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Sample records for equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography

  1. Equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography in male patients after transmural myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestaval, A; Stanek, V; Malek, I; Kidery, J; Runczik, I [Institut pro Klinickou a Experimentalni Medicinu, Prague (Czechoslovakia); Cernoch, V; Oppelt, A [Institut pro Dalsi Vzdelavani Lekaru a Farmaceutu, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1982-12-17

    The ejection fraction of the left ventricle was measured using the method of equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography in 10 healthy males and 57 males after the first transmural myocardial infarction. The examination was effected 4 to 7 months after the event and the sample is representative for males after myocardial infarction who are younger than 65 years and show no signs of heart insufficiency by the time of examination. The resting value of the ejection fraction was 63+-5% in healthy males, 54+-7% in patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarction and 37+-8% in patients with clinical manifestations of heart insufficiency in acute phase. The differences between the groups are statistically significant. In patients with anteroseptal localization of myocardial infarction there was a negative correlation between the ejection fraction on the one hand and the sum of the voltages of Q waves in precordial ECG map and the maximum value of serum creatine kinase in acute phase on the other. The ejection fraction was in correlation to the degree of pulmonary hypertension measured in equal phase during exercise. The ejection fraction was measured in 31 patients under the working load of 50 W; significant changes were not found in healthy males or in patients after myocardial infarction. No changes were found when the state just before discharge from the hospital was compared with his state 6 months after myocardial infarction. The results obtained in compensated patients showed a relative stability of the value of the ejection fraction both during the first 6 months after discharge and under a mild working load. A comparison between the indicators in acute phase and hemodynamic examination after 6 months shows that the value of the ejection fraction is a sensitive indicator of the extent of necrosis and functional lesion of the left ventricle.

  2. Evaluation of segmental left ventricular wall motion by equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nostrand, D; Janowitz, W R; Holmes, D R; Cohen, H A

    1979-01-01

    The ability of equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography to detect segmental left ventricular (LV) wall motion abnormalities was determined in 26 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Multiple gated studies obtained in 30 degrees right anterior oblique and 45 degrees left anterior oblique projections, played back in a movie format, were compared to the corresponding LV ventriculograms. The LV wall in the two projections was divided into eight segments. Each segment was graded as normal, hypokinetic, akinetic, dyskinetic, or indeterminate. Thirteen percent of the segments in the gated images were indeterminate; 24 out of 27 of these were proximal or distal inferior wall segments. There was exact agreement in 86% of the remaining segments. The sensitivity of the radionuclide technique for detecting normal versus any abnormal wall motion was 71%, with a specificity of 99%. Equilibrium gated ventriculography is an excellent noninvasive technique for evaluating segmental LV wall motion. It is least reliable in assessing the proximal inferior wall and interventricular septum.

  3. Equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography: Comparison with echo-ventriculography and digital subtraction angiocardiography, evaluation of multiparameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoer, G; Standke, R; Klepzig, H Jr; Maul, F D; Tuengerthal, S; Tezak, S; Reifarth, N; Kanemoto, N; Happ, J; Baum, R P

    1986-09-01

    Subsequent to the discussion of technical prerequisites (fully-automated, reproducible multiparameter-analysis (MPA), rest, exercise) which is followed by remarks concerning the pathophysiology of ischemic left ventricular functional disorders in diastole and systole, the following points are considered: 1) comparative results of RNV, cineventriculoangiography, echo-ventriculography and intraveneous digital subtraction angiocardiography; 2) 'normal' values of RNV in MPA; 3) heart and pulmonary diseases (coronary artery disease with sensitivity and specificity of MPA), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic aortic insufficiency, hypertension; 4) summary of, and prospects for future potentialities (software, clinical indications).

  4. Normal left ventricular emptying in coronary artery disease at rest: analysis by radiographic and equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denenberg, B.S.; Makler, P.T.; Bove, A.A.; Spann, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    The volume ejected early in systole has been proposed as an indicator of abnormal left ventricular function that is present at rest in patients with coronary artery disease with a normal ejection fraction and normal wall motion. The volume ejected in systole was examined by calculating the percent change in ventricular volume using both computer-assisted analysis of biplane radiographic ventriculograms at 60 frames/s and equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculograms. Ventricular emptying was examined with radiographic ventriculography in 33 normal patients and 23 patients with coronary artery disease and normal ejection fraction. Eight normal subjects and six patients with coronary artery disease had both radiographic ventriculography and equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography. In all patients, there was excellent correlation between the radiographic and radionuclide ventricular emptying curves (r . 0.971). There were no difference in the ventricular emptying curves of normal subjects and patients with coronary artery disease whether volumes were measured by radiographic or equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography. It is concluded that the resting ventricular emptying curves are identical in normal subjects and patients with coronary artery disease who have a normal ejection fraction and normal wall motion

  5. Possibilities of exercise radionuclide ventriculography carried out in equilibrium in the detection of ischaemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csernay, L.; Mester, J.; Edes, I.; Pavics, L.; Gruber, N.; Szasz, K.; Csanady, M.

    1985-08-04

    Authors give account of the initiation of the exercise radionuclide ventriculography and of their diagnostic experiences. In 33 control persons and 20 patients with coronary heart disease verified with coronarography, the left ventricular ejection fraction, the wall motion and the systolic and diastolic volume of the left ventricle were examined at rest and during exercise. A decrease or an increase of not more than 5% of ejection fraction, the exercise induced wall motion abnormalities or an increase of resting wall motion disorder were interpreted as an index of underlying significant coronary stenosis. A sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 88% of the method were found. Upon the results, which are in good agreement with literary data, the initiation of the method in nuclear medical laboratories equipped with camera-computer system is proposed

  6. Possibilities of exercise radionuclide ventriculography carried out in equilibrium in the detection of ischaemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernay, Laszlo; Mester, Janos; Edes, Istvan; Pavics, Laszlo; Gruber, Noemi; Szasz, Karoly; Csanady, Miklos

    1985-01-01

    Authors give account of the initiation of the exercise radionuclide ventriculography and of their diagnostic experiences. In 33 control persons and 20 patients with coronary heart disease verified with coronarography, the left ventricular ejection fraction, the wall motion and the systolic and diastolic volume of the left ventricle were examined at rest and during exercise. A decrease or an increase of not more than 5% of ejection fraction, the exercise induced wall motion abnormalities or an increase of resting wall motion disorder were interpreted as an index of underlying significant coronary stenosis. A sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 88% of the method were found. Upon the results, which are in good agreement with literary data, the initiation of the method in nuclear medical laboratories equipped with camera-computer system is proposed. (author)

  7. Segmental wall-motion analysis in the right anterior oblique projection: comparison of exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography and exercise contrast ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.H.; Keyes, J.W. Jr.; Brymer, J.F.; Walton, J.A.; Pitt, B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease were studied at rest and during supine bicycle exercise with radionuclide and contrast left ventriculography. Analysis of regional wall motion was made by visual evaluation of the five standard 30 0 right anterior oblique (RAO) wall segments in the contrast images and the corresponding 10 0 RAO radionuclide segments. The radionuclide studies were evaluated independently by three observers using a five-point grading system. The interobserver wall-motion grading agreed completely in more than 80% of segments at rest and exercise, and agreed within one wall-motion grade in more than 95% of segments. The comparison of wall-motion grades between radionuclide and contrast ventriculograms showed complete agreement in 86% of segments at rest and in 78% during exercise, and agreement within one wall-motion grade in 97% of rest and 96% of exercise segments. Visual evaluation of 10 0 RAO rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculograms compares favorably with rest and exercise 30 0 RAO contrast ventriculograms and demonstrates satisfactory interobserver agreement

  8. Fourier phase analysis on equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography: range of phase spread and cut-off limits in normal individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramaiah, Vijayaraghavan L.; Harish, B.; Sunil, H.V.; Selvakumar, Job; Ravi Kishore, A.G.; Nair, Gopinathan

    2011-01-01

    To define the range of phase spread on equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography (ERNV) in normal individuals and derive the cut-off limit for the parameters to detect cardiac dyssynchrony. ERNV was carried out in 30 individuals (age 53±23 years, 25 males and 5 females) who had no history of cardiovascular disease. They all had normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF 55-70%) as determined by echocardiography, were in sinus rhythm, with normal QRS duration (≤120 msec) and normal coronary angiography. First harmonic phase analysis was performed on scintigraphic data acquired in best septal view. Left and right ventricular standard deviation (LVSD and RVSD, respectively) and interventricular mechanical delay (IVMD), the absolute difference of mean phase angles of right and left ventricle, were computed and expressed in milliseconds. Mean + 3 standard deviation (SD) was used to derive the cut-off limits. Average LVEF and duration of cardiac cycle in the study group were 62.5%±5.44% and 868.9±114.5 msec, respectively. The observations of LVSD, RVSD and right and left ventricular mean phase angles were shown to be normally distributed by Shapiro-Wilk test. Cut-off limits for LVSD, RVSD and IVMD were calculated to be 80 msec, 85 msec and 75 msec, respectively. Fourier phase analysis on ERNV is an effective tool for the evaluation of synchronicity of cardiac contraction. The cut-off limits of parameters of dyssynchrony can be used to separate heart failure patients with cardiac dyssynchrony from those without. ERNV can be used to select patients for cardiac resynchronization therapy. (author)

  9. Improved method of static radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidzon, G.S.; Myasnik, B.N.

    1988-01-01

    A method of 2-stage recording of radionuclide ventriculography has been proposed, the second stage being shifted to a certain time interval, i.e. a delay line is introduced between a synchronizing device and computer. Particular attention is drawn to a choice of delay time depending on a computer memory volume: in a small memory volume delay time must be approximately one-third of the patient's R-R interval

  10. Radionuclide exercise ventriculography and levels of workload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynchank, S.

    1982-01-01

    The wealth of useful information made available from the utilization of radionuclide cardiological investigations by non-invasive means is outlined and reasons for investigating results obtained under conditions of increased heart workload are explained. The lack of an accepted protocol for the determination of exercise levels is noted. A format for obtaining increasing heart loads dependent on increasing pulse rate is offered, with justification. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography examinations can be conducted which are simple, reproducible and allow appropriate levels of stress in patients who can benefit from such investigations

  11. Application of radionuclide ventriculography to cardiac screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, J. Jr.; Milner, M.R.; Chandeysson, P.L.; Rodman, D.J.; Okin, P.M.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Screening asymptomatic individuals for latent coronary disease often requires sequential testing because exercise electrocardiography typically produces more false positive than true positive results in a population with a low prevalence of coronary disease. Cardiac scintigraphy is a technique that may be employed as a confirmatory test in lieu of coronary arteriography to further evaluate the significance of a positive exercise electrocardiogram. Radionuclide ventriculography was employed in 98 asymptomatic individuals who were considered to be at moderate risk of heart disease after risk factor analysis and exercise electrocardiography. Seventeen (17%) patients had an abnormal study and underwent cardiac catheterization. Seven had coronary artery disease, two had cardiomyopathy, and eight were normal. Eighty-one (83%) patients had a normal study. Because the sensitivity of radionuclide ventriculography is 63-80%, it was postulated that 2 to 5 individuals with disease were missed. Thus, from a population with an 11-14% prevalence of disease, two subsets were identified. A large subset in which a prevalence of 2-6% could be estimated was separated from a much smaller one in which a prevalence of approximately 50% was demonstrated

  12. Potassium cardioplegia: early assessment by radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.J.; Born, M.; Feit, T.; Ebert, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    Left ventricular function was evaluated by single pass /sup 99m/Tc radionuclide ventriculography when potassium cardioplegia was combined with hypothermia. In 35 patients undergoing myocardial revascularization (3 CABG/patient) in which potassium cardioplegia at 4 0 C was used, no patient developed a myocardial infarction either by electrocardiogram or /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate imaging in the postoperative period. In 22 patients, aortic cross-clamp time was greater than 60 min, and the ejection fraction by the single pass radionuclide technique was 50% preoperatively and 53% postoperatively (NS). Wall motion in the single RAO view was not worse postoperatively. No patient required any inotropic agents in the immediate postoperative period. It appears that no significant ventricular impairment occurred in the immediate postoperative period (48 to 72 hours) when potassium cardioplegia combined with hypothermia was used for a 60-minute period

  13. The acute hemodynamic effects of intravenous verapamil in coronary artery disease. Assessment by equilibrium-gated radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, H.O.; Ninio, R.; Oren, V.; Lang, R.; Sareli, P.; DiSegni, E.; David, D.; Guerrero, J.; Kaplinsky, E.

    1983-01-01

    The acute hemodynamic effects of an i.v. bolus of verapamil, 0.1 mg/kg or 0.06-0.075 mg/kg, were examined by serial radionuclide studies in 46 patients with coronary artery disease. In 20 patients with ejection fractions (EFs) greater than 35% (group 1A), verapamil, 0.1 mg/kg given over 1-11/2 minutes, had a biphasic effect: first, a transient decrease in EF accompanied by increased left ventricular (LV) volumes and cardiac output equivalents; then, an overshoot of EF to values above control, accompanied by a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and a drastic decrease in LV volumes, while cardiac output equivalent remained slightly elevated. In eight patients with EFs less than 35% (group 1B), only the first effect on EF was noted. In 10 patients with EFs greater than 35% (group 2), verapamil, 0.06-0.075 mg/kg, exerted qualitatively similar but milder effects on hemodynamic function. Finally, verapamil, 0.1 mg/kg given more slowly, over 2-21/2 minutes, produced no significant changes in EF or LV volumes in another eight patients (group 3). The acute effects of verapamil are thus both time-related and dose-dependent. They are also related to the baseline functional reserve of the left ventricle. This study documents that verapamil exerts a depressant effect on LV function. However, the transient nature of this depression and the quick recovery to normal or above-normal values indicate that verapamil, in the doses used in this study, is safe to use intravenously in patients with coronary artery disease

  14. Evaluation of right ventricular function using gated equilibrium blood pool radionuclide ventriculography in patients with congenital volume and pressure overload late after surgical repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Nobuaki; Sakakibara, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Shinichiro; Nomura, Fumikazu; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Matsumura, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Jiro; Kodama, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    The effects of congenital right ventricular pressure and volume overload were studied in 3 patients with pulmonary stenosis, 7 with atrial septal defect and 6 with atrial septal defect plus pulmonary stenosis late after successful surgical correction. Gated equilibrium blood pool radionuclide ventriculography was used to measure right ventricular function at rest and during exercise and to compare it with eight normal subjects. Right ventricular ejection fractions at rest and during exercise were measured to be 61±9% and 66±13%, respectively, in the group with pulmonary stenosis, 49±7% and 54±8% in the group with atrial septal defect, and 65±13% and 69±13% in the group with atrial septal defect plus pulmonary stenosis. The values in the groups with pulmonary stenosis and atrial septal defect plus pulmonary stenosis were significantly higher than the control subjects (45±5% and 51±5%, p<0.01). The peak filling rate at rest and during exercise was also significantly higher in the groups with pulmonary stenosis and atrial septal defect plus pulmonary stenosis than in controls (at rest, 2.72±0.72, 2.53±0.94 vs. 1.64±0.24 p<0.05; during exercise, 4.38±1.23, 4.13±1.18 vs. 2.25±0.62, p<0.01). When patients with right ventricular systolic pressure equal to or greater than left ventricular systolic pressure and those with right ventricular systolic pressure less than left ventricular systolic pressure were compared, the right ventricular ejection fraction and peak filling rate were greater with the higher pressure at rest (71±10% and 3.12±0.81% vs. 55±3% and 2.30±0.27, p<0.05) and during exercise (75±11% and 4.86±1.01 vs. 59±3% and 2.61±0.35, p<0.05). Postoperative right ventricular hyperfunction may be due to preoperative pressure, but not volume, overload. (author)

  15. Factor analysis for exercise stress radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Kazuyoshi; Yasuda, Mitsutaka; Oku, Hisao; Ikuno, Yoshiyasu; Takeuchi, Kazuhide; Takeda, Tadanao; Ochi, Hironobu

    1987-01-01

    Using factor analysis, a new image processing in exercise stress radionuclide ventriculography, changes in factors associated with exercise were evaluated in 14 patients with angina pectoris or old myocardial infarction. The patients were imaged in the left anterior oblique projection, and three factor images were presented on a color coded scale. Abnormal factors (AF) were observed in 6 patients before exercise, 13 during exercise, and 4 after exercise. In 7 patients, the occurrence of AF was associated with exercise. Five of them became free from AF after exercise. Three patients showing AF before exercise had aggravation of AF during exercise. Overall, the occurrence or aggravation of AF was associated with exercise in ten (71 %) of the patients. The other three patients, however, had disappearance of AF during exercise. In the last patient, none of the AF was observed throughout the study. In view of a high incidence of AF associated with exercise, the factor analysis may have the potential in evaluating cardiac reverse from the viewpoint of left ventricular wall motion abnormality. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Results of radionuclide ventriculography in normal children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, O.; Krejcir, M.; Ruth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In order to assess the range of normal values in radionuclide ventriculography, 53 normal children and adolescents were selected in retrospect. All were exdamined by radionuclide angiocardiography on account of clinical and echocardiographical suspicion of congenital heart disease with a left-to-right shunt; a significant shunt was, however, excluded. In all patients, after equilibration of the radiopharmaceutical the ventricular function was examined by radionuclide ventriculography. The usual volume, time and rate characteristics were evaluated. The normal range was defined as the mean ±2 standard deviations which is 47 to 72% for the ejection fraction of the left ventricle and 31 to 56% for the ejection fraction of the right ventricle. (author). 2 tabs., 18 refs

  17. Radionuclide ventriculography in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jiahe

    1992-01-01

    The ventricular functions of 22 children with Duchenne disease(DD) were studied by radionuclide multi-gated ventriculography using in-vivo labeled 99m Tc-RBC and compared with those of 30 age-matched normal children, 20 congenital heart disease and 7 congestive cardiomyopathy. 21 parameters were evaluated, including RV and LV EF, systolic and diastolic functions and phase distribution, etc. It was found that the DD patients showed several specific cardiac functional alterations, i.e, slight but significant abnormality in both systolic and diastolic function, special phase delay at post-lateral segment of LV in 81.8% of the patients. It is concluded that (1) all DD patients have definite evidence of heart injury; (2) the injury is mainly on the left side of the heart, influencing entire cardiac cycle; (3) there is specific phase abnormality in DD patients; (4) the radionuclide ventriculography is of great value in monitoring of these cardiac functional changes

  18. Assessment of sistemic ventricle function in corrected transposition of great arteries with Gated SPECT: comparison with radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexanderson, E.; Espinola, N.; Duenas, D.; Fermon, S.; Acevedo, C.; Martinez, C.

    2002-01-01

    Corrected trasposition of great arteries is a uncommon congenital heart disease where the right ventricle works as the sistemic one. QGS Gated SPECT program was designed to recognize the contours of left ventricle being a good method to evaluate left ventricle ejection fraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the right ventricle ejection fraction (RVEF) by gated SPECT using Tc-99mSestaMIBI in comparison with radionuclide ventriculography (RVG) in patients with corrected trasposition of great arteries. Methods: We performed gated SPECT and radionuclide ventriculography within 15 days of each other in 7 adults consecutive patients with the diagnosis of corrected trasposition of great arteries (5 men, 2 women; mean age 47 y). Gated tomographic data, including ventricular volumes and ejection fraction, were processed using QGS automatic algorithm, whereas equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography used standard techniques. Results: We found a good correlation between right ventricle ejection fraction obtained with Gated SPECT compared with equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography. The mean of the RVEF with Gated SPECT was 41.2% compared with 44.2% of RVEF with equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography. Both methods recognized abnormal RVEF in 5 patients ( 50%) with Gated SPECT and abnormal with RVG meanwhile another patient had normal RVEF with RVG and abnormal with Gated SPECT. Conclusion: Quantitative gated tomography, using Tc 99mSestaMIBI, has a good correlation with radionuclide ventriculography for the assessment of right ventricle ejection fraction in patients with corrected trasposition of great arteries. These results support the clinical use of this technique among these patients

  19. Assessment of ventricular function by radionuclide ventriculography in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Weiyu; He Pinyu; Zhuang Weite

    1996-01-01

    Left ventricular(LV) and right ventricular(RV) function were determined using radionuclide ventriculography in 50 patients with hyperthyroidism. LVEF, LVPFR, SV of the hyperthyroidism group were decreased in comparison with the normal group (P<0.01), whereas CO of the hyperthyroidism patients were higher than that of normal (P<0.01). Except LVPER, the LVEF, SV had significant difference between two groups. Compared to normal group, RVEF, RVPER, RVPFR were also decreased (P<0.01). Besides 30 cases of the hyperthyroidism were examined by impedance cardiogram (ICG) and impedance pulmonary rheogram (IPR), all showed closely correlation with the parameters determined by ventriculography. There was the involvement of right ventricular function insufficiency, especially in ejection phase. When compared with pre-therapy, pos-therapy cases showed significant improvement in EF, PER, PFR of left and right ventricular

  20. Quantitative assessment of valvular regurgitation using radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Rongfang

    1992-01-01

    Radionuclide ventriculography has been used to assess quantitatively the extent of mitral and aortic regurgitation in 70 patients and compared to echocardiography and the finding of surgery. Two radionuclide parameters were measured: regurgitant index (RI) = left ventricular stroke counts/right ventricular stroke counts; and regurgitant fraction (RF) = left ventricular stroke counts-right ventricular stroke counts/left ventricular stroke counts. In 28 patients without valvular heart disease, the RI was 1.10 ± 0.15 and Rf was 10.3 ± 15.0%, respectively. However, in patients with valvular regurgitation, the RI and RF were 3.41 ± 1.73 and 61.1 ± 21.2%, respectively. A good correlation was found between the results obtained by radionuclide techniques and the findings of surgery and doppler studies. The level of concordance between RI and surgical findings was 91.7%. Follow up studies in 10 patients after valvular replacement surgery showed the RI and RF return to normal. These data suggested that radionuclide ventriculography is very useful for quantitative assessment of valvular regurgitation

  1. Preoperative prediction of reversible myocardial asynergy by postexercise radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanski, A.; Berman, D.; Gray, R.; Diamond, G.; Raymond, M.; Prause, J.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Matloff, J.

    1982-01-01

    Myocardial asynergy is sometimes reversed by coronary bypass, and a noninvasive method of predicting which assess are reversible would be desirable. To assess whether changes in myocardial wall motion observed immediately after exercise can differentiate reversible from nonreversible myocardial asynergy, we evaluated 53 patients by radionuclide ventriculography before and after exercise and again at rest after coronary bypass surgery. Preoperative improvement in wall motion immediately after exercise was highly predictive of the surgical outcome (average chance-corrected agreement, 91 per cent). At surgery the asynergic segments that had improved after exercise were free of grossly apparent epicardial scarring. The accuracy of these predictions for postoperative improvement was significantly greater (P less than 0.01) than that of analysis of Q waves on resting electrocardiography (average chance-corrected agreement, 40 per cent). In contrast, preoperative changes in left ventricular ejection fraction after exercise were not predictive of postoperative resting ejection fraction. We conclude that postexercise radionuclide ventriculography can be used to identify reversible resting myocardial asynergy. This test should prove effective in predicting which patients with myocardial asynergy are most likely to benefit from aortocoronary revascularization

  2. Detection of coronary artery disease by exercise radionuclide ventriculography, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Saito, Muneyasu; Uehara, Toshiisa; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1982-01-01

    In order to assess the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) and LV functional reserve, exercise radionuclide ventriculography (ERV) were performed in 80 patients who underwent selective cardiac catneterization for evaluation of chest pain syndrome. 70 patients had CAD (30 patients with angina pectoris and 40 patients with myocardial infarction) and 10 did not. In this study, to obtain accurate data by ERV, its practical consideration were metioned. Radionuclide cardioangiography with sup(99m)Tc-invivo RBC labelling were performed using an Anger camera attached with high-sense collimator and on-line minicomputer system. For data aquisition, multi-gated method were used, especially during exercise, list mode collection was suitable for ERV because of variable R-R intervals. Patient stability was performed with an adjustable shoulder support and hand grip, ECG monitoring system by carbon electrolode was used to obtain during exercise. Exercise protocal was graded bicycle ergometer in supine position. As the results, in the patients of CAD, changes of LVEF from rest to exercise were under 5%, while in normal patients, LVEF increased over 5% in all patients. In 30 patients with angina pectoris, the ERV was abnormal in 25 for a sensitivity of 83.3% and specificity of 100%. The ERV were thought to be superior than stress ECG for the detection of CAD. In conclusion, with increasing clinical application, the use of ERV is rapidly becoming wider-spread but the excellent results were thought to depend upon the careful attention to equipment and exercise procedure. (author)

  3. Radionuclide ventriculography for evaluation of left ventricular function in patients after myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sledzevskaya, I.K.; Stroganova, N.P.; Il'yash, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    The use of an expanded set of parameters of radionuclide ventriculography with 99m Tc-prtechnetate, characterizing myocardial function, made it possible to specify radionuclide semiotics of myocardial infarction, to identify 4 cardiodynamic types, and to establish correlation between a degree of cardiodynamic changes and a site of lesion, and the relationship with exercise tolerance

  4. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography to detect restenosis following coronary angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Puey, E.G.; Leatherman, L.L.; Dear, W.E.; Leachman, R.D.; Massin, E.K.; Mathur, V.S.; Burdine, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Forty one patients (pts) underwent semiupright exercise gated radionuclide ventriculography (EGRNV) before, within 3 d after single vessel transluminal coronary angioplasty (TCA), and 4 to 12 mos later, at which time follow-up cardiac catheterization was also performed. Prior to TCA 76% of pts had abnormal EGRNV, as defined by a failure to increase ejection fraction (EF) by 5 points or the development of a new regional wall motion abnormality. Stenosis was reduced from 90 +- 7% to 18 +- 17%. Early after TCA, exercise duration and maximum double product increased (p's 20% but <50%; Group III (n=8): ≥ 50%] Pts with abnormal EGRNV early after TCA were demonstrated to have a greater percent increase in stenosis at late follow-up than pts with normal EGRNV (41 +- 30% vs 19 +- 25%, p<.001). Early after TCA EGRNV was abnormal in 5% of Group I pts vs 75% in Group III (p<.01), and EF increased to a greater degree during exercise in Group I pts (+11.3 +- 7.5 vs +3.5 +- 6.5 points, p<.01). At 4-12 mos EGRNV was abnormal in 27% of Group I vs 88% of Group III (p<.01), and during exercise EF increased in Group I pts (+11.8 +- 7.8 points) but decreased in Group III (-1.9 +- 8.7 points) (p<.0005). The accuracy of abnormal EGRNV in predicting ≥ 50% restenosis was 73% early post-TCA and 77% at 4-12 mos. The authors conclude that EGRNV is a valuable test to verify the success of TCA and to detect subsequent restenosis

  5. Receiver operating characteristic analysis improves diagnosis by radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, C.Z.; Forman, M.B.; Vaugh, W.K.; Sandler, M.P.; Kronenberg, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic analysis (ROC) evaluates continuous variables to define diagnostic criteria for the optimal sensitivity (SENS) and specificity (SPEC) of a test. The authors studied exercise-induced chest pain (CP), ST-changes on electrocardiography (ECG) and rest-exercise gated radionuclide ventriculography (RVG) using ROC to clarify the optimal criteria for detecting myocardial ischemia due to coronary artherosclerosis (CAD). The data of 95 consecutive patients studied with coronary angiography, rest-exercise RVG and ECG were reviewed. 77 patients had ''significant'' CAD (≥50% lesions). Exercise-induced CP, ECG abnormalities (ST-T shifts) and RVG abnormalities (change in ejection fraction, 2-view regional wall motion change and relative end-systolic volume) were evaluated to define optimal SENS/SPEC of each and for the combined data. ROC curves were constructed by multiple logistic regression (MLR). By MLR, RVG alone was superior to ECG and CP. The combination of all three produced the best ROC curve for the entire group and for clinical subsets based on the number of diseased vessels and the presence or absence of prior myocardial infarction. When CP, ECG and RVG were combined, the optimal SENS/SPEC for detection of single vessel disease was 88/86. The SENS/SPEC for 3 vessel disease was 93/95. Thus, the application of RVG for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is improved with the inclusion of ECG and CP data by the use of a multiple logistic regression model. ROC analysis allows clinical application of multiple data for diagnosing CAD at desired SENS/SPEC rather than by arbitrary single-standard criteria

  6. Effect of acute postinfusion lipemia and free fatty acids on myocardial contractility: Assessment with radionuclide ventriculography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, L; Freeman, M L; Barnes, W E; Kaplan, E; Pacold, I; Loeb, H S; Johnson, B; Reid, R W

    1986-08-01

    Equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography was used to valuate the effect of intravenous fat-emulsion overload and excess of free fatty acids (FFA) on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in 20 patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifteen of these patients had normal (>50%) baseline LVEF and 5 had low (<50%) baseline LVEF. From 100 to 150 ml of 20% artificial fat emulsion (Liposyn) was infused over 20-25 min. At the end of the infusion, triglyceridemia reached 820 +- 220 mg% and left ventricular ejection fraction decreased from baseline 62 +- 19% (mean +-SD) to 58 +- 16% (P < 0.05, paired t-test). After completion of Liposyn infusion, 5,000 U of heparin was administered intravenously and monitoring of LVEF was continued. One and one-half hours following heparin administration, plasma FFA levels reached 3.7 + 2.0 mmol/l and LVEF rose to 69 +- 19% (P < 0.001, paired t-test). Our data indicate that acute intravenous fat overload can suppress and high pathophysiologic levels of FFA can increase LVEF. This effect is more uniform and statistically more reliable in patients with normal LVEF. The study failed to demonstrate any significant difference in the effect of this pharmacologic intervention between patients with and without CAD.

  7. Pharmacological radionuclide ventriculography for detection of myocardial contractile reserve in patients after myocardial infarction: head-to-head comparison of low dose dobutamine and low dose dypiridamole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrasinovic, Z.; Ostojic, M.; Beleslin, B.; Stojkovic, S.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Stankovic, G.; Dikic, A.; Pavlovic, S.; Sobic, D.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Low dose pharmacological stress echocardiography with either dobutamine or dipyridamole infusion has been proposed for recognition of myocardial viability. However, dependence on adequate acoustic window, observer experience, and the mild degree of wall motion changes make the viability assessment by stress echocardiography especially bothersome. The objective of the study was to evaluate the ability of low dose dobutamine and low dose dipyridamole radionuclide ventriculography to detect contractile reserve in patients after myocardial infarction and functional recovery after coronary angioplasty. Methods. The study group consisted of 20 consecutive patients (52±10 years, 17 male) with previous myocardial infarction and resting regional dyssynergy, in whom diagnostic cardiac catheterization revealed significant one-vessel coronary artery stenosis suitable for angioplasty. Each patient underwent equilibrium 99m-Tc radionuclide ventriculography which was performed at rest and during low dose dipyridamole (0.28 mg/kg over 2 minutes) and low dose dobutamine infusion (up to 10 mcg/kg/min). Left ventricular global and regional ejection fractions were determined. Increase of regional ejection fraction for >5% (inferoapical and posterolateral regions) or >10% (anteroseptal regions) during low dose dobutamine and dipyridamole in infarcted regions, as well as in the follow up period, was considered as index of contractile reserve. After 8 weeks of successful angioplasty, resting radionuclide ventriculography was repeated in all patients in order to identify functional recovery of the infarct zone. Results. Out of the 180 analyzed segments (20x9), 90 regional ejection fractions have shown depressed contractility. The mean of the regional ejection fractions showing depressed contractility increased from the resting value of 34±12% to 42±14% in the follow-up period (p=0.06). Of the 90 with baseline dyssynergy, 46 were responders during low-dose dobutamine (51

  8. Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography in the ambulatory monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raichlen, J.S.; Brest, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography serves as a valuable adjunct in the noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease. Although estimations of regurgitant fractions and the differences between left and right ventricular stroke volumes can be made, the limitations of the techniques do not enable adequate quantitation of the severity of valvular insufficiency to warrant routine use in ambulatory management. The importance of radionuclide ventriculography, however, lies in its ability to examine global ventricular function both at rest and with exercise, thus enabling assessment of the functional reserve of the left and right ventricles. Such data are of considerable value in determining the need for invasive evaluation and the timing of valve replacement in patients with valvular heart disease. 41 references.

  9. Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography in the ambulatory monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichlen, J.S.; Brest, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography serves as a valuable adjunct in the noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease. Although estimations of regurgitant fractions and the differences between left and right ventricular stroke volumes can be made, the limitations of the techniques do not enable adequate quantitation of the severity of valvular insufficiency to warrant routine use in ambulatory management. The importance of radionuclide ventriculography, however, lies in its ability to examine global ventricular function both at rest and with exercise, thus enabling assessment of the functional reserve of the left and right ventricles. Such data are of considerable value in determining the need for invasive evaluation and the timing of valve replacement in patients with valvular heart disease. 41 references

  10. Importance of adequate exercise in the detection of coronary heart disease by radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.H.; Lo, K.; Pitt, B.

    1980-01-01

    Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculograms were obtained on 77 symptomatic patients without prior documented coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary artery disease was present by angiograms in 48. Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was abnormal in 41 patients (overall sensitivity 85%). In 29 patients with normal coronary arteries, RNV was normal in 24 (specificity 83%). To determine if the exercise level affects sensitivity, the studies were graded for adequacy of exercise. It was considered adequate if patients developed (a) chest pain, or (b) ST segment depression of at least 1 mm, or (c) if they achieved a pressure rate product greater than 250. Among the 48 patients with coronary artery disease, 35 achieved adequate exercise. Thirty-three had an abnormal RNV (sensitivity 94%). In 13 patients who failed to achieve adequate exercise, RNV was abnormal in eight (sensitivity of only 62%). Some patients with coronary artery disease may have a normal ventricular response at inadequate levels of stress

  11. Analysis of cardiac images of radionuclide ventriculography in AT-Type personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillo, R.; Gonzalez, P.; Ehijo, A.; Otarola, T.M.S.; Ortiz, M.; Silva, A.M.; Ortiz, M.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this research was to produce software for the processing of Cardiac Phase images in personal computers. The results of standard radionuclide Ventriculography and Fourier analysis, got on gamma camera Ohio Nuclear 410 Sygma and Digital PDP 11/34 computer were coded into ASCII file and then transfered via Smarterm 220/Kermit to an Accel 900 AT PC. After decoding the images they were processed with a program develope in C Lenguaje obtaining the values of Phase Angles in the whole phase images and in regions of interest drawn around the cardiac chambers. The images and values were the same as those obtained by conventional processing in the PDP 11/34 computer. This is considered a first stage for the use of PC to Nuclear Medicine imaging studies. (author)

  12. Relative value of clinical variables, bicycle ergometry, rest radionuclide ventriculography and 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring at discharge to predict 1 year survival after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Fioretti (Paolo); R.W. Brower (Ronald); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); H.J. ten Katen (Harald); A. Beelen (Anita); T. Baardman (Taco); J. Lubsen (Jacob); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe relative value of predischarge clinical variables, bicycle ergometry, radionuclide ventriculography and 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring for predicting survival during the first year in 351 hospital survivors of acute myocardial infarction was assessed. Discriminant

  13. Combined evaluation of first-pass radionuclide angiography and epuilibrium radionuclide ventriculography in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knesewitsch, P.; Kleinhans, E.; Buell, U.

    1986-01-01

    The results of 203 patients who underwent first-pass radionuclide angiography (FP), as well as quantitative equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography (qERNV), were stored in a data base system and evaluated statistically. In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) without previous myocardial infarction (MI), evaluation of global and regional ejection fraction (gEF, rEF) at rest revealed a poor sensitivity of 64% (Rest-qERNV) and 69% (Rest-FP), respectively. In patients with a history of one previous MI, the sensitivity of both methods was equivalent: FP 87% and qERNV 84%. In patients with several MIs, sensitivity was higher than 90%. Concerning localization of MI, remarkable differences between FP and qERNV were found. In posterior wall infarction, the FP sensitivity was 87% and qERNV only 67%, whereas in anterior wall infarction, the results were similar for both methods.: 93% (FP) and 96% (qERNV), respectively. Since 30 0 RAO camera position achieves the best visualization of the anterior and posterior wall, FP is superior to qERNV in the evaluation of posterior wall asynergies. In addition, qERNV often fails to discriminate anterior and posterior wall motion abnormalities. (orig.)

  14. How to accurately assess the clinical value of isometric exercise radionuclide ventriculography in diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shunfang; Zhu Huiping; Zeng Jun; Xie Wenhui; Yu Zhichang

    2001-01-01

    To assess the influence of isometric handgrip exercise on left ventricular function by radionuclide ventriculography in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Using gated equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography, parameters of left ventricular function were analyzed at rest and during 30% sustained handgrip (HNG) for 5 - 10 minuets in 8 normal control subjects and 38 consecutive CAD patients. All investigated subjects were also performed coronary arteriography within 2 weeks. Results showed that at rest, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), peak filling rate (PFR), end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and heart rate (HR) were reduced in one-vessel, two-vessel and three-vessel of stenosis patient group (53.67 +- 5.0)%, (52.47 +- 8.26)%, (52.81 +- 8.89)%; 2.87 +- 0.29, 2.71 +- 0.88, 3.07 +- 0.71 end-diastolic volume per second (EDV/s); 1.36 +- 0.05, 1.34 +- 0.06, 1.34 +- 0.06; 0.62 +-0.06, 0.66 +- 0.06, 0.65 +- 0.1; 69.67 +- 8.14, 72.85 +- 10.5, 76.56 +- 18.04 (min -1 ), respectively, as compared with controls (57 +- 10.45)%, p = NS; 2.94 +- 0.44 (EDV/s), p = NS; 1.38 +- 0.15, p = NS; 0.59 +- 0.11, p = NS; 72.88 +- 8.25 (min -1 ), p = NS, respectively. During HNG exercise using both hands, the indexes were reduced in CAD patients (54.44 +- 5.66)%, (48.84 +- 8.70)%, (45.25 +- 8.69)%; 2.75 +- 0.39, 2.50 +- 0.68, 2.22 +- 0.58 (EDV/s); 1.36 +- 0.05, 1.31 +- 0.06, 1.26 +- 0.07; 0.61 +- 0.07, 0.69 +- 0.06, 0.71 +- 0.09; 81.33 +- 8.92, 84.46 +- 14.29, 90.56 +- 26.54 (min -1 ), respectively, as compared with controls (59.38 +- 9.44)%, p = NS; -1 ), p = NS, respectively. The four protocols of CAD diagnosis were 1. LVEF <55% and ΔPFR < 0 EDV/s at rest (Δ value = during HNG value-rest value); 2. LVEF <55% during HNG and ΔPFR <0 EDV/s; 3. ΔLVEF <0% and ΔPFR <0 EDV/s; 4. ΔEF <0%. Their sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 45%, 53%, 66%, 76%, 100%, 100%, 87.5%, 87.5%, 54%, 61%, 70%, 78%, respectively. The isomeric exercise radionuclide

  15. Detection of occult pericardial hemorrhage early after open-heart surgery using technetium-99m red blood cell radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, T.M.; Czer, L.S.; Gray, R.J.; Kass, R.M.; Raymond, M.J.; Garcia, E.V.; Chaux, A.; Matloff, J.M.; Berman, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    Pericardial or mediastinal hemorrhage requiring reoperation occurs in 2% to 5% of patients, usually early (0 to 48 hours), after open-heart surgery. This hemorrhage may be occult, and resulting cardiac tamponade may easily be misinterpreted as ventricular dysfunction, common early postoperatively. In such cases, appropriate and timely intervention may not occur. Of 50 patients evaluated by technetium-99m red blood cell gated equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) because of early postoperative cardiogenic shock of uncertain etiology, 17 had unique scintigraphic images suggestive of intrathoracic hemorrhage. Of these 17, 5 had a generalized halo of abnormal radioactivity surrounding small hyperdynamic right and left ventricles, 11 had localized regions of intense blood pool activity outside the cardiac chambers (two with compression of single chambers), and one demonstrated marked radionuclide activity in the right hemithorax (2000 ml of blood at reoperation). Twelve patients had exploratory reoperation for control of hemorrhage as a direct result of the scintigraphic findings, three were successfully treated with fresh frozen plasma and platelet infusions along with medical interventions to optimize cardiac performance, and two patients died in cardiogenic shock (presumed tamponade) without reoperation. In the 12 reoperated patients, all were confirmed to have active pericardial bleeding. Scintigraphic localization of abnormal blood pools within the pericardium corresponded to the sites at which active bleeding was witnessed at reoperation. The abnormal bleeding was etiologically related to the tamponade state, with marked improvement in hemodynamics after reoperation. Nine additional patients were reoperated for presumed tamponade after RNV revealed an exaggerated halo of photon deficiency surrounding the cardiac chambers

  16. Problems in clinical assessment of left ventricular peak filling rate with radionuclide ventriculography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Kim, Bong-Ha; Tsuneoka, Yutaka

    1987-02-01

    With an increased clinical application of early peak diastolic filling rate (PFR) using radionuclide ventriculography, problems of its clinical significance have emerged. The study was designed to answer the following questions: 1) accuracy of PFR measurement, 2) normalization of PFR, and 3) whether PFR may reflect left ventricular relaxation rate (LVRR). In measuring PFR, an elevated framing rate was required, and the optimal rate was 20 msec/F. Second sound heart gating technique proved to be complementary to conventional ECG R wave gating technique in the evaluation of left ventricular diastolic volume curves and mean filling rate associated with changes in the range of R-R interval. PFR which was normalized with end-diastolic volume (EDV) did not necessarily reflect measured PFR because of individual differences of EDV. An experiment on the relationship of mitral valve pressure to blood flow in dogs revealed that PFR was influenced by not only LVRR but also left atrial pressure. These results may raise a question of the rationale for using the measurement of PFR, as well as its technical problems, in the objective evaluation of LVRR. (Namekawa, K.).

  17. Effects of AV delay programming on ventricular resynchronisation: role of radionuclide ventriculography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, Patrick T.; Comte, Nathalie; Holzmeister, Johannes; Suetsch, Gabor; Koepfli, Pascal; Namdar, Mehdi; Duru, Firat; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Scharf, Christoph [Universitiy Hospital Zurich NUK C 32, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [Universitiy Hospital Zurich NUK C 32, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-08-15

    Optimal atrioventricular delay (AVD) setting for cardiac resynchronisation therapy, i.e. biventricular pacing in patients with heart failure, remains a formidable challenge. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different AVD on inter- and intra-ventricular resynchronisation using phase histograms of radionuclide ventriculography (RNV). In 17 consecutive patients (mean age 64 {+-} 6 years), RNV was performed 236 {+-} 350 days after pacemaker implantation for cardiac resynchronisation therapy. Images were acquired during atrial pacing at 80 bpm and during biventricular pacing with AVD ranging from 80 to 160 ms. Inter-ventricular dyssynchrony was measured by the delay between the mean phase angles of the left and right ventricles. Intra-ventricular dyssynchrony was measured by the standard deviation (SD) of left ventricular phase histograms. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) was inversely correlated to LV dyssynchrony (SD of LV phase histogram, R = -0.82, p < 0.0001). However, the increase in LVEF by biventricular pacing (mean +4.4 {+-} 4%) showed only modest correlation to the resulting resynchronisation effect (characterised by a -13 {+-} 8 decrease in LV phase histogram SD, R = -0.38, p < 0.0001). RNV is helpful in optimising pacing parameters for resynchronisation therapy. Varying AVD did not have a major impact on intra- or inter-ventricular resynchronisation. Thus, the benefit of AVD-based LVEF optimisation seems to result from atrioventricular resynchronisation. (orig.)

  18. Left ventricle expands maximally preceding end-diastole. Radionuclide ventriculography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horinouchi, Osamu

    2002-01-01

    It has been considered that left ventricle (LV) expands maximally at the end-diastole. However, is it exactly coincident with this point? This study was aimed to determine whether the maximal expansion of LV coincides with the peak of R wave on electrocardiogram. Thirty-three angina pectoris patients with normal LV motion were examined using radionuclide ventriculography. Data were obtained from every 30 ms backward frame from the peak of R wave. All patients showed the time of maximal expansion preceded the peak of R wave. The intervals from the peak of R wave and the onset of P wave to maximal expansion of LV was 105±29 ms and 88±25 ms, respectively. This period corresponds to the timing of maximal excurtion of mitral valve by atrial contraction, and the centripetal motion of LV without losing its volume before end-diastole may be interpreted on account of the movement of mitral valve toward closure. These findings suggest that LV expands maximally between P and R wave after atrial contraction, preceding the peak of R wave thought conventionally as the end-diastole. (author)

  19. Clinical assessment of first pass radionuclide ventriculography after dipyridamole infusion in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Tohru; Tono-oka, Ichiro; Satoh, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiko; Hoshi, Hikaru; Ikeda, Kozue; Tsuiki, Kai; Yasui, Shoji; Komatani, Akio

    1986-01-01

    First pass radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was performed after dipyridamole (D) infusion in 33 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 15 normal volunteers. RNV findings after D infusion were compared with those of conventional exercise RNV and body surface ECG mapping (MAP). For patients with multiple vessel disease, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was significantly lower after D infusion than at rest. Wall motion abnormality (WMA) sites induced by D infusion were well coincident with those induced by exercise. Pressure rate product at exercise was significantly higher than that after D infusion, suggesting the different mechanism of the occurrence of WMA after D infusion and at exercise. The incidence of ischemic reaction tended to be higher after D infusion than at exercise in 25 patients with CAD. There was negative correlation between ST depression on MAP after D infusion and LVEF on RNV after D infusion. This RNV after D infusion can be used as a supplement tool to conventional exercise RNV in the evaluation of the degree of coronary artery lesions and preserved left ventricular function. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Automated system for ST segment and arrhythmia analysis in exercise radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsia, P.W.; Jenkins, J.M.; Shimoni, Y.; Gage, K.P.; Santinga, J.T.; Pitt, B.

    1986-01-01

    A computer-based system for interpretation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in the diagnosis of arrhythmia and ST segment abnormality in an exercise system is presented. The system was designed for inclusion in a gamma camera so the ECG diagnosis could be combined with the diagnostic capability of radionuclide ventriculography. Digitized data are analyzed in a beat-by-beat mode and a contextual diagnosis of underlying rhythm is provided. Each beat is assigned a beat code based on a combination of waveform analysis and RR interval measurement. The waveform analysis employs a new correlation coefficient formula which corrects for baseline wander. Selective signal averaging, in which only normal beats are included, is done for an improved signal-to-noise ratio prior to ST segment analysis. Template generation, R wave detection, QRS window size, baseline correction, and continuous updating of heart rate have all been automated. ST level and slope measurements are computed on signal-averaged data. Arrhythmia analysis of 13 passages of abnormal rhythm by computer was found to be correct in 98.4 percent of all beats. 25 passages of exercise data, 1-5 min in length, were evaluated by the cardiologist and found to be in agreement in 95.8 percent in measurements of ST level and 91.7 percent in measurements of ST slope

  1. Clinical validation of the planar radionuclide ventriculography in patients with right ventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontemps, L; Merabet, Y; Chevalier, P; Itti, R

    2013-01-01

    Gated radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) may be used for the evaluation of the right ventricular function. However, the accuracy of the method should be clinically validated in patients suffering from diseases with specific pathology of the right ventricle (RV) and with possible left ventricular (LV) interaction. Three groups of 15 patients each, diagnosed with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD), pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) or atrial septal defect (ASD) were compared to a group of normal subjects. The parameters for both ventricles were evaluated separately (ejection fractions: LVEF and RVEF, and intraventricular synchronism quantified as phase standard deviation: LVPSD and RVPSD) as well as the relation or interdependence of the right to left ventricle (RV/LV volume ratio, LV/RV ejection fraction and stroke volume ratios, and interventricular synchronism). All the variables as a whole were analyzed to identify groups of patients according to their functional behaviour. Significant differences were found between the patients and control group for the RV function while the LV function remained mostly within normal limits. When the RV function was considered, the control group and ASD patient group showed differences regarding the ARVD and PAH patients. On evaluating the RV/LV ratios, differences were found between the control group and the ASD group. In the PAH patients, LV function showed differences in relation to the rest of the groups. RNV is a reliable clinical tool to evaluate RV function in patients with RV abnormality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  2. The value of exercise radionuclide ventriculography in risk stratification after coronary arterial bypass grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Goel, I.P.; Mundth, E.D.; Kane, S.; Schenk, C.

    1985-01-01

    Cardiac events after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) may be related to left ventricular (LV) function, residual coronary artery diseases (CAD), graft occlusion, and progression of CAD. This study examined the value of rest and exercise (EX) radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) done 3-6 mos after CABG in risk stratification in 212 pts. There were 185 men and 27 women, aged 57 +- 8 years (mean +- SD). During a followup period of up to 4 years, (15 +- 10 months), there were 23 cardiac events; 13 pts died of cardiac causes and 20 had non-fatal acute myocardial infarctions. The pts with and without events did not differ in: clinical presentation after CABG (most were asymptomatic), medications and ECG findings at rest and EX. The pts with events had lower EX systolic blood pressure (p < 0.01); resting LV ejection fraction (EF) (p = 0.002), and EX EF (40 +- 18% vs 54 +- 16%, p = 0.002). The change in EF (rest to EX) was not significantly different (l.6 +- 8.2%, vs 2.1 +- 9.2%). Survival analysis (Cox model) identified the EX EF as the best predictor of death and total events (X/sup 2/ = 4.3 and 2.4, p = 0.04 and 0.07 respectively). Actuarial life table analysis showed that the risk increased as the EX EF decreased when pts were grouped into EX EF ≥ 50, 30-49, and <30%, (p < 0.001, Mantel-Cox). Thus, EX RNA is useful in risk stratification after CABG. The EX LVEF is an important descriptor that categorizes pts into different risks groups. The pts at high risk probably require more aggressive followup and continued medical therapy

  3. A study of the global and regional ventricle function using radionuclide ventriculography in the cases of patients with and without KHK under nitrate and placebo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroth, B.

    1983-01-01

    In a controlled study of 74 patients with coronary heart disease (KHK) or without provable heart disease the ventricle function at rest and under ergonomic load before and after oral administration of nitrates, respectively placebos was studied with the help of radionuclide ventriculography. Radionuclide ventriculography proved itself thereby as a valuable method of high sensitivity for the recognition of KHK. The stress test increases the sensitivity and allows inferences to be made on the extent of the ischemia. The global function at rest is more a parameter for the functional restriction by infarct scars. A quantitative regional evaluation also makes possible the recognition of minor local changes. The additional study after nitrate administration allows a basis for the extent of reversibility in the stress-dependent functional restriction. The effects of a drug therapy become extrinsically presentable as a result of radionuclide ventriculography. (TRV) [de

  4. Comparison of two-dimensional echocardiography with gated radionuclide ventriculography in the evaluation of global and regional left ventricular function in acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Reet, R.E.; Quinones, M.A.; Poliner, L.R.; Nelson, J.G.; Waggoner, A.D.; Kanon, D.; Lubetkin, S.J.; Pratt, C.M.; Winters, W.L. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography and gated radionuclide ventriculography were performed in 93 patients (66 men, 27 women; mean age 61 years) with 95 episodes of acute myocardial infarction within 48 hours and at 10 days after infarction. Abnormal motion of an inferior or posterior wall segment was seen in 91% of inferoposterior infarctions by echocardiography versus 61% seen by radionuclide ventriculography. Ejection fractions determined by echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography correlated well (r . 0.82) and did not change from the first 48 hours to 10 days after infarction (0.48 +/- 0.14). Similarly, wall motion score showed minimal change from the first 48 hours to 10 days. In-hospital mortality was 37 and 42% in patients with an ejection fraction of 0.35 or less by echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography, respectively. No mortality was seen in patients with an ejection fraction above 0.40 by either test. The echocardiographic wall motion score was also predictive of mortality (40 versus 2%; score less than or equal to 0.50 versus greater than 0.50). The 1 year mortality rate in the 81 short-term survivors was 17%. Mortality was lowest in patients with an ejection fraction above 0.49 or wall motion score above (0.79 (2 to 5%) and worse in those with an ejection fraction below 0.36 or wall motion score below 0.51 (36 to 63%) by either technique. Thus in acute myocardial infarction, echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography provide a comparable assessment of left ventricular function and wall motion in anterior infarction. Echocardiography appears more sensitive in detecting inferoposterior wall motion abnormalities. Both techniques are capable of identifying subgroups of patients with a high risk of death during the acute event and with an equally high mortality rate over a 1 year follow-up period

  5. Application of radionuclide ventriculography phase analysis in patients with atrial or ventricular pacing for detecting ventricular abnormal excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Rongfang; Wang Zhonggan; Li Shengting

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the study was to increase the accuracy of detecting ventricular abnormal excitation. During atrial or ventricular pacing, radionuclide ventriculography phase analysis (RNV-PA) was performed in 17 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (W-P-W) syndrome and paroxysmal supra ventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and ventricular tachycardia (PVT). During pacing, detection rate of abnormal excitation by RNV-PA was 95.5%, compared with 68.2% during basic conduction. Atrial or ventricular pacing can significantly increase the detection rate of abnormal excitation by RNV-PA in patients with W-P-W syndrome. It may be a valuable method for identifying the abnormal excitation and estimating the therapeutic effect of ablation

  6. Intravenous streptokinase therapy in acute myocardial infarction: Assessment of therapy effects by quantitative 201Tl myocardial imaging (including SPECT) and radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehn, H.; Bialonczyk, C.; Mostbeck, A.; Frohner, K.; Unger, G.; Steinbach, K.

    1984-01-01

    To evaluate a potential beneficial effect of systemic streptokinase therapy in acute myocardial infarction, 36 patients treated with streptokinase intravenously were assessed by radionuclide ventriculography and quantitative 201 Tl myocardial imaging (including SPECT) in comparison with 18 conventionally treated patients. Patients after thrombolysis had significantly higher EF, PFR, and PER as well as fewer wall motion abnormalities compared with controls. These differences were also observed in the subset of patients with anterior wall infarction (AMI), but not in patients with inferior wall infarction (IMI). Quantitative 201 Tl imaging demonstrated significantly smaller percent myocardial defects and fewer pathological stress segments in patients with thrombolysis compared with controls. The same differences were also found in both AMI and IMI patients. Our data suggest a favorable effect of intravenous streptokinase on recovery of left ventricular function and myocardial salvage. Radionuclide ventriculography and quantitative 201 Tl myocardial imaging seem to be reliable tools for objective assessment of therapy effects. (orig.)

  7. Atrial pacing as an alternative to supine exercise (SE) in radionuclide ventriculography (RNV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Grand, V.; Wells, S.; O'Neil, W.W.; Jenkins, J.; Gross, M.D.; Vogel, R.

    1984-01-01

    Stress RNV is at times of limited value as many patients cannot achieve a sufficient pressure rate product (PRP). Atrial pacing is a noninvasive alternative to SE by bicycle ergometry. A swallowable electrode attached to a flexible wire is positioned in a retroatrial position in the esophagus and when connected to a variable output stimulator, variable rate (120, 140, 160 beats/min) atrial pacing ventriculography (APV) can be performed. RNV is performed in the sitting position at rest and at each pacing stage. APV was compared to SE RNV in 4 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 3 normal volunteers (N). Tolerance to APV was excellent with adequate pacing. All subjects reported a minor sensation of chest burning. No arrhythmias occurred. At maximal APV mean PRP was 174 +- 26. The diastolic volumes in APV fell in all patients. Systolic volumes fell in N but not in CAD to APV. A flat EF response to APV was seen in both N and CAD patients. APV is an alternative to SE RNV although PRP remains low. Volume changes in APV are different than in SE RNV and in the interpretation of the results of APV in CAD, changes in systolic and diastolic volumes may be more important than the response of EF

  8. Comparison of exercise stress testing with dobutamine stress echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdemir, K.; Kisacik, H.L.; Oguzhan, A.

    1999-01-01

    Dobutamine stress echocardiography, Tc-99m radionuclide ventriculography (RNVG), and exercise stress testing were performed prospectively in 63 patients with suspected coronary artery disease to compare the values of exercise testing, dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG in the non-invasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The sensitivities of dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG were found to be higher than that of exercise testing (93-62%, p 0.05). There were no differences between the sensitivities of the three techniques in multiple vessel disease (p>0.05). The specificities of dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG were higher than that of exercise testing (for both of the tests 86-62%, p 0.05). The results of dobutamine stress echocardiography RNVG were concordant with each other in 46 patients (76%, kappa=65%) in sectional analysis. Dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG tests were comparable with each other in 85% of the 189 segments (kappa=64%). The expected 5% decrease at peak doses of dobutamine was not detected in stress echocardiography in 25 patients and in RNVG in 26 of the patients. Dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG are superior to exercise testing in the diagnosis of single vessel disease and there is no significant difference between the two techniques. When the ejection fraction is considered in dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG, it does not make an additional contribution to the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. (author)

  9. Exercise tolerance in mitral stenosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Evaluation by anaerobic threshold and radionuclide ventriculography

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    Uenami, Atsushi; Mizuno, Toshikazu; Chiba, Hiroshi; Ohno, Masanori; Wakino, Kouichi; Sawada, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Joichi; Kume, Kiyoshi

    1986-06-01

    Serial radionuclide ventriculography was performed using a newly developed ''real-time'' system, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF), stroke volume (SV), and cardiac output (CO) were measured during graded supine exercise in five patients with mitral stenosis (MS), in five patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and in five healthy subjects. Simultaneous pulmonary gas exchange analysis permitted determining the anaerobic threshold, which is the point during incremental exercise when lactate begins to accumulate in the blood. LVEF at the anaerobic threshold was not significantly changed in any patient groups and in healthy subjects, but RVEF at the anaerobic threshold was lower in COPD and MS patients as compared with healthy subjects. In MS, SV during exercise was reduced at the anaerobic threshold, but not in COPD or in healthy subjects. In conclusion, reduced working capacity is related to decreased RVEF in both COPD and MS, but the inhibited increase in CO during exercise is also important for the working capacity in MS.

  10. Can isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) prevent myocardial ischemia during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease; An assessment with radionuclide ventriculography

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    Konishi, Tokuji; Koyama, Takao; Aoki, Toshikazu; Okamoto, Shinya; Setsuda, Morimichi; Futagami, Yasuo; Nakano, Takeshi (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    The effects of sublingual isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) on left ventricular function during exercise were evaluated in 8 patients with coronary artery disease. ECG gated multistage exercise radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was performed to assess the global and regional left ventricular function before and after sublingual ISND. Chest pain during exercise was observed in six patients (75%) during exercise but subsided negative ISDN. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) during stress did not show improved significant change during exercise (from 64.4 {plus minus} 8.7% to 64.6 {plus minus} 8.3%) but increased significantly from 66.0 {plus minus} 6.3% to 69.9 {plus minus} 8.6% after ISDN. Left ventricular end-systolic volume increased during exercise from 56.9 {plus minus} 19.6 ml to 68.0 {plus minus} 15.9 ml, but the increase was suppressed (from 49.1 {plus minus} 11.0 ml to 44.5 {plus minus} 15.5 ml) after ISDN. ISDN prevented not only cardiac symptoms nor ECG changes but also improved abnormal left ventricular function during exercise. (author).

  11. Can the diagnostic accuracy of radionuclide ventriculography during exercise be improved by means of a step-up loading procedure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruegenberg, T.

    1985-01-01

    34 patients (31 of whom were coronary heart disease sufferers as proven by angiography) and further 3 patients failing to show symptoms of this disorder were subjected to radionuclide ventriculography carried out with the aid of 99m Tc-labelled erythrocytes in such a way that examinations at rest were directly followed by maximum loading tests. In a second series of examinations a step-up procedure was adopted where initial recordings at rest were followed by preliminary exercise tests using only 25% of the maximum load. The parameters chosen to evaluate the results were heart rate, ejection fraction, maximum velocity of changes in volume, endsystolic and enddiastolic volumes (ESV and EDV) as well as cardiac output. In 23 patients the preliminary exercise test revealed an insufficient increase or even decrease of the ejection fraction that was associated with delayed volume changes, increases in ESV and EDV as well as reductions in cardiac output and in 21 patients it became evident during those examinations that the onset of stenocardiac complaints was preceded by markedly pronounced function disorders in the left ventricle. It was concluded from these findings that the step-up procedure followed here may in some patients provide additional information on the level of myocardial performance. It can thus be assumed to contribute considerably to higher diagnostic accuracy, although it requires no more time than conventional exercise tests and is not associated with additional radiation exposure. (TRV) [de

  12. Attempts at diagnostic differentiation between dilatory cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease on the basis of radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefermann, R.

    1989-01-01

    It was the purpose of this study to find out which of the various parameters of radionuclide ventriculography would be suitable to determine whether a patient suffers from dilatory myocardiopathy (MCP) or coronary heart disease (CHD). Two groups of patients were examined using a mathematical procedure known as analysis of discriminance, in which the weights that individual parameters would have in a separation function were determined with the help of a computer programme. On the basis of these data, attempts were made to assign the patients of the different diagnostic groups. The parameters registered at rest, which were FSMIN, EFAFI (end of fast filling) and CONTR (contraction), led to a total of five diagnostic errors, with one case of CHD being classified as CMP and four CMP patients as having CHD. On the basis of the parameters measured during exercise), which were RELAX (relaxation), stroke volume and PETI (peak ejection time), only one CMP patient was erroneously assigned to the CHD group. When the parameters of RNV at rest and during exercise were combined to give FSMINR (minimum of highest factor minus lowest factor at rest), DFSDIFF (difference between F-S at rest and during exercise) and DMINVOL (difference between heart minute volumes at rest and during exercise), the classifications were correct for all of the 30 study participants (100%). This led us to conclude that the RNV parameters chosen permitted reliable diagnostic discriminations to be made between those two groups of patients. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Gold-195m first-pass radionuclide ventriculography, thallium-201 single-photon emission CT, and 12-lead ECG stress testing as a combined procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipper, S.L.; Ashburn, W.L.; Norris, S.L.; Rimkus, D.S.; Dillon, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    Graded, sequential, rest/exercise, gold-195m, first-pass ventriculography and thallium-201 (Tl-201) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were performed simultaneously during a single, electrocardiograph-monitored, bicycle stress test in 24 individuals. The technical aspects and logistics involved in performing this combined radionuclide study are stressed in this preliminary report. Fourteen healthy volunteers each had a normal left ventricular ejection fraction and wall-motion response, along with normal T1-201 perfusion and washout, as determined by both visual and quantitative analysis of the tomographic sections. Each of ten patients with coronary artery disease had at least one abnormality of these parameters. The authors suggest that it is technically feasible to evaluate both cardiac function and myocardial perfusion simultaneously by combing Au-195m ventriculography and Tl-201 SPECT imaging into a single, noninvasive, diagnostic package

  14. The significance of abnormal systolic blood pressure response during supine ergometer exercise and postexercise in ischemic heart disease, studied by exercise radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Shigeyuki; Masuoka, Takeshi

    1989-01-01

    Abnormal response to blood pressure (BP) during exercise and postexercise was examined in 169 patients with ischemic heart disease. The patients underwent supine ergometer exercise gated equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography and coronary arteriography. When BP during exercise did not increase by at least 11 mmHg or initially increased but later decreased by more than 10 mmHg, the BP response was defined as abnormal during exercise. A postexercise BP increase of more than 10 mmHg above the peak exercise BP was defined as abnormal during postexercise. Fifteen-one patients (30%) were classified as abnormal (group 1) and the other 118 as normal (group 2). Abnormal BP response fell into three types: (1a) exercise hypotension (n=11), (1b) postexercise hypertension (n=30), and (1c) exercise hypotension with postexercise hypertension (n=10). Both average exercise duration and peak heart rate were significantly lower in groups 1a, 1b, and 1c than group 2. Exercise ST-segment depression was more noticeable in groups 1b and 1c than group 2. However, there was no significant difference in the severitiy of exercise ST-segment depression between groups 1a and 2. A decline in ejection fraction occurred more frequently in groups 1b and 1c than group 2. Patients in groups 1a, 1b, and 1c had more extensive coronary artery disease than did patients in group 2. Medically managed patients having an abnormal BP response had a poorer prognosis than those with a normal BP response. An abnormal BP response during both supine exercise and postexercise was infrequent. The abnormal BP during exercise may be usually associated with impaired exercise tolerance and severe coronary artery disease; and that during postexercise may be closely associated with myocardial ischemia and global left ventricular dysfunction. Postexercise hypertension may be of the same value as exercise hypotension in predicting poor prognosis. (Namekawa, K)

  15. Incremental value of clinical assessment, supine exercise electrocardiography, and biplane exercise radionuclide ventriculography in the prediction of coronary artery disease in men with chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, P.J.; Kelly, M.J.; Harper, R.W.; Federman, J.; Kalff, V.; Anderson, S.T.; Pitt, A.

    1983-01-01

    The incremental value of clinical assessment, exercise electrocardiography (ECG) and biplane radionuclide ventriculography (RVG) in the prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) was assessed in 105 men without myocardial infarction who were undergoing coronary angiography for investigation of chest pain. Independent clinical assessment of chest pain was made prospectively by 2 physicians. Graded supine bicycle exercise testing was symptom-limited. Right anterior oblique ECG-gated first-pass RVG and left anterior oblique ECG-gated equilibrium RVG were performed at rest and exercise. Regional wall motion abnormalities were defined by agreement of 2 of 3 blinded observers. A combined strongly positive exercise ECG response was defined as greater than or equal to 2 mm ST depression or 1.0 to 1.9 mm ST depression with exercise-induced chest pain. A multivariate logistic regression model for the preexercise prediction of CAD was derived from the clinical data and selected 2 variables: chest pain class and cholesterol level. A second model assessed the incremental value of the exercise test in prediction of CAD and found 2 exercise variables that improved prediction: RVG wall motion abnormalities, and a combined strongly positive ECG response. Applying the derived predictive models, 37 of the 58 patients (64%) with preexercise probabilities of 10 to 90% crossed either below the 10% probability threshold or above the 90% threshold and 28 (48%) also moved across the 5 and 95% thresholds. Supine exercise testing with ECG and biplane RVG together, but neither test alone, effectively adds to clinical prediction of CAD. It is most useful in men with atypical chest pain and when the ECG and RVG results are concordant

  16. Left ventricular performance at rest and during peak exercise in never-treated hypertensive female - an assessment with radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topuzovic, N.; Karner, I.; Rusic, A.; Krstonosic, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate left ventricular performance and exercise tolerance in never-treated female hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: Seventeen female patients with newly established, uncomplicated essential hypertension (aged 25 to 57 years) were evaluated with rest-stress radionuclide gated ventriculography, and were compared to 23 age-matched normotensive female volunteers. Results: Mean blood pressure was significantly higher in patients at rest and during exercise than in controls (121±13 vs. 89±7 mm Hg, and 143±11 vs. 122±9 mm Hg, respectively, p 2 , respectively, p<0.01), while ESV was similar in both groups. Ejection fraction (EF) at rest and stress did not differ significantly (54±10 vs. 55±8%, and 70±10 vs. 66±8%, respectively), but % rise in EF during exercise was significantly higher in patients. At rest and during exercise, there were no significant difference in peak ejection rate (PER) and time to PER (TPER) between patients and controls. Patients had similar peak filling rate (PFR) at rest (2.88±0.79 vs. 2.76±0.76 EDV/s) and during exercise (5.85±1.86 vs. 6.21±1.97 EDV/s), in addition to nonsignificant difference in time to PFR (at rest 143±62 vs. 146±42 ms at rest, and 97±20 vs. 91±19 ms during exercise). Conclusion: Female patients with newly diagnosed, never-treated hypertension have preserved maximal exercise performance, systolic function and diastolic function, but they have significant enlargement of EDV and elevated cardiac output during exercise

  17. Comparison between Radionuclide Ventriculography and Echocardiography for Quantification of Left Ventricular Systolic Function in Rats Exposed to Doxorubicin

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    Luciano Fonseca Lemos de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Radionuclide ventriculography (RV is a validated method to evaluate the left ventricular systolic function (LVSF in small rodents. However, no prior study has compared the results of RV with those obtained by other imaging methods in this context. Objectives: To compare the results of LVSF obtained by RV and echocardiography (ECHO in an experimental model of cardiotoxicity due to doxorubicin (DXR in rats. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats serving as controls (n = 7 or receiving DXR (n = 22 in accumulated doses of 8, 12, and 16 mg/kg were evaluated with ECHO performed with a Sonos 5500 Philips equipment (12-MHz transducer and RV obtained with an Orbiter-Siemens gamma camera using a pinhole collimator with a 4-mm aperture. Histopathological quantification of myocardial fibrosis was performed after euthanasia. Results: The control animals showed comparable results in the LVSF analysis obtained with ECHO and RV (83.5 ± 5% and 82.8 ± 2.8%, respectively, p > 0.05. The animals that received DXR presented lower LVSF values when compared with controls (p < 0.05; however, the LVSF values obtained by RV (60.6 ± 12.5% were lower than those obtained by ECHO (71.8 ± 10.1%, p = 0.0004 in this group. An analysis of the correlation between the LVSF and myocardial fibrosis showed a moderate correlation when the LVSF was assessed by ECHO (r = -0.69, p = 0.0002 and a stronger correlation when it was assessed by RV (r = -0.79, p < 0.0001. On multiple regression analysis, only RV correlated independently with myocardial fibrosis. Conclusion: RV is an alternative method to assess the left ventricular function in small rodents in vivo. When compared with ECHO, RV showed a better correlation with the degree of myocardial injury in a model of DXR-induced cardiotoxicity.

  18. Phase changes caused by hyperventilation stress in spastic angina pectoris analyzed by first-pass radionuclide ventriculography

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    Wu, Jin; Takeda, Tohoru; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Masuoka, Takeshi; Watanabe, Sigeyuki; Sato, Motohiro; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Toyama, Hinako; Ishikawa, Nobuyoshi

    1999-02-01

    To understand the effect of hyperventilation (HV) stress in patients with spastic angina, left ventricular (LV) contraction was analyzed by quantitative phase analysis. The study was performed on 36 patients with spastic angina pectoris, including vasospastic angina pectoris (VspAP: 16 patients) and variant angina pectoris (VAP: 20 patients). First-pass radionuclide ventriculography (first-pass RNV) was performed at rest and after HV stress, and standard deviation of the LV phase distribution (SD) was analyzed. The SD was lower in patients with VspAP than in VAP(12.8{+-}1.4 degrees vs. 14.6{+-}2.2 degrees, p<0.005) at rest. After HV stress, the SD (HVSD) tended to increase in VspAP patients (62.5%), whereas the SD decreased in VAP patients (70%). Due to HV stress, the percentage change in SD (%SD) in VspAP patients was 8.9{+-}23.7% whereas that in VAP patients was -9.1{+-}17.3% (p<0.01). Moreover, phase histograms were divided into HVSD increase and HVSD decrease groups. The HVSD increase group had a decrease of HVEF, but the HVSD decrease group tended to have more decreased HVEF than the HVSD increase group. These results indicate that spastic angina pectoris patients show various responses to HV stress. The HVSD increase group might have additional myocardial ischemia due to regional coronary spasm. In contrast, in the HVSD decrease group severe LV dysfunction or diffuse wall motion abnormality might have been generated, and this caused a reduction in the SD value. Phase analysis would therefore add new information regarding electrocardiographically silent myocardial ischemia due to coronary spasm, and HV stress might increase sensitivity for the detection of abnormalities in quantitative phase analysis, especially in VspAP patients. (author)

  19. Comparison between radionuclide ventriculography and echocardiography for quantification of left ventricular systolic function in rats exposed to doxorubicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos de; Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira de; Romano, Minna Moreira Dias; Maciel, Benedito Carlos; Simões, Marcus Vinicius

    2017-01-01

    Background: Radionuclide ventriculography (RV) is a validated method to evaluate the left ventricular systolic function (LVSF) in small rodents. However, no prior study has compared the results of RV with those obtained by other imaging methods in this context. Objectives: To compare the results of LVSF obtained by RV and echocardiography (ECHO) in an experimental model of cardiotoxicity due to doxorubicin (DXR) in rats. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats serving as controls (n = 7) or receiving DXR (n = 22) in accumulated doses of 8, 12, and 16 mg/kg were evaluated with ECHO performed with a Sonos 5500 Philips equipment (12-MHz transducer) and RV obtained with an Orbiter-Siemens gamma camera using a pinhole collimator with a 4-mm aperture. Histopathological quantification of myocardial fibrosis was performed after euthanasia. Results: The control animals showed comparable results in the LVSF analysis obtained with ECHO and RV (83.5 ± 5% and 82.8 ± 2.8%, respectively, p > 0.05). The animals that received DXR presented lower LVSF values when compared with controls (p < 0.05); however, the LVSF values obtained by RV (60.6 ± 12.5%) were lower than those obtained by ECHO (71.8 ± 10.1%, p = 0.0004) in this group. An analysis of the correlation between the LVSF and myocardial fibrosis showed a moderate correlation when the LVSF was assessed by ECHO (r = -0.69, p = 0.0002) and a stronger correlation when it was assessed by RV (r = -0.79, p < 0.0001). On multiple regression analysis, only RV correlated independently with myocardial fibrosis. Conclusion: RV is an alternative method to assess the left ventricular function in small rodents in vivo. When compared with ECHO, RV showed a better correlation with the degree of myocardial injury in a model of DXR-induced cardiotoxicity. (author)

  20. Evaluation of aortic and mitral valve regurgitation by radionuclide ventriculography: comparison with the method of Sandler and Dodge

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    Kress, P.; Geffers, H.; Stauch, M.; Nechwatal, W.; Sigel, H.; Bitter, F.; Adam, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to introduce a quantitative scintigraphic method for evaluation of regurgitation and to compare it with the generally accepted quantitative method of Sandler and Dodge. Radionuclide ventriculography was carried out after injection of 20 mCi 99mtechnetium-labeled red blood cells. Time-activity curves were obtained from the left and right ventricular regions. The ratio of end-diastolic-end-systolic count-rate differences for the left and right ventricles was calculated. The ratio (A) was compared with a hemodynamic ratio determined after the method of Sandler and Dodge with the stroke volume of the left ventricle measured angiographically, and the stroke volume of the right ventricle measured by thermodilution. In 33 patients with aortic and mitral valve regurgitation researchers found a correlation of r . 0.75. Due to a broad range of normal values of the sensitivity of the scintigraphic method is low. The specificity seems to be high, however, since in 64 patients with all types of heart diseases there were no false positive results. Comparing the described scintigraphic method with other modern or generally accepted methods, the principal advantages are noninvasiveness, good practicability, and the fact that important additional information about the functional state of the heart is gained. This is important in follow-up studies in patients with chronic valvular incompetence. It seems that this method will become a valuable supplement to heart catheterization in the diagnosis of valvular heart disease and may partially replace invasive methods for measuring the regurgitation fraction.

  1. Evaluation of aortic and mitral valve regurgitation by radionuclide ventriculography: comparison with the method of Sandler and Dodge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, P.; Geffers, H.; Stauch, M.; Nechwatal, W.; Sigel, H.; Bitter, F.; Adam, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to introduce a quantitative scintigraphic method for evaluation of regurgitation and to compare it with the generally accepted quantitative method of Sandler and Dodge. Radionuclide ventriculography was carried out after injection of 20 mCi 99mtechnetium-labeled red blood cells. Time-activity curves were obtained from the left and right ventricular regions. The ratio of end-diastolic-end-systolic count-rate differences for the left and right ventricles was calculated. The ratio (A) was compared with a hemodynamic ratio determined after the method of Sandler and Dodge with the stroke volume of the left ventricle measured angiographically, and the stroke volume of the right ventricle measured by thermodilution. In 33 patients with aortic and mitral valve regurgitation researchers found a correlation of r . 0.75. Due to a broad range of normal values of the sensitivity of the scintigraphic method is low. The specificity seems to be high, however, since in 64 patients with all types of heart diseases there were no false positive results. Comparing the described scintigraphic method with other modern or generally accepted methods, the principal advantages are noninvasiveness, good practicability, and the fact that important additional information about the functional state of the heart is gained. This is important in follow-up studies in patients with chronic valvular incompetence. It seems that this method will become a valuable supplement to heart catheterization in the diagnosis of valvular heart disease and may partially replace invasive methods for measuring the regurgitation fraction

  2. Comparison between radionuclide ventriculography and echocardiography for quantification of left ventricular systolic function in rats exposed to doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos de; Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira de; Romano, Minna Moreira Dias; Maciel, Benedito Carlos; Simões, Marcus Vinicius, E-mail: msimoes@fmrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Centro de Cardiologia; O' Connell, João Lucas; Pulici, Érica Carolina Campos [Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU), MG (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Background: Radionuclide ventriculography (RV) is a validated method to evaluate the left ventricular systolic function (LVSF) in small rodents. However, no prior study has compared the results of RV with those obtained by other imaging methods in this context. Objectives: To compare the results of LVSF obtained by RV and echocardiography (ECHO) in an experimental model of cardiotoxicity due to doxorubicin (DXR) in rats. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats serving as controls (n = 7) or receiving DXR (n = 22) in accumulated doses of 8, 12, and 16 mg/kg were evaluated with ECHO performed with a Sonos 5500 Philips equipment (12-MHz transducer) and RV obtained with an Orbiter-Siemens gamma camera using a pinhole collimator with a 4-mm aperture. Histopathological quantification of myocardial fibrosis was performed after euthanasia. Results: The control animals showed comparable results in the LVSF analysis obtained with ECHO and RV (83.5 ± 5% and 82.8 ± 2.8%, respectively, p > 0.05). The animals that received DXR presented lower LVSF values when compared with controls (p < 0.05); however, the LVSF values obtained by RV (60.6 ± 12.5%) were lower than those obtained by ECHO (71.8 ± 10.1%, p = 0.0004) in this group. An analysis of the correlation between the LVSF and myocardial fibrosis showed a moderate correlation when the LVSF was assessed by ECHO (r = -0.69, p = 0.0002) and a stronger correlation when it was assessed by RV (r = -0.79, p < 0.0001). On multiple regression analysis, only RV correlated independently with myocardial fibrosis. Conclusion: RV is an alternative method to assess the left ventricular function in small rodents in vivo. When compared with ECHO, RV showed a better correlation with the degree of myocardial injury in a model of DXR-induced cardiotoxicity. (author)

  3. Phase changes caused by hyperventilation stress in spastic angina pectoris analyzed by first-pass radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jin; Takeda, Tohoru; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Masuoka, Takeshi; Watanabe, Sigeyuki; Sato, Motohiro; Itai, Yuji; Toyama, Hinako; Ishikawa, Nobuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    To understand the effect of hyperventilation (HV) stress in patients with spastic angina, left ventricular (LV) contraction was analyzed by quantitative phase analysis. The study was performed on 36 patients with spastic angina pectoris, including vasospastic angina pectoris (VspAP: 16 patients) and variant angina pectoris (VAP: 20 patients). First-pass radionuclide ventriculography (first-pass RNV) was performed at rest and after HV stress, and standard deviation of the LV phase distribution (SD) was analyzed. The SD was lower in patients with VspAP than in VAP(12.8±1.4 degrees vs. 14.6±2.2 degrees, p<0.005) at rest. After HV stress, the SD (HVSD) tended to increase in VspAP patients (62.5%), whereas the SD decreased in VAP patients (70%). Due to HV stress, the percentage change in SD (%SD) in VspAP patients was 8.9±23.7% whereas that in VAP patients was -9.1±17.3% (p<0.01). Moreover, phase histograms were divided into HVSD increase and HVSD decrease groups. The HVSD increase group had a decrease of HVEF, but the HVSD decrease group tended to have more decreased HVEF than the HVSD increase group. These results indicate that spastic angina pectoris patients show various responses to HV stress. The HVSD increase group might have additional myocardial ischemia due to regional coronary spasm. In contrast, in the HVSD decrease group severe LV dysfunction or diffuse wall motion abnormality might have been generated, and this caused a reduction in the SD value. Phase analysis would therefore add new information regarding electrocardiographically silent myocardial ischemia due to coronary spasm, and HV stress might increase sensitivity for the detection of abnormalities in quantitative phase analysis, especially in VspAP patients. (author)

  4. The value of exercise radionuclide ventriculography in risk stratification in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Kane, S.; Schenk, C.

    1985-01-01

    This study examined the value of rest and exercise (EX) radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) in risk stratification in 392 pts with suspected or known coronary artery disease who were being evaluated for anginal symptoms. There were 289 men and 203 women, aged 55 +- 12 years (mean +- SD). There were 20 cardiac events in the followup period of up to 4 years (19 +- 10 months): 14 pts died of cardiac causes and 6 had non-fatal acute myocardial infarctions. The pts with and without events did not differ in age, clinical presentation, risk factors, and rest and EX ECGs. However, pts with events had lower EX systolic blood pressure (p < 0.02); lower EX duration; (5.5 +- 2.5 vs 7.6 +- 3.7 minutes, p < 0.0l), lower resting left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) (p = 0.001), and lower EX EF (35 +- 17% vs 56 +- 15%, p = 0.0001). The change in EF from rest to EX was not significantly different (-0.1 +- 6.1 vs 3 +- 9.9). Univariate survival analysis (Cox model) showed several descriptors related to prognosis: EX EF, rest EF, wall motion and EX duration. Multivariate analysis, however, identified the EX EF as the only significant predictor (X/sup 2/ = 19.9). None of the other variables added independent information to that provided by the EX EF. Actuarial lie table analysis showed that the risk increased as the EX EF decreased, when pts were grouped into those with EXEF ≥ 50%, 30-49%, and <30%., (p = 0.001, Mantel-Cox). Thus, the EX RNV is useful in risk stratification; the EX EF is the best descriptor that categorizes pts into different risk groups

  5. Computer analysis of the exercise electrocardiogram and control of radionuclide ventriculography: an optimal statistical decision model for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsia, P.W.E.

    1987-01-01

    A new automated technique for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) by stress electrocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) has been developed. The method employs digital signal processing of the electrocardiogram (ECG) for recognition of ischemic and arrhythmic events. On-line detection of abnormal beats is used for control image acquisition by the gamma camera resulting in improved image quality since only identical beats are included in the composite images of the cardiac cycle. A combined stress ECG analysis which measures ST changes indicative of ischemia, and radionuclide results, which reveal corresponding ejection fraction abnormalities yields greater sensitivity and specificity than either test alone. Digitized data from the electrocardiogram are analyzed in a beat-by-beat mode and a contextual diagnosis of underlying rhythm is given. Template generation, R wave detection, QRS window size, baseline correction, and continuous updating of heart rate are completely automated. A statistical model base on computerized ST segment measurements combined with radionuclide ventriculography data has been developed by using a logistic model with stepwise regression fitting. A previously acquired database of similar measurements was used for designing the model. The most significant parameters were found to be (1) ejection fraction of exercise RNV; (2) difference of ST level between exercise and resting test (stdif); and (3) ejection fraction difference between exercise and resting test. The new parameter stdif, not previously used in ECG interpretation, was found to be of great diagnostic significance

  6. Cardiac ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillis, L.D.; Grossman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Cardiac ventriculography has been used extensively to define the anatomy of the ventricles and related structures in patients with congenital, valvular, coronary, and cardiomyopathic heart disease. Specifically, left ventriculography may provide valuable information about global and segmental left ventricular function, mitral valvular incompetence, and the presence, location, and severity of a number of other abnormalities, including ventricular septal defect and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. As a result, it should be a routine part of catheterization in patients being evaluated for coronary artery disease, aortic or mitral valvular disease, unexplained left ventricular failure, or congenital heart disease. Similarly, right ventriculography may provide information about global and segmental right ventricular function and can be especially helpful in patients with congenital heart disease

  7. Evaluation of coronary artery disease by functional imaging from equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zuoxiang

    1992-01-01

    Functional imagings were performed in 10 normals, 9 subjects with Non coronary Artery disease (NCAD), 33 CAD patients with documented MI (CAD-WMI) and 20 without MI (CAD-NMI). The sensitivity of LVGEF, LVREF and phase analysis at rest for detecting CAD-WMI was 66.7%, 78.8%, 93.9% respectively. LVGEF, LVREF during exercise for assessing CAD-NMI had the sensitivity of 90%, 80%, respectively, while specificity 90%. Early LVEF decrease, > 10% LVEF decrease and abnormal response at > 7 sectors during exercise were observed in 2 patients with 3 vessel. In conclusion, functional imaging were very useful for detecting CAD and evaluating its extent

  8. Myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function during exercise evaluated by 201Tl myocardial scintigraphy and 99mTc radionuclide ventriculography in patients treated with PTCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Toshio; Jo, Tadafumi; Doiuchi, Junji

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), we investigated myocardial ischemia and left ventricular function during exercise before and after successful PTCA in 30 patients. We used extent and severity scores of 201 thallium ( 201 Tl) exercise myocardial scintigraphy to assess myocardial ischemia and determined global and regional left ventricular ejection fraction (EF and REF) of 99m Tc-RBC exercise radionuclide ventriculography to assess left ventricular function. The extent and severity scores of stress images were significantly less after PTCA than before PTCA. The scores of the redistribution images were unchanged before and after PTCA. Global EF during exercise was significantly higher after PTCA than before PTCA. There was no difference in resting global EF between before and after PTCA. Myocardial ischemia induced by exercise was semi-quantitatively analyzed as transient perfusion defect with severity score. Severity score was significantly less after PTCA than before PTCA. ΔEF, which was obtained by subtraction of resting global EF from exercise one, was significantly higher after PTCA than before PTCA. However, the degree of improvement in myocardial ischemia and left ventricular function varied from patient to patient. In 17 patients with one-vessel left anterior descending artery disease, ΔREF, which was determined by subtracting resting regional EF from exercise one, was significantly higher in septal and apical segments after PTCA than before PTCA. Myocardial ischemia and left ventricular function under exercise were alleviated by PTCA. However, the degree of improvement varied from patient to patient and it might have been affected by various factors including coronary dissection, edema, thrombus, restenosis, spasm, side branch stenosis or occlusion, distal thrombus, and myocardial hibernation. (author)

  9. Comparison of exercise ECG and radionuclide ventriculography in the assessment of myocardial ischemia in patients with isolated stenoses of the left anterior descending artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepzig, H. Jr.; Mildenberger, D.; Kaltenbach, M.; Standke, R.; Baum, R.P.; Tezak, S.; Maul, F.D.; Hoer, G.

    1988-01-01

    21 patients with LAD-stenoses of at least 70% and 21 patients with LAD-stenoses and additional intramural anterior wall infarctions were studied. 20 patients without heart disease or after successful transluminal coronary angioplasty and 18 patients with intramural anterior wall infarction after successful transluminal dilatation of the LAD (remaining stenosis maximal 30%) served as controls. The normal range of global and regional left ventricular ejection fraction response to exercise was defined based on the data of 25 further patients without relevant coronary heart disease. Thus, a decrease in global ejection fraction and regional wall motion abnormalities were judged pathological. All patients were comparable with respect to age, ejection fraction at rest and work load. Myocardial ischemia could be detected by the exercise ECG in 81% of all patients without infarction and in 71% of patients with infarction. The corresponding values for global left ventricular ejection fraction were 76% and 81%, respectively, and for regional ejection fraction 95% in both groups. No false-positive exercise ECGs were observed in the healthy controls and 2(11%) in the corresponding group with intramural infaction. The global ejection fraction was pathological in 1(5%) healthy subject without infarction and in 3(17%) corresponding patients with infarction. Sectorial analysis revealed 5 and 22%, respectively. Our findings suggest that the exercise ECG has a limited sensitivity to detect myocardial ischemia in patients with isolated LAD-stenoses and intramural myocardial infarction. Radionuclide ventriculography yields pathological values more often; however, false-positive results also occur more frequently. (orig.) [de

  10. Right and left ventricular cardiac function in a developed world population with human immunodeficiency virus studied with radionuclide ventriculography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Anne-Mette; Gerstoft, Jan; Hesse, Birger

    2004-01-01

    . No correlations were found between reduced cardiac function and levels of the 3 peptides measured. CONCLUSIONS: No major dysfunction of the left ventricle is present in a developed world HIV population. However, a small but significant part of this population has modestly reduced right-sided systolic function.......-associated morbidity and mortality rates. Accordingly, the prevalence of HIV-associated cardiac dysfunction may also have changed. The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of right- and left-sided cardiac dysfunction in a Danish HIV population, most of whom were undergoing HAART, with radionuclide...... ventricular ejection fraction and 6 (7%) had a reduced right ventricle ejection fraction (0.35-0.42) compared with reference values from the age- and sex-matched reference population. Patients with HIV and reduced cardiac function did not differ in the duration of HIV, CD4 count, CD4 nadir, or HIV RNA load...

  11. Dual-ROI radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standke, R.; Hoer, G.; Kanemoto, N.; Maul, F.D.

    1981-01-01

    Accurate determination of the left ventricular activity function is the precondition for a quantitative analysis of the ventricular volume function. During the volume reduction period, extra-myocardial tissue penetrates into the ROI of the late diastole. This curve-distorting activity cannot be eliminated by a single-ROI technique. Of the multiple-ROI techniques, the dual-ROI method is the least complex and tedions and involves the least methodological error. At the time of maximum volume change rates, the curve may be distorted if the late diastolic ROI is inaccurately defined. A method is described which uses only the counting rate over the late diastolic ROI and corrects it only on the basis of the counting rate of the late systolic ROI. The time parameters remain uninfluenced by this correction method while the volumetric parameters are corrected. (orig./APR) [de

  12. Tricuspid insufficiency detected by equilibrium gated radionuclide study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handler, B.; Pavel, D.G.; Lam, W.; Byrom, E.; Swiryn, S.; Pietras, R.; Rosen, K.M.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a gated radionuclide cardiac study are reported in a patient with biventricular failure and tricuspid insufficiency demonstrated by clinical evaluation, M-mode and 2-D sector echocardiography, and cardia catheterization. The processed gated radionuclide cardiac study showed a left ventricular/right ventricular stroke volume ratio of 0.5; expansion of the hepatic blood pool demonstrated by hepatic time activity curve and calculation of an '''expansion fraction''; and synchronous changes of count rate of the atrial and hepatic regions detected by phase analysis

  13. Prognostic value of echocardiography in 190 patients with chronic congestive heart failure. A comparison with New York Heart Association functional classes and radionuclide ventriculography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, B K; Videbaek, R; Stokholm, H

    1996-01-01

    Survival in 190 consecutive patients with congestive heart failure, discharged from a general hospital, was studied. Sixteen patients were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I, 87 in II, 83 in III and 4 in IV. Median left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) from radionuclide...

  14. Use of phase images in radionuclide ventriculography for topical diagnosis of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and sources of abnormal rhythms in the ventricles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostroumov, E.N.; Sergienko, V.B.; Golitsin, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the mapping of various types of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and ventricular arrhythmias by using phase images of radionuclide ventriculograms as compared to 12 leads and electrophysiological studies. Phase images are a highly informative method that supplements an electrophysiological study in the topical diagnosis of abnormal tracts and ventricular arrhythmias

  15. Comparison of equilibrium radionuclide and contrast angiographic measurements of left ventricular peak ejection and filling rates and their time intervals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugrue, D.D.; Dickie, S.; Newman, H.; Myers, M.J.; Lavender, J.P.; McKenna, W.J. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (UK))

    1984-10-01

    A comparison has been made of the equilibrium radionuclide and contrast angiographic estimates of normalized peak rates of ejection (PER) and filling (PFR) and their time intervals in twenty-one patients with cardiac disorders. Contrast angiographic and radionuclide measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), PER and PFR correlated well but time intervals correlated poorly. Mean values for radionuclide LVEF, PER and PFR were significantly lower and radionuclide time intervals were significantly longer compared to contrast angiography measurements.

  16. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  17. Assessment of poststress left ventricular ejection fraction by gated SPECT: comparison with equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acampa, Wanda; Liuzzi, Raffaele; De Luca, Serena; Capasso, Enza; Luongo, Luca; Cuocolo, Alberto; Caprio, Maria Grazia; Nicolai, Emanuele; Petretta, Mario

    2010-01-01

    We compared left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction obtained by gated SPECT with that obtained by equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography in a large cohort of patients. Within 1 week, 514 subjects with suspected or known coronary artery disease underwent same-day stress-rest 99m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. For both studies, data were acquired 30 min after completion of exercise and after 3 h rest. In the overall study population, a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.82, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.83, p<0.0001). In Bland-Altman analysis, the mean differences in ejection fraction (radionuclide angiocardiography minus gated SPECT) were -0.6% at rest and 1.7% after stress. In subjects with normal perfusion (n=362), a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.72, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.70, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were -0.9% at rest and 1.4% after stress. Also in patients with abnormal perfusion (n=152), a good correlation between the two techniques was observed both at rest (r=0.89, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.90, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were 0.1% at rest and 2.5% after stress. In a large study population, a good agreement was observed in the evaluation of LV ejection fraction between gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. However, in patients with perfusion abnormalities, a slight underestimation in poststress LV ejection fraction was observed using gated SPECT as compared to equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography. (orig.)

  18. Physical aspects of nuclear ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpert, N.M.; Chesler, D.A.; Burnham, C.A.; McKusick, K.A.; Pohost, G.; Dinsmore, R.E.; Brownell, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    The use of edge enhancement and computer motion display improves the detection of regional wall motion abnormalities in the LV. Improved gating and processing techniques should improve the accuracy of ventricular volume vs time measurements. It is hoped that the simulations described will aid in the development of new instrumentation for the collection and analysis of nuclear ventriculographie data

  19. Equilibrium concentration of radionuclides in cement/groundwater/carbon steel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, D. K.; Cho, W. J.; Hahn, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    Equilibrium concentration of major elements in an underground repository with a capacity of 100,000 drums have been simulated using the geochemical computer code (EQMOD). The simulation has been carried out at the conditions of pH 12 to 13.5, and Eh 520 and -520 mV. Solubilities of magnesium and calcium decrease with the increase of pH. The solubility of iron increases with pH at Eh -520 mV of reducing environment, while it almost entirely exists as the precipitate of Fe(OH) 3 (s) at Eh 520 mV of oxidizing environment. All of cobalt and nickel are predicted to be dissolved in the liquid phase regardless of pH since the solubility limit is greater than the total concentration. In the case of cesium and strontium, all forms of both ions are present in the liquid phase because they have negligible sorption capacity on cement and large solubility under disposal atmosphere. And thus the total concentration determines the equilibrium concentration. Adsorbed amounts of iodide and carbonate are dependent on adsorption capacity and adsorption equilibrium constant. Especially, the calcite turns out to be a solubility-limiting phase on the carbonate system. In order to validate the model, the equilibrium concentrations measured for a number of systems which consist of iron, cement, synthetic groundwater and radionuclides are compared with those predicted by the model. The concentrations between the model and the experiment of nonadsorptive elements - cesium, strontium, cobalt, nickel and iron, are well agreed. It indicates that the assumptions and the thermodynamic data in this work are valid. Using the adsorption equilibrium constant as a free parameter, the experimental data of iodide and carbonate have been fitted to the model. The model is in a good agreement with the experimental data of the iodide system. (author)

  20. A report on intercomparison studies of computer programs which respectively model: i) radionuclide migration ii) equilibrium chemistry of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broyd, T.W.; McD Grant, M.; Cross, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes two intercomparison studies of computer programs which respectively model: i) radionuclide migration ii) equilibrium chemistry of groundwaters. These studies have been performed by running a series of test cases with each program and comparing the various results obtained. The work forms a part of the CEC MIRAGE project (MIgration of RAdionuclides in the GEosphere) and has been jointly funded by the CEC and the United Kingdom Department of the Environment. Presentations of the material contained herein were given at plenary meetings of the MIRAGE project in Brussels in March, 1984 (migration) and March, 1985 (equilibrium chemistry) respectively

  1. Radionuclide diagnostics of right ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaorska-Rajca, J.

    1993-01-01

    Difficulties in evaluating the right ventricle function motivate to making research into new non-invasive methods. Four radionuclide methods that are used to access the right ventricle have been discussed in this paper: first-pass angiocardiography, gated equilibrium ventriculography with red blood cells labelled in vivo technetium- 99 Tc, ventriculography with radioactive xenon 133 and a computerized single probe. Advantages and disadvantages of using each method have been discussed. RNV 99m Tc method has been recognized as the best one to evaluate RV function. Results of the right ventricle assessment in patients have been discussed in the following clinical groups: chronic cor pulmonale (CP), chronic lung disease without pulmonary arterial hypertension (LD), coronary artery disease (CAD), in patients after infarction (IMA and IMi), dilated cardiomyopathy (KZ) and valvular heart diseases (Wm and Wa). Abnormals in right ventricle function occur with different intensity in all groups, although they no specificity. The highest abnormality occurs in patients with KZ, CP, IMi and Wm, the lowest one - in patients with CAD. Abnormalities are higher in patients with congestive heart failure. In most pathological groups the right ventricle dysfunction is connected with the left ventricle insufficiency. The interdependence between the dysfunction of both ventricles is differs in particular diseases. Assessment of right ventricle function with radionuclide methods plays an important role in diagnosis and control therapy of cardiopulmonary diseases. (author). 385 refs, 48 figs, 6 tabs

  2. Benchmark studies of computer prediction techniques for equilibrium chemistry and radionuclide transport in groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broyd, T.W.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review of two recent benchmark exercises is presented. These were separately concerned with the equilibrium chemistry of groundwater and the geosphere migration of radionuclides, and involved the use of a total of 19 computer codes by 11 organisations in Europe and Canada. A similar methodology was followed for each exercise, in that series of hypothetical test cases were used to explore the limits of each code's application, and so provide an overview of current modelling potential. Aspects of the user-friendliness of individual codes were also considered. The benchmark studies have benefited participating organisations by providing a means of verifying current codes, and have provided problem data sets by which future models may be compared. (author)

  3. Assessment of right ventricular function with nonimaging first pass ventriculography and comparison of results with gamma camera studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Liu, X J; Liu, Y Z; Lu, P; Crawley, J C; Lahiri, A

    1990-08-01

    A new technique has been developed for measuring right ventricular function by nonimaging first pass ventriculography. The right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) obtained by non-imaging first pass ventriculography was compared with that obtained by gamma camera first pass and equilibrium ventriculography. The data has demonstrated that the correlation of RVEFs obtained by the nonimaging nuclear cardiac probe and by gamma camera first pass ventriculography in 15 subjects was comparable (r = 0.93). There was also a good correlation between RVEFs obtained by the nonimaging nuclear probe and by equilibrium gated blood pool studies in 33 subjects (r = 0.89). RVEF was significantly reduced in 15 patients with right ventricular and/or inferior myocardial infarction compared to normal subjects (28 +/- 9% v. 45 +/- 9%). The data suggests that nonimaging probes may be used for assessing right ventricular function accurately.

  4. Validation of attenuation-corrected equilibrium radionuclide angiographic determinations of right ventricular volume: comparison with cast-validated biplane cineventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Italia, L.J.; Starling, M.R.; Walsh, R.A.; Badke, F.R.; Lasher, J.C.; Blumhardt, R.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of attenuation-corrected equilibrium radionuclide angiographic determinations of right ventricular volumes, the authors initially studied 14 postmortem human right ventricular casts by water displacement and biplane cineventriculography. Biplane cineventriculographic right ventricular cast volumes, calculated by a modification of Simpson's rule algorithm, correlated well with right ventricular cast volumes measured by water displacement (r = .97, y = 8 + 0.88x, SEE = 6 ml). Moreover, the mean volumes obtained by both methods were no different (73 +/- 28 vs 73 +/- 25 ml). Subsequently, they studied 16 patients by both biplane cineventriculography and equilibrium radionuclide angiography. The uncorrected radionuclide right ventricular volumes were calculated by normalizing background corrected end-diastolic and end-systolic counts from hand-drawn regions of interest obtained by phase analysis for cardiac cycles processed, frame rate, and blood sample counts. Attenuation correction was performed by a simple geometric method. The attenuation-corrected radionuclide right ventricular end-diastolic volumes correlated with the cineventriculographic end-diastolic volumes (r = .91, y = 3 + 0.92x, SEE = 27 ml). Similarly, the attenuation-corrected radionuclide right ventricular end-systolic volumes correlated with the cineventriculographic end-systolic volumes (r = .93, y = - 1 + 0.91x, SEE = 16 ml). Also, the mean attenuation-corrected radionuclide end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were no different than the average cineventriculographic end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (160 +/- 61 and 83 +/- 44 vs 170 +/- 61 and 86 +/- 43 ml, respectively)

  5. Computed tomography and/or ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, S.; Kishikawa, T.; Huewel, N.; Kazner, E.; Grumme, T.; Lanksch, W.

    1982-01-01

    It is discussed if in intracranial tumors, especially in tumors of the posterior cranial fossa, a CT and/or a ventriculography should be practiced. We have made investigations of 134 patients, 93 of whom were children up to 14 years of age. Each case was undertaken computed tomography as well as ventriculography. The results are clearly demonstrating the superiority of computed tomography compared with ventriculography. Ventriculography is a surgical intervention stressing the patients, side-effects may occur, and sometimes serious complications are caused. Modern computed tomography is producing pictures of high quality, which are highly sufficient for neurosurgical intervention. Very rarely additional angiography has to be performed. The diagnosis of intracranial tumors can fully be established by computed tomography, whereas ventriculography is no longer necessary. (orig.) [de

  6. Scintigraphic ventriculography and stress testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goris, M.L.; Hung, J.; Debusk, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    Scintigraphic stress ventriculography yields information which is complex and defies description by the difference in ejection fraction between rest and maximum exercise only. The complexity results in part from the ''derived'' nature of the ejection fraction measurement, which is physiologically secondary to stroke volume and end-diastolic volume. Furthermore, the nature of the stress test in which the pulse (stress) is not independent from the response forces an analysis which considers ''when'' as much as ''what'' happens. Automation in data processing, however, has made oversimplification unnecessary and allows a more exhaustive but correct analysis

  7. Response of left ventricular volume to exercise in man assessed by radionuclide equilibrium angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutsky, R.; Karliner, J.; Ricci, D.; Schuler, G.; Pfisterer, M.; Peterson, K.; Ashburn, W.

    1979-01-01

    To assess the effects of exercise on left ventricular volumes we studied 10 normal men, 15 patients with coronary disease who developed angina pectoris during exercise, and 10 patients with known coronary disease who did not develop angina during exercise. Each subject performed supine bicycle exercise under a mobile, single-crystal scintillation camera until angina or fatigue occurred. Technetium-99m bound to human serum albumin was the imaging agent. Data were collected at rest and during the last 2 minutes of each 3-minute stage of exercise and for 10 minutes after exercise. Volumes were calculated by a new radionuclide technique that correlated well with cineangiography and is expressed in nondimensional units. In normal subjects, the end-diastolic volume (EDV) at rest was not different from that a peak exercise. The end-systolic volume (ESV) decreased at peak exercise. ESV decreased progressively in all but two of 30 exercise periods. Angina patients had a larger EDV at rest and during chest pain than normals. Angina patients increased their ESV during chest pain resulting in a decreased ejection fraction (EF). All angina patients had a higher ESV during chest pain than during the exercise stage before chest pain. As a group, patients who did not develop angina had a lower EDV at rest and peak exercise than those who did develop angina. We conclude: that the EF increases during exercise due to a decrease in ESV; that the EF in patients with angina decreases because of an increase in ESV; and that the EF in coronary disease patients without angina shows no change because there is no significant change in the ESV. Radionuclide equilibrium angiography may prove useful for assessing EF and volume changes in patients with coronary artery disease

  8. Clinical evaluation of right ventricular function using radionuclide method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yasushi; Tamaki, Nagayoshi; Mukai, Takao; Motohara, Seiichito; Ikekubo, Katsuji.

    1982-01-01

    Essential thing to evaluate the right ventricular (RV) function is its volumetric measurement. However, its geometrical complexity has hampered this even with the contrast ventriculography, unlike left ventricle (LV). Meanwhile, the radionuclide time-activity curve from the first pass of a tracer through RV in the RAO view provides the most reliable data of the RV ejection fraction (RVEF), same data from the multigated equilibrium study in the LAO view is necessitated for a repeated intervention study, but the latter imposes a critical problem to locate ROI separately in the LAO view. Finally, three dimensional location of RV should be mandatory using new method as the dynamic SPECT in the future. (author)

  9. Comparison of analytical charge-form and equilibrium thermodynamic speciation of certain radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenne, E.A.; Cowan, C.E.; Robertson, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Calculating trace element speciation with a thermodynamic model is often challenged on the basis that the existing thermodynamic data are not sufficiently reliable. Water quality data and corresponding analytical charge-form speciation analysis were available for radionuclides occurring in a low-level radioactive groundwater. This offered an opportunity for comparing the results of an equilibrium thermodynamic model with the results of analytical charge-form speciation. The charge-form speciation was determined using the Battelle Large Volume Water Sampler, which contains consecutive layers of cation resin, anion resin and activated aluminum oxide for retention of cationic, anionic and non-ionic dissolved chemical species, respectively. The thermodynamic speciation of Cs, Cr, Fe, I, Mn, Mo, Na, and Zn was calculated using the MINTEQ geochemical model. Ce, Co, Tc, Np, Pm, and Sb were speciated by hand calculation. Excellent agreement between the analytically determined charge-form and the thermodynamic speciation was observed for 54 Mn, 144 Ce, 131 I, 24 Na, 137 Cs, 99 Mo, 99 Tc, 151 Pm, 239 Np. Organic complexation by natural and/or synthetic organics in the waters may be important in the speciation of 65 An, 60 Co, 131 I, 59 Fe and possibly 51 Cr. Both 124 Sb and 125 Sb appeared to be in redox disequilibria with the groundwater. 29 references, 2 tables

  10. Quantitative analysis of cardiac function: Comparison of electrocardiogram dual gated single photon emission tomography, planar radionuclide ventriculogram and contrast ventriculography in the determination of LV volume and ejection fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziada, G.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Higazy, E.; Mohamed, M.M.; Bahar, R.; Hayat, N.; Yousof, A.M.

    1987-03-01

    A dual gated tomography (DGT) program for end systolic and end diastolic acquisition and subsequent processing for calculation of LVEF, end diastolic and end systolic volumes (EDV, ESV) has been evaluated in 20 healthy volunteers (25 years-40 years) and 45 patients (25 years-60 years): 20 with ischaemic heart disease and 25 with valvular heart disease (VHD). All had biplane multigated blood pool (MUGA) studies in the 40/sup 0/ LAO projection using in vivo /sup 99m/Tc-R BCs, immediately followed by DG. The results in the patients group were correlated with contrast ventriculography (CV). In the volunteer group, the normal values for LVEF, EDV and ESV measured with DGT were found to be 63%+10%, 91 ml + 6 ml and 30 ml + 6ml and r value for the LVEF=0.91 compared with MUGA. In the IHD group, r values compared with CV were 0.915 and 0.97 for the EDV and ESV and 0.934 for the LVEF. Compared with the MUGA, the r value for LVEF was 0.883. In the VHD group, r values were 0.98 for both the EDV and ESV and 0.948 for the LVEF (P<0.002) compared with CV and 0.789 for the LVEF compared with the MUGA. We feel that DGT is an accurate and reproducible technique for LV function measurements.

  11. Left ventricular function and visual phase analysis with equilibrium radionuclide angiography in patients with biventricular device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muxi, Africa; Setoain, Francisco J.; Pons, Francisca; Paredes, Pilar; Duch, Joan; Fuertes, Silvia; Ortin, Jaime; Mont, Lluis; Diaz-Infante, Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is a technique indicated in patients with moderate to severe heart failure and ventricular dyssynchrony. To evaluate left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and synchronisation changes after CRT with a biventricular pacing implant, we used an equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA). Fifty patients were studied. An ERNA was made 72 h and 6 months after the implant. Two acquisitions were performed: with the CRT device connected and after disconnecting it. In the follow-up, responders were defined as those who had improved in accordance with various clinical variables. Quantitative changes in LVEF and visual changes in synchronisation (phase analysis) were studied comparing the two studies and also comparing the connected and disconnected modes. At 6 months, 30 patients were defined as responders. LVEF increased significantly at 6 months compared with the 72-h study only in responders. At 72 h, the number of patients showing a decrease in LVEF (p < 0.05) or a synchronisation worsening after disconnecting the device was higher in responders than in nonresponders. At 6 months, 57% of responders had no synchronisation changes between the connected and disconnected modes, suggesting a resynchronisation process. ERNA permits the study of resynchronisation patients, showing a statistical LVEF improvement at 6 months. Moreover, visual phase analysis permits the study of the mechanism involved in the response, with an important number of responders with no changes between the two modes at 6 months. In the 72-h study, after disconnection of the device, LVEF and resynchronisation worsening can predict patient improvement at 6 months. (orig.)

  12. Right-ventricular and left-ventricular function parameters in patients with and without outflow tract patches as determined by radionuclide methods at least 10 years following surgical correction of Fallot's tetralogy in the adult individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, P.

    1988-01-01

    During a period starting in 1983 and ending in April 1984 radionuclide ventriculography was performed in 26 patients subjected to surgical correction of Fallot's tetralogy after having reached adulthood. They were divided into two groups according to the surgical methods used. Patients showing no right-ventricular outflow patch were assigned to group I, while group II was made up of individuals that had received outflow tract patches of Dacron or Teflon for pressure reduction in the right ventricle. The parameters registered during radionuclide ventriculography, in which the tracer substance TC 99m was administered into a peripheral vein, included the endiastolic volume, endsystolic volume, stroke volume, global ejection fraction and cardiac index. For resting patients, these values were calculated using the first-pass technique, the determinations during exercise on the ergometer were based on equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography. It could be concluded from the results obtained here that non-invasive endocardial scintigraphy is a sensitive method that can be used both at rest and during exercise on the ergometer to detect function disorders of the right and left ventricles. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Left ventricular diastolic performance at rest in patients with angina and normal systolic function - assessment by equilibrium radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maini, C.L.; Bonetti, M.G.; Valle, G.; Antonelli Incalzi, R.; Montenero, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of the study was to correlate diastolic function, as evaluated by peak filling rate (PFR) and relative time (TPFR), with the severity of ischemic heart disease, as evaluated by exercise electrocardiography. Accordingly, 83 ischemic patients with effort angina, but normal ejection function at rest and normal left ventricular size, were studied by equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography within two weeks from the exercise ECG. Diastolic dysfunction, as determined from PFR and, to a lesser extent, from TPFR, is common in patients with ischemic heart disease and normal systolic function. The prevalence and severity of such dysfunction is related more to the severity of the ischemia, as evaluated by the exercise ECG, than to the presence of an old myocardial infarction. Such findings are consistent with the hypothesis that PFR reflects mainly the early diastolic active uncoupling process. (orig.) [de

  14. Evaluation with equilibrium radionuclide angiography of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in pulmonary hypertension secondary to chronic pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuya; Sera, Kazuaki; Fukuzaki, Hisashi.

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to chronic pulmonary diseases, 86 patients were studied using equilibrium radionuclide angiography with forward and reverse gating from the R wave. At rest left ventricular function, both in systolic and diastolic properties, in patients with pulmonary hypertension was significantly lower than in normal subjects (LVEF; P<0.05, PER; P<0.05, PFR; P<0.025, FF; P<0.025). During exercise left ventricular systolic function did not increase as much as in normals (LVEF; N.S., PER; N.S.). Left ventricular diastolic function during exercise was significantly lower than at rest (PFR; P<0.05, FF; P<0.001). The indices of left ventricular function obtained from radionuclide angiography had no close correlation with pulmonary hemodynamics or with blood gases. These results demonstrated that left ventricular dysfunction in patients with pulmonary hypertension was observed both at rest and during exercise, and might play an important role in reduced exercise tolerance. (author)

  15. Evaluation with equilibrium radionuclide angiography of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in pulmonary hypertension secondary to chronic pulmonary diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Kazuya; Sera, Kazuaki [National Akashi Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Fukuzaki, Hisashi

    1989-08-01

    To evaluate left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to chronic pulmonary diseases, 86 patients were studied using equilibrium radionuclide angiography with forward and reverse gating from the R wave. At rest left ventricular function, both in systolic and diastolic properties, in patients with pulmonary hypertension was significantly lower than in normal subjects (LVEF; P<0.05, PER; P<0.05, PFR; P<0.025, FF; P<0.025). During exercise left ventricular systolic function did not increase as much as in normals (LVEF; N.S., PER; N.S.). Left ventricular diastolic function during exercise was significantly lower than at rest (PFR; P<0.05, FF; P<0.001). The indices of left ventricular function obtained from radionuclide angiography had no close correlation with pulmonary hemodynamics or with blood gases. These results demonstrated that left ventricular dysfunction in patients with pulmonary hypertension was observed both at rest and during exercise, and might play an important role in reduced exercise tolerance. (author).

  16. Radionuclide cardiography in medical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strangfeld, D.; Mohnike, W.; Schmidt, J.; Heine, H.; Correns, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compendium on all aspects of radionuclide diagnostics concerning cardiovascular system diseases. Starting with introductory remarks on the control of cardiovascular diseases the contribution of radionuclide cardiology to functional cardiovascular diagnostics as well as pathophysiological and pathobiochemical aspects of radiocardiography are outlined. Radiopharmaceuticals used in radiocardiography, physical and technical problems in application of radionuclides and their measuring techniques are discussed. In individual chapters radionuclide ventriculography, myocardial scintiscanning, circulatory diagnostics, radionuclide diagnostics of arterial hypertension, of thrombosis and in vitro diagnostics of thrombophilia are treated in the framework of clinical medicine

  17. Aqueous geochemistry in icy world interiors: Equilibrium fluid, rock, and gas compositions, and fate of antifreezes and radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Marc; Desch, Steven J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2017-09-01

    The geophysical evolution of many icy moons and dwarf planets seems to have provided opportunities for interaction between liquid water and rock (silicate and organic solids). Here, we explore two ways by which water-rock interaction can feed back on geophysical evolution: the production or consumption of antifreeze compounds, which affect the persistence and abundance of cold liquid; and the potential leaching into the fluid of lithophile radionuclides, affecting the distribution of a long-term heat source. We compile, validate, and use a numerical model, implemented with the PHREEQC code, of the interaction of chondritic rock with pure water and with C, N, S-bearing cometary fluid, thought to be the materials initially accreted by icy worlds, and describe the resulting equilibrium fluid and rock assemblages at temperatures, pressures, and water-to-rock ratios of 0-200 ° C, 1-1000 bar, and 0.1-10 by mass, respectively. Our findings suggest that water-rock interaction can strongly alter the nature and amount of antifreezes, resulting in solutions rich in reduced nitrogen and carbon, and sometimes dissolved H2, with additional sodium, calcium, chlorine, and/or oxidized carbon. Such fluids can remain partially liquid down to 176 K if NH3 is present. The prominence of Cl in solution seems to hinge on its primordial supply in ices, which is unconstrained by the meteoritical record. Equilibrium assemblages, rich in serpentine and saponite clays, retain thorium and uranium radionuclides unless U-Cl or U-HCO3 complexing, which was not modeled, significantly enhances U solubility. However, the radionuclide 40 K can be leached at high water:rock ratio and/or low temperature at which K is exchanged with ammonium in minerals. We recommend the inclusion of these effects in future models of the geophysical evolution of ocean-bearing icy worlds. Our simulation products match observations of chloride salts on Europa and Enceladus; CI chondrites mineralogies; the observation of

  18. Decay profiles of β and γ for a radionuclide inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaices, M.; Sandoval, S.; Ovando, R.

    2007-01-01

    Presently work the β and γ radiation decay profiles for a radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor is presented. The profiles are presented in terms of decay in the activity of the total inventory as well as of the chemical groups that conform the inventory. In the obtaining of the radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle the ORIGEN2 code, version 1 was used, which simulates fuel burnup cycles and it calculates the evolution of the isotopic composition as a result of the burnt one, irradiation and decay of the nuclear fuel. It can be observed starting from the results that the decrease in the activity for the initial inventory and the different chemical groups that conform it is approximately proportional to the base 10 logarithm of the time for the first 24 hours of having concluded the burnt one. It can also be observed that the chemical groups that contribute in more proportion to the total activity of the inventory are the lanthanides-actinides and the transition metals, with 39% and 28%, respectively. The groups of alkaline earth metals, halogens, metalloids, noble gases and alkaline metals, contribute with percentages that go from the 8 to 5%. The groups that less they contribute to the total activity of the inventory they are the non metals and semi-metals with smaller proportions that 1%. The chemical groups that more contribute to the energy of β and γ radiation its are the transition metals and the lanthanides-actinides with a change in the order of importance at the end of the 24 hours period. The case of the halogens is of relevance for the case of the γ radiation energy due that occupying the very near third site to the dimensions of the two previous groups. Additionally, the decay in the activity for the total inventory and the groups that conform it can be simulated by means of order 6 polynomials or smaller than describe its behavior appropriately. The results presented in this work, coupled to a distribution model

  19. Sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide equilibrium angiocardiography for detection of hemodynamically significant secundum atrial septal defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunotte, F.; Laurens, M.H.; Itty, C.; Robert, J.; Cloez, J.L.; Marcon, F.; Pernot, C.

    1986-12-01

    To determine the value, of gated equilibrium angiography in secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) in children, the first pass pulmonic/systemic flow ratio (Qp/Qs) was compared with diastolic count ratio (DCR) and stroke count ratio (SCR) of the two ventricles. In 50 children we have found a correlation between Qp/Qs and DCR (r=0.71) and between Qp/Qs and SCR (r=0.66). For detection of significant atrial shunt (Qp/Qs>1.5) the sensitivity of DCR>2 was 0.81 and the specificity 0.75. For SCR>1.5 we sensitivity and specificity values of 0.87 and 0.71 respectively. Left and right ventricular ejection fractions were normal (0.67+-0.08 and 0.50+-0.07).

  20. Radionuclide ventriculography during rest and exercise: normal values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, E.B.; Marroni, B.J.; Achutti, A.C.; Anselmi, O.E.; Rabin, M.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty young volunteers of both sexes were examined by radioisotopic techniques to establish the normal range of ventricular function at rest and the response to a stress test (systolic arterious pressure X cardiac frequency > 25000). (M.A.C.) [pt

  1. Right-ventricular and left-ventricular function parameters in patients with and without outflow tract patches as determined by radionuclide methods at least 10 years following surgical correction of Fallot's tetralogy in the adult individuals. Nuklearmedizinische Bestimmung der rechts- und linksventrikulaeren Funktionsparameter von Patienten ohne und mit Ausflusstraktpatch - mindestens 10 Jahre nach operativer Korrektur der Fallot'schen Tetralogie im Erwachsenenalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, P.

    1988-12-15

    During a period starting in 1983 and ending in April 1984 radionuclide ventriculography was performed in 26 patients subjected to surgical correction of Fallot's tetralogy after having reached adulthood. They were divided into two groups according to the surgical methods used. Patients showing no right-ventricular outflow patch were assigned to group I, while group II was made up of individuals that had received outflow tract patches of Dacron or Teflon for pressure reduction in the right ventricle. The parameters registered during radionuclide ventriculography, in which the tracer substance TC 99m was administered into a peripheral vein, included the endiastolic volume, endsystolic volume, stroke volume, global ejection fraction and cardiac index. For resting patients, these values were calculated using the first-pass technique, the determinations during exercise on the ergometer were based on equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography. It could be concluded from the results obtained here that non-invasive endocardial scintigraphy is a sensitive method that can be used both at rest and during exercise on the ergometer to detect function disorders of the right and left ventricles. (orig./MG).

  2. Digital subtraction ventriculography for assessment of global and regional leftventricular parameters in comparison to conventional contrast ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichstaedt, H.; Langer, M.; Felix, R.

    1984-01-01

    Since May 1982 we studied more than 100 patients with heart diseases by means of digital angiography, out of them 46 patients with a history of transmural myocardial infarction were selected. Urografin 76, 30 ml, was administered at a flow rate of 18 ml/s by means of a catheter in the superior vena cava during digital subtraction ventriculography. Results were compared with conventional contrast ventriculograms. The correlation coefficient was r=0.93 (p 0.001) for determination of ejection fraction with both methods. The data in individual cases suggest that DSV is more sensitive than conventional contrast ventriculography in determination of severely reduced ejection fractions. The methods are practically identical in qualitative evaluation of disorders of regional wall motion in the anterolateral region, while DSV is more sensitive than conventional ventriculography in evaluating the apical region. Sensitivity was 85.7% when the two methods were compared in evaluation of the inferior region of the left ventricle. Both methods are identical in demonstration of severely deformed ventricles. Digital subtraction ventriculography may replace conventional contrast ventriculography in some of situations discussed above. (orig.)

  3. Do we need ventriculography in the era of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, S.; Kishikawa, T.; Huewel, N.; Kazner, E.; Grumme, T.; Lanksch, W.

    1982-01-01

    The question is posed whether in the investigation of intracranial tumors, particularly in the posterior cranial fossa, CT and/or ventriculography should be practiced. We investigated 134 patients (93 were children up to the age of 14 years), all of whom had both computed tomography and ventriculography. The results clearly demonstrate the superiority of CT compared with centriculography. Ventriculography is a surgical intervention with risk for the patient; side effects may occur and serious complications can sometimes arise. Modern CT is producing pictures of high quality which are entirely sufficient for neurosurgical intervention. Very rarely does additional angiography have to be performed. The diagnosis of intracrenial tumor can be fully established by CT and ventriculogrphy is no longer necessary. (orig.)

  4. Right ventricular ejection fraction - comparison of various angiographic and radionuclide approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schicha, H.; Tebbe, U.; Voth, E.; Sciagra, R.; Schultz, W.; Neuhaus, G.; Goettingen Univ.

    1987-01-01

    In 21 patients with various heart diseases RVEF was measured angiographically and by radionuclide ventriculography. Using biplane angiocardiography evaluation was performed by 7 different methods (Simpson's rule, Dogde, Arcilla, Ferlinz, Duebel). Using equilibrium RNV, evaluation was performed by 9 modifications of analysis. Problems were evident to separate the right atrium from the ventricle and to define the site of the pulmonary valve. The results show that when using the various methods of angiography considerable variations of the absolute volumes occur, but least so with RVEF. When using RNV with one single enddiastolic ROI, the RVEF was much too low. By means of the enddiastolic/endsystolic Double-ROI-method a good agreement with angiography was found, with correlation coefficients up to r=0.85. There was only a minor effect of background correction. (orig.) [de

  5. Quantitation of aortic and mitral regurgitation in the pediatric population: evaluation by radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, R.A.; Treves, S.; Freed, M.; Girod, D.A.; Caldwell, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The ability to quantitate aortic (AR) or mitral regurgitation (MR), or both, by radionuclide angiocardiography was evaluated in children and young adults at rest and during isometric exercise. Regurgitation was estimated by determining the ratio of left ventricular stroke volume to right ventricular stroke volume obtained during equilibrium ventriculography. The radionuclide measurement was compared with results of cineangiography, with good correlation between both studies in 47 of 48 patients. Radionuclide stroke volume ratio was used to classify severity: the group with equivocal regurgitation differed from the group with mild regurgitation (p less than 0.02); patients with mild regurgitation differed from those with moderate regurgitation (p less than 0.001); and those with moderate regurgitation differed from those with severe regurgitation (p less than 0.01). The stroke volume ratio was responsive to isometric exercise, remaining constant or increasing in 16 of 18 patients. After surgery to correct regurgitation, the stroke volume ratio significantly decreased from preoperative measurements in all 7 patients evaluated. Results from the present study demonstrate that a stroke volume ratio greater than 2.0 is compatible with moderately severe regurgitation and that a ratio greater than 3.0 suggests the presence of severe regurgitation. Thus, radionuclide angiocardiography should be useful for noninvasive quantitation of AR or MR, or both, helping define the course of young patients with left-side valvular regurgitation

  6. EFFECTIVE SPECIFIC ACTIVITY OF NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES FOR THE NORM BELONGED TO 238U AND 232TH SERIES BEING IN THE STATE OF DISTURBED RADIOACTIVE EQUILIBRIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Stamat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Sanitary Rules SR 2.6.1.1292-03 and SR 2.6.6.1169-02 classification of the industrial waste containing naturally occurring radioactive materials is adopted in accordance to the values of their effective specific activity Aeff. In a case of the disturbed equilibrium in 238U and 232Th series it is necessary to take into consideration actual contribution of the separate natural radionuclides of the mentioned series into the value of gamma dose rate of the waste. This will permit to avoid unjustified overestimating or understating of the waste category which prevents as unjustified expenditures on their treating so undertaking of the necessary measures providing radiation safety.

  7. EANM/ESC guidelines for radionuclide imaging of cardiac function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, B.; Lindhardt, T.B.; Acampa, W.

    2008-01-01

    radionuclide ventriculography, gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, gated PET, and studies with non-imaging devices for the evaluation of cardiac function. The items covered are presented in 11 sections: clinical indications, radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry, study acquisition, RV EF, LV EF, LV volumes...

  8. Equilibrium radionuclide assessment of left ventricular ejection and filling. Comparison of list mode-and multigated frame-mode measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugrue, D.D.; McKenna, W.J.; Dickie, S.; Oakley, C.M.; Myers, M.J.; Lavender, J.P. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (UK))

    1983-10-01

    The relationship as studied between radionuclide indices of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function acquired in conventional multigated frame-mode compared to list-mode in patients with sinus rhythm. The study showed that frame-mode and list-mode measurements of ejection and filling indices are not significantly different in these patients but that backward reformatting of data acquired in list-mode is necessary to measure the atrial contribution to LV stroke counts. It was concluded that valid measurements of left ventricular systolic ejection and diastolic filling can be made in patients in sinus rhythm using frame-mode acquisition with the exception of measurements of the contribution from atrial systole to stroke volume.

  9. Evaluation of left ventricular function using digital subtraction ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiannikas, J.; Detrano, R.

    1986-01-01

    Digital subtraction ventriculography following injections of contrast via peripheral veins provides excellent images to assess left ventricular function. The images are essentially identical to those following DCV, but allow more uniform mixing of contrast in the left ventricular chamber. Furthermore, few, if any, cardiac arrhythmias occur, hence obviating difficulties that arise from DCV. The spatial resolution of the method is such that regional wall motion assessment of ventricular function is more accurate than that of other noninvasive imaging methods. The use of video-densitometry allows accurate assessment of left ventricular function even when the left ventricular cavity is nonsymmetrically deformed and aneurysmal. In the setting of the cardiac catheterization laboratory, digital ventriculography may provide a safer means of assessing left ventricular function when critical coronary or myocardial disease is present and allows multiple assessments of ventricular function during the same study. Although excellent correlations with standard ventriculography have been noted by all workers, significant discrepancies still exist in individual patients, particularly in the calculations of end diastolic volumes. In the authors experience and in those of most workers, the largest discrepancies existed in patients in whom suboptimal studies are included for analysis. The most frequent reason for the occasional suboptimal study as with all digital subtraction work is the misregistration that results from motion

  10. Evaluation of ventriculography as a supplement to computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakstad, P.; Sortland, O.; Hovind, K.

    1982-04-01

    The diagnostic value of ventriculography (VGR) as a supplement to computed tomography (CT) is evaluated in 42 patients. CT was slightly superior for diagnosing expanding lesions and could tell more about the size and nature of the processes in this selected material which includes only lesions adjacent to the ventricular system. VGR yielded more information about the attachment of a tumor to the wall, floor, or roof of the ventricles. Stenosis or occlusion of the Sylvian aqueduct, communicating hydrocephalus, and basal adhesive arachnoiditis were diagnosed by VGR, while the correct diagnosis could be suggested only by CT in these cases.

  11. Interventricular delay measurement using equilibrium radionuclide angiography before resynchronization therapy should be performed outside the area of segmental wall motion abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtehoux, Maxime [Service EFMP CHU Trousseau, Chambray les Tours (France); Zannad, Noura; Fauchier, Laurent; Babuty, Dominique [Service Cardiologie B CHU Trousseau, Tours (France); Eder, Veronique [Service EFMP CHU Trousseau, Chambray les Tours (France); EA3852 University Francois Rabelais, Tours (France)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that only mechanical dyssynchrony outside the area of segmental wall motion abnormalities (WMA) can be reduced by cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Included in the study were 28 consecutive patients with nonischaemic cardiomyopathy selected for CRT. Equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA) was carried out before and after implantation of a multisite pacemaker. Patients were separated into two groups depending on the presence or absence of segmental WMA. A reduction in QRS duration was observed in all patients after CRT. The interventricular delay (IVD) decreased significantly after CRT only in patients without WMA (homogeneous contraction, HG group; IVD 44 {+-} 11.4 vs. 17 {+-} 3.1 , p = 0.04). In contrast, no significant decrease was observed in patients with WMA (WMA group; IVD 51 {+-} 6 vs. 38 {+-} 6 , p NS). However, when dyssynchrony was considered outside the WMA area, a significant reduction in IVD was obtained, in the same range as in the HG group (IVD 32 {+-} 3 vs. 19 {+-} 3 , p = 0.04). In 9 of 15 patients (60%) with a reduction in IVD after CRT, the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) increased by about +10%. In contrast, in 13 of 13 patients (100%) with no reduction in IVD, no modification of LVEF was obtained. In the presence of segmental WMA without significant delays outside the WMA area, no reduction in IVD was observed and LVEF did not increase (IVD 34 {+-} 5 before CRT vs. 37 {+-} 7 after CRT; LVEF 19 {+-} 4% before CRT vs. 22 {+-} 3% after CRT, p NS). ERNA can be used to predict good mechanical resynchronization (decrease in IVD) in patients after pacing. IVD has to be determined excluding the area of WMA in order to select patients who will show an increase in their left ventricle function after CRT. (orig.)

  12. BLT-EC (Breach, Leach Transport, and Equilibrium Chemistry), a finite-element model for assessing the release of radionuclides from low-level waste disposal units: Background, theory, and model description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, R.J.; Sullivan, T.M.; Simonson, S.A.; Suen, C.J.

    1995-08-01

    Performance assessment models typically account for the processes of sorption and dissolution-precipitation by using an empirical distribution coefficient, commonly referred to as K d that combines the effects of all chemical reactions between solid and aqueous phases. In recent years, however, there has been an increasing awareness that performance assessments based solely on empirically based K d models may be incomplete, particularly for applications involving radionuclides having sorption and solubility properties that are sensitive to variations in the in-situ chemical environment. To accommodate variations in the in-situ chemical environment, and to assess its impact on radionuclide mobility, it is necessary to model radionuclide release, transport, and chemical processes in a coupled fashion. This modeling has been done and incorporated into the two-dimensional, finite-element, computer code BLT-EC (Breach, Leach, Transport, Equilibrium Chemistry). BLT-EC is capable of predicting container degradation, waste-form leaching, and advective-dispersive, multispecies, solute transport. BLT-EC accounts for retardation directly by modeling the chemical processes of complexation, sorption, dissolution-precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions. In this report we: (1) present a detailed description of the various physical and chemical processes that control the release and migration of radionuclides from shallow land LLW disposal facilities; (2) formulate the mathematical models that represent these processes; (3) outline how these models are incorporated and implemented in BLT-EC; and (4) demonstrate the application of BLT-EC on a set of example problems

  13. Radionuclide determination of right and left ventricular stroke volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wei Feng; Roubin, G S; Choong, C Y.P.; Harris, P J; Flether, P J; Kelly, D T; Uren, R F; Hutton, B F

    1985-03-01

    The relationship between radionuclide and thermodilution measurement of stroke volumes (SV) was investigated in 30 patients without valvular regurgitation or intracardiac shunt (group A) at rest and during exercise. Both attenuated radionuclide right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) SV measurements correlated well with the SV determined by the thermodilution method (r = 0.87 and r = 0.93, all P < 0.001). The reliability of the radionuclide method to estimate SV was evaluated prospectively in two additional groups of patients. In 11 patients without valvular regurgitation or intracardiac shunt (group B) the radionuclide RVSV and LVSV closely approximated to thermodilution SV at rest and during exercise. In 15 patients with aortic regurgitation (group C) the radionuclide stroke volume ratio correlated well with the angiographic regurgitant fraction. Thus, both RVSV and LVSV and the severity of aortic regurgitation can be reliably measured with gated radionuclide ventriculography.

  14. Equilibrium and generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, H.S.

    1994-01-01

    This work studies the behaviour of radionuclides when it produce a desintegration activity,decay and the isotopes stable creation. It gives definitions about the equilibrium between activity of parent and activity of the daughter, radioactive decay,isotope stable and transient equilibrium and maxim activity time. Some considerations had been given to generators that permit a disgregation of two radioisotopes in equilibrium and its good performance. Tabs

  15. Value of radionuclide angiocardiography for determination of left ventricular volume in patients with valvular heart diseases (preliminary report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madeja, G.; Konieczna, S.; Gosiewska-Marcinkowska, E.; Leszek, P.

    1991-01-01

    In 15 patients with mitral valve defect and 10 patients with aortic valve defect, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined by gated radionuclide angiography. The results were compared with contrast ventriculography. The correlation coefficient between the two methods was much lower in cases of mitral valve diseases. (author). 1 tab

  16. Precision of gated equilibrium radioventriculography in measuring left ventricular stroke volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourguignon, M.H.; Wise, R.A.; Ehrlich, W.E.; Douglas, K.H.; Camargo, E.E.; Harrison, K.E.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    We have demonstrated that relative changes of small amplitude in ventricular stroke volume can be measured accurately in dogs when a fully automated technique for delineation of end diastolic and end systolic region of interest (ROI) is used. Consequently, we expect such a technique to be very sensitive in measuring relative changes of any ventricular quantitative parameter from gated equilibrium radio ventriculography in humans

  17. Comparison between radioisotopic ventriculography in balance with Tc99-albumine-DTPA and quantitative gated SPECT with Tc-99m-MIBI for determining the eject fraction of left ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguera, E. C; Jaime, Adelina; Pamellin, Miriam; Veliz, J

    2002-01-01

    Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) and electrocardiography gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (GSPECT), can be used to assess the ventricular function.The purpose of this study was:1) to compare left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF(%) using post-stress or rest gated GSPECT with LVEF by resting RNV and 2) to evaluate the 99m-Tc99m human serum albumin (HAS) with diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) (99m-TcHSA-DTPA) as a potential use a as blood pool imaging agent (Au)

  18. Clinical assessment of patients with mitral valve prolapse syndrome using radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Masakazu; Shirayama, Takeshi; Otsuki, Katsuichi; Adachi, Haruhiko; Nakagawa, Masao.

    1995-01-01

    Left ventricular performance in patients with mitral valve prolapse syndrome (MVP) was evaluated and compared with that in patients with ischemic heart diseases (IHD), consisting of angina pectoris (AP) and old myocardial infarction (OMI). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and peak ejection rate (PER) were used as indices of systolic function. Peak filling rate (PFR), filling fraction in the first third of diastole (1/3FF) and time to peak filling (TPF) were used as indices of diastolic function. At rest, LVEF and PER were significantly larger in the MVP group than those in the OMI group. PFR and TPF were shown better diastolic functions in the MVP group than those in the AP or OMI groups. During stress testing, the LVEF of the MVP group increased during exercise, whereas that of the IHD group decreased gradually to the downward response (exercise-induced ischemia). The PFR of the MVP group curved upward during exercise in contrast with the inconstant response of the IHD group. We conclude that chest pain and various symptom in patients with MVP are unrelated to IHD. (author)

  19. The blood-pool technique of radionuclide ventriculography: Data acquisition and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Schauenburg, W.

    1986-01-01

    For gated heart studies an in-vitro-labelling of erythrocytes is commonly used. Rest and exercise studies are acquired from LAO. Complementary studies may have different views. Besides the most common direct frame mode acquisition, there are the more flexible list mode and a hybrid mode. Concerning evaluation the ejection fraction is the leading parameter of global ventricular analysis. In local analysis a pixelwise evaluation generates functional images of phases and amplitudes (the Fourier approach developed by the Ulm group) or Noelep's trend images. Special attention has to be paid to the varying cycle length when a sine or cosine fitting (Fourier) is used for curve smoothing or phase and amplitude images. There are two opposed problems: If there are undetected QRS-complexes, the end of the representative cycle will contain early phases of subsequent cycles which must be cut off. In the case of really varying cycle length, the last images of the representative cycle must be corrected for acquisition time per frame. The total count curve may help to discriminate both cases and supplies suitable correction factors in the latter case. (orig.) [de

  20. Visualisation of regional motility disorders in the left ventricular wall using radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, H.

    1985-01-01

    During this study ECG-triggered intramyocardial scintiscans were obtained following in-vivo labelling of erythrocytes (99mTc) from 74 patients showing coronary heart disease and analysed with the aim to assess the suitability of this method for the detection of mural motility disorders and for visualisation of the accurate size of the left ventricle. The results of the intramyocardial scintiscans were evaluated against those of levocardiograms recorded for reasons of comparison and found to demonstrate mural motility disorders with a specifity of 0.70 and a sensitivity of 0.75. Relatively reliable data to diagnose those myocardial motility disorders were obtained by combined analysis of the individual scintiphotographic displays of amplitudes, phases, ejection fractions and positive gradients. The investigation of further parameters like the recorded stroke volumes and negative gradients provided no additional information. The phase recording proved to be the most suitable parameter to assess the size of the left ventricle. All other recordings gave a distorted picture of the left ventricle in terms of a reduction in size. (TRV) [de

  1. An attempt to evaluate pulmonary hypertension by phase analysis of radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuoka, Takeshi; Toyama, Hinako; Ajisaka, Ryuuichi

    1988-01-01

    Using phase analysis derived from the gated blood pool imaging, the pattern of right ventricular regional contraction was examined in 5 patients with pulmonary hypertension who showed 30 mmHg of pulmonary arterial systolic pressure and 20 mmHg or more of mean pulmonary arterial pressure. All of the patients had markedly delayed phase in contraction of right ventricular outflow tract. Pulmonary arterial pressure positively correlated with both the proportion of delayed phase area to the whole right ventricle and mean phase difference between the right and left ventricles. The results suggest the usefulness of phase analysis in the non-invasive evaluation of incease in overloading of right ventricular pressure. (Namekawa, K)

  2. Echocardiography, ventriculography and coronary angiography in patients just recovering from acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, S.

    1983-01-01

    Comparative evaluations were carried out on the basis of ventriculography, echocardiography and corornary angiography that would permit to throw some light on the following issues: Can the changes in overall ventricular function occurring in response to the processes in the infarcted zone be visualised by means of M-mode scans. Which degree of accuracy can be achieved, if attempts are made to establish an echocardiographic diagnosis on the basis of M-mode scans in order to confirm regional contractility disorders revealed by ventriculography. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Decay profiles of {beta} and {gamma} for a radionuclide inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor; Perfiles de decaimiento de radiacion {beta} y {gamma} para un inventario de radionuclidos en ciclo de equilibrio de un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaices, M.; Sandoval, S.; Ovando, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas. Gerencia de Energia Nuclear, Av. Reforma 113 Col. Palmira. 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: sal@iie.org.mx

    2007-07-01

    Presently work the {beta} and {gamma} radiation decay profiles for a radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor is presented. The profiles are presented in terms of decay in the activity of the total inventory as well as of the chemical groups that conform the inventory. In the obtaining of the radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle the ORIGEN2 code, version 1 was used, which simulates fuel burnup cycles and it calculates the evolution of the isotopic composition as a result of the burnt one, irradiation and decay of the nuclear fuel. It can be observed starting from the results that the decrease in the activity for the initial inventory and the different chemical groups that conform it is approximately proportional to the base 10 logarithm of the time for the first 24 hours of having concluded the burnt one. It can also be observed that the chemical groups that contribute in more proportion to the total activity of the inventory are the lanthanides-actinides and the transition metals, with 39% and 28%, respectively. The groups of alkaline earth metals, halogens, metalloids, noble gases and alkaline metals, contribute with percentages that go from the 8 to 5%. The groups that less they contribute to the total activity of the inventory they are the non metals and semi-metals with smaller proportions that 1%. The chemical groups that more contribute to the energy of {beta} and {gamma} radiation its are the transition metals and the lanthanides-actinides with a change in the order of importance at the end of the 24 hours period. The case of the halogens is of relevance for the case of the {gamma} radiation energy due that occupying the very near third site to the dimensions of the two previous groups. Additionally, the decay in the activity for the total inventory and the groups that conform it can be simulated by means of order 6 polynomials or smaller than describe its behavior appropriately. The results presented in this work, coupled

  4. The cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia: isotopic ventriculography and myocardial imaging with thallium-201

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therriault, L.; Lamoureux, G.; Cote, M.; Plourde, G.; Lemieux, B.

    1984-01-01

    Myocardial scanning after the intravenous administration of Thallium 201 was used to evaluate regional myocardial perfusion in 14 patients with Friedreich's ataxia. Isotopic ventriculography was also used to assess left ventricular contractility. Myocardial images in patients with Friedreich's ataxia were found to be precociously abnormal irrespective of the degree of neurological impairment or of the severity of myocardial hypertrophy

  5. Equilibrium dialysis-ligand exchange: adaptation of the method for determination of conditional stability constants of radionuclide-fulvic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaus, M.A.; Hummel, W.; Van Loon, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    The equilibrium dialysis-ligand exchange technique (EDLE) is used to determine conditional stability constants for the complexation of metal ions with humic acid, particularly in high pH solutions. Here, this technique has been adapted to measure conditional stability constants with fulvic acid. Fulvic acid permeates across all membranes during the experiment. The quantities involved therefore have to be determined analytically and taken into account when calculating the conditional stability constants. Co(II) and Laurentian Soil fulvic (LFA) acid were selected as a test system in order to investigate the time scale required to establish chemical and diffusion equilibria. After an incubation time of approximately two days, the conditional stability constants measured for the formation of Co-LFA-complexes are not time dependent, although across the whole time period investigated, LFA was still diffusing in increasing amounts across the dialysis membrane. This work demonstrates that the modified EDLE technique can be used in the determination of conditional metal stability constants of fulvic acid. (authors)

  6. Ventriculography and cisternography with water-soluble contrast media in infants with myelomeningocele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.; Nakamura, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tajima, M.; Kageyama, N.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-four newborn infants with myelomeningocele and hydrocephalus were studied by ventriculography using water-soluble contrast media; 20 were also studied by metrizamide myeloencephalography and computerized tomographic (CT) cisternography. Ventriculography suggested that the aqueduct was patent in all cases. Outflow of contrast medium from the fourth ventricle was slow in most cases, complete obstruction was seen in 15%, communication was delayed at the outlet in 54%, and rather free communication was observedin 31%. Metrizamide myeloencephalography and CT cisternography suggested a partial block at the level of the ambient cisterns in approximately one-third of infants. These findings support the concept that flow of cerebrospinal fluid is reduced in several areas. Aqueductal stenosis was not considered an important factor in hydrocephalus, while the most important site of obstruction was felt to be the lowest portion of the fourth ventricle

  7. Right-sided phase abnormalities on gated blood pool ventriculography: Demonstration of six different patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahar, R.H.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Ziada, G.; Al-Suhali, A.; Constantinides, C.; Nair, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Phase pattern abnormalities on multiple gated blood pool ventriculography are better reported for the left ventricle (LV) than for the right side of the heart. In a study of 92 patients who also underwent contrast ventriculography, the authors identified six different patterns of right-sided phase abnormalities and their causes: right bundle-branch block, causing delayed phase in the entire right ventricle (RV); ischemic right coronary artery disease, causing delayed phase in the inferior RV wall; pericardial effusion, causing an L-shaped area of delayed phase to the right of the septum and below the LV; pulmonary hypertension, causing delayed phase in the pulmonary infundibulum; tricuspid regurgitation, causing a crescentic area of delayed phase around and below the right RV and extending below the LV as well, and atrial septal defect causing an abnormally large auricular phase

  8. Radionuclide trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition

  9. Right ventriculography as a valid method for the diagnosis of tricuspid insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubago, J L; Figueroa, A; Colman, T; Ochoteco, A; Rodríguez, M; Durán, C M

    1981-01-01

    The value of right ventriculography in the diagnosis of tricuspid insufficiency (TI) is often questioned because of 1) the high incidence of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) during injections and 2) interference of the catheter in the valve closure mechanism. In 168 patients a commercially available, not preshaped, balloon-tipped catheter was used for right ventriculography. To avoid the induction of PVCs, the catheter tip was placed in the middle third of the diafragmatic wall of the right ventricle, and the balloon was inflated, becoming trapped by the trabeculae. In this position the catheter's side holes should be located in the inflow chamber. To ensure this correct position, and therefore lack of ectopic beats during angiography, a saline test injection was performed previously in every case. With this technique the incidence of PVCs during ventriculography was only 7.7%. In all but one case, such beats were isolated. The 168 patients were divided into three groups according to their likelihood of experiencing tricuspid interference by the catheter: group 1 included 41 patients with a normal heart or with coronary artery disease. No one from this group had TI. Of group II, 28 patients with right ventricular pressure or volume overload or cardiomyopathy, only 2 had TI, both with a previous clinical diagnosis of regurgitation. Group III contained 99 patients with rheumatic heart disease. Thirty-five of them showed angiographic TI, and 24 of these had this diagnosis confirmed either clinically or at surgery. It is felt that this technique of right ventriculography, with its low incidence of PVCs and slight interference with tricuspid closure, is a valid method for the objective study of the tricuspid valve.

  10. Magnetic resonance ventriculography with gadolinium DTPA: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebner, H.R.; Einsiedel, H. von; Conrad, B.

    1997-01-01

    We report intrathecal use of gadolinium DTPA for MRI of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In two patients with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, we injected 0.01 mmol gadolinium DTPA into the lateral ventricle via an Ommaya device. Coronal T1-weighted images of the head were obtained at 0.2 T prior to and after injection. There was pronounced enhancement of CSF close to the injection site, allowing good delineation of CSF and surrounding brain tissue. No side effects occurred. MRI with intrathecal administration of highly diluted gadolinium DTPA may be a promising alternative to conventional investigation of CSF-filled cavities using iodinated X-ray contrast media or radionuclides. (orig.). With 3 figs

  11. Evaluation of the effect of different types and location of pacemaker on cardiac function using radionuclide techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Rongfang; Liu Xiujie; Guo Xiuzhen

    1993-01-01

    Left ventricular function was measured in 24 patients using radionuclide ventriculography before and after planting different types of pacemakers. The results showed that the heart rate, peak filling rate (PFR) and relative cardiac output (RCO) were significantly increased after planting the pacemaker. However, the effects of AAI and VVI on the synchronism of LV were different. AAI can significantly improve the synchronism and compliance of LV

  12. Radionuclide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  13. Ventricular dysfunction in children with obstructive sleep apnea: radionuclide assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tal, A.; Leiberman, A.; Margulis, G.; Sofer, S.

    1988-01-01

    Ventricular function was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography in 27 children with oropharyngeal obstruction and clinical features of obstructive sleep apnea. Their mean age was 3.5 years (9 months to 7.5 years). Conventional clinical assessment did not detect cardiac involvement in 25 of 27 children; however, reduced right ventricular ejection fraction (less than 35%) was found in 10 (37%) patients (mean: 19.5 +/- 2.3% SE, range: 8-28%). In 18 patients wall motion abnormality was detected. In 11 children in whom radionuclide ventriculography was performed before and after adenotonsillectomy, right ventricular ejection fraction rose from 24.4 +/- 3.6% to 46.7 +/- 3.4% (P less than 0.005), and in all cases wall motion showed a definite improvement. In five children, left ventricular ejection fraction rose greater than 10% after removal of oropharyngeal obstruction. It is concluded that right ventricular function may be compromised in children with obstructive sleep apnea secondary to adenotonsillar hypertrophy, even before clinical signs of cardiac involvement are present

  14. Exercise radionuclide ventriculographic responses in hypertensive patients with chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, A.G.; Katz, R.J.; Varghese, P.J.; Leiboff, R.H.; Bren, G.G.; Schlesselman, S.; Varma, V.M.; Reba, R.C.; Ross, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of exercise-treadmill testing in diagnosing coronary-artery disease in hypertensive patients is limited by a high rate of false positivity. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography, however, relies on different criteria (ejection fraction and wall motion), and we have evaluated this procedure in 37 hypertensive and 109 normotensive patients with chest pain, using coronary arteriography as an indicator of coronary disease. In the hypertensive cohort there was no difference in the ejection fraction at rest between the 17 patients with coronary disease and the 20 without it. Neither group had a significant mean (+/- S.E.M.) change in ejection fraction from rest to exercise (-1.9 +/- 2 and 1.4 +/- 1%, respectively). A wall-motion abnormality developed during exercise in 5 of the 17 hypertensive patients with coronary disease (29%) and in 4 of the 20 without it (20%) (P = not significant). In the normotensive cohort, however, the peak-exercise ejection fractions were significantly different. The 71 patients with coronary disease had a mean decrease of 3.6 +/- 1%, in contrast to the patients without coronary disease, who had an increase of +/- 1% (P < 0.001). An exercise-induced wall-motion abnormality was seen in 35 of the 71 patients with coronary disease (48%), as compared with 3 of the 38 without it (8%) (P < 0.001). We conclude that exercise radionuclide ventriculography is inadequate as a screening test for coronary atherosclerosis in hypertensive patients with chest pain. 28 references, 2 figures, 3 tables

  15. The radionuclide migration model in river system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukova, O.M.; Shiryaeva, N.M.; Myshkina, M.K.; Shagalova, Eh.D.; Denisova, V.V.; Skurat, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    It was propose the model of radionuclide migration in river system based on principle of the compartmental model at hydraulically stationary and chemically equilibrium conditions of interaction of radionuclides in system water-dredge, water-sediments. Different conditions of radioactive contamination entry in river system were considered. The model was verified on the data of radiation monitoring of Iput' river

  16. Positive ventriculography and computer assisted tomography of the skull in the evaluation of megalocephaly in newborns and infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellermann, K.; Heuser, L.; Bliesener, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    To clarify indications and limits of computer assisted tomography and positive ventriculography the results of both methods were compared with each other retrospectively in 55 macrocephalic newborns and infants. It could be shown that positive ventriculography, even if combined with coronal views, was superseded by computer assisted tomography to only a certain extent. To complete the appropriate diagnosis preoperatively positive ventriculography was necessary most often in patients with paranatal disturbances who had undergone intensive care treatment. The non-invasive method of computer assisted tomography often yielded sufficient information on localisation, size, and nature of the underlying pathologic process. Both methods turned out to be complementary when topographical and functional interrelations of cranial cysts were to be analysed, or when anatomical details had to be demonstrated, especially structures of the midline and of the posterior fossa, which could not be visualized by computer assisted tomography alone. (orig.) [de

  17. Radionuclide cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to show that radionuclide cisternography makes an essential contribution to the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, especially for the investigation of hydrocephalus. The technical details of radionuclide cisternography are discussed, followed by a description of the normal and abnormal radionuclide cisternograms. The dynamics of CFS by means of radionuclide cisternography were examined in 188 patients in whom some kind of hydrocephalus was suspected. This study included findings of anomalies associated with hydrocephalus in a number of cases, such as nasal liquorrhea, hygromas, leptomeningeal or porencephalic cysts. The investigation substantiates the value of radionuclide cisternography in the diagnosis of disturbances of CSF flow. The retrograde flow of radiopharmaceutical into the ventricular system (ventricular reflux) is an abnormal phenomenon indicating the presence of communicating hydrocephalus. (Auth.)

  18. Clinical experience with a non-ionic contrast medium (ultravist) in left ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ghi Jai; Park, Jae Hyung; Soe, Gwy Suk; Hong, Ju Hee; Han, Man Chung

    1988-01-01

    Non-ionic contrast medium, iopromide (Ultravist), was compared with ionic contrast medium, ioxitalamate (Telebrix), for efficacy and safety in 63 patients undergoing left ventriculography. In all patients, adverse symptoms and signs including pain, heat sense, nausea, vomiting, etc., were checked during and shortly after the injection. Blood pressure, heart rate, EKG and left ventricular pressure were also monitored during the study, and CBC, UA, BUN and creatinine were checked before and 24 hours after the study. The cineangiographic films were analysed and compared by 2 radiologists for the quality. Serious adverse effect did not occur in any case. Minor effects, especially nausea, were lee frequently caused by non-ionic contrast medium than by ionic contrast medium, and heat sense to non-ionic contrast medium was less severe than to ionic contrast medium. Except slightly elevated LVEDP at 1,5 minutes after the study in patients given ionic contrast medium, there was no significant change of electrophysiologic parameters and laboratory findings in both groups. In regard to image quality, there was no significant difference between ionic and non-ionic contrast medium. Thus non-ionic contrast medium, iopromide, appears to be safer for use in left ventriculography than the conventional ionic contrast medium, particularly in those patients at high risk of adverse effects.

  19. Radionuclide carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, F.A.; Kretschmar, H.C.; Tofe, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable particulate radionuclide carrier is described. It comprises a modified anionic starch derivative with 0.1% to 1.5% by weight of a reducing agent and 1 to 20% by weight of anionic substituents

  20. Phase analysis of regional and global ventricular contraction patterns in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Assessment by radionuclide ventriculography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Tokuji; Koyama, Takao; Ichikawa, Takehiko and others

    1989-04-01

    Multigated blood pool scintigraphy was performed in 20 normal subjects and 39 patients with various intraventricular conduction abnormalities, including 25 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Cardiac imaging was performed in the modified left anterior oblique, right anterior oblique, and left lateral projections. In WPW syndrome, early contraction sites which were not seen in normal subjects were detected at the ventricular base in phase images. These anomalous early contraction sites disappeared after successful suppression of conduction through an accessory pathway by intravenous procainamide. These sites are believed to correspond to the location of the bundle of Kent and were consistent with the electrocardiographic findings. Phase mapping is a suitable noninvasive method to locate the position of the bundle of Kent and evaluate the ventricular contraction pattern in WPW syndrome and other intraventricular conduction abnormalities. (author).

  1. Radionuclide data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Chapter 8 presents tables on selected alpha, beta, gamma and x-ray emitters by increasing energy; information on specific activity for selected radionuclides; naturally occurring radionuclides; the natural decay series; and the artificially produced neptunium series. A table of alpha emitters is listed by increasing atomic number and by energy. The table of β emitters presented is useful in identifying β emitters whose energies and possibly half-lives have been determined by standard laboratory techniques. It is also a handy guide to β-emitting isotopes for applications requiring specific half-lives and/or energies. Gamma rays for radionuclides of importance to radiological assessments and radiation protection are listed by increasing energy. The energies and branching ratios are important for radionuclide determinations with gamma spectrometry detectors. This section also presents a table of x-ray energies which are useful for radiochemical analyses. A number of nuclides emit x-rays as part of their decay scheme. These x-rays may be counted with Ar proportional counters, Ge planar or n-type Ge co-axial detectors, or thin crystal NaI(T1) scintillation counters. In both cases, spectral measurements can be made and both qualitative and quantitative information obtained on the sample. Nuclear decay data (energy and probability by radiation type) for more than one hundred radionuclides that are important to health physicists are presented in a schematic manner

  2. Radionuclide generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    The status of radionuclide generators for chemical research and applications related to the life sciences and biomedical research are reviewed. Emphasis is placed upon convenient, efficient and rapid separation of short-lived daughter radionuclides in a chemical form suitable for use without further chemical manipulation. The focus is on the production of the parent, the radiochemistry associated with processing the parent and daughter, the selection and the characteristic separation methods, and yields. Quality control considerations are briefly noted. The scope of this review includes selected references to applications of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and the life sciences, particularly in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. The 99 Mo-sup(99m)Tc generator was excluded. 202 references are cited. (orig.)

  3. A prospective comparison between three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging and ventriculography for target-coordinate determination in frame-based functional stereotactic neurosurgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, P. R.; de Bie, R. M.; Majoie, C. B.; Speelman, J. D.; Bosch, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECT: The purpose of this prospective study was to compare stereotactic coordinates obtained with ventriculography with coordinates derived from stereotactic computer-reconstructed three-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) imaging in functional stereotactic procedures. METHODS: In 15

  4. Noninvasive assessment of right ventricular wall motion by radionuclide cardioangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Naito, Hiroaki; Hayashida, Kohei; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide cardioangiography is a useful method to evaluate the left ventricular wall motion in various heart diseases. It has been also attempted to assess the right ventricular wall motion simultaneously by radionuclide method. In this study, using the combination of first-pass (RAO 30 0 ) and multi-gate (LAO 40 0 ) method, the site of right vetricle was classified in five. (1 inflow, 2 sinus, 3 outflow, 4 septal, 5 lateral) and the degree of wall motion was classified in four stages (dyskinesis, akinesis, hypokinesis, normal) according to the AHA committee report. These methods were applied clinically to forty-eight patients with various heart diseases. In the cases with right ventricular pressure or volume overload such as COLD, pulmonary infarction, the right ventricle was dilated and the wall motion was reduced in all portions. Especially, in the cases with right ventricular infarction, the right ventricular wall motion was reduced in the infarcted area. The findings of radionuclide method were in good agreement with those of contrast right ventriculography or echocardiography. In conclusion, radionuclide cardioangiography is a useful and noninvasive method to assess not only the left but also the right ventricular wall motion. (author)

  5. Radionuclide generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Wollongong Univ.; Tomiyoshi, K.; Sekine, T.

    1997-01-01

    The present status and future directions of research and development on radionuclide generator technology are reported. The recent interest to develop double-neutron capture reactions for production of in vivo generators; neutron rich nuclides for radio-immunotherapeutic pharmaceuticals: and advances with ultra-short lived generators is highlighted. Emphasis is focused on: production of the parent radionuclide; the selection and the evaluation of support materials and eluents with respect to the resultant radiochemical yield of the daughter, and the breakthrough of the radionuclide parent: and, the uses of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, biomedical and industrial applications. The 62 Zn → 62 Cu, 66 Ni → 66 Cu, 103m Rh → 103 Rh, 188 W → 188 Re and the 225 Ac → 221 Fr → 213 Bi generators are predicted to be emphasized for future development. Coverage of the 99 Mo → 99m Tc generator was excluded, as it the subject of another review. The literature search ended June, 1996. (orig.)

  6. Radionuclide scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide scanning is the production of images of normal and diseased tissues and organs by means of the gamma-ray emissions from radiopharmaceutical agents having specific distributions in the body. The gamma rays are detected at the body surface by a variety of instruments that convert the invisible rays into visible patterns representing the distribution of the radionuclide in the body. The patterns, or images, obtained can be interpreted to provide or to aid diagnoses, to follow the course of disease, and to monitor the management of various illnesses. Scanning is a sensitive technique, but its specificity may be low when interpreted alone. To be used most successfully, radionuclide scanning must be interpreted in conjunction with other techniques, such as bone radiographs with bone scans, chest radiographs with lung scans, and ultrasonic studies with thyroid scans. Interpretation is also enhanced by providing pertinent clinical information because the distribution of radiopharmaceutical agents can be altered by drugs and by various procedures besides physiologic and pathologic conditions. Discussion of the patient with the radionuclide scanning specialist prior to the study and review of the results with that specialist after the study are beneficial

  7. Radionuclide study for cardiac lesion in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko; Shishikura, Keiko

    1985-12-01

    Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy and radionuclide ventriculography with Tc-99m were performed in 10 patients with Duchenne muscular dystropohy (DMD) and 2 siblings with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Perfusion defect especially in the left ventricular posterolateral wall (LVPLW) and cardiac apex was seen on Tl-201 imaging in 6 of the DMD patients and one of the BMD patients. For these patients, Tc-99m imaging also showed left ventricular local wall motion abnormality in 5 patients and a decreased left ventricular ejection fraction in 4 patients. These findings coincided well with fibrosis of the LVPLW found on autopsy. There were individual differences regarding the occurrence of cardiac complications. One of the BMD patients, as well as DMD patients, had also cardiac complications which have long been considered less common. (Namekawa, K.).

  8. Radionuclide study for cardiac lesion in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko; Shishikura, Keiko

    1985-01-01

    Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy and radionuclide ventriculography with Tc-99m were performed in 10 patients with Duchenne muscular dystropohy (DMD) and 2 siblings with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Perfusion defect especially in the left ventricular posterolateral wall (LVPLW) and cardiac apex was seen on Tl-201 imaging in 6 of the DMD patients and one of the BMD patients. For these patients, Tc-99m imaging also showed left ventricular local wall motion abnormality in 5 patients and a decreased left ventricular ejection fraction in 4 patients. These findings coincided well with fibrosis of the LVPLW found on autopsy. There were individual differences regarding the occurrence of cardiac complications. One of the BMD patients, as well as DMD patients, had also cardiac complications which have long been considered less common. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Radionuclide examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on radionuclide examinations of the pancreas. The pancreas, situated retroperitonally high in the epigastrium, was a particularly difficult organ to image noninvasively before ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) became available. Indeed the organ still remains difficult to examine in some patients, a fact reflected in the variety of methods available to evaluate pancreatic morphology. It is something of a paradox that the pancreas is metabolically active and physiologically important but that its examination by radionuclide methods has virtually ceased to have any role in day-to-day clinical practice. To some extent this is caused by the tendency of the pancreas's commonest gross diseases emdash carcinoma and pancreatitis, for example emdash to result in nonfunction of the entire organ. Disorders of pancreatic endocrine function have generally not required imaging methods for diagnosis, although an understanding of diabetes mellitus and its nosology has been advanced by radioimmunoassay of plasma insulin concentrations

  10. Radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Characteristics of 201Tl myocardial SPECT and left ventriculography in patients with acute diagonal branch myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Aizawa, Tadanori; Katou, Kazuzo; Ogasawara, Ken; Kirigaya, Hajime

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of 201 Tl myocardial SPECT and ventriculography were studied in 13 patients with acute diagonal branch myocardial infarction. Rest 201 Tl myocardial SPECT and left ventriculography were underwent in chronic phase. In 5 patients electrocardiogram (ECG) changes in acute phase were not definite. In 6 patients it was difficult to identify the obstructed coronary artery with coronary angiography in acute phase. Mean value of maximum creatine phosphokinese (CPK) was 854 (458-1,774) U/l. It seemed to be difficult to diagnose acute diagonal branch myocardial infarction with ECG and/or coronary angiography. In all patients defects were noted on 201 Tl SPECT. Defects were small and noted in the central anterior wall and not in the septum. In 2 patients defects were noted at apex. In left ventriculography dyskinetic motion was noted in 10 patients; one patient showed apical aneurysm and 3 patients showed anterior wall aneurysm. In 3 patients anterior wall showed akinesis. It was concluded that 201 Tl myocardial SPECT were useful for detecting diagonal branch lesion. In case of diagonal branch myocardial infarction size of defects were small and defects were not noted in the septum, however aneurysmal motion was frequently noted. (author)

  12. Local equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-12-15

    From 3-6 September the First International Workshop on Local Equilibrium in Strong Interaction Physics took place in Bad-Honnef at the Physics Centre of the German Physical Society. A number of talks covered the experimental and theoretical investigation of the 'hotspots' effect, both in high energy particle physics and in intermediate energy nuclear physics.

  13. Equilibrium Dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    context of antimicrobial therapy in malnutrition. Dialysis has in the past presented technical problems, being complicated and time-consuming. A new dialysis system based on the equilibrium technique has now become available, and it is the principles and practical application of this apparatus (Kontron Diapack; Kontron.

  14. Strategic Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.

    2000-01-01

    An outcome in a noncooperative game is said to be self-enforcing, or a strategic equilibrium, if, whenever it is recommended to the players, no player has an incentive to deviate from it.This paper gives an overview of the concepts that have been proposed as formalizations of this requirement and of

  15. Maximin equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new concept which extends von Neumann and Morgenstern's maximin strategy solution by incorporating `individual rationality' of the players. Maximin equilibrium, extending Nash's value approach, is based on the evaluation of the strategic uncertainty of the whole game. We show that

  16. Radionuclide transport in a single fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide migration have been studied in natural fissures orieted parallel to the axis of granite drill cores. A short pulse of the radionuclides solution was injected at one end of the fissure and the temporal change in radionuclide concentration of the eluate measured. After several hundred fissure volumes water had been pumped through the fissure following the radionuclide pulse the activity distribution on the fissure surfaces was measured. From the retardation of 152 Eu, 235 Np and 237 Pu it is concluded that these radionuclides are transported in the oxidation states Eu(III), Pu(IV) and Np(V). The distribution coefficients K sub (d) calculated from flow and activity distribution data on the basis of geometric surface area/volume ratios are of the same order as published K sub (d) values obtained from batch equilibrium experiments. (Author)

  17. Radionuclide ventriculographic evaluation of exercised left ventricular performance in asymptomatic diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yusuke; Hara, Fumio

    1991-01-01

    Radionuclide ventriculography was made in 49 asymptomatic diabetic patients, aged 30∼70 years, to investigate cardiac function. Comparisons were made with 33 age- and sex-matched non-diabetic controls. Radionuclide ventriculography was performed at rest and during dynamic exercise by multigraded, supine bicycle ergometer. The resting left ventricular ejection fractions were similar between the diabetic patients and control subjects. No significant rise in the left ventricular ejection fractions during dynamic exercise was observed in the diabetic patients [58.4±9.8% (mean±SD) to 60.3±9.9]. In the control subjects, the left ventricular ejection fractions increased during dynamic exercise [59.3±8.4 to 63.0±11.4 (p -1 ) vs -2.66±0.52] and during dynamic exercise [-3.25±0.74 vs -3.23±0.90]. Time to end-systole were similar in both groups at rest [315±42 (ms) vs 309±42] and during dynamic exercise [258±37 vs 262±37]. The resting peak filling rates were similar in both groups [2.27±0.62 (s -1 ) vs 2.45±0.58], and the peak filling rates increased (p 1c in the diabetic patients. These results suggest that diabetic patients have less cardiac reserved performance. (author)

  18. Sweatshop equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Nancy H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a capability-augmented model of on the job search, in which sweatshop conditions stifle the capability of the working poor to search for a job while on the job. The augmented setting unveils a sweatshop equilibrium in an otherwise archetypal Burdett-Mortensen economy, and reconciles a number of oft noted yet perplexing features of sweatshop economies. We demonstrate existence of multiple rational expectation equilibria, graduation pathways out of sweatshops in complete abs...

  19. Radionuclide radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  20. Cardiac involvement of progressive muscular dystrophy (Becker type, Limb-girdle type and Fukuyama type) evaluated by radionuclide method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Inoue, Kenjiro; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Ono, Seiji; Ohnishi, Takashi; Futami, Shigemi; Watanabe, Katsushi; Hayashi, Tohru

    1994-01-01

    Tl-201 SPECT and Tc-99m-Human serum albumin (HSA) multigated radionuclide ventriculography were performed on 11 patients with progressive muscular dystrophy (Becker type 2, Fukuyama type 2, Limb-girdle type 7) to evaluate myocardial involvement. Hypoperfusion was detected in 8 patients on Tl-201 SPECT. Decreases in both systolic function (left ventricular ejection fraction; LVEF) and diastolic function (peak filling rate; PFR) were also seen in these patients. A high incidence of myocardial involvement of these kinds of progressive muscular dystrophy was suggested. (author)

  1. Cardiac involvement of progressive muscular dystrophy (Becker type, Limb-girdle type and Fukuyama type) evaluated by radionuclide method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Inoue, Kenjiro; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Ono, Seiji; Ohnishi, Takashi; Futami, Shigemi; Watanabe, Katsushi; Hayashi, Tohru [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1994-02-01

    Tl-201 SPECT and Tc-99m-Human serum albumin (HSA) multigated radionuclide ventriculography were performed on 11 patients with progressive muscular dystrophy (Becker type 2, Fukuyama type 2, Limb-girdle type 7) to evaluate myocardial involvement. Hypoperfusion was detected in 8 patients on Tl-201 SPECT. Decreases in both systolic function (left ventricular ejection fraction; LVEF) and diastolic function (peak filling rate; PFR) were also seen in these patients. A high incidence of myocardial involvement of these kinds of progressive muscular dystrophy was suggested. (author).

  2. Regional rates of myocardial fatty acid metabolism: Comparison with coronary angiography and ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schad, N.; Vattimo, A.; Bertelli, P.

    1990-01-01

    In 50 patients, 1 mCi 123 I phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) was injected at peak ergometric stress and 1500 frames were acquired (1 frame/s) with a high count rate gamma camera. Parametric images of rates of decrease and increase for different time intervals after stress were compared with coronary angiography and LV ventriculography, separately evaluating the 3 main coronary territories: 18/150 territories supplied by normal coronaries presented rather homogeneous regional clearing rates, whereas a gradual decrease in clearing rates towards the end of the territory (frequently with peripheral defects) was seen in all 87/150 territories with significant coronary narrowing. In local correspondence to clearing defects, initial IPPA accumulations could be observed with later onset of clearing between 10 and 25 min. In all 44/150 territories presented abnormal clearing rates, mostly with a patchy pattern, with normal coronary anatomy, but all except one had LV dysfunction and a clinical diagnosis of cardiomyopathy, diabetes mellitus or hypertensive disease. Twenty four of the 41 patients with CAD had, in correspondence to a prior myocardial infarction, minimum or missing metabolic activity frequently in circumscribed zones, partly separated by bridges of still viable tissue with preserved but reduced clearing rates. (orig.)

  3. Regional rates of myocardial fatty acid metabolism: comparison with coronary angiography and ventriculography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, N; Wagner, R K; Hallermeier, J; Daus, H J; Vattimo, A; Bertelli, P

    1990-01-01

    In 50 patients, 1 mCi 123I phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) was injected at peak ergometric stress and 1500 frames were acquired (1 frame/s) with a high count rate gamma camera. Parametric images of rates of decrease and increase for different time intervals after stress were compared with coronary angiography and LV ventriculography, separately evaluating the 3 main coronary territories: 18/150 territories supplied by normal coronaries presented rather homogeneous regional clearing rates, whereas a gradual decrease in clearing rates towards the end of the territory (frequently with peripheral defects) was seen in all 87/150 territories with significant coronary narrowing. In local correspondence to clearing defects, initial IPPA accumulations could be observed with later onset of clearing between 10 and 25 min. 44/150 territories presented abnormal clearing rates, mostly with a patchy pattern, with normal coronary anatomy, but all except one had LV dysfunction and a clinical diagnosis of cardiomyopathy, diabetes mellitus or hypertensive disease. Twenty four of the 41 patients with CAD had, in correspondence to a prior myocardial infarction, minimum or missing metabolic activity frequently in circumscribed zones, partly separated by bridges of still viable tissue with preserved but reduced clearing rates.

  4. Equilibrium Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Anderlini; Daniele Terlizzese

    2009-01-01

    We build a simple model of trust as an equilibrium phenomenon, departing from standard "selfish" preferences in a minimal way. Agents who are on the receiving end of an other to transact can choose whether to cheat and take away the entire surplus, taking into account a "cost of cheating." The latter has an idiosyncratic component (an agent's type), and a socially determined one. The smaller the mass of agents who cheat, the larger the cost of cheating suffered by those who cheat. Depending o...

  5. Selective coronarography and ventriculography with Iopamidol in the acute phase of myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci Maccarini, P; Benenati, P M; Bellanti, G; Piscitelli, G

    1988-01-01

    The new techniques for an early treatement of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), such as thrombolysis and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, often necessitate rapid and accurate radiological evaluation of coronaric lesions and left ventricular function. The aim of the present study was to evaluate both safety and tolerability of selective coronarography (SC) and left ventriculography (LVG), with iopamidol 370 mg I/ml as a contrast medium, in the acute phase of AMI. Thirty-nine patients aged 26-29 years, were examined: 18 group A, within 4 days (mean 2.6+-0.8 SD) and 21, group B, within 5-15 days after AMI (mean 8.8+-3 SD). Contrast media (cm) dosage varied from 150 to 300 ml (2.43-5.5 ml/bw). During the procedure, ECG was continuosly recorded; left ventricular pressure was registered immediately and 30 minutes after cm administration. During the following 9 days ECG tracings and plasmatic cytolysisenzymes were monitored. During the examination no patient complained of any symptoms. After LVG slight elevations in end diastolic pressure were detected in all patients (mean increase 4.7 mmHg), which were not relevant from a clinical point of view. In 11/39 cases ventricular tachycardia was observed, which spontaneously ceased. During SC no change in ECG tracings was registered except in one patient, group A, in whom complete transitory heart block was detected. After SC no alteration in instrumental and biochemical parameters was registered except in one patient, group B, in whom a reinfarction due to right coronaric artery occlusion was observed. In conclusion, these results suggest that both SC and LVG with iopamidol are safe techniques also in the early phase of myocardial infarction. 24 refs.

  6. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Mário J

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions. These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This new edit...

  7. Radionuclide stroke count ratios for assessment of right and left ventricular volume overload in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, M.D.; Graham, T.P. Jr.; Born, M.L.; Jones, J.P.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Artman, M.; Partain, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    The ratio of left ventricular to right ventricular stroke counts measured by radionuclide angiography has been used in adults to estimate the severity of left-sided valvular regurgitation. The validation of this technique in children for assessment of right and left ventricular volume overload is reported herein. Radionuclide stroke count ratios in 60 children aged 0.5 to 19 years (mean 11) were determined. Based on their diagnoses, the patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) normal--40 patients with no shunts or valvular regurgitation, (2) left ventricular volume overload--13 patients with mitral or aortic regurgitation, or both, and (3) right ventricular volume overload--7 patients, 2 with severe tricuspid regurgitation, 3 with atrial septal defects, and 2 with total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage. The radionuclide stroke count ratio clearly differentiated these groups (p less than 0.05): normal patients had a stroke count ratio of 1.04 +/- 0.17 (mean +/- 1 standard deviation), the left ventricular volume overload group had a stroke count ratio of 2.43 +/- 0.86, and the right ventricular volume overload group had a stroke count ratio of 0.44 +/- 0.17. In 22 of our 60 patients, radionuclide stroke count ratios were compared with cineangiographic stroke volume ratios, resulting in a correlation coefficient of 0.88. It is concluded that radionuclide ventriculography is an excellent tool for qualitative and quantitative assessment of valvular regurgitation in children

  8. Migration of radionuclide chains in subseabed disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, A.K.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    In this study of subseabed disposal, the two dimensional (axial and radial) migration of radionuclide chains released from a canister located in a sedimentary layer bounded at the top by the ocean and at the bottom by an impermeable basalt zone is analyzed to determine the escape rate of radionuclides into the seawater. Analytical solutions have been derived to represent the transient concentration profiles within the sediment, flux and discharge rates to the water column of each member present in a decay chain. Using the properties of chain members present in actinide decay systems, the effects of half-life, adsorption equilibrium and other relevant parameters are elucidated. 4 figures, 1 table

  9. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.E.; Horrill, A.D.; Howard, B.J.; Lowe, V.P.W.; Parkinson, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: concentration and spatial distribution of radionuclides in grazed and ungrazed saltmarshes; incorporation of radionuclides by sheep grazing on an estuarine saltmarsh; inland transfer of radionuclides by birds feeding in the estuaries and saltmarshes at Ravenglass; radionuclides in contrasting types of coastal pastures and taken up by individual plant species found in west Cumbria; procedures developed and used for the measurement of alpha and gamma emitters in environmental materials. (U.K.)

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using 111In-DTPA ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, S.A.; Trump, D.L.; Chen, D.C.; Thompson, G.; Camargo, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by 111 In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ( 111 In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that 111 In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis

  11. Measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction using gated 99mTc-sestamibi myocardial planar images: Comparison to contrast ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, D.A.; Lloret, R.L.; Barilla, F.; Douthat, L.; Gheorghiade, M.

    1991-01-01

    Using the new myocardial perfusion agent 99mTc-sestamibi and multigated acquisition on a nuclear medicine gamma camera, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was derived in 13 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Cross-sectional activity profiles were used to measure the left ventricle from end-diastolic and end-systolic images. Several different geometric methods were then utilized to derive ejection fractions from the nuclear data. Comparison of the resultant ejection fractions to those obtained from contrast ventriculography showed significant correlation for all geometric methods (P less than 0.01, Sy X x = 6.2 to 9.6). The authors conclude that in patients with CAD one or more of these simple geometric methods can provide a useful estimate of the LVEF when performing 99mTc-sestamibi multigated myocardial perfusion imaging

  12. Determination of right ventricular ejection fraction from reprojected gated blood pool SPET: comparison with first-pass ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, M.L.; Seaton, D.; McEwan, L.; Fong, W.

    2001-01-01

    Gated blood pool (GBP) studies are widely available and relatively inexpensive. We have previously published a simple and convenient method for measuring left ventricle ejection fraction (EF) with increased accuracy from single-photon emission tomography (SPET) GBP scans. This paper describes an extension of this method by which right ventricular EF may also be measured. Gated SPET images of the blood pool are acquired and re-oriented in short-axis slices. Counts from the left ventricle are excluded from the short-axis slices, which are then reprojected to give horizontal long-axis images. Time-activity curves are generated from each pixel around the right ventricle, and an image is created with non-ventricular pixels ''greyed out''. This image is used as a guide in drawing regions of interest around the right ventricle on the end-diastolic and end-systolic long-axis images. In 28 patients, first-pass ventriculography studies were acquired followed by SPET GBP scans. The first-pass images were analysed a total of four times by two observers and the SPET images were analysed three times each by two observers. The agreement between the two techniques was good, with a correlation coefficient of 0.72 and a mean absolute difference between first-pass and reprojected SPET EFs of 4.8 EF units. Only four of the 28 patients had a difference of greater than 8 EF units. Variability was also excellent for SPET right ventricular EF values. Intra-observer variability was significantly lower for SPET than for first-pass EFs: standard error of the estimate (SEE)=5.1 and 7.3 EF units, respectively (P<0.05). Inter-observer variability was comparable in the two techniques (SEE=5.2 and 6.9 EF units for SPET and first-pass ventriculography, respectively). (orig.)

  13. Radionuclide solubilities to be used in SKB 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.; Sellin, P.

    1992-06-01

    We have performed thermodynamic calculations in order to assess the solubility limits (source term) for selected radionuclides. Equilibrium solubilities for U, Pu, Np, Am, Th, Ra, Sn, Tc, Zr, Sn, Ni, Sm, Pa, Nb and Pd have been calculated in four waters, representing average fresh and saline granitic groundwaters under oxidizing and reducing conditions, respectively. The results from the calculations have been compared with the measured radionuclide concentrations in natural waters as well as in spent fuel leaching tests. (26 refs.)

  14. Assessment of function of the cardiovascular system in arterial hypertension using radionuclide methods of investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesyan, N.M.; Babayan, A.S.; Mikaehlyan, R.S.; Mnatsakyan, Eh.L.

    1986-01-01

    Proceeding from a study of the nature of changes in hemodynamics during development of hypertensive disease (HD) at its different stages it was shown that hemodynamic changes in 42.1% of the patients with Stage 1-2A HD were of hypertensive type, in the patients with Stage 2B-3 HD normal and hypokinetic types of the blood circulation prevailed. After bicycle ergometry exercise the reactivity of the cardiovascular system was revealed more completely. The most complete information on function of the cardiovascular system and myocardial contractility can be obtained with the help of radioangiocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography. However in the absence of a gamma-chamber radiocardiography can provide necessary information on function of the cardiovascular system in case it is used in one and the same patient over time using bicycle ergometry testing

  15. Factor analysis of radionuclide ejection fraction response during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamuro, Masashi

    1986-01-01

    In 204 patients with ischemic heart disease and 25 normal subjects who underwent exercise radionuclide ventriculography (RNV), multivariate analyses and other statistical methods were employed to study factors affecting changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (ΔEF). Twenty one variables were obtained from clinical diagnosis, cardiac catheterization, and RNV. Multivariate analyses showed that coronary score for the severity of coronary artery lesions was the most significant factor, followed by exercise duration, resting heart rate, the number of diseased vessels, and exercise heart rate. Statistically significant decrease in ΔEF was associated with regional wall motion abnormality, ECG changes, and chest pain. Lesions in the left main trunk and the proximal area of left anterior descending artery were greatly involved in the decrease of ΔEF. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Measurement of absolute left ventricular volume by radionuclide angiography: a technical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khawaja, I.M.; Lahiri, Avijit; Raftery, E.B.; Medical Research Council, Harrow

    1988-01-01

    Absolute left ventricular volumes have important clinical implications in the evaluation of cardiac performance. Several invasive and noninvasive techniques have been reported, none of which can be considered ideal for this purpose. Contrast angiography, echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography are open to criticism. Different radioisotopic approaches are described with emphasis on the importance of accurate separation of left ventricular activity, the selection of background activity, and the correction for photon attenuation by body tissues. Improper use of statistics and validation techniques have obscured the value of these techniques. In the absence of a 'gold standard' there should be a 'radioisotopic' left ventricular volume with established independent characteristics, repeatability and reproducibility by which new approaches can be judged. (author)

  17. Evaluation of right ventricular ejection fraction by first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Toshiisa; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Naito, Hiroaki; Hayashida, Kohei; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1981-01-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) obtained by radionuclide angiocardiography is a convenient and good parameter of the left ventricular function. Right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) also seems to be a good parameter of the right ventricular function. RVEF calculated from volumetry with contrast right ventriculography is not necessarily correct because of the complex figure of the right ventricle. On the other hand, the method of calculation of RVEF with radionuclide angiocardiography has the advantage of being able to ignore the complexity of figure of RV, because RI counts extracted from the time-activity curve represent changes in ventricular volume. In this study, we developped an original method to calculate RVEF with first pass method. After setting of region of interest (ROI) of RV, background and ROI for correction of motion of tricuspid valve, we calculated RVEF with these time-activity curves, Since we found that too rapid infusion of RI made the time-activity curve of RV too steep, and too slow infusion of RI made the background of lung field too high, the appropriate infusion rate was required to get correct value of RVEF. In addition, the time-activity curve often became steep or flat in dependence of the speed of venous return and cardiac output of patients. In order to avoid the effect of infusion speed, the time-activity curve was fitted to linear curves and the value of RVEF was corrected. The validity of these methods was confirmed in our study. As the result, RVEF obtained with our methods appeared to have good correlation with that obtained from volumetry of contrast right ventriculography (r = 0.77) and to be very useful in clinical estimation of right ventricular function. (author)

  18. Influence of speciation on the geospheric migration of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadermann, J.; Schweingruber, M.

    1982-01-01

    For geosphere transport calculations in safety analyses of waste repositories it is generally assumed that the retardation of a migrating radionuclide is characterized by a single retention factor. However, in groundwater, radionuclides exist in various chemical forms with strongly differing sorption properties. We consider the effect of pseudo first order chemical reactions in liquid phase on migration. Conditions are derived under which local equilibrium in liquid phase is well fulfilled and migration is governed by a single effective retention factor. It is argued that in geosphere transport, equilibrium is likely to exist even when laboratory measurements show chromatographic separations. (author)

  19. Speciation analysis of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides in the environment can be present in different physico-chemical forms (i. e. radionuclide species) varying in size (nominal molecular mass), charge properties and valence, oxidation state, structure and morphology, density, complexing ability etc. Low molecular mass (LMM) species are believed to be mobile and potentially bioavailable, while high molecular mass (HMM) species such as colloids, polymers, pseudocolloids and particles are considered inert. Due to time dependent transformation processes such as mobilization of radionuclide species from solid phases or interactions of mobile and reactive radionuclide species with components in soils and sediments, however, the original distribution of radionuclides deposited in ecosystems will change over time and influence the ecosystem behaviour. To assess the environmental impact from radionuclide contamination, information on radionuclide species deposited, interactions within affected ecosystems and the time-dependent distribution of radionuclide species influencing mobility and biological uptake is essential. The development of speciation techniques to characterize radionuclide species in waters, soils and sediments should therefore be essential for improving the prediction power of impact and risk assessment models. The present paper reviews fractionation techniques which should be utilised for radionuclide speciation purposes. (author)

  20. The results of artificial radionuclides monitoring in the Baltic sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrauskiene, N.; Lukinskiene, M; Zemaitiene, G.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term radionuclides volume activity (v.a.) monitoring (1976-1990) data showed that measurement results obtained in steady observation station give reliable information of the coastal area of the Baltic sea radioactive equilibrium between atmosphere and surface water was observed in the coastal zone. Chernobyl Power Plant accident influenced upon the Baltic sea coastal water by radionuclides 137 Cs and 144 Ce. Radionuclide 90 Sr volume activity was practically unchangerable. The mechanism of radionuclides fallout from atmosphere are various. lt can be illustrated by 137 Cs and 144 Ce a.v. structure field variations in open sea and coastal zone near Juodkrante. The Baltic sea inhomogeneous contamination by radionuclide 137 Cs in 1988-1990 leads to equalization of 137 Cs v.a. in the surface waters and it causes v.a. increase in coastal waters. (author)

  1. Mathematical and numerical modeling considerations for radionuclide ion migration in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treadway, A.H.

    1984-04-01

    The equations governing radionuclide transport in sorbing, porous media are presented using phenomenological coefficients. Both equilibrium controlled and simple rate controlled chemistry are summarized. Several simplified models are discussed. Finally, various numerical problems are considered. 25 references

  2. Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function

  3. Equilibrium Droplets on Deformable Substrates: Equilibrium Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koursari, Nektaria; Ahmed, Gulraiz; Starov, Victor M

    2018-05-15

    Equilibrium conditions of droplets on deformable substrates are investigated, and it is proven using Jacobi's sufficient condition that the obtained solutions really provide equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformed support. At the equilibrium, the excess free energy of the system should have a minimum value, which means that both necessary and sufficient conditions of the minimum should be fulfilled. Only in this case, the obtained profiles provide the minimum of the excess free energy. The necessary condition of the equilibrium means that the first variation of the excess free energy should vanish, and the second variation should be positive. Unfortunately, the mentioned two conditions are not the proof that the obtained profiles correspond to the minimum of the excess free energy and they could not be. It is necessary to check whether the sufficient condition of the equilibrium (Jacobi's condition) is satisfied. To the best of our knowledge Jacobi's condition has never been verified for any already published equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate. A simple model of the equilibrium droplet on the deformable substrate is considered, and it is shown that the deduced profiles of the equilibrium droplet and deformable substrate satisfy the Jacobi's condition, that is, really provide the minimum to the excess free energy of the system. To simplify calculations, a simplified linear disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm is adopted for the calculations. It is shown that both necessary and sufficient conditions for equilibrium are satisfied. For the first time, validity of the Jacobi's condition is verified. The latter proves that the developed model really provides (i) the minimum of the excess free energy of the system droplet/deformable substrate and (ii) equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate.

  4. Marine biogeochemistry of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides entering the ocean from runoff, fallout, or deliberate release rapidly become involved in marine biogeochemical cycles. Sources, sinks and transport of radionuclides and analogue elements are discussed with emphasis placed on how these elements interact with marine organisms. Water, food and sediments are the source terms from which marine biota acquire radionuclides. Uptake from water occurs by surface adsorption, absorption across body surfaces, or a combination of both. Radionuclides ingested with food are either assimilated into tissue or excreted. The relative importance of the food and water pathway in uptake varies with the radionuclide and the conditions under which exposure occurs. Evidence suggests that, compared to the water and food pathways, bioavailability of sediment-bound radionuclides is low. Bioaccumulation processes are controlled by many environmental and intrinsic factors including exposure time, physical-chemical form of the radionuclide, salinity, temperature, competitive effects with other elements, organism size, physiology, life cycle and feeding habits. Once accumulated, radionuclides are transported actively by vertical and horizontal movements of organisms and passively by release of biogenic products, e.g., soluble excreta, feces, molts and eggs. Through feeding activities, particles containing radionuclides are ''packaged'' into larger aggregates which are redistributed upon release. Most radionuclides are not irreversibly bound to such particles but are remineralized as they sink and/or decompose. In the pelagic zones, sinking aggregates can further scavenge particle-reactive elements thus removing them from the surface layers and transporting them to depth. Evidence from both radiotracer experiments and in situ sediment trap studies is presented which illustrates the importance of biological scavenging in controlling the distribution of radionuclides in the water column. (author)

  5. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  6. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocock, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the distribution and movement of radionuclides in semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems in north-west England with particular emphasis on inputs to, and outputs from ecosystems; on plant and soil aspects; and on radionuclides in fallout and in discharges by the nuclear industry. (author)

  7. Quantity Constrained General Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babenko, R.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In a standard general equilibrium model it is assumed that there are no price restrictions and that prices adjust infinitely fast to their equilibrium values.In case of price restrictions a general equilibrium may not exist and rationing on net demands or supplies is needed to clear the markets.In

  8. Right and left cardiac function in HIV-infected patients investigated using radionuclide ventriculography and brain natriuretic peptide: a 5-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, U.S.; Lebech, A.M.; Gerstoft, J.

    2008-01-01

    ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as measurement of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Between July 2005 and January 2007, 63 patients (69%) agreed to participate in a follow-up study with a mean follow-up of 4.5 years. RESULTS: All patients had normal......, it seems that the improvement in immunocompetency and viral load has removed the problem of HIV-related cardiomyopathy. Although HAART has been suggested as a possible new cause of cardiomyopathy, we did not find any evidence of this Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  9. Right-sided cardiac function in healthy volunteers measured by first-pass radionuclide ventriculography and gated blood-pool SPECT: comparison with cine MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Hesse, Birger

    2005-01-01

    for evaluation of right-sided cardiac function. The aim of our study was to compare the agreement between these methods when measuring right-sided cardiac function. METHODS: Twenty-four healthy volunteers were included. Mean age was 44 years (range: 25-60) and 29% were females. All participants had FP, GBPS...

  10. Evaluation of aspirin therapy on intracardiac thrombi using indium-111-oxine platelet scintigraphy, two-dimentional echocardiography and left ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Masanori; Irino, Tadayoshi; Yoshioka, Toshiharu; Sugimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tsuji, Kazuo; Naka, Masashi; Arai, Hidekazu.

    1984-01-01

    Left ventriculography (LVG), two-dimensional echocardiography (2-DE) and indium-111-oxine platelet scintigraphy were performed in five patients with intracardiac thrombi. Thrombi were visible in 7 sites (5 in the ventricle and 2 in the atrium) by platelet scintigraphy, in 4 sites (3 in the ventricle and 1 in the atrium) by 2-DE, and in 4 sites (4 in the ventricle) by LVG. When aspirin was administered to the patients, platelet scintigraphy had become negative for thrombi in 5 sites and false-negative for them in 2 sites. However, thrombi were detected in 6 sites after the withdrawal of aspirin. On the other hand, thrombi were detected in 4 sites by 2-DE, irrespective of the administration of aspirin. Indium-111-oxine platelet scintigraphy has proved to not only have higher sensitivity for detecting thrombi but also to be capable of observing the coagulation status of platelets on the thrombi. It is therefore considered very helpful in assessing anticoagulation therapy. (Namekawa, K)

  11. Usefulness of acoustic quantification method in left ventricular volume and ejection fraction. Compared with ventriculography and scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Takahiro; Honda, Youichi; Kashiwagi, Hidehiko

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic quantification method (AQ: on-line automated boundary detection system) has proved to have a good correlation with left ventriculography (LVG) and scintigraphy (SG) in patients with normal left ventricular (LV) function. The aim of this study is to determine whether AQ is also useful in patients with abnormal LV function. We examined 54 patients with LV asynergy. End-diastolic volumes with AQ, LVG and SG were 77, 135, 118 ml. A good correlation was found between AQ and LVG and SG (LVG; r=0.81, SG; r=0.68). End-systolic volumes with AQ, LVG and SG were 38, 64 and 57 ml. Left ventricular volumes obtained from AQ had a good correlation with LVG and SG, but were underestimated. LV ejection fraction obtained from AQ had good correlation with those with LVG and SG (LVG; r=0.84. SG; r=0.77). On-line AQ appears to be a useful noninvasive method for evaluation of the left ventricular ejection fraction, but care must be exercised when estimations of left ventricular volumes are made. (author)

  12. Process for encapsulating radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, L.E.; Isaacson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclides are immobilized in virtually an insoluble form by reacting at a temperature of at least 90 0 C as an aqueous alkaline mixture having a solution pH of at least 10, containing a source of silicon, the radionuclide waste, and a metal cation. The molar ratio of silicon to the metal cation is on the order of unity to produce a gel from which complex metalosilicates crystallize to entrap the radionuclides within the resultant condensed crystal lattice. The product is a silicious stone-like material which is virtually insoluble and nonleachable in alkaline or neutral environment. One embodiment provides for the formation of the complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by gel formation with subsequent calcination to the solid product; another embodiment utilizes a hydrothermal process, either above ground or deep within basalt caverns, at greater than atmospheric pressures and a temperature between 90 and 500 0 C to form complex metalo-silicates, such as strontium aluminosilicate. Another embodiment provides for the formation of complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by slurrying an alkaline mixture of bentonite or kaolinite with a source of silicon and the radionuclide waste in salt form. In each of the embodiments a mobile system is achieved whereby the metalo-silicate constituents reorient into a condensed crystal lattice forming a cage structure with the condensed metalo-silicate lattice which completely surrounds the radionuclide and traps the radionuclide therein; thus rendering the radionuclide virtually insoluble

  13. Foodstuffs, radionuclides, monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisikov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination of water and food stuffs as a result of the Chernobyl accident and permissible contents of 90 Sr and 137 Cs are considered in brief. A method of radiation monitoring of food stuffs and water for the radionuclides mentioned is suggested. The method permits employment of the simplest and cheapest radiometric equipment for analysis, whole the high degree of radionuclide concentration using fiber sorbents permits using the instrumentation without expensive shields against external radiation. A description of ion-exchange unit for radiation monitoring of liquid samples of food stuffs or water, is provided [ru

  14. Generator for radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisner, P.S.; Forrest, T.R.F.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a radionuclide generator of the kind in which a parent radionuclide, adsorbed on a column of particulate material, generates a daughter radionuclide which is periodically removed from the column. This invention is particularly concerned with technetium generators using single collection vials. The generator comprises a column, a first reservoir for the eluent, a second reservoir to contain the volume of eluent required for a single elution, and means connecting the first reservoir to the second reservoir and the second reservoir to the column. Such a generator is particularly suitable for operation by vacuum elution

  15. EVALUATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACCUMULATION IN SOIL DUE TO LONG-TERM IRRIGATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wesley Wu

    2006-01-01

    Radionuclide accumulation in soil due to long-term irrigation is an important part of the model for predicting radiation dose in a long period of time. The model usually assumes an equilibrium condition in soil with a constant irrigation rate, so that radionuclide concentration in soil does not change with time and can be analytically solved. This method is currently being used for the dose assessment in the Yucca Mountain project, which requires evaluating radiation dose for a period of 10,000 years. There are several issues associated with the method: (1) time required for the equilibrium condition, (2) validity of constant irrigation rate, (3) agricultural land use for a long period of time, and (4) variation of a radionuclide concentration in water. These issues are evaluated using a numerical method with a simple model built in the GoldSim software. Some key radionuclides, Tc-99, Np-237, Pu-239, and Am-241 are selected as representative radionuclides. The results indicate that the equilibrium model is acceptable except for a radionuclide that requires long time to accumulate in soil and that its concentration in water changes dramatically with time (i.e. a sharp peak). Then the calculated dose for that radionuclide could be overestimated using the current equilibrium method

  16. Colloidal nature of radionuclides in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, I.

    1976-01-01

    There is considerable doubt that equilibrium calculations, i.e., employing solubility products and complex-ion stability constants, are valid for the submicro concentrations of radionuclides in seawater. The existence of radiocolloids should be expected in seawater. The great tendency of radiocolloids to adsorb onto finely-divided hydrous oxides makes their formation of significance in seawater, especially for artificial radionuclides. The subject of radiocolloid formation is reviewed in this chapter. It is shown that the 226 Ra/ 230 Th/U relationship found in seawater can be explained from the fact that the tendencies of these elements to form radiocolloids in seawater should decrease in order thorium > radium much greater than uranium. This explanation is much simpler than the prevailing oceanographic one. The theories for radiocolloid formation are discussed. The recent theory of Jones and Healy for the adsorption of hydrolyzable metal ions onto hydrous oxides is reviewed briefly, and its relevance to radiocolloid formation is pointed out

  17. Radionuclides in analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tousset, J.

    1984-01-01

    Applications of radionuclides in analytical chemistry are reviewed in this article: tracers, radioactive sources and activation analysis. Examples are given in all these fields and it is concluded that these methods should be used more widely [fr

  18. Radionuclide Basics: Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Radiation Protection Contact Us Share Radionuclide Basics: Iodine Iodine (chemical symbol I) is a chemical element. ... in the environment Iodine sources Iodine and health Iodine in the Environment All 37 isotopes of iodine ...

  19. Nuclear decay data for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1977-08-01

    This report gives tabulations of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted by 240 radionuclides. Most of the radionuclides are those expected to occur in routine releases of effluents from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. For each radionuclide are given the half-life and recommended values for the energies, intensities, and equilibrium absorbed-dose constants for each of the atomic and nuclear radiations. Also given are the daughter radionuclides produced and recommended values for decay branching ratios, where applicable. The radioactivity decay chains and branching ratios are displayed in diagram form.

  20. Nuclear decay data for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1977-08-01

    This report gives tabulations of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted by 240 radionuclides. Most of the radionuclides are those expected to occur in routine releases of effluents from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. For each radionuclide are given the half-life and recommended values for the energies, intensities, and equilibrium absorbed-dose constants for each of the atomic and nuclear radiations. Also given are the daughter radionuclides produced and recommended values for decay branching ratios, where applicable. The radioactivity decay chains and branching ratios are displayed in diagram form

  1. Phase equilibrium engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brignole, Esteban Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the teaching of phase equilibria emphasizes the relationships between the thermodynamic variables of each phase in equilibrium rather than its engineering applications. This book changes the focus from the use of thermodynamics relationships to compute phase equilibria to the design and control of the phase conditions that a process needs. Phase Equilibrium Engineering presents a systematic study and application of phase equilibrium tools to the development of chemical processes. The thermodynamic modeling of mixtures for process development, synthesis, simulation, design and

  2. Abscess detection with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide studies may aid in the diagnosis and localization of intra-abdominal infections. Despite the introduction of new radiographic and ultrasound methods, there are several clinical situations in which radionuclide scans have proved useful. Those include detection of postoperative intra-abdominal abscess, evaluation of liver abscess, differentiation between pancreatic pseudocyst or abscess, evaluation of fever of unknown origin, and evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease. Each clinical situation is discussed separately here

  3. Exchange of certain radionuclides between environment and freshwater algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchyulenene, E. D.P.

    1978-01-01

    Data on the dynamics and levels of accumulation of strontium, cesium, cerium and ruthenium radionuclides by Charophyta and Cladophora fresh-water algae are presented. An attempt has been made to investigate some processes that accompany the accumulation of radionuclides by plants. Under experimental conditions, the intensity and levels of radionuclide accumulation can be presented in the following order: 144 Ce> 106 Ru> 90 Sr> 137 Cs. The dynamics of radionuclide accumulation varied greatly with the radionuclide and the algae species studied. The 144 Ce accumulation coefficients (AC) in the course of experiment (from 3 hours to 16 days) increased 8-, 9-, 23.4-, 27-, 14.3- and 20.4-fold for Cladophora glomerata, Nitella syncarpa, Nitellopsis obtusa, Chara vulgaris, Ch. rudis, and Ch. aspera, respectively. In the case of 106 Ru, AC for C.glomerata, N. syncarapa, Ch. vulgaris and Ch. rudis increased 34-, 18-,24- and 23-fold, respectively. In all algae species studied the equilibrium of radionuclide accumulation was attained after 2-4 days of experiment. Levels of accumulated 90 Sr and 137 Cs in most species depended on the season while that of 144 Cs and 106 Ru remained constant throughout the vegetation period. The levels of radionuclide elimination, like the accumulation levels, are shown to depend on both isotopes and algae species

  4. Quantitative Computed Tomography Ventriculography for Assessment and Monitoring of Hydrocephalus: A Pilot Study and Description of Method in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multani, Jasjit Singh; Oermann, Eric Karl; Titano, Joseph; Mascitelli, Justin; Nicol, Kelly; Feng, Rui; Skovrlj, Branko; Pain, Margaret; Mocco, J D; Bederson, Joshua B; Costa, Anthony; Shrivastava, Raj

    2017-08-01

    There is no facile quantitative method for monitoring hydrocephalus (HCP). We propose quantitative computed tomography (CT) ventriculography (qCTV) as a novel computer vision tool for empirically assessing HCP in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Twenty patients with SAH who were evaluated for ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) placement were selected for inclusion. Ten patients with normal head computed tomography (CTH) findings were analyzed as negative controls. CTH scans were segmented both manually and automatically (by qCTV) to generate measures of ventricular volume. The median manually calculated ventricular volume was 36.1 cm 3 (interquartile range [IQR], 30-115 cm 3 ), which was similar to the median qCTV measured volume of 37.5 cm 3 (IQR, 32-118 cm 3 ) (P = 0.796). Patients undergoing VPS placement demonstrated an increase in median ventricular volume on qCTV from 21 cm 3 to 40 cm 3 on day T-2 and to 51 cm 3 by day 0, a change of 144%. This is in contrast to patients who did not require shunting, in whom median ventricular volume decreased from 16 cm 3 to 14 cm 3 on day T-2 and to 13 cm 3 by day 0, with an average overall volume decrease 19% (P = 0.001). The average change in ventricular volume predicted which patients would require VPS placement, successfully identifying 7 of 10 patients (P = 0.004). Using an optimized cutoff of a change in ventricular volume of 2.5 cm 3 identified all patients who went on to require VPS placement (10 of 10; P = 0.011). qCTV is a reliable means of quantifying ventricular volume and hydrocephalus. This technique offers a new tool for monitoring neurosurgical patients for hydrocephalus, and may be beneficial for use in future research studies, as well as in the routine care of patients with hydrocephalus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fall Back Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleppe, J.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hendrickx, R.L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Fall back equilibrium is a refinement of the Nash equilibrium concept. In the underly- ing thought experiment each player faces the possibility that, after all players decided on their action, his chosen action turns out to be blocked. Therefore, each player has to decide beforehand on a back-up

  6. Correlation of heart rate and radionuclide index of left ventricular contraction and relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Haruhiko; Sugihara, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Suetsugu; Kubota, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Masao

    1990-01-01

    Since the cardiac function indices derived from radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) are considered to depend on the heart rate, we studied the relationship between systolic or diastolic indices and heart rates in patients with normal RNV and devised a method of correcting these indices according to the heart rate. For the systolic indices, the heart rate showed significant correlation with ET (r=-0.640), PER (r=0.791) and TPE (r=-0.401) but not with EF, 1/3 EF, MNSER or 1/3 MNSER. For the diastolic indices, the heart rate correlated well with FT (r=-0.938), RFT (r=-0.736), SFT (r=-0.803), 1/3 FF (r=-0.758), PFR (r=0.759), 1/3 PFR (r=0.742) and TPF (r=-0.389) but not with AFT, 1/3 MNDFR or AFF. These results indicate that many systolic and diastolic indices derived from RNV are affected by the heart rate, So when cardiac function is evaluated with the use of radionuclide indices, those which are independent of the heart rate should be used, or they should be corrected for the heart rate. As a method of correction, we proposed a rotating method obtained by manipulation of the regression equation of heart rates and indices. This new method is certain and easier to use when the correcting equations are set into a computer program. (author)

  7. Radionuclide fixation mechanisms in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, S.

    1991-01-01

    In the safety evaluation of the radioactive waste disposal in geological environment, the mass balance equation for radionuclide migration is given. The sorption of radionuclides by geological formations is conventionally represented by the retardation of the radionuclides as compared with water movement. In order to quantify the sorption of radionuclides by rocks and sediments, the distribution ratio is used. In order to study quantitatively the long term behavior of waste radionuclides in geological environment, besides the distribution ratio concept in short term, slower radionuclide retention reaction involving mineral transformation should be considered. The development of microspectroscopic method for long term reaction path modeling, the behavior of iron during granite and water interaction, the reduction precipitation of radionuclides, radionuclide migration pathways, and the representative scheme of radionuclide migration and fixation in rocks are discussed. (K.I.)

  8. Radioactivity: radionuclides in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R.E.; Baratta, E.J.; Jelinek, C.F.

    1977-01-01

    The results are summarized of the analysis for strontium-90, cesium-137, iodine-131, ruthenium-106, and potassium-40, a naturally occurring radionuclide, in samples of total diet and selected import commodities in the foods compliance program of the Food and Drug Administration. On the basis of the radionuclide intake guidelines established by the Federal Radiation Council (FRC), the low content of radionuclides found in the total diet samples for fiscal years 1973 and 1974 demonstrates the need for surveillance only at the present level. The low levels of radionuclides found in a limited number of edible imported commodities indicate that their contribution to the total diet would not increase the levels of these radionuclides above those recommended for only periodic surveillance by the FRC. The potassium levels, determined from potassium-40 activity, found in meats and fish agree with the value for normal muscle tissue for the reference man reported by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. Of the other commodities, nuts contained the highest levels, while sugar, beverages, and processed foods contained the lowest levels of potassium. Although cesium and potassium are chemical analogs with similar metabolic properties, because of their variable content in some leafy samples as a result of surface contamination, a correlation between cesium-137 levels and the cesium-137-to-potassium ratio was inconclusive

  9. Nopal I uranium deposit: A study of radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, V.; Anthony, E.; Goodell, P.

    1996-01-01

    This summary reports on activities of naturally-occurring radionuclides for the Nopal I uranium deposit located in the Pena Blanca Uranium District, Chihuahua, Mexico. Activities were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy. In addition, data reduction procedures and sample preparation (for Rn retention) will be discussed here. Nopal I uranium deposit has been identified as one of the most promising sites for analogue studies to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of this research is to study the potential for radionuclide migration by testing whether any portion of the deposit is in secular equilibrium

  10. Nopal I uranium deposit: A study of radionuclide migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, V.; Anthony, E.; Goodell, P. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    1996-12-01

    This summary reports on activities of naturally-occurring radionuclides for the Nopal I uranium deposit located in the Pena Blanca Uranium District, Chihuahua, Mexico. Activities were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy. In addition, data reduction procedures and sample preparation (for Rn retention) will be discussed here. Nopal I uranium deposit has been identified as one of the most promising sites for analogue studies to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of this research is to study the potential for radionuclide migration by testing whether any portion of the deposit is in secular equilibrium.

  11. Osmium-191 → iridium-191m radionuclide generator: development and clinical application. Progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treves, S.; Cheng, C.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype osmium-191 (T 1/2 = 16 days) → iridium-191m (T 1/2 = 4.9 seconds) generator designed for first pass radionuclide angiography was developed in our laboratory (Os-191 → Ir-191m). Our generator had 14 to 20% Ir-191m yield and a 1 to 3 x 10 -3 % Os-191 breakthrough. Iridium-191m decays with emission of a 65 and a 129 keV photon in 50% and 25% abundance respectively. This radionuclide is advantageous for angiography since it provides higher photon flux and results in much lower radiation dose to the patient than Tc-99m. One objective of this research is to improve the Os-191 → Ir-191m generator for first pass radionuclide angiography at an increase in the Ir-191m yield and a decrease in the Os-191 breakthrough. In addition, we would like to develop an Os-191 → Ir-191m generator for continuous infusion which will be used for ECG gated blood pool ventriculography, venography, and arteriography. Another approach will be to develop a carrier free Os-191 → Ir-191m generator in combination with organic or inorganic exchangers. Iridium-191m from our current generator has been employed successfully in two patient studies for the quantitation left-to-right shunting and the measurement of right and left ventricular ejection fractions. These types of studies will be expanded and further evaluated

  12. Equilibrium and non equilibrium in fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorso, C.O.; Chernomoretz, A.; Lopez, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In this communication we present recent results regarding the interplay of equilibrium and non equilibrium in the process of fragmentation of excited finite Lennard Jones drops. Because the general features of such a potential resemble the ones of the nuclear interaction (fact that is reinforced by the similarity between the EOS of both systems) these studies are not only relevant from a fundamental point of view but also shed light on the problem of nuclear multifragmentation. We focus on the microscopic analysis of the state of the fragmenting system at fragmentation time. We show that the Caloric Curve (i e. the functional relationship between the temperature of the system and the excitation energy) is of the type rise plateau with no vapor branch. The usual rise plateau rise pattern is only recovered when equilibrium is artificially imposed. This result puts a serious question on the validity of the freeze out hypothesis. This feature is independent of the dimensionality or excitation mechanism. Moreover we explore the behavior of magnitudes which can help us determine the degree of the assumed phase transition. It is found that no clear cut criteria is presently available. (Author)

  13. Distinguish natural sources out of secular equilibrium with their parents or daughters in Gamma ray spectrum analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yahong; Liu Yigang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine materials containing natural radionuclides in or out secular equilibrium with their parents or daughters. Methods: In gamma ray spectrum analyses, the activity concentration of every daughter is the same as that of its parent when the material is in secular equilibrium. The activity concentrations of daughters and their parents are different when the material is out of secular equilibrium. Results: It is different to determine whether the exposures from these materials should be exempted that materials containing natural radionuclides are in or out of secular equilibrium with their parents or daughters. Conclusion: It is important to determine materials containing natural radionuclides in or out secular equilibrium with their parents or daughters in gamma ray spectrum analyses. (authors)

  14. Radionuclides in house dust

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  15. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  16. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in arcs and torches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A general treatment of non-equilibrium plasma aspects is obtained by relating transport fluxes to equilibrium restoring processes in so-called disturbed Bilateral Relations. The (non) equilibrium stage of a small microwave induced plasma serves as case study.

  17. Radionuclides in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains data on the levels of radionuclides in the UK foodchain. Most data derive from monitoring programmes that exist around nuclear sites, and in some cases date back to the 1960s. Some comparative data from site operator and government-run programmes are included. Data from monitoring undertaken after the Chernobyl accident are summarised. General monitoring of the foodchain for both artificial and natural radionuclides, and the results of relevant government-sponsored research are also described. The report includes basic information on radioactivity in the environment, radiation protection standards and describes what measures are taken to routinely monitor the foodchain and assess public risk. (Author)

  18. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  19. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersahin, Devrim, E-mail: devrimersahin@yahoo.com; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, 333 Cedar St., New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2011-10-11

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  20. Radionuclide deposition control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for controlling the deposition, on to the surfaces of reactor components, of the radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from a liquid stream containing the radionuclides. The method consists of disposing a getter material (nickel) in the liquid stream, and a non-getter material (tantalum, tungsten or molybdenum) as a coating on the surfaces where deposition is not desired. The process is described with special reference to its use in the coolant circuit in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. (U.K.)

  1. Radionuclide examination in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streda, A.; Kolar, J.; Valesova, M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of twenty years of experience with the use of radionuclides in bone and articular rheumatic diseases indications for such examinations are summed up. The main advantage of the use of radionuclide methods is that they bring forward early diagnosis of tissue reconstruction which can thus be detected at the stage of microstructural changes. They also provide earlier and more reliable detection of the degree of the pathological process than is provided by X-ray examination. In some cases scintiscan may also be found useful as a method for following up the results of treatment of rheumatic diseases. (author)

  2. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersahin, Devrim; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David

    2011-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose

  3. Radionuclides sorption in clay soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siraky, G.; Lewis, C.; Hamlat, S.; Nollmann, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of clay soils is examined through a parametric study of the distribution coefficient (Kd) for the radionuclides of interest, Cs and Sr. This work is a preliminary stage of the migration studies of these nuclides in a porous medium (ground of Ezeiza, Argentina) and the evaluation of radiologic impact of the removal of low and intermediate activity wastes in shallow trenches. The determination of Kd is performed by a static technique or batch. The phases are separated by centrifugation at 20000 g during 1 hour. The activity of supernatant solution of Cs-137 and Sr-85 is measured in a detecting system of I Na(Tl) well-type. Two types of parameters were changed: a) those related to the determination method: phase separation (centrifugation vs. centrifugation plus filtration); equilibrium period, ratio solid/liquid; b) those related to the geochemical system: pH of contact solution, carrier concentration, competitive ions, ionic strength, desorption. It was observed that the modification of parameters in the Kd-measurement does not change the order of magnitude of results. (Author)

  4. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-11-15

    , however, the approximation of equilibrium chemistry is assumed to be sufficient for order of magnitude predictions when a constant inflow of radionuclides is considered. A first sensitivity analysis of the model is performed in which different model parameters have been varied. At the time for the model development, almost no detailed site-specific information about e.g. channel geometry or sediment characteristics were available. Simulations were therefore performed for a hypothetical case, where the ranges of possible parameter values was based on literature information, generalizations from other stream systems and some site-specific information such as large-scale information of the morphology at the present sites. For order of magnitude predictions of the concentration or amount of radionuclides in the different parts of the stream ecosystem, a yearly mean value of the water flow was assumed to be sufficient. Therefore, the further sensitivity analyses were performed for constant flow conditions. The sensitivity analyses indicated that the main retention along the stream is due to uptake within the sediment. Initially, the uptake will cause a retardation of the solute transport. The sediment capacity is however limited and after saturation, the outflow of radionuclides in the longitudinal direction will be completely determined by the inflow to the system. The time for reaching this equilibrium and the equilibrium concentration in the sediment varies however with different conditions and radionuclides, e.g. due to sorption characteristics, sedimentation velocity and advective velocity within the sediment. The degree of variation caused by different factors is, however, different. In the simulations performed in this study, the time for reaching equilibrium ranges from less than a year to a couple of hundred years. For predictions of the dose to humans, the accumulated amount in the sediment should also be considered and not only the concentration in the stream water

  5. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark

    2005-11-01

    , however, the approximation of equilibrium chemistry is assumed to be sufficient for order of magnitude predictions when a constant inflow of radionuclides is considered. A first sensitivity analysis of the model is performed in which different model parameters have been varied. At the time for the model development, almost no detailed site-specific information about e.g. channel geometry or sediment characteristics were available. Simulations were therefore performed for a hypothetical case, where the ranges of possible parameter values was based on literature information, generalizations from other stream systems and some site-specific information such as large-scale information of the morphology at the present sites. For order of magnitude predictions of the concentration or amount of radionuclides in the different parts of the stream ecosystem, a yearly mean value of the water flow was assumed to be sufficient. Therefore, the further sensitivity analyses were performed for constant flow conditions. The sensitivity analyses indicated that the main retention along the stream is due to uptake within the sediment. Initially, the uptake will cause a retardation of the solute transport. The sediment capacity is however limited and after saturation, the outflow of radionuclides in the longitudinal direction will be completely determined by the inflow to the system. The time for reaching this equilibrium and the equilibrium concentration in the sediment varies however with different conditions and radionuclides, e.g. due to sorption characteristics, sedimentation velocity and advective velocity within the sediment. The degree of variation caused by different factors is, however, different. In the simulations performed in this study, the time for reaching equilibrium ranges from less than a year to a couple of hundred years. For predictions of the dose to humans, the accumulated amount in the sediment should also be considered and not only the concentration in the stream water

  6. Transfer of radionuclides to animal products following ingestion or inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Contamination of animal products forms an important pathway in the transfer of radionuclides from source to man. Simulation of radionuclide transfer via animal products requires an understanding of the processes and mechanisms involved in absorption, distribution, turnover and excretion of radionuclides and related elements in animals as well as knowledge of animal grazing habits and husbandry. This paper provides a summary of the metabolism of important radionuclides in typical domestic animals and of the mathematical approaches that have been used to simulate transfer from diet to animal product. The equilibrium transfer factor approach has been used widely but suffers a number of disadvantages when releases or intakes are variable with time or when intakes are short relative to the lifetime of the animal of interest. Dynamic models, especially those of the compartmental type, have been developed and used widely. Both approaches have benefited from experiences obtained after the Chernobyl accident but a number of uncertainties still exist. Whereas there is now extensive knowledge on the behaviour of radiocaesium in both domestic and wild animals, knowledge of the behaviour of other potentially important radionuclides remains limited. Further experimental and metabolic studies will be required to reduce uncertainties associated with the transfer of radionuclides other than radiocaesium and thereby produce a sound basis for radiological assessments. (author)

  7. Non-equilibrium Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Martinás

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A microeconomic, agent based framework to dynamic economics is formulated in a materialist approach. An axiomatic foundation of a non-equilibrium microeconomics is outlined. Economic activity is modelled as transformation and transport of commodities (materials owned by the agents. Rate of transformations (production intensity, and the rate of transport (trade are defined by the agents. Economic decision rules are derived from the observed economic behaviour. The non-linear equations are solved numerically for a model economy. Numerical solutions for simple model economies suggest that the some of the results of general equilibrium economics are consequences only of the equilibrium hypothesis. We show that perfect competition of selfish agents does not guarantee the stability of economic equilibrium, but cooperativity is needed, too.

  8. DIAGNOSIS OF FINANCIAL EQUILIBRIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUCIU GHEORGHE

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis based on the balance sheet tries to identify the state of equilibrium (disequilibrium that exists in a company. The easiest way to determine the state of equilibrium is by looking at the balance sheet and at the information it offers. Because in the balance sheet there are elements that do not reflect their real value, the one established on the market, they must be readjusted, and those elements which are not related to the ordinary operating activities must be eliminated. The diagnosis of financial equilibrium takes into account 2 components: financing sources (ownership equity, loaned, temporarily attracted. An efficient financial equilibrium must respect 2 fundamental requirements: permanent sources represented by ownership equity and loans for more than 1 year should finance permanent needs, and temporary resources should finance the operating cycle.

  9. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, J E

    1968-01-01

    The International Encyclopedia of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Volume 1: Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics covers the fundamental principles and the development of theoretical aspects of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Statistical mechanical is the study of the connection between the macroscopic behavior of bulk matter and the microscopic properties of its constituent atoms and molecules. This book contains eight chapters, and begins with a presentation of the master equation used for the calculation of the fundamental thermodynamic functions. The succeeding chapters highlight t

  10. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  11. Distribution coefficients for radionuclides in aquatic environments. Volume 2. Dialysis experiments in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibley, T.H.; Nevissi, A.E.; Schell, W.R.

    1981-05-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to obtain new information that can be used to predict the fate of radionuclides that may enter the aquatic environment from nuclear power plants, waste storage facilities or fuel reprocessing plants. Important parameters for determining fate are the distribution of radionuclides between the soluble and particulate phases and the partitioning of radionuclides among various suspended particulates. This report presents the results of dialysis experiments that were used to study the distribution of radionuclides among suspended sediments, phytoplankton, organic detritus, and filtered sea water. Three experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium distribution of (59)Fe, (60)Co, (65)Zn, (106)Ru, (137)Cs, (207)Bi, (238)Pu, and (241)Am in marine system. Diffusion across the dialysis membranes depends upon the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides, proceeding quite rapidly for ionic species of (137)Cs and (60)Co but much more slowly for radionuclides which occur primarily as colloids and solid precipitates such as (59)Fe, (207)Bi, and (241)Am. All the radionuclides adsorb to suspended particulates although the amount of adsorption depends upon the specific types and concentration of particulates in the system and the selected radionuclide. High affinity of some radionuclides - e.g., (106)Ru and (241)Am - for detritus and phytoplankton suggests that suspended organics may significantly affect the eventual fate of those radionuclides in marine ecosystems

  12. Taking radionuclides to heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleynhans, P.H.T.; Lotter, M.G.; Van Aswegen, A.; Minnaar, P.C.; Iturralde, M.; Herbst, C.P.; Marx, D.

    1980-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is a main cause of death in South Africa. Non-invasive ECG gated radionuclide bloodpool imaging plays an increasingly useful role in the evalution of the function of the heart as a pump, and the extent of heart muscle perfusion defects is further pinpointed by invasive krypton-81m studies to improve patient management

  13. Radionuclides deposition over Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourchet, M.; Magand, O.; Frezzotti, M.; Ekaykin, A.; Winther, J.-G.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed and comprehensive map of the distribution patterns for both natural and artificial radionuclides over Antarctica has been established. This work integrates the results of several decades of international programs focusing on the analysis of natural and artificial radionuclides in snow and ice cores from this polar region. The mean value (37±20 Bq m -2 ) of 241 Pu total deposition over 28 stations is determined from the gamma emissions of its daughter 241 Am, presenting a long half-life (432.7 yrs). Detailed profiles and distributions of 241 Pu in ice cores make it possible to clearly distinguish between the atmospheric thermonuclear tests of the fifties and sixties. Strong relationships are also found between radionuclide data ( 137 Cs with respect to 241 Pu and 210 Pb with respect to 137 Cs), make it possible to estimate the total deposition or natural fluxes of these radionuclides. Total deposition of 137 Cs over Antarctica is estimated at 760 TBq, based on results from the 90-180 deg. East sector. Given the irregular distribution of sampling sites, more ice cores and snow samples must be analyzed in other sectors of Antarctica to check the validity of this figure

  14. Soil burden by radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, W.E.H.; Wenzel, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    Natural radioactivity - half-lifes and radiation type of man-made nuclides, radionuclide behaviour in soils, effects on soil condition and soil functions are described. The only mode of decontamination is by decay and thus primarily dependent on the half-life of nuclides

  15. Radionuclides in house dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Dodd, N J; Hammond, D J

    1985-04-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate authorising Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, although radionuclides originating rom the BNFL site can be detected in house dust, this source of contamination is a negligible route of exposure for members of the public in West Cumbria. This report presents the results of the Board's study of house dust in twenty homes in Cumbria during the spring and summer of 1984. A more intensive investigation is being carried out by Imperial College. (author)

  16. Radionuclide body function imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, H.F.

    1983-01-01

    A transverse radionuclide scan field imaging apparatus is claimed. It comprises: a plurality of highly focused closely laterally adjacent collimators arranged inwardly focused in an array which surrounds a scan field, each collimator being moveable relative to its adjacent collimator; means for rotating the array about the scan field and means for imparting travel to the collimators

  17. Radionuclides in peat bogs and energy peat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helariutta, K.; Rantavaara, A.; Lehtovaara, J.

    2000-06-01

    The study was aimed at improving the general view on radionuclides contents in energy peat produced in Finland. The annual harvest of fuel peat in 1994 was studied extensively. Also thirteen peat bogs used for peat production and one bog in natural condition were analysed for vertical distributions of several radionuclides. These distributions demonstrate the future change in radioactivity of energy peat. Both natural nuclides emitting gamma radiation ( 238 U, 235 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra, 40 K) and radiocaesium ( 137 Cs, 134 Cs) origin in fallout from a nuclear power plant accident (1986) and in atmospheric nuclear weapon tests were analysed. The beta and alpha active natural nuclides of lead and polonium ( 210 Pb, 210 Po) were determined on a set of peat samples. These nuclides potentially contribute to radiation exposure through inhalation when partially released to atmosphere during combustion of peat. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides often increased towards the deepest peat bog layers whereas the radioactive caesium deposited from atmosphere was missing in the deep layers. In undisturbed surface layers of a natural bog and peat production bogs the contents of 210 Pb and 210 Po exceeded those of the deeper peat layers. The nuclides of the uranium series in the samples were generally not in radioactive equilibrium, as different environmental processes change their activity ratios in peat. Radiation exposure from handling and utilisation of peat ash was estimated with activity indices derived from the data for energy peat harvested in 1994. Intervention doses were exceeded in a minor selection of samples due to 137 Cs, whereas natural radionuclides contributed very little to the doses. (orig.)

  18. Methods for determining radionuclide retardation factors: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relyea, J.F.; Serne, R.J.; Rai, D.

    1980-04-01

    This report identifies a number of mechanisms that retard radionuclide migration, and describes the static and dynamic methods that are used to study such retardation phenomena. Both static and dynamic methods are needed for reliable safety assessments of underground nuclear-waste repositories. This report also evaluates the extent to which the two methods may be used to diagnose radionuclide migration through various types of geologic media, among them unconsolidated, crushed, intact, and fractured rocks. Adsorption is one mechanism that can control radionuclide concentrations in solution and therefore impede radionuclide migration. Other mechanisms that control a solution's radionuclide concentration and radionuclide migration are precipitation of hydroxides and oxides, oxidation-reduction reactions, and the formation of minerals that might include the radionuclide as a structural element. The retardation mechanisms mentioned above are controlled by such factors as surface area, cation exchange capacity, solution pH, chemical composition of the rock and of the solution, oxidation-reduction potential, and radionuclide concentration. Rocks and ground waters used in determining retardation factors should represent the expected equilibrium conditions in the geologic system under investigation. Static test methods can be used to rapidly screen the effects of the factors mentioned above. Dynamic (or column) testing, is needed to assess the effects of hydrodynamics and the interaction of hydrodynamics with the other important parameters. This paper proposes both a standard method for conducting batch Kd determinations, and a standard format for organizing and reporting data. Dynamic testing methods are not presently developed to the point that a standard methodology can be proposed. Normal procedures are outlined for column experimentation and the data that are needed to analyze a column experiment are identified

  19. Exercise radionuclide ventriculographic study of mitral stenosis before and after percutaneous mirtal valvuloplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do Yun; Shim, Won Heum; Cho, Seung Yun; Kim, Sung Soon; Lee, Woong Ku; Kim, Myeong Jin; Choe, Kyu Ok [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seung Jung [Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    We performed radionuclide ventriculography before and within 1 week after percutaneous mirtal valvuloplasty (PMV) to evaluate left ventricular (LV) function in 20 patients (2 meals and 17 females, mean age of 38 {+-} 10 years) who were pure mitral stenosis before PMV and less than grade 1 mirtal regurgitation developed after PMV. 9 out of 20 patients had atrial fibrillation and 3 patients developed a small left-to-right shunt (Qp/Qs < 1.5) after PMV. PMV using double-balloon technique resulted in a increase in mitral valve area (0.9 {+-} 0.3 to 2.1 {+-} 0.8cm{sup 2}, {rho} < 0.001) and in rest cardiac output (4.2 {+-} 1.0 to 4.8 {+-} 1.4 L/min, {rho} < 0.005). And also a decrease in mean mitral gradient (16.2 {+-} 7.0 to 5.2 {+-} 3.0 mmHg, {rho} < 0.001) was noted. Comparisons of LV function by supine bicycle exercise radionuclide ventriculography before and after PMV showed no significant changes in rest LV ejection fraction (LVEF, 55.2 {+-} 9.7 to 56.1 {+-} 11.0%, {rho} > 0.05), maximal exercise LVEF (60.9 {+-} 10.3 to 59.3 {+-} 11.1%, {rho} > 0.05), peak ejection rate (2.02 {+-} 0.58 to 2.15 {+-} 0.60 EDV/ses, {rho} > 0.05), and peak filling rate (1.04 {+-} 0.55 to 1.52 {+-} 0.49 EDV/ses, {rho} > 0.05). However, LV end diastolic volume (LVEDV, -29.3 {+-} 19.0 to +3.3 {+-} 32.9%, {rho} < 0.001), stroke volume (SV,-22.0 {+-} 22.0 to +11.2 {+-} 40.0%, {rho} < 0.001), and cardiac output (CO, 64.6 {+-} 54.0 to 100.4 {+-} 69.7%, {rho} < 0.05) with exercise compared to resting values were significantly increased. We conclude that PMV resulted in a significant increase in LVEDV, SV, and CO with exercise, but decreased LV systolic performance and no improvement in diastolic filling.

  20. Natural radionuclide distribution in phosphate fertilizer and superphosphate production technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisachenko, Eh P; Ponikarova, T M; Lisitsyna, Yu Z

    1987-01-01

    The obtained data on the natural radionuclide distribution by phosphate fertilizer and superphosphate production process stages testify to phosphate fertilizer enrichment 2-4 times in relation to initial ore, depending in the raw material used. In this case uranium and thorium series element concentration value (in equilibrium with their decomposition products), proposed as a regulating one in phosphorus-containing fertilizers, is not achieved. However, the fact of lurichment as it is and the enrichment factor, stated in the course of the work, should be taken into account for evaluation of phosphorite new deposit raw material with higher concentrations of natural radionuclides. Natural radionuclide separation in the enrichment process and superphosphate production is not revealed.

  1. Application and validation of predictive computer programs describing the chemistry of radionuclides in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, M.; Duffield, J.R.; Griffiths, P.J.F.; Williams, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Chemval is an international project concerned with improving the data used to model the speciation chemistry of radionuclide migration from underground waste disposal sites. Chemval has two main aims: to produce a reliable database of thermodynamic equilibrium constants for use in such chemical modelling; to perform a series of test-case modelling exercises based upon real site and field data to verify and validate the existing tools used for simulating the chemical speciation and the transport of radionuclides in the environment

  2. Radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2008-01-01

    The sources of the presence of radionuclides in food are presented: natural radiation and artificial radiation. The transfer of radionuclides through food chains, intakes of radionuclides to the body with its partners effective doses and typical consumption of basic foods of a rural adult population are exposed as main topics. Also the radiation doses from natural sources and exposure to man by ingestion of contaminated food with radionuclides of artificial origin are shown. The contribution of the food ingestion to the man exposure depends on: characteristics of radionuclide, natural conditions, farming practices and eating habits of the population. The principal international organizations in charge of setting guide levels for radionuclides in food are mentioned: standards, rules and the monitoring. It establishes that a guide is necessary for the food monitoring; the alone CODEX ALIMENTARIUS is applicable to emergency situations and the generic action levels proposed by the CODEX not satisfy all needs (no guiding international levels for planned or existing situations such as NORM). There are handled mainly socio-economic and political aspects. Among the actions to be taken are: to assure a public comprehensive information over the risk evaluation in food; to reinforce the collaboration among the different international organizations (WHO, IAEA, ICRP, EC) in relation with the food of set; to give follow-up to the control of the drinkable water and NORM's presence in the food. In addition, it is possible to create the necessary mechanisms to reduce the number of irrelevant measures and bureaucratic useless steps (certificates); to promote the exchange between the different institutions involved in the topic of the food, with relation to the acquired experiences and learned lessons. Likewise, it might examine the possibility of a multidisciplinary approximation (radioactive and not radioactive pollutants); to elaborate a technical guide to assure the

  3. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Prouty

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  4. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  5. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations determined by other

  6. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement

  7. Application of radionuclide techniques in evaluation of dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yueqin; Liu Xiujie; Shi Rongfang

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical significance of radionuclide techniques in differentiating dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) from ischemic cardiomyopathy (CAD-CM). Methods: 28 patients (pts) with DCM and 55 pts with CAD-CM were studied. All pts underwent 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT and 18 F-FDG myocardial metabolic PET. 73 pts had 99 Tc m -RBC radionuclide ventriculography and 68 pts had coronary angiography. Results: 23 pts (82%) with DCM showed perfusion abnormalities with mild and not segmental distribution. 52 pts (95%) with CAD-CM showed perfusion abnormalities that distributed along the coronary vessel territories. Perfusion defects were found in 4 pts (14%) with DCM and 45 pts (82%) with CAD-CM (P<0.01). The average perfusion score was 4.5 +- 2.6 in DCM and 9.5 +- 2.9 in CAD-CM, the area of perfusion diminished uptake was significantly smaller in DCM than in CAD-CM (P < 0.001). 2 pts with DCM and 18 pts with CAD-CM had metabolic defect. The patterns of perfusion/metabolic imaging showed mismatch in most pts with CAD-CM but match in pts with DCM. The LVEF in pts with DCM and CAD-CM was decreased but no significant difference between DCM and CAD-CM was observed. The RVEF in pts with DCM was significantly lower than that in pts with CAD-CM (32.4% +- 13.9% vs 40.9% +- 15.4%, P < 0.05). Conclusions: The radionuclide techniques showed to be helpful for distinguishing DCM from CAD-CM. The discriminate analysis revealed that segmental perfusion abnormality and RVEF were the most important factors for differentiation of DCM from CAD-CM

  8. Clinical evaluation of segmental wall motion by radionuclide cardioangiography in the patients with myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1980-01-01

    To detect segmental wall motion of left ventricle is useful to identify the size and location of infarcted area in coronary arteries diseases. In this study, segmental wall motion by radionuclide cardioangiography were evaluated to compare with contrast left ventriculography in fifty patients of myocardial infarction. Segmental wall motion in RAO position by first pass method, in LAO position by multi-gated method were evaluated using an Anger camera and on-line minicomputer system by following methods; ED, ES images, sequential images, edge display, regional ejection fraction and movie imaging system (MIS). The percent agreements of segmental wall motion by RI and LVG were 84% in 350 segments of 50 cases. In all segments, segments 4, 6, 7 were better agreements than other segments. For the degree of wall motion, skinesis and dyskinesis were good agreements in both methods, while hypokinesia was slightly poor agreement (62%). On the other hand, the size of infarction, that is, percent thallium defect area was good correlated with radionuclide left ventricular ejection fraction (r = -0.855 in anterior infarction, r = -0.646 in inferior infarction). From these data, wall motion was thought to be closely related with left ventricular function, therefore, regional ejection fraction in seven areas in left ventricular image was developed and compared with segmental wall motion in left ventriculogram according to the classification of A.H.A. Comittee Report. The value of regional ejection fraction is 0.29, 0.40, 0.60 in akinesis, hypokinesis and normal. In conclusion, radionuclide cardioangiography is useful in the detection of abnormal segmental wall motion as noninvasive methods. (author)

  9. Immunity by equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  10. Equilibrium shoreface profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Hughes, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale coastal behaviour models use the shoreface profile of equilibrium as a fundamental morphological unit that is translated in space to simulate coastal response to, for example, sea level oscillations and variability in sediment supply. Despite a longstanding focus on the shoreface...... profile and its relevance to predicting coastal response to changing environmental conditions, the processes and dynamics involved in shoreface equilibrium are still not fully understood. Here, we apply a process-based empirical sediment transport model, combined with morphodynamic principles to provide......; there is no tuning or calibration and computation times are short. It is therefore easily implemented with repeated iterations to manage uncertainty....

  11. Fukushima Daiichi Radionuclide Inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoni, Jeffrey N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jankovsky, Zachary Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Radionuclide inventories are generated to permit detailed analyses of the Fukushima Daiichi meltdowns. This is necessary information for severe accident calculations, dose calculations, and source term and consequence analyses. Inventories are calculated using SCALE6 and compared to values predicted by international researchers supporting the OECD/NEA's Benchmark Study on the Accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (BSAF). Both sets of inventory information are acceptable for best-estimate analyses of the Fukushima reactors. Consistent nuclear information for severe accident codes, including radionuclide class masses and core decay powers, are also derived from the SCALE6 analyses. Key nuclide activity ratios are calculated as functions of burnup and nuclear data in order to explore the utility for nuclear forensics and support future decommissioning efforts.

  12. Radionuclide table. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, Jean; Perolat, J.-P.; Lagoutine, Frederic; Le Gallic, Yves.

    The evaluation of the following 29 radionuclides is presented: 22 Na, 24 Na, sup(24m)Na, 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 57 Co, 58 Co, sup(58m)Co, 60 Co, sup(60m)Co, 75 Se, 103 Ru, sup(103m)Rh, sup(110m)Ag- 110 Ag, 109 Cd, 125 Sb, sup(125mTe), 125 I, 133 Xe, sup(133m)Xe, 131 Cs, 134 Cs, sup(134m)Cs, 139 Ce, 144 Ce- 144 Pr, 144 Pr, 169 Er, 186 Re, 203 Hg. The introduction contains a brief description of radioactive processes and the evaluation rules followed. The best values and associated uncertainties are given for each radionuclide for the major parameters of the decay scheme and the radiation intensities emitted, together with a decay table. Gamma, X-rays and sometimes conversion electron spectra are also provided [fr

  13. Radionuclide co-precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.; Sandino, A.

    1987-12-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of the minor components of the spent fuel matrix has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. Two different situations have been studied: Part I, the near field scenario, where the release and migration of the minor components is dependent on the solubility behaviour of UO 2 (s); Part II, the far field, where the solubility and transport of the radionuclides is related to the major geochemical processes occurring. (orig.)

  14. Radionuclide fate and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The studies reported here deal with the full range of contaminant behavior and fate, from the initial physicochemical factors that govern radionuclide availability in terrestrial and aquatic environments to studies of contaminant transport by biological means. By design, we focus more on the biologically and chemically mediated transport processes and food-chain pathways than on the purely physical forms of contaminant transport, such as transport by wind and water

  15. Geochemistry and radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretically, the geochemical barrier can provide a major line of defense in protecting the biosphere from the hazards of nuclear waste. The most likely processes involved are easily identified. Preliminary investigations using computer modeling techniques suggest that retardation is an effective control on radionuclide concentrations. Ion exchange reactions slow radionuclide migration and allow more time for radioactive decay and dispersion. For some radionuclides, solubility alone may limit concentrations to less than the maximum permissible now considered acceptable by the Federal Government. The effectiveness of the geochemical barrier is ultimately related to the repository site characteristics. Theory alone tells us that geochemical controls will be most efficient in an environment that provides for maximum ion exchange and the precipitation of insoluble compounds. In site selection, consideration should be given to rock barriers with high ion exchange capacity that might also act as semi-permeable membranes. Also important in evaluating the site's potential for effective geochemical controls are the oxidation potentials, pH and salinity of the groundwater

  16. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.J.; Kennedy, V.H.; Nelson, A.

    1983-06-01

    A bibliographical database has been developed to provide quick access to research and background literature in the field of radioecology. This is a development of an earlier database described by Nelson (Bocock 1981). ITE's particular fields of interest have led to a subject bias in the bibliography towards studies in Cumbria, especially those concerned with radionuclides originating from the reprocessing plant at Sellafield, and towards ecological research studies that are complementary to radionuclide studies. Other subjects covered, include the chemistry of radionuclides, budgets and transfers within ecosystems and techniques for the analysis of environmental samples. ITE's research objectives have led to the establishment of a specialized database which is intended to complement rather than compete with the large international databases made available by suppliers such as IRS-DIALTECH or DIALOG. Currently the database holds about 1900 references which are stored on a 2 1/2 megabyte hard disk on a Digital PDP11/34 computer operating under a time shared system. The references follow a standard format. (author)

  17. Radionuclides in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Teruyuki

    2001-01-01

    The concentration and accumulation of radionuclides in marine organisms were explained in this paper. Secular change of the radioactivity concentration of 137 Cs in seaweed in coastal area of Japan showed more than 5Bq/kg-fresh in the first half of 1960, but decreased less than 1 Bq/kg-fresh after then and attained to less than 0.1 Bq/kg-fresh in 1990s. However, the value increased a while in 1986, which indicated the effect of Chernobyl accident. The accident increased 137 Cs of shellfish near Japan. The concentration of 239+240 Pu was the lowest value in muscles of fish, but increased from 1.7 to 42.3 mBq/kg wet wt in seaweed in 1999. 99 Tc concentration of seaweed showed from 100 to 1000 times as much as that of seawater. Radionuclides in the Irish Sea are originated from Sellafield reprocessing plant. The concentration factors of macro-algae and surface water fish (IAEA,1985) were shown. Analytical results of U in 61 kinds of marine organs showed that the concentration was different in the part of organ. The higher concentration of U was observed in hard tissue of fish. The concentration factor was different between chemical substances with the same radionuclides. (S.Y.)

  18. Proficiency testing for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faanhof, A.; Kotze, O.; Louw, I.

    2010-01-01

    Proficiency testing in general is only useful when it suites a certain purpose. With regards to radionuclides basically three fields of interest can be identified: (I)Foodstuffs-Introduced in the early 1960's to monitor the fall-out of nuclear tests and eventually the pathway to foodstuffs fit for human consumption. The demand for analysis increased substantially after the Chernobyl accident. (II) Natural radioactivity-Associated with mining and mineral processing of uranium and thorium baring mineral resources throughout the world where the radionuclides from the natural uranium and thorium decay series are found to pose concern for professional and public exposure. (III) Artificial radioactivity-This category covers mostly the long-lived nuclides generated by nuclear fission of the fuel used in nuclear power plants, research reactors and nuclear bomb tests. All three categories require a specific approach for laboratories to test their ability to analyze specific radio nuclides of interest in a variety of matrices. In this lecture I will give a compiled overview of the required radioanalytical skills, analysis sensitivity needed and radionuclides of interest, with more specific emphasis on QAQC of water sources and the recommended monitoring approach. And provide information on available reference materials and organizations/institutes that provide regular exercises for participating laboratories. I will also briefly communicate on the advantages and disadvantages of ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation for test laboratories, which is these days a prerequisite in national and international trade especially where foodstuffs and mineral products are concerned.

  19. Radionuclides in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadev, V.

    1980-01-01

    The three main areas of application of radionuclides in thyroid disease will be reviewed. Firstly thyroid radionuclide imaging in thyroid swellings, in relationship to lumps in the neck and ectopic thyroid tissue such as retrosternal goitre, and lingual goitre will be described. Future developments in the field including tomographic scanning, using the coded aperture method, and fluorescent scans and ultrasound are reviewed. The second area of application is the assessment and evaluation of thyroid function and the therapy of Grave's Disease and Plummer's Disease using radioiodine. The importance of careful collection of the line of treatment, results of treatment locally and the follow-up of patients after radioiodine therapy will be described. The third area of application is in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid cancer. Investigation of thyroid swelling, and the diagnosis of functioning metastases are reported. The therapeutic iodine scan as the sole evidence of functioning metastatic involvement is recorded. Histological thyroid cancer appears to be increasingly encountered in clinical practice and the plan of management in relation to choice of cases for therapeutic scanning is discussed with case reports. Lastly the role of whole body scanning in relationship to biochemical markers is compared. In the changing field of nuclear medicine radionuclide applications in thyroid disease have remained pre-eminent and this is an attempt to reassess its role in the light of newer developments and local experience in the Institute of Radiotherapy, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  20. Right heart ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiography - right heart ... moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can ... is injected into the right side of the heart. It helps the cardiologist determine the size and ...

  1. Kinetic approach for interactive reactions of radionuclide, bacteria and granitic crushed rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Woo; Baik, Min Hoon; Lee, Seung Yeop; Lee, Jae Kwang; Kim, Seung Soo; Oh, Jong Min; Lee, Tae Yup

    2011-01-01

    For many radionuclides, sorption is an important phenomenon as their migration rates in groundwater are reduced in both engineered barrier and fractured rock matrix. Sorption of radionuclides is strongly dependent on the chemistry of the surrounding groundwater, such as pH, Eh, ionic strength, etc., by changing their valence states (e.g.,). In addition, it is also known that some bacteria can change the mobility and speciation of a radionuclide in groundwater. Biological immobilization mechanisms of radionuclides include precipitation, transformation to less soluble forms and so on. On the other hand, bacteria can also play a role of sorbent for radionuclides. Since bacteria can not only be mobile as a colloid but also be immobile as biofilm in the rock fracture, the bacteria as the sorbents of radionuclides in the groundwater can have both positive and negative effects on the radionuclide migration. In this study, therefore, sorption of radionuclide onto rock surface in the presence of bacteria was investigated via batch experiments. Although sorption equilibrium state can be expected in the transport of weakly sorbing (distribution coefficient, K d -3 m 3 kg -1 ) or strongly adsorbing (K d > ∼4.6 m 3 kg -1 ) nuclides in fractured rock, sorption kinetics needs to be considered in the intermediate range. Therefore, the sorption of radionuclide whose valence state is expected to be changed by biological reduction was evaluated in a kinetic approach

  2. Nuclear medical control of the efficiency of transluminal coronary angioplasty (TCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepzig, H. Jr.; Scherer, D.; Kober, G.; Maul, F.D.; Kanemoto, N.; Standke, R.; Hoer, G.; Kaltenbach, M.; Frankfurt Univ.

    1982-01-01

    To assess the results of transluminal coronary angioplasty 48 patients with coronary heart disease were investigated at rest and during exercise with the ECG (46 patients), thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy (26 patients), and equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography (38 patients). Exercise stress test was quantified by means of an ischemia score, myocardial scintigraphy by an vitality index and by corresponding redistribution factors, and radionuclide ventriculography by ejection fraction and maximum systolic volume change as a fraction of enddiastolic volume. This, the results show, that in selected cases, TCA can achieve improved left ventricular function and perfusion comparable to that of aortocoronary bypass surgery. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Radionuclide solubility control by solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, F.; Klinkenberg, M.; Rozov, K.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6); Vinograd, V. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geosciences

    2015-07-01

    The migration of radionuclides in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption processes onto minerals and colloids. On a molecular level, sorption phenomena involve surface complexation, ion exchange as well as solid solution formation. The formation of solid solutions leads to the structural incorporation of radionuclides in a host structure. Such solid solutions are ubiquitous in natural systems - most minerals in nature are atomistic mixtures of elements rather than pure compounds because their formation leads to a thermodynamically more stable situation compared to the formation of pure compounds. However, due to a lack of reliable data for the expected scenario at close-to equilibrium conditions, solid solution systems have so far not been considered in long-term safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories. In recent years, various solid-solution aqueous solution systems have been studied. Here we present state-of-the art results regarding the formation of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions. In some scenarios describing a waste repository system for spent nuclear fuel in crystalline rocks {sup 226}Ra dominates the radiological impact to the environment associated with the potential release of radionuclides from the repository in the future. The solubility of Ra in equilibrium with (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} is much lower than the one calculated with RaSO{sub 4} as solubility limiting phase. Especially, the available literature data for the interaction parameter W{sub BaRa}, which describes the non-ideality of the solid solution, vary by about one order of magnitude (Zhu, 2004; Curti et al., 2010). The final {sup 226}Ra concentration in this system is extremely sensitive to the amount of barite, the difference in the solubility products of the end-member phases, and the degree of non-ideality of the solid solution phase. Here, we have enhanced the fundamental understanding regarding (1) the thermodynamics of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions and (2) the

  4. Natural radionuclides in Brazilian underground mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Talita de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Rock, soil and water contain "2"3"8U and "2"3"2Th and their decay products. The distribution of these radionuclides differs in terms of activity concentration depending on the mineral type and origin. All ore processing releases long and short half-life radionuclides, mainly radon and its progeny. It is important to monitor this gas and its decay products in underground mines in order to assess the radiological hazards of the exposed workers. On this concern, the present work outlines the characterization of brazilian underground mines with relation to natural radionuclides, specially radon and its progeny. The radon concentration was measured by using E-PERM Electrets Ion Chamber (Radelec), AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) and CR-39 (Landauer) track etch detectors. The radon progeny was determined by using DOSEman detector. The equilibrium state between radon and its progeny was calculated. Based on these data, the total effective dose for miners was estimated. Moreover, the contribution from the main sources to the radon level inside mines was evaluated. For this, the following detectors were used: measurements of radon concentrations in soil gas were carried out by using AlphaGUARD detector; "2"2"6Ra ("2"1"4Bi), "2"3"2Th e "4"0K specific activity in ore and soil samples were determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry HPGe detector (Canberra); and radon concentration in groundwater samples was performed by using RAD7 (Durridge Inc.). The radon concentration ranged from 113 to 8171 Bq.m"-"3 and the Equilibrium Equivalent Concentration varied from 76 to 1174 Bq.m"-"3. The equilibrium factor mean value was 0.4 (0.2 -0.7). The workers estimated total effective dose ranged from 1 to 22 mSv.a"-"1 (mean 10 mSv.a"-"1). Therefore, results show the importance to assess continually and permanently the radon and its progeny behavior and the need to adopt safety measurements against natural radiation in underground mines environment. (author)

  5. Effect of organic complexants on the mobility of low-level-waste radionuclides in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1982-02-01

    The effect of certain organic complexants on the distribution of some radionuclides between solution and soil has been measured. The complexants and radionuclides examined are some of those most likely to be present in low-level waste disposal sites; Cs, Sr, Ni, Co, and Eu radionuclides, and EDTA, DTPA, oxalate, and citrate complexants. The effect of complexants was found to vary widely; in some systems there was no effect and in other systems there were large effects. In some cases slow rates of reaction have not allowed equilibrium measurements to be made

  6. The dynamics of radionuclide behaviour in soil solution with special reference to the application of countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, A.F.; Lembrechts, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Any investigations into the effect of countermeasures on radionuclide transfer to plants should include a comprehensive chemical analysis of soil solution. This is because of the disturbances that soil-based countermeasures cause on soil:solution equilibria and radionuclide distribution between solid and liquid phases. As it is difficult to determine directly the effects of countermeasures under field conditions, it is recommended that laboratory-based studies be done first. These should include batch equilibrium experiments for soil:solution interactions, and hydroponic studies for solution:plant relationships. Speciation of radionuclides should form a fundamental part of both studies. (author)

  7. Microeconomics : Equilibrium and Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Raa, T.

    2013-01-01

    Microeconomics: Equilibrium and Efficiency teaches how to apply microeconomic theory in an innovative, intuitive and concise way. Using real-world, empirical examples, this book not only covers the building blocks of the subject, but helps gain a broad understanding of microeconomic theory and

  8. Differential Equation of Equilibrium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. Analysis of underground circular cylindrical shell is carried out in this work. The forth order differential equation of equilibrium, comparable to that of beam on elastic foundation, was derived from static principles on the assumptions of P. L Pasternak. Laplace transformation was used to solve the governing ...

  9. Comments on equilibrium, transient equilibrium, and secular equilibrium in serial radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Equations describing serial radioactive decay are reviewed along with published descriptions or transient and secular equilibrium. It is shown that terms describing equilibrium are not used in the same way by various authors. Specific definitions are proposed; they suggest that secular equilibrium is a subset of transient equilibrium

  10. Natural radionuclides in soils from Sao Paulo State cerrado forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Marcia V.F.E.S.; Farias, Emerson E.G. de; Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Franca, Elvis J. de

    2015-01-01

    Considering the long life history, forests should be preferentially evaluated for the monitoring of radionuclides, mainly artificial radioisotopes. However, little is known about nuclides from Uranium and Thorium series, as well as, K-40, in soils from the Sao Paulo State forests. Soils are the main reservoir of natural radionuclides for vegetation, thereby deserving attention. Taking into account the advantages of High-Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometry (HRGS), diverse radionuclides can be quantified simultaneously. In this work natural radionuclides in soils from the Estacao Ecologica de Assis were evaluated by HRGS. Samples of 0-10 cm depth were collected under crown projection of most abundant tree species of long-term plots installed within the Estacao Ecologica de Assis, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. After drying and milling until 0.5 mm particle size, test portions of 30 g were transferred to polypropylene vials, sealed with silicone and kept under controlled conditions until 30 days to achieve secular equilibrium. A group of gamma-ray spectrometers was used to analyze about 27 samples by 80,000 seconds. Activity concentrations of Pb-214, Ac-228 and K-40 and their respective expanded analytical uncertainties at the 95% confidence level were calculated by Genie software from Canberra. Abnormal values were not detected for radionuclides in soils samples, however K-40 activity concentrations changed considerably due to the mineral cycling, in which K and, consequently K-40, is mainly stocked in vegetation in spite of soils. (author)

  11. Natural radionuclides in soils from Sao Paulo State cerrado forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Marcia V.F.E.S.; Farias, Emerson E.G. de; Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Franca, Elvis J. de, E-mail: mvaleria@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Considering the long life history, forests should be preferentially evaluated for the monitoring of radionuclides, mainly artificial radioisotopes. However, little is known about nuclides from Uranium and Thorium series, as well as, K-40, in soils from the Sao Paulo State forests. Soils are the main reservoir of natural radionuclides for vegetation, thereby deserving attention. Taking into account the advantages of High-Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometry (HRGS), diverse radionuclides can be quantified simultaneously. In this work natural radionuclides in soils from the Estacao Ecologica de Assis were evaluated by HRGS. Samples of 0-10 cm depth were collected under crown projection of most abundant tree species of long-term plots installed within the Estacao Ecologica de Assis, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. After drying and milling until 0.5 mm particle size, test portions of 30 g were transferred to polypropylene vials, sealed with silicone and kept under controlled conditions until 30 days to achieve secular equilibrium. A group of gamma-ray spectrometers was used to analyze about 27 samples by 80,000 seconds. Activity concentrations of Pb-214, Ac-228 and K-40 and their respective expanded analytical uncertainties at the 95% confidence level were calculated by Genie software from Canberra. Abnormal values were not detected for radionuclides in soils samples, however K-40 activity concentrations changed considerably due to the mineral cycling, in which K and, consequently K-40, is mainly stocked in vegetation in spite of soils. (author)

  12. The equilibrium leach testing of ferric/aluminium hydroxide flocs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Greenfield, B.F.; Greenham, P.S.; Rees, J.H.

    1987-09-01

    Equilibrium leach tests have been carried out on ferric/aluminium hydroxide flocs using cement and resin matrices, and cement and clay backfills in both air and nitrogen atmospheres. The equilibrium concentrations of a number of actinides and fission products were measured in leachates obtained over periods of up to a year. The lowest equilibrium actinide concentrations were found in leachates from systems with a cement backfill. Cement matrix-cement backfill was the most promising combination for limiting concentrations of long-lived radionuclides, resin-clay the least. Comparison of leachate concentrations with limiting drinking water concentrations are made and the high degree of protection afforded by candidate near field components shown. (author)

  13. The equilibrium leach testing of ferric/aluminium hydroxide flocs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Greenfield, B.F.; Greenham, P.S.; Rees, J.H.

    1987-09-01

    Equilibrium leach tests have been carried out on ferric/aluminium hydroxide flocs using cement and resin matrices, and cement and clay backfills in both air and nitrogen atmospheres. The equilibrium concentrations of a number of actinides and fission products were measured in leachates obtained over periods of up to a year. The lowest equilibrium actinide concentrations were found in leachates from systems with a cement backfill. Cement matrix-cement backfill was the most promising combination for limiting concentrations of long-lived radionuclides, resin-clay the least. Comparisons of leachate concentrations with limiting drinking water concentrations are made and the high degree of protection afforded by candidate near field components shown. (author)

  14. Chapter 2. Radionuclides in the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Harangozo, M.

    2000-01-01

    This is a chapter of textbook of radioecology for university students. In this chapter authors deal with role of radionuclides in the biosphere. Chapter consists of next parts: (1) Natural radionuclides in biosphere; (2) Man-made radionuclides in the biosphere; (3) Ecologically important radionuclides; (4) Natural background; (5) Radiotoxicity and (6) Paths of transfer of radionuclides from the source to human

  15. Radionuclide diagnosis of emergency states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishmukhametov, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    Solution of emergency state radionuclide diagnostics from the technical point of view is provided by the application of the mobile quick-operating equipment in combination with computers, by the use of radionuclides with acceptable for emergency medicine characteristics and by development of radionuclide investigation data propcessing express-method. Medical developments include the study of acute disease and injury radioisotope semiotics, different indication diagnostic value determining, comparison of the results, obtained during radionuclide investigation, with clinicolaboratory and instrumental data, separation of methodical complex series

  16. History of medical radionuclide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ice, R D

    1995-11-01

    Radionuclide production for medical use originally was incidental to isotope discoveries by physicists and chemists. Once the available radionuclides were identified they were evaluated for potential medical use. Hevesy first used 32P in 1935 to study phosphorous metabolism in rats. Since that time, the development of cyclotrons, linear accelerators, and nuclear reactors have produced hundreds of radionuclides for potential medical use. The history of medical radionuclide production represents an evolutionary, interdisciplinary development of applied nuclear technology. Today the technology is represented by a mature industry and provides medical benefits to millions of patients annually.

  17. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport

  18. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  19. Equilibrium and pre-equilibrium emissions in proton-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    necessary for the domain of fission-reactor technology for the calculation of nuclear transmutation ... tions occur in three stages: INC, pre-equilibrium and equilibrium (or compound. 344. Pramana ... In the evaporation phase of the reaction, the.

  20. Osteopetrosis: Radiological & Radionuclide Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sit, Cherry; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Fogelman, Ignac; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited bone disease where bones harden and become abnormally dense. While the diagnosis is clinical, it also greatly relies on appearance of the skeleton radiographically. X-ray, radionuclide bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging have been reported to identify characteristics of osteopetrosis. We present an interesting case of a 59-year-old man with a history of bilateral hip fractures. He underwent 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate whole body scan supplemented with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of spine, which showed increased uptake in the humeri, tibiae and femora, which were in keeping with osteopetrosis

  1. Modifying radionuclide effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasser, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    This project involves a study of the relationship of physiological and environmental factors to the metabolism and effects of radionuclides. We have studied placental transfer and suckling as pathways of americium entry into the newborn or juvenile rat. Rats were injected intravenously with 5 μCi of 241 Am while nulliparous (30 days prior to mating), pregnant (day 19 of gestation), or lactating (1 day after parturition), and subsequent litters were killed to determine 241 Am retention. A deficit in reproductive performance was observed in the group injected before mating, as evidenced by reduced number and weight of offspring

  2. Radionuclides in the sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1971-07-01

    Water covers a little more than two-thirds of the earth's surface. What is thrown into the sea from a ship may be washed up on a shore thousands of miles away; wastes discharged into the seas or into rivers flowing into them can affect marine life and possibly also the health of man. The study, prevention and control of pollution of the seas and oceans by radionuclides introduced as by-products of man's use of nuclear energy is thus of global interest. (author)

  3. Sherlock Holmes for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitzer, C.

    2002-01-01

    At the end of 2001 ARC Seibersdorf research has taken the management of the first worldwide certified laboratory to control the realization of the international Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Altogether there will be 16 CTBT certified laboratories worldwide; therefore a global network of radionuclides measurements stations and test laboratories as well as seismic, radiation and hydroacustic measurements stations is necessary . In the future air samples will be taken from these stations and analyzed in one of these certified laboratories, when appears the suspicion that an atomic test was carried out. (nevyjel)

  4. Gated equilibrium bloodpool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinders Folmer, S.C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis deals with the clinical applications of gated equilibrium bloodpool scintigraphy, performed with either a gamma camera or a portable detector system, the nuclear stethoscope. The main goal has been to define the value and limitations of noninvasive measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction as a parameter of cardiac performance in various disease states, both for diagnostic purposes as well as during follow-up after medical or surgical intervention. Secondly, it was attempted to extend the use of the equilibrium bloodpool techniques beyond the calculation of ejection fraction alone by considering the feasibility to determine ventricular volumes and by including the possibility of quantifying valvular regurgitation. In both cases, it has been tried to broaden the perspective of the observations by comparing them with results of other, invasive and non-invasive, procedures, in particular cardiac catheterization, M-mode echocardiography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. (Auth.)

  5. Problems in equilibrium theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aliprantis, Charalambos D

    1996-01-01

    In studying General Equilibrium Theory the student must master first the theory and then apply it to solve problems. At the graduate level there is no book devoted exclusively to teaching problem solving. This book teaches for the first time the basic methods of proof and problem solving in General Equilibrium Theory. The problems cover the entire spectrum of difficulty; some are routine, some require a good grasp of the material involved, and some are exceptionally challenging. The book presents complete solutions to two hundred problems. In searching for the basic required techniques, the student will find a wealth of new material incorporated into the solutions. The student is challenged to produce solutions which are different from the ones presented in the book.

  6. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, E Atlee

    2000-01-01

    Ideal as an elementary introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics, this volume covers both classical and quantum methodology for open and closed systems. Introductory chapters familiarize readers with probability and microscopic models of systems, while additional chapters describe the general derivation of the fundamental statistical mechanics relationships. The final chapter contains 16 sections, each dealing with a different application, ordered according to complexity, from classical through degenerate quantum statistical mechanics. Key features include an elementary introduction t

  7. Volatility in Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Sizova, Natalia; Tauchen, George

    Stock market volatility clusters in time, carries a risk premium, is fractionally inte- grated, and exhibits asymmetric leverage effects relative to returns. This paper develops a first internally consistent equilibrium based explanation for these longstanding empirical facts. The model is cast i......, and the dynamic cross-correlations of the volatility measures with the returns calculated from actual high-frequency intra-day data on the S&P 500 aggregate market and VIX volatility indexes....

  8. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, C.M.; Huebner, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated. 18 refs

  9. Biventricular function in sickle-cell anemia: radionuclide angiographic and thallium-201 scintigraphic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manno, B.V.; Burka, E.R.; Hakki, A.H.; Manno, C.S.; Iskandrian, A.S.; Noone, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) function were evaluated at rest and during exercise using radionuclide ventriculography in 10 patients, aged 19-53 years, with sickle-cell anemia (SCA). Seven patients were in New York Heart Association functional class I and 3 were in class II. The resting LV ejection fraction (EF) was normal in 9 patients and the resting RVEF was normal in 4. LV dilation and high cardiac output were observed in 6 patients at rest. The LVEF during exercise was normal in all 10 patients, whereas only 2 patients had normal RVEF at rest and during exercise. The LVEF was lower in patients with SCA at rest (54 +/- 4% versus 61 +/- 6%, p less than 0.001) and exercise (66 +/- 4% versus 74 +/- 6%, p less than 0.001) than in 42 age-matched normal subjects. Rest thallium-201 images from 9 patients showed abnormal RV uptake in 8 and normal LV uptake in 8. Thus, in adult patients with SCA, LV function was normal during exercise in all patients and at rest in all but 1 patient. The LVEF, however, was lower than that in age-matched normal subjects. RV function was abnormal in most patients at rest and during exercise. RV thallium-201 uptake suggested pressure or volume overload (or both), most likely due to pulmonary vaso-occlusive complications of the disease

  10. Equilibrium calculations, ch. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deursen, A.P.J. van

    1976-01-01

    A calculation is presented of dimer intensities obtained in supersonic expansions. There are two possible limiting considerations; the dimers observed are already present in the source, in thermodynamic equilibrium, and are accelerated in the expansion. Destruction during acceleration is neglected, as are processes leading to newly formed dimers. On the other hand one can apply a kinetic approach, where formation and destruction processes are followed throughout the expansion. The difficulty of this approach stems from the fact that the density, temperature and rate constants have to be known at all distances from the nozzle. The simple point of view has been adopted and the measured dimer intensities are compared with the equilibrium concentration in the source. The comparison is performed under the assumption that the detection efficiency for dimers is twice the detection efficiency for monomers. The experimental evidence against the simple point of view that the dimers of the onset region are formed in the source already, under equilibrium conditions, is discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Radionuclide Therapy. Chapter 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flux, G.; Du, Yong [Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Cancer has been treated with radiopharmaceuticals since the 1940s. The radionuclides originally used, including 131I and 32P, are still in use. The role of the physicist in radionuclide therapy encompasses radiation protection, imaging and dosimetry. Radiation protection is of particular importance given the high activities of the unsealed sources that are often administered, and must take into account medical staff, comforters and carers, and, as patients are discharged while still retaining activity, members of the public. Regulations concerning acceptable levels of exposure vary from country to country. If the administered radiopharmaceutical is a γ emitter, then imaging can be performed which may be either qualitative or quantitative. While a regular system of quality control must be in place to prevent misinterpretation of image data, qualitative imaging does not usually rely on the image corrections necessary to determine the absolute levels of activity that are localized in the patient. Accurate quantitative imaging is dependent on these corrections and can permit the distribution of absorbed doses delivered to the patient to be determined with sufficient accuracy to be clinically beneficial.

  12. Intervention procedures for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    As in the case of smoking and lung cancer, for large radionuclide releases, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. On the other hand, we feel compelled to do something sensible after an accident even if the principal benefit of intervention may be to comfort the population at risk. Of course, for populations near the site of an accident, evacuation should be considered, but it is unreasonable to apply this measure to distant populations, e.g., large segments of the European community could not be moved about as we observe the shifting of a radioactive cloud in response to changing winds. If the radionuclides are delivered as particulates, bringing people indoors and employing primitive air filters can temporarily reduce exposures, but these stratagems are not very effective against gaseous or volatile elements. What, then, can be done for populations downwind of a radioactive release whose air, water, and/or food supply are, or are about to become contaminated? 5 refs

  13. Noncompact Equilibrium Points and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Al-Rumaih

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove an equilibrium existence result for vector functions defined on noncompact domain and we give some applications in optimization and Nash equilibrium in noncooperative game.

  14. Equilibrium thermodynamics - Callen's postulational approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongschaap, R.J.J.; Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2001-01-01

    In order to provide the background for nonequilibrium thermodynamics, we outline the fundamentals of equilibrium thermodynamics. Equilibrium thermodynamics must not only be obtained as a special case of any acceptable nonequilibrium generalization but, through its shining example, it also elucidates

  15. MHD equilibrium with toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.

    1987-03-01

    The present work attempts to formulate the equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma with purely toroidal flow within ideal MHD theory. In general, the inertial term Rho(v.Del)v caused by plasma flow is so complicated that the equilibrium equation is completely different from the Grad-Shafranov equation. However, in the case of purely toroidal flow the equilibrium equation can be simplified so that it resembles the Grad-Shafranov equation. Generally one arbitrary two-variable functions and two arbitrary single variable functions, instead of only four single-variable functions, are allowed in the new equilibrium equations. Also, the boundary conditions of the rotating (with purely toroidal fluid flow, static - without any fluid flow) equilibrium are the same as those of the static equilibrium. So numerically one can calculate the rotating equilibrium as a static equilibrium. (author)

  16. Erosion of atmospherically deposited radionuclides as affected by soil disaggregation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claval, D.; Garcia-Sanchez, L.; Real, J.; Rouxel, R.; Mauger, S.; Sellier, L.

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of soil disaggregation with radionuclide erosion were studied under controlled conditions in the laboratory on samples from a loamy silty-sandy soil. The fate of 134 Cs and 85 Sr was monitored on soil aggregates and on small plots, with time resolution ranging from minutes to hours after contamination. Analytical experiments reproducing disaggregation mechanisms on aggregates showed that disaggregation controls both erosion and sorption. Compared to differential swelling, air explosion mobilized the most by producing finer particles and increasing five-fold sorption. For all the mechanisms studied, a significant part of the contamination was still unsorbed on the aggregates after an hour. Global experiments on contaminated sloping plots submitted to artificial rainfalls showed radionuclide erosion fluctuations and their origin. Wet radionuclide deposition increased short-term erosion by 50% compared to dry deposition. A developed soil crust when contaminated decreased radionuclide erosion by a factor 2 compared to other initial soil states. These erosion fluctuations were more significant for 134 Cs than 85 Sr, known to have better affinity to soil matrix. These findings confirm the role of disaggregation on radionuclide erosion. Our data support a conceptual model of radionuclide erosion at the small plot scale in two steps: (1) radionuclide non-equilibrium sorption on mobile particles, resulting from simultaneous sorption and disaggregation during wet deposition and (2) later radionuclide transport by runoff with suspended matter

  17. Some parameters of radionuclide kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokof'ev, O.N.; Smirnov, V.A.; Belen'kij, E.I.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical values of the rates of radionuclide absorption into, and elimination from, bovine organs were determined. Kinetic rate constants of radionuclides such as 89 Sr, 99 Mo, 131 I, 132 Tl, and 140 Be were calculated. The calculations were done for muscle, liver, and kidney

  18. Radionuclide - Soil Organic Matter Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between soil organic matter, i.e. humic and fulvic acids, and radionuclides of primary interest to shallow land burial of low activity solid waste have been reviewed and to some extent studied experimentally. The radionuclides considered in the present study comprise cesium, strontium...

  19. Chapter 13. Radionuclides in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Harangozo, M.

    2000-01-01

    This is a chapter of textbook of radioecology for university students. In this chapter authors deal with problems connected with using of radionuclides in medicine. Methods of treatment with using of radionuclides are reviewed. Chapter consists of next parts: (1) Remotion of thyroid gland; (2) Treatment of cerebrally tumour in nuclear reactor; (3) Artificial heart

  20. Radionuclide sorption studies on abyssal red clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, K.L.

    1979-01-01

    The radionuclide sorption properties of a widely distributed abyssal red clay are being experimentally investigated using batch equilibration techniques. This paper summarizes sorption equilibrium data obtained when 0.68 N NaCl solutions containing either Tc, U, Pu, Am or Cm were contacted with samples of the red clay and also summarizes some initial results from experiments designed to determine the relative selectivity of the clay for various nuclides. Under mildly oxidizing conditions, the sorption equilibrium distribution coefficients for technetium were essentially zero. At solution-phase nuclide concentrations on the order of 10 -6 M and less and at solution pH values of about 6.9, the distribution coefficients for plutonium were about 3 x 10 3 m1/gm and for uranium, americium, and curium were about 10 5 ml/gm or greater. However, at solution pH values of about 2.7, the distribution coefficients for each of the nuclides were greatly diminished. Initial experiments conducted in order to determine the relative selectivity of the clay for cesium, barium, and cerium, indicated that the silicate phases in the clay were selective for cesium over barium and cerium. These experiments also indicated that the hydrous oxide phases were selective for cerium over barium and for barium over cesium

  1. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Groot, Sybren Ruurds

    1984-01-01

    The study of thermodynamics is especially timely today, as its concepts are being applied to problems in biology, biochemistry, electrochemistry, and engineering. This book treats irreversible processes and phenomena - non-equilibrium thermodynamics.S. R. de Groot and P. Mazur, Professors of Theoretical Physics, present a comprehensive and insightful survey of the foundations of the field, providing the only complete discussion of the fluctuating linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics. The application covers a wide range of topics: the theory of diffusion and heat conduction, fluid dyn

  2. Radionuclide transverse section imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    A radioisotope scanning apparatus for use in nuclear medicine is described in detail. The apparatus enables the quantification and spatial location of the radioactivity in a body section of a patient to be determined with high sensitivity. It consists of an array of highly focussed collimators arranged such that adjacent collimators move in the same circumferential but opposite radial directions. The explicit movements of the gantry are described in detail and may be controlled by a general purpose computer. The use of highly focussed collimators allows both a reasonable solid angle of acceptance and also high target to background images; additionally, dual radionuclide pharmaceutical studies can be performed simultaneously. It is claimed that the high sensitivity of the system permits the early diagnosis of pathological changes and the images obtained show accurately the location and shape of physiological abnormalities. (UK)

  3. Radioactivity, radionuclides, radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Magill, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    RADIOACTIVITY – RADIONUCLIDES – RADIATION is suitable for a general audience interested in topical environmental and human health radiological issues such as radiation exposure in aircraft, food sterilisation, nuclear medicine, radon gas, radiation dispersion devices ("dirty bombs")… It leads the interested reader through the three Rs of nuclear science, to the forefront of research and developments in the field. The book is also suitable for students and professionals in the related disciplines of nuclear and radiochemistry, health physics, environmental sciences, nuclear and astrophysics. Recent developments in the areas of exotic decay modes (bound beta decay of ‘bare’ or fully ionized nuclei), laser transmutation, nuclear forensics, radiation hormesis and the LNT hypothesis are covered. Atomic mass data for over 3000 nuclides from the most recent (2003) evaluation are included.

  4. Deep sea radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanisch, G.; Vobach, M.

    1993-01-01

    Every year since 1979, either in sping or in summer, the fishing research vessel 'Walther Herwig' goes to the North Atlantic disposal areas of solid radioactive wastes, and, for comparative purposes, to other areas, in order to collect water samples, plankton and nekton, and, from the deep sea bed, sediment samples and benthos organisms. In addition to data on the radionuclide contents of various media, information about the plankton, nekton and benthos organisms living in those areas and about their biomasses could be gathered. The investigations are aimed at acquiring scientifically founded knowledge of the uptake of radioactive substances by microorganisms, and their migration from the sea bottom to the areas used by man. (orig.) [de

  5. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Joon

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of non-invasive imaging technologies continues to strengthen the role of molecular imaging biological research. These tools have been validated recently in variety of research models, and have been shown to provide continuous quantitative monitoring of the location(s), magnitude, and time-variation of gene expression. This article reviews the principles, characteristics, categories and the use of radionuclide reporter gene imaging technologies as they have been used in imaging cell trafficking, imaging gene therapy, imaging endogenous gene expression and imaging molecular interactions. The studies published to date demonstrate that reporter gene imaging technologies will help to accelerate model validation as well as allow for clinical monitoring of human diseases

  6. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Joon [School of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Recent progress in the development of non-invasive imaging technologies continues to strengthen the role of molecular imaging biological research. These tools have been validated recently in variety of research models, and have been shown to provide continuous quantitative monitoring of the location(s), magnitude, and time-variation of gene expression. This article reviews the principles, characteristics, categories and the use of radionuclide reporter gene imaging technologies as they have been used in imaging cell trafficking, imaging gene therapy, imaging endogenous gene expression and imaging molecular interactions. The studies published to date demonstrate that reporter gene imaging technologies will help to accelerate model validation as well as allow for clinical monitoring of human diseases.

  7. Natural radionuclides in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laul, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The U-234 and Th-230 radionuclides are highly retarded by factors of 10 4 to 10 5 in basalt groundwater (Hanford) and briny groundwaters from Texas and geothermal brine from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In basalt groundwaters (low ionic strength), Ra is highly sorbed, while in brines (high ionic strength), Ra is soluble. This is probably because the sorption sites are saturated with Na + and Cl - ions and RaCl 2 is soluble in brines. Pb-210 is soluble in SSGF brine, probably as a chloride complex. The U-234/Th-230 ratios in basalt groundwaters and brines from Texas and SSGF are nearly unity, indicating that U is in the +4 state, suggesting a reducing environment for these aquifers. 19 refs., 3 figs

  8. Natural radionuclides in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laul, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The 234 U and 230 Th radionuclides are highly retarded by factors of 10 4 to 10 5 in basalt groundwater (Hanford) and briny groundwaters from Texas, and geothermal brine form the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In basalt groundwaters (low ionic strength), Ra is highly sorbed, while in brines (high ionic strength), Ra is soluble. This is probably because the sorption sites are saturated with Na + and Cl - ions, and RaCl 2 is soluble in brines. 210 Pb is soluble in SSGF brine, probably as a chloride complex. The 234 U/ 230 Th ratios in basalt groundwaters and brines from Texas and SSGF are nearly unity, indicating that U is in the +4 state, suggesting a reducing environment for these aquifers. (author) 19 refs.; 3 figs

  9. An international database of radionuclide concentration ratios for wildlife: development and uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copplestone, D.; Beresford, N.A.; Brown, J.E.; Yankovich, T.

    2013-01-01

    A key element of most systems for assessing the impact of radionuclides on the environment is a means to estimate the transfer of radionuclides to organisms. To facilitate this, an international wildlife transfer database has been developed to provide an online, searchable compilation of transfer parameters in the form of equilibrium-based whole-organism to media concentration ratios. This paper describes the derivation of the wildlife transfer database, the key data sources it contains and highlights the applications for the data. -- Highlights: • An online database containing wildlife radionuclide transfer parameters is described. • Database underpins recent ICRP and IAEA data wildlife transfer compilations. • Database contains equilibrium based whole organism to media concentration ratios

  10. Assessment of right ventricular afterload in mitral valve diseases with radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Mitsuharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Kohno, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Masahiro; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Hiraki, Yoshio; Nagaya, Isao; Senoh, Yoshimasa; Teramoto, Shigeru

    1991-01-01

    Right ventricular function at rest and during exercise was studied in 33 patients with mitral valve disease by equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography using 99m Tc in vivo labeled red blood cells. Radionuclide measurements of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) were correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP). RVEF decreased significantly with exercise. There was no significant correlation between RVEF at rest and mPAP. However, mPAP showed significant negative correlation with RVEF during exercise and with the changes of RVEF from rest to exercise. It is concluded that RVEF during exercise in mitral valve disease is affected by right ventricular afterload, and the measurements of RVEF at rest and during exercise by equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography is useful to assess right ventricular afterload. (author)

  11. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  12. Radionuclide calibrators performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora Ramirez, E.; Zeledon Fonseca, P.; Jimenez Cordero, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radionuclide calibrators are used to estimate accurately activity prior to administration to a patient, so it is very important that this equipment meets its performance requirements. The purpose of this paper is to compare the commercially available 'Calicheck' (Calcorp. Inc), used to assess linearity, versus the well-known source decay method, and also to show our results after performing several recommended quality control tests. The parameters that we wanted to evaluate were carried on using the Capintec CRC-15R and CRC-15 β radionuclide calibrators. The evaluated tests were: high voltage, display, zero adjust, background, reproducibility, source constancy, accuracy, precision and linearity. The first six tests were evaluated on the daily practice, here we analyzed the 2007 recorded data; and the last three were evaluated once a year. During the daily evaluation both calibrators performance were satisfactory comparing with the manufacture's requirements. The accuracy test show result within the ± 10% allowed for a field instrument. Precision performance is within the ± 1 % allowed. On the other hand, the linearity test shows that using the source decay method the relative coefficient is 0.9998, for both equipment and using the Calicheck the relative coefficient is 0.997. However, looking the percentage of error, during the 'Calicheck' test, its range goes from 0.0 % up to -25.35%, and using the source decay method, the range goes from 0.0 % up to -31.05 %, taking into account both instruments. Checking the 'Calicheck' results we can see that the results varying randomly, but using the source decay method the percentage of error increase as the source activity decrease. We conclude that both devices meet its manufactures requirements, in the case of the linearity using the decay method, decreasing the activity source, increasing the percentage of error, this may happen because of the equipment age. (author)

  13. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quine, T.A.; Walling, D.

    1998-01-01

    Geomorphologists have shown increasing interest in environmental radionuclides since pioneering studies by Ritchie and McHenry in the USA and Campbell, Longmore and Loughran in Australia. Environmental radionuclides have attracted this interest because they provide geomorphologists with the means to trace sediment movement within the landscape. They, therefore, facilitate investigation of subjects at the core of geomorphology, namely the rates and patterns of landscape change. Most attention has been focussed on the artificial radionuclide caesium-137 ( 137 Cs) but more recently potential applications of the natural radionuclides lead-210 ( 210 Pb) and beryllium-7( 7 Be) have been investigated (Walling et al., 1995; Wallbrink and Murray, 1996a, 1996b). The origin, characteristics and applications of these radionuclides are summarised. These radionuclides are of value as sediment tracers because of three important characteristics: a strong affinity for sediment; a global distribution and the possibility of measurement at low concentration. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides provide unique access to detailed qualitative data concerning landscape change over a range of timescales

  15. Physical and chemical factors influencing radionuclide behaviour in arable soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauret, G.; Vidal, M.; Alexakhin, R.M.; Kruglov, S.V.; Cremers, A.; Wauters, J.; Valcke, E.; Ivanov, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides integrates plant physiological and soil chemical aspects. Therefore, it is necessary to study the factors affecting the equilibrium of the radionuclides between solid and soil solution phases. Desorption and adsorption studies were applied to the podsolic and peat soils considered in the ECP-2 project. In the desorption approach, both sequential extraction and 'infinite bath' techniques were used. In the adsorption approach, efforts were directed at predicting Cs and Sr-K D on the basis of soil properties and soil solution composition. Desorption approach predicts time-dynamics of transfer with time but it is un sufficient for comparatively predicting transfer. Adsorption studies informs about which are the key factors affecting radionuclide transfer. For Sr, availability depends on the CEC and on the concentration of the Ca + Mg in the soil solution. For Cs, availability is mainly dependent on the partitioning between FES -frayed edge sites-, which are highly specific and REC -regular exchange complex-, with low selectivity for Cs. Moreover, availability depends on the K and NH 4 , levels in the soil solution and fixation properties of the soil. Considering these factors, the calculation of the in situ K D values helps to predict the relative transfer of radionuclides. The calculation of the K D of the materials that could be used as countermeasures could permit the prediction of its suitability to decrease transfer and therefore to help in producing cleaner agricultural products

  16. Radionuclides in Canada goose eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickard, W.H.; Sweany, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    Low levels of radionuclides were measured in Canada goose eggs taken from deserted nests from Columbia River islands on the Energy Research and Development Administration's Hanford Reservation. Potassium-40, a naturally occurring radionuclide, was the most abundant radionuclide measured in egg contents and egg shell. Strontium-90 was incorporated into egg shells and cesium-137 into inner egg contents. Manganese-54, cobalt-60, and zinc-65 were more abundant in inner egg contents than in egg shell. Cerium-144 was detected in egg shell but not in inner shell

  17. Radionuclide migration in water reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionova, L.F.

    1983-01-01

    Toxicity degree and radiation effect of different radionuclides depend on multiple factors, whose interaction can strengthen or weaken the effects through the mechanism of nuclide accumulation by hydrobiontes. Stage of development of an aquatic organism, its age, mass and sex as well as lifetime and residence time of the organism in the given medium are of importance. The radionuclide build up depends on illumination, locale of the bioobject residence, on the residence nature. The concentration of radionuclides in aquatic organisms and bionts survival depend on a season, temperature of the residence medium, as well as salinity and mineral composition of water influence

  18. Models for transport and fate of carbon, nutrients and radionuclides in the aquatic ecosystem at Oeregrundsgrepen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erichsen, Anders Christian; Moehlenberg, Flemming; Closter, Rikke Margrethe; Sandberg, Johannes

    2010-06-01

    -stationary equilibrium within the model area. The coupled ecosystem and radionuclide models were used to simulate present conditions, i.e. 2020 AD. Six radionuclides were modelled explicitly in addition to C-14. They represent a wide range of accumulation potentials and partition coefficients (K d , distribution of radionuclides between water, sediment and biota). The ecosystem and associated radionuclide model include a detailed sediment module where radionuclides can be bound by adsorption to the organic and inorganic fractions, be precipitated, be transported by resuspension and later deposited at larger depths. With the exception of radionuclides with very low particle affinity, such as Cl-35, the majority of radionuclides released in basins where they were introduced via groundwater flow remained in the sediments even after a simulation period of eight years. The spread of radionuclides with high partition coefficients for sediments from areas with groundwater flow takes place by sediment resuspension and subsequent transport and sedimentation. In the case of radionuclides with lower partition coefficients, release from the sediments to the water column followed by transport of dissolved radionuclides by currents plays a larger role. A significant result of the modelling was the quantification of the seasonal and spatial variation in radionuclide accumulation and in bioconcentration factors (BCFs) with spatial variation of BCFs often ranging 2 to 3 orders of magnitude. This variation was dominated by spatial differences in concentrations of radionuclides in water. In basins where radionuclides were introduced by groundwater flow, BCFs were typically 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than in deep basins without radionuclide release in the groundwater. In phytoplankton and grazers, bioconcentration factors (BCFs) scaled linearly to partition coefficients (Kd), underlining the fact that adsorption is an important process for radionuclide accumulation in the lower parts of the food web

  19. Models for transport and fate of carbon, nutrients and radionuclides in the aquatic ecosystem at Oeregrundsgrepen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erichsen, Anders Christian; Moehlenberg, Flemming; Closter, Rikke Margrethe; Sandberg, Johannes [DHI, Hoersholm (Denmark)

    2010-06-15

    -stationary equilibrium within the model area. The coupled ecosystem and radionuclide models were used to simulate present conditions, i.e. 2020 AD. Six radionuclides were modelled explicitly in addition to C-14. They represent a wide range of accumulation potentials and partition coefficients (K{sub d}, distribution of radionuclides between water, sediment and biota). The ecosystem and associated radionuclide model include a detailed sediment module where radionuclides can be bound by adsorption to the organic and inorganic fractions, be precipitated, be transported by resuspension and later deposited at larger depths. With the exception of radionuclides with very low particle affinity, such as Cl-35, the majority of radionuclides released in basins where they were introduced via groundwater flow remained in the sediments even after a simulation period of eight years. The spread of radionuclides with high partition coefficients for sediments from areas with groundwater flow takes place by sediment resuspension and subsequent transport and sedimentation. In the case of radionuclides with lower partition coefficients, release from the sediments to the water column followed by transport of dissolved radionuclides by currents plays a larger role. A significant result of the modelling was the quantification of the seasonal and spatial variation in radionuclide accumulation and in bioconcentration factors (BCFs) with spatial variation of BCFs often ranging 2 to 3 orders of magnitude. This variation was dominated by spatial differences in concentrations of radionuclides in water. In basins where radionuclides were introduced by groundwater flow, BCFs were typically 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than in deep basins without radionuclide release in the groundwater. In phytoplankton and grazers, bioconcentration factors (BCFs) scaled linearly to partition coefficients (Kd), underlining the fact that adsorption is an important process for radionuclide accumulation in the lower parts of the food web

  20. Radioactive waste-Portland cement systems: I, radionuclide distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Glasser, F.P.; Lachowski, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    Crystal chemical stabilization of radioactive wastes can be achieved during clinkering of, or with, ordinary portland cement. Waste loadings of 20 to 30 wt% are achieved by dilute solid solution of waste ions into cementitious host lattices. Higher waste loadings result in compatible noncementitious radiophases. The cementitious phases hydrate without loss of compressive strength. Crystallochemical relationships predict that the radionuclide partitioning in the anhydrous clinkered phases will be maintained in the hydration products. These cementitious hydroxylated radiophases would be in internal equilibrium under anticipated repository conditions. The radionuclide distributions observed are described in the context of established phase equilibria for commercial waste cement systems, but are applicable to transuranic, medium- and low-level wastes

  1. Artificial radionuclides in soil, flora and fauna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marej, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Sources and ways of soil contamination by radionuclides, as well as the main regularities of radionuclide behaviour in soils, are discussed. Ways of radionuclide uptake by plants are discussed in detail, since radionuclide contamination of vegetation, and agricultural plants and pastures in particular, is one of the main factors, determining sanitary value of environmental contamination by radioactive substances

  2. Electrocardiograph-gated single photon emission computed tomography radionuclide angiography presents good interstudy reproducibility for the quantification of global systolic right ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Doumit; Coaguila, Carlos; Vilain, Didier

    2007-05-01

    Electrocardiograph-gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclide angiography provides accurate measurement of right ventricular ejection fraction and end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes. In this study, we report the interstudy precision and reliability of SPECT radionuclide angiography for the measurement of global systolic right ventricular function using two, three-dimensional volume processing methods (SPECT-QBS, SPECT-35%). These were compared with equilibrium planar radionuclide angiography. Ten patients with chronic coronary artery disease having two SPECT and planar radionuclide angiography acquisitions were included. For the right ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume, the interstudy precision and reliability were better with SPECT-35% than with SPECT-QBS. The sample sizes needed to objectify a change in right ventricular volumes or ejection fraction were lower with SPECT-35% than with SPECT-QBS. The interstudy precision and reliability of SPECT-35% and SPECT-QBS for the right ventricle were better than those of equilibrium planar radionuclide angiography, but poorer than those previously reported for the left ventricle with SPECT radionuclide angiography on the same population. SPECT-35% and SPECT-QBS present good interstudy precision and reliability for right ventricular function, with the results favouring the use of SPECT-35%. The results are better than those of equilibrium planar radionuclide angiography, but poorer than those previously reported for the left ventricle with SPECT radionuclide angiography. They need to be confirmed in a larger population.

  3. Radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, O.; Ruth, C.; Samanek, M.

    1990-01-01

    The use of radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology is discussed for non-invasive evaluation of myocardial function and perfusion, regional lung perfusion and ventilation, and for measuring central and peripheral hemodynamics. (H.W.). 16 refs

  4. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  5. Radionuclides in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, J.H.; Schmidt, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclides in the Food Chain reviews past experience in meeting the challenge of radionuclide contamination of foodstuffs and water sources and, in the wake of the reactor accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island, presents current concepts and programs relating to measurement, surveillance, effects, risk management, evaluation guidelines, and control and regulatory activities. This volume, based on a symposium sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute in association with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, which brought together both radiation experts and food industry policymakers, examines such vital topics as structural problems in large-scale crisis-managment systems; dose assessment from man-made sources; international recommendations on radiation protection; airborne contamination, as well as aquatic and soilborne radionuclides; food-chain contamination from testing nuclear devices; long-term health effects of radionuclides in food and water supplies; and use of mathematical models in risk assessment and management. (orig.)

  6. Equilibrium models and variational inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Konnov, Igor

    2007-01-01

    The concept of equilibrium plays a central role in various applied sciences, such as physics (especially, mechanics), economics, engineering, transportation, sociology, chemistry, biology and other fields. If one can formulate the equilibrium problem in the form of a mathematical model, solutions of the corresponding problem can be used for forecasting the future behavior of very complex systems and, also, for correcting the the current state of the system under control. This book presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts in economics, including several models from related sciences.- Presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts and also the present state of investigations in this field- Describes static and dynamic input-output models, Walras, Cassel-Wald, spatial price, auction market, oligopolistic equilibrium models, transportation and migration equilibrium models- Covers the basics of theory and solution methods both for the complementarity and variational inequality probl...

  7. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport: a regulatory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, W. L.; Pickett, D. A.; Codell, R. B.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    investigating approaches to colloid modeling in order to help evaluate DOE's approach. One alternative approach uses DOE laboratory data to invoke kinetic controls on reversible radionuclide attachment to colloids. A kinetic approach in which desorption from colloids is slow may help assess whether DOE's instantaneous equilibrium approach for reversible attachment, as well as their application of irreversible attachment to only a small portion of the radionuclide inventory, are reasonable and conservative. An approach to examine microbial processes would also contribute to considerations of leaching of radionuclides and colloid formation. Reducing uncertainties in colloid transport processes should help in better understanding their importance to repository performance. This work is an independent product and does not necessarily reflect the views or regulatory position of the NRC. CNWRA participation was funded under contract No. NRC-02-97-009.

  8. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  9. Surface diffusion of sorbed radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Bond, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Surface diffusion has in the past been invoked to explain rates of radionuclide migration which were greater than those predicted. Results were generally open to interpretation but the possible existence of surface diffusion, whereby sorbed radionuclides could potentially migrate at much enhanced rates, necessitated investigation. In this work through-diffusion experiments have shown that although surface diffusion does exist for some nuclides, the magnitude of the phenomenon is not sufficient to affect repository safety assessment modelling. (author)

  10. Radionuclide generators for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, R.D.; Molinski, V.J.; Hupf, H.B.; Kramer, H.

    1983-10-01

    This document reviews the chemical literature of those radionuclide generators that have gained or appear to possess utility in medical imaging. The text represents a conscientious effort to peruse the scientific literature through 1980. The intent of this work is to provide a reference point for the investigator who is interested in the development of a particular generator system and the refinements which have been reported. Moreover, the incorporation of the particular daughter radionuclide into a suitable radiodiagnostic agent is presented

  11. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  12. Mental Equilibrium and Rational Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Eyal Winter; Ignacio Garcia-Jurado; Jose Mendez-Naya; Luciano Mendez-Naya

    2009-01-01

    We introduce emotions into an equilibrium notion. In a mental equilibrium each player "selects" an emotional state which determines the player's preferences over the outcomes of the game. These preferences typically differ from the players' material preferences. The emotional states interact to play a Nash equilibrium and in addition each player's emotional state must be a best response (with respect to material preferences) to the emotional states of the others. We discuss the concept behind...

  13. Para-equilibrium phase diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Koukkari, Pertti; Pajarre, Risto; Eriksson, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A rapidly cooled system may attain a state of para-equilibrium. • In this state rapidly diffusing elements reach equilibrium but others are immobile. • Application of the Phase Rule to para-equilibrium phase diagrams is discussed. • A general algorithm to calculate para-equilibrium phase diagrams is described. - Abstract: If an initially homogeneous system at high temperature is rapidly cooled, a temporary para-equilibrium state may result in which rapidly diffusing elements have reached equilibrium but more slowly diffusing elements have remained essentially immobile. The best known example occurs when homogeneous austenite is quenched. A para-equilibrium phase assemblage may be calculated thermodynamically by Gibbs free energy minimization under the constraint that the ratios of the slowly diffusing elements are the same in all phases. Several examples of calculated para-equilibrium phase diagram sections are presented and the application of the Phase Rule is discussed. Although the rules governing the geometry of these diagrams may appear at first to be somewhat different from those for full equilibrium phase diagrams, it is shown that in fact they obey exactly the same rules with the following provision. Since the molar ratios of non-diffusing elements are the same in all phases at para-equilibrium, these ratios act, as far as the geometry of the diagram is concerned, like “potential” variables (such as T, pressure or chemical potentials) rather than like “normal” composition variables which need not be the same in all phases. A general algorithm to calculate para-equilibrium phase diagrams is presented. In the limit, if a para-equilibrium calculation is performed under the constraint that no elements diffuse, then the resultant phase diagram shows the single phase with the minimum Gibbs free energy at any point on the diagram; such calculations are of interest in physical vapor deposition when deposition is so rapid that phase

  14. A study on the radionuclide transport by bacteria in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Sub

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology to develop a predictive model based on a conceptual three phase system and to investigate the influence of bacteria and their generation on the transport of radionuclide in porous and fractured media. The mass balance for bacteria, substrate and radionuclide were formulated. To illustrate the model simply, an equilibrium condition was assumed to partition the substrate, bacteria and radionuclide concentrations between the solid soil matrix, aqueous phase, rock matrix and bacterial surface. From the numerical calculation of the radionuclide transport in the presence of bacteria, it was found that the growth of bacteria and supplied primary substrate as limiting or stimulating growth factor of bacteria are the most important factors of the radionuclide transport. We also found that, depend on the transport of bacteria the temporal and spatial distribution of radionuclide concentration was significantly altered. The model proposed in this study will improve the evaluation of the role of the bacteria in the transport of radionuclide in groundwater systems. Furthermore, this model would be usefully utilized in analyzing the important role of colloidal particulate on the overall performance of radioactive waste safety

  15. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one-space dimensional transport and fate model for M-chain radionuclides in very dry homogeneous or heterogeneous soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advection velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The air-pumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions, which is driven by barometric pressure. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions are used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77

  16. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes as they are advected and/or dispersed. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one space dimensional transport and fate model for an m-chain of radionuclides in very dry soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advocation velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The airpumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions and is barometric pressure driven. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions is used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77

  17. The effect of bacterial generation on the transport of radionuclide in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B.S.; Lee, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology to develop a predictive model based on a conceptual three-phase system and to investigate the influence of bacteria and their generation on the radionuclide transport in porous media. The mass balance equations for bacteria, substrate and radionuclide were formulated. To illustrate the model simply, an equilibrium condition was assumed to partition the substrate, bacteria and radionuclide concentrations, between the solid soil matrix, aqueous phase and bacterial surface. From the numerical calculation of radionuclide transport in the presence of bacteria, it was found that the growth of bacterial and supplied primary substrate as a limiting or stimulating growth factor of bacteria are the most important factors of the radionuclide transport. It was also found that, depending on the transport of bacteria, the temporal and spatial distribution of the radionuclide concentration was significantly affected. The model proposed in this study will improve the evaluation of the role of the bacteria to the transport of radionuclide in groundwater systems. Furthermore, this model can be usefully utilized in analyzing the important role of colloidal particulate on the overall performance of radioactive waste safety. (Author)

  18. Radionuclide migration in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demir, M [Ingenieurgesellschaft Bonnenberg und Drescher, Juelich (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-01-01

    Unplanned releases from a nuclear installation - e.g., leakage from a storage tank or other incident - can result in the escape of contaminants such as U, Pu, Cs, Sr, T etc. Nuclide transport through the ground is governed by characteristics of the subsurface hydrology and the specific nuclides under consideration. Unsaturated soil layers result in a transport rate so low as to negligible. Radionuclides reaching the ground water are assumed to endanger human life because of potential uncontrolled ingestion. The most dangerous nuclides are long-lived and not absorbed, or very poorly absorbed, in the soil. During migration of nuclides through saturated soil layers, the concentration can be reduced by dilution. Preliminary results indicate that tritium is spread with ground water velocity. Its concentration can be reduced only by diffusion, dispersion and radioactive decay. Alpha-emitters are strongly retained velocities of alpha-emitters are approximately one thousandth (10/sup -3/) that of T. Transport velocities of Cs and Sr are approximately one hundreth (10/sup -2/) and one tenth (10/sup -1/) that of T respectively.

  19. Radionuclide migration in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, M.

    1979-01-01

    Unplanned releases from a nuclear installation - e.g., leakage from a storage tank or other incident - can result in the escape of contaminants such as U, Pu, Cs, Sr, T etc. Nuclide transport through the ground is governed by characteristics of the subsurface hydrology and the specific nuclides under consideration. Unsaturated soil layers result in a transport rate so low as to negligible. Radionuclides reaching the ground water are assumed to endanger human life because of potential uncontrolled ingestion. The most dangerous nuclides are long-lived and not absorbed, or very poorly absorbed, in the soil. During migration of nuclides through saturated soil layers, the concentration can be reduced by dilution. Preliminary results indicate that tritium is spread with ground water velocity. Its concentration can be reduced only by diffusion, dispersion and radioactive decay. Alpha-emitters are strongly retained velocities of alpha-emitters are approximately one thousandth (10 -3 ) that of T. Transport velocities of Cs and Sr are approximately one hundreth (10 -2 ) and one tenth (10 -1 ) that of T respectively. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific.

  1. Radionuclide brain scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Dayem, H.

    1992-01-01

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ''allied advances'' with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  2. Radionuclides migration or isolation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulhoat, P.; Grambow, B.; Simoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    After 20 years of research, the chemical behaviour of actinides and fission products in nuclear waste disposal environments is much better understood. Consistent thermodynamic data have been gathered and allow much more accurate previsions. Through the considerable development of analytical spectroscopy, including time resolved laser fluorescence and X ray absorption, a better understanding of the chemical reactivity (complexation, sorption) of actinides and fission products at a molecular scale has been possible. Chemically reducing conditions are found in most selected disposal host rock formations, generally chosen for their high sorption capacity (clays); such conditions favour the chemical confinement of most radionuclides through precipitation or sorption. Low permeability host rocks participate to this confinement, as convective fluxes are lower than diffusive fluxes. The most recent performance assessment exercises have taken into account the recent progress of knowledge in the chemical evolution of the near field. They show that the dose rates at the outlet are far lower than existing recommendations for normal and most altered evolution scenarios. (authors)

  3. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-01-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific

  4. Radionuclide brain scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Dayem, H

    1993-12-31

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ``allied advances`` with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  5. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  6. Kinetic aspects of the syntheses using short-lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laangstroem, B.; Obenius, U.; Sjoeberg, S.; Bergson, G.

    1981-01-01

    In syntheses using short-lived radionuclides, such as 11 C, the reaction conditions are usually such that the concentrations of the reactants, except for the labelled reactant, can be considered constant during the reaction. Two kinetic models have been investigated - irreversible and reversible bimolecular elementary reactions. The influence of the rate constants, of the equilibrium constants, and of the ratio between the starting reactants on the yield of the labelled product has been studied. The results show that, even in cases with unfavourable equilibrium constants, high yields of the labelled products can be obtained if the rate constant for the forward reaction is large. In addition, the specific activity of the labelled product as a function of time has been studied for the irreversible bimolecular case. (author)

  7. Thermodynamic chemical energy transfer mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2015-01-01

    Chemical energy transfer mechanisms at finite temperature are explored by a chemical energy transfer theory which is capable of investigating various chemical mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium. Gibbs energy fluxes are obtained as a function of chemical potential, time, and displacement. Diffusion, convection, internal convection, and internal equilibrium chemical energy fluxes are demonstrated. The theory reveals that there are chemical energy flux gaps and broken discrete symmetries at the activation chemical potential, time, and displacement. The statistical, thermodynamic theory is the unification of diffusion and internal convection chemical reactions which reduces to the non-equilibrium generalization beyond the quasi-equilibrium theories of migration and diffusion processes. The relationship between kinetic theories of chemical and electrochemical reactions is also explored. The theory is applied to explore non-equilibrium chemical reactions as an illustration. Three variable separation constants indicate particle number constants and play key roles in describing the distinct chemical reaction mechanisms. The kinetics of chemical energy transfer accounts for the four control mechanisms of chemical reactions such as activation, concentration, transition, and film chemical reactions. - Highlights: • Chemical energy transfer theory is proposed for non-, quasi-, and equilibrium. • Gibbs energy fluxes are expressed by chemical potential, time, and displacement. • Relationship between chemical and electrochemical reactions is discussed. • Theory is applied to explore nonequilibrium energy transfer in chemical reactions. • Kinetics of non-equilibrium chemical reactions shows the four control mechanisms

  8. Dosimetry in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, G.

    2001-01-01

    While it is known that therapeutic effects of radionuclides are due to absorbed radiation dose and to radiosensitivity, individual dosimetry in 'Gy' is practiced rarely in clinical Nuclear Medicine but 'doses' are described in 'mCi' or 'MBq', which is only indirectly related to 'Gy' in the target. To estimate 'Gy', the volume of the target, maximum concentration of the radiopharmaceutical in it and residence time should be assessed individually. These parameters can be obtained usually only with difficulty, involving possibly also quantitative SPET or PET, modern imaging techniques (sonography, CT, MRT), substitution of y- or positron emitting radiotracers for β - emitting radiopharmaceuticals as well as whole-body distribution studies. Residence time can be estimated by obtaining data on biological half-life of a comparable tracer and transfer of these data in the physical characteristics of the therapeutic agent. With all these possibilities for gross dosimetry the establishment of a dose-response-relation should be possible. As distribution of the radiopharmaceutical in lesions is frequently inhomogenous and microdosimetric conditions are difficult to assess in vivo as yet, it could be observed since decades that empirically set, sometimes 'fixed' doses (mCi or MBq) can also be successful in many diseases. Detailed dosimetric studies, however, are work- and cost-intensive. Nevertheless, one should be aware at a time when more sophisticated therapeutic possibilities in Nuclear Medicine arise, that we should try to estimate radiation dose (Gy) in our new methods even as differences in individual radiosensitivity cannot be assessed yet and studies to define individual radiosensitivity in lesions should be encouraged. (author)

  9. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for loW--level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements

  10. Fundamental functions in equilibrium thermodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, H.J. ter

    In the standard presentations of the principles of Gibbsian equilibrium thermodynamics one can find several gaps in the logic. For a subject that is as widely used as equilibrium thermodynamics, it is of interest to clear up such questions of mathematical rigor. In this paper it is shown that using

  11. Bioavailability in ecological risk. Assessment for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Gilbin, R.; Della-Vedova, C.; Adam, C.; Simon, O.; Denison, F.; Beaugelin, K.

    2005-01-01

    The guidance for performing Ecological Risk Assessments (ERA) in Europe has been published in 2003 in the EC's Technical Guidance Document. This document constitutes the official reference in which current water quality standards and risk assessment approach for metals/metalloids are still mainly based on total or dissolved concentrations. However, it has been recognized that accurate assessment of the bio-available metal fraction is crucial, even if the way to incorporate bioavailability into these procedures is still under discussion. The speciation of a pollutant in the exposure medium is the first factor that regulates its bioavailability and consequently its bioaccumulation and the induced biological effects. Therefore, within any ecological risk assessment, bioavailability has obvious implications: firstly in exposure analysis which aim is to determine Predicted Exposure Concentration (PEC); secondly in effect analysis while deriving the so-called Predicted No-Effect Concentrations (PNEC) as toxicity is often linked to the amount of the contaminant incorporated into the tissues of biota. Similarities between metals/metalloids and radionuclides are limited to the biogeochemical behaviour of the element considered and to the need to use bioavailability models. In addition, for radionuclides, emitted ionising radiations (type and energy) need to be taken into account for both exposure and effect analyses whilst performing dosimetric calculations appropriate to the exposure scenarios. A methodology for properly implementing bioavailability models is explained and illustrated for aqueous U(VI), starting from a comprehensive review of the thermodynamic data relevant to environmentally-realistic physico-chemical conditions. Then, the use of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling as a tool for interpreting the bioavailability of U(VI) is presented. Using a systematic approach, different bioavailability models of increasing complexity were tested to model U bio

  12. A Multiperiod Equilibrium Pricing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsuk Kwak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an equilibrium pricing model in a dynamic multiperiod stochastic framework with uncertain income. There are one tradable risky asset (stock/commodity, one nontradable underlying (temperature, and also a contingent claim (weather derivative written on the tradable risky asset and the nontradable underlying in the market. The price of the contingent claim is priced in equilibrium by optimal strategies of representative agent and market clearing condition. The risk preferences are of exponential type with a stochastic coefficient of risk aversion. Both subgame perfect strategy and naive strategy are considered and the corresponding equilibrium prices are derived. From the numerical result we examine how the equilibrium prices vary in response to changes in model parameters and highlight the importance of our equilibrium pricing principle.

  13. Non-equilibrium phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Henkel, Malte; Lübeck, Sven

    2009-01-01

    This book describes two main classes of non-equilibrium phase-transitions: (a) static and dynamics of transitions into an absorbing state, and (b) dynamical scaling in far-from-equilibrium relaxation behaviour and ageing. The first volume begins with an introductory chapter which recalls the main concepts of phase-transitions, set for the convenience of the reader in an equilibrium context. The extension to non-equilibrium systems is made by using directed percolation as the main paradigm of absorbing phase transitions and in view of the richness of the known results an entire chapter is devoted to it, including a discussion of recent experimental results. Scaling theories and a large set of both numerical and analytical methods for the study of non-equilibrium phase transitions are thoroughly discussed. The techniques used for directed percolation are then extended to other universality classes and many important results on model parameters are provided for easy reference.

  14. Inverse problem in radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.

    1988-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste must comply with the performance objectives set forth in 10 CFR 61 for low-level waste (LLW) and 10 CFR 60 for high-level waste (HLW). To determine probable compliance, the proposed disposal system can be modeled to predict its performance. One of the difficulties encountered in such a study is modeling the migration of radionuclides through a complex geologic medium for the long term. Although many radionuclide transport models exist in the literature, the accuracy of the model prediction is highly dependent on the model parameters used. The problem of using known parameters in a radionuclide transport model to predict radionuclide concentrations is a direct problem (DP); whereas the reverse of DP, i.e., the parameter identification problem of determining model parameters from known radionuclide concentrations, is called the inverse problem (IP). In this study, a procedure to solve IP is tested, using the regression technique. Several nonlinear regression programs are examined, and the best one is recommended. 13 refs., 1 tab

  15. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  16. Radionuclide injury to the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Sanders, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequently observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. 88 references

  17. Techniques for rapid determination of effects of synergy between radionuclides and pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, A.; Grauby, A.

    1975-01-01

    The authors present a number of chromatographic techniques for rapid determination of synergy between radionuclides and various compounds in water. The first technique consists in studying how the chemical equilibrium of iodine varies in the presence of various organic and mineral compounds. The second makes it possible to define the effects of synergy within a given hydrographic basin. A third technique deals with the effects of synergy in ground water in the presence of various types of irrigation water. Finally, to complete this set of techniques, the authors define the mobility potential of a radionuclide in a given aqueous effluent

  18. An international database of radionuclide concentration ratios for wildlife: development and uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copplestone, D; Beresford, N A; Brown, J E; Yankovich, T

    2013-12-01

    A key element of most systems for assessing the impact of radionuclides on the environment is a means to estimate the transfer of radionuclides to organisms. To facilitate this, an international wildlife transfer database has been developed to provide an online, searchable compilation of transfer parameters in the form of equilibrium-based whole-organism to media concentration ratios. This paper describes the derivation of the wildlife transfer database, the key data sources it contains and highlights the applications for the data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-09-18

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  20. Method of preparing radionuclide doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperus, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described of preparing aliquot dosea of a tracer material useful in diagnostic nuclear medicine comprising: storing discrete quantities of a lyophilized radionuclide carrier in separate tubular containers from which air and moisture is excluded, selecting from the tubular containers a container in which is stored a carrier appropriate for a nuclear diagnostic test to be performed, interposing the selected container between the needle and the barrel of a hypodermic syringe, and drawing a predetermined amount of a liquid containing a radionuclide tracer in known concentration into the hypodermic syringe barrel through the hypodermic needle and through the selected container to dissolve the discrete quantity of lyophilized carrier therein to combine the carrier with the radionuclide tracer to form an aliquot dose of nuclear diagnostic tracer material, as needed

  1. Spontaneity and Equilibrium: Why "?G Equilibrium" Are Incorrect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental criteria for chemical reactions to be spontaneous in a given direction are generally incorrectly stated as ?G equilibrium are also misstated as being ?G = 0 or ?A = 0. Following a brief review of the…

  2. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of 223 Ra and 225 Ac, from a radionuclide ''cow'' of 227 Ac or 229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of (a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide ''cow'' forming an ingrown mixture; (b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; (c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the ''cow'' from at least one radionuclide daughter; (d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; (e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and (f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the ''cow''. In one embodiment the radionuclide ''cow'' is the 227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a 227 Th and the product radionuclide is the 223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the 227 Ac and retains the 227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide ''cow'' is the 229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a 225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the 225 Ac and the 225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the 229 Th and passes the 225 Ra/Ac. 8 figs

  3. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift

  4. Producing new radionuclides for medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaut, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Arronax cyclotron, a new particle accelerator dedicated to the production of radionuclides for medicine and research has been commissioned in Nantes (France). Because of its unique features: an energy of 70 MeV and an intensity of 750 μA, Arronax will produce radionuclides that can not be produce in present cyclotrons. Among others it will produce Strontium-82 and Germanium-68 that are the precursors for Rubidium-82 and Gallium-68 respectively. 20 per cent of the research works will be dedicated to other domains like radioactive wastes, the radiation biological damage and the radiation damage on electronic devices. (A.C.)

  5. Radionuclide migration in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbreau, A.; Heremans, R.; Skytte Jensen, B.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive waste disposal into geological formation is based on the capacity of rocks to confine radioactivity for a long period of time. Radionuclide migration from the repository to the environment depends on different mechanisms and phenomena whose two main ones are groundwater flow and the retention and ion-exchange property of rocks. Many studies are underway presently in EEC countries concerning hydrodynamic characteristics of deep geological formations as well as in radionuclide retention capacity and modelling. Important results have already been achieved which show the complexity of some phenomena and further studies shall principally be developed taking into account real conditions of the repository and its environment

  6. Automatic alignment of radionuclide images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    The variability of the position, dimensions and orientation of a radionuclide image within the field of view of a gamma camera hampers attempts to analyse the image numerically. This paper describes a method of using a set of training images of a particular type, in this case right lateral brain images, to define the likely variations in the position, dimensions and orientation for that type of image and to provide alignment data for a program that automatically aligns new images of the specified type to a standard position, size and orientation. Examples are given of the use of this method on three types of radionuclide image. (author)

  7. Radionuclide techniques for brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.J.; Moody, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past decade, many of the prime indications for radionuclide brain scanning have become instead indications for CCT, and nuclear medicine studies of the brain have assumed more of a complementary, supportive role. However, there is great promise for improvement in central nervous system radionuclide applications with advances anticipated in both radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation. Nuclear medicine is continuing to function as a powerful research tool and, in the relatively near future, may regain its role as a major clinical test of the central nervous system

  8. UCBNE25, Radionuclide Migration in Geologic Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilshtok, G.

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: UCBNE25 estimates the maximum concentration of nuclides occurring during the migration of three-member radionuclide chains in geologic media without axial dispersion. Unlike other migration codes, the release rate in UCBNE25 is the independent variable, and time is the dependent variable. The extrema in concentrations are determined without having to calculate the entire concentration history. The program assumes one-dimensional water transport and sorption equilibrium for the nuclides in the soil and in the water. The water velocity is held constant, and the leach times are smaller than the half-lives of the nuclides involved. UCBNE25 calculates for each nuclide the time of the maxima at a specified position, the maximum dimensionless concentration, the corresponding water dilution rate, and the contamination time for that position. The closed form solutions can be easily checked by hand, making it a useful calibration tool for other codes. 2 - Method of solution: The method concentrates on the estimation of the extrema positions in space at a fixed time and their occurrence at a fixed position

  9. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, G.; Hu, Q.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids, and

  10. Transport of radionuclides by concentrated brine in a porous medium with micropore-macropore structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    This work concerns itself with the study of effects of soil aggregation and high salt concentrations on the transport of radionuclides by concentrated brine flowing through an aggregated porous medium. The medium is considered to be composed of porous rock aggregates separated by macropores through which the brine flows and transport of salt and radionuclides takes place. The aggregates contain dead-end pores, cracks, and stationary pockets collectively called micropores. The micropore space does not contribute to the flow, but it serves as a storage for salt and radionuclides. Adsorption of radionuclides takes place at internal surfaces of aggregates where they assume that a linear equilibrium isotherm describes the process. A one-dimensional numerical model is developed which is based on two sets of equations: one set for the flow and transport of salt and another set for transport of radionuclides. Results of numerical experiments clearly indicate that the existence of high salt concentrations markedly reduces the peak of nuclides concentration and slows down their movement. Also, it is found that diffusive mass exchange between macropores and aggregates results in a pronounced lowering of the radionuclides concentration peaks. 9 references, 7 figures

  11. Numerical Verification Of Equilibrium Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piro, Markus; Lewis, Brent; Thompson, William T.; Simunovic, Srdjan; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical tool is in an advanced state of development to compute the equilibrium compositions of phases and their proportions in multi-component systems of importance to the nuclear industry. The resulting software is being conceived for direct integration into large multi-physics fuel performance codes, particularly for providing boundary conditions in heat and mass transport modules. However, any numerical errors produced in equilibrium chemistry computations will be propagated in subsequent heat and mass transport calculations, thus falsely predicting nuclear fuel behaviour. The necessity for a reliable method to numerically verify chemical equilibrium computations is emphasized by the requirement to handle the very large number of elements necessary to capture the entire fission product inventory. A simple, reliable and comprehensive numerical verification method is presented which can be invoked by any equilibrium chemistry solver for quality assurance purposes.

  12. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative

  13. On the local equilibrium condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessling, H.

    1994-11-01

    A physical system is in local equilibrium if it cannot be distinguished from a global equilibrium by ''infinitesimally localized measurements''. This should be a natural characterization of local equilibrium, but the problem is to give a precise meaning to the qualitative phrase ''infinitesimally localized measurements''. A solution is suggested in form of a Local Equilibrium Condition (LEC), which can be applied to linear relativistic quantum field theories but not directly to selfinteracting quantum fields. The concept of local temperature resulting from LEC is compared to an old approach to local temperature based on the principle of maximal entropy. It is shown that the principle of maximal entropy does not always lead to physical states if it is applied to relativistic quantum field theories. (orig.)

  14. A Strategic-Equilibrium Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel J. Turbay

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The strategic equilibrium of an N-person cooperative game with transferable utility is a system composed of a cover collection of subsets of N and a set of extended imputations attainable through such equilibrium cover. The system describes a state of coalitional bargaining stability where every player has a bargaining alternative against any other player to support his corresponding equilibrium claim. Any coalition in the sable system may form and divide the characteristic value function of the coalition as prescribed by the equilibrium payoffs. If syndicates are allowed to form, a formed coalition may become a syndicate using the equilibrium payoffs as disagreement values in bargaining for a part of the complementary coalition incremental value to the grand coalition when formed. The emergent well known-constant sum derived game in partition function is described in terms of parameters that result from incumbent binding agreements. The strategic-equilibrium corresponding to the derived game gives an equal value claim to all players.  This surprising result is alternatively explained in terms of strategic-equilibrium based possible outcomes by a sequence of bargaining stages that when the binding agreements are in the right sequential order, von Neumann and Morgenstern (vN-M non-discriminatory solutions emerge. In these solutions a preferred branch by a sufficient number of players is identified: the weaker players syndicate against the stronger player. This condition is referred to as the stronger player paradox.  A strategic alternative available to the stronger players to overcome the anticipated not desirable results is to voluntarily lower his bargaining equilibrium claim. In doing the original strategic equilibrium is modified and vN-M discriminatory solutions may occur, but also a different stronger player may emerge that has eventually will have to lower his equilibrium claim. A sequence of such measures converges to the equal

  15. Thermodynamic evolution far from equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khantuleva, Tatiana A.

    2018-05-01

    The presented model of thermodynamic evolution of an open system far from equilibrium is based on the modern results of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, the nonlocal theory of nonequilibrium transport developed by the author and the Speed Gradient principle introduced in the theory of adaptive control. Transition to a description of the system internal structure evolution at the mesoscopic level allows a new insight at the stability problem of non-equilibrium processes. The new model is used in a number of specific tasks.

  16. Determination of alpha radionuclides in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, L.; Matel, L.; Rosskopfova, O.

    2001-01-01

    In atmospheric water, external water and undercurrent the occurrence of radionuclides is usual. It is an important factor of quality of the environment. Plants ingest radionuclides from water and with they everyone. And it arises radioactivity infest food-chain. Radiotoxicity of this radionuclides is very deer sometimes. The sensitive radiochemical procedures for their determination are necessarily important. The poster presents the combined procedure used at our laboratory for determination of alpha radionuclides in biological samples. (authors)

  17. Assessment of left ventricular function: comparison between radionuclide angiography and semiquantitative two-dimensional echocardiographic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottsauner-Wolf, M.; Schedlmayer-Duit, J.; Porenta, G.; Gwechenberger, M.; Huber, K.; Glogar, D.; Probst, P.; Sochor, H.

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of global left ventricular function is important in the follow-up of cardiac patients and is a good prognostic indicator in acute cardiac situations. We compared quantitative measurements of global left ventricular function made with radionuclide angiography (RNA) and contrast cardiac ventriculography (CVG) to visual semiquantitative estimates from two-dimensional echocardiographic images (2D-echo). Three hundred and thirty-nine consecutive patients who underwent RNA were assessed with 2D-echo within 3 months. In addition, 92 of these patients also underwent CVG (correlation of ejection fraction between CVG and RNA: r=0.82; P<0.0001). The RNA mean ejection fractions in the four 2D-echo groups (0=normal, 1=slightly, 2=moderate, or 3=severe reduced left ventricular function) differed markedly (P<0.0001); however, there was overlapping among the groups (2D-echo score/RNA ejection fraction: 0=57.3%±12.8%; 1=46.0%±12.9%; 2=29.6%± 12.2%; and 3=24.6%±11.5%) and the difference between 2D-echo scores 2 and 3 was not significant. 2D-echo showed a good concordance in RNA classes (0=≥505; 1=35%-49%; 2=21%-34%; and 3=≤20% ejection fraction) 0 (133/166; 80%) and 3 (18/30; 60%) but low concordance in classes 1 (27/82; 33%) and 2 (21/61; 34%). For accurate assessment of global left ventricular ejection fraction, visual semiquantitative judgement of a 2D echocardiographic image is limited in comparison to CVG or RNA, especially in patients with a slight or moderate reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central 40 Ca + 40 Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80≤t≤300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables

  19. Naturally occurring radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djujic, I.

    1995-01-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclides are the major source of radiation exposure to humans. The principal way of natural radiation exposure is the inhalation of 222 Rn decay products (about 85% of the total). The remainder is equally divided between internally deposited radionuclides, cosmic and terrestrial sources. In the present study, the content of 40 K, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 230 Th, 232 Th and 238 U in representative food samples (milk, pork, beef, potatoes, wheat and corn flour) and samples of different food items that do not represent entire national production but provide interesting additional data for approximative calculation of naturally occurring radionuclide intake is presented. Daily weight of food eaten, participation of food groups, as well as daily intake by food of mentioned naturally occurring radionuclides in the Serbian diet was obtained on the base of house hold budget surveys. The result obtained for daily intake estimates in mBq for Serbian population are 78.1 ( 40 K), 38.2( 210 Pb), 52.3( 226 Ra), 2.0( 230 Th) and 12.5( 238 U). (author)

  20. 100 Years of radionuclide metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, S.M.; Arnold, D.; Chauvenet, B.; Collé, R.; De Felice, P.; García-Toraño, E.; Wätjen, U.

    2014-01-01

    The discipline of radionuclide metrology at national standards institutes started in 1913 with the certification by Curie, Rutherford and Meyer of the first primary standards of radium. In early years, radium was a valuable commodity and the aim of the standards was largely to facilitate trade. The focus later changed to providing standards for the new wide range of radionuclides, so that radioactivity could be used for healthcare and industrial applications while minimising the risk to patients, workers and the environment. National measurement institutes responded to the changing demands by developing new techniques for realising primary standards of radioactivity. Looking ahead, there are likely to be demands for standards for new radionuclides used in nuclear medicine, an expansion of the scope of the field into quantitative imaging to facilitate accurate patient dosimetry for nuclear medicine, and an increasing need for accurate standards for radioactive waste management and nuclear forensics. - Highlights: • The driving forces for the development of radionuclide metrology. • Radium standards to facilitate trade of this valuable commodity in the early years. • After 1950, focus changes to healthcare and industrial applications. • National Measurement Institutes develop new techniques, standards, and disseminate the best practice in measurement. • Challenges in nuclear medicine, radioactive waste management and nuclear forensics

  1. Chemistry and analysis of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Lehto, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    Written by chemists for chemists, this is a comprehensive guide to the important radionuclides as well as techniques for their separation and analysis. It introduces readers to the important laboratory techniques and methodologies in the field, providing practical instructions on how to handle nuclear waste and radioactivity in the environment.

  2. Radionuclide migration studies in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marumo, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    In this work a brief description about retention and migration parameters of radionuclides in soil, including main methods to determine the distribution coefficient (K) are given. Some of several factors that can act on the migration are also mentioned. (author) [pt

  3. Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Perkins, R.W.; Rieck, H.G.; Wogman, N.A.

    1984-09-12

    A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container by analysis of the waste's gamma-ray spectrum and neutron emissions. Some radionuclides are measured by characteristic photopeaks in the gamma-ray spectrum; transuranic nuclides are measured by neutron emission rate; other radionuclides are measured by correlation with those already measured.

  4. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  5. Status report on radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    At the suggestion of the Federal Minstry of the Interior, in June 1978, a group of scientists from several institutions who are active in the field of radionuclide transfer or are interested in these problems got together. During the discussions of the work team, especially the transfer soil/plants was emphasized. Then the work team set up a status report on the transfer of the radionuclides relevant in the sense of the radiation protection act. The nuclides H 3 and C14, the isotopes of the Sr, J, and Cs, Tc99, the so-called corrosion nuclides Mn54, Fe59, co-isotopes and Zn65, and isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm were regarded as important for a possible radiation exposition. Recent investigations revealed that also the natural radionuclides Ra226, Po210, and Pb210 should be covered by the investigations. The goal of this status report is to present the level of knowledge on the transfer of these radionuclides to man in a brief form, giving hints at the most important literature. It was requested by the Federal Ministry of the Interior, as fas as possible, to indicate transfer factors which are necessary for the radio-occology act to be decreed according to Para. 45 of the radiation protection act. Another goal of the report was to show the gap in the knowledge on the radio nuclide transfer. This was thought to help to create a basis for the decisions of the Federal Ministry concerning the support of other investigation projects in the field of transfer of radionuclides. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Modelling interaction of deep groundwaters with bentonite and radionuclide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, H.

    1986-04-01

    In the safety analysis recently reported for a potential Swiss high-level waste repository, radionuclide speciation and solubility limits are calculated for expected granitic groundwater conditions. This report describes a thermodynamic model which is used to estimate the chemical composition of the pore water in compacted sodium bentonite. The model is based on available experimental data and describes the basic reactions between bentonite and groundwater by an ion-exchange model for sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. The model assumes equilibrium with calcite as long as sufficient carbonates remain in the bentonite, as well as quartz saturation. The long-term situation is modelled by the assumption that the near-field of a deep repository behaves like a mixing tank. It is found that sodium bentonite will slowly be converted to calcium bentonite. The modelled composition of the pore water of compacted sodium bentonite is used to estimate radionuclide solubilities in the near-field of a deep repository. The elements considered are: uranium, neptunium, plutonium, thorium, americium, and technetium. The redox potential in the near-field is assumed to be controlled by the corrosion products of the iron canister. Except for uranium and neptunium, radionuclide solubilities turn out to be lower under the modelled near-field conditions than in the groundwater of the surrounding granitic host rock. Uranium and neptunium solubility might be higher by orders of magnitude in the near-field than in the far-field. From the chemical point of view, calcium bentonite seems to be more stable than sodium bentonite in the presence of Swiss Reference Groundwater. The use of calcium bentonite instead of sodium bentonite will improve the reliability in the prediction of source terms for radionuclide transport in the geosphere. (author)

  7. The role equilibrium leach testing in understanding the behaviour of nuclear wastes under disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Rees, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Results from the equilibrium leach testing of a range of intermediate level nuclear wastes have been modelled successfully using sorption and solubility data obtained in experiments with individual radionuclides. The wastes involved included fuel cladding (after removal of irradiated fuel for reprocessing), combustible plutonium-contaminated materials and ferric/aluminium hydroxide flocs. The test has an important role in validating nearfield models, and helps to build confidence in disposal assessments. (orig.)

  8. The role of equilibrium leach testing in understanding the behaviour of nuclear wastes under disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Rees, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Results from the equilibrium leach testing of a range of intermediate level nuclear wastes have been modelled using sorption and solubility data obtained in experiments with individual radionuclides. The wastes involved were AGR hulls, Magnox cladding wastes, combustible plutonium-contaminated materials and ferric/aluminium hydroxide flocs. The test has an important role in validating near-field models, and helps to build confidence in disposal assessments. (author)

  9. Determination of γ-rays emitting radionuclides in surface water: application of a quantitative biosensing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolterbeek, H. Th.; Van der Meer, A. J. G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A quantitative biosensing method has been developed for the determination of γ-rays emitting radionuclides in surface water. The method is based on the concept that at equilibrium the specific radioactivity in the biosensor is equal to the specific radioactivity in water. The method consists of the measurement of both the radionuclide and the related stable isotope (element) in the biosensor and the determination of the element in water. This three-way analysis eliminates problems such as unpredictable biosensor behaviour, effects of water elemental composition or further abiotic parameters on accumulation levels: what remains is the generally high enrichment (bioaccumulation factor BCF) of elements and radionuclides in the biosensor material. Using water plants, the method is shown to be three to five orders of magnitude more sensitive than the direct analysis of water. (author)

  10. Determination of {gamma}-rays emitting radionuclides in surface water: application of a quantitative biosensing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolterbeek, H Th; Van der Meer, A. J. G. M. [Delft University of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    A quantitative biosensing method has been developed for the determination of {gamma}-rays emitting radionuclides in surface water. The method is based on the concept that at equilibrium the specific radioactivity in the biosensor is equal to the specific radioactivity in water. The method consists of the measurement of both the radionuclide and the related stable isotope (element) in the biosensor and the determination of the element in water. This three-way analysis eliminates problems such as unpredictable biosensor behaviour, effects of water elemental composition or further abiotic parameters on accumulation levels: what remains is the generally high enrichment (bioaccumulation factor BCF) of elements and radionuclides in the biosensor material. Using water plants, the method is shown to be three to five orders of magnitude more sensitive than the direct analysis of water. (author)

  11. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of host rocks, secondary minerals, and fluids would affect the transport of radionuclides from a previously proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Minerals in the Yucca Mountain tuffs that are important for retarding radionuclides include clinoptilolite and mordenite (zeolites), clay minerals, and iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides. Water compositions along flow paths beneath Yucca Mountain are controlled by dissolution reactions, silica and calcite precipitation, and ion-exchange reactions. Radionuclide concentrations along flow paths from a repository could be limited by (1) low waste-form dissolution rates, (2) low radionuclide solubility, and (3) radionuclide sorption onto geological media.

  12. Local Equilibrium and Retardation Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott K; Vesselinov, Velimir V

    2018-01-01

    In modeling solute transport with mobile-immobile mass transfer (MIMT), it is common to use an advection-dispersion equation (ADE) with a retardation factor, or retarded ADE. This is commonly referred to as making the local equilibrium assumption (LEA). Assuming local equilibrium, Eulerian textbook treatments derive the retarded ADE, ostensibly exactly. However, other authors have presented rigorous mathematical derivations of the dispersive effect of MIMT, applicable even in the case of arbitrarily fast mass transfer. We resolve the apparent contradiction between these seemingly exact derivations by adopting a Lagrangian point of view. We show that local equilibrium constrains the expected time immobile, whereas the retarded ADE actually embeds a stronger, nonphysical, constraint: that all particles spend the same amount of every time increment immobile. Eulerian derivations of the retarded ADE thus silently commit the gambler's fallacy, leading them to ignore dispersion due to mass transfer that is correctly modeled by other approaches. We then present a particle tracking simulation illustrating how poor an approximation the retarded ADE may be, even when mobile and immobile plumes are continually near local equilibrium. We note that classic "LEA" (actually, retarded ADE validity) criteria test for insignificance of MIMT-driven dispersion relative to hydrodynamic dispersion, rather than for local equilibrium. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Radionuclide transfer from mother to embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toader, M.; Vasilache, R.A.; Scridon, R.; Toader, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The transfer of radionuclides from mother to embryo is still a matter of high interest. Therefore, the relation was investigated between the amount of radionuclides in the embryo and the dietary intake of the mother, this for two scenarios: a recurrent intake of variable amounts of radionuclides, and a long-term intake of a relatively constant amount of radionuclides, the radionuclide being 137 Cs. In the first case, the amount of radionuclides present in the embryo increases with the age of the embryo and with the intake of the mother. In the second case, no correlation could be found between the age of the embryo and its radioactive content; only the correlation between the intake of the mother and the radionuclide content of the embryo remained. (A.K.)

  14. Dependency of soil activity concentration on soil -biota concentration ratio of radionuclides for earthworm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keum, Dong Kwon; Kim, Byeong Ho; Jun, In; Lim, Kwang Muk; Choi, Yong Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The transfer of radionuclides to wildlife (non-human biota) is normally quantified using an equilibrium concentration ratio (CR{sub eq}), defined as the radionuclide activity concentration in the whole organism (fresh weight) divided by that in the media (dry weight for soil). The present study describes the effect of soil radionuclide activity concentration on the transfer of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 65}Zn to a functionally important wildlife group, annelids, using a commonly studied experimental worm (E.andrei). Time-dependent whole body concentration ratios of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 65}Zn for the earthworm were experimentally measured for artificially contaminated soils with three different activity concentrations for each radionuclide which were considerably higher than normal background levels. Two parameters of a first order kinetic model, the equilibrium concentration ratio (CR{sub eq}) and the effective loss rate constant (k), were estimated by comparison of experimental CR results with the model prediction

  15. The role of high temperature heterogeneous reaction kinetics in the rate of radionuclide vaporisation during core-concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, D.P.; Clough, P.N.

    1989-09-01

    Heterogeneous reactions may cause enhanced release of radionuclides during the core-concrete interaction (CCl) stage of a PWR severe accident. The VANESA computer code models these CCI releases using chemical equilibrium assumptions; however, the possibility that chemical kinetics could prevent equilibrium from being achieved is considered in this report. Direct experimental evidence is lacking on these reactions. Therefore, some analogues studies are reviewed, including examples of Eyring's surface reaction rate theory; sequential vaporisation-oxidation processes; iron and steelmaking chemistry; radionuclide evaporation from solid UO 2 . This circumstantial evidence appeared to agree with the current assumptions, in VANESA and some UK modelling studies, that mass transfer, rather than chemical kinetics will limit the rate at which equilibrium is attained. (author)

  16. Facts and features of radionuclide migration in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Regge, P.; Henrion, P.; Monsecour, M.; Put, M.

    1988-01-01

    The evolution which took place during ten years of research on the behaviour of radionuclides in Boom Clay is described. Initially, the Boom Clay was regarded as a chemically inert exchanger and the radiochemical research aimed at determining the distribution of cations between the clay and some liquid phases. The observation that Boom Clay deteriorates in contact with air and loses important intrinsic properties formed a major breakthrough in the research and led to a careful examination of the real in-situ conditions. Efforts devoted to the understanding of the chemical factors pertaining to the pH, the redox potential, the extent of the buffering capacity of FeS 2 and CaCO 3 in equilibrium with the interstitial aqueous phase are reviewed. Also emerging from the overall picture was the role of the organic material present in the Boom Clay. In contrast to the water percolating fractured formations which may not be in equilibrium with the rock, the interstitial aqueous phase is completely in equilibrium with Boom Clay mainly because of its low permeability and the large excesses of buffering components. As the retention mechanisms are better understood, a more coherent picture is obtained from distribution and diffusion experiments and the effects of consolidation are being investigated in detail. 23 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. The post-ischemic ventricular dysfunction in PRINZMETAL's variant angina: Radionuclide evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picozzi, R.; Palagi, B.; Baroffio, R.

    1987-01-01

    We studied by equilibrium radionuclide angiography 15 patients admitted to our coronary care unit because of PRINZMETAL's variant angina. Patients were examined mostly in the absence of symptoms. The incidence of ejection fraction abnormalities was low, while regional wall motion was always impaired at the site corresponding to ST-segment elevation at the time of the anginal attack. In 7 patients who underwent coronary angiography, we found an almost complete agreement between the site of atherosclerotic lesions and that of regional wall motion abnormalities. The patients were re-studied during intravenous perfusion of nitroglycerin: A detectable improvement of regional wall motion was found in 8 of them. We concluded that equilibrium radionuclide angiography appears to be a suitable tool for identifying reliably, in patients affected with PRINZMETAL's variant angina, the regional ventricular dysfunction remaining after the remission of symptoms in the presence of normalized ECG or signs of non-transmural ischemia. Equilibrium radionuclide angiography performed during nitroglycerin perfusion allowed us to evaluate in advance the importance of the vasospastic component and hence the efficacy of pharmacologic treatment. (orig.) [de

  18. Equilibrium Arrival Times to Queues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Jesper; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    We consider a non-cooperative queueing environment where a finite number of customers independently choose when to arrive at a queueing system that opens at a given point in time and serves customers on a last-come first-serve preemptive-resume (LCFS-PR) basis. Each customer has a service time...... requirement which is identically and independently distributed according to some general probability distribution, and they want to complete service as early as possible while minimizing the time spent in the queue. In this setting, we establish the existence of an arrival time strategy that constitutes...... a symmetric (mixed) Nash equilibrium, and show that there is at most one symmetric equilibrium. We provide a numerical method to compute this equilibrium and demonstrate by a numerical example that the social effciency can be lower than the effciency induced by a similar queueing system that serves customers...

  19. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-03-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal

  20. Choice of radionuclides for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeNardo, S.J.; Jungerman, J.A.; DeNardo, G.L.; Lagunas-Solar, M.C.; Cole, W.C.; Meares, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    Innumerable questions need to be answered and obstacles overcome before radioimmunotherapy can be generally successful in cancer patients. Major developments have greatly enhanced the likelihood of success. The important development of appropriate radionuclides and radiochemistry for this therapy must be intimately linked with the biological and biochemical realities. All aspects must be considered, such as the specific nature of the antigenic target, the pharmacokinetics of the antibody fragment carrier, the capability of in vivo quantitation of tumor uptake and turnover time, as well as total body kinetics. With this knowledge, then, practical radiochemistry methods can be integrated with the suitable radionuclide choices, and production methods can be developed which will deliver effective and dependable products for patient therapy

  1. Radionuclide transfer in terrestrial animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiGregorio, D.; Kitchings, T.; Van Voris, P.

    1978-01-01

    The analysis of dispersion of radionuclides in terrestrial food chains, generally, is a series of equations identifying the fractional input and outflow rates from trophic level to trophic level. Data that are prerequisite inputs for these food chain transport models include: (1) identification of specific transport pathway, (2) assimilation at each pathway link, and (3) the turnover rate or retention function by successive receptor species in the appropriate food chain. In this report, assimilation coefficients, biological half-lives, and excretion rates for a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate species and radionuclides have been compiled from an extensive search of the available literature. Using the information accumulated from the literature, correlations of nuclide metabolism and body weight are also discussed. (author)

  2. Applications of radionuclides in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1955-01-01

    After a brief recall of a few concepts (mass number, charge and beams properties) and the description of used detectors (ionization chamber, Geiger-Mueller counter, scintillation counters), some radionuclides applications are described. In a first part, the well-developed applications are presented in three distinct groups: continuous applications such as β and γ gauges (determination hydrogen content of an hydrocarbon and content of an emulsion; discharge of static electricity), discontinuous applications such as radiography and autoradiography, wear or manufacture problems (distribution of a fungicide on tobacco) and finally, applications in research laboratories such as diffusion, exchange and solubility. It also describes the applications which are still in development such as the action of beams on matter (reticulation and degradation of polymers, monomers polymerisation, cold sterilization). In conclusion, few advices on the opportunity of such applications and the choice of the radionuclides are given. (M.P.)

  3. Radionuclide imaging of musculoskeletal infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palestr, Christopher J.; North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY; Love, Charito

    2007-01-01

    Radionuclide imaging studies are routinely used to evaluate patients suspected of having musculoskeletal infection. Three-phase bone imaging is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and very accurate in the setting of otherwise normal bone. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be used in cases of 'complicating osteomyelitis' such as prosthetic joint infection. This test also is useful in clinically unsuspected diabetic pedal osteomyelitis as well as in the neuropathic joint. It is often necessary, however, to perform complementary bone marrow imaging, to maximize the accuracy of labeled leukocyte imaging. In contrast to other regions in the skeleton, labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. At the moment, gallium is the preferred radionuclide procedure for this condition and is a useful adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET likely will play an important role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infection, especially spinal osteomyelitis, and may replace gallium imaging for this purpose. (author)

  4. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-03-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal.

  5. Radionuclide imaging of musculoskeletal infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palestr, Christopher J. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; E-mail: palestro@lij.edu; Love, Charito [North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2007-09-15

    Radionuclide imaging studies are routinely used to evaluate patients suspected of having musculoskeletal infection. Three-phase bone imaging is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and very accurate in the setting of otherwise normal bone. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be used in cases of 'complicating osteomyelitis' such as prosthetic joint infection. This test also is useful in clinically unsuspected diabetic pedal osteomyelitis as well as in the neuropathic joint. It is often necessary, however, to perform complementary bone marrow imaging, to maximize the accuracy of labeled leukocyte imaging. In contrast to other regions in the skeleton, labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. At the moment, gallium is the preferred radionuclide procedure for this condition and is a useful adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET likely will play an important role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infection, especially spinal osteomyelitis, and may replace gallium imaging for this purpose. (author)

  6. Terrestrial pathways of radionuclide particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, F.W.; Ng, Y.C.

    1981-01-01

    Formulations are developed for computing potential human intake of 13 radionuclides via the terrestrial food chains. The formulations are an extension of the NRC methodology. Specific regional crop and livestock transfer and fractional distribution data from the southern part of the U.S.A. are provided and used in the computation of comparative values with those computed by means of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 formulations. In the development of the model, emphasis was also placed on identifying the various time-delay compartments of the food chains and accounting for all of the activity initially deposited. For all radionuclides considered, except 137 Cs, the new formulations predict lower potential intakes from the total of all food chains combined than do the comparable Regulatory Guide formulations by as much as a factor of 40. For 137 Cs the new formulations predict 10% higher potential intakes. (author)

  7. Radionuclide cinematography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.E.; Sigel, H.; Geffers, H.; Bitter, F.; Meyer, G.; Kampmann, H.; Stauch, M.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclide cinematography is described as a procedure making use of radiation-level variations above the heart after equipartitioning of sup(99m)Tc-labelled human serum albumin in the blood pool. Regional ventricular and vestibular variations are phase-shifted. This procedure permits delineation of aneurysmas with interphasic course, cicatrization of the cardiac wall not producing any cyclical variation. The study included normal subjects and 16 patients with full course infarction. Characteristic disturbances of motility distribution were found in all cases of scarred or aneurysmic alterations in the frontal and side walls of the left ventricle. The procedure was unable to detect two small infarction scars on the rear wall. The possibility of using radionuclide cinematography to prove coronary insufficiency as well as a comparison with other methods are discussed

  8. Spontaneity and Equilibrium: Why "?G Equilibrium" Are Incorrect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental criteria for chemical reactions to be spontaneous in a given direction are generally incorrectly stated as ?G chemistry textbooks and even in some more advanced texts. Similarly, the criteria for equilibrium are also misstated as being ?G = 0 or ?A = 0. Following a brief review of the…

  9. Equilibrium problems for Raney densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Peter J.; Liu, Dang-Zheng; Zinn-Justin, Paul

    2015-07-01

    The Raney numbers are a class of combinatorial numbers generalising the Fuss-Catalan numbers. They are indexed by a pair of positive real numbers (p, r) with p > 1 and 0 0 and similarly use both methods to identify the equilibrium problem for (p, r) = (θ/q + 1, 1/q), θ > 0 and q \\in Z+ . The Wiener-Hopf method is used to extend the latter to parameters (p, r) = (θ/q + 1, m + 1/q) for m a non-negative integer, and also to identify the equilibrium problem for a family of densities with moments given by certain binomial coefficients.

  10. Equilibrium in a Production Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarolla, Maria B., E-mail: maria.chiarolla@uniroma1.it [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Metodi e Modelli per l' Economia, il Territorio e la Finanza, Facolta di Economia (Italy); Haussmann, Ulrich G., E-mail: uhaus@math.ubc.ca [University of British Columbia, Department of Mathematics (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Consider a closed production-consumption economy with multiple agents and multiple resources. The resources are used to produce the consumption good. The agents derive utility from holding resources as well as consuming the good produced. They aim to maximize their utility while the manager of the production facility aims to maximize profits. With the aid of a representative agent (who has a multivariable utility function) it is shown that an Arrow-Debreu equilibrium exists. In so doing we establish technical results that will be used to solve the stochastic dynamic problem (a case with infinite dimensional commodity space so the General Equilibrium Theory does not apply) elsewhere.

  11. Incentives in Supply Function Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vetter, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The author analyses delegation in homogenous duopoly under the assumption that the firm-managers compete in supply functions. In supply function equilibrium, managers’ decisions are strategic complements. This reverses earlier findings in that the author finds that owners give managers incentives...... to act in an accommodating way. As a result, optimal delegation reduces per-firm output and increases profits to above-Cournot profits. Moreover, in supply function equilibrium the mode of competition is endogenous. This means that the author avoids results that are sensitive with respect to assuming...

  12. Equilibrium in a Production Economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarolla, Maria B.; Haussmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-01-01

    Consider a closed production-consumption economy with multiple agents and multiple resources. The resources are used to produce the consumption good. The agents derive utility from holding resources as well as consuming the good produced. They aim to maximize their utility while the manager of the production facility aims to maximize profits. With the aid of a representative agent (who has a multivariable utility function) it is shown that an Arrow-Debreu equilibrium exists. In so doing we establish technical results that will be used to solve the stochastic dynamic problem (a case with infinite dimensional commodity space so the General Equilibrium Theory does not apply) elsewhere.

  13. The Equilibrium Rule--A Personal Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Examples of equilibrium are evident everywhere and the equilibrium rule provides a reasoned way to view all things, whether in static (balancing rocks, steel beams in building construction) or dynamic (airplanes, bowling balls) equilibrium. Interestingly, the equilibrium rule applies not just to objects at rest but whenever any object or system of…

  14. Non equilibrium atomic processes and plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takako

    2003-01-01

    Along with the technical progress in plasma spectroscopy, non equilibrium ionization processes have been recently observed. We study non local thermodynamic equilibrium and non ionization equilibrium for various kinds of plasmas. Specifically we discuss non equilibrium atomic processes in magnetically confined plasmas, solar flares and laser produced plasmas using a collisional radiative model based on plasma spectroscopic data. (author)

  15. Radionuclide 252Cf neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolevatov, Yu.I.; Trykov, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of radionuclide neutron sourses of 252 Cf base with the activity from 10 6 to 10 9 n/s have been investigated. Energetic distributions of neutrons and gamma-radiation have been presented. The results obtained have been compared with other data available. The hardness parameter of the neutron spectrum for the energy range from 3 to 15 MeV is 1.4 +- 0.02 MeV

  16. Radionuclide diagnosis of Meckel's diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, J.J.; Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL

    1980-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum can be detected with a high degree of accuracy by radionuclide scintigraphy using technetium-99m pertechnetate. The technique is without risk and should precede roentgenographic studies when the diagnosis is suspected. The method is described and the causes for false positive and false negative examinations are discussed. False negatives are rare and false positives are usually secondary to other surgical entities. Overall accuracy is 85 to 90%. (orig.) [de

  17. Radionuclides for therapy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, H.; Noelpp, U.; Triller, K.J.; Steffen, R.

    1986-01-01

    Progress in angiographic techniques has been a gradual evolutionary development which now permits the selective and superselective access to a tumor's vascular bed. A diagnostic angiographic procedure can be supplemented by a one-step, quick application of embolizing radioactive material. This endoarterial radionuclide embolizing tumor therapy has the maximum selectivity among radiotherapeutic methods, with the highest radiation doses to the tumor and neglectible exposure of normal tissue. Spread of radioactivity by diffusion or leaching can be prevented

  18. Radionuclide dispersion in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Amorim, E.S. do; Panetta, J.

    1979-05-01

    The instantaneous liberation of radionuclides in the atmosphere is studied in three dimensions, according to the formalism of the diffusion theory. The analytical solution, expose to gravitational and an atmospherical effects, is combined with the discretization of space and time in the calculation of levels of exposure. A typical inventory (for a PWR) was considered in the calculation of immersion doses, and the results permitted a comparative analysis among the different existing models. (Author) [pt

  19. Radiation protection in radionuclide investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; radiation and radioactivity; alpha particles; beta particles; neutrons; electromagnetic radiation; units of radioactivity and radiation; biological effects of radiation; the philosophy of radiation protection (ALARA principle); practical aspects of radiation protection; work with unsealed radiation sources; radionuclide studies in experimental animals; radiation safety during clinical investigations; legislative control of radiation work; radioactive waste disposal; emergency procedures; conclusion. (U.K.)

  20. Radionuclide evaluation of renal transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hong; Zhao Deshan

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide renal imaging and plasma clearance methods can quickly quantitate renal blood flow and function in renal transplants. They can diagnose acute tubular necrosis and rejection, renal scar, surgical complications such as urine leaks, obstruction and renal artery stenosis after renal transplants. At the same time they can assess the therapy effect of renal transplant complications and can also predict renal transplant survival from early post-operative function studies

  1. Radionuclide behavior in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the following task: Review for quality and consistency the available data on measurements of initial ground contamination of Chernobyl radionuclides in various parts of Norway and subsequent concentrations of these radionuclides in various environmental media as functions of time. Utilize the data obtained to verify the existing models, or to improve them, for describing radionuclide behavior in the environment. Some of the processes standard were: migration into soil; weathering; resuspension; food-chain contamination; and loss or reconcentration by run-off. The task performed within this contract has been to use post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in MACCS. Work has consisted mainly of collecting and evaluating post-Chernobyl information from Norway or other countries when relevant; but has also included experimental work performed specifically for the current task. In most connections the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is faulty or inadequate are, however, pointed out in the report. These should be examined carefully, and appropriate modifications should eventually be made. 14 refs., 12 figs., 22 tabs

  2. Radionuclide daughter inventory generator code: DIG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.E.; Sharp, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    The Daughter Inventory Generator (DIG) code accepts a tabulation of radionuclide initially present in a waste stream, specified as amounts present either by mass or by activity, and produces a tabulation of radionuclides present after a user-specified elapsed time. This resultant radionuclide inventory characterizes wastes that have undergone daughter ingrowth during subsequent processes, such as leaching and transport, and includes daughter radionuclides that should be considered in these subsequent processes or for inclusion in a pollutant source term. Output of the DIG code also summarizes radionuclide decay constants. The DIG code was developed specifically to assist the user of the PRESTO-II methodology and code in preparing data sets and accounting for possible daughter ingrowth in wastes buried in shallow-land disposal areas. The DIG code is also useful in preparing data sets for the PRESTO-EPA code. Daughter ingrowth in buried radionuclides and in radionuclides that have been leached from the wastes and are undergoing hydrologic transport are considered, and the quantities of daughter radionuclide are calculated. Radionuclide decay constants generated by DIG and included in the DIG output are required in the PRESTO-II code input data set. The DIG accesses some subroutines written for use with the CRRIS system and accesses files containing radionuclide data compiled by D.C. Kocher. 11 refs

  3. Radionuclide migration test using undisturbed aerated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Ohtsuka, Yoshiro; Ogawa, Hiromichi; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1988-01-01

    As one of the most important part of safety assessment on the shallow land disposal of lowlevel radioactive waste, the radionuclide migration was studied using undisturbed soil samples, in order to evaluate an exact radionuclide migration in an aerated soil layer. Soil samples used in the migration test were coastal sand and loamy soil which form typical surface soil layers in Japan. The aqueous solution containing 60 CoCl 2 , 85 SrCl 2 and 137 CsCl was fed into the soil column and concentration of each radionuclide both in effluent and in soil was measured. Large amount of radionuclides was adsorbed on the surface of soil column and small amount of radionuclides moved deep into the soil column. Difference in the radionuclide profile was observed in the low concentration portion particularly. It is that some fractions of 60 Co and 137 Cs are stable in non-ionic form and move downward through the soil column together with water. The radionuclide distribution in the surface of soil column can be fairly predicted with a conventional migration equation for ionic radionuclides. As a result of radionuclide adsorption, both aerated soil layers of coastal sand and loamy soil have large barrier ability on the radionuclide migration through the ground. (author)

  4. Metabolism of radionuclides in domestic animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, E.; Leising, C.

    1986-01-01

    The reactor accident at Chernobyl has shown that shortly after the contamination of the environment radionuclides can be found in animal products. The main contamination pathways of domestic animas are: uptake of radionuclides by foodstuffs; uptake of radionuclides by contaminated drinking water; uptake of radionuclides by inhalation; uptake of radionuclides through skin; uptake of radionuclides by ingestion of soil particles. Generally the uptake of radionuclides by food is the dominant exposure pathway. In rare cases the inhalation of radionuclides or the uptake by drinking water may be of importance. The metabolism of incorporated radionuclides is comparable to the respective metabolism of essential mass or trace elements or heavy metals. Radioisotopes of essential elements are for instance iron 55, manganese 54, cobalt 58 and cobalt 60. Other elements are typical antagonists to essential elements, e.g. strontium 90 is an antagonist to calcium or cesium 137 to potassium. Lead 210 and plutonium 239 behave similarly as heavy metals. Generally the knowledge of the metabolism of trace and mass elements, of antagonistic and synergistic elements and heavy metals can be applied to these radionuclides

  5. Deviations from thermal equilibrium in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burm, K.T.A.L.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma system in local thermal equilibrium can usually be described with only two parameters. To describe deviations from equilibrium two extra parameters are needed. However, it will be shown that deviations from temperature equilibrium and deviations from Saha equilibrium depend on one another. As a result, non-equilibrium plasmas can be described with three parameters. This reduction in parameter space will ease the plasma describing effort enormously

  6. Non-equilibrium fluctuation-induced interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, David S

    2012-01-01

    We discuss non-equilibrium aspects of fluctuation-induced interactions. While the equilibrium behavior of such interactions has been extensively studied and is relatively well understood, the study of these interactions out of equilibrium is relatively new. We discuss recent results on the non-equilibrium behavior of systems whose dynamics is of the dissipative stochastic type and identify a number of outstanding problems concerning non-equilibrium fluctuation-induced interactions.

  7. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  8. Thermodynamic theory of equilibrium fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The postulational basis of classical thermodynamics has been expanded to incorporate equilibrium fluctuations. The main additional elements of the proposed thermodynamic theory are the concept of quasi-equilibrium states, a definition of non-equilibrium entropy, a fundamental equation of state in the entropy representation, and a fluctuation postulate describing the probability distribution of macroscopic parameters of an isolated system. Although these elements introduce a statistical component that does not exist in classical thermodynamics, the logical structure of the theory is different from that of statistical mechanics and represents an expanded version of thermodynamics. Based on this theory, we present a regular procedure for calculations of equilibrium fluctuations of extensive parameters, intensive parameters and densities in systems with any number of fluctuating parameters. The proposed fluctuation formalism is demonstrated by four applications: (1) derivation of the complete set of fluctuation relations for a simple fluid in three different ensembles; (2) fluctuations in finite-reservoir systems interpolating between the canonical and micro-canonical ensembles; (3) derivation of fluctuation relations for excess properties of grain boundaries in binary solid solutions, and (4) derivation of the grain boundary width distribution for pre-melted grain boundaries in alloys. The last two applications offer an efficient fluctuation-based approach to calculations of interface excess properties and extraction of the disjoining potential in pre-melted grain boundaries. Possible future extensions of the theory are outlined.

  9. Equilibrium theory : A salient approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, S.

    1999-01-01

    Whereas the neoclassical models in General Equilibrium Theory focus on the existence of separate commodities, this thesis regards 'bundles of trade' as the unit objects of exchange. Apart from commodities and commodity bundles in the neoclassical sense, the term `bundle of trade' includes, for

  10. Essays in general equilibrium theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konovalov, A.

    2001-01-01

    The thesis focuses on various issues of general equilibrium theory and can approximately be divided into three parts. The first part of the thesis studies generalized equilibria in the Arrow-Debreu model in the situation where the strong survival assumption is not satisfied. Chapter four deals with

  11. Financial equilibrium with career concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amil Dasgupta

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available What are the equilibrium features of a financial market where a sizeable proportion of traders face reputational concerns? This question is central to our understanding of financial markets, which are increasingly dominated by institutional investors. We construct a model of delegated portfolio management that captures key features of the US mutual fund industry and embed it in an asset pricing framework. We thus provide a formal model of financial equilibrium with career concerned agents. Fund managers differ in their ability to understand market fundamentals, and in every period investors choose a fund. In equilibrium, the presence of career concerns induces uninformed fund managers to churn, i.e., to engage in trading even when they face a negative expected return. Churners act as noise traders and enhance the level of trading volume. The equilibrium relationship between fund return and net fund flows displays a skewed shape that is consistent with stylized facts. The robustness of our core results is probed from several angles.

  12. Equilibrium with arbitrary market structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Birgit; Vind, Karl

    2005-01-01

    . The complete market predicted by this theory is clearly unrealistic, and Radner [10] formulated and proved existence of equilibrium in a multiperiod model with incomplete markets. In this paper the Radner result is extended. Radner assumed a specific structure of markets, independence of preferences...

  13. Nash equilibrium with lower probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes, Ebbe; Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen; Sloth, Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    We generalize the concept of Nash equilibrium in mixed strategies for strategic form games to allow for ambiguity in the players' expectations. In contrast to other contributions, we model ambiguity by means of so-called lower probability measures or belief functions, which makes it possible...

  14. MARFA user's manual: Migration analysis of radionuclides in the far field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, S.; Mancillas, J.

    2013-12-01

    The computer code Migration Analysis of Radionuclides in the Far Field (MARFA) uses a particle-based Monte Carlo method to simulate the transport of radionuclides in a sparsely fractured geological medium. The algorithm uses non-interacting particles to represent packets of radionuclide mass. These particles are moved through the system according to rules that mimic the underlying physical transport and retention processes. The physical processes represented in MARFA include advection, longitudinal dispersion, Fickian diffusion into an infinite or finite rock matrix, equilibrium sorption, decay, and in-growth. Because the algorithm uses non-interacting particles, the transport and retention processes are limited to those that depend linearly on radionuclide concentration. Multiple non-branching decay chains of arbitrary length are supported, as is full heterogeneity in the transport and retention properties. Two variants of the code are provided. These two versions differ in how particles are routed through the computational domain. In MARFA 3.2.3, transport is assumed to occur along a set of trajectories or pathways that originate at radionuclide source locations. The trajectories are intended to represent the movement of hypothetical, advectively transported groundwater tracers and are typically calculated by pathline tracing in a discrete fracture network flow code. The groundwater speed and retention properties along each pathway may change in time, but the pathway trajectories are fixed. MARFA 3.3.1 allows the transport effects of changing flow directions to be represented by abandoning the fixed pathways and performing node routing within MARFA. (orig.)

  15. Mathematical Basis and Test Cases for Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport Modeling in GDSA-PFLOTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-31

    This report provides documentation of the mathematical basis for a colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport modeling capability that can be incorporated into GDSA-PFLOTRAN. It also provides numerous test cases against which the modeling capability can be benchmarked once the model is implemented numerically in GDSA-PFLOTRAN. The test cases were run using a 1-D numerical model developed by the author, and the inputs and outputs from the 1-D model are provided in an electronic spreadsheet supplement to this report so that all cases can be reproduced in GDSA-PFLOTRAN, and the outputs can be directly compared with the 1-D model. The cases include examples of all potential scenarios in which colloid-facilitated transport could result in the accelerated transport of a radionuclide relative to its transport in the absence of colloids. Although it cannot be claimed that all the model features that are described in the mathematical basis were rigorously exercised in the test cases, the goal was to test the features that matter the most for colloid-facilitated transport; i.e., slow desorption of radionuclides from colloids, slow filtration of colloids, and equilibrium radionuclide partitioning to colloids that is strongly favored over partitioning to immobile surfaces, resulting in a substantial fraction of radionuclide mass being associated with mobile colloids.

  16. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Lane A.; Ryan, Jack L.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of .sup.223 Ra and .sup.225 Ac, from a radionuclide "cow" of .sup.227 Ac or .sup.229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide "cow" forming an ingrown mixture; b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the "cow" from at least one radionuclide daughter; d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the "cow". In one embodiment the radionuclide "cow" is the .sup.227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.227 Th and the product radionuclide is the .sup.223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the .sup.227 Ac and retains the .sup.227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide "cow"is the .sup.229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the .sup.225 Ac and the .sup.225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the .sup.229 Th and passes the .sup.225 Ra/Ac.

  17. An Exact Solution for the Assessment of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Radionuclides in the Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R. L.; Chen, J-S.

    2002-01-01

    In a report on model evaluation, the authors ran the HYDRUS Code, among other transport codes, to evaluate the impacts of nonequilibrium sorption sites on the time-evolution of 99Tc and 90Sr through the vadose zone. Since our evaluation was based on a rather low, annual recharge rate, many of the numerical results derived from HYDRUS indicated that the nonequilibrium sorption sites, in essence, acted as equilibrium sorption sites. To help explain these results, we considered a ''stripped-down'' version of the HYDRUS system. This ''stripped-down'' version possesses two dependent variables, one for the radionuclides in solution and the other for the radionuclides adsorbed to the nonequilibrium sites; and it possesses constant physical parameters. The resultant governing equation for the radionuclides in solution is a linear, advection-dispersion-reaction (i.e., radioactive decay) partial differential equation containing a history integral term accounting for the nonequilibrium sorption sites. It is this ''stripped-down'' version, which is the subject of this paper. We found an exact solution to this new version of the model. The exact solution is given in terms of a single definite integral of terms involving elementary functions of the independent variables and the system parameters. This integral possesses adequate convergence properties and is easy to evaluate, both in a quantitative matter and in a qualitative manner. The parameters that are considered in the system are as follows: the radionuclide's equilibrium partition coefficient between water and soil, the bulk density of the soil, the fractions of equilibrium/nonequilibrium sorption sites, the volumetric water content, the first order equilibrium adsorption rate constant, the first order radioactive decay rate constant, the liquid water soil tortuosity factor, the molecular diffusion coefficient in water, the longitudinal dispersivity factor, and the Darcian fluid flux density. In addition, the system

  18. Investigation of chemical equilibrium kinetics by the electromigration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozhikov, G.A.; Ivanov, P.I.; Maslov, O.D.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Bontchev, G.D.; Milanov, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of the chemical reaction rates for complex formation as well as hydrolysis type reactions by the method of horizontal zone electrophoresis is outlined. The correlation between chemical equilibrium kinetics and electrodiffusion processes in a constant d.c. electric field is described. In model electromigration experiments the reaction rate constant of the formation a complex by Hf(IV) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is determined. The electrophoretic mobility, diffusion coefficient and stability constant of the [HfDTPA] - complex are calculated, taking into account experimental electrophoretic data obtained at 298.15±0.05 K and constant ionic strength. No-carrier-added 175 Hf radionuclide was used in electromigration experiments at concentrations of 10 -10 -10 -11 M. (orig.)

  19. Phytoremediation of radionuclides: an emerging alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Shraddha

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation of nuclear power industry, nuclear weapon testing, dismantling of existing nuclear weapons and occasional accidents have contributed to an enhancement in the level of radionuclides in the environment. The radionuclides due to their long half life and transfer through the food chain effect adversely to normal biological systems. Hence, it is essential to effectively remove the radionuclides from contaminated soils and solutions. Phytoremediation - the use of plants for remediation of toxic metals and radionuclides has been recognized as an aesthetically pleasing, low cost and environment friendly in situ method. Phytoremediation is an umbrella term which covers several plant based approaches. Plants have shown the potential of remediation of these radionuclides from spiked solutions, low level nuclear waste and soil. Various aspects of phytoremediation as well as potential of various plants for remediation of radionuclides will be discussed here. (author)

  20. Radionuclide transport processes in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    Some major principles and the status of knowledge concerning the transport of radionuclides through terrestrial ecosystems are reviewed. Fundamental processes which control the flow of radionuclides between ecosystem components such as air, soil, plants, and animals are described, with emphasis on deposition, resuspension, plant uptake, ingestion, and assimilation. Properties of radionuclides, organisms, and ecosystems are examined in relation to their influence on the accumulation of radioactive materials by plants and animals. The effects of the physicochemical nature of the radionuclide; morphology, physiology, and behavior of the organism; and soil, nutrient, and trophic characteristics of the ecosystem are highlighted. Observations in natural ecosystems on radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 131 I, 3 H, and 239 Pu are used to illustrate current concepts. An assessment of the degree to which the processes controlling radionuclide behavior are understood and of our ability to simulate and predict such behavior with computerized models is offered. Finally, brief comments are made on research needs

  1. Radionuclides in the study of marine processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kershaw, P.J.; Woodhead, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    For many years, the radioactive properties of the naturally occurring radionuclides have been used to determine their distributions in the marine environment and, more generally, to gain an understanding of the dynamic processes which control their behaviour in attaining these distributions. More recently the inputs from human activities of both natural and artificial (i.e. man-made) radionuclides have provided additional opportunities for the study of marine processes on local, regional and global scales. The primary objective of the symposium is to provide a forum for an open discussion of the insights concerning processes in the marine environment which can be gained from studies of radionuclide behaviour. Papers have been grouped within the following principal themes; the uses of radionuclides as tracers of water transport; scavenging and particulate transport processes in the oceans as deduced from radionuclide behaviour; processes in the seabed and radionuclides in biological systems. (Author)

  2. Chemical speciation of radionuclides migrating in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.; Schilk, A.; Abel, K.; Lepel, E.; Thomas, C.; Pratt, S.; Cooper, E.; Hartwig, P.; Killey, R.

    1994-04-01

    In order to more accurately predict the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration from low-level waste disposal facilities via groundwater transport, ongoing studies are being conducted at field sites at Chalk River Laboratories to identify and characterize the chemical speciation of mobile, long-lived radionuclides migrating in groundwaters. Large-volume water sampling techniques are being utilized to separate and concentrate radionuclides into particular, cationic, anionic, and nonionic chemical forms. Most radionuclides are migrating as soluble, anionic species that appear to be predominantly organoradionuclide complexes. Laboratory studies utilizing anion exchange chromatography have separated several anionically complexed radionuclides, e.g., 60 Co and 106 Ru, into a number of specific compounds or groups of compounds. Further identification of the anionic organoradionuclide complexes is planned utilizing high resolution mass spectrometry. Large-volume ultra-filtration experiments are characterizing the particulate forms of radionuclides being transported in these groundwaters

  3. Production of radionuclides with generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khujaev, S.; Egamediev, S.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The radionuclide generator provides a convenient means for researchers and clinicians to obtain a source of radionuclides without dependence on nuclear facilities (nuclear reactor or cyclotron). It should be noted that radionuclide generator technique yields products of very high purity and it offers moreover the only possible way of obtaining very short-lived radionuclides for practical applications. Therefore at present radionuclide generators have found important uses in nuclear medicine. This talk reviews the development of preparation methods for radionuclide generators of current interest: 99 Mo- 99m Tc, 188 W- 188 Re and 68 Ge- 68 Ga. 99 Mo- 99m Tc generator. 99m Tc is presently the most widely used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The reason for such a preeminent position of 99m Tc in clinical uses is its extremely favorable nuclear properties with γ-energy of 140 keV and short half-life of 6 hours. Chromatographic generator of 99 Mo- 99m Tc based on aluminium oxide using as eluent of isotonic saline solution, containing nitrate-ions has been produced in INP AS RU. However, the main disadvantage of this generator is that the eluent-saline solution contains some amount of nitrate-ions. Nitrate-ions added to maximize and stabilize 99m Tc yields would interfere with the chemical reactions which involve Sn(II) reduction of the pertechnetate ion and which are used subsequently in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. Therefore we proposed the new method for preliminary treatment of aluminium oxide by the external gamma (Co-60) irradiation. It is found that the aluminium oxide has got electron-acceptor properties after gamma-irradiation. Adsorption of 99 Mo radionuclide as isopolymolybdate on gamma-irradiated aluminium oxide is very high and molybdenum is firmly retained. Adsorption capacity of gamma-irradiated aluminium oxide at pH 2-4 is 60-80 mg Mo per gram of Al 2 O 3 . The yields of 99m Tc from experimental generators remained high

  4. DKPRO: A radionuclide decay and reprocessing code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootan, D.; Schmittroth, F.A.

    1997-01-01

    The DKPRO code solves the general problem of modeling complex nuclear wastes streams using ORIGEN2 radionuclide production files. There is a continuing need for estimates of Hanford radionuclides. Physical measurements are one basis; calculational estimates, the approach represented here, are another. Given a known nuclear fuel history, it is relatively straightforward to calculate radionuclide inventories with codes such as the widely-used Oak Ridge National Laboratory code ORIGEN2

  5. Radionuclide usage survey 1979-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, M.J.

    1980-08-01

    Details of a survey by the Life Sciences Working Group of the International Committee for Radionuclide Metrology (ICRM) on radionuclide usage by medical physicists in 11 countries are presented. The results indicate that the radionuclide which will be of most significance in the future will be F-18, Fe-52, Ga-67, Ga-68, Kr-81m, Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, Xe-127 and Tl-201, (U.K.)

  6. Preparation of porous materials for radionuclides capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajzikova, Anna; Smrcek, Stanislav; Kozempel, Jan; Vlk, Martin; Barta, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Porous materials showing promise for radionuclide capture from water at contaminated sites were prepared. Nanoporous materials (size of pores 1-100 nm) and some polymers are well suited to this purpose owing their affinity for selected radionuclides. Nanoporous metal oxides and silica gel with styrene-divinylbenzene-TODGA-modified surface were prepared, characterized and tested for radionuclide ( 227 Ac, 227 Th, 223 Ra) capture efficiency. (orig.)

  7. On generalized operator quasi-equilibrium problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Sangho; Kim, Won Kyu

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we will introduce the generalized operator equilibrium problem and generalized operator quasi-equilibrium problem which generalize the operator equilibrium problem due to Kazmi and Raouf [K.R. Kazmi, A. Raouf, A class of operator equilibrium problems, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 308 (2005) 554-564] into multi-valued and quasi-equilibrium problems. Using a Fan-Browder type fixed point theorem in [S. Park, Foundations of the KKM theory via coincidences of composites of upper semicontinuous maps, J. Korean Math. Soc. 31 (1994) 493-519] and an existence theorem of equilibrium for 1-person game in [X.-P. Ding, W.K. Kim, K.-K. Tan, Equilibria of non-compact generalized games with L*-majorized preferences, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 164 (1992) 508-517] as basic tools, we prove new existence theorems on generalized operator equilibrium problem and generalized operator quasi-equilibrium problem which includes operator equilibrium problems.

  8. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  9. Environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.

    1982-01-01

    The environmental behaviour of the radionuclides making the major contribution to man's irradiation through diet is described. The following stages are emphasized: transfer of radionuclides to plants; transfer of radionuclides to animals; metabolism of inhaled or ingested radionuclides in animals providing food for man; transfer of radionuclides through the aquatic environment; application of food chain models. (43 references)

  10. Intracrystalline diffusion in clinoptilolite: Implications for radionuclide isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, S.K.; Viani, B.E.; Phinney, D.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to measure the rate of exchange diffusion in the zeolite clinoptilolite (CL) for elements important to radionuclide isolation at Yucca Mountain, NV. Clinoptilolite is one of the major sorptive minerals in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain, and occurs both as a major component in zeolitized units (Calico Hills), and in fractures in non-zeolitized tuffs (Topopah Spring). Field evidence and numerical modeling suggests that the movement of fluids through the tuff rocks adjacent to the potential repository may occur via episodic flow through fractures. Under conditions of rapid fracture flow the effective sorptive capacity of fracture-lining clinoptilolite may be controlled by exchange diffusion rather than exchange equilibrium

  11. Radionuclides in diffusion probing of inorganic materials based on chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsova, L.P.

    1994-01-01

    Migration of tellurium-125m, selenium-75, sulfur-35 radionuclides in solid solutions Pb 1-y (Se 0.08 Te 0.92 ) y and (Pb 1-x Sn x ) y Te 1-y , where x=0.1 and 0.2, has been studied, the results are presented. Data on dependence of selenium and tellurium self-diffusion coefficients on temperature in the range of 600-750 deg C are given. The results of the study of self-diffusion coefficient isothermal dependences on lead and tellurium vapour pressure in equilibrium with solid phases have been considered. It is ascertained that a change in the temperature and p-n transitions initiate the change in self-diffusion mechanisms of chalcogenide atoms. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  12. Radionuclide accumulation peculiarities demonstrated by vegetable varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruk, A.V.; Goncharenko, G.G.; Kilchevsky, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    This study focused on ecological and genetic aspects of radionuclide accumulation demonstrated by a number of vegetable varieties. The researches resulted in determining the cabbage varieties which were characterised by the minimal level of radionuclide accumulation. It was shown that the above varieties manifested the relation between radionuclide accumulation and morphobiological characteristics such as vegetation period duration and yield criteria. The study specified the genotypes with high ecological stability as regards to radionuclide accumulation: 'Beloruskaya 85' cabbage and 'Dokhodny' tomato showed the best response to Cs 137, while 'Beloruskaya 85', 'Rusinovka', 'Amager 611' cabbage varieties and 'Sprint' tomato showed the minimal level of Sr 90 accumulation. (authors)

  13. Therapy for incorporated radionuclides: scope and need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, V.H.

    1981-03-01

    In the United States the recent termination of funding for research on therapy for incorporated radionuclides has virtually halted progress on improved or new agents and procedures for removing radioactivity from the body. Research was eliminated, but is still needed on new removal agents, improved delivery system, in vitro test systems, and the toxicology of treatments. For many radionuclides, no adequate therapy exists. The relationship between radionuclide removal and reduction in cancer risk is still unanswered. Without proper research support, needed improvements in the treatment for incorporated radionuclides in the US are uncertain

  14. Equilibrium studies of helical axis stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.; Harris, J.H.; Rome, J.A.; Cantrell, J.L.; Lynch, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    The equilibrium properties of helical axis stellarators are studied with a 3-D equilibrium code and with an average method (2-D). The helical axis ATF is shown to have a toroidally dominated equilibrium shift and good equilibria up to at least 10% peak beta. Low aspect ratio heliacs, with relatively large toroidal shifts, are shown to have low equilibrium beta limits (approx. 5%). Increasing the aspect ratio and number of field periods proportionally is found to improve the equilibrium beta limit. Alternatively, increasing the number of field periods at fixed aspect ratio which raises and lowers the toroidal shift improves the equilibrium beta limit

  15. Radionuclide transport through heteogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadermann, J.

    1980-01-01

    One-dimensional radionuclide migration for conevective water transport with sorption and longitudinal dispersion is investigated. A semianalytic solution for layered media with piecewise constant parametes can be written when taking into account mass conservation and approximate flux conservation at interlayer boundaries. The solution is analytic in the first layer and allows for a recursive calculation in the following layers. Scaling laws for the relevant parameters can be formulated. Numerical examples exhibit the importance of at least a single highly sorbing layer. Small values of dispersivity may not lead to a conservative estimate of conservation at the geological column's end

  16. Radionuclide transfer to meadow vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, N.; Matsko, N.; Zhebrakova, I.; Montik, T.

    1999-01-01

    In the paper results of radioecological monitoring of natural plant populations in the 30 km zone of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Polesky State Radioecological Reserve) during the period from 1987 to 1998 are presented. The level of radiation background in experimental areas varied from 0.1 to 30 mR/h that correspond to the total soil activity of 300-24000 kBq/m 2 (for May 1997). Monitoring was carried out including the radionuclide migration in natural plant complexes and transfer of 137 Cs between some plant organs. Refs. 3 (author)

  17. Dosimetry of incorporated transuranic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loessner, V.

    1983-01-01

    Modern in vivo and in vitro techniques for detecting transuranic radionuclides within the human body are described with special emphasis on multiparameter measuring methods developed at the National Board of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection. Furthermore, problems related to calibration and interpretation of measuring data are discussed and new methods presented for the calculation of committed dose equivalents on the basis of data from ICRP Publication 30. Also included is an introductory chapter on radiobiological fundamentals of intake, translocation and metabolism of these nuclides. (author)

  18. Dietary intake of natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith-Briggs, J L; Bradley, E J [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (UK)

    1984-09-01

    The levels of the natural radionuclides, radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 were measured in food samples collected for a National Food Survey, thus reflecting current consumption patterns in the UK. Daily intakes of radium-226, lead-210 and inferred values of polonium-210 were calculated for 20 food groups. From these data, the annual effective dose equivalents from radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 in the UK diet were estimated to be 3..mu..Sv, 41..mu..Sv and 13..mu..Sv respectively.

  19. Dietary intake of natural radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith-Briggs, J.L.; Bradley, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    The levels of the natural radionuclides, radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 were measured in food samples collected for a National Food Survey, thus reflecting current consumption patterns in the UK. Daily intakes of radium-226, lead-210 and inferred values of polonium-210 were calculated for 20 food groups. From these data, the annual effective dose equivalents from radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 in the UK diet were estimated to be 3μSv, 41μSv and 13μSv respectively. (U.K.)

  20. Students’ misconceptions on solubility equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiowati, H.; Utomo, S. B.; Ashadi

    2018-05-01

    This study investigated the students’ misconceptions of the solubility equilibrium. The participants of the study consisted of 164 students who were in the science class of second year high school. Instrument used is two-tier diagnostic test consisting of 15 items. Responses were marked and coded into four categories: understanding, misconception, understand little without misconception, and not understanding. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 45 students according to their written responses which reflected different perspectives, to obtain a more elaborated source of data. Data collected from multiple methods were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on the data analysis showed that the students misconceptions in all areas in solubility equilibrium. They had more misconceptions such as in the relation of solubility and solubility product, common-ion effect and pH in solubility, and precipitation concept.

  1. Verification and improvement of predictive algorithms for radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.; Miller, C.W.; Remer, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    This research addresses issues relevant to numerical simulation and prediction of migration of radionuclides in the environment of nuclear waste repositories. Specific issues investigated are the adequacy of current numerical codes in simulating geochemical interactions affecting radionuclide migration, the level of complexity required in chemical algorithms of transport models, and the validity of the constant-k/sub D/ concept in chemical transport modeling. An initial survey of the literature led to the conclusion that existing numerical codes did not encompass the full range of chemical and physical phenomena influential in radionuclide migration. Studies of chemical algorithms have been conducted within the framework of a one-dimensional numerical code that simulates the transport of chemically reacting solutes in a saturated porous medium. The code treats transport by dispersion/diffusion and advection, and equilibrium-controlled proceses of interphase mass transfer, complexation in the aqueous phase, pH variation, and precipitation/dissolution of secondary solids. Irreversible, time-dependent dissolution of solid phases during transport can be treated. Mass action, transport, and sorptive site constraint equations are expressed in differential/algebraic form and are solved simultaneously. Simulations using the code show that use of the constant-k/sub D/ concept can produce unreliable results in geochemical transport modeling. Applications to a field test and laboratory analogs of a nuclear waste repository indicate that a thermodynamically based simulator of chemical transport can successfully mimic real processes provided that operative chemical mechanisms and associated data have been correctly identified and measured, and have been incorporated in the simulator. 17 references, 10 figures

  2. Distribution of radionuclides and elements in Cubatao River sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, P.S.C.; Mazzilli, B.P.; Favaro, D.I.T.

    2006-01-01

    Cubatao River is located in Santos Basin, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. This region is characterized by the occurrence of estuaries and mangrove. Due to its location, near the coastal line, it is also an important industrial area, where phosphate fertilizer plants, petrol refineries, and chemical and steel industries are present. Such human activities contribute to the enhancement of elemental composition in sediments and, in some cases, also increase the radionuclide concentrations, the so called Technologically Enhanced Natural Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM). The contamination of land and sediments by TENORM is of major concern. The activity concentration of U and Th series radionuclides was determined in five sediment samples from Cubatao River. The activity concentration ratio was also determined. Equilibrium was observed for the ratio 234 U/ 238 U. The activity ratios of Th/ 238 U, 228 Ra/ 226 Ra and 210 Pb/ 226 Ra were higher than the unity. In the first two cases, the observed values are due to the higher activity of Th in the sediment and in the last case are probably due to the atmospheric deposition of 210 Pb. (author)

  3. Calculated distribution of radionuclides in soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomenech, I.; Bergstroem, U.

    1994-12-01

    The description of the accumulation of radionuclides in some biospheric compartments is in general based on a sorption distribution coefficient K d . This value is very decisive for the concentration of long-lived radionuclides in reservoirs that are important from the dose point of view. Sorption is due to several processes such as ion-exchange and a variety of physical and chemical interactions which are difficult to interpret with the current K d -methodology. In addition, many of the K d values are obtained from laboratory or geospheric conditions not comparable to conditions prevailing in the biosphere. The main objective with this work is to deepen the knowledge about the theoretical background of K d -values. To achieve this purpose, available theoretical models for ion-exchange and surface complexation have been adapted for simulation under biospheric conditions. The elements treated are cesium, radium, neptunium, uranium and plutonium The results show that a triple layer surface complexation model may be used in estimating K d -values for actinides as a function of important chemical parameters such as pH and E H . It is concluded that by estimating some equilibrium constants and making some careful approximations, surface complexation models can be used for performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories. 72 refs, 7 figs

  4. Transport of oxidants and radionuclides through a clay barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, I.

    1978-02-01

    The masstransfer rate for oxidants to, and radionuclides from a capsule in a repository has been computed. The capsule which is 0.75 m in diameter is surrounded by Montmorillonite clay. The hole is 1.5 m in diameter. For one capsule about 1220g copper will corrode due to oxygen corrosion in 10 000 years. If the fissures in the rock nearest the hole are filled with clay, the corrosion will decrease significantly. This is valid for a case where the groundwater is in equilibrium with oxygen of 0.2 bar pressure (normal air pressure). Measurements of the oxygen content in groundwater at large depths show a more than 1 000 times smaller values. The transport rate will then be correspondingly smaller. Corrosion due to sulphate/sulphide corrosion may reach some 590 g in the same time if there is 10 mg/l of the least abundant component. The radionuclides Sr 90 , Cs 137 , Am 241 and Am 243 will decay totally in the clay barriers. Pu 240 will be seriously hindered. The total dissolution of the uranium oxide in a capsule takes at least 1.8 million years. Nuclides with high solubilities decrease in about 2 000 years to half their original concentration. The sodium in the Montmorillonite clay in the fissures is exchanged for calcium in about 20 000 years. The exchange of the sodium in the clay in the hole takes millions of years

  5. An introduction to equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Morrill, Bernard; Hartnett, James P; Hughes, William F

    1973-01-01

    An Introduction to Equilibrium Thermodynamics discusses classical thermodynamics and irreversible thermodynamics. It introduces the laws of thermodynamics and the connection between statistical concepts and observable macroscopic properties of a thermodynamic system. Chapter 1 discusses the first law of thermodynamics while Chapters 2 through 4 deal with statistical concepts. The succeeding chapters describe the link between entropy and the reversible heat process concept of entropy; the second law of thermodynamics; Legendre transformations and Jacobian algebra. Finally, Chapter 10 provides a

  6. Money Inventories in Search Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Aleksander

    1998-01-01

    The paper relaxes the one unit storage capacity imposed in the basic search-theoretic model of fiat money with indivisible real commodities and indivisible money. Agents can accumulate as much money as they want. It characterizes the stationary distributions of money and shows that for reasonable parameter values (e.g. production cost, discounting, degree of specialization) a monetary equilibrium exists. There are multiple stationary distributions of a given amount of money, which differ in t...

  7. Local equilibrium in bird flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an example of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with respect to analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. This non-equilibrium characteristic has been studied theoretically, but its impact on actual animal groups remains to be fully explored experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accommodates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment occurs on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  8. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Park, Hyun Soo

    2003-04-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. This project is composed of 6 subjects such as data production required for safety assessments, sorption properties and mechanisms, nuclide migration in the fractured rock, colloid formation and migration, nuclide speciation in deep geological environments, and total evaluation of geochemical behaviors considering multi-factors. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal

  9. Miscellaneous applications of radionuclide imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishkin, F.S.; Freeman, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    The procedures discussed in this chapter are either developmental, in limited clinical use, or frankly moribund. A number of radionuclide imaging techniques have proved disappointing when approached from a purely anatomic point of view. This is particularly evident to our colleagues with the explosive growth of the noninvasive imaging procedures, magnetic resonance imaging (NMR), CT, and ultrasound, and the introduction of the less invasive digital radiographic approach to vascular opacification, all of which are capable of providing exquisite anatomic or tissue detail beyond the reach of current or reasonably priced nuclear medicine imaging systems. Yet, most nuclear medicine procedures possess the unique advantage of portraying a physiologic function without interfering with that function. Moreover, the procedures can be employed under conditions of stress, which are likely to bring out pathophysiologic abnormalities that remain masked when unchallenged. Information concerning form without functional data has less meaning than both together. The physiologic information inherent in nuclear medicine imaging may often provide not only key diagnostic information but also illuminate a therapeutic trail. Yet, it is often slighted in favor of the anatomic quest. While mastery of the nuances of imaging details remains critical, radionuclide image interpretation must rest upon a firm physiologic foundation. For this reason, this chapter emphasizes the physiologic approach

  10. Stochastic approach for radionuclides quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, A.; Saurel, N.; Perrin, G.

    2018-01-01

    Gamma spectrometry is a passive non-destructive assay used to quantify radionuclides present in more or less complex objects. Basic methods using empirical calibration with a standard in order to quantify the activity of nuclear materials by determining the calibration coefficient are useless on non-reproducible, complex and single nuclear objects such as waste packages. Package specifications as composition or geometry change from one package to another and involve a high variability of objects. Current quantification process uses numerical modelling of the measured scene with few available data such as geometry or composition. These data are density, material, screen, geometric shape, matrix composition, matrix and source distribution. Some of them are strongly dependent on package data knowledge and operator backgrounds. The French Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) is developing a new methodology to quantify nuclear materials in waste packages and waste drums without operator adjustment and internal package configuration knowledge. This method suggests combining a global stochastic approach which uses, among others, surrogate models available to simulate the gamma attenuation behaviour, a Bayesian approach which considers conditional probability densities of problem inputs, and Markov Chains Monte Carlo algorithms (MCMC) which solve inverse problems, with gamma ray emission radionuclide spectrum, and outside dimensions of interest objects. The methodology is testing to quantify actinide activity in different kind of matrix, composition, and configuration of sources standard in terms of actinide masses, locations and distributions. Activity uncertainties are taken into account by this adjustment methodology.

  11. Infusion of radionuclides throughout pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountford-Lister, P.G.; Lambert, B.E.; Milner, A.C.; Kang, X.Z.

    1992-01-01

    This work is part of a long-term study to examine the cancer incidence in the offspring of mice exposed to 239 Pu or 147 Pm throughout pregnancy. The need to model the human intake scenario and the possibility of a critical period during uterine development necessitates constant availability of radionuclides throughout pregnancy. Various methods (multiple daily injections, infusion by external cannula and infusion by indwelling osmotic pump) have been examined and osmotic infusion pumps chosen. These pumps result in a near-constant blood concentration for up to 21 days. Part of the study is the estimation of dose to the critical haemopoietic tissues of the pup from a knowledge of the radionuclide distribution and kinetics. At present the distribution has been followed from birth to 180 days. Activity in the suckling pups at 7 days old is around 1 percent of the infused activity, though most of this is accounted for by the contents of the stomach and gastrointestinal tract. The liver and femur account for around 0.025 percent and 0.012 percent respectively per pup. Activity increases in both liver and femur during lactation after which both concentration and activity fall with time. Long-term studies with the pups of dams exposed to a range of 239 Pu concentrations between 0-70 kBq/kg are underway. Correlation of average organ dose with tumour incidence will be determined at completion of the life-span study. (Author) 39 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  12. Sedimentary Processes. Quantification Using Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, J.; Lerche, I.

    2003-01-01

    The advent of radionuclide methods in geochronology has revolutionized our understanding of modern sedimentary processes in aquatic systems. This book examines the principles of the method and its use as a quantitative tool in marine geology, with emphasis on the Pb-210 method. The assumptions and consequences of models and their behaviour are described providing the necessary background to assess the advantages and trade-offs involved when choosing a particular model for application. One of the purposes of this volume is to disentangle the influences of complicating factors, such as sediment flux variations, post-depositional diffusion of radionuclides, and bio-irrigation of sediments, to arrive at sediment ages and to properly assess the attendant data uncertainty. Environmental impacts of chemical, nuclear, or other waste material are of concern in a variety of areas around the world today. A number of relevant examples are included, demonstrating how dating models are useful for determining sources of contaminants and interpreting their influence on the environment. The book is set at a level so that an able student or professional should have no difficulty in following the procedures and methods developed. Each chapter includes case histories showing the strengths and weaknesses of a given procedure with respect to a data example. Included with this volume is the computer source code of a new generation of modelling tools based on inverse numerical analysis techniques. This first generation of the modelling tool is included, along with detailed instructions and examples for its use, in an appendix

  13. Radionuclide transit in esophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, S.H.; Wang, S.J.; Wu, L.C.; Liu, R.S.; Tsai, Y.T.; Chiang, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    This study assessed esophageal motility in patients with esophageal varices by radionuclide transit studies. Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position above a low-energy all-purpose collimator of a gamma camera. The condensed image (CI) superimposed with a centroid curve was also produced in each case. Twenty-five normal subjects (N) and 32 patients (pts) with esophageal varices by endoscopy (large varices in Grades IV and V in 8 and small varices in Grade III or less in 24) were studied. TMTT, RTT, RF, and RI were all significantly increased in pts as compared to N. Especially, the transit time for the middle third (6.7 +- 2.6 sec vs 3.5 +- 0.9 sec in N, rho < 0.005) had the optimal sensitivy and specificity of 88% each at the cutoff value of 4.2 sec as determined by ROC analysis. In summary, radionuclide transit disorders occur in the majority of pts with esopageal varices. The middle RTT and CI are both optimal in sensitivity and specificity for detecting the abnormalities

  14. Radionuclide analysis of bush food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koperski, J.; Bywater, J.

    1985-01-01

    A model diet for an Aboriginal adult living entirely on bush foods collected from the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory has been established. Results of investigations of the specific activities of thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 in 123 samples of bush foods collected by Ranger Uranium Mines Pty Ltd during pre-production and production periods are presented. For all the investigated bush food items, excluding freshwater mussels (Velesunio angasi), no systematic differences were found between the specific activities of the radionuclides monitored in food items sampled during preproduction and production periods. Preliminary estimates of annual effective dose equivalent (DE) rates for stochastic effects on an adult living entirely on the model bush diet are presented. Of the four radionuclides monitored the major contributor to the effective DE rates appears to be lead-210 followed by radium-226. Among the selected nine components of the diet the major contributor to the effective DE rates appear to be mussels, water lilies and fish

  15. Radionuclide analysis of bush food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koperski, J; Bywater, J [Ranger Uranium Mines Proprietary Ltd., Chatswood (Australia)

    1985-04-01

    A model diet for an Aboriginal adult living entirely on bush foods collected from the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory has been established. Results of investigations of the specific activities of thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 in 123 samples of bush foods collected by Ranger Uranium Mines Pty. Ltd. during pre-production and production periods are presented. For all the investigated bush food items, excluding freshwater mussels (Velesunio angasi), no systematic differences were found between the specific activities of the radionuclides monitored in food items sampled during preproduction and production periods. Preliminary estimates of annual effective dose equivalent (DE) rates for stochastic effects on an adult living entirely on the model bush diet are presented. Of the four radionuclides monitored the major contributor to the effective DE rates appears to be lead-210 followed by radium-226. Among the selected nine components of the diet the major contributor to the effective DE rates appear to be mussels, water lilies and fish.

  16. Quantum dynamical semigroups and approach to equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigerio, A.

    1977-01-01

    For a quantum dynamical semigroup possessing a faithful normal stationary state, some conditions are discussed, which ensure the uniqueness of the equilibrium state and/or the approach to equilibrium for arbitrary initial condition. (Auth.)

  17. Biological transfer of radionuclides in marine environments - Identifying and filling knowledge gaps for environmental impact assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.E.; Borretzen, P.; Hosseini, A.; Iosjpe, M.

    2004-01-01

    A review on concentration factors (CF) for the marine environment was conducted in order to consider the relevance of existing data from the perspective of environmental protection and to identify areas of data paucity. Data have been organised in a format compatible with a reference organism approach, for selected radionuclides, and efforts have been taken to identify the factors that may be of importance in the context of dosimetric and dose-effects analyses. These reference organism categories had been previously selected by identifying organism groups that were likely to experience the highest levels of radiation exposure, owing to high uptake levels or residence in a particular habitat, for defined scenarios. Significant data gaps in the CF database have been identified, notably for marine mammals and birds. Most empirical information pertains to a limit suite of radionuclides, particularly 137 Cs, 210 Po and 99 Tc. A methodology has been developed to help bridge this information deficit. This has been based on simple dynamic, biokinetic models that mainly use parameters derived from laboratory-based study and field observation. In some cases, allometric relationships have been employed to allow further model parameterization. Initial testing of the model by comparing model output with empirical data sets suggest that the models provide sensible equilibrium CFs. Furthermore, analyses of modelling results suggest that for some radionuclides, in particularly those with long effective half-lives, the time to equilibrium can be far greater than the life-time of an organism. This clearly emphasises the limitations of applying a universal equilibrium approach. The methodology, therefore, has an added advantage that non-equilibrium scenarios can be considered in a more rigorous manner. Further refinements to the modelling approach might be attained by exploring the importance of various model parameters, through sensitivity analyses, and by identifying those

  18. The geometry of finite equilibrium sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...... of equilibrium datasets is pathconnected when the equilibrium condition does impose restrictions on datasets, as for example when total resources are widely noncollinear....

  19. Accelerating Multiagent Reinforcement Learning by Equilibrium Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yujing; Gao, Yang; An, Bo

    2015-07-01

    An important approach in multiagent reinforcement learning (MARL) is equilibrium-based MARL, which adopts equilibrium solution concepts in game theory and requires agents to play equilibrium strategies at each state. However, most existing equilibrium-based MARL algorithms cannot scale due to a large number of computationally expensive equilibrium computations (e.g., computing Nash equilibria is PPAD-hard) during learning. For the first time, this paper finds that during the learning process of equilibrium-based MARL, the one-shot games corresponding to each state's successive visits often have the same or similar equilibria (for some states more than 90% of games corresponding to successive visits have similar equilibria). Inspired by this observation, this paper proposes to use equilibrium transfer to accelerate equilibrium-based MARL. The key idea of equilibrium transfer is to reuse previously computed equilibria when each agent has a small incentive to deviate. By introducing transfer loss and transfer condition, a novel framework called equilibrium transfer-based MARL is proposed. We prove that although equilibrium transfer brings transfer loss, equilibrium-based MARL algorithms can still converge to an equilibrium policy under certain assumptions. Experimental results in widely used benchmarks (e.g., grid world game, soccer game, and wall game) show that the proposed framework: 1) not only significantly accelerates equilibrium-based MARL (up to 96.7% reduction in learning time), but also achieves higher average rewards than algorithms without equilibrium transfer and 2) scales significantly better than algorithms without equilibrium transfer when the state/action space grows and the number of agents increases.

  20. The Geometry of Finite Equilibrium Datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...... of equilibrium datasets is pathconnected when the equilibrium condition does impose restrictions on datasets, as for example when total resources are widely non collinear....

  1. Modeling Radionuclide Decay Chain Migration Using HYDROGEOCHEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. C.; Tsai, C. H.; Lai, K. H.; Chen, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear technology has been employed for energy production for several decades. Although people receive many benefits from nuclear energy, there are inevitably environmental pollutions as well as human health threats posed by the radioactive materials releases from nuclear waste disposed in geological repositories or accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear facilities. Theoretical studies have been undertaken to understand the transport of radionuclides in subsurface environments because that the radionuclide transport in groundwater is one of the main pathway in exposure scenarios for the intake of radionuclides. The radionuclide transport in groundwater can be predicted using analytical solution as well as numerical models. In this study, we simulate the transport of the radionuclide decay chain using HYDROGEOCHEM. The simulated results are verified against the analytical solution available in the literature. Excellent agreements between the numerical simulation and the analytical are observed for a wide spectrum of concentration. HYDROGECHEM is a useful tool assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  2. Fire fighting in a radionuclide laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, H.

    1991-01-01

    A fire-brigade was called to a laboratory which held a handling licence for the radionuclides C-14, T, P-32, Se-75, Mo-99, and S-35. The fire-brigade was unaware of a release of radionuclides. Therefore they used respiratory equipment, and all persons present were subsequently examined for contamination. (DG) [de

  3. Mechanisms of radionuclide transition in natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacyna, J.

    1974-01-01

    Mechanisms of radionuclide transition in various elements of the environment have been dealt with in an ecological aspect. The knowledge of the radionuclide propagation tracks will make possible to ascertain precisely causes and effects of the radiation and to reduce the contamination value. Particular attention has been paid to test methods. (author)

  4. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-01-01

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions

  5. The concept of equilibrium in organization theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, H.W.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many organization theories consist of an interpretation frame and an idea about the ideal equilibrium state. This article explains how the equilibrium concept is used in four organization theories: the theories of Fayol, Mintzberg, Morgan, and Volberda. Equilibrium can be defined as balance, fit or

  6. The concept of equilibrium in organization theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, Henk W.M.

    1997-01-01

    Many organization theories consist of an interpretation frame and an idea about the ideal equilibrium state. This article explains how the equilibrium concept is used in four organization theories: the theories of Fayol, Mintzberg, Morgan, and Volberda. Equilibrium can be defined as balance, fit or

  7. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  8. Sensors and Automated Analyzers for Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.

    2003-01-01

    The production of nuclear weapons materials has generated large quantities of nuclear waste and significant environmental contamination. We have developed new, rapid, automated methods for determination of radionuclides using sequential injection methodologies to automate extraction chromatographic separations, with on-line flow-through scintillation counting for real time detection. This work has progressed in two main areas: radionuclide sensors for water monitoring and automated radiochemical analyzers for monitoring nuclear waste processing operations. Radionuclide sensors have been developed that collect and concentrate radionuclides in preconcentrating minicolumns with dual functionality: chemical selectivity for radionuclide capture and scintillation for signal output. These sensors can detect pertechnetate to below regulatory levels and have been engineered into a prototype for field testing. A fully automated process monitor has been developed for total technetium in nuclear waste streams. This instrument performs sample acidification, speciation adjustment, separation and detection in fifteen minutes or less

  9. Speciation of radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunten, H.R. von; Benes, P.

    1994-02-01

    Methods for the determination of the speciation of radionuclides in aerosols, in aquatic solutions, in sediments, soils and rocks are reviewed. At present, most of the results about speciation are deduced from model calculations, model experiments, and separation of species (forms) of radionuclides, e.g., by sequential extraction procedures. Methods of direct determination of speciation of radionuclides (e.g. by laser induced spectroscopy) are in general not yet sensitive enough for a measurement of the very low concentrations of radionuclides in the environment. The methodological part of this paper is followed by a review of the very abundant literature about speciation of important radionuclides in the environment, i.e. in the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. The review does not include the biosphere. Literature up to spring 1993 is included (with a few more recent additions). (author)

  10. Radionuclides in the environment: Risks and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elzerman, A.W.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental chemistry plays a critical role in the open-quotes nuclear ageclose quotes. It makes a vital contribution to understanding of the sources, fate and effects of radionuclides in the environment, both man-made and natural. Risk assessment of radionuclides in the environment relies heavily on the tools of environmental chemistry. On the other hand, radionuclides provide unique opportunities to exploit in environmental chemistry investigations due to their well-defined sources, traceability in environmental processes, analytical sensitivities, and open-quotes built-inclose quotes radioactive decay open-quotes clocksclose quotes. In some cases naturally present radionuclides are utilized, while in others tracers are deliberately added or have already been added by the nuclear fuel cycle or nuclear testing. Several examples in each of these categories are discussed to spotlight the current status of environmental chemistry and radionuclides in the environment as an example application

  11. Mobility and Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iurian, A.; Olufemi Phaneuf, M.; Mabit, L.

    2016-01-01

    It is crucial to understand the behavior of radionuclides in the environment, their potential mobility and bioavailability related to long-term persistence, radiological hazards, and impact on human health. Such key information is used to develop strategies that support policy decisions. The environmental behavior of radionuclides depends on ecosystem characteristics. A given soil’s capacity to immobilize radionuclides has been proved to be the main factor responsible for their resulting activity concentrations in plants. The mobility and bioavailability of radionuclides in soils is complex, depending on clay-sized soil fraction, clay mineralogy, organic matter, cation exchange capacity, pH and quantities of competing cations. Moreover, plant species have different behaviors regarding radionuclide absorption depending on soil and plan characteristics

  12. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO 2 ) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO 2 system, ZrO 2 precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO 2 phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO 2 is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO 2 precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed [111] Au/ZrO 2 interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent or semi-coherent. This paper reports that this indicates that there may be a relatively strong bond between MgO and Au

  13. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmel, Filip; Dumarey, Nicolas; Palestro, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor 99m Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and 67 Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [ 18 F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including radiolabelled

  14. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, Filip [Ghent Maria-Middelares, General Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Medical Center Leeuwarden (MCL), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Henri Dunantweg 2, Postbus 888, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Dumarey, Nicolas [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Long Island, NY (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor {sup 99m}Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and {sup 67}Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including

  15. Effect of chronic L-thyroxine-suppressive therapy on cardiac function in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma: Radionuclide techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziada, G.; Farouk, S.; Zidan, A.; Mustafa, S.; El-Reffaie, S.

    2005-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is usually treated by a combination of surgery, radioiodine (I-131) and suppressive doses of thyroid hormones [L-thyroxine (Eltroxine)]. It is well-known that thyroid hormone affects the function of cardiovascular system. However there is no study to objectively substantiate this phenomenon. The objective of this study was to assess the left ventricular function with the help of radionuclide ventriculography in patients of DTC. Various parameters of systolic function [ejection fraction (EF), peak ejection rate (PER) and time to peak ejection rate (TPER)], diastolic function [peak filling rate (PFR) and time to peak filling rate (TPFR)] and heart rate were determined. Ten healthy control subjects and 50 patients of DTC on suppressive doses of eltroxine following surgery and radio-iodine (I-131) therapy were evaluated. The patients were divided into 5 groups according to their clinical status and thyroid hormone profile. These groups were: euthyroid, sub-clinical hypothyroid, hypothyroid, sub-clinical hyperthyroid and hyperthyroid groups. The results of the study revealed that Eltroxine significantly affected left ventricular function. Although it did not affect the systolic function, the diastolic function was significantly impaired. Prolongation of TPER was noted in hypothyroid patients, while the same was significantly decreased in hyper- and sub-clinical hyper-thyroids patients. Such abnormalities in cardiac function would be responsible for serious morbidity and could affect the lives of patients' in several ways. Hence, early effective treatment of thyroid function is important in patients of DTC, which would improve their quality of life and avoid long-term serious or irreversible cardiovascular disorder. (author)

  16. A review on studies of the transport and the form of radionuclides in the fluvial environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-06-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has conducted studies with an aim to contribute to understanding the long-term behavior of atmospherically-derived radionuclides deposited on the ground. The present report reviews a series of studies among them which have especially dealt with the behavior of those radionuclides in a fluvial environment. The studies cited here include investigations of 1) the evaluation of the transport rate of the atmospherically-derived radionuclides from the ground via a river to the downstream areas where the affected water is consumed; 2) the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides in the fluvial environment. An investigation in the Kuji river watershed with {sup 137}Cs, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be has validated i) the importance of suspended particulate materials in the fluvial discharge of those radionuclides, and ii) a methodology to estimate the discharge of those radionuclides based on the regression analysis with the river water flow rate. From a viewpoint of their distribution between water and suspended particles, the form of radionuclides released by the Chernobyl accident in rivers and lakes in the vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant were analyzed. As a result, a general reasonability and some cautions were suggested when commonly reported distribution ratios obtained in the laboratory and the different environment are applied to describe the partitioning of the radionuclides in specific natural environmental conditions. This experimental investigation in Chernobyl also revealed the role of natural dissolved organics in affecting the dissolution and transport of {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am through complexation to form soluble species. Further, a chemical equilibrium model was applied to describe this complexation. The similar model was also applied for the behavior of iron and manganese (hydr)oxides in river recharged aquifers which can bear riverborne radionuclides and can influence their migration. The

  17. A review on studies of the transport and the form of radionuclides in the fluvial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi

    2001-06-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has conducted studies with an aim to contribute to understanding the long-term behavior of atmospherically-derived radionuclides deposited on the ground. The present report reviews a series of studies among them which have especially dealt with the behavior of those radionuclides in a fluvial environment. The studies cited here include investigations of 1) the evaluation of the transport rate of the atmospherically-derived radionuclides from the ground via a river to the downstream areas where the affected water is consumed; 2) the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides in the fluvial environment. An investigation in the Kuji river watershed with 137 Cs, 210 Pb and 7 Be has validated i) the importance of suspended particulate materials in the fluvial discharge of those radionuclides, and ii) a methodology to estimate the discharge of those radionuclides based on the regression analysis with the river water flow rate. From a viewpoint of their distribution between water and suspended particles, the form of radionuclides released by the Chernobyl accident in rivers and lakes in the vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant were analyzed. As a result, a general reasonability and some cautions were suggested when commonly reported distribution ratios obtained in the laboratory and the different environment are applied to describe the partitioning of the radionuclides in specific natural environmental conditions. This experimental investigation in Chernobyl also revealed the role of natural dissolved organics in affecting the dissolution and transport of 239,240 Pu, 241 Am through complexation to form soluble species. Further, a chemical equilibrium model was applied to describe this complexation. The similar model was also applied for the behavior of iron and manganese (hydr)oxides in river recharged aquifers which can bear riverborne radionuclides and can influence their migration. The obtained findings and the

  18. Thermal equilibrium in Einstein's elevator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rey, Bernardo; Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Dagdug, Leonardo; Cubero, David

    2013-05-01

    We report fully relativistic molecular-dynamics simulations that verify the appearance of thermal equilibrium of a classical gas inside a uniformly accelerated container. The numerical experiments confirm that the local momentum distribution in this system is very well approximated by the Jüttner function-originally derived for a flat spacetime-via the Tolman-Ehrenfest effect. Moreover, it is shown that when the acceleration or the container size is large enough, the global momentum distribution can be described by the so-called modified Jüttner function, which was initially proposed as an alternative to the Jüttner function.

  19. Fully coupled modeling of radionuclide migration in a clayey rock disturbed by alkaline plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrni, D.; Windt, L. de; Lee, J.V.D.

    2002-03-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in clayey formations may require the use of large amounts of concrete and cement as a barrier to minimize corrosion of steel containers and radionuclide migration and for supporting drifts and disposal vaults. In this context, reactive transport modeling of the interactions between cement or concrete and the argillaceous host rock aims at estimating the evolution in time of the containment properties of the multi-barriers system. The objectives of the paper are to demonstrate that integrating radionuclides migration in the modeling of strongly coupled geochemical processes of cement-clay stone interactions is feasible and that it represents an efficient way to assess the sensitivity and modification of the classical Kd and solubility parameters with respect to the chemical evolutions. Two types of modeling are considered in the paper: i): calculation of intrinsic solubility limits and Kd values backing up on the results of modeling of cement/clay stone interactions (radionuclides are assumed to be present over the whole domain at any time whatever the scenario), ii) full mechanistic modeling which explicitly introduces radionuclides in the calculation with ad hoc assumptions on radionuclide inventory, canister failure, migration pathway, etc. The reactive transport code HYTEC, based on the geochemical code CHESS, is used to simulate both the cement-clay stone interaction processes and the radionuclide migration in 1-D and 2-D configurations. Convective/dispersive and diffuse transport can be simulated for solutes and colloids. A wide range of processes such as aqueous chemistry, redox, dissolution/precipitation, surface complexation and ion exchange can be modeled at equilibrium or with kinetic control. In addition, HYTEC is strongly coupled, i.e. the hydrology (flow and diffusion) may change when mineral precipitation or dissolution changes the local porosity. (authors)

  20. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…