coefficients were given for lard, beef, and five tissue- equivalent materials. For spectrometry, a planar Ge(Li) detector proved most suitable. (author)

  15. Final-photon polarization in the scattering of photons by high-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.; Choi, S.Y.; Ie, S.H.; Song, H.S.; Good, R.H. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A general method for calculating the polarization of the outgoing photon beam in any reaction is presented. As an example the method is applied to the high-energy photon beam produced in Compton scattering of a laser beam by a high-energy electron beam. The Stokes parameters of the outgoing photon beam, relative to a unit vector normal to the photon momentum and including their dependence on the polarization of incident photon and electron beams, are obtained explicitly. It is expected that this method will be useful, both in photon production reactions and in the subsequent high-energy photon reactions

  16. An assessment method of dose equivalent due to indoor 220Rn progeny by using 220Rn concentration measured at a 20 cm distance from wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, T.; Ikebe, Y.; Okamoto, K.; Guo, Q.; Yamasaki, T.

    1996-01-01

    A pair of passive cup monitors with a different air exchange openings was developed for measuring simultaneously 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations. Indoor 220 Rn concentrations were very high in traditional Japanese dwellings with soil walls. The 220 Rn concentration decreases exponentially with the distance from wall. The effective diffusion coefficient of 220 Rn in dwelling and the exhalation rate of 220 Rn from wall were evaluated from the distribution of the 220 Rn concentrations. Then, indoor 220 Rn progeny concentration could be estimated from the 220 Rn concentration at a 20 cm distance from wall. From the results of the surveys. the average annual effective dose equivalent due to 220 Rn progeny was expected to be 0.67 mSv/year in the traditional Japanese dwellings. (author)

  17. Effects of calibration methods on quantitative material decomposition in photon-counting spectral computed tomography using a maximum a posteriori estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tyler E; Roeder, Ryan K

    2017-10-01

    Advances in photon-counting detectors have enabled quantitative material decomposition using multi-energy or spectral computed tomography (CT). Supervised methods for material decomposition utilize an estimated attenuation for each material of interest at each photon energy level, which must be calibrated based upon calculated or measured values for known compositions. Measurements using a calibration phantom can advantageously account for system-specific noise, but the effect of calibration methods on the material basis matrix and subsequent quantitative material decomposition has not been experimentally investigated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the range and number of contrast agent concentrations within a modular calibration phantom on the accuracy of quantitative material decomposition in the image domain. Gadolinium was chosen as a model contrast agent in imaging phantoms, which also contained bone tissue and water as negative controls. The maximum gadolinium concentration (30, 60, and 90 mM) and total number of concentrations (2, 4, and 7) were independently varied to systematically investigate effects of the material basis matrix and scaling factor calibration on the quantitative (root mean squared error, RMSE) and spatial (sensitivity and specificity) accuracy of material decomposition. Images of calibration and sample phantoms were acquired using a commercially available photon-counting spectral micro-CT system with five energy bins selected to normalize photon counts and leverage the contrast agent k-edge. Material decomposition of gadolinium, calcium, and water was performed for each calibration method using a maximum a posteriori estimator. Both the quantitative and spatial accuracy of material decomposition were most improved by using an increased maximum gadolinium concentration (range) in the basis matrix calibration; the effects of using a greater number of concentrations were relatively small in

  18. Beyond Language Equivalence on Visibly Pushdown Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    We study (bi)simulation-like preorder/equivalence checking on the class of visibly pushdown automata and its natural subclasses visibly BPA (Basic Process Algebra) and visibly one-counter automata. We describe generic methods for proving complexity upper and lower bounds for a number of studied...... preorders and equivalences like simulation, completed simulation, ready simulation, 2-nested simulation preorders/equivalences and bisimulation equivalence. Our main results are that all the mentioned equivalences and preorders are EXPTIME-complete on visibly pushdown automata, PSPACE-complete on visibly...... one-counter automata and P-complete on visibly BPA. Our PSPACE lower bound for visibly one-counter automata improves also the previously known DP-hardness results for ordinary one-counter automata and one-counter nets. Finally, we study regularity checking problems for visibly pushdown automata...

  19. A comparison of small-field tissue phantom ratio data generation methods for an Elekta Agility 6 MV photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Neil; Brackenridge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-phantom ratios (TPRs) are a common dosimetric quantity used to describe the change in dose with depth in tissue. These can be challenging and time consuming to measure. The conversion of percentage depth dose (PDD) data using standard formulae is widely employed as an alternative method in generating TPR. However, the applicability of these formulae for small fields has been questioned in the literature. Functional representation has also been proposed for small-field TPR production. This article compares measured TPR data for small 6 MV photon fields against that generated by conversion of PDD using standard formulae to assess the efficacy of the conversion data. By functionally fitting the measured TPR data for square fields greater than 4cm in length, the TPR curves for smaller fields are generated and compared with measurements. TPRs and PDDs were measured in a water tank for a range of square field sizes. The PDDs were converted to TPRs using standard formulae. TPRs for fields of 4 × 4cm(2) and larger were used to create functional fits. The parameterization coefficients were used to construct extrapolated TPR curves for 1 × 1 cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields. The TPR data generated using standard formulae were in excellent agreement with direct TPR measurements. The TPR data for 1 × 1-cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields created by extrapolation of the larger field functional fits gave inaccurate initial results. The corresponding mean differences for the 3 fields were 4.0%, 2.0%, and 0.9%. Generation of TPR data using a standard PDD-conversion methodology has been shown to give good agreement with our directly measured data for small fields. However, extrapolation of TPR data using the functional fit to fields of 4 × 4cm(2) or larger resulted in generation of TPR curves that did not compare well with the measured data. © 2013 Published by American Association of Medical Dosimetrists on behalf of American Association of Medical

  20. Photon generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  1. Personnel dose equivalent monitoring at SLAC using lithium-fluoride TLD's [thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, T.M.; Busick, D.D.

    1987-03-01

    TLD's replaced film badges in the early 1970's for all dose equivalent monitoring, both neutron and photon, and for all locations at SLAC. The photon TLD's, composed of Li-7 loaded teflon discs, are calibrated using conventional gamma-ray sources; i.e., Co-60, Cs-137, etc. For these TLD's a nominal value of 1 nC/mrem is used, and is independent of source energy for 100 keV to 3 MeV. Since measured dose equivalents at SLAC are only a small fraction of the allowable levels, it was not deemed necessary to develop neutron dosimeters which would measure dose equivalent accurately for all possible neutron spectra. Today, wallet TLD's, composed of pairs of Li-7 and Li-6 discs, are used, with the Li-6 measuring only thermal neutrons; i.e., they aren't moderated in any way to make them sensitive to neutrons with energies greater than thermal. The assumption is made that there is a correlation between thermal neutron fluences and fast neutron fluences around the research area where almost all neutron doses (exclusive of sealed sources) are received. The calibration factor for these Li-6 TLD's is 1 nC/mrem of fast neutrons. The method of determining the validity of this calibration is the subject of this note. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  2. Composition variability and equivalence of Shonka TE plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spokas, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    A number of conducting plastic mixtures had been developed by Francis R. Shonka, and collaborators, in the Physical Sciences Laboratory of Illinois Benedictine College (formerly St. Procopius College). Several of these mixtures have been used widely in radiation research. In particular, a tissue-equivalent (muscle) formulation designated A-150 has been used extensively in the dosimetry, research and measurements of gamma, neutron and pion beams. Certain confusion has arisen concerning the composition of A-150. The definition of A-150 is reviewed and what is known of the composition is summarized. The equivalence of A-150 and ICRU ''muscle'' with respect to photons is discussed as a function of photon energy using the latest data on extra-nuclear photon cross sections. (U.S.)

  3. Equivalence, commensurability, value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Deriving value in Capital Marx uses three commensurability arguments (CA1-3). CA1 establishes equivalence in exchange as exchangeability with the same third commodity. CA2 establishes value as common denominator in commodities: embodied abstract labour. CA3 establishes value substance...... as commonality of labour: physiological labour. Tensions between these logics have permeated Marxist interpretations of value. Some have supported value as embodied labour (CA2, 3), others a monetary theory of value and value as ‘pure’ societal abstraction (ultimately CA1). They all are grounded in Marx....

  4. Effective use of Monte Carlo methods for simulating photon transport with special reference to slab penetration problems in X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Monte Carlo methods has been made in connection with a particular problem concerning the transport of low energy photons (30-140 keV) through layers of water with thicknesses between 5 and 20 cm. While not claiming to be a complete exposition of available Monte Carlo techniques, the methodological analyses are not restricted to this particular problem. The report describes in a general manner a number of methods which can be used in order to obtain results of greater precision in a fixed computing time. (Auth.)

  5. FDTD method for computing the off-plane band structure in a two-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of nearly free-electron metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Sanshui; He Sailing

    2002-12-01

    An FDTD numerical method for computing the off-plane band structure of a two-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of nearly free-electron metals is presented. The method requires only a two-dimensional discretization mesh for a given off-plane wave number k{sub z} although the off-plane propagation is a three-dimensional problem. The off-plane band structures of a square lattice of metallic rods with the high-frequency metallic model in the air are studied, and a complete band gap for some nonzero off-plane wave number k{sub z} is founded.

  6. FDTD method for computing the off-plane band structure in a two-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of nearly free-electron metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Sanshui; He Sailing

    2002-01-01

    An FDTD numerical method for computing the off-plane band structure of a two-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of nearly free-electron metals is presented. The method requires only a two-dimensional discretization mesh for a given off-plane wave number k z although the off-plane propagation is a three-dimensional problem. The off-plane band structures of a square lattice of metallic rods with the high-frequency metallic model in the air are studied, and a complete band gap for some nonzero off-plane wave number k z is founded

  7. Probing the SEB Sensitive Depth of a Power MOSFET Using a Two-Photon Absorption Laser Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Liu, Sandra; Titus, Jeffrey L.; McMorrow, Dale; Casey, Megan C.; Buchner, Stephen P.; Warner, Jeffrey; Phan, Anthony M.; Topper, Alyson D.; Kim, Hak S.; hide

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents two-photon absorption test results on an engineering single-event burnout- (SEB-) sensitive power MOSFET to verify that the energy deposition/charge ionization in the highly-doped substrate does not contribute to SEB. It is shown that for a vertical power MOSFET, the SEB sensitive volume is the lightly doped epitaxial layer; the most sensitive region is under the polysllicon gate.

  8. Source of single photons and interferometry with one photon. From the Young's slit experiment to the delayed choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, V.

    2007-11-01

    This manuscript is divided in two independent parts. In the first part, we study the wave-particle duality for a single photon emitted by the triggered photoluminescence of a single NV color center in a diamond nano-crystal. We first present the realization of a single-photon interference experiment using a Fresnel's bi-prism, in a scheme equivalent to the standard Young's double-slit textbook experiment. We then discuss the complementarity between interference and which-path information in this two-path interferometer. We finally describe the experimental realization of Wheeler's delayed-choice Gedanken experiment, which is a fascinating and subtle illustration of wave-particle duality. The second part of the manuscript is devoted to the efficiency improvement of single-photon sources. We first describe the implementation of a new single-photon source based on the photoluminescence of a single nickel-related defect center in diamond. The photophysical properties of such defect make this single-photon source well adapted to open-air quantum cryptography. We finally demonstrate an original method that leads to an improvement of single-molecule photo stability at room temperature. (author)

  9. Equivalent nozzle in thermomechanical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesari, F.

    1977-01-01

    When analyzing nuclear vessels, it is most important to study the behavior of the nozzle cylinder-cylinder intersection. For the elastic field, this analysis in three dimensions is quite easy using the method of finite elements. The same analysis in the non-linear field becomes difficult for designs in 3-D. It is therefore necessary to resolve a nozzle in two dimensions equivalent to a 3-D nozzle. The purpose of the present work is to find an equivalent nozzle both with a mechanical and thermal load. This has been achieved by the analysis in three dimensions of a nozzle and a nozzle cylinder-sphere intersection, of a different radius. The equivalent nozzle will be a nozzle with a sphere radius in a given ratio to the radius of a cylinder; thus, the maximum equivalent stress is the same in both 2-D and 3-D. The nozzle examined derived from the intersection of a cylindrical vessel of radius R=191.4 mm and thickness T=6.7 mm with a cylindrical nozzle of radius r=24.675 mm and thickness t=1.350 mm, for which the experimental results for an internal pressure load are known. The structure was subdivided into 96 finite, three-dimensional and isoparametric elements with 60 degrees of freedom and 661 total nodes. Both the analysis with a mechanical load as well as the analysis with a thermal load were carried out on this structure according to the Bersafe system. The thermal load consisted of a transient typical of an accident occurring in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, with a peak of the temperature (540 0 C) for the sodium inside the vessel with an insulating argon temperature constant at 525 0 C. The maximum value of the equivalent tension was found in the internal area at the union towards the vessel side. The analysis of the nozzle in 2-D consists in schematizing the structure as a cylinder-sphere intersection, where the sphere has a given relation to the

  10. Low-energy photons in high-energy photon fields--Monte Carlo generated spectra and a new descriptive parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rühmann, Antje; Poppe, Björn

    2011-09-01

    The varying low-energy contribution to the photon spectra at points within and around radiotherapy photon fields is associated with variations in the responses of non-water equivalent dosimeters and in the water-to-material dose conversion factors for tissues such as the red bone marrow. In addition, the presence of low-energy photons in the photon spectrum enhances the RBE in general and in particular for the induction of second malignancies. The present study discusses the general rules valid for the low-energy spectral component of radiotherapeutic photon beams at points within and in the periphery of the treatment field, taking as an example the Siemens Primus linear accelerator at 6 MV and 15 MV. The photon spectra at these points and their typical variations due to the target system, attenuation, single and multiple Compton scattering, are described by the Monte Carlo method, using the code BEAMnrc/EGSnrc. A survey of the role of low energy photons in the spectra within and around radiotherapy fields is presented. In addition to the spectra, some data compression has proven useful to support the overview of the behaviour of the low-energy component. A characteristic indicator of the presence of low-energy photons is the dose fraction attributable to photons with energies not exceeding 200 keV, termed P(D)(200 keV). Its values are calculated for different depths and lateral positions within a water phantom. For a pencil beam of 6 or 15 MV primary photons in water, the radial distribution of P(D)(200 keV) is bellshaped, with a wide-ranging exponential tail of half value 6 to 7 cm. The P(D)(200 keV) value obtained on the central axis of a photon field shows an approximately proportional increase with field size. Out-of-field P(D)(200 keV) values are up to an order of magnitude higher than on the central axis for the same irradiation depth. The 2D pattern of P(D)(200 keV) for a radiotherapy field visualizes the regions, e.g. at the field margin, where changes of

  11. A Method for Extracting the Free Energy Surface and Conformational Dynamics of Fast-Folding Proteins from Single Molecule Photon Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy holds the promise of providing direct measurements of protein folding free energy landscapes and conformational motions. However, fulfilling this promise has been prevented by technical limitations, most notably, the difficulty in analyzing the small packets of photons per millisecond that are typically recorded from individual biomolecules. Such limitation impairs the ability to accurately determine conformational distributions and resolve sub-millisecond processes. Here we develop an analytical procedure for extracting the conformational distribution and dynamics of fast-folding proteins directly from time-stamped photon arrival trajectories produced by single molecule FRET experiments. Our procedure combines the maximum likelihood analysis originally developed by Gopich and Szabo with a statistical mechanical model that describes protein folding as diffusion on a one-dimensional free energy surface. Using stochastic kinetic simulations, we thoroughly tested the performance of the method in identifying diverse fast-folding scenarios, ranging from two-state to one-state downhill folding, as a function of relevant experimental variables such as photon count rate, amount of input data, and background noise. The tests demonstrate that the analysis can accurately retrieve the original one-dimensional free energy surface and microsecond folding dynamics in spite of the sub-megahertz photon count rates and significant background noise levels of current single molecule fluorescence experiments. Therefore, our approach provides a powerful tool for the quantitative analysis of single molecule FRET experiments of fast protein folding that is also potentially extensible to the analysis of any other biomolecular process governed by sub-millisecond conformational dynamics. PMID:25988351

  12. Effect of shape of scatterers and plasma frequency on the complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T., E-mail: tfathollahi@aeoi.org.ir; Bananej, A.

    2016-12-16

    In this study, we analyze complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals with triangular and square lattices, composed of plasma rods with different geometrical shapes in the anisotropic tellurium background. Using the finite-difference time-domain method we discuss the maximization of the complete photonic band gap width as a function of plasma frequency and plasma rods parameters with different shapes and orientations. The numerical results demonstrate that our proposed structures represent significantly wide complete photonic band gaps in comparison to previously studied dielectric-plasma photonic crystals. - Highlights: • In this paper, we have investigated plasma photonic crystals. • Plasma is a kind of dispersive medium with its equivalent refractive index related to the frequency of an incident EM wave. • In this work, our simulations are performed using the Meep implementation of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. • For this study, the lattice structures investigated are triangular and square. • Extensive calculations reveal that almost all of these structures represent wide complete band gaps.

  13. Effect of shape of scatterers and plasma frequency on the complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T.; Bananej, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyze complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals with triangular and square lattices, composed of plasma rods with different geometrical shapes in the anisotropic tellurium background. Using the finite-difference time-domain method we discuss the maximization of the complete photonic band gap width as a function of plasma frequency and plasma rods parameters with different shapes and orientations. The numerical results demonstrate that our proposed structures represent significantly wide complete photonic band gaps in comparison to previously studied dielectric-plasma photonic crystals. - Highlights: • In this paper, we have investigated plasma photonic crystals. • Plasma is a kind of dispersive medium with its equivalent refractive index related to the frequency of an incident EM wave. • In this work, our simulations are performed using the Meep implementation of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. • For this study, the lattice structures investigated are triangular and square. • Extensive calculations reveal that almost all of these structures represent wide complete band gaps.

  14. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  15. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter ∼200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  16. Photonic band gap engineering in 2D photonic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -dimensional photonic crystals with square lattices composed of air holes in dielectric and vice versa i.e., dielectric rods in air, using the plane-wave expansion method are investigated. We then study, how the photonic band gap size is ...

  17. Shielding implications for secondary neutrons and photons produced within the patient during IMPT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMarco, J.; Kupelian, P.; Santhanam, A.; Low, D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) uses a combination of computer controlled spot scanning and spot-weight optimized planning to irradiate the tumor volume uniformly. In contrast to passive scattering systems, secondary neutrons and photons produced from inelastic proton interactions within the patient represent the major source of emitted radiation during IMPT delivery. Various published studies evaluated the shielding considerations for passive scattering systems but did not directly address secondary neutron production from IMPT and the ambient dose equivalent on surrounding occupational and nonoccupational work areas. Thus, the purpose of this study was to utilize Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the energy and angular distributions of secondary neutrons and photons following inelastic proton interactions within a tissue-equivalent phantom for incident proton spot energies between 70 and 250 MeV.Methods: Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to calculate the ambient dose equivalent of secondary neutrons and photons produced from inelastic proton interactions in a tissue-equivalent phantom. The angular distribution of emitted neutrons and photons were scored as a function of incident proton energy throughout a spherical annulus at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 m from the phantom center. Appropriate dose equivalent conversion factors were applied to estimate the total ambient dose equivalent from secondary neutrons and photons.Results: A reference distance of 1 m from the center of the patient was used to evaluate the mean energy distribution of secondary neutrons and photons and the resulting ambient dose equivalent. For an incident proton spot energy of 250 MeV, the total ambient dose equivalent (3.6 × 10 −3 mSv per proton Gy) was greatest along the direction of the incident proton spot (0°–10°) with a mean secondary neutron energy of 71.3 MeV. The dose equivalent decreased by a factor of 5 in the backward direction (170°–180°) with a mean

  18. Shielding implications for secondary neutrons and photons produced within the patient during IMPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarco, J.; Kupelian, P.; Santhanam, A.; Low, D. [UCLA Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) uses a combination of computer controlled spot scanning and spot-weight optimized planning to irradiate the tumor volume uniformly. In contrast to passive scattering systems, secondary neutrons and photons produced from inelastic proton interactions within the patient represent the major source of emitted radiation during IMPT delivery. Various published studies evaluated the shielding considerations for passive scattering systems but did not directly address secondary neutron production from IMPT and the ambient dose equivalent on surrounding occupational and nonoccupational work areas. Thus, the purpose of this study was to utilize Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the energy and angular distributions of secondary neutrons and photons following inelastic proton interactions within a tissue-equivalent phantom for incident proton spot energies between 70 and 250 MeV.Methods: Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to calculate the ambient dose equivalent of secondary neutrons and photons produced from inelastic proton interactions in a tissue-equivalent phantom. The angular distribution of emitted neutrons and photons were scored as a function of incident proton energy throughout a spherical annulus at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 m from the phantom center. Appropriate dose equivalent conversion factors were applied to estimate the total ambient dose equivalent from secondary neutrons and photons.Results: A reference distance of 1 m from the center of the patient was used to evaluate the mean energy distribution of secondary neutrons and photons and the resulting ambient dose equivalent. For an incident proton spot energy of 250 MeV, the total ambient dose equivalent (3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mSv per proton Gy) was greatest along the direction of the incident proton spot (0 Degree-Sign -10 Degree-Sign ) with a mean secondary neutron energy of 71.3 MeV. The dose equivalent decreased by a factor of 5 in the

  19. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte-Carlo methods. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.; Zankl, M.; Williams, G.; Drexler, G.

    1982-12-01

    By the help of a Monte-Carlo program the dose that single organs, organ groups and bigger or smaller parts of body would receive on an average, caused by an irradiation definitely fixed by the geometry of irradiation and photon energy, can be determined. Thus the phantom in connection with the Monte-Carlo program can be used for several considerations as for example - calculation of dose from occupational exposures - calculation of dose from diagnostic procedures - calculation of dose from radiotherapy procedures. (orig.)

  20. Green photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas. (review article)

  1. A Bayesian equivalency test for two independent binomial proportions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yohei; Shimokawa, Asanao; Yamada, Hiroshi; Miyaoka, Etsuo

    2016-01-01

    In clinical trials, it is often necessary to perform an equivalence study. The equivalence study requires actively denoting equivalence between two different drugs or treatments. Since it is not possible to assert equivalence that is not rejected by a superiority test, statistical methods known as equivalency tests have been suggested. These methods for equivalency tests are based on the frequency framework; however, there are few such methods in the Bayesian framework. Hence, this article proposes a new index that suggests the equivalency of binomial proportions, which is constructed based on the Bayesian framework. In this study, we provide two methods for calculating the index and compare the probabilities that have been calculated by these two calculation methods. Moreover, we apply this index to the results of actual clinical trials to demonstrate the utility of the index.

  2. The application of Monte Carlo method to electron and photon beams transport; Zastosowanie metody Monte Carlo do analizy transportu elektronow i fotonow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zychor, I. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The application of a Monte Carlo method to study a transport in matter of electron and photon beams is presented, especially for electrons with energies up to 18 MeV. The SHOWME Monte Carlo code, a modified version of GEANT3 code, was used on the CONVEX C3210 computer at Swierk. It was assumed that an electron beam is mono directional and monoenergetic. Arbitrary user-defined, complex geometries made of any element or material can be used in calculation. All principal phenomena occurring when electron beam penetrates the matter are taken into account. The use of calculation for a therapeutic electron beam collimation is presented. (author). 20 refs, 29 figs.

  3. Radiological equivalent of chemical pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, V.O.

    1982-01-01

    The development of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy has caused continued effort toward public safety through radiation health protection measures and nuclear management practices. However, concern has not been focused on the development specifically in the operation of chemical pestrochemical industries as well as other industrial processes brought about by technological advancements. This article presents the comparison of the risk of radiation and chemicals. The methods used for comparing the risks of late effects of radiation and chemicals are considered at three levels. (a) as a frame of reference to give an impression of resolving power of biological tests; (b) as methods to quantify risks; (c) as instruments for an epidemiological survey of human populations. There are marked dissimilarities between chemicals and radiation and efforts to interpret chemical activity may not be achieved. Applicability of the concept of rad equivalence has many restrictions and as pointed out this approach is not an established one. (RTD)

  4. Quantification of the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative relationships illustrate Einstein's equivalence principle, relating it to Newton's ''fictitious'' forces arising from the use of noninertial frames, and to the form of the relativistic time dilatation in local Lorentz frames. The equivalence principle can be interpreted as the equivalence of general covariance to local Lorentz covariance, in a manner which is characteristic of Riemannian and pseudo-Riemannian geometries

  5. Modeling of photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Barkou, Stig Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Diferent theoretical models for analysis of photonic crystal fibres are reviewed and compaired. The methods span from simple scalar approaches to full-vectorial models using different mode-field decompositions. The specific advantages of the methods are evaluated.......Diferent theoretical models for analysis of photonic crystal fibres are reviewed and compaired. The methods span from simple scalar approaches to full-vectorial models using different mode-field decompositions. The specific advantages of the methods are evaluated....

  6. Equivalence of the different discounted cash flow valuation methods. Different alternatives for determining the discounted value of tax shields and their implications for the valuation

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Pablo

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the valuation of firms by cash flow discounting. The first part shows that the four most commonly used discounted cash flow valuation methods (free cash flow discounted at the WACC; cash flow available for equity holders discounted at the required return on the equity flows; capital cash flow discounted at the WACC before taxes; and Adjusted Present Value) always give the same value. This result is logical because all the methods analyse the same reality under the same hy...

  7. The use of filtering methods to compensate for constant attenuation in single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1981-01-01

    A back projection of filtered projection (BKFIL) reconstruction algorithm is presented that is applicable to single-photon emission computed tomography (ECT) in the presence of a constant attenuating medium such as the brain. The filters used in transmission computed tomography (TCT)-comprised of a ramp multiplied by window functions-are modified so that the single-photon ECT filter is a function of the constant attenuation coefficient. The filters give good reconstruction results with sufficient angular and lateral sampling. With continuous samples the BKFIL algorithm has a point spread function that is the Hankel transform of the window function. The resolution and statistical properties of the filters are demonstrated by various simulations which assume an ideal detector response. Statistical formulas for the reconstructed image show that the square of the percent-root-mean-square (percent-rms) uncertainty of the reconstruction is inversely proportional to the total measured counts. The results indicate that constant attenuation can be compensated for by using an attenuation-dependent filter that reconstructs the transverse section reliably. Computer time requirements are two times that of conventional TCT or positron ECT and there is no increase in memory requirements

  8. Study and development of a method allowing the identification of actinides inside nuclear waste packages, by active neutron or photon interrogation and delayed gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrel, F.

    2007-10-01

    An accurate estimation of the alpha-activity of a nuclear waste package is necessary to select the best mode of storage. The main purpose of this work is to develop a non-destructive active method, based on the fission process and allowing the identification of actinides ( 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu). These three elements are the main alpha emitters contained inside a package. Our technique is based on the detection of delayed gammas emitted by fission products. These latter are created by irradiation with the help of a neutron or photon beam. Performances of this method have been investigated after an Active Photon or Neutron Interrogation (INA or IPA). Three main objectives were fixed in the framework of this thesis. First, we measured many yields of photofission products to compensate the lack of data in the literature. Then, we studied experimental performances of this method to identify a given actinide ( 239 Pu in fission, 235 U in photofission) present in an irradiated mixture. Finally, we assessed the application of this technique on different mock-up packages for both types of interrogation (118 l mock-up package containing EVA in fission, 220 l mock-up package with a wall of concrete in photofission). (author)

  9. Precise material identification method based on a photon counting technique with correction of the beam hardening effect in X-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimoto, Natsumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Asahara, Takashi; Mihara, Yoshiki; Kanazawa, Yuki; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Yamasaki, Masashi; Okada, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study is to develop a novel material identification method based on a photon counting technique, in which the incident and penetrating X-ray spectra are analyzed. Dividing a 40 kV X-ray spectra into two energy regions, the corresponding linear attenuation coefficients are derived. We can identify the materials precisely using the relationship between atomic number and linear attenuation coefficient through the correction of the beam hardening effect of the X-ray spectra. - Highlights: • We propose a precise material identification method to be used as a photon counting system. • Beam hardening correction is important, even when the analysis is applied to the short energy regions in the X-ray spectrum. • Experiments using a single probe-type CdTe detector were performed, and Monte Carlo simulation was also carried out. • We described the applicability of our method for clinical diagnostic X-ray imaging in the near future.

  10. Calculation of pole profiles for the design of particle accelerators magnets. Equivalent current and conformal representation methods; Calcul de profils polaires destines a des aimants d'accelerateurs de particules. Methode des courants et methode des transformations conformes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaidane, S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-04-01

    These two methods allow the determination of the shape of the poles in magnets, for a given field distribution in the air-gap. First method: The principle of the method consists to create the desired law of field by means of current sheets in which one can adjust the density given in a polynomial form. For the right distribution of these currents, the equipotential corresponding to the magnetic potential of the excitation coils is calculated. The pole profile of the H or C magnet identified with this equipotential line will finally take the place of the distribution of the current sheets used in the calculation. Steel permeability is assumed to be infinite and Foucault current effects are neglected in the case of variable fields. Second method: It consists to find a conformal representation that maps the pole profile plane upon the upper half of another plane where the equipotentials are two half straight lines, and where the field problems are easier to solve. Steel permeability is also considered to be infinite and the coils far from the pole faces. This known method has been applied to be compared with the first one. (author) [French] Ces deux methodes consistent a determiner la forme des pieces polaires d'aimants pour une distribution de champ determinee a l'avance dans l'entrefer. Premiere methode: Le principe de la methode consiste a creer la loi de champ desiree par l'intermediaire de nappes de courant dont on peut ajuster la densite exprimee sous une forme polynominale. Pour une distribution convenable de ces courants, on calcule l'equipotentielle correspondant au potentiel magnetique des bobines d'excitation. Le profil polaire d'un aimant en H ou C identifie a l'equipotentielle se substitue finalement a la repartition des nappes de courant utilisee dans la methode de calcul. La permeabilite de l'acier est supposee infinie et les courants de Foucault sont negliges dans le cas des champs variables. Seconde methode: Elle consiste a trouver une transformation

  11. Accelerating Photons with Gravitational Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Graham M

    2001-01-01

    The nature of superluminal photon propagation in the gravitational field describing radiation from a time-dependent, isolated source (the Bondi-Sachs metric) is considered in an effective theory which includes interactions which violate the strong equivalence principle. Such interactions are, for example, generated by vacuum polarisation in conventional QED in curved spacetime. The relation of the resulting light-cone modifications to the Peeling Theorem for the Bondi-Sachs spacetime is explained.

  12. Photon Rao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72 Feature Article. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1303-1306. Molecule of the Month - Molecular-Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best!

  13. New recommendations for dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, G.

    1985-01-01

    In its report 39, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), has defined four new quantities for the determination of dose equivalents from external sources: the ambient dose equivalent, the directional dose equivalent, the individual dose equivalent, penetrating and the individual dose equivalent, superficial. The rationale behind these concepts and their practical application are discussed. Reference is made to numerical values of these quantities which will be the subject of a coming publication from the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP. (Author)

  14. Method for extracting an equivalent Winkler model of the 3D dynamic soil-structure interaction of large-diameter offshore monopile foundations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteijlen, W.G.; De Oliveira Barbosa, J.M.; Van Dalen, K.N.; Metrikine, A.

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for this work stems from the offshore wind industry, where designers are faced with a discrepancy between the available design methods and the typical dimensions of the offshore wind foundations that call for other design approaches. Throughout the years, much valuable work has been

  15. Skin Dose Equivalent Measurement from Neutron-Deficient Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Costigan, Steve A.; Romero, Leonard L.; Whicker, Jeffrey J.

    1997-12-01

    Neutron-deficient-isotopes decay via positron emission and/or electron capture often followed by x-ray, gamma-ray, and 0.511 MeV photons from positron annihilation. For cases of significant area and/or personnel contamination with these isotopes, determination of skin dose equivalent (SDE) is required by 10CFR835. For assessment of SDE, we evaluated the MICROSPEC-2(TM) system manufactured by Bubble Technology Industries of Canada which uses three different probes for dose measurement. We used two probes: (1) the X-probe which measures lower energy (4 - 120 keV) photon energy distributions and determines deep dose equivalent, SDE and dose equivalent to eyes, and (2) the B-probe which measures electron (positron) energy distributions, and determines skin dose equivalent. Also, the measured photon and beta spectra can be used to identify radioactive isotopes in the contaminated area. Measurements with several neutron-deficient sources showed that this system provided reasonably accurate SDE rate measurements when compared with calculated benchmark SDE rates with an average percent difference of 40%. Variations were expected because of differences between the assumed geometries used by MlCROSPEC-2 and the calculations when compared to the measurement conditions

  16. Photon strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, I.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for extracting photon strength functions are briefly discussed. We follow the Brink-Axel approach to relate the strength functions to the giant resonances observed in photonuclear work and summarize the available data on the E1, E2 and M1 resonances. Some experimental and theoretical problems are outlined. (author)

  17. Direct photon experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeggild, H.

    1986-11-01

    The author reviews the experiments on direct photon production in hadronic collisions. After a description of the experimental methods for the study of such processes he presents some results on differential cross sections and the γ/π 0 ratio in π - p, π + p, pp, and anti pp processes as well as in reactions of π - , π + , and p on carbon. (HSI)

  18. Total photon absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, P.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental methods using real photon beams for measurements of total photonuclear absorption cross section σ(Tot : E/sub γ/) are recalled. Most recent σ(Tot : E/sub γ/)results for complex nuclei and in the nucleon resonance region are presented

  19. A design of ambient dose equivalent dosimeter and its dosimetric performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shian; Ou Xiangming; Li Kaibao

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To design an ambient dose equivalent dosimeter with digital display for radiation protection, which is based on the definition of the new operational radiation quantity for environmental monitoring-ambient dose equivalent recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) Report 39. Methods: Considering the energy response of the instrument, the inner wall of ionizing chamber is coated with gum graphite added with a bit of metal powder. Results: Using this chamber, measurement of H * (10) for photon radiation with unknown spectrum distribution is possible in the energy range from 47 keV to 230 keV with an uncertainty of better than 5%. The configuration, technology and dosimetric performance of the chamber and automatic functions of the reader are presented. Conclusion: The ambient dose equivalent dosimeter can be used as not only a working reference dosimeter, but also a field dosimeter for radiation protection because the readings are expressed directly in ambient dose equivalent and averaged automatically in the period of measurement. Also, its power is supplied by battery for the portable purpose and the readings are displayed on the screen with light-background for dim field

  20. Are stirring and sonication pre-dispersion methods equivalent for in vitro toxicology evaluation of SiC and TiC?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, Jorge; Valembois, Vanessa; Piret, Jean-Pascal; Tichelaar, Frans; Huis, Marijn van; Masereel, Bernard; Toussaint, Olivier; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb; Lucas, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the particle size distribution and the surface composition of silicon carbide and titanium carbide nanoparticle (NP) dispersions were studied. The pre-dispersions were prepared using two commonly used protocols for dispersion: stirring and sonication. Two dispersants were investigated (water and Pluronic F108 1 %) at two stages: pre-dispersion and during in vitro assays. Our data show that for each tested condition, different time-dependent results for the surface chemical composition as well as size and percentage of the agglomerates and the primary particles are observed. De-agglomeration and successive or simultaneous cleaning-wrapping cycles of the nanomaterial are observed and are related to the dispersion method and the medium as well as to the chemical stability of the NP surface. Biological response during in vitro assessment was also performed for one given pre-dispersion time condition and demonstrates that the preparation method significantly alters the results.