WorldWideScience

Sample records for equilibrium isotope effects

  1. Equilibrium deuterium isotope effect of surprising magnitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.J.; Pressman, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Seemingly large deuterium isotope effects are reported for the preference of deuterium for the α-chloro site to the bridgehead or to the vinyl site in samples of anti-7-chlorobicyclo[4.3.2]undecatetraene-d 1 . Studies of molecular models did not provide a basis for these large equilibrium deuterium isotope effects. The possibility is proposed that these isotope effects only appear to be large for want of comparison with isotope effects measured for molecules that might provide even greater contrasts in local force fields

  2. Isotope effects in the equilibrium and non-equilibrium vaporization of tritiated water and ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgaertner, F.; Kim, M.-A.

    1990-01-01

    The vaporization isotope effect of the HTO/H 2 O system has been measured at various temperatures and pressures under equilibrium as well as non-equilibrium conditions. The isotope effect values measured in equilibrium sublimation or distillation are in good agreement with the theoretical values based on the harmonic oscillator model. In non-equilibrium vaporization at low temperatures ( 0 C), the isotope effect decreases rapidly with decreasing system pressure and becomes negligible when the system pressure is lowered more than one tenth of the equilibrium vapor pressure. At higher temperatures, the isotope effect decreases very slowly with decreasing system pressure. Discussion is extended for the application of the present results to the study of biological enrichment of tritium. (author)

  3. Glutathione reductase: solvent equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.K.; Vanoni, M.A.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Glutathione reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG). The kinetic mechanism is ping-pong, and we have investigated the rate-limiting nature of proton-transfer steps in the reactions catalyzed by the spinach, yeast, and human erythrocyte glutathione reductases using a combination of alternate substrate and solvent kinetic isotope effects. With NADPH or GSSG as the variable substrate, at a fixed, saturating concentration of the other substrate, solvent kinetic isotope effects were observed on V but not V/K. Plots of Vm vs mole fraction of D 2 O (proton inventories) were linear in both cases for the yeast, spinach, and human erythrocyte enzymes. When solvent kinetic isotope effect studies were performed with DTNB instead of GSSG as an alternate substrate, a solvent kinetic isotope effect of 1.0 was observed. Solvent kinetic isotope effect measurements were also performed on the asymmetric disulfides GSSNB and GSSNP by using human erythrocyte glutathione reductase. The Km values for GSSNB and GSSNP were 70 microM and 13 microM, respectively, and V values were 62 and 57% of the one calculated for GSSG, respectively. Both of these substrates yield solvent kinetic isotope effects greater than 1.0 on both V and V/K and linear proton inventories, indicating that a single proton-transfer step is still rate limiting. These data are discussed in relationship to the chemical mechanism of GSSG reduction and the identity of the proton-transfer step whose rate is sensitive to solvent isotopic composition. Finally, the solvent equilibrium isotope effect measured with yeast glutathione reductase is 4.98, which allows us to calculate a fractionation factor for the thiol moiety of GSH of 0.456

  4. Concentration effect on inter-mineral equilibrium isotope fractionation: insights from Mg and Ca isotopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Wang, W.; Zhou, C.; Kang, J.; Wu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Many naturally occurring minerals, such as carbonate, garnet, pyroxene, and feldspar, are solid solutions with large variations in chemical compositions. Such variations may affect mineral structures and modify the chemical bonding environment around atoms, which further impacts the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors among minerals. Here we investigated the effects of Mg content on equilibrium Mg and Ca isotope fractionation among carbonates and Ca content on equilibrium Ca isotope fractionation between orthopyroxene (opx) and clinopyroxene (cpx) using first-principles calculations. Our results show that the average Mg-O bond length increases with decreasing Mg/(Mg+Ca) in calcite when it is greater than 1/48[1] and the average Ca-O bond length significantly decreases with decreasing Ca/(Ca+Mg+Fe) in opx when it ranges from 2/16 to 1/48[2]. Equilibrium isotope fractionation is mainly controlled by bond strengths, which could be measured by bond lengths. Thus, 103lnα26Mg/24Mg between dolomite and calcite dramatically increases with decreasing Mg/(Mg+Ca) in calcite [1] and it reaches a constant value when it is lower than 1/48. 103lnα44Ca/40Ca between opx and cpx significantly increases with decreasing Ca content in opx when Ca/(Ca+Mg+Fe) ranges from 2/16 to 1/48 [2]. If Ca/(Ca+Mg+Fe) is below 1/48, 103lnα44Ca/40Ca is not sensitive to Ca content. Based on our results, we conclude that the concentration effect on equilibrium isotope fractionation could be significant within a certain range of chemical composition of minerals, which should be a ubiquitous phenomenon in solid solution systems. [1] Wang, W., Qin, T., Zhou, C., Huang, S., Wu, Z., Huang, F., 2017. GCA 208, 185-197. [2] Feng, C., Qin, T., Huang, S., Wu, Z., Huang, F., 2014. GCA 143, 132-142.

  5. NMR spectroscopic determination of an equilibrium isotope effect on the hydration of cobalt(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evilia, R.F.; Saunders, M.

    1985-01-01

    A recently reported NMR method for the measurement of deuterium equilibrium isotope effects is applied to the hydration of the paramagnetic cobalt(II) ion. An isotope effect of about 1.3% is measured. A substantial difference between the intrinsic shift of H 2 O and D 2 O when coordinated to cobalt is also measured

  6. Using Beads and Divided Containers to Study Kinetic and Equilibrium Isotope Effects in the Laboratory and in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Dean J.; Brewer, Emily R.; Martinez, Keri A.; Fitzjarrald, Tamara J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this laboratory experiment is to study fundamental concepts of kinetics and equilibria and the isotope effects associated with both of these concepts. The concepts of isotopes in introductory and general chemistry courses are typically used within the contexts of atomic weights and radioactivity. Kinetic and equilibrium isotope…

  7. Isotope anomalies in oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaka, M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the isotope anomalies in oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium systems, according to the calculations of the equilibrium constants for oxygen isotopic exchange reactions, and the calculations of the oxygen isotope separation factors between two phases. The equilibrium constants (K65, K67, K68 and K69) of 16 O- 15 O, 16 O 17 O, 16 O- 18 O, and 16 O- 19 O exchange reactions between diatomic oxides were calculated in a wide temperature range on the basis of quantum statistical mechanics. Many equilibrium constants showed the anomalous mass effects, and then had the crossover temperatures and the mass independent fractionation (MIF) temperatures which held K67 = K65, K67 = K68, or K67 = K69, etc. For example, the equilibrium constants for the reactions between OH and the other diatomic oxides (MO) showed the anomalous mass effects, when M was Li, Na, Mg, K, Fe, Al, Ge, Zr, Pt, etc. The 16 O 15 O, 16 O 17 O, 16 O- 18 O, and 16 O- 19 O oxygen isotope separation factors (S65, S67, S68 and S69) between two phases were calculated, when OH and CO were in the first phase, and SiO was in the second phase. Although the oxygen isotopic exchange equilibria in the two phases had no MIF and crossover temperatures, the separation factors showed the anomalous mass effects and had the temperatures. According to what is called the normal mass effects for the equilibrium constant of isotopic exchange reaction, the value of InK68/InK67 is 1.885. Therefore, the value of InS68/InS67 should be 1.885 too. The value calculated, however, widely changed. It can be concluded from the results obtained in the present work that some oxygen isotopic exchange equilibria cause the anomalous mass effects, the anomalous oxygen isotope separation factors, and then isotope anomalies

  8. Autoinduced catalysis and inverse equilibrium isotope effect in the frustrated Lewis pair catalyzed hydrogenation of imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussing, Sebastian; Greb, Lutz; Tamke, Sergej; Schirmer, Birgitta; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Luy, Burkhard; Paradies, Jan

    2015-05-26

    The frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)-catalyzed hydrogenation and deuteration of N-benzylidene-tert-butylamine (2) was kinetically investigated by using the three boranes B(C6F5)3 (1), B(2,4,6-F3-C6H2)3 (4), and B(2,6-F2-C6H3)3 (5) and the free activation energies for the H2 activation by FLP were determined. Reactions catalyzed by the weaker Lewis acids 4 and 5 displayed autoinductive catalysis arising from a higher free activation energy (2 kcal mol(-1)) for the H2 activation by the imine compared to the amine. Surprisingly, the imine reduction using D2 proceeded with higher rates. This phenomenon is unprecedented for FLP and resulted from a primary inverse equilibrium isotope effect. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Fine print in isotope effects: the glucose anomeric equilibrium and binding of glucose to human brain hexokinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.E; Schramm, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    Binding isotope effects are a sensitive measure of changes in molecular vibrational character that occur during ligand-receptor binding. In this study, we have measured isotope effects on the binding of glucose to human brain hexokinase using the ultrafiltration method, with the following results: 0.991±0.001, 0.908±0.003, 1.010±0.001, 0.974±0.002, 1.022±0.002 for [ 14 C]-glucose mixed with [1- 3 H]-, [2- 3 H]-, [3- 3 H]-, [5- 3 H]-, [6,6- 3 H]-glucose, respectively. Comparing the observed data with isotope effects on the anomeric equilibrium in glucose reported previously proves the existence of binding isotope effects in this system. Preliminary computational results are presented to explain the observed binding isotope effects in terms of hydrogen bond patterns and molecular crowding found in the binary complex of sugar and enzyme. (author)

  10. The Isotopologue Record of Repeat Vital Effect Offenders: Tracking (Dis)equilibrium Effects in Sea Urchins and Nannofossil Using Clumped Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, C. M.; Davies, A.; Drury, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Vital effects vary between species and affect various isotopic systems in unequal proportion. The magnitude of the response of different isotopic systems might thus be key in understanding biologically-mediated disequilibrium, especially in groups that show a tendency to be "repeat offenders" with regards to vital effects. Here we present carbon, oxygen, and clumped isotope data from echinoderm calcite and nannofossil ooze, both of which exhibit strong vital effects in bulk isotopes. Our study is the first to investigate the clumped isotope (dis)equilibrium of echinoids. Results from two echinoids, three marine gastropods and a bivalve mollusk from modern beach deposits of Bali, Indonesia, highlight a significant offset in clumped isotopes of a regular echinoid test from expected values, interpreted as evidence of a similar "vital effect" as observed in surface corals. This is in contrast to the test of an irregular "sand dollar" echinoid, with clumped isotope values within error of expected sea surface temperature. Furthermore, data on the inter-skeletal variability in the clumped isotopic composition of two regular echinoid species shows that the spines of the echinoids are in equilibrium with seawater with respect to clumped isotopes, but the test is not. For the nannofossil material, no clumped isotope vital effects are observed, consistent with previously published studies but at odds with strong vital effects in carbon and oxygen isotopes, often correlated with cell-size. In addition, we reveal that the <63 micron fraction of deep-sea ooze could constitute useful material for clumped isotope studies. An intriguing result of our study is that vital effects are mostly absent in clumped isotopes, even in phylums known for important isotopic effects. It remains to be explained why some parts of the echinoids show clear vital effects, notably enrichment in clumped isotopes of urchin tests. Mechanisms that could explain this include pH effects during calcification

  11. Neutron skin effect of some Mo isotopes in pre-equilibrium reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It can help to investigate nuclear surface properties (and also neutron skin thickness effects) depending on the incident nucleon en- ergy PEQ reactions and it gives more information about new nuclear reaction mechanism studies [11,12]. We study molybdenum in the present work because Mo and Mo containing alloys are.

  12. Solvent Isotope-induced Equilibrium Perturbation for Isocitrate Lyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartararo, Christine E.; Hadi, Timin; Cahill, Sean M.; Blanchard, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Isocitrate lyase (ICL) catalyzes the reversible retro-aldol cleavage of isocitrate to generate glyoxylate and succinate. ICL is the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, which allows for the anaplerosis of citric acid cycle intermediates under nutrient limiting conditions. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the source of ICL for these studies, ICL is vital for the persistence phase of the bacteria’s life cycle. Solvent kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) in the direction of isocitrate cleavage of D2OV = 2.0 ± 0.1 and D2O[V/Kisocitrate] = 2.2 ± 0.3 arise from the initial deprotonation of the C2 hydroxyl group of isocitrate or the protonation of the aci-acid of succinate product of the isocitrate aldol cleavage by a solvent-derived proton. This KIE suggested that an equilibrium mixture of all protiated isocitrate, glyoxylate and succinate prepared in D2O, would undergo transient changes in equilibrium concentrations as a result of the solvent KIE and solvent-derived deuterium incorporation into both succinate and isocitrate. No change in the isotopic composition of glyoxylate was expected or observed. We have directly monitored the changing concentrations of all isotopic species of all reactants and products using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Continuous monitoring of glyoxylate by 1H NMR spectroscopy shows a clear equilibrium perturbation in D2O. The final equilibrium isotopic composition of reactants in D2O revealed di-deuterated succinate, protiated glyoxylate, and mono-deuterated isocitrate, with the transient appearance and disappearance of mono-deuterated succinate. A model for the equilibrium perturbation of substrate species, and their time-dependent isotopic composition is presented. PMID:24261638

  13. An experimental study on the effect of carbonic anhydrase on the oxygen isotope exchange kinetics and equilibrium in the carbonic acid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of marine biogenic carbonates are often depleted in 18O relative to the values expected for thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater. One possibility is that 18O-depletion in carbonates is kinetically controlled. The kinetic isotope effect associated with the hydration of CO2 results in 18O-depleted HCO3-. If the HCO3- is utilized before re-establishing equilibrium with ambient water under rapid calcification, the 18O-depletion will be recorded in carbonates. But one caveat in this kinetic model is the fact that many marine calcifiers posses carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bearing enzyme that catalyzes the CO2 hydration reaction. It is expected that this enzyme accelerates 18O-equilibration in the carbonic acid system by facilitating direct oxygen isotope exchange between HCO3- and H2O via CO2 hydration. Clearly this argues against the conceptual framework of the kinetic model. Yet the critical variable here is the effectiveness of the carbonic anhydrase, which is likely to depend on its concentration and the carbonate chemistry of the aqueous medium. It is also hitherto unknown whether the presence of carbonic anhydrase alters the equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations between dissolved carbonate species and water. We performed a series of quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments to examine the changes in the oxygen isotope equilibration time as a function of carbonic anhydrase concentrations. We conducted experiments at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are similar to the average surface ocean pH and the elevated pH levels observed within calcification microenvironments of certain corals and planktonic foraminifera. A summary of our new experimental results will be presented.

  14. Deuterium isotope effects on the ring inversion equilibrium in cyclohexane: the A value of deuterium and its origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anet, F.A.L.; Kopelevich, M.

    1986-01-01

    It has been reported recently that the deuterium in cyclohexane-d 1 prefers the equatorial over the axial position by about 200 J/mol (i.e., ca. 50 cal/mol), as shown by three different kinds of NMR measurements. Such an isotope effect is unexpectedly large, and this has led the authors to reinvestigate the problem using Saunder's isotopic perturbation method. The authors thereby established that the free energy difference (the A value for deuterium) is 6.3 +/- 1.5 cal/mol, with deuterium more stable equatorial than axial. This value is supported by molecular mechanics calculations based in part on experimental vibrational frequencies. 17 references, 1 figure

  15. Isotope effects on nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    This review concentrates upon empirical trends and practical uses of mostly secondary isotope effects, both of the intrinsic and equilibrium types. The text and the tables are arranged in the following fashion. The most 'popular' isotope effect is treated first, deuterium isotope effects on 13 C nuclear shielding, followed by deuterium on 1 H nuclear shieldings, etc. Focus is thus on the isotopes producing the effect rather than on the nuclei suffering the effect. After a brief treatment of each type of isotope effect, general trends are dealt with. Basic trends of intrinsic isotope effects such as additivity, solvent effects, temperature effects, steric effects, substituent effects and hyperconjugation are discussed. Uses of isotope effects for assignment purposes, in stereochemical studies, in hydrogen bonding and in isotopic tracer studies are dealt with. Kinetic studies, especially of phosphates, are frequently performed by utilizing isotope effects. In addition, equilibrium isotope effects are treated in great detail as these are felt to be new and very important and may lead to new uses of isotope effects. Techniques used to obtain isotope effects are briefly surveyed at the end of the chapter. (author)

  16. Isotope effects on chemical equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golding, P.D.

    1974-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium constants of three deuterated substituted acetic acids are reported. The calculation of secondary isotope effects of the second kind for the three isotopic acid pairs has been accomplished by the appropriate comparison of thermodynamic equilibrium constants, and by the comparison of isotopic slopes. The effect of substituent variation on the isotope effects reported here disqualifies the simple inductive model as a legitimate description of secondary isotope effects of the second kind. The correlation of diminishing isotope effect per deuterium atom with increasing acidity is also invalidated by the present results. The syntheses of 9-thia-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene-9-oxide and thioxanthene-10-oxide are described. These compounds have been partially deuterated at their respective methylene positions. Spectral evidence indicates stereoselectivity of the methylene protons in the exchange reactions of both compounds. (author)

  17. Equilibrium mass-dependent fractionation relationships for triple oxygen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaobin; Liu, Yun

    2011-12-01

    With a growing interest in small 17O-anomaly, there is a pressing need for the precise ratio, ln 17α/ln 18α, for a particular mass-dependent fractionation process (MDFP) (e.g., for an equilibrium isotope exchange reaction). This ratio (also denoted as " θ") can be determined experimentally, however, such efforts suffer from the demand of well-defined process or a set of processes in addition to high precision analytical capabilities. Here, we present a theoretical approach from which high-precision ratios for MDFPs can be obtained. This approach will complement and serve as a benchmark for experimental studies. We use oxygen isotope exchanges in equilibrium processes as an example. We propose that the ratio at equilibrium, θE ≡ ln 17α/ln 18α, can be calculated through the equation below: θa-bE=κa+(κa-κb){ln18βb}/{ln18α} where 18βb is the fractionation factor between a compound "b" and the mono-atomic ideal reference material "O", 18αa-b is the fractionation factor between a and b and it equals to 18βa/ 18βb and κ is a new concept defined in this study as κ ≡ ln 17β/ln 18β. The relationship between θ and κ is similar to that between α and β. The advantages of using κ include the convenience in documenting a large number of θ values for MDFPs and in estimating any θ values using a small data set due to the fact that κ values are similar among O-bearing compounds with similar chemical groups. Frequency scaling factor, anharmonic corrections and clumped isotope effects are found insignificant to the κ value calculation. However, the employment of the rule of geometric mean (RGM) can significantly affect the κ value. There are only small differences in κ values among carbonates and the structural effect is smaller than that of chemical compositions. We provide κ values for most O-bearing compounds, and we argue that κ values for Mg-bearing and S-bearing compounds should be close to their high temperature limitation (i.e., 0.5210 for

  18. Identifying apparent local stable isotope equilibrium in a complex non-equilibrium system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuyang; Cao, Xiaobin; Wang, Jianwei; Bao, Huiming

    2018-02-28

    Although being out of equilibrium, biomolecules in organisms have the potential to approach isotope equilibrium locally because enzymatic reactions are intrinsically reversible. A rigorous approach that can describe isotope distribution among biomolecules and their apparent deviation from equilibrium state is lacking, however. Applying the concept of distance matrix in graph theory, we propose that apparent local isotope equilibrium among a subset of biomolecules can be assessed using an apparent fractionation difference (|Δα|) matrix, in which the differences between the observed isotope composition (δ') and the calculated equilibrium fractionation factor (1000lnβ) can be more rigorously evaluated than by using a previous approach for multiple biomolecules. We tested our |Δα| matrix approach by re-analyzing published data of different amino acids (AAs) in potato and in green alga. Our re-analysis shows that biosynthesis pathways could be the reason for an apparently close-to-equilibrium relationship inside AA families in potato leaves. Different biosynthesis/degradation pathways in tubers may have led to the observed isotope distribution difference between potato leaves and tubers. The analysis of data from green algae does not support the conclusion that AAs are further from equilibrium in glucose-cultured green algae than in the autotrophic ones. Application of the |Δα| matrix can help us to locate potential reversible reactions or reaction networks in a complex system such as a metabolic system. The same approach can be broadly applied to all complex systems that have multiple components, e.g. geochemical or atmospheric systems of early Earth or other planets. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Study of oxalic acid effect on equilibrium and kinetics of isotopic exchange between penta- and hexavalent neptunium in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Ionnikova, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometry at 25 deg C and ionic force μ=1.0 mol/l (KNO 3 +HNO 3 ) was used to show that at HNO 3 concentration 0.1-1.0 mol/l H 2 C 2 O 4 introduction to nitric acid solutions of Np 5+ in the presence of nitrite-ion resulted in the shift of equilibrium between Np 5+ and Np 6+ to the side of Np 6+ accumulation. The presence of H 2 C 2 O 4 at HNO 3 concentration > 1.0 mol/l doesn't affect the equilibrium position. The values of nominal equilibrium constant at different HNO 3 and H 2 C 2 O 4 concentrations were calculated. It was found that isotope exchange ( 239 Np/ 237 Np) between Np 5+ and Np 6+ in oxalate solutions proceeded more slowly than in oxalate absence. Rate constants of isotope exchange calculated at 9 deg C, μ=1.0 mol/l (KNO 3 ), H 2 C 2 O 4 concentration 0.01 mol/l and pH=2.2 and 3.5 are equal to 0.49x10 3 and 0.67x10 2 l/mol·min respectively. Mechanism of isotope exchange including electron transport between Np 5+ and Np 6+ oxalate complexes is suggested

  20. Equilibrium properties of dense hydrogen isotope gases based on the theory of simple fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; MacElroy, J M D

    2006-08-03

    We present a new method for the prediction of the equilibrium properties of dense gases containing hydrogen isotopes. The proposed approach combines the Feynman-Hibbs effective potential method and a deconvolution scheme introduced by Weeks et al. The resulting equations of state and the chemical potentials as functions of pressure for each of the hydrogen isotope gases depend on a single set of Lennard-Jones parameters. In addition to its simplicity, the proposed method with optimized Lennard-Jones potential parameters accurately describes the equilibrium properties of hydrogen isotope fluids in the regime of moderate temperatures and pressures. The present approach should find applications in the nonlocal density functional theory of inhomogeneous quantum fluids and should also be of particular relevance to hydrogen (clean energy) storage and to the separation of quantum isotopes by novel nanomaterials.

  1. Structural isotopic effect of the α/β-phase transition in the vanadium hydride and its influence on the equilibrium coefficient of separation of hydrogen isotopes in the gas-solid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magomedbekov, Eh.P.; Bochkarev, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    Equilibrium coefficient of hydrogen isotope separation (α H-D ) in the system of vanadium hydride VH n (solid, n ∼ 0.7)-H 2 (g) is measured by the counterbalancing method in a circulation facility and by the method of laser desorption at 298, 373, and 437 K. It is shown that the combination of highly anharmonic potential in the lattice octahedral sites and in significant difference in the energy of hydrogen atom coordination for tetra- and octahedral sites is the reason for unusual behaviour of the hydrogen isotope separation coefficient and the difference in crystal structures of vanadium hydride and deuteride [ru

  2. Isotope effect and isotope separation. A chemist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Takanobu

    2002-01-01

    What causes the isotope effects (IE)? This presentation will be centered around the equilibrium isotope effects due to the differences in the nuclear masses. The occurrence of the equilibrium constant, K, of isotope exchange reactions which differ from the values predicted by the classical theory of statistical mechanics, K cl , is explored. The non-classical K corresponds to the unit-stage separation factor, α, that is different from unity and forms a basis of an isotope separation process involving the chemical exchange reaction. Here, the word 'chemical exchange' includes not only the isotope exchange chemical reactions between two or more chemical species but also the isotope exchanges involving the equilibria between liquid and vapor phases and liquid-gas, liquid solution-gas, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid phases. In Section I, origins of the isotope effect phenomena will be explored and, in the process, various quantities used in discussions of isotope effect that have often caused confusions will be unambiguously defined. This Section will also correlate equilibrium constant with separation factor. In Section II, various forms of temperature-dependence of IE and separation factor will be discussed. (author)

  3. Assessment of local and regional isotopic equilibrium in the mantle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, A W; Hart, S R [Carnegie Institution of Washington, D.C. (USA). Dept. of Terrestrial Magnetism

    1978-02-01

    The assumption of local equilibrium during partial melting is fundamental to the interpretation of isotope and trace element data for mantle-derived rocks. If disequilibrium melting is significant, the scale of the chemical and isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle indicated by the data could be as small as the grain size of the mantle rock, and the isotope data themselves are then of doubtful value to the understanding of mantle processes. To assess the scale of isotopic heterogeneity in a partially molten asthenosphere the authors review the Sr isotopic data of volcanic rocks from oceanic regions and the available experimental data on diffusion kinetics in minerals and melts similar to those existing in the mantle. Although diffusion data are scarce and afflicted with uncertainties, most of the diffusion coefficients for cations in mantle minerals at temperatures of 1000 to 1200/sup 0/C appear to be greater than 10/sup -13/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/. Struntium diffusion in liquid basalt is more rapid, with diffusion coefficients of D = 10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ near 1300/sup 0/C. Simple model calculations show that, with these D values, a fluid-free mantle can maintain a state of disequilibrium on a centimeter scale for periods of 10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ years. The state of disequilibrium found in many mantle-derived xenoliths is thus easily explained. A partially molten mantle, on the other hand, will tend to equilibrate locally in less than 10/sup 5/ to 10/sup 6/ years. The analytical data on natural rocks likewise indicate that the inhomogeneities are both old (> 1.5 b.y.) and regional in character and that the consistent isotopic differences between ocean island and ocean floor volcanics cannot be explained by small-scall hetorogeneity of the source rock.

  4. EQUILIBRIUM AND KINETIC NITROGEN AND OXYGEN-ISOTOPE FRACTIONATIONS BETWEEN DISSOLVED AND GASEOUS N2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    INOUE, HY; MOOK, WG

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the equilibrium as well as kinetic stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionations between aqueous dissolved and gaseous N2O. The equilibrium fractionations, defined as the ratio of the isotopic abundance ratios (15R and 18R, respectively) of gaseous and

  5. Lithium isotope separation factors of some two-phase equilibrium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palko, A.A.; Drury, J.S.; Begun, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Isotope separation factors of seventeen two-phase equilibrium systems for lithium isotope enrichment have been determined. In all cases, lithium amalgam was used as one of the lithium-containing phases and was equilibrated with an aqueous or organic phase containing a lithium compound. In all systems examined, isotopic exchange was found to be extremely rapid, and 6 Li was concentrated in the amalgam phase. The isotopic separation factor for the LiOH(aqueous) vs Li(amalgam) system has been studied as a function of temperature from -2 to 80 degreeC. The values obtained have been compared with the ''electrolysis'' and exchange separation factors given in the literature. The two-phase systems, LiCl(ethylenediamine) vs Li(amalgam) and LiCl(propylenediamine) vs Li(amalgam), have been studied, and the isotopic separation factors have been determined as functions of the temperature. The factors for the two systems have been found to be substantially the same (within limits of the errors involved) over the temperature range studied (0 to 100 degreeC) as those for the aqueous system. The isotopic separation factors for the seventeen systems have been tabulated, and correlations have been drawn that show the salt and solvent effects upon the values obtained

  6. The effect of carbonic anhydrase on the kinetics and equilibrium of the oxygen isotope exchange in the CO2-H2O system: Implications for δ18O vital effects in biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2012-10-01

    Interpretations of the primary paleoceanographic information recorded in stable oxygen isotope values (δ18O) of biogenic CaCO3 can be obscured by disequilibrium effects. CaCO3 is often depleted in 18O relative to the δ18O values expected for precipitation in thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater as a result of vital effects. Vital effects in δ18O have been explained in terms of the influence of fluid pH on the overall δ18O of the sum of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species (often referred to as "pH model") and in terms of 18O depletion as a result of the kinetic effects associated with CO2 hydration (CO2 + H2O ↔ H2CO3 ↔ HCO3- + H+) and CO2 hydroxylation (CO2 + OH- ↔ HCO3-) in the calcification sites (so-called "kinetic model"). This study addresses the potential role of an enzyme, carbonic anhydrase (CA), that catalyzes inter-conversion of CO2 and HCO3- in relation to the underlying mechanism of vital effects. We performed quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments in order to examine the changes in 18O equilibration rate as a function of CA concentration. Experiments were performed at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are comparable to the average surface ocean pH and elevated pH levels observed in the calcification sites of some coral and foraminiferal species, respectively. The rate of uncatalyzed 18O exchange in the CO2-H2O system is governed by the pH-dependent DIC speciation and the kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydration and hydroxylation, which can be summarized by a simple mathematical expression. The results from control experiments (no CA addition) are in agreement with this expression. The results from control experiments also suggest that the most recently published kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydroxylation has been overestimated. When CA is present, the 18O equilibration process is greatly enhanced at both pH levels due to the catalysis of CO2 hydration by the enzyme. For example, the time required for 18O

  7. Non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model for the design of boron isotopes chemical exchange column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Peng; Fan, Kaigong; Guo, Xianghai; Zhang, Haocui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model instead of a distillation equilibrium model to calculate boron isotopes separation. • We apply the model to calculate the needed column height to meet prescribed separation requirements. - Abstract: To interpret the phenomenon of chemical exchange in boron isotopes separation accurately, the process is specified as an absorption–reaction–desorption hybrid process instead of a distillation equilibrium model, the non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model is put forward and a mass transfer enhancement factor E is introduced to find the packing height needed to meet the specified separation requirements with MATLAB.

  8. Equilibrium mercury isotope fractionation between dissolved Hg(II) species and thiol-bound Hg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiederhold, Jan G.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Daniel, Kelly; Infante, Ivan; Bourdon, Bernard; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    Stable Hg isotope ratios provide a new tool to trace environmental Hg cycling. Thiols (-SH) are the dominant Hg-binding groups in natural organic matter. Here, we report experimental and computational results on equilibrium Hg isotope fractionation between dissolved Hg(II) species and thiol-bound

  9. Strontium isotope fractionation during strontianite (SrCO3) dissolution, precipitation and at equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Harrison, Anna L.; Eisenhauer, Anton; Dietzel, Martin

    2017-12-01

    In this study we examine the behavior of stable Sr isotopes between strontianite [SrCO3] and reactive fluid during mineral dissolution, precipitation, and at chemical equilibrium. Experiments were performed in batch reactors at 25 °C in 0.01 M NaCl solutions wherein the pH was adjusted by bubbling of a water saturated gas phase of pure CO2 or atmospheric air. The equilibrium Sr isotope fractionation between strontianite and fluid after dissolution of the solid under 1 atm CO2 atmosphere was estimated as Δ88/86SrSrCO3-fluid = δ88/86Sr SrCO3 - δ88/86Srfluid = -0.05 ± 0.01‰. On the other hand, during strontianite precipitation, an enrichment of the fluid phase in 88Sr, the heavy isotopomer, was observed. The evolution of the δ88/86Srfluid during strontianite precipitation can be modeled using a Rayleigh distillation approach and the estimated, kinetically driven, fractionation factor αSrCO3-fluid between solid and fluid is calculated to be 0.99985 ± 0.00003 corresponding to Δ88/86SrSrCO3-fluid = -0.15‰. The obtained results further support that under chemical equilibrium conditions between solid and fluid a continuous exchange of isotopes occurs until the system approaches isotopic equilibrium. This isotopic exchange is not limited to the outer surface layer of the strontianite crystal, but extends to ∼7-8 unit cells below the crystal surface. The behavior of Sr isotopes in this study is in excellent agreement with the concept of dynamic equilibrium and it suggests that the time needed for achievement of chemical equilibrium is generally shorter compared to that for isotopic equilibrium. Thus it is suggested that in natural Sr-bearing carbonates an isotopic change may still occur close to thermodynamic equilibrium, despite no observable change in aqueous elemental concentrations. As such, a secondary and ongoing change of Sr isotope signals in carbonate minerals caused by isotopic re-equilibration with fluids has to be considered in order to use Sr

  10. INTRAMOLECULAR ISOTOPE EFFECTS IN HYDROCARBON MASS SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, D. P.; Schachtschneider, J. H.

    1963-07-15

    Approximate calculations based on the quasi-equilibrium rate theory of the origin of mass spectra are shown to lead to an approximately correct magnitude for the intramolecular ( pi /sup -/) isotope effect on C--H bond dissociation probabilities of various deuterohydrocarbons. (auth)

  11. Noncovalent Hydrogen Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Breslavskaya, N. N.

    2018-02-01

    Zero-point energies (ZPE) and isotope effects, induced by intermolecular, noncovalent vibrations, are computed and tested by experimental data. The ZPE differences of H- and D-complexes of water with hydrogen, methane, and water molecules are about 100-300 cal/mol; they result to isotope effects IE of 1.20-1.70. Semi-ionic bonds between metal ions and water ligands in M(H2O) 6 2+ complexes are much stronger; their ZPEs are about 12-14 kcal/mol per molecule and result to IE of 1.9-2.1 at 300 K. Protonated (deuterated) water and biwater exhibit the largest ZPE differences and isotope effects; the latter are 25-28 and 12-13 for water and biwater, respectively. Noncovalent IEs contribute markedly into the experimentally measured effects and explain many anomalous and even magic properties of the effects, such as the dependence of IE on the solvents and on the presence of the third substances, enormously large isotope effects at the mild conditions, the difference between IEs measured in the reactions of individual protiated and deuterated compounds and those measured in their mixture. Noncovalent IEs are not negligible and should be taken into account to make correct and substantiated conclusions on the reaction mechanisms. The kinetic equations are derived for the total isotope effects, which include noncovalent IEs as additive factors.

  12. The temporal evolution of magnesium isotope fractionation during hydromagnesite dissolution, precipitation, and at equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Berninger, Ulf-Niklas; Pérez-Fernàndez, Andrea; Chmeleff, Jérôme; Mavromatis, Vasileios

    2018-04-01

    This study provides experimental evidence of the resetting of the magnesium (Mg) isotope signatures of hydromagnesite in the presence of an aqueous fluid during its congruent dissolution, precipitation, and at equilibrium at ambient temperatures over month-long timescales. All experiments were performed in batch reactors in aqueous sodium carbonate buffer solutions having a pH from 7.8 to 9.2. The fluid phase in all experiments attained bulk chemical equilibrium within analytical uncertainty with hydromagnesite within several days, but the experiments were allowed to continue for up to 575 days. During congruent hydromagnesite dissolution, the fluid first became enriched in isotopically light Mg compared to the dissolving hydromagnesite, but this Mg isotope composition became heavier after the fluid attained chemical equilibrium with the mineral. The δ26Mg composition of the fluid was up to ∼0.35‰ heavier than the initial dissolving hydromagnesite at the end of the dissolution experiments. Hydromagnesite precipitation was provoked during one experiment by increasing the reaction temperature from 4 to 50 °C. The δ26Mg composition of the fluid increased as hydromagnesite precipitated and continued to increase after the fluid attained bulk equilibrium with this phase. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that mineral-fluid equilibrium is dynamic (i.e. dissolution and precipitation occur at equal, non-zero rates at equilibrium). Moreover the results presented in this study confirm (1) that the transfer of material from the solid to the fluid phase may not be conservative during stoichiometric dissolution, and (2) that the isotopic compositions of carbonate minerals can evolve even when the mineral is in bulk chemical equilibrium with its coexisting fluid. This latter observation suggests that the preservation of isotopic signatures of carbonate minerals in the geological record may require a combination of the isolation of fluid-mineral system

  13. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  14. Using the Wolfsberg--Schactschneider program to calculate equilibrium constants for isotopic acetylenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.K.K.; Pyper, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Equilibrium constants were calculated for the gas-phase isotopic exchange reactions C 2 H 2 + C 2 D 2 = 2C 2 HD and C 2 H 2 + D 2 O = C 2 D 2 + H 2 O at temperatures ranging from 40 to 2000 0 K. No corrections to the harmonic approximation were made. The results agree quite well with experimental measurements

  15. A study of chemical equilibrium of tri-component mixtures of hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, Ioana; Cristescu, I.; Peculea, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we present a model for computing the equilibrium constants for chemical reactions between hydrogen's isotopes as function of temperature. The equilibrium constants were expressed with the aid of Gibbs potential and the partition function of the mixture. We assessed the partition function for hydrogen's isotopes having in view that some nuclei are fermions and other bosons. As results we plotted the values of equilibrium constants as function of temperature. Knowing these values we determined the deuterium distribution on species (for mixture H 2 -HD-D 2 ) as function of total deuterium concentration and the tritium distribution on species (for mixtures D 2 -DT-T 2 and H 2 -HT-T 2 ) as function of total tritium concentration. (authors)

  16. Equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganic aqueous Fe(III) and the siderophore complex, Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Baker, Joel A.; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2008-01-01

    be controlled by isotope fractionation between the free and complexed iron.We have determined the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation induced by organic ligand activity in experiments with solutions having co-existing inorganic Fe(III) species and siderophore complexes, Fedesferrioxamine B (at pH 2). The two......-type fractionation during precipitation, this experiment yielded an isotope fractionation factor of a56Fesolution-solid=1.00027. Calculations based on these results indicate that isotopic re-equilibration is unlikely to significantly affect our determined equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganically...... and organically complexed Fe. To determine the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganically and organically bound Fe(III), experiments with variable proportions of inorganic Fe were carried out at 25 °C. Irrespective of the proportion of inorganic Fe, equilibrium fractionation factors were within...

  17. pH-dependent equilibrium isotope fractionation associated with the compound specific nitrogen and carbon isotope analysis of substituted anilines by SPME-GC/IRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarpeli-Liati, Marita; Turgeon, Aurora; Garr, Ashley N; Arnold, William A; Cramer, Christopher J; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2011-03-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) was used to elucidate the effects of N-atom protonation on the analysis of N and C isotope signatures of selected aromatic amines. Precise and accurate isotope ratios were measured using polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) as the SPME fiber material at solution pH-values that exceeded the pK(a) of the substituted aniline's conjugate acid by two pH-units. Deviations of δ(15)N and δ(13)C-values from reference measurements by elemental analyzer IRMS were small (IRMS. Under these conditions, the detection limits for accurate isotope ratio measurements were between 0.64 and 2.1 mg L(-1) for δ(15)N and between 0.13 and 0.54 mg L(-1) for δ(13)C, respectively. Substantial inverse N isotope fractionation was observed by SPME-GC/IRMS as the fraction of protonated species increased with decreasing pH leading to deviations of -20‰ while the corresponding δ(13)C-values were largely invariant. From isotope ratio analysis at different solution pHs and theoretical calculations by density functional theory, we derived equilibrium isotope effects, EIEs, pertinent to aromatic amine protonation of 0.980 and 1.001 for N and C, respectively, which were very similar for all compounds investigated. Our work shows that N-atom protonation can compromise accurate compound-specific N isotope analysis of aromatic amines.

  18. Isotope effects in gas-phase chemical reactions and photodissociation processes: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The origins of isotope effects in equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemical processes are reviewed. In non-equilibrium processes, attention is given to isotope effects in simple bimolecular reactions, symmetry-related reactions, and photodissociation processes. Recent examples of isotope effects in these areas are reviewed. Some indication of other scientific areas for which measurements and/or calculations of isotope effects are used is also given. Examples presented focus on neutral molecule chemistry and in many cases complement examples considered in greater detail in the other chapters of this volume

  19. Equilibrium properties of proximity effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve, D.; Pothier, H.; Gueron, S.; Birge, N.O.; Devoret, M.

    1996-01-01

    The proximity effect in diffusive normal-superconducting (NS) nano-structures is described by the Usadel equations for the electron pair correlations. We show that these equations obey a variational principle with a potential which generalizes the Ginzburg-Landau energy functional. We discuss simple examples of NS circuits using this formalism. In order to test the theoretical predictions of the Usadel equations, we have measured the density of states as a function of energy on a long N wire in contact with a S wire at one end, at different distances from the NS interface. (authors)

  20. Equilibrium properties of proximity effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteve, D.; Pothier, H.; Gueron, S.; Birge, N.O.; Devoret, M.

    1996-12-31

    The proximity effect in diffusive normal-superconducting (NS) nano-structures is described by the Usadel equations for the electron pair correlations. We show that these equations obey a variational principle with a potential which generalizes the Ginzburg-Landau energy functional. We discuss simple examples of NS circuits using this formalism. In order to test the theoretical predictions of the Usadel equations, we have measured the density of states as a function of energy on a long N wire in contact with a S wire at one end, at different distances from the NS interface. (authors). 12 refs.

  1. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K K; Wielandt, D; Schiller, M; Bizzarro, M

    2016-04-22

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of these species can result in incomplete Cr recovery during chromatographic purification. Because of large mass-dependent inter-species isotope fractionation, incomplete recovery can affect the accuracy of high-precision Cr isotope analysis. Here, we demonstrate widely differing cation distribution coefficients of Cr(III)-species (Cr(3+), CrCl(2+) and CrCl2(+)) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ∼1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr(3+), intermediates in CrCl(2+) and the lightest in CrCl2(+)/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ∼25% Cr (in the form of Cr(3+)) through chromatographic purification, this translates into 185 ppm/amu offset in the stable Cr isotope ratio of the residual sample. Depending on the validity of the mass-bias correction during isotope analysis, this further results in artificial mass-independent effects in the mass-bias corrected (53)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(53)Cr* of 5.2 ppm) and (54)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(54)Cr* of 13.5 ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high and reproducible Cr recovery. This is achieved either through 1) effective promotion of Cr(3+) by >5 days exposure to HNO3H2O2 solutions at room temperature, resulting in >∼98% Cr recovery for most types of sample matrices tested using a cationic chromatographic retention strategy, or 2) formation of Cr(III)-Cl complexes through exposure to concentrated HCl at high temperature (>120 °C) for several hours, resulting in >97.5% Cr recovery using a

  2. Ice-vapor equilibrium fractionation factor of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellehøj, Mads Dam; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Johnsen, Sigfus Johann

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: The equilibrium fractionation factors govern the relative change in the isotopic composition during phase transitions of water. The commonly used results, which were published more than 40 years ago, are limited to a minimum temperature of -33 degrees C. This limits the reliability...... values, with a temperature dependency in accordance with theory for equilibrium fractionation. We obtain the following expressions for the temperature dependency of the fractionation coefficients: ln(alpha(delta 2H)) = 0.2133 - 203.10/T + 48888/T-2 ln(alpha(delta 18O)) = 0.0831 - 49.192/T + 8312.5/T2...... Compared with previous experimental work, a significantly larger for H-2 is obtained while, for O-18, is larger for temperatures below -20 degrees C and slightly lower for temperatures above this. CONCLUSIONS: Using the new values for alpha, a Rayleigh distillation model shows significant changes in both...

  3. Isotopic equilibrium between precipitation and water vapor: evidence from continental rains in central Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, K.; Gerlein, C.; Kemeny, P. C.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    An accurate understanding of the relationships between the isotopic composition of liquid water and that of water vapor in the environment can help describe hydrologic processes across many scales. One such relationship is the isotopic equilibrium between falling raindrops and the surrounding vapor. The degree of equilibration is used to model the isotopic composition of precipitation in isotope-enable general circulation models and land-atmosphere exchange models. Although this equilibrium has been a topic of isotope hydrology research for more than four decades, few studies have included vapor measurements to validate modeling efforts. Recent advances in laser technology have allowed for in situ vapor measurements at high temporal resolution (e.g., >1 Hz). Here we present concomitant rain and vapor measurements for a series of 17 rain events during the 'Continental' rainy season (June through August) at Mpala Research Center in central Kenya. Rain samples (n=218) were collected at intervals of 2 to 35 minutes (median of 3 minutes) depending on the rain rate (0.4 to 10.5 mm/hr). The volume-weighted mean rain values for δ18O, δ2H and D-excess (δ2H - 8* δ18O) were 0.1 ‰, 10.7 ‰, and 10.1 ‰. These values are more enriched than the annual weighted means reported for the area (-2.2 ‰, -7.6 ‰, and 11.0 ‰, respectively). Vapor was measured continuously at ~2Hz (DLT-100, Los Gatos Research), with an inverted funnel intake 4m above the ground surface. The mean vapor isotopic composition during the rain events was -10.0 +/- 1.2 ‰ (1 σ) for δ18O and -73.9 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. The difference between the rain sample isotopic composition and that of liquid in isotopic equilibrium with the corresponding vapor at the ambient temperature was 0.8 +/- 2.2 ‰ for δ18O and 6.2 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. This disequilibrium was found to correlate with the natural log of rain rate (R2 of 0.26 for δ18O and 0.46 for δ2H), with lower rain rates having larger

  4. Non-equilibrium effects in the plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einfeld, D.

    1975-01-01

    Radial dependences of non-equilibrium effects of a He plasma were studied in a wall-stabilized short-time discharge. The electron density (nsub(e) = 2.5 x 10 22 m -3 ), the electron temperature and the equilibrium shift were determined by calculations of the continuum beam density and the beam densities of one He-I and one He-II line, respectively. In the discharge axis, the overpopulation factors of the ground state of He-I and He-II are about 75. As the distance to the axis increases, they increase for He-I and decrease for He-II. Except for the usual errors of measurement, the overpopulation factors found here correspond to those calculated from the balance equations (Drawin). (orig./AK) [de

  5. Isotope effects in photochemical rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, F.

    1983-01-01

    Taking anthracene resp. 9-deuteroanthracene as the initial substance, different substitution products have been prepared. The products originating by direct photolysis have been characterized and their structure has been determined. By comparing the measured kinetic isotope effect and the quantum yield of the nondeuterated and the monodeuterated fluorenes formed it could been demonstrated that the isotope effect mainly is due to the reaction rates and the influence of the deuterium substitution upon the radiationless desactivation against that is small. (HBR) [de

  6. Kinetic isotope effect in the thermolysis of methylenecyclobutane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chickos, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    The intramolecular kinetic isotope effect for the thermolysis of equilibrated methylenecyclobutane-d 2 was investigated at 515 0 C as a function of pressure. A high-pressure value of k/sub H/k/sub D/ (ethylene/ethylene-d 2 ) = 0.9 was obtained at 13 cm of N 2 pressure. This value decreased to 0.86 at 70 μm total pressure. No intermolecular kinetic isotope effect was measured for the formation of ethylene from labeled and unlabeled methylenecyclobutane. The pressure and temperature dependence of the intramolecular kinetic isotope effect was used as evidence in establishing the inverse nature of the effect. The isotope effect observed was explained in terms of competing equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects in which the equilibrium isotope effects dominate. It was concluded on the bases of these results that an acyclic intermediate is involved in the fragmentation of methylenecyclobutane to ethylene and allene. The results also support the notion that deuterium prefers to accumulate at the methylene group with the greatest p character in the carbon--hydrogen bond. 1 figure, 4 tables

  7. Specific equilibrium behavior of hydrogen isotopes adsorbed onto synthetic zeolite A-type governed by lithium cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Shoji; Kotoh, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Isotherms for H 2 and D 2 adsorbed onto SZ-LiA at 77.4 K are shown. • The adsorption isotherms exhibit specific deviation in the range lower than 10 Pa. • SZ-LiA indicates the power of several 100-times at 0.1 Pa, compared with SZ-NaA. • Experimental isotherms are described empirically by a dual-site Langmuir equation. • The isotope effect on adsorption isotherms appears in the Langmuir constants. -- Abstract: Since synthetic zeolites (SZs) are powerfully adsorptive for hydrogen isotopes at cryogenic temperatures such as liquefied nitrogen, adsorption processes using these have been considered applicable to such as recovery of tritium from the lithium blanket of DT fusion reactor system. Onto these zeolites the adsorptions isotherms for hydrogen isotopes onto SZ-NaA, SZ-CaA and SZ-NaX at 77.4 K were already clarified experimentally and analytically. These isotherms exhibit similar profiles of Langmuir type. In this work, adsorption isotherms were examined for H 2 and D 2 on SZ-LiA at 77.4 K. SZ-LiA was made from SZ-NaA by exchanging its sodium ions for lithium ones, provided by TOSOH Corp. The experimental results demonstrate the specific equilibrium behavior of hydrogen isotopes adsorbed on SZ-LiA, deviating from isothermal profiles on SZ-CaA and SZ-NaX. SZ-LiA show the isothermal profiles of adsorption for H 2 and D 2 similar to on the conventional zeolites in the range from around 1 kPa to the atmospheric pressure, but exhibit a plateau around 1 mol/kg between 0.1 Pa and 100 Pa, while other zeolites show linearly profiling isotherms. This deviation indicates the adsorptive power of SZ-LiA remarkably greater than that of the others

  8. Site-Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Propane: Mass spectrometric methods, equilibrium temperature dependence, and kinetics of exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Ponton, C.; Kitchen, N.; Lloyd, M. K.; Lawson, M.; Formolo, M. J.; Eiler, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Intramolecular isotope ordering can constrain temperatures of synthesis, mechanisms of formation, and/or source substrates of organic compounds. Here we explore site-specific hydrogen isotope variations of propane. Statistical thermodynamic models predict that at equilibrium methylene hydrogen (-CH2-) in propane will be 10's of per mil higher in D/H ratio than methyl hydrogen (-CH3) at geologically relevant temperatures, and that this difference is highly temperature dependent ( 0.5-1 ‰/°C). Chemical-kinetic controls on site-specific D/H in propane could constrain the mechanisms, conditions and extents of propane synthesis or destruction. We have developed a method for measuring the difference in D/H ratio between methylene and methyl hydrogen in propane by gas source mass spectrometry. The data were measured using the Thermo Fisher Double Focusing Sector high resolution mass spectrometer (DFS), and involve comparison of the D/H ratios of molecular ion (C3H8+) and the ethyl fragmental ion (C2H5+). We demonstrate the accuracy and precision of this method through analysis of D-labeled and independently analyzed propanes. In the exchange experiments, propane was heated (100-200 oC) either alone or in the presence of D-enriched water (δD=1,1419 ‰ SMOW), with or without one of several potentially catalytic substrates for hours to weeks. Propane was found to exchange hydrogen with water vigorously at 200 °C in the presence of metal catalysts. In the presence of Ni catalyst, methylene hydrogen exchanges 2.5 times faster than methyl hydrogen. Hydrogen exchange in the presence of Pd catalyst is more effective and can equilibrate hydrogen isotope distribution on propane on the order of 7 days. Isotopic exchange in the presence of natural materials have also been tested, but is only measurable in the methylene group at 200 °C. High catalytic activity of Pd permits attainment of a bracketed, time-invariant equilibrium state that we use to calibrate the site

  9. Equilibrium isotope exchange kinetics of native and site-specific mutant forms of E. coli aspartate transcarbamoylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedler, F.C.; Hsuanyu, Y.; Kantrowitz, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    Isotope exchange kinetics at equilibrium (EIEK) have been used to probe the kinetic and regulatory mechanisms of native aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from E. coli at pH 7.0, 30 0 . Substrate saturation patterns were most consistent with a preferred order random kinetic mechanism: C-P prior to L-Asp, C-Asp released before Pi, with the Asp ↔ C-Asp exchange rate 5X faster than C-P ↔ Pi. Computer simulations allow one to fit the EIEK experimental data and to arrive at the best set of kinetic constants for a given enzyme state. These approaches have been applied to modified ATCase. Bound CTP and ATP were observed, respectively, to inhibit and activate differentially Asp ↔ C-Asp, but not C-P ↔ Pi, indicating that these modifiers alter the association-dissociation rates of L-Asp and C-Asp but not of C-P or Pi. Low levels of PALA activated both exchange rates (due to shifting the T-R equilibrium), but higher [PALA] completely blocked both exchanges. The effects of a site-specific mutation of Tyr240 Phe have been similarly probed by EIEK methods. The Phe240 mutant enzyme exhibited kinetic properties markedly different from native ATCase: the data indicate that Phe240 ATCase is much closer to an R-state enzyme than is native enzyme

  10. Stable isotope geochemical study of Pamukkale travertines: New evidences of low-temperature non-equilibrium calcite-water fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kele, Sándor; Özkul, Mehmet; Fórizs, István; Gökgöz, Ali; Baykara, Mehmet Oruç; Alçiçek, Mehmet Cihat; Németh, Tibor

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present the first detailed geochemical study of the world-famous actively forming Pamukkale and Karahayit travertines (Denizli Basin, SW-Turkey) and associated thermal waters. Sampling was performed along downstream sections through different depositional environments (vent, artificial channel and lake, terrace-pools and cascades of proximal slope, marshy environment of distal slope). δ 13C travertine values show significant increase (from + 6.1‰ to + 11.7‰ PDB) with increasing distance from the spring orifice, whereas the δ 18O travertine values show only slight increase downstream (from - 10.7‰ to - 9.1‰ PDB). Mainly the CO 2 outgassing caused the positive downstream shift (~ 6‰) in the δ 13C travertine values. The high δ 13C values of Pamukkale travertines located closest to the spring orifice (not affected by secondary processes) suggest the contribution of CO 2 liberated by thermometamorphic decarbonation besides magmatic sources. Based on the gradual downstream increase of the concentration of the conservative Na +, K +, Cl -, evaporation was estimated to be 2-5%, which coincides with the moderate effect of evaporation on the water isotope composition. Stable isotopic compositions of the Pamukkale thermal water springs show of meteoric origin, and indicate a Local Meteoric Water Line of Denizli Basin to be between the Global Meteoric Water Line (Craig, 1961) and Western Anatolian Meteoric Water Line (Şimşek, 2003). Detailed evaluation of several major and trace element contents measured in the water and in the precipitated travertine along the Pamukkale MM section revealed which elements are precipitated in the carbonate or concentrated in the detrital minerals. Former studies on the Hungarian Egerszalók travertine (Kele et al., 2008a, b, 2009) had shown that the isotopic equilibrium is rarely maintained under natural conditions during calcite precipitation in the temperature range between 41 and 67 °C. In this paper

  11. Effect of Equilibrium Flow on Plasma Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Lahiri, S.; Sakanaka, P.H.; Dasgupta, B.

    2003-01-01

    The transition to high confinement modes have been identified with the occurrence of strong shear flow near the plasma boundary. Plasma flow has also been associated with various instabilities, heating and other physical processes. As a result, it has become very important to study the effect of such flows on various plasma parameters. In this paper, we present the numerical solution of plasma equilibrium with incompressible toroidal and poloidal flows in several magnetic confinement configurations including tokamaks. The code, which was reported in the last conference, has been used to solve the problem in both circular and D-shaped devices. A parametric study on the generation of shear flow due to radial electric fields has been carried out. Through this study, it has been possible to generate plasma equilibria having sharp pressure gradients which are remarkably close to those reported in various H-mode experiments. The effects of flow on reverse shear equilibria and on the position of the magnetic axis has been studied. Finally, a detailed study has been carried out to understand the effect of flows on important plasma parameters, such as the poloidal flux function, β, energy confinement time

  12. Non-linear Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    ’s stratosphere is nearly mass dependent, and only a small fraction of the observed anomalous oxygen-17 excess can be attributed to N2O photolysis. In contrast, stratospheric photolysis produces a significant inverse clumped isotope effect.(ii) Stratospheric OCS photolysis significantly enrich the remaining OCS...

  13. Equilibrium & Nonequilibrium Fluctuation Effects in Biopolymer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachan, Devin Michael

    speculate that cells take advantage of this equilibrium effect by tuning near the transition point, where small changes in free cross-linker density will affect large structural rearrangements between free filament networks and networks of bundles. Cells are naturally found far from equilibrium, where the active influx of energy from ATP consumption controls the dynamics. Motor proteins actively generate forces within biopolymer networks, and one may ask how these differ from the random stresses characteristic of equilibrium fluctuations. Besides the trivial observation that the magnitude is independent of temperature, I find that the processive nature of the motors creates a temporally correlated, or colored, noise spectrum. I model the network with a nonlinear scalar elastic theory in the presence of active driving, and study the long distance and large scale properties of the system with renormalization group techniques. I find that there is a new critical point associated with diverging correlation time, and that the colored noise produces novel frequency dependence in the renormalized transport coefficients. Finally, I study marginally elastic solids which have vanishing shear modulus due to the presence of soft modes, modes with zero deformation cost. Although network coordination is a useful metric for determining the mechanical response of random spring networks in mechanical equilibrium, it is insufficient for describing networks under external stress. In particular, under-constrained networks which are fluid-like at zero load will dynamically stiffen at a critical strain, as observed in numerical simulations and experimentally in many biopolymer networks. Drawing upon analogies to the stress induced unjamming of emulsions, I develop a kinetic theory to explain the rigidity transition in spring and filament networks. Describing the dynamic evolution of non-affine deformation via a simple mechanistic picture, I recover the emergent nonlinear strain

  14. Lithium isotope effect accompanying electrochemical intercalation of lithium into graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Yanase, S; Oi, T

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has been electrochemically intercalated from a 1:2 (v/v) mixed solution of ethylene carbonate (EC) and methylethyl carbonate (MEC) containing 1 M LiClO sub 4 into graphite, and the lithium isotope fractionation accompanying the intercalation was observed. The lighter isotope was preferentially fractionated into graphite. The single-stage lithium isotope separation factor ranged from 1.007 to 1.025 at 25 C and depended little on the mole ratio of lithium to carbon of the lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (Li-GIC) formed. The separation factor increased with the relative content of lithium. This dependence seems consistent with the existence of an equilibrium isotope effect between the solvated lithium ion in the EC/MEC electrolyte solution and the lithium in graphite, and with the formation of a solid electrolyte interfaces on graphite at the early stage of intercalation. (orig.)

  15. Isotope exchange between alkaline earth metal hydroxide and HTO water in the equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, H.; Gounome, J.; Kano, N.

    1997-01-01

    In order reveal to what extent tritium ( 3 H or T) can be incorporated into hydroxides, the isotope exchange reaction (OT-for-OH exchange reaction) between each alkaline earth metal hydroxide (M(OH) 2 ), where M means alkaline earth metal (M=Ca, Sr or Ba) and HTO water was observed homogeneously at 30 deg C under equilibrium after mixing. Consequently, the followings were obtained: a quantitative relation between the electronegativity of each M ion and the ability (of the M ion) incorporating OT - into the M hydroxide can be found and the ability is small when the temperature is high, the exchange rate for the OT-for-OH exchange reaction is small when the electronegativity of the M ion in the M hydroxide is great, as for the dissociation of HTO water, it seems that formula (HTO ↔ T + + OH - ) is more predominant than the formula (HTO ↔H + + OT - ) when the temperature is high and the method used in this work is useful to estimate the reactivity of a certain alkaline material. (author)

  16. Estimating Equilibrium Effects of Job Search Assistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier, Pieter; Muller, Paul; van der Klaauw, Bas

    that the nonparticipants in the experiment regions find jobs slower after the introduction of the activation program (relative to workers in other regions). We then estimate an equilibrium search model. This model shows that a large scale role out of the activation program decreases welfare, while a standard partial...... microeconometric cost-benefit analysis would conclude the opposite....

  17. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: Neviniza-VA@nrcki.ru; Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu., E-mail: yuri.titarenko@itep.ru [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing {sup 233}U from {sup 232}Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  18. A new method for studying iodine metabolism; the isotopic equilibrium method - kinetic and quantitative aspects of measurements made on rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, C.

    1964-05-01

    The isotopic equilibrium method which has been developed in the case of the rat has made it possible to measure the absolute values of the principal parameters of iodine metabolism in this animal. The quantities and concentrations of iodine have been measured in the thyroid gland and in the plasma with a sensitivity of 0.001 μg of 127 I. This sensitivity has made it possible to measure pools as small as the iodide and the free iodotyrosines of the thyroid and to demonstrate the absence of free iodotyrosines in the plasma of the normal rat. In vivo, the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the iodine content of the thyroid gland and to calculate the intensity of this gland's secretion without removing it. By double labelling with 125 I and 131 I the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the flux, intensity of the intrathyroidal recycling as well as the turnover rates of all the iodine containing compounds of the thyroid gland. For this gland no precursor-product relationship has been found between The iodotyrosines (MIT and DIT) and the iodothyronines (T 4 and T 3 ). The absence of this relationship is due to the heterogeneity of the thyroglobulin turnover. It has been shown furthermore that there exists in the plasma an organic fraction of the iodine which is different to thyroglobulin and which is renewed more rapidly than the circulating hormones T 3 and T 4 . The isotopic equilibrium method is very useful for series measurements of iodine. It makes it possible furthermore to improve the biochemical fractionations by adding carriers without affecting the subsequent 127 I measurements. (author) [fr

  19. Non-equilibrium synergistic effects in atmospheric pressure plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Heng; Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Chen, Jian; Li, He-Ping; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2018-03-19

    Non-equilibrium is one of the important features of an atmospheric gas discharge plasma. It involves complicated physical-chemical processes and plays a key role in various actual plasma processing. In this report, a novel complete non-equilibrium model is developed to reveal the non-equilibrium synergistic effects for the atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasmas (AP-LTPs). It combines a thermal-chemical non-equilibrium fluid model for the quasi-neutral plasma region and a simplified sheath model for the electrode sheath region. The free-burning argon arc is selected as a model system because both the electrical-thermal-chemical equilibrium and non-equilibrium regions are involved simultaneously in this arc plasma system. The modeling results indicate for the first time that it is the strong and synergistic interactions among the mass, momentum and energy transfer processes that determine the self-consistent non-equilibrium characteristics of the AP-LTPs. An energy transfer process related to the non-uniform spatial distributions of the electron-to-heavy-particle temperature ratio has also been discovered for the first time. It has a significant influence for self-consistently predicting the transition region between the "hot" and "cold" equilibrium regions of an AP-LTP system. The modeling results would provide an instructive guidance for predicting and possibly controlling the non-equilibrium particle-energy transportation process in various AP-LTPs in future.

  20. Modeling Equilibrium Fe Isotope Fractionation in Fe-Organic Complexes: Implications for the use of Fe Isotopes as a Biomarker and Trends Based on the Properties of Bound Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagal-Goldman, S.; Kubicki, J. D.

    2006-05-01

    Fe Isotopes have been proposed as a useful tracer of biological and geochemical processes. Key to understanding the effects these various processes have on Fe isotopes is accurate modeling of the reactions responsible for the isotope fractionations. In this study, we examined the theoretical basis for the claims that Fe isotopes can be used as a biomarker. This was done by using molecular orbital/density functional theory (MO/DFT) calculations to predict the equilibrium fractionation of Fe isotopes due to changes in the redox state and the bonding environment of Fe. Specifically, we predicted vibrational frequencies for iron desferrioxamine (Fe-DFOB), iron triscatechol (Fe(cat)3), iron trisoxalate (Fe(ox)3), and hexaaquo iron (Fe(H2O)6) for complexes containing both ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) iron. Using these vibrational frequencies, we then predicted fractionation factors between these six complexes. The predicted fractionation factors resulting from changes in the redox state of Fe fell in the range 2.5- 3.5‰. The fractionation factors resulting from changes in the bonding environment of Fe ranged from 0.2 to 1.4‰. These results indicate that changes in the bonding strength of Fe ligands are less important to Fe isotope fractionation processes than are changes to the redox state of Fe. The implications for use of Fe as a tracer of biological processes is clear: abiological redox changes must be ruled out in a sample before Fe isotopes are considered as a potential biomarker. Furthermore, the use of Fe isotopes to measure the redox state of the Earths surface environment through time is supported by this work, since changes in the redox state of Fe appear to be the more important driver of isotopic fractionations. In addition to the large differences between redox-driven fractionations and ligand-driven fractionations, we will also show general trends in the demand for heavy Fe isotopes as a function of properties of the bound ligand. This will help the

  1. Non-equilibrium effects on the chemistry of nebular condensates - Implications for the planets and asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blander, M.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetic effects, for example nucleation constraints and slow reactions, should have been important in nebular condensation. Consideration of these effects leads to the prediction of pressure-dependent compositions and physical properties of nebular condensates which is consistent with (1) the differences between different classes of chondritic meteorites, (2) some of the differences between planets, and (3) the presence of oxidized iron on the moon and in the eucrite parent body (presumably an asteroid) despite the low abundance of volatiles. Diffusion effects appear to be important for understanding oxygen isotope anomalies in refractory inclusions in Allende. The consideration of kinetic effects leads to more information concerning nebular processes than if equilibrium is assumed.

  2. Effect of impurity radiation on tokamak equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Green, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to the radiation from impurities is of great importance in the overall energy balance. Taking the temperature dependence of this loss for two impurities characteristic of those present in existing tokamak plasmas, the condition for radial power balance is derived. For the impurities considered (oxygen and iron) it is found that the radiation losses are concentrated in a thin outer layer of the plasma and the equilibrium condition places an upper limit on the plasma paraticle number density in this region. This limiting density scales with mean current density in the same manner as is experimentally observed for the peak number density of tokamak plasmas. The stability of such equilibria is also discussed. (author)

  3. Pre-equilibrium emission and nuclear level densities in neutron induced reactions on Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivascu, M.; Avrigeanu, M.; Ivascu, I.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1989-01-01

    The experimentally well known (n,p), (n,α) and (n,2n) reaction excitation functions, from threshold to 20 MeV incident energy, and neutron, proton and alpha-particle emission spectra at 14.8 MeV from Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes are calculated in the frame of a generalized Geometry-Dependent-Hybrid pre-equilibrium emission model, including angular momentum and parity conservation and alpha-particle emission, and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Use of a consistent statistical model parameter set enables the validation of the pre-equilibrium emission model. Moreover, an enhanced pre-equilibrium emission from higher spin composite system states, associated with higher incident orbital momenta, has been evidenced. Higher orbital momenta involved also in the emergent channels of this process are suggested by calculations of the residual nuclei level populations. Finally, the unitary account of the (n, p) and (n, 2n) reaction excitation functions for Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes has allowed the proper establishment of the limits of the transition excitation range between the two different nuclear level density models used at medium and higher excitation energies, respectively. (author). 83 refs, 15 figs

  4. Computational study of substrate isotope effect probes of transition state structure for acetylcholinesterase catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikorski, R.S.; Malany, S.; Seravalli, J.; Quinn, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    Secondary isotope effects for carbonyl addition reactions of methyl thioacetate, acetone and acetaldehyde have been calculated by ab initio quantum mechanical methods in an effect to interpret measured β-deuterium isotope effects on acetylcholinesterase-catalysed hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine. The calculated β-deuterium isotope effect for equilibrium addition of methanol to methyl thioacetate is D3 K eq = 0.965, and the corresponding effect for addition of methoxide ion to methyl thioacetate wherein three waters are hydrogen bonded to the carbonyl oxyanion is D3 K eq = 1.086. Neither of these calculated isotope effects is an inverse as the experimental β-deuterium isotope effect for acetylcholinesterase-catalysed hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine, D3 K eq = 0.90±0.03. Structural comparisons show that the water-solvated methoxide adduct of methyl thioacetate is more expanded than is the natural methanol addition adduct, and suggest that the degree of which the isotope effect is inverse (i.e. less than) is inversely correlated to the degree of expansion of the adduct. A similar correlation of α-deuterium and β-deuterium secondary isotope effects with the degree of expansion of the adducts is found for equilibrium additions of methanol and methoxide ion to acetylaldehyde. These computational results suggest that the markedly inverse β-deuterium isotope effect for the acetylcholinesterase reaction arises from enzymatic compression of the transition state. (author)

  5. Salt effects on isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Fortier, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Essential to the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers and geothermometers is the knowledge of equilibrium isotope partitioning between different phases and species, which is usually a function of temperature only. The one exception known to date is oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation between liquid water and other phases (steam, gases, minerals), which changes upon the addition of salts to water, i.e., the isotope salt salt effect. Our knowledge of this effect, the difference between activity and composition (a-X) of isotopic water molecules in salt solutions, is very limited and controversial, especially at elevated temperatures. For the last several years, we have been conducting a detailed, systematic experimental study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the isotope salt effects from room temperature to elevated temperatures (currently to 500 degree C). From this effort, a simple, coherent picture of the isotope salt effect is emerging, that differs markedly from the complex results reported in the literature. In this communication, we present an overview on the isotope salt effect, obtained chiefly from our study. Observed isotope salt effects in salt solutions are significant even at elevated temperatures. The importance and implications of the isotope salt effect for isotopic studies of brine-dominated systems are also discussed in general terms

  6. Isotopic equilibrium constants of the deuterium exchange between HDO and H2S, H2Se and H2Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, D.

    1959-11-01

    We have determined experimentally the equilibrium constant K of each of the following isotope exchanges: SH 2 + OHD ↔ SHD + OH 2 ; SeH 2 + OHD ↔ SeHD + OH 2 ; TeH 2 + OHD ↔ TeHD + OH 2 . In gaseous phase, statistical thermodynamics leads to the expression: K (Z OHD x Z RH 2 )/(Z OH 2 x Z RHD ) x e W/T (R being the elements S, Se or Te). Z, the partition functions, have been calculated and, through our experimental results, the constant W has been determined. Having obtained W, the equilibrium constant K has been calculated for a series of temperatures. (author) [fr

  7. How did Marine Isotope Stage 3 and Last Glacial Maximum climates differ? – Perspectives from equilibrium simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Van Meerbeeck

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dansgaard-Oeschger events occurred frequently during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3, as opposed to the following MIS2 period, which included the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. Transient climate model simulations suggest that these abrupt warming events in Greenland and the North Atlantic region are associated with a resumption of the Thermohaline Circulation (THC from a weak state during stadials to a relatively strong state during interstadials. However, those models were run with LGM, rather than MIS3 boundary conditions. To quantify the influence of different boundary conditions on the climates of MIS3 and LGM, we perform two equilibrium climate simulations with the three-dimensional earth system model LOVECLIM, one for stadial, the other for interstadial conditions. We compare them to the LGM state simulated with the same model. Both climate states are globally 2°C warmer than LGM. A striking feature of our MIS3 simulations is the enhanced Northern Hemisphere seasonality, July surface air temperatures being 4°C warmer than in LGM. Also, despite some modification in the location of North Atlantic deep water formation, deep water export to the South Atlantic remains unaffected. To study specifically the effect of orbital forcing, we perform two additional sensitivity experiments spun up from our stadial simulation. The insolation difference between MIS3 and LGM causes half of the 30–60° N July temperature anomaly (+6°C. In a third simulation additional freshwater forcing halts the Atlantic THC, yielding a much colder North Atlantic region (−7°C. Comparing our simulation with proxy data, we find that the MIS3 climate with collapsed THC mimics stadials over the North Atlantic better than both control experiments, which might crudely estimate interstadial climate. These results suggest that freshwater forcing is necessary to return climate from warm interstadials to cold stadials during MIS3. This changes our perspective, making the stadial

  8. Chemical and oxygen isotopic properties of ordinary chondrites (H5, L6) from Oman: Signs of isotopic equilibrium during thermal metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arshad; Nasir, Sobhi J.; Jabeen, Iffat; Al Rawas, Ahmed; Banerjee, Neil R.; Osinski, Gordon R.

    2017-10-01

    Mean bulk chemical data of recently found H5 and L6 ordinary chondrites from the deserts of Oman generally reflect isochemical features which are consistent with the progressive thermal metamorphism of a common, unequilibrated starting material. Relative differences in abundances range from 0.5-10% in REE (Eu = 14%), 6-13% in siderophile elements (Co = 48%), and >10% in lithophile elements (exceptions are Ba, Sr, Zr, Hf, U = >30%) between H5 and L6 groups. These differences may have accounted for variable temperature conditions during metamorphism on their parent bodies. The CI/Mg-normalized mean abundances of refractory lithophile elements (Al, Ca, Sm, Yb, Lu, V) show no resolvable differences between H5 and L6 suggesting that both groups have experienced the same fractionation. The REE diagram shows subtle enrichment in LREE with a flat HREE pattern. Furthermore, overall mean REE abundances are 0.6 × CI with enriched La abundance ( 0.9 × CI) in both groups. Precise oxygen isotope compositions demonstrate the attainment of isotopic equilibrium by progressive thermal metamorphism following a mass-dependent isotope fractionation trend. Both groups show a slope-1/2 line on a three-isotope plot with subtle negative deviation in Δ17O associated with δ18O enrichment relative to δ17O. These deviations are interpreted as the result of liberation of water from phyllosilicates and evaporation of a fraction of the water during thermal metamorphism. The resultant isotope fractionations caused by the water loss are analogous to those occurring between silicate melt and gas phase during CAI and chondrule formation in chondrites and are controlled by cooling rates and exchange efficiency.

  9. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfide by the purple photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Small inverse isotope effects of 1-3 per thousand were consistently observed for the oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur during anaerobic photometabolism by Chromatium vinosum. The inverse fractionation can be accounted for by an equilibrium isotope effect between H 2 S and HS - , and may indicate that C. vinosum (and other photosynthetic bacteria) utilizes H 2 S rather than HS - as the substrate during sulfide oxidation. (Auth.)

  10. Solvent isotope effects on the rates of alkylation of thiolamine models of papain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wandinger, A.; Creighton, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    As a test of whether it is chemically reasonable to attribute any or all of the observed kinetic solvent deuterium isotope effects reported on papain to the fundamental properties of the tautomerization equilibrium, the magnitudes of the solvent deuterium isotope effects on the rates of alkylation of the tautomeric forms of cysteine and β-mercaptoethylamine were determined for bromo- and chloroacetate, bromo- and chloroacetamide, as well as for methylbromoacetate. These thiolamines are viewed as elementary chemical models of the sulfhydryl group tautomerization equilibrium envisioned in the active site of papain. (Auth.)

  11. Convection with local thermal non-equilibrium and microfluidic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Straughan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This book is one of the first devoted to an account of theories of thermal convection which involve local thermal non-equilibrium effects, including a concentration on microfluidic effects. The text introduces convection with local thermal non-equilibrium effects in extraordinary detail, making it easy for readers newer to the subject area to understand. This book is unique in the fact that it addresses a large number of convection theories and provides many new results which are not available elsewhere. This book will be useful to researchers from engineering, fluid mechanics, and applied mathematics, particularly those interested in microfluidics and porous media.

  12. Non equilibrium effects in nuclear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papa, M.; Arena, N.; Cardella, G.; Lanzano, G.; Filippo, E. de; Lanzalone, G.; Pagano, A.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G. [Catania Univ., INFN Catania and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Bonasera, A.; Cavallaro, S.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Giustolisi, F.; Iacono Manno, M.; La Guidara, E.; Maiolino, C.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Sperduto, M.L. [Catania Univ., INFN-LNS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Auditore, L.; Trifiro, A.; Trimarchi, M. [Messina Univ., INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    A Constraint Molecular Dynamics (CoMD) approach is used to study dynamical effects related to both the average dynamics and the fluctuations around it. Data obtained in the REVERSE and in TRASMARAD experiments were compared with the theoretical simulations. The concept of temperature, as derived from a fully dynamical description of the GDR (giant dipole resonance) mode, is also discussed. In this contribution we have discussed the comparison between the CoMD model and two classes of phenomena, induced by heavy ion collisions. The first one is related to the IMF (intermediate mass fragment) production in semi-peripheral collisions for the {sup 124}Sn + {sup 64}Ni system at 35 MeV/nucleon. The comparison put in evidence clear preequilibrium effects in the fragment production mechanism which are essentially related to the behavior of the average dynamics. The second one concerns the high {gamma}-ray productions, due to dipolar resonant mechanisms, in the {sup 40}Ca + {sup 48}Ca system at 25 MeV/nucleon. In this case the comparisons with the model allows to put in evidence preequilibrium effects related both to the average dynamics and to the fluctuating one.

  13. Determination of tin equilibrium isotope fractionation factors from synchrotron radiation experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyakov, VB; Mineev, SD; Clayton, RN; Hu, G; Mineev, KS

    2005-01-01

    A method of determination of the reduced isotopic partition function ratio (beta-factor) from the partial density of state (PDOS) obtained by inelastic nuclear resonant X-ray scattering (INRXS) in synchrotron radiation experiments has been established. The method has been demonstrated by the example

  14. Medium Effects in Reactions with Rare Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C A; Karakoç, M

    2012-01-01

    We discuss medium effects in knockout reactions with rare isotopes of weakly-bound nuclei at intermediate energies. We show that the poorly known corrections may lead to sizable modifications of knockout cross sections and momentum dsitributions.

  15. Heavy-atom isotope effects on binding of reactants to lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawlita, E.

    1993-04-01

    18 O and 13 C kinetic isotope effects have been measured on the reaction of pyruvate kinase with phospho-enol-pyruvate and ADP using a remote label technique. The magnitude of both investigated isotope effects showed a dependence on the concentration of ADP. However, while the carbon effect was simply 'washed out' to unity at high ATP concentration, the oxygen effect becomes inverse and reached 0.9928 at the highest used concentration of ADP. Such a result testifies that the assumption of the negligible effect of isotopic substitution on enzyme-substrate associations remains correct only for carbon effects. An equilibrium 18 O isotope effect on association of oxalate with lactate dehydrogenase in the presence of NADHP has been evaluated by both experimental and theoretical means. Experimental methods, which involved equilibrium dialysis and gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric measurement of isotopic ration, yielded an inverse value of 0.9840. Semiempirical methods involved vibrational analysis of oxalate in two different environments. The comparison of calculated values with the experimentally determined isotope effect indicated that the AM 1 Hamiltonian proved superior to its PM 3 counterpart in this modelling. 160 refs, 8 figs, 18 tabs

  16. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn; Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of ...

  17. Bibliography on vapour pressure isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illy, H.; Jancso, G.

    1976-03-01

    The bibliography of research on vapour pressure isotope effects from 1919 to December 1975 is presented in chronological order. Within each year the references are listed alphabetically according to the name of the first author of each work. The bibliography is followed by a Compound Index containing the names o compounds, but the type of isotopic substituation is not shown. The Author Index includes all authors of the papers. (Sz.N.Z.)

  18. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in tautomeric systems with double proton transfer. Citronin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.; Langgard, M.; Bolvig, S.

    1998-01-01

    Primary and secondary deuterium isotope effects on 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts are measured in citrinin, a tautomeric compound with an unusual doubly intramolecularly hydrogen bonded structure. The isotope effects are to a large extent dominated by equilibrium contributions and deuteration leads to more of the deuterated enol forms rather than the deuterated acid form. 1 H 13 C and 17 O nuclear shieldings are calculated using density functional ab initio methods. A very good correlation between calculated nuclear shieldings and experimental 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts is obtained. The tautomeric equilibrium can be analyzed based on the isotope effects on B-6 and C-8 carbons and shows an increase in the o-quinone form on lowering the temperature. Furthermore, upon deuteration the largest equilibrium shift is found for deuteration at OH-8 and the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium upon deuteration at OH-8 and the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium upon deuteration is increasing at lower temperature. (author)

  19. Adsorption of hydrogen isotopes by metals in non-equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livshits, A.I.; Notkin, M.E.; Pustovojt, Yu.M.

    1982-01-01

    To study the interaction of thermonuclear plasma and additions with metallic walls, nonequilibrium system of thermal atomary hydrogen - ''cold'' (300-1100 K) metal is experimentally investigated. Atomary hydrogen was feeded to samples of Ni and Pd in the shape of atomic beam, coming into vacuum from high-frequency gaseous discharge. It is shown that hydrogen solubility under nonequilibrium conditions increases with surface passivation (contamination); in this case it surpasses equilibrium solubility by value orders. Nickel and iron dissolve more hydrogen than palladium at a certain state of surface ( passivation) and gas (atomary hydrogen). The sign of the temperature dependence of hydrogen solubility in passivated N 1 and Fe changes when alterating molecular hydrogen by atomary hydrogen

  20. Study of kinetics, equilibrium and isotope exchange in ion exchange systems Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plicka, J.; Stamberg, K.; Cabicar, J.; Gosman, A.

    1986-01-01

    The description of kinetics of ion exchange in ternary system was based upon three Nernst-Planck equations, each of them describing the particle diffusion flux of a given counterion as an independent process. For experimental verification, the strongly acidic cation exchanger OSTION KS 08 the shallow-bed technique, and 0.2 mol x dm -3 aqueous nitrate solutions were chosen. The kinetics of ion exchange in the system of cations Na + - Mg 2+ - UO 2 2+ was studied. The values of diffusion coefficients obtained by evaluating of kinetics of isotope exchange and binary ion exchange were used for calculation. The comparison of calculated exchange rate curves with the experimental ones was made. It was found that the exchanging counterions were affected by each other. (author)

  1. Isotope effects of sulfur in chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolajczuk, A.

    1999-01-01

    Sulfur is an important component of organic matter because it forms compounds with many elements. Due to high chemical activity of sulfur, it takes part in biological and geological processes in which isotope effects are occurring. It has been shown during last years research of isotope effects that we have take into account not only mass difference but also many other physical properties of nuclides e.g. even or odd number of neutrons in nuclei, shape and distribution of charge, turn of nuclear spin etc. The factor remains that new theoretical ideas have been formed on the base of data, being obtained in fractionation processes of heavy element isotope, particularly uranium. Now it is being well known that effects unconnected with vibration energy have also caused an effect on fractionation of considerably lighter elements like iron and magnesium. The important question is, if these effects would come to light during the separation of sulfur isotopes. Sulfur have three even isotopes M = (32, 34, 36) and one odd M 33). This problem is still open. (author)

  2. Local effect of equilibrium current on tearing mode stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzani, F.

    1985-12-01

    The local effect of the equilibrium current on the linear stability of low poloidal number tearing modes in tokamaks is investigated analytically. The plasma response inside the tearing layer is derived from fluid theory and the local equilibrium current is shown to couple to the mode dynamics through its gradient, which is proportional to the local electron temperature gradient under the approximations used in the analysis. The relevant eigenmode equations, expressing Ampere's law and the plasma quasineutrality condition, respectively, are suitably combined in a single integral equation, from which a variational principle is formulated to derive the mode dispersion relations for several cases of interest. The local equilibrium current is treated as a small perturbation of the known results for the m greater than or equal to 2 and the m = 1 tearing modes in the collisional regime, and the m greater than or equal to 2 tearing mode in the semicollisional regime; its effect is found to enhance stabilization for the m greater than or equal to 2 drift-tearing mode in the collisional regime, whereas the m = 1 growth rate is very slightly increased and the stabilizing effect of the parallel thermal conduction on the m greater than or equal to 2 mode in the semicollisional regime is slightly reduced

  3. Isotope effects in pericyclic reactions, ch. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolbier, W.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A distinction is made between primary and secondary isotope effects, the primary ones being based on the relative large vibrational frequencies and ensuing large zeroprint energies for C-H vibrations whereas the secondary effects are observed in systems where the vibrational modes of the isotopically labelled site are perturbed during transformation from reactant to product. Both effects are utilised in the elucidation of mechanism in pericyclic processes. The main processes dealt with in this chapter are cycloadditions of all types and sigmatropic rearrangements

  4. Isotope effects: definitions and consequences for pharmacologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Langenhove, A.

    1986-01-01

    The use of stable isotope-labeled compounds for pharmacologic studies requires careful consideration of the nature of the stable isotope label (2H, 13C, 15N, 18O) and its position of incorporation in the molecule. When deuterium is used, improper positioning can lead to significant primary isotope effects. Primary isotope effects occur when the breaking of the bond to the heavy isotope is the rate-limiting step in a reaction (or metabolic transformation). A reaction will proceed slower for the molecule with the heavy isotope label because of the mass difference between the light and the heavy isotope. In addition to these primary isotope effects, smaller but nevertheless important secondary isotope effects, physicochemical isotope effects, active hydrogen/deuterium exchange, or isotope effects associated with either the enzyme-catalyzed biotransformation or the mass spectrometric ionization and fragmentation can be operative. In mechanistic studies, isotope effects are used to their advantage; however, in pharmacokinetic studies, the occurrence of isotope effects can lead to grossly misleading biologic and analytic results: the metabolism of the drug will differ when in vivo isotope effects are operative, and isotope effects occurring during the analysis procedure will obscure the true metabolic profile of the drug

  5. Characterization of non equilibrium effects on high quality critical flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camelo, E.; Lemonnier, H.; Ochterbeck, J.

    1995-01-01

    The appropriate design of various pieces of safety equipment such as relief systems, relies on the accurate description of critical flow phenomena. Most of the systems of industrial interest are willing to be described by one-dimensional area-averaged models and a large fraction of them involves multi-component high gas quality flows. Within these circumstances, the flow is very likely to be of an annular dispersed nature and its description by two-fluid models requires various closure relations. Among the most sensitive closures, there is the interfacial area and the liquid entrained fraction. The critical flowrate depends tremendously on the accurate description of the non equilibrium which results from the correctness of the closure equations. In this study, two-component flows are emphasized and non equilibrium results mainly form the differences in the phase velocities. It is therefore of the utmost importance to have reliable data to characterize non equilibrium phenomena and to assess the validity of the closure models. A comprehensive description of air-water nozzle flows, with emphasis on the effect of the nozzle geometry, has been undertaken and some of the results are presented here which helps understanding the overall flow dynamics. Besides the critical flowrate, the presented material includes pressure profiles, droplet size and velocity, liquid film flowrate and liquid film thickness

  6. Characterization of non equilibrium effects on high quality critical flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camelo, E.; Lemonnier, H.; Ochterbeck, J. [Commissariat a l Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The appropriate design of various pieces of safety equipment such as relief systems, relies on the accurate description of critical flow phenomena. Most of the systems of industrial interest are willing to be described by one-dimensional area-averaged models and a large fraction of them involves multi-component high gas quality flows. Within these circumstances, the flow is very likely to be of an annular dispersed nature and its description by two-fluid models requires various closure relations. Among the most sensitive closures, there is the interfacial area and the liquid entrained fraction. The critical flowrate depends tremendously on the accurate description of the non equilibrium which results from the correctness of the closure equations. In this study, two-component flows are emphasized and non equilibrium results mainly form the differences in the phase velocities. It is therefore of the utmost importance to have reliable data to characterize non equilibrium phenomena and to assess the validity of the closure models. A comprehensive description of air-water nozzle flows, with emphasis on the effect of the nozzle geometry, has been undertaken and some of the results are presented here which helps understanding the overall flow dynamics. Besides the critical flowrate, the presented material includes pressure profiles, droplet size and velocity, liquid film flowrate and liquid film thickness.

  7. Excitation functions and isotopic effects in (n, p) reactions for stable nickel isotopes from reaction threshold to 20 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalremruata, B. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune-411007, Maharashtra (India)], E-mail: marema@physics.unipune.ernet.in; Ganesan, S. [Reactor Physics Design Division, BARC, Mumbai 58 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune-411007, Maharashtra (India)], E-mail: vnb@physics.unipune.ernet; Dhole, S.D. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune-411007, Maharashtra (India)], E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.in

    2009-05-01

    The excitation function for (n, p) reactions from reaction threshold to 20 MeV on five nickel isotopes viz; {sup 58}Ni, {sup 60}Ni, {sup 61}Ni, {sup 62}Ni and {sup 64}Ni were calculated using Talys-1.0 nuclear model code involving the fixed set of global parameters. A good agreement between the calculated and measured data is obtained with minimum effort on parameter fitting and only one free parameter called 'Shell damping factor'. This is of importance to the validation of nuclear model approaches with increased predictive power. The systematic decrease in (n, p) cross-sections with increasing neutron number in reactions induced by neutrons on isotopes of nickel is explained in terms of the proton separation energy and the pre-equilibrium model. The compound nucleus and pre-equilibrium reaction mechanism as well as the isotopic effects were also studied.

  8. Active Brownian particles at interfaces: An effective equilibrium approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, René; Brader, Joseph M.

    2016-06-01

    A simple theoretical approach is used to investigate active colloids at the free interface and near repulsive substrates. We employ dynamical density functional theory to determine the steady-state density profiles in an effective equilibrium system (Farage T. F. F. et al., Phys. Rev. E, 91 (2015) 042310). In addition to the known accumulation at surfaces, we predict wetting and drying transitions at a flat repulsive wall and capillary condensation and evaporation in a slit pore. These new phenomena are closely related to the motility-induced phase separation (MIPS) in the bulk.

  9. Combining Solvent Isotope Effects with Substrate Isotope Effects in Mechanistic Studies of Alcohol and Amine Oxidation by Enzymes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin-and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. PMID:25448013

  10. alfa-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects in reactions of methyllithium. Is better aggregation the cause of lower reactivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1996-01-01

    The value of kH/kD for alfa deuterium kinetic isotope effects for the reaction of methyllithium and methylmagnesium iodid with a series of substrates are consistently ca. 10-15 % higher for the lithium reagent. This may indicate a pre-equilibrium......The value of kH/kD for alfa deuterium kinetic isotope effects for the reaction of methyllithium and methylmagnesium iodid with a series of substrates are consistently ca. 10-15 % higher for the lithium reagent. This may indicate a pre-equilibrium...

  11. Isotope Effect on the Thermal Conductivity of Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengji Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity (TC of isolated graphene with different concentrations of isotope (C13 is studied with equilibrium molecular dynamics method at 300 K. In the limit of pure C12 or C13 graphene, TC of graphene in zigzag and armchair directions are ~630 W/mK and ~1000W/mK, respectively. We find that the TC of graphene can be maximally reduced by ~80%, in both armchair and zigzag directions, when a random distribution of C12 and C13 is assumed at different doping concentrations. Therefore, our simulation results suggest an effective way to tune the TC of graphene without changing its atomic and electronic structure, thus yielding a promising application for nanoelectronics and thermoelectricity of graphene-based nano device.

  12. The effect of dipolar interaction on the magnetic isotope effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden; Lukzen, Nikita

    2010-01-01

    A multi-channel kinetic description is used to study the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) in zero magnetic field. The maximal isotope effect is equal to the number of channels, two for the hyperfine interaction but four for the electron spin dipole–dipole interaction of the intermediate radical pair....... Quantum mechanical calculations agree with these conclusion and show that large MIE may be obtained even in the presence of a strong exchange interaction. The observed magnesium isotope effect on the rate of enzymatic synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is approximately 3 implying that the dipolar...... interaction is responsible for the effect. Our calculations provide support for the proposed mechanism....

  13. A Fast Numerical Method for the Calculation of the Equilibrium Isotopic Composition of a Transmutation System in an Advanced Fuel Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Álvarez-Velarde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A fast numerical method for the calculation in a zero-dimensional approach of the equilibrium isotopic composition of an iteratively used transmutation system in an advanced fuel cycle, based on the Banach fixed point theorem, is described in this paper. The method divides the fuel cycle in successive stages: fuel fabrication, storage, irradiation inside the transmutation system, cooling, reprocessing, and incorporation of the external material into the new fresh fuel. The change of the fuel isotopic composition, represented by an isotope vector, is described in a matrix formulation. The resulting matrix equations are solved using direct methods with arbitrary precision arithmetic. The method has been successfully applied to a double-strata fuel cycle with light water reactors and accelerator-driven subcritical systems. After comparison to the results of the EVOLCODE 2.0 burn-up code, the observed differences are about a few percents in the mass estimations of the main actinides.

  14. H/D isotope effects in high temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonanos, Nikolaos; Huijser, A.; Poulsen, Finn Willy

    2015-01-01

    The atomic mass ratio of ca. 2 between deuterium and hydrogen is the highest for any pair of stable isotopes and results in significant and measurable H/D isotope effects in high temperature proton conductors containing these species. This paper discusses H/D isotope effects manifested in O-H/O-D...

  15. Isotope effect on confinement in DT plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.; Yagi, M.; Azumi, M.

    1994-03-01

    Isotope effect on the energy confinement time is discussed for the DT plasma. The transport theory which is based on the ballooning mode turbulence is applied. When the DT plasma is produced under the condition of β p >1, the energy confinement time of DT plasma (50% mixture) is expected to be about 1.2 times better than the D plasma with the same operation condition. (author)

  16. Anharmonic effects in the quantum cluster equilibrium method

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Domaros, Michael; Perlt, Eva

    2017-03-01

    The well-established quantum cluster equilibrium (QCE) model provides a statistical thermodynamic framework to apply high-level ab initio calculations of finite cluster structures to macroscopic liquid phases using the partition function. So far, the harmonic approximation has been applied throughout the calculations. In this article, we apply an important correction in the evaluation of the one-particle partition function and account for anharmonicity. Therefore, we implemented an analytical approximation to the Morse partition function and the derivatives of its logarithm with respect to temperature, which are required for the evaluation of thermodynamic quantities. This anharmonic QCE approach has been applied to liquid hydrogen chloride and cluster distributions, and the molar volume, the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient, and the isobaric heat capacity have been calculated. An improved description for all properties is observed if anharmonic effects are considered.

  17. pH-Free Measurement of Relative Acidities, Including Isotope Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Charles L

    2017-01-01

    A powerful pH-free multicomponent NMR titration method can measure relative acidities, even of closely related compounds, with excellent accuracy. The history of the method is presented, along with details of its implementation and a comparison with earlier NMR titrations using a pH electrode. Many of its areas of applicability are described, especially equilibrium isotope effects. The advantages of the method, some practical considerations, and potential pitfalls are considered. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Non - Adiabaticity and Novel Isotope Effect in the Doped Cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kresin, V.; WOLF, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports a novel isotope effect which is due to a strong non-adiabaticity that manifests itself in the dependence of the carrier concentration on the isotopic mass. The critical temperature in turn depends on the carrier concentration giving rise to a unique and non-phononic isotope shift. (author)

  19. Studying effects of non-equilibrium radiative transfer via HPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-24

    This report presents slides on Ph.D. Research Goals; Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) Implications; Calculating an Opacity; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Collisional Radiative Modeling; Radiative and Collisional Excitation; Photo and Electron Impact Ionization; Autoionization; The Rate Matrix; Example: Total Photoionization rate; The Rate Coefficients; inlinlte version 1.1; inlinlte: Verification; New capabilities: Rate Matrix – Flexibility; Memory Option Comparison; Improvements over previous DCA solver; Inter- and intra-node load balancing; Load Balance – Full Picture; Load Balance – Full Picture; Load Balance – Internode; Load Balance – Scaling; Description; Performance; xRAGE Simulation; Post-process @ 2hr; Post-process @ 4hr; Post-process @ 8hr; Takeaways; Performance for 1 realization; Motivation for QOI; Multigroup Er; Transport and NLTE large effects (1mm, 1keV); Transport large effect, NLTE lesser (1mm, 750eV); Blastwave Diagnostici – Description & Performance; Temperature Comparison; NLTE has effect on dynamics at wall; NLTE has lesser effect in the foam; Global Takeaways; The end.

  20. New NMR method for measuring the difference between corresponding proton and deuterium chemical shifts: isotope effects on exchange equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, M.; Saunders, S.; Johnson, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    A convenient and accurate method is described for measuring the difference between a proton frequency and the corresponding deuterium frequency in its deuterated analogue relative to a reference system by using the deuterium lock in a Fourier-transform NMR spectrometer. This measurement is a sensitive way of measuring equilibrium isotope effects for hydrogen-deuterium exchange. A value of 1.60 per H-D pair is obtained for the equilibrium 2H 3 O + + 3D 2 O in equilibrium 2D 3 O + + 3H 2 O at 30 0 C in aqueous perchloric acid (HClO 4 ). 7 references, 2 tables

  1. Equilibrium and generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, H.S.

    1994-01-01

    This work studies the behaviour of radionuclides when it produce a desintegration activity,decay and the isotopes stable creation. It gives definitions about the equilibrium between activity of parent and activity of the daughter, radioactive decay,isotope stable and transient equilibrium and maxim activity time. Some considerations had been given to generators that permit a disgregation of two radioisotopes in equilibrium and its good performance. Tabs

  2. Lithium isotope effect in the extraction systems of polyethers: effect of salt concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Shengqiang; Fu Lian

    1991-01-01

    Separation factors of lithium isotopes at 20 deg C were determined in the extraction systems of B15C5-CHCl 3 /LiBr-H 2 O. The initial concentration of LiBr was controlled in the extent of more than 2 mol/l. It may be established that the increase of LiBr concentration causes a remarkable increase of the separation factor. The essence of this effect due to the change in salt concentration was discussed in connection with examination of relevant phenomena in literature. It can be concluded that the relationship between α and Cm, the concentration of lithium salt, is dependent on K Q and K P express respectively, lithium isotope exchange equilibrium constants between Li-crownether complex and hydrated lithium ion for lithium concentration less than 1-2 mol/l, and between lithium salt ion pair and hydrated lithium ion for lithium concentration more than 2 mol/l in aqueous phase

  3. Isotope and multiband effects in layered superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Keller, Hugo

    2012-06-13

    In this review we consider three classes of superconductors, namely cuprate superconductors, MgB(2) and the new Fe based superconductors. All of these three systems are layered materials and multiband compounds. Their pairing mechanisms are under discussion with the exception of MgB(2), which is widely accepted to be a 'conventional' electron-phonon interaction mediated superconductor, but extending the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory to account for multiband effects. Cuprates and Fe based superconductors have higher superconducting transition temperatures and more complex structures. Superconductivity is doping dependent in these material classes unlike in MgB(2) which, as a pure compound, has the highest values of T(c) and a rapid suppression of superconductivity with doping takes place. In all three material classes isotope effects have been observed, including exotic ones in the cuprates, and controversial ones in the Fe based materials. Before the area of high-temperature superconductivity, isotope effects on T(c) were the signature for phonon mediated superconductivity-even when deviations from the BCS value to smaller values were observed. Since the discovery of high T(c) materials this is no longer evident since competing mechanisms might exist and other mediating pairing interactions are discussed which are of purely electronic origin. In this work we will compare the three different material classes and especially discuss the experimentally observed isotope effects of all three systems and present a rather general analysis of them. Furthermore, we will concentrate on multiband signatures which are not generally accepted in cuprates even though they are manifest in various experiments, the evidence for those in MgB(2), and indications for them in the Fe based compounds. Mostly we will consider experimental data, but when possible also discuss theoretical models which are suited to explain the data.

  4. Pressure effect on equilibrium configuration of CTCC-2 spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.; Kato, Y.; Satomi, N.; Watanabe, K.

    1990-01-01

    In CTCC-2 experiment, the initial plasma is produced by a magnetized gun and ejected into a metallic aluminum flux conserver (FC) with thickness of 15 mm. The spheromak is formed in the FC during a life time of 1.5 ms, in which the plasma is isolated from any external feeder. A choking-field-generating coil is equipped on the entrance of the spheroidal FC. The choking field is suppressing some leakage of spheromak field along the entrance duct, which is made of thin stainless steel plate (0.8 mm) for rapid penetration of the choking magnetic field. This resistive part acts as an effective plasma current limiter, which produces stable currentless region (flux hole). The flux hole increases magnetic shear without inserting a central conducting pole along the symmetric axis and is controlled to decrease with the choking field strength. Thus, in CTCC-2 spheromak, a stable oblate spheroidal boundary is rigidly fixed by the metal wall of FC and the entrance hole of FC is effectively closed by choking magnetic field, so that it is suitable to investigate precisely a fine structure of configuration. In spheromak configuration whose aspect ratio is near one, the ratio of the magnetic strength at the inner part to that at the outer part on equi-flux surface (mirror ratio) becomes very large in comparison with that of a large aspect ratio. This extreme configuration with a high mirror ratio may be associated with an anisotropic pressure effect even in collisional state like as our experimental condition. They have investigated the pressure effect on spheromak configuration in more detail. The obtained equilibrium profile is grossly explained by a theoretical profile on assuming low beta limit until now. However, the authors observe a systematic discrepancy between a measured poloidal profile and a theoretical one as mentioned

  5. Experimental investigation of nitrogen isotopic effects associated with ammonia degassing at 0-70 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuying; Li, Yingzhou; Li, Long

    2018-04-01

    Ammonia degassing is a common process in natural alkaline waters and in the atmosphere. To quantitatively assess the nitrogen cycle in these systems, the essential parameter of nitrogen isotope fractionation factors associated with ammonia degassing is required, but still not constrained yet. In this study, we carried out laboratory experiments to examine the nitrogen isotope behavior during ammonia degassing in alkaline conditions. The experiments started with ammonium sulfate solution with excess sodium hydroxide. The reaction can be described as: NH4+ + OH- (excess) → NH3·nH2O → NH3 (g)↑. Two sets of experiments, one with ammonia degassing under static conditions and the other with ammonia degassing by bubbling of N2 gas, were carried out at 2, 21, 50, and 70 °C. The results indicate that kinetic isotopic effects are dominated during efficient degassing of ammonia in the bubbling experiments, which yielded kinetic nitrogen isotope fractionation factors αNH3(g)-NH3(aq) of 0.9898 at 2 °C, 0.9918 at 21 °C, 0.9935 at 50 °C and 0.9948 at 70 °C. These values show a good relationship with temperature as 103lnαNH3(g)-NH3(aq) = 14.6 - 6.8 × 1000/T. In contrast, isotopic effects during less efficient degassing of ammonia in the static experiments are more complicated. The results do not match either kinetic isotope fractionation or equilibrium isotope fractionation but sit between these two. The most likely cause is that back dissolution of the degassed ammonia occurred in these experiments and consequently shifted kinetic isotope fractionation toward equilibrium isotope fractionation. Our experimental results highlight complicated isotopic effects may occur in natural environments, and need to be fully considered in the interpretation of field data.

  6. Use of isotope effects to elucidate enzyme mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, W.W.

    1982-01-01

    The chemical bond breaking steps are normally not rate limiting for enzymatic reactions. However, comparison of deuterium and tritium isotope effects on the same reaction, especially when coupled with 13 C isotope effects for the same step measured with deuterated as well as unlabeled substrates, allows calculation of the intrinsic isotope effects on the bond breaking steps and thus a determination of the commitments to catalysis for the reactants. The variation in observed isotope effects as a function of reactant concentration can be used to determine kinetic mechanisms, while the pH variation of isotope effects can determine the stickiness of the reactants and which portions of the reactant mechanism are pH dependent. Finally the size of primary and secondary intrinsic isotope effects can be used to determine transition state structure

  7. Evidence for H2/D2 isotope effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over supported ruthenium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellner, C.S.; Bell, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of using D 2 rather than H 2 during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were investigated using alumina- and silica-supported Ru catalysts. For the alumina-supported catalysts, the rate of CD 4 formation was 1.4 to 1.6 times faster than the formation of CH 4 . A noticeable isotope effect was also observed for higher molecular weight products. The magnitude of the isotope effects observed using the silica-supported catalyst was much smaller than that found using the alumina-supported catalysts. The formation of olefins relative to paraffins was found to be higher when H 2 rather than D 2 was used, independent of the catalyst support. The observed isotope effects are explained in terms of a mechanism for CO hydrogenation and are shown to arise from a complex combination of the kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects associated with elementary processes occurring on the catalyst surface

  8. Uses of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Damian

    1998-01-01

    The most important fields of stable isotope use with examples are presented. These are: 1. Isotope dilution analysis: trace analysis, measurements of volumes and masses; 2. Stable isotopes as tracers: transport phenomena, environmental studies, agricultural research, authentication of products and objects, archaeometry, studies of reaction mechanisms, structure and function determination of complex biological entities, studies of metabolism, breath test for diagnostic; 3. Isotope equilibrium effects: measurement of equilibrium effects, investigation of equilibrium conditions, mechanism of drug action, study of natural processes, water cycle, temperature measurements; 4. Stable isotope for advanced nuclear reactors: uranium nitride with 15 N as nuclear fuel, 157 Gd for reactor control. In spite of some difficulties of stable isotope use, particularly related to the analytical techniques, which are slow and expensive, the number of papers reporting on this subject is steadily growing as well as the number of scientific meetings organized by International Isotope Section and IAEA, Gordon Conferences, and regional meeting in Germany, France, etc. Stable isotope application development on large scale is determined by improving their production technologies as well as those of labeled compound and the analytical techniques. (author)

  9. The effect of pressure, isotopic (H/D) substitution, and other variables on miscibility in polymer-solvent systems. The nature of the demixing process; dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hook, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    A research program examining the effects of pressure, isotope substitution and other variables on miscibility in polymer solvent systems is described. The techniques employed included phase equilibrium measurements and dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering

  10. Kinetic α-deuterium isotope effect as a probe of transition state structure and reaction mechanism in nucleoside hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical equilibrium α-deuterium isotope effects were calculated for systems modeling nucleoside and glycoside hydrolyses using a computer program (Burton, G.W., Sims, L.B., Wilson, J.C., and Fry, A.J., J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 99, 3374(1977)) which computes isotope effects directly from the expression of Biegeleisen and Mayer (Biegeleisen, J. and Mayer, M.G., J. Chem. Phys., 17, 675(1949)). For nucleoside hydrolysis proceeding through an oxocarbonium ion intermediate, KH/KD = 1.21 to 1.25; while for nucleoside hydrolysis proceeding through an oxocarbonium ion intermediate KH/KD = 1.15 to 1.19. The models used in the calculations were generated systematically and involved a minimum of subjectivity in the selection of molecular parameters. The isotope effects calculated formed the basis for the interpretation of experimental kinetic α-deuterium isotope effects for nucleoside and glycoside hydrolysis

  11. Transport infrastructure and technology: Investment, externalities, and general equilibrium effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Bergh, Jeroen C.J.M.; Nijkamp, P. [Faculty of Economics, Free University, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1993-04-01

    The paper addresses the use of general equilibrium models to analyze transportation policies. After a discussion of possible approaches, a representative set of static and dynamic models is developed and investigated, which focus on the interaction between general equilibrium, transport, infrastructure and environment. It is shown that each of these allows one to deal with specific types of policy questions. More technical modelling issues are dealt with as well, e.g. returns to scale, production functions, and disaggregation. Finally, attention is devoted to freight transport in a multisectoral production setting. 5 figs., 8 refs.

  12. Density functional theory calculations of H/D isotope effects on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanase, Satoshi; Oi, Takao [Sophia Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    2015-10-01

    To elucidate hydrogen isotope effects observed between fuel and exhaust hydrogen gases during polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operations, H-to-D reduced partition function ratios (RPFRs) for the hydrogen species in the Pt catalyst phase of the anode and the electrolyte membrane phase of the fuel cell were evaluated by density functional theory calculations on model species of the two phases. The evaluation yielded 3.2365 as the value of the equilibrium constant of the hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between the two phases at 39 C, which was close to the experimentally estimated value of 3.46-3.99 at the same temperature. It was indicated that H{sup +} ions on the Pt catalyst surface of the anode and H species in the electrolyte membrane phase were isotopically in equilibrium with one another during fuel cell operations.

  13. Dew water effects on leaf water using a stable isotope approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Lee, X.

    2009-12-01

    The presence of dew is a common meteorological phenomenon in field conditions and takes into account for significant portion of hydrologic processes in terrestrial ecosystems. The isotope composition of leaf water plays an important role in the isotopic water and carbon fluxes between terrestrial plants and the atmosphere. However, the consequence of dew formation in the plant-atmosphere relations has been ignored in many studies. The objective of this study is to improve our understanding of environmental and biological controls on the leaf water in equilibrium with dew water through laboratory experiments. Five species of plants (soybean, corn, sorghum, wheat, cotton) were grown hydroponically with water of a known isotopic content in a greenhouse. On the day of the experiment, they were first moved to ambient environment in full sunlight for at least 6 hr and then into a dark container inside the lab for up to 48 hr in which water vapor isotope ratios, temperature, and humidity were controlled. This arrangement created a step change in the forcing on the plant isotopic exchange. Leaves were sampled prior to the transfer to the dark container and 6 more times every 4 - 12 hr over the experiment. Humidity inside the container was saturated to mimic dew events in field conditions. Water from the leaf samples was extracted by a vacuum line and was analyzed for both δD and δ18O. The dataset will allow us to evaluate leaf water isotopic theories by exploring the transitions of the isotopic ratio of leaf water in response to the step change. Specifically, we are interested in whether the stomatal opening is an effective pathway for gaseous exchange in total darkness and how the transitional behaviors of the isotopic ratio of leaf water differ between the C3 and C4 photosynthesis pathways.

  14. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects in the 1,4-dimethylenecyclohexane boat cope rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajewski, J.J.; Jimenez, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    In order to examine the extent of bond making in the boat-like 3,3-sigmatropic shift transition states, trans-2,3-dimethyl-1,4-dimethylenecyclohexane (T) and its exomethylene tetradeuteria derivative (TXD) were prepared. The 3,3-shift of TXD at 305 0 C results in interconversion of starting material, 5,5,6,6-tetradeuterio-trans-2,3-dimethyl-1,4-dimethylene-cyclohexane (TND), and 2,2,3,3-tetradeuterio-anti-1,4-diethylidenecyclohexane (AD). A kinetic analysis of the first-order rate equations for the three-component system in both protio and deuterio species by numerical integration of the data and simplex minimization of the rate constants with symmetry and the assumption of no equilibrium or kinetic isotope effect on the TND-AD reaction gives a bond making kinetic isotope effect of 1/1.04 (0.04). The equilibrium isotope effects observed are 1/1.16 (0.04) so that the extent of bond formation in this boat-like bicyclo[2.2.2]octyl transition state is roughly 25%, a value to be compared with ca. 67% in chair-like acyclic 3,3-shift transition states. This rules out significant intervention of a bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-1,4-diyl intermediate or transition state. 30 references, 6 figures, 4 tables

  15. A model of the isotope effect of the oxide superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Liyuan.

    1989-03-01

    In this paper, a possible mechanism of producing negative correlation energy centers is proposed. Combining this electronic attractive potential with phonon mediated attractive potential between carriers the isotope effect exponent of La-Sr-Cu-O system is quantitatively explained. Generally, the isotope effect exponent is smaller than 1/2 in this mechanism. (author). 20 refs, 1 fig

  16. Secondary deuterium isotope effects in the hydrolysis of some acetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, R.V.

    Secondary α-deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined in the hydrolyses of some acetals. Benzaldehyde dimethyl acetal and 2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolan show isotope effects in agreement with an A1 mechanism. 2-Phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3-dioxolan, which has been shown to undergo hydrolysis by an A2 type mechanism, has an isotope effect in agreement with participation by water in the transition state. Hydrolysis of benzylidene norbornanediols, although complicated by isomerisation, has an isotope effect in agreement with an A2 mechanism. Kinetic isotope effects in acetals which have a neighbouring carboxyl group have also been determined. Hydrolysis of 2-carboxybenzaldehyde dimethyl acetal in aqueous and 82% w/w dioxan-water buffers has isotope effects in agreement with a large degree of carbonium ion character in the transition state. Anderson and Capon proposed nucleophilic participation in the hydrolysis of this acetal in 82% dioxan-water. The isotope effect determined in this study is not in agreement with this finding. Hydrolysis of 2-(2'-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3-dioxolan shows an isotope effect larger than the corresponding dioxolan without the carboxyl group in agreement with some carbonium ion character in the transition state. A new synthesis of a deuterated aldehyde is described which might be general for aldehydes which will not form benzoins readily. (author)

  17. Equilibrium and Kinetic Studies of Systems of Hydrogen Isotopes, Lithium Hydrides, Aluminum and LiAlO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper described measurements of (1) the distribution of tritium and helium throughout both phases of irradiated Li-Al alloy, (2) the migration rate of tritium during moderate heating, (3) equilibrium pressures as functions of temperature of H2, D2, or T2 in contact with lithium hydrides + aluminum, Li-Al alloy, or irradiated Li-Al alloy, (4) the equilibrium constant for the reaction as a function of temperature, and (5) extraction rates of tritium from irradiated LiAlO2 targets at elevated temperatures

  18. Effects of Confinement on Chemical Reaction Equilibrium in Nanoporous Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, W.R.; Lísal, Martin; Brennan, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 3984, - (2006), s. 743-751 ISSN 0302-9743 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0725; GA AV ČR 1ET400720507 Grant - others:NRCC(CA) OGP 1041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nanoporous materials * chemical reaction equilibrium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.402, year: 2005

  19. Teachers' Misconceptions about the Effects of Addition of More Reactants or Products on Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Derek; Ma, Hong-jia; Yang, Jie

    2009-01-01

    The importance of research on misconceptions about chemical equilibrium is well recognized by educators, but in the past, researchers' interest has centered on student misconceptions and has neglected teacher misconceptions. Focusing on the effects of adding more reactants or products on chemical equilibrium, this article discusses the various…

  20. Effectiveness of Instruction Based on the Constructivist Approach on Understanding Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, Huseyin; Kadayifci, Hakki; Atasoy, Basri; Geban, Omer

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify misconceptions concerning chemical equilibrium concepts and to investigate the effectiveness of instruction based on the constructivist approach over traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts. The subjects of this study consisted of 71 10th grade…

  1. Discussions on the non-equilibrium effects in the quantitative phase field model of binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi-Jun, Wang; Jin-Cheng, Wang; Gen-Cang, Yang

    2010-01-01

    All the quantitative phase field models try to get rid of the artificial factors of solutal drag, interface diffusion and interface stretch in the diffuse interface. These artificial non-equilibrium effects due to the introducing of diffuse interface are analysed based on the thermodynamic status across the diffuse interface in the quantitative phase field model of binary alloys. Results indicate that the non-equilibrium effects are related to the negative driving force in the local region of solid side across the diffuse interface. The negative driving force results from the fact that the phase field model is derived from equilibrium condition but used to simulate the non-equilibrium solidification process. The interface thickness dependence of the non-equilibrium effects and its restriction on the large scale simulation are also discussed. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  2. Methane clumped isotopes: Progress and potential for a new isotopic tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, Peter M. J.; Stolper, Daniel A.; Eiler, John M.; Sessions, Alex L.; Lawson, Michael; Shuai, Yanhua; Bishop, Andrew; Podlaha, Olaf G.; Ferreira, Alexandre A.; Santos Neto, Eugenio V.; Niemann, Martin; Steen, Arne S.; Huang, Ling; Chimiak, Laura; Valentine, David L.; Fiebig, Jens; Luhmann, Andrew J.; Seyfried, William E.; Etiope, Giuseppe; Schoell, Martin; Inskeep, William P.; Moran, James J.; Kitchen, Nami

    2017-11-01

    The isotopic composition of methane is of longstanding geochemical interest, with important implications for understanding hydrocarbon systems, atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, the global carbon cycle, and life in extreme environments. Recent analytical developments focusing on multiply substituted isotopologues (‘clumped isotopes’) are opening a potentially valuable new window into methane geochemistry. When methane forms in internal isotopic equilibrium, clumped isotopes can provide a direct record of formation temperature, making this property particularly valuable for identifying different methane origins. However, it has also become clear that in certain settings methane clumped isotope measurements record kinetic rather than equilibrium isotope effects. Here we present a substantially expanded dataset of methane clumped isotope analyses, and provide a synthesis of the current interpretive framework for this parameter. We review different processes affecting methane clumped isotope compositions, describe the relationships between conventional isotope and clumped isotope data, and summarize the types of information that this measurement can provide in different Earth and planetary environments.

  3. Isotopic shifts in chemical exchange systems. 1. Large isotope effects in the complexation of Na+ isotopes by macrocyclic polyethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoechel, A.; Wilken, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    The complexation of 24 Na + and 22 Na + by 18 of the most widely used macrocyclic polyethers (crown ethers and monocyclic and bicyclic aminopolyethers) has been investigated in view of possible equilibrium isotope shifts. Solvated salts and polyether complexes were distributed differently into two phases and isotope ratios determined in both phases. Chloroform/water systems were shown to be particularly suitable to the investigations allowing favorable distribution for Na + and 13 of the 18 polyethers employed. With crown ethers 24 Na + enrichment varied from nonsignficant values (for large crown ethers) up to 3.1 +- 0.4% (18-crown-6). In the case of bicyclic aminopolyethers, ligands with cages of optimum size to accommodate Na + showed 24 Na + enrichment between O (nonsignificant) (2.2/sub B/2./sub B/) and 5.2 +- 1.8% (2.2.1). In contrast, for 2.2.2. and its derivatives, being too large for Na + , 22 Na + enrichment varying from O (nonsignificant) (2.2.2.p) up to 5.4 +- 0.5% (2.2.2.) has been observed. These values are remarkably high. They are explained by different bonding in solvate structure and polyether complex by using the theoretical approach of Bigeleisen

  4. Isotope effects on the optical spectra of semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Manuel; Thewalt, M. L. W.

    2005-10-01

    Since the end of the cold war, macroscopic amounts of separated stable isotopes of most elements have been available “off the shelf” at affordable prices. Using these materials, single crystals of many semiconductors have been grown and the dependence of their physical properties on isotopic composition has been investigated. The most conspicuous effects observed have to do with the dependence of phonon frequencies and linewidths on isotopic composition. These affect the electronic properties of solids through the mechanism of electron-phonon interaction, in particular, in the corresponding optical excitation spectra and energy gaps. This review contains a brief introduction to the history, availability, and characterization of stable isotopes, including their many applications in science and technology. It is followed by a concise discussion of the effects of isotopic composition on the vibrational spectra, including the influence of average isotopic masses and isotopic disorder on the phonons. The final sections deal with the effects of electron-phonon interaction on energy gaps, the concomitant effects on the luminescence spectra of free and bound excitons, with particular emphasis on silicon, and the effects of isotopic composition of the host material on the optical transitions between the bound states of hydrogenic impurities.

  5. Great isotope effects in compounding of sodium isotopes by macrocyclic polyether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoechel, A.; Wilken, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Isotope effects appear in the compounding of the two sodium isotopes 24 Na + and 22 Na + with macrocyclic polyethers, whose value was determined for the 13 best known polyethers. A radiometric process was used for determining the different half life periods of the nuclides used. To separate the compound and non-compound types, these were distributed between water and chloroform. The isotope ratio in the chloroform phase was compared with the output isotope ratio and the separation facfor determined from this. When using crown ethers, there was enrichment of 24 Na + by a significant amount (large crown ether) up to 3.1 +- 0.4% for 18 crown 6. The remarkably high results can be correlated by Biegeleisen's theory with other chemical conditions. There is a report on the first results of transferring these conditions to the H + /T + system. (orig.) [de

  6. Calcium hydroxide isotope effect in calcium isotope enrichment by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepson, B.E.; Shockey, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    The enrichment of calcium isotopes has been observed in ion-exchange chromatography with an aqueous phase of calcium hydroxide and a solid phase of sulfonic acid resin. The band front was exceedingly sharp as a result of the acid-base reaction occuring at the front of the band. Single-stage separation coefficients were found to be epsilon( 44 Ca/ 40 Ca) = 11 x 10 -4 and epsilon( 48 Ca/ 40 Ca) = 18 x 10 -4 . The maximum column separation factors achieved were 1.05 for calcium-44 and 1.09 for calcium-48 with the heavy isotopes enriching in the fluid phase. The calcium isotope effect between fully hydrated aqueous calcium ions and undissociated aqueous calcium hydroxide was estimated. For the calcium-44/40 isotope pair the separation coefficient was 13 x 10 -4 . 20 references, 2 figures

  7. Isotope effect in the Knight shift of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahm, W.; Schwenk, A.

    1975-01-01

    The Knight shifts of the potassium isotopes 39 K and 41 K were determined with high accuracy: Ksup((39)) = 0.274 35(10)% and Ksup((41)) = 0.274 93(12)%. The relative isotope effect ΔK/K = -0.210 (20)% is in agreement with the hyperfine structure anomaly 39 Δ 41 . (orig.) [de

  8. Non-equilibrium effects in high temperature chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Reaction rate data were collected for chemical reactions occurring at high temperatures during reentry of space vehicles. The principle of detailed balancing is used in modeling kinetics of chemical reactions at high temperatures. Although this principle does not hold for certain transient or incubation times in the initial phase of the reaction, it does seem to be valid for the rates of internal energy transitions that occur within molecules and atoms. That is, for every rate of transition within the internal energy states of atoms or molecules, there is an inverse rate that is related through an equilibrium expression involving the energy difference of the transition.

  9. Effects of must concentration techniques on wine isotopic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, Francois; Douet, Christine; Colas, Sebastien; Salagoïty, Marie-Hélène; Medina, Bernard

    2006-12-27

    Despite the robustness of isotopic methods applied in the field of wine control, isotopic values can be slightly influenced by enological practices. For this reason, must concentration technique effects on wine isotopic parameters were studied. The two studied concentration techniques were reverse osmosis (RO) and high-vacuum evaporation (HVE). Samples (must and extracted water) have been collected in various French vineyards. Musts were microfermented at the laboratory, and isotope parameters were determined on the obtained wine. Deuterium and carbon-13 isotope ratios were studied on distilled ethanol by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), respectively. The oxygen-18 ratio was determined on extracted and wine water using IRMS apparatus. The study showed that the RO technique has a very low effect on isotopic parameters, indicating that this concentration technique does not create any isotopic fractionation, neither at sugar level nor at water level. The effect is notable for must submitted to HVE concentration: water evaporation leads to a modification of the oxygen-18 ratio of the must and, as a consequence, ethanol deuterium concentration is also modified.

  10. Evaluation of indoor radon equilibrium factor using CFD modeling and resulting annual effective dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, R.; Oufni, L.

    2018-04-01

    The equilibrium factor is an important parameter for reasonably estimating the population dose from radon. However, the equilibrium factor value depended mainly on the ventilation rate and the meteorological factors. Therefore, this study focuses on investigating numerically the influence of the ventilation rate, temperature and humidity on equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny. The numerical results showed that ventilation rate, temperature and humidity have significant impacts on indoor equilibrium factor. The variations of equilibrium factor with the ventilation, temperature and relative humidity are discussed. Moreover, the committed equivalent doses due to 218Po and 214Po radon short-lived progeny were evaluated in different tissues of the respiratory tract of the members of the public from the inhalation of indoor air. The annual effective dose due to radon short lived progeny from the inhalation of indoor air by the members of the public was investigated.

  11. Effect of Equilibrium Current Profiles on External Kink Modes in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chao; Liu Yue; Ma Zhaoshuai

    2014-01-01

    Based on a linearized MHD model, the effect of equilibrium current profiles on external kink modes in tokamaks is studied by MARS code. Three types of equilibrium current profiles are adopted in this work. Firstly, a set of parabolic equilibrium current profiles are chosen. In these profiles the maximum current values in the center of the plasma are fixed, and the currents have different gradient and jump at the plasma boundary. The effects of the current gradient and jump on the growth rate of external kink mode are investigated. It is found that the current jump which causes the q profiles to change plays an important role in the external kink modes in tokamaks. Secondly, a set of step equilibrium current profiles with different jump positions are chosen. The effect of jump position on external kink modes is discussed. Thirdly, a set of parabolic equilibrium current profiles with current bumps are chosen for the case of off-axis heating. The effects of height, width and position of the current bumps on external kink modes are analyzed. The flat equilibrium current profiles are disadvantageous for the MHD stabilities of tokamaks, because of the large current jump at the plasma edge. The peaked equilibrium current profiles and a large and localized current bump near the plasma edge benefit the MHD stabilities of tokamaks

  12. Symmetry effects in neutron scattering from isotopically enriched Se isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachkar, J.; Haouat, G.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Patin, Y.; Sigaud, J.; Cocu, F.

    1975-06-01

    Differential cross sections for neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from {sup 76}Se, {sup 78}Se, {sup 80}Se and {sup 82}Se, have been measured at 8-MeV incident neutron energy and from {sup 76}Se and {sup 82}Se at 6- and 10-MeV incident energies. The differences observed in the elastic scattering cross sections are interpretable as the effects of isospin term in the scattering potentials. A full analysis of the elastic scattering data are presented.

  13. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects of Ammonia Oxidation by Thermophilic Thaumarchaeota from a Geothermal Water Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Manabu; Sakai, Sanae; Konno, Uta; Nakahara, Nozomi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Saito, Yumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Tasumi, Eiji; Makabe, Akiko; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia oxidation regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature. Although ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been recently recognized to often outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in various environments, the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea is still uncertain due to difficulties in the in situ quantification of ammonia oxidation activity. Nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrite (δ(15)NNO2- and δ(18)ONO2-, respectively) are geochemical tracers for evaluating the sources and the in situ rate of nitrite turnover determined from the activities of nitrification and denitrification; however, the isotope ratios of nitrite from archaeal ammonia oxidation have been characterized only for a few marine species. We first report the isotope effects of ammonia oxidation at 70°C by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota populations composed almost entirely of "Candidatus Nitrosocaldus." The nitrogen isotope effect of ammonia oxidation varied with ambient pH (25‰ to 32‰) and strongly suggests the oxidation of ammonia, not ammonium. The δ(18)O value of nitrite produced from ammonia oxidation varied with the δ(18)O value of water in the medium but was lower than the isotopic equilibrium value in water. Because experiments have shown that the half-life of abiotic oxygen isotope exchange between nitrite and water is longer than 33 h at 70°C and pH ≥6.6, the rate of ammonia oxidation by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota could be estimated using δ(18)ONO2- in geothermal environments, where the biological nitrite turnover is likely faster than 33 h. This study extended the range of application of nitrite isotopes as a geochemical clock of the ammonia oxidation activity to high-temperature environments. Because ammonia oxidation is generally the rate-limiting step in nitrification that regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature, it is important to understand the biological and environmental factors underlying the regulation of

  14. Equilibrium and Disequilibrium of River Basins: Effects on Stream Captures in Serra do Mar and Serra da Mantiqueira, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    DA Silva, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Landscapes are mainly driven by river processes that control the dynamic reorganization of networks. Discovering and identifying whether river basins are in geometric equilibrium or disequilibrium requires an analysis of water divides, channels that shift laterally or expand upstream and river captures. Issues specifically discussed include the variation of drainage area change and erosion rates of the basins. In southeastern Brazil there are two main escarpments with extensive geomorphic surfaces: Serra do Mar and Serra da Mantiqueira Mountains. These landscapes are constituted of Neoproterozoic and early Paleozoic rocks, presenting steep escarpments with low-elevation coastal plains and higher elevation interior plateaus. To identify whether river basins and river profiles are in equilibrium or disequilibrium in Serra do Mar and Serra da Mantiqueira Mountains, we used the proxy (χ), evaluating the effect of drainage area change and erosion rates. We selected basins that drain both sides of these two main escarpments (oceanic and continental sides) and have denudation rates derived from pre-existing cosmogenic isotopes data (Rio de Janeiro, Paraná and Minas Gerais). Despite being an ancient and tectonically stable landscape, part of the coastal plain of Serra do Mar Mountain in Rio de Janeiro and Paraná is in geometric disequilibrium, with water divides moving in the direction of higher χ values. To achieve equilibrium, some basins located in the continental side are retracting and disappearing, losing area to the coastal basins. On the contrary, there are some adjacent sub-basins that are close to equilibrium, without strong contrasts in χ values. The same pattern was observed in Serra da Mantiqueira (Minas Gerais state), with stream captures and river network reorganization in its main rivers. The initial results suggest a strong contrast between erosion rates in the continental and the oceanic portions of the escarpments.

  15. Isotope effect on the zero point energy shift upon condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornblum, Z.C.

    1977-01-01

    The various isotope-dependent and independent atomic and molecular properties that pertain to the isotopic difference between the zero point energy (ZPE) shifts upon condensation have been derived. The theoretical development of the change of the ZPE associated with the internal molecular vibrations, due to the condensation of the gaseous molecules, has been presented on the basis of Wolfsberg's second-order perturbation treatment of the isotope-dependent London dispersion forces between liquid molecules. The isotope effect on the ZPE shift is related to the difference between the sums of the integrated intensities of the infrared absorption bands of the two gaseous isotopic molecules. Each intensity sum is expressed, in part, in terms of partial derivatives of the molecular dipole moment with respect to atomic cartesian coordinates. These derivatives are related to the isotope-independent effective charges of the atoms, which are theoretically calculated by means of a modified CNDO/2 computer program. The effective atomic charges are also calculated from available experimental infrared intensity data. The effects of isotopic substitutions of carbon-13 for carbon-12 and/or deuterium for protium, in ethylene, methane, and the fluorinated methanes, CH 3 F, CH 2 F 2 , CHF 3 , and CF 4 , on the ZPE shift upon condensation are calculated. These results compare well with the Bigeleisen B-factors, which are experimentally obtained from vapor pressure measurements of the isotopic species. Each of the following molecular properties will tend to increase the isotopic difference between the ZPE shifts upon condensation: (1) large number of highly polar bonds, (2) high molecular weight, (3) non-polar (preferably) or massive molecule, (4) non-hydrogenous molecule, and (5) closely packed liquid molecules. These properties will result in stronger dispersion forces in the liquid phase between the lighter molecules than between the isotopically heavier molecules

  16. Rotational spectra of rare isotopic species of fluoroiodomethane: determination of the equilibrium structure from rotational spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; López, Juan Carlos; Alonso, José Luis; Baldacci, Agostino; Baldan, Alessandro; Stopkowicz, Stella; Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-14

    Supported by accurate quantum-chemical calculations, the rotational spectra of the mono- and bi-deuterated species of fluoroiodomethane, CHDFI and CD(2)FI, as well as of the (13)C-containing species, (13)CH(2)FI, were recorded for the first time. Three different spectrometers were employed, a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, a millimeter/submillimter-wave spectrometer, and a THz spectrometer, thus allowing to record a huge portion of the rotational spectrum, from 5 GHz up to 1.05 THz, and to accurately determine the ground-state rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants. Sub-Doppler measurements allowed to resolve the hyperfine structure of the rotational spectrum and to determine the complete iodine quadrupole-coupling tensor as well as the diagonal elements of the iodine spin-rotation tensor. The present investigation of rare isotopic species of CH(2)FI together with the results previously obtained for the main isotopologue [C. Puzzarini, G. Cazzoli, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, S. Stopkowicz, L. Cheng, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 174312 (2011); G. Cazzoli, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, and C. Puzzarini, Mol. Phys. 109, 2245 (2011)] enabled us to derive a semi-experimental equilibrium structure for fluoroiodomethane by means of a least-squares fit procedure using the available experimental ground-state rotational constants together with computed vibrational corrections. Problems related to the missing isotopic substitution of fluorine and iodine were overcome thanks to the availability of an accurate theoretical equilibrium geometry (computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations).

  17. Uranium isotopic effect studies on cation and anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarpal, S.K.; Gupta, A.R.

    1975-01-01

    Uranium isotope effects in exchange reactions involving hexavalent and tetravalent uranium, on ion exchange resins, have been re-examined. The earlier work on uranium isotope effects in electron exchange reactions involving hexavalent and tetravalent uranium, has been critically reviewed. New experimental data on these systems in hydrochloric acid medium, has been obtained, using break-through technique on anion-exchange columns. The isotope effects in these break-through experiments have been reinterpreted in a way which is consistent with the anion exchange behaviour of the various uranium species in these systems. (author)

  18. Theory of the isotope effect in superconducting compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culetto, F.J.; Rainer, D.

    1978-05-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the isotope effect on the superconducting transition temperature. Our method is to calculate via formal perturbation theory the response of the transition temperature to small changes of the masses of the various constituents of the compound. We discuss the relation between the isotope effect and various more fundamental parameters in strong coupling superconductors. As illustrative examples, we consider the systems Pd-H(D) alloys and the binary Chevrel phase superconductor Mo 6 Se 8 , and show that analysis of the isotope effect can yield useful information concerning interaction mechanisms in these compounds. (orig.)

  19. Biosynthetic effects on the stable carbon isotopic compositions of agal lipids: Implications for deciphering the carbon isotopic biomarker record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.; Klein Breteler, W.C.M.; Blokker, P.; Schogt, N.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Grice, K.; Baas, M.

    1998-01-01

    Thirteen species of algae covering an extensive range of classes were cultured and stable carbon isotopic compositions of their lipids were analysed in order to assess carbon isotopic fractionation effects during their biosynthesis. The fatty acids were found to have similar stable carbon isotopic

  20. General equilibrium effects of increasing carbon taxes in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, G.W.; Kristroem, B.

    1997-01-01

    Sweden was one of the first countries to introduce carbon taxes, and is currently evaluating further carbon taxes. The authors were asked to advise a government commission charged with undertaking the official Swedish evaluation. We did so by constructing and simulating a computable general equilibrium model of Sweden. In this report, the carbon tax debate in Sweden is first reviewed, then our model is described and the main results presented. The conclusion from the cost-benefit analysis is clear, the benefits of increasing the carbon tax in Sweden are a tiny fraction of the costs that consumers must pay in the form of higher prices and reduced incomes. Although we do not put much credence in the gross benefit numbers, they do serve to highlight the basis of our conclusion that carbon tax increases are not currently justifiable in Sweden. 35 refs., 13 tabs

  1. General equilibrium effects of increasing carbon taxes in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, G W [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Economics, College of Business Administration; Kristroem, B [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Economics

    1997-09-01

    Sweden was one of the first countries to introduce carbon taxes, and is currently evaluating further carbon taxes. The authors were asked to advise a government commission charged with undertaking the official Swedish evaluation. We did so by constructing and simulating a computable general equilibrium model of Sweden. In this report, the carbon tax debate in Sweden is first reviewed, then our model is described and the main results presented. The conclusion from the cost-benefit analysis is clear, the benefits of increasing the carbon tax in Sweden are a tiny fraction of the costs that consumers must pay in the form of higher prices and reduced incomes. Although we do not put much credence in the gross benefit numbers, they do serve to highlight the basis of our conclusion that carbon tax increases are not currently justifiable in Sweden. 35 refs., 13 tabs.

  2. Assessment of surface reactivity of thorium oxide in conditions close to chemical equilibrium by isotope exchange {sup 229}Th/{sup 232}Th method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki-Muresan, Tomo; Perrigaud, Katy; Vandenborre, Johan; Ribet, Solange; Grambow, Bernd [Nantes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). SUBATECH Unite Mixte de Recherche 6457; Takamasa, Inai [TOKAI Univ., Kanagawa (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    This work aims to assess the solubility and the surface reactivity of crystallized thorium at pH 3.0 in presence of three types of solids: synthesized powder at 1300 C, crushed kernel, and intact kernel. In this study, the kernel is composed by the core solid from high temperature reactors (HTR) sphere particles. The originality of this work consisted in following in a sequential order the kinetic of dissolution, the surface reactivity in presence of isotope tracer {sup 229}Th, and its desorption process. Long time experiments (634 days) allowed to get deeper understanding on the behavior of the surface reactivity in contact with the solution. Solubility values are ranging from 0.3 x 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1} to 3 x 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1} with a dissolution rate of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -4} g.m{sup -2} day{sup -1}. PHREEQC modeling showed that crystallized ThO{sub 2}(cr, 20 nm) phase controls the equilibrium in solution. Isotope exchange between {sup 229}Th and {sup 232}Th indicated that well-crystallized phase exist as an inert surface regarding to the absence of exchange between surface solid and solution.

  3. Isotope effect in gamma-radiolysis of absorbed ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyapina, T G; Kotov, A G [Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Fiziko-Khimicheskij Inst., Moscow (USSR)

    1975-07-01

    The radiolysis of NH/sub 3/ of various isotopic compounds adsorbed on silica gel or zeolite at 77degK was studied. Experimental data were treated using the kinetic equation dR/dt=GI-kIR where R=radical concentration, G=radical yield, k=radical termination constant and I=radiation dose rate. Both the values of G and R for NH/sub 3/ adsorbed on silica gel are affected by the isotopic effect of /sup 15/N, but not on zeolite. The isotopic effect is explained by the influence of protonated acidity of the silica gel surface.

  4. Magnetic field effects on the chemical equilibrium in LaCo5-H system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Isao; Yamaguchi, Masuhiro; Deguchi, Noritaka; Miura, Shigeto.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic field effects on the chemical equilibrium were investigated for a ferromagnetic metal hydride-hydrogen system. The equilibrium hydrogen pressure, measured in the β+γ region for LaCo 5 H x , changed significantly with the applied magnetic fields up to 15 T in the temperature range between 293 and 343 K. Namely, the measured hydrogen pressure increased with increasing magnetic fields. However, such a change in the equilibrium pressure became less remarkable with increasing temperature. These experimental results agreed with the thermodynamic calculation based on magnetic data. (author)

  5. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of systems of hydrogen isotopes, lithium hydrides, aluminum, and LiAlO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, J.H.; Randall, D.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium might be bred by the 6 Li(n,α)T reaction in a solid lithium alloy or compound in the blanket of a controlled thermonuclear reactor to avoid problems associated with molten lithium or lithium compounds. Li--Al and LiAlO 2 systems containing hydrogen, deuterium, or tritium were studied 10 to 15 years ago at the Savannah River Laboratory. This paper descibes measurements of (1) the distribution of tritium and helium throughout both α and β phases of irradiated Li--Al alloy, (2) the migration rate of tritium to the β phase during moderate heating, (3) equilibrium pressures as functions of temperature of H 2 , D 2 , or T 2 in contact with lithium hydrides + aluminum, Li--Al alloy, or irradiated Li--Al alloy, (4) the equilibrium constant for the reaction LiH + Al → LiAl + 1 / 2 H 2 as a function of temperature, and (5) extraction rates of tritium from irradiated LiAlO 2 targets at elevated temperatures

  6. Absence of isotope effect of diffusion in a metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heesemann, A.; Raetzke, K.; Faupel, F.; Hoffmann, J.; Heinemann, K.

    1995-01-01

    The isotope effect E = d ln(D)/d ln (1/√m) of Co diffusion in structurally relaxed Co 86 Zr 14 and Co 81 Zr 19 glasses has been measured by means of a radiotracer technique. Within experimental accuracy no isotope effect was detected (E < 0.04). This suggests a highly cooperative diffusion mechanism. The connection between diffusion and collective low-frequency relaxations in glasses is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Mass-independent isotope effects in chemical exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Kazushige

    2000-01-01

    Isotope effects of some elements in chemical exchange reaction were investigated by use of liquid-liquid extraction, liquid membrane or chromatographic separation. Cyclic polyether was used for every method. All polyethers used in a series of the studies were made clear that they distinguished the isotopes not only by their nuclear masses but also by their nuclear sizes and shapes. Chromium isotopes, for example, were recognized to have enrichment factors being proportional to δ 2 > which is a parameter to show field shift or the nuclear size and shape of the isotope. It follows that the chromium isotopes are separated not by their masses but by their field shift effects. Nuclear spin also played a great role to separate odd mass number isotopes from even mass number isotopes in even atomic number elements. Contribution of the nuclear spin (I=3/2) of 53 Cr to total enrichment factor, ε 53/52 = -0.00028, for 53 Cr to 52 Cr was observed to be, ε spin = -0.0025. (author)

  8. H/D Isotope Effects in Hydrogen Bonded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Filarowski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely strong H/D isotope effect observed in hydrogen bonded A-H…B systems is connected with a reach diversity of the potential shape for the proton/deuteron motion. It is connected with the anharmonicity of the proton/deuteron vibrations and of the tunneling effect, particularly in cases of short bridges with low barrier for protonic and deuteronic jumping. Six extreme shapes of the proton motion are presented starting from the state without possibility of the proton transfer up to the state with a full ionization. The manifestations of the H/D isotope effect are best reflected in the infra-red absorption spectra. A most characteristic is the run of the relationship between the isotopic ratio nH/nD and position of the absorption band shown by using the example of NHN hydrogen bonds. One can distinguish a critical range of correlation when the isotopic ratio reaches the value of ca. 1 and then increases up to unusual values higher than . The critical range of the isotope effect is also visible in NQR and NMR spectra. In the critical region one observes a stepwise change of the NQR frequency reaching 1.1 MHz. In the case of NMR, the maximal isotope effect is reflected on the curve presenting the dependence of Δd (1H,2H on d (1H. This effect corresponds to the range of maximum on the correlation curve between dH and ΔpKa that is observed in various systems. There is a lack in the literature of quantitative information about the influence of isotopic substitution on the dielectric properties of hydrogen bond except the isotope effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in some hydrogen bonded crystals.

  9. Isotope effect on the zero point energy shift upon condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornblum, Z.C.; Ishida, T.

    1977-07-01

    The various isotope-dependent and independent atomic and molecular properties that pertain to the isotopic difference between the zero point energy (ZPE) shifts upon condensation were derived. The theoretical development of the change of the ZPE associated with the internal molecular vibrations, due to the condensation of the gaseous molecules, is presented on the basis of Wolfsberg's second-order perturbation treatment of the isotope-dependent London dispersion forces between liquid molecules. The isotope effect on the ZPE shift is related to the difference between the sums of the integrated intensities of the infrared absorption bands of the two gaseous isotopic molecules. The effective atomic charges are also calculated from available experimental infrared intensity data. The effects of isotopic substitutions of carbon-13 for carbon-12 and/or deuterium for protium, in ethylene, methane, and the fluorinated methanes, CH 3 F, CH 2 F 2 , CHF 3 , and CF 4 , on the ZPE shift upon condensation are calculated. These results compare well with the Bigeleisen B-factors, which are experimentally obtained from vapor pressure measurements of the isotopic species. Each of the following molecular properties will tend to increase the isotopic difference between the ZPE shifts upon condensation: (1) large number of highly polar bonds, (2) high molecular weight, (3) non-polar (preferably) or massive molecule, (4) non-hydrogenous molecule, and (5) closely packed liquid molecules. These properties will result in stronger dispersion forces in the liquid phase between the lighter molecules than between the isotopically heavier molecules. 36 tables, 9 figures

  10. Steric effects on the primary isotope dependence of secondary kinetic isotope effects in hydride transfer reactions in solution: caused by the isotopically different tunneling ready state conformations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, Binita; Raghibi Boroujeni, Mahdi; Lefton, Jonathan; White, Ormacinda R; Razzaghi, Mortezaali; Hammann, Blake A; Derakhshani-Molayousefi, Mortaza; Eilers, James E; Lu, Yun

    2015-05-27

    The observed 1° isotope effect on 2° KIEs in H-transfer reactions has recently been explained on the basis of a H-tunneling mechanism that uses the concept that the tunneling of a heavier isotope requires a shorter donor-acceptor distance (DAD) than that of a lighter isotope. The shorter DAD in D-tunneling, as compared to H-tunneling, could bring about significant spatial crowding effect that stiffens the 2° H/D vibrations, thus decreasing the 2° KIE. This leads to a new physical organic research direction that examines how structure affects the 1° isotope dependence of 2° KIEs and how this dependence provides information about the structure of the tunneling ready states (TRSs). The hypothesis is that H- and D-tunneling have TRS structures which have different DADs, and pronounced 1° isotope effect on 2° KIEs should be observed in tunneling systems that are sterically hindered. This paper investigates the hypothesis by determining the 1° isotope effect on α- and β-2° KIEs for hydride transfer reactions from various hydride donors to different carbocationic hydride acceptors in solution. The systems were designed to include the interactions of the steric groups and the targeted 2° H/D's in the TRSs. The results substantiate our hypothesis, and they are not consistent with the traditional model of H-tunneling and 1°/2° H coupled motions that has been widely used to explain the 1° isotope dependence of 2° KIEs in the enzyme-catalyzed H-transfer reactions. The behaviors of the 1° isotope dependence of 2° KIEs in solution are compared to those with alcohol dehydrogenases, and sources of the observed "puzzling" 2° KIE behaviors in these enzymes are discussed using the concept of the isotopically different TRS conformations.

  11. Bibliography on vapor pressure isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jancso, G.

    1980-04-01

    The first Bibliography on Vapour Pressure Isotope and covered the literature of the period from 1919 through December 1975. The present Supplement reviews the literature from January 1976 through December 1979. The bibliography is arranged in chronological order; within each year the references are listed alphabetically according to the name of the first author of each work. (author)

  12. Isotopic effects on phonon anharmonicity in layered van der Waals crystals: Isotopically pure hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuscó, Ramon; Artús, Luis; Edgar, James H.; Liu, Song; Cassabois, Guillaume; Gil, Bernard

    2018-04-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h -BN) is a layered crystal that is attracting a great deal of attention as a promising material for nanophotonic applications. The strong optical anisotropy of this crystal is key to exploit polaritonic modes for manipulating light-matter interactions in 2D materials. h -BN has also great potential for solid-state neutron detection and neutron imaging devices, given the exceptionally high thermal neutron capture cross section of the boron-10 isotope. A good knowledge of phonons in layered crystals is essential for harnessing long-lived phonon-polariton modes for nanophotonic applications and may prove valuable for developing solid-state 10BN neutron detectors with improved device architectures and higher detection efficiencies. Although phonons in graphene and isoelectronic materials with a similar hexagonal layer structure have been studied, the effect of isotopic substitution on the phonons of such lamellar compounds has not been addressed yet. Here we present a Raman scattering study of the in-plane high-energy Raman active mode on isotopically enriched single-crystal h -BN. Phonon frequency and lifetime are measured in the 80-600-K temperature range for 10B-enriched, 11B-enriched, and natural composition high quality crystals. Their temperature dependence is explained in the light of perturbation theory calculations of the phonon self-energy. The effects of crystal anisotropy, isotopic disorder, and anharmonic phonon-decay channels are investigated in detail. The isotopic-induced changes in the phonon density of states are shown to enhance three-phonon anharmonic decay channels in 10B-enriched crystals, opening the possibility of isotope tuning of the anharmonic phonon decay processes.

  13. Effects of interruptible load program on equilibrium outcomes of electricity markets with wind power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Xuena; Zhang, Shaohua; Li, Xue [Shanghai Univ. (China). Key Lab. of Power Station Automation Technology

    2013-07-01

    High wind power penetration presents a lot of challenges to the flexibility and reliability of power system operation. In this environment, various demand response (DR) programs have got much attention. As an effective measure of demand response programs, interruptible load (IL) programs have been widely used in electricity markets. This paper addresses the problem of impacts of the IL programs on the equilibrium outcomes of electricity wholesale markets with wind power. A Cournot equilibrium model of wholesale markets with wind power is presented, in which IL programs is included by a market demand model. The introduction of the IL programs leads to a non-smooth equilibrium problem. To solve this equilibrium problem, a novel solution method is proposed. Numerical examples show that IL programs can lower market price and its volatility significantly, facilitate the integration of wind power.

  14. Inverse isotope effect in iron-based superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirage, Parasharam M.; Kihou, Kunihiro; Miyazawa, Kiichi; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kito, Hijiri; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasumoto; Iyo, Akira

    2010-01-01

    We have found that (Ba, K)Fe 2 As 2 superconductor (a transition temperature, T c ∼ 38 K) shows an inverse Iron isotope effect (α Fe = -0.18 ± 0.03, where T c ∼ M -αFe and M is the iron isotope mass), i.e. the sample containing the larger iron mass depicts higher T c . Systematic studies using three types of Fe-isotopes ( 54 Fe, natural Fe and 57 Fe) reveal a clear inverse shift on T c by measurements of temperature dependent magnetization and resistivity. The inverse isotope effect that is the first case in high-T c superconductors strongly suggests that superconducting mechanism of the iron-based system is not explained by conventional BCS theory mediated by phonons.

  15. Solvent isotope effects on tautomerization equilibria of papain and model thiolamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creighton, D.J.; Schamp, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The state of ionization of the active site sulfhydryl group of papain at the pH-optimum of activity (pH approximately 6.5) remains a controversial issue. An alternative approach to the problem is reported here which utilizes the difference between the isotopic fractionation factor of the S-H bond (phi approximately equal to 0.4) and the N-H bond (phi = 0.97). In principle, the tautomerization equilibrium should be subject to an inverse solvent deuterium isotope effect in which the non-ionised form is more stable relative to the ionised form in D 2 O compared to H 2 O (K(H 2 O)/K(D 2 O) = phisub(SH)/phisub(MH) approximately equal to 0.4). This priniciple has been successfully tested on the tautomerization equilibria of cysteine and β-mercaptoethylamine from spectrophotometric titrations. To the extent that these simple thiolamines model the spectral properties of the tautomeric species envisioned in the active site of papain, the tautomerization equilibrium constant for papain is estimated (K(H 2 O) approximately equal to 2) from a comparison of the effect of solvent D 2 O on the mercaptide ion spectra of the thiolamines and the mercaptide ion-like difference absorption spectrum of papain. (Auth.)

  16. Clumped isotope effects during OH and Cl oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitehill, Andrew R.; Joelsson, Lars Magnus T.; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to determine the clumped (13CH3D) methane kinetic isotope effects during oxidation of methane by OH and Cl radicals, the major sink reactions for atmospheric methane. Experiments were performed in a 100 L quartz photochemical reactor, in which OH was produ......A series of experiments were carried out to determine the clumped (13CH3D) methane kinetic isotope effects during oxidation of methane by OH and Cl radicals, the major sink reactions for atmospheric methane. Experiments were performed in a 100 L quartz photochemical reactor, in which OH...... effects for singly substituted species were consistent with previous experimental studies. For doubly substituted methane, 13CH3D, the observed kinetic isotope effects closely follow the product of the kinetic isotope effects for the 13C and deuterium substituted species (i.e., 13,2KIE = 13KIE × 2KIE...... reactions. In a closed system, however, this effect is overtaken by the large D/H isotope effect, which causes the residual methane to become anti-clumped relative to the initial methane. Based on these results, we demonstrate that oxidation of methane by OH, the predominant oxidant for tropospheric methane...

  17. X-RAY SIGNATURES OF NON-EQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION EFFECTS IN GALAXY CLUSTER ACCRETION SHOCK REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Ka-Wah; Sarazin, Craig L.; Ji Li

    2011-01-01

    The densities in the outer regions of clusters of galaxies are very low, and the collisional timescales are very long. As a result, heavy elements will be under-ionized after they have passed through the accretion shock. We have studied systematically the effects of non-equilibrium ionization for relaxed clusters in the ΛCDM cosmology using one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. We found that non-equilibrium ionization effects do not depend on cluster mass, but depend strongly on redshift which can be understood by self-similar scaling arguments. The effects are stronger for clusters at lower redshifts. We present X-ray signatures such as surface brightness profiles and emission lines in detail for a massive cluster at low redshift. In general, soft emission (0.3-1.0 keV) is enhanced significantly by under-ionization, and the enhancement can be nearly an order of magnitude near the shock radius. The most prominent non-equilibrium ionization signature we found is the O VII and O VIII line ratio. The ratios for non-equilibrium ionization and collisional ionization equilibrium models are different by more than an order of magnitude at radii beyond half of the shock radius. These non-equilibrium ionization signatures are equally strong for models with different non-adiabatic shock electron heating efficiencies. We have also calculated the detectability of the O VII and O VIII lines with the future International X-ray Observatory (IXO). Depending on the line ratio measured, we conclude that an exposure of ∼130-380 ks on a moderate-redshift, massive regular cluster with the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) on the IXO will be sufficient to provide a strong test for the non-equilibrium ionization model.

  18. A general equilibrium view of global rebound effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Taoyuan

    2010-01-01

    How do energy efficiency gains affect energy consumption? The effects are generally called 'rebound effects' in the literature. Previous studies have extensively focused on only part of the global economy to study rebound effects, e.g. energy consumption by households, one industry, or one country. However, since the global economy is highly connected among countries, these studies may lead to misleading conclusions if the rebound effects in the rest of the economy are significant. Recently Saunders (2008) analyzes the demand side by taking the global economy as a whole. Wei (2007) also provides a general analysis by using Cobb-Douglas production functions for the global economy. The present article expands Wei (2007) general analysis to explore the rebound effects from an economist's viewpoint by taking the global economy as a whole and applying general forms of production functions. The analysis provides new insights related to rebound effects: we highlight the role of energy supply as a determinant of rebound. We show that the substitution between energy resources and other productive resources is more relevant to long term rebound. We predict that long term rebound may be lower than short term rebound. And we also discover that super-conservation can happen in both the short term and the long term.

  19. Pollution and Climate Effects on Tree-Ring Nitrogen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, M. M.; Bégin, C.; Marion, J.; Smirnoff, A.

    2009-04-01

    Georgian Bay reflect deposition of NOx emissions from cars and coal-power plants, with higher proportions from coal burning in Georgian Bay (Savard et al., 2009b). This interpretation is conceivable because recent monitoring indicates that coal-power plant NOx emissions play an important role in the annual N budget in Ontario, but they are negligible on the Quebec side. CONCLUSION Interpretations of long tree-ring N isotopic series in terms of effects generated by airborne N-species have been previously advocated. Here we further propose that the contrasted isotopic trends obtained for wood samples from two regions reflect different regional anthropogenic N deposition combined with variations of climatic conditions. This research suggests that nitrogen tree-ring series may record both regional climatic conditions and anthropogenic perturbations of the N cycle. REFERENCES Savard, M.M., Bégin,C., Marion, J., Aznar, J.-C., Smirnoff, A., 2009a. Changes of Air Quality in an urban region as inferred from tree-ring width and stable isotopes. Chapter 9 in "Relating Atmospheric Source Apportionment to Vegetation Effects: Establishing Cause Effect Relationships" (A. Legge ed.). Elsevier, Amsterdam; doi: 10.1016/S1474-8177(08)00209x. Savard, M.M., Bégin, C., Smirnoff, A., Marion, J., Rioux-Paquette, E., 2009b. Tree-ring nitrogen isotopes reflect climatic effects and anthropogenic NOx emissions. Env. Sci. Tech (doi: 10.1021/es802437k).

  20. Intra-event isotope and raindrop size data of tropical rain reveal effects concealed by event averaged data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managave, S. R.; Jani, R. A.; Narayana Rao, T.; Sunilkumar, K.; Satheeshkumar, S.; Ramesh, R.

    2016-08-01

    Evaporation of rain is known to contribute water vapor, a potent greenhouse gas, to the atmosphere. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions (δ18O and, δD, respectively) of precipitation, usually measured/presented as values integrated over rain events or monthly mean values, are important tools for detecting evaporation effects. The slope ~8 of the linear relationship between such time-averaged values of δD and δ18O (called the meteoric water line) is widely accepted as a proof of condensation under isotopic equilibrium and absence of evaporation of rain during atmospheric fall. Here, through a simultaneous investigation of the isotopic and drop size distributions of seventeen rain events sampled on an intra-event scale at Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), southern India, we demonstrate that the evaporation effects, not evident in the time-averaged data, are significantly manifested in the sub-samples of individual rain events. We detect this through (1) slopes significantly less than 8 for the δD-δ18O relation on intra-event scale and (2) significant positive correlations between deuterium excess ( d-excess = δD - 8*δ18O; lower values in rain indicate evaporation) and the mass-weighted mean diameter of the raindrops ( D m ). An estimated ~44 % of rain is influenced by evaporation. This study also reveals a signature of isotopic equilibration of rain with the cloud base vapor, the processes important for modeling isotopic composition of precipitation. d-excess values of rain are modified by the post-condensation processes and the present approach offers a way to identify the d-excess values least affected by such processes. Isotope-enabled global circulation models could be improved by incorporating intra-event isotopic data and raindrop size dependent isotopic effects.

  1. Mass independent isotope effects and their observations in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiemens, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    In 1983, Thiemens and Heidenreich reported the first chemically produced mass independent isotope effect. A significant feature of the fractionation was that it identically produced the isotopic relation observed in the calcium-aluminum inclusions in the Allende meteorite. This δ 17 O=δ 18 O composition had previously been thought to represent a nucleosynthetic component as no chemical process was capable of producing a mass independent isotopic composition. It now appears nearly certain that the meteoritic oxygen isotopic anomalies were produced by chemical, rather than nuclear, processes. Since oxygen is the major element in stony planets this represents a major event in the formation of the solar system. In a recent review (Thiemens, 1999), it has been shown that mass independent isotopic compositions are pervasive in the Earth's atmosphere. Molecules which have been demonstrated to possess mass independent isotopic compositions include: O 2 , O 3 , CO 2 , CO, and N 2 O. In each case, the specific nature of the mass independent isotopic composition has provided details of their atmospheric chemistry that could not have been obtained by any other measurement technique. Most recently, solid materials have been observed to possess mass independent isotopic composition. In this paper, these observations are briefly discussed. These solid reservoirs include: 1) carbonates and sulphates from Mars, 2) terrestrial aerosol sulphate, 3) sulphides and sulphates from the Earth, ranging in time from 3.8 to 2.2 billion years before present, 4) sulphates from the Namibian desert and 5) the Antartic Dry Valleys. The information obtained from these measurements is extraordinarily wide ranging, extending from understanding the history of Martian atmosphereregolith interaction to the evolution of the oxygen in the Earth's earliest atmosphere. As was the case for gas phase species, this information and insight could not have been obtained by any other measurement technique

  2. Transport hysteresis and hydrogen isotope effect on confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2018-03-01

    A Gedankenexperiment on hydrogen isotope effect is developed, using the transport model with transport hysteresis. The transport model with hysteresis is applied to case where the modulational electron cyclotron heating is imposed near the mid-radius of the toroidal plasmas. The perturbation propagates either outward or inward, being associated with the clockwise (CW) hysteresis or counter-clockwise (CCW) hysteresis, respectively. The hydrogen isotope effects on the CW and CCW hysteresis are investigated. The local component of turbulence-driven transport is assumed to be the gyro-Bohm diffusion. While the effect of hydrogen mass number is screened in the response of CW hysteresis, it is amplified in CCW hysteresis. This result motivates the experimental studies to compare CW and CCW cases in order to obtain further insight into the physics of hydrogen isotope effects.

  3. Long-term equilibrium effects of constraints in energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookes, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: introduction; the economic role of energy; the economics of energy price; a first attempt to model long term effects (energy consumption and economic activity); what is a price hike (energy supply and demand functions before and after price hike); modelling energy price hikes; implications and lessons for nuclear energy; the present reality. (U.K.)

  4. Modeling the Effect of Contact and Seepage Forces at Equilibrium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There have been records of failures and quicksand conditions in boreholes in recent times impeding the performance and operation of boreholes which may have resulted from various factors ranging from construction problems, drilling inaccuracies, fitting and installation problems, some chemical effects within the aquifer ...

  5. Isotope and mixture effects on neoclassical transport in the pedestal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztai, Istvan; Buller, Stefan; Omotani, John T.; Newton, Sarah L.

    2017-10-01

    The isotope mass scaling of the energy confinement time in tokamak plasmas differs from gyro-Bohm estimates, with implications for the extrapolation from current experiments to D-T reactors. Differences in mass scaling in L-mode and various H-mode regimes suggest that the isotope effect may originate from the pedestal. In the pedestal, sharp gradients render local diffusive estimates invalid, and global effects due to orbit-width scale profile variations have to be taken into account. We calculate neoclassical cross-field fluxes from a radially global drift-kinetic equation using the PERFECT code, to study isotope composition effects in density pedestals. The relative reduction to the peak heat flux due to global effects as a function of the density scale length is found to saturate at an isotope-dependent value that is larger for heavier ions. We also consider D-T and H-D mixtures with a focus on isotope separation. The ability to reproduce the mixture results via single-species simulations with artificial ``DT'' and ``HD'' species has been considered. These computationally convenient single ion simulations give a good estimate of the total ion heat flux in corresponding mixtures. Funding received from the International Career Grant of Vetenskapsradet (VR) (330-2014-6313) with Marie Sklodowska Curie Actions, Cofund, Project INCA 600398, and Framework Grant for Strategic Energy Research of VR (2014-5392).

  6. Blade bowing effects on radial equilibrium of inlet flow in axial compressor cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han XU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The circumferentially averaged equation of the inlet flow radial equilibrium in axial compressor was deduced. It indicates that the blade inlet radial pressure gradient is closely related to the radial component of the circumferential fluctuation (CF source item. Several simplified cascades with/without aerodynamic loading were numerically studied to investigate the effects of blade bowing on the inlet flow radial equilibrium. A data reduction program was conducted to obtain the CF source from three-dimensional (3D simulation results. Flow parameters at the passage inlet were focused on and each term in the radial equilibrium equation was discussed quantitatively. Results indicate that the inviscid blade force is the inducement of the inlet CF due to geometrical asymmetry. Blade bowing induces variation of the inlet CF, thus changes the radial pressure gradient and leads to flow migration before leading edge (LE in the cascades. Positive bowing drives the inlet flow to migrate from end walls to mid-span and negative bowing turns it to the reverse direction to build a new equilibrium. In addition, comparative studies indicate that the inlet Mach number and blade loading can efficiently impact the effectiveness of blade bowing on radial equilibrium in compressor design.

  7. Effect of bootstrap current on MHD equilibrium beta limit in heliotron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, K.Y.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of bootstrap current on the beta limit of MHD equilibria is studied systematically by an iterative calculation of MHD equilibrium and the consistent bootstrap current in high beta heliotron plasmas. The LHD machine is treated as a standard configuration heliotron with an L=2 planar axis. The effects of vacuum magnetic configurations, pressure profiles and the vertical field control method are studied. The equilibrium beta limit with consistent bootstrap current is quite sensitive to the magnetic axis location for finite beta, compared with the currentless cases. For a vacuum configuration with the magnetic axis shifted inwards in the torus, even in the high beta regimes, the bootstrap current flows to increase the rotational transform, leading to an increase in the equilibrium beta limit. On the contrary, for a vacuum configuration with the magnetic axis shifted outwards in the torus, even in the low beta regimes, the bootstrap current flows so as to reduce the rotational transform; therefore, there is an acceleration of the Shafranov shift increase as beta increases, leading to a decrease in the equilibrium beta limit. The pressure profiles and vertical field control methods influence the equilibrium beta limit through the location of the magnetic axis for finite beta. These characteristics are independent of both device parameters, such as magnetic field strength, and device size in the low collisional regime. (author)

  8. Anharmonic phonons and the isotope effect in superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespi, V.H.; Cohen, M.L.; Penn, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Anharmonic interionic potentials are examined in an Einstein model to study the unusual isotope-effect exponents for the high-T c oxides. The mass dependences of the electron-phonon coupling constant λ and the average phonon frequency √ left-angle ω 2 right-angle are computed from weighted sums over the oscillator levels. The isotope-effect exponent is depressed below 1/2 by either a double-well potential or a potential with positive quadratic and quartic parts. Numerical solutions of Schroedinger's equation for double-well potentials produce λ's in the range 1.5--4 for a material with a vanishing isotope-effect parameter α. However, low phonon frequencies limit T c to roughly 15 K. A negative quartic perturbation to a harmonic well can increase α above 1/2. In the extreme-strong-coupling limit, α is 1/2, regardless of anharmonicity

  9. Local equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-12-15

    From 3-6 September the First International Workshop on Local Equilibrium in Strong Interaction Physics took place in Bad-Honnef at the Physics Centre of the German Physical Society. A number of talks covered the experimental and theoretical investigation of the 'hotspots' effect, both in high energy particle physics and in intermediate energy nuclear physics.

  10. The effect of natural weathering on the chemical and isotopic composition of biotites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauer, N.; Bonnot-Courtois, C.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of progressive natural weathering on the isotopic (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, deltaD, delta 18 O) and chemical (REE, H 2 O + ) compositions of biotite has been studied on a suite of migmatitic biotites from the Chad Republic. During the early stages of weathering the Rb-Sr system is strongly affected, the hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions change markedly, the minerals are depleted in light REE, the water content increases by a factor of two, and the K-Ar system is relatively little disturbed. During intensive weathering the K-Ar system is more strongly disturbed than the Rb-Sr system. Most of the isotopic and chemical modifications take place under nonequilibrium conditions and occur before newly formed kaolinite and/or smectite can be detected. These observations suggest that (a) 'protominerals' may form within the biotite structure during the initial period of weathering, and (b) only when chemical equilibrium is approached in the weathering profile are new minerals able to form. (author)

  11. Kinetic isotope effects and aliphatic diazo-compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albery, W.J.; Conway, C.W.; Hall, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for the variation of the rate of decomposition of ethyl diazomalonate (EDM) and diazomalonate anions with pH and for the deuterium solvent isotope effect for EDM. The shape of the pH profile is explained by successive protonations of the anions. Ethyl diazoacetate is observed as an intermediate in the decomposition of EDM. The degree of proton transfer in the EDM transition state is deduced from the solvent isotope effect and the results together with those for other aliphatic diazo-compounds are discussed in terms of the Marcus theory. (author)

  12. Stable isotope methods: The effect of gut contents on isotopic ratios of zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. M.; McQuaid, C. D.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased awareness of the potential for methodological bias resulting from multiple pre-analytical procedures in foodweb interpretations based on stable isotope techniques. In the case of small organisms, this includes the effect of gut contents on whole body signatures. Although gut contents may not reflect actual assimilation, their carbon and nitrogen values will be isotopically lighter than after the same material has been assimilated. The potential skewing of isotopic ratios in whole organism samples is especially important for aquatic environments as many studies involve trophic relationships among small zooplankton. This is particularly important in pelagic waters, where herbivorous zooplankton comprise small taxa. Hence this study investigated the effect of gut contents on the δ13C and δ15N ratios of three size classes of zooplankton (1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 mm) collected using bongo net tows in the tropical waters of the south-west Indian Ocean. Animals were collected at night, when they were likely to be feeding, sieved into size classes and separated into genera. We focused on Euphausia spp which dominated zooplankton biomass. Three treatment types were processed: bulk animals, bulk animals without guts and tail muscle from each size class at 10 bongo stations. The δ15N ratios were influenced by zooplankton size class, presumably reflecting ontogenetic changes in diet. ANOVA post hoc results and correlations in δ15N signatures among treatments suggest that gut contents may not affect overall nitrogen signatures of Euphausia spp., but that δ13C signatures may be significantly altered by their presence. Carbon interpretations however, were complicated by potential effects of variation in chitin, lipids and metabolism among tissues and the possibility of opportunistic omnivory. Consequently we advocate gut evacuation before sacrifice in euphausiids if specific tissue dissection is impractical and recommend

  13. Solvent effect on the rate and equilibrium of reaction between 10-phenylphenoxarsine and methyl iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, V.I.; Gumerov, N.S.; Rakhmatullin, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    Effect of solvent nature on nucleophilic capacity of three-coordinated arsenic and the equilibrium state of 10-phenylphenoxarsine (PA) reaction with methyl iodide are studied. Kinetic investigations are carried out by the conductometry at 24,35,45 deg C. It is established that quaternization of PA with methyl iodide when substituting a solvent (ketone for alcohol) increases 3-14 times with simultaneous growth of the activation energy value. When transforming from aprotic solvents to protic ones PA interaction equilibrium with methyl iodide shifts to the side of arsonic salt formation

  14. Effects of a weakly 3-D equilibrium on ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegna, C. C. [Departments of Engineering Physics and Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The effect of a small three-dimensional equilibrium distortion on an otherwise axisymmetric configuration is shown to be destabilizing to ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes. The calculations assume that the 3-D fields are weak and that shielding physics is present so that no islands appear in the resulting equilibrium. An eigenfunction that has coupled harmonics of different toroidal mode number is constructed using a perturbation approach. The theory is applied to the case of tokamak H-modes with shielded resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) present indicating RMPs can be destabilizing to intermediate-n peeling-ballooning modes.

  15. Non-equilibrium effects upon the non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett quantum master equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, A.O.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Classical Brownian motion described by a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation. → Quantization process. → Quantum Brownian motion described by a non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett equation. → A non-equilibrium quantum thermal force is predicted. - Abstract: We obtain a non-Markovian quantum master equation directly from the quantization of a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation describing the Brownian motion of a particle immersed in a generic environment (e.g. a non-thermal fluid). As far as the especial case of a heat bath comprising of quantum harmonic oscillators is concerned, we derive a non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett master equation on the basis of which we work out the concept of non-equilibrium quantum thermal force exerted by the harmonic heat bath upon the Brownian motion of a free particle. The classical limit (or dequantization process) of this sort of non-equilibrium quantum effect is scrutinized, as well.

  16. Pre-equilibrium assumptions and statistical model parameters effects on reaction cross-section calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1992-02-01

    A systematic study on effects of statistical model parameters and semi-classical pre-equilibrium emission models has been carried out for the (n,p) reactions on the 56 Fe and 60 Co target nuclei. The results obtained by using various assumptions within a given pre-equilibrium emission model differ among them more than the ones of different models used under similar conditions. The necessity of using realistic level density formulas is emphasized especially in connection with pre-equilibrium emission models (i.e. with the exciton state density expression), while a basic support could be found only by replacement of the Williams exciton state density formula with a realistic one. (author). 46 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Shifts in rotifer life history in response to stable isotope enrichment: testing theories of isotope effects on organismal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In ecology, stable isotope labelling is commonly used for tracing material transfer in trophic interactions, nutrient budgets and biogeochemical processes. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism growth and metabolism. This assumption is, however, challenged by theoretical considerations and experimental studies on kinetic isotope effects in vivo. Here, I demonstrate profound changes in life histories of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis fed 15N-enriched algae (0.4–5.0 at%); i.e. at the enrichment levels commonly used in ecological studies. These findings support theoretically predicted effects of heavy isotope enrichment on growth, metabolism and ageing in biological systems and underline the importance of accounting for such effects when using stable isotope labelling in experimental studies. PMID:28405367

  18. Low temperature isotope effects of hydrogen diffusion in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.; Kronmueller, H.

    1989-01-01

    Snoek-like relaxation peaks of Hydrogen and Deuterium in amorphous Fe 80 B 20 , Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 and Fe 91 Zr 9 are detected. At low H, D concentrations the peaks are near 200 K and show small isotope effects of the average activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.6 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≤ 10 meV). For higher H, D-contents the peaks shift to lower temperatures around to 120 K and show distinct isotope effects in the activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.3 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≅ 30 meV) and in the amplitude of the low temperature tails of the relaxation peaks. This points to isotope mass dependent deviations from the Arrhenius law due to nonthermal tunneling processes. (orig.)

  19. The Effect of a Conceptual Change Approach on Understanding of Students' Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasoy, Basri; Akkus, Huseyin; Kadayifci, Hakki

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on tenth-grade students' conceptual achievement in understanding chemical equilibrium. The study was conducted in two classes of the same teacher with participation of a total of 44 tenth-grade students. In this study, a…

  20. Travelling wave solutions for the Richards equation incorporating non-equilibrium effects in the capillarity pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijn, C. J.; Mitra, K.; Pop, I. S.

    2018-01-01

    The Richards equation is a mathematical model for unsaturated flow through porous media. This paper considers an extension of the Richards equation, where non-equilibrium effects like hysteresis and dynamic capillarity are incorporated in the relationship that relates the water pressure and the

  1. Effects of energy conservation on equilibrium properties of hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Ko, Che Ming

    2018-01-01

    Based on the relativistic Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport model, which includes relativistic scalar and vector potentials on baryons, we consider an N -Δ -π system in a box with periodic boundary conditions to study the effects of energy conservation in particle production and absorption processes on the equilibrium properties of the system. The density and temperature of the matter in the box are taken to be similar to the hot dense matter formed in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies. We find that to maintain the equilibrium numbers of N ,Δ , and π , which depend on the mean-field potentials of N and Δ , we must include these potentials in the energy conservation condition that determines the momenta of outgoing particles after a scattering or decay process. We further find that the baryon scalar potentials mainly affect the Δ and pion equilibrium numbers, while the baryon vector potentials have considerable effect on the effective charged pion ratio at equilibrium. Our results thus indicate that it is essential to include in the transport model the effect of potentials in the energy conservation of a scattering or decay process, which is ignored in most transport models, for studying pion production in heavy ion collisions.

  2. The Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Texts in Remediating High School Students' Alternative Conceptions Concerning Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of conceptual change texts in remediating high school students' alternative conceptions concerning chemical equilibrium. A quasi-experimental design was used in this study. The subjects for this study consisted of a total 78 tenth-grade students, 38 of them in the experimental group and 40 of them in the…

  3. Chlorine isotope effects from isotope ratio mass spectrometry suggest intramolecular C-Cl bond competition in trichloroethene (TCE) reductive dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretnik, Stefan; Bernstein, Anat; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Löffler, Frank; Elsner, Martin

    2014-05-20

    Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (bio)chemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE) dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i) of tetrachloroethene (PCE) to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii) of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were -19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE) and -12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE) (95% confidence intervals). Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (-5.0‰ ± 0.1‰) and TCE (-3.6‰ ± 0.2‰). In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by -16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error)) than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of -2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of -6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals). A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect). These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition). This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I) or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms.

  4. Chlorine Isotope Effects from Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry Suggest Intramolecular C-Cl Bond Competition in Trichloroethene (TCE Reductive Dehalogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Cretnik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (biochemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i of tetrachloroethene (PCE to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were −19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE and −12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE (95% confidence intervals. Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (−5.0‰ ± 0.1‰ and TCE (−3.6‰ ± 0.2‰. In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by −16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of −2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of −6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals. A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect. These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition. This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms.

  5. Carbon-13 and oxygen-18 isotope effects in the decarboxylation of nicotinic acid of natural isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Zielinska, A.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.; McKenzie, J.A.; Bernasconi, S.; Paul, H.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon-13 and oxygen-18 isotope effects in the decarboxylation of nicotinic acid of natural isotopic composition above and below its melting temperature have been studied and compared with the primary (PKIE) and secondary kinetic isotope effects (SKIE) of 13 C and 18 O, respectively, in the decarboxylation of other heterocyclic acids. The temperature dependence of the secondary oxygen-18 isotope effects is negative in the total 221-255 deg C temperature interval investigated initially. The 13 C KIE measured above melting point of N.A. (temperature interval 235-270 deg C) are located in the range 1.007-1.009. Below melting point of nicotinic acid the 13 C KIE are larger and reveal the negative temperature dependence ( 13 C KIE decreases with decreasing the reaction temperature from 1.013/at 230 deg C to 1.0114/at 221 deg C). A discussion of the above isotopic results is presented. (author)

  6. Effects of centrifugal modification of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium on resistive wall mode stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, J.; Aiba, N.; Miyato, N.; Yagi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Toroidal rotation effects are self-consistently taken into account not only in the linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability analysis but also in the equilibrium calculation. The MHD equilibrium computation is affected by centrifugal force due to the toroidal rotation. To study the toroidal rotation effects on resistive wall modes (RWMs), a new code has been developed. The RWMaC modules, which solve the electromagnetic dynamics in vacuum and the resistive wall, have been implemented in the MINERVA code, which solves the Frieman–Rotenberg equation that describes the linear ideal MHD dynamics in a rotating plasma. It is shown that modification of MHD equilibrium by the centrifugal force significantly reduces growth rates of RWMs with fast rotation in the order of M 2  = 0.1 where M is the Mach number. Moreover, it can open a stable window which does not exist under the assumption that the rotation affects only the linear dynamics. The rotation modifies the equilibrium pressure gradient and current density profiles, which results in the change of potential energy including rotational effects. (paper)

  7. Effect of amino acids on the precipitation kinetics and Ca isotopic composition of gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harouaka, Khadouja; Kubicki, James D.; Fantle, Matthew S.

    2017-12-01

    Stirred gypsum (CaSO4 · 2H2O) precipitation experiments (initial Ωgypsum = 2.4 ± 0.14, duration ≈ 1.0-1.5 h) were conducted in the presence of the amino acids glycine (190 μM), L-alanine (190 μM), D- and L-arginine (45 μM), and L-tyrosine (200 μM) to investigate the effect of simple organic compounds on both the precipitation kinetics and Ca isotopic composition of gypsum. Relative to abiotic controls, glycine, tyrosine, and alanine inhibited precipitation rates by ∼22%, 27%, and 29%, respectively, while L- and D-arginine accelerated crystal growth by ∼8% and 48%, respectively. With the exception of tyrosine, amino acid induced inhibition resulted in fractionation factors (αs-f) associated with precipitation that were no more than 0.3‰ lower than amino acid-free controls. In contrast, the tyrosine and D- and L-arginine experiments had αs-f values associated with precipitation that were similar to the controls. Our experimental results indicate that Ca isotopic fractionation associated with gypsum precipitation is impacted by growth inhibition in the presence of amino acids. Specifically, we propose that the surface-specific binding of amino acids to gypsum can change the equilibrium fractionation factor of the bulk mineral. We investigate the hypothesis that amino acids can influence the growth of gypsum at specific crystal faces via adsorption and that different faces have distinct fractionation factors (αface-fluid). Accordingly, preferential sorption of amino acids at particular faces changes the relative, face-specific mass fluxes of Ca during growth, which influences the bulk isotopic composition of the mineral. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that the energetic favorability of glycine sorption onto gypsum crystal faces occurs in the order: (1 1 0) > (0 1 0) > (1 2 0) > (0 1 1), while glycine sorption onto the (-1 1 1) face was found to be energetically unfavorable. Face-specific fractionation factors constrained by

  8. Secondary isotope effects on alpha-cleavage reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingemann, S.; Hammerum, S.

    1980-01-01

    Kinetic deuterium isotope effects on mass spectral reactions have in several instances been utilized to provide structural information and to answer mechanistic questions. Typically, the influence of the deuterium label on the rate of one of a number of competing reactions has been studied. Secondary isotope effects have usually been assumed to be relatively insignificant in comparison with the observed kinetic effects, even though various workers have shown that secondary isotope effects may indeed exert a considerable influence on the rates of competing simple cleavages. Recent studies have provided quantitative data to show that the mere presence of deuterium atoms up to six bonds away may influence the rate of a simple cleavage reaction. In relation to an investigation of rearrangements accompanying simple cleavage reactions, a semi-quantitative measure was needed of the variation of the secondary isotope effect with the number of bonds between the deuterium label and the point of rupture. The influence has therefore been examined of the presence of remote deuterium atoms on a typical simple cleavage reaction, the α-cleavage of aliphatic amines. As a model compound, N-methyldipentylamine was chosen, systematically labelled with deuterium. (author)

  9. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  10. Deuterium secondary isotope kinetic effects in imine formation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, L. do; Rossi, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetic α-deuterium isotope effects, K D /K H , for reaction mechanisms is studied. The reaction of pH function to m-bromobenzaldehyde, semicarbazide nucleophile, methoxy-amine and hydroxylamine are analysed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  11. Magic numbers and isotopic effect of ion clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghou

    1989-04-01

    The magic numbers and isotopic effect as well as stable configurations in relation to the charge state of the clusters are discussed. Ionic (atomic) clusters are small atomic aggregates, a physical state between gas and solid states, and have many interesting properties, some of them are more or less similar to those in nuclei

  12. Contribution of local thyroxine monodeiodination to intracellular 3,5, 3'-triiodothyronine in several tissues of hyperthyroid rats at isotopic equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Doorn, J.; van der Heide, D.; Roelfsema, F.

    1984-01-01

    The local conversion of T4 as a source of intracellular T3 in several organs of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats has recently been recognized to be an important phenomenon. In the present study the source and quantity of T3 in various peripheral tissues of hyperthyroid rats were investigated. Athyreotic rats received a continuous iv infusion of T4 over a prolonged period in order to attain hyperthyroid conditions. At the same time, the animals also received a continuous iv infusion of [ 125 I]T4 and [ 131 I]T3 until isotopic equilibrium was achieved. After the animals were bled and perfused, the source and quantity of T3 in various tissue homogenates and subcellular preparations of liver, kidney, and the anterior pituitary gland were analyzed. In spite of the elevated plasma T3 and T4 levels, the concentration of T3 in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum was within the normal range. The contribution of T3 derived from local T4 to T3 conversion [Lc T3(T4)] was rather low in both parts of the brain when compared with values previously determined for euthyroid rats. Whereas previous studies revealed that Lc T3(T4) contributes significantly to the T3 in the pituitary glands of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats, this was not the case for the hyperthyroid animals; virtually all T3 was derived from plasma. It was found that the T3 in muscle was derived exclusively from plasma. Both the liver and kidney showed high concentrations of T3. Whereas Lc T3(T4) was the main source of T3 in the liver, it contributed only a minor fraction of the total T3 content in the kidney

  13. Contribution of local thyroxine monodeiodination to intracellular 3,5, 3'-triiodothyronine in several tissues of hyperthyroid rats at isotopic equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Doorn, J.; van der Heide, D.; Roelfsema, F.

    1984-07-01

    The local conversion of T4 as a source of intracellular T3 in several organs of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats has recently been recognized to be an important phenomenon. In the present study the source and quantity of T3 in various peripheral tissues of hyperthyroid rats were investigated. Athyreotic rats received a continuous iv infusion of T4 over a prolonged period in order to attain hyperthyroid conditions. At the same time, the animals also received a continuous iv infusion of (/sup 125/I)T4 and (/sup 131/I)T3 until isotopic equilibrium was achieved. After the animals were bled and perfused, the source and quantity of T3 in various tissue homogenates and subcellular preparations of liver, kidney, and the anterior pituitary gland were analyzed. In spite of the elevated plasma T3 and T4 levels, the concentration of T3 in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum was within the normal range. The contribution of T3 derived from local T4 to T3 conversion (Lc T3(T4)) was rather low in both parts of the brain when compared with values previously determined for euthyroid rats. Whereas previous studies revealed that Lc T3(T4) contributes significantly to the T3 in the pituitary glands of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats, this was not the case for the hyperthyroid animals; virtually all T3 was derived from plasma. It was found that the T3 in muscle was derived exclusively from plasma. Both the liver and kidney showed high concentrations of T3. Whereas Lc T3(T4) was the main source of T3 in the liver, it contributed only a minor fraction of the total T3 content in the kidney.

  14. Isotopically exchangeable phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, N.O.

    1984-01-01

    A critique revision of isotope dilution is presented. The concepts and use of exchangeable phosphorus, the phosphate adsorption, the kinetics of isotopic exchange and the equilibrium time in soils are discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  15. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains nonsteady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Riley, William J.

    2009-12-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic isotope fractionation often assumes first-order or Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the latter solved under the quasi-steady state assumption. Both formulations lead to a constant isotope fractionation factor, therefore they may return incorrect estimations of isotopic effects and misleading interpretations of isotopic signatures when fractionation is not a steady process. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitrification in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate (2006) in which high and variable 15N-N2O enrichment during N2O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N2O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. When Michaelis-Menten kinetics were coupled to Monod kinetics to describe biomass and enzyme dynamics, and the quasi-steady state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observed concentrations, and variable and inverse isotope fractionations. These results imply a substantial revision in modeling isotopic effects, suggesting that steady state kinetics such as first-order, Rayleigh, and classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics should be superseded by transient kinetics in conjunction with biomass and enzyme dynamics.

  16. Isotope effects accompanying evaporation of water from leaky containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Kazimierz; Chmura, Lukasz

    2008-03-01

    Laboratory experiments aimed at quantifying isotope effects associated with partial evaporation of water from leaky containers have been performed under three different settings: (i) evaporation into dry atmosphere, performed in a dynamic mode, (ii) evaporation into dry atmosphere, performed in a static mode, and (iii) evaporation into free laboratory atmosphere. The results demonstrate that evaporative enrichment of water stored in leaky containers can be properly described in the framework of the Craig-Gordon evaporation model. The key parameter controlling the degree of isotope enrichment is the remaining fraction of water in the leaking containers. Other factors such as temperature, relative humidity, or extent of kinetic fractionation play only minor roles. Satisfactory agreement between observed and predicted isotope enrichments for both (18)O and (2)H in experiments for the case of evaporation into dry atmosphere could be obtained only when molecular diffusivity ratios of isotope water molecules as suggested recently by Cappa et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 108, 4525-4535, (2003).] were adopted. However, the observed and modelled isotope enrichments for (2)H and (18)O could be reconciled also for the ratios of molecular diffusivities obtained by Merlivat [J. Chem. Phys., 69, 2864-2871 (1978).], if non-negligible transport resistance in the viscous liquid sub-layer adjacent to the evaporating surface is considered. The evaporation experiments revealed that the loss of mass of water stored in leaky containers in the order of 1%, will lead to an increase of the heavy isotope content in this water by ca. 0.35 and 1.1 per thousand, for delta (18)O and delta (2)H, respectively.

  17. The effect of non-equilibrium metal cooling on the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelo, Pedro R.; Bovino, Stefano; Lupi, Alessandro; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Grassi, Tommaso

    2018-04-01

    By using a novel interface between the modern smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GASOLINE2 and the chemistry package KROME, we follow the hydrodynamical and chemical evolution of an isolated galaxy. In order to assess the relevance of different physical parameters and prescriptions, we constructed a suite of 10 simulations, in which we vary the chemical network (primordial and metal species), how metal cooling is modelled (non-equilibrium versus equilibrium; optically thin versus thick approximation), the initial gas metallicity (from 10 to 100 per cent solar), and how molecular hydrogen forms on dust. This is the first work in which metal injection from supernovae, turbulent metal diffusion, and a metal network with non-equilibrium metal cooling are self-consistently included in a galaxy simulation. We find that properly modelling the chemical evolution of several metal species and the corresponding non-equilibrium metal cooling has important effects on the thermodynamics of the gas, the chemical abundances, and the appearance of the galaxy: the gas is typically warmer, has a larger molecular-gas mass fraction, and has a smoother disc. We also conclude that, at relatively high metallicity, the choice of molecular-hydrogen formation rates on dust is not crucial. Moreover, we confirm that a higher initial metallicity produces a colder gas and a larger fraction of molecular gas, with the low-metallicity simulation best matching the observed molecular Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. Finally, our simulations agree quite well with observations that link star formation rate to metal emission lines.

  18. Tritium conductivity and isotope effect in proton-conducting perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukundan, R.; Brosha, E.L.; Birdsell, S.A.; Costello, A.L.; Garzon, F.H.; Willms, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The tritium ion conductivities of SrZr 0.9 Yb 0.1 O 2.95 and BaCe 0.9 Yb 0.1 O 2.95 have been measured by ac impedance analysis. The high tritium conductivity of these perovskites could potentially lead to their application as an electrochemical membrane for the recovery of tritium from tritiated gas streams. The conductivities of these perovskites, along with SrCe 0.95 Yb 0.05 O 2.975 , were also measured in hydrogen- and deuterium-containing atmospheres to illustrate the isotope effect. For the strontium zirconate and barium cerate samples, the impedance plot consists of two clearly resolved arcs, a bulk and a grain boundary arc, in the temperature range 50--350 C. However, for the strontium cerate sample, the clear resolution of the bulk conductivity was not possible and only the total conductivity was measurable. Thus, the isotope effect was clearly established only for the strontium zirconate and barium cerate samples. The decrease in bulk conductivity with increasing isotope mass was found to be a result of an increase in the activation energy for conduction accompanied by a decrease in the pre-exponential factor. Since the concentration of the mobile species (H+, D+, or T+) should remain relatively constant at T < 350 C, this increase in activation energy is directly attributable to the increased activation energy for the isotope mobility

  19. Chemical exchange equilibria in isotope separation. Part I : Evaluation of separation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of chemical exchange equilibria as applied to the isotope separation processes and the isotope effects on equilibrium constants of different exchange reactions has come a long way since its inception by Urey and Rittenberg. An attempt has been made to bring relevant information together and present a unified approach to isotopic chemical exchange equilibrium constant evaluation and its implications to separation processes. (auth.)

  20. Modification of the isotope effect due to pair breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbotte, J.P.; Greeson, M.; Perez-Gonzalez, A.

    1991-01-01

    We have calculated the effect of pair breaking on the isotope-effect coefficient (β) of a superconductor. We find that, as the pair-breaking scattering rate is increased, β also increases in absolute value. Values of β much larger than the canonical value of 1/2 can easily be achieved even in models where the electron-phonon interaction contributes only a very small amount to the value of the intrinsic critical temperature

  1. Allowance for effects of thermodynamic nonideality in sedimentation equilibrium distributions reflecting protein dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Peter R; Scott, David J; Winzor, Donald J

    2012-03-01

    This reexamination of a high-speed sedimentation equilibrium distribution for α-chymotrypsin under slightly acidic conditions (pH 4.1, I(M) 0.05) has provided experimental support for the adequacy of nearest-neighbor considerations in the allowance for effects of thermodynamic nonideality in the characterization of protein self-association over a moderate concentration range (up to 8 mg/mL). A widely held but previously untested notion about allowance for thermodynamic nonideality effects is thereby verified experimentally. However, it has also been shown that a greater obstacle to better characterization of protein self-association is likely to be the lack of a reliable estimate of monomer net charge, a parameter that has a far more profound effect on the magnitude of the measured equilibrium constant than any deficiency in current procedures for incorporating the effects of thermodynamic nonideality into the analysis of sedimentation equilibrium distributions reflecting reversible protein self-association. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  3. Isotope effects in photo dissociation of ozone with visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früchtl, Marion; Janssen, Christof; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ozone (O3) plays a key role for many chemical oxidation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. In these chemical reactions, ozone can transfer oxygen to other trace gases. This is particularly interesting, since O3 has a very peculiar isotope composition. Following the mass dependent fractionation equation δ17O = 0.52 * δ18O, most fractionation processes depend directly on mass. However, O3 shows an offset to the mass dependent fractionation line. Processes, which show such anomalies, are termed mass independent fractionations (MIF). A very well studied example for a chemical reaction that leads to mass independent fractionation is the O3 formation reaction. To what degree O3 destruction reactions need to be considered in order to understand the isotope composition of atmospheric O3 is still not fully understood and an open question within scientific community. We set up new experiments to investigate the isotope effect resulting from photo dissociation of O3 in the Chappuis band (R1). Initial O3 is produced by an electric discharge. After photolysis O3 is collected in a cold trap at the triple point temperature of nitrogen (63K). O3 is then converted to O2 in order to measure the oxygen isotopes of O3 using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. To isolate O3 photo dissociation (R1) from O3 decomposition (R2) and secondary O3 formation (R3), we use varying amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) as O atom quencher (R4). In this way we suppress the O + O3 reaction (R3) and determine the isotope fractionation in R1 and R2 separately. We present first results on the isotope effects in O3 photo dissociation with visible light in the presence of different bath gases. Results are interpreted based on chemical kinetics modeling. (R1) O3 + hυ → O (3P) + O2 (R2) O3 + O (3P) → 2 O2 (R3) O + O2 + M → O3 + M (R4) O (3P) + CO + M → CO2 + M

  4. Effect of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators on Non-equilibrium Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-28

    results for MIG with the US3D code devel- oped at the University of Minnesota.61 US3D is an unstruc- tured CFD code for hypersonic flow solution used...Effect of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators on non-equilibrium hypersonic flows Ankush Bhatia,1 Subrata Roy,1 and Ryan Gosse2 1Applied...a cylindrical body in Mach 17 hypersonic flow is presented. This application focuses on using sinusoidal dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

  5. Non-equilibrium effects in the magnetic behavior of Co_3O_4 nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Bisht, Vijay; Rajeev, K. P.

    2011-01-01

    We report detailed studies on non-equilibrium magnetic behavior of antiferromagnetic Co_3O_4 nanoparticles. Temperature and field dependence of magnetization, wait time dependence of magnetic relaxation (aging), memory effects and temperature dependence of specific heat have been investigated to understand the magnetic behavior of these particles. We find that the system shows some features characteristic of nanoparticle magnetism such as bifurcation of field cooled (FC) and zero field cooled...

  6. Effect of configuration widths on the spectra of local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Shalom, A.; Oreg, J.; Goldstein, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    We present the extension of the supertransition-array (STA) theory to include configuration widths in the spectra of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) plasmas. Exact analytic expressions for the moments of a STA are given, accounting for the detailed contributions of individual levels within the configurations that belong to a STA. The STA average energy is shifted and an additional term appears in its variance. Various cases are presented, demonstrating the effect of these corrections on the LTE spectrum

  7. Measuring the Effects of Generic Dairy Advertising in a Multi-Market Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph V. Balagtas; Sounghun Kim

    2007-01-01

    We develop a multi-market equilibrium displacement model that allows demand linkages across downstream product markets, and supply linkages through the common use of a raw commodity as the key input. Applying the model to the dairy sector, we find that the effectiveness of producer-funded advertising depends on the demand relationships across dairy product markets (cross-price and cross-advertising elasticities) as well as the reallocation of milk toward the advertised market. We show that th...

  8. Marginal-Fermi-liquid theory and the isotope effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, E.J.; Carbotte, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    In the marginal-Fermi-liquid model, the coupling between two electrons is via charge (attractive) and spin (repulsive) fluctuations, and so it does not exhibit an isotope effect. To include this effect, an additional phonon contribution must be introduced. Using the case of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 , for illustrative purposes, with a total isotope effect coefficient of β tot congruent 0.05 at a T c of 90 K, we find that the implied electron-phonon mass renormalization is very small for coupling to high-energy phonons but increases rapidly with decreasing phonon frequency or an increasing amount of spin fluctuations. Finally, we examine how β increases with decreasing T c when charge fluctuations are reduced or spin fluctuations augmented

  9. Prediction of isotope effects for anticipated intermediate structures in the course of bacterial denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, M.A.; Schowen, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    Vibrational-analysis methods have been used to estimate the equilibrium 14 N/ 15 N isotope effects to be expected for conversion of nitrite anion to thirteen possible intermediate-state and product-state structures [HONO, NO + , NO, NO - , FeNO, ON * NO 2 , O * NNO 2 , O 2 NNO 2 , ONO * N, O * NON, ONNO, * NNO, N * NO] in the reduction of nitrite ion to nitrous oxide denitrifying bacteria. The results, taken in combination with previous experimental isotope-effect and tracer studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri and related systems, are consistent with a suggestion that a second nitrite anion enters the enzyme-catalytic cycle at the stage of a nitrosyl-ion intermediate but re-emerges after entry of the reducing electrons; the product nitrous oxide is then formed by disproportionation of enzymically generated hyponitrous acid. The calculations are consistent with contributions, under different experimental conditions, of several different transition states to limiting the rate of the enzymic reaction. These transition states (and the corresponding experimental conditions) are the transition states for N-O fission in the generation of a mononitrogen electrophilic species from nitrite anion (high reductant, high nitrite concentrations), for attack of nitrite on this electrophile (high reductant, low nitrite concentrations) and for electron transfer to a dinitrogen-trioxide-like species (low reductant concentration). (orig.)

  10. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition in phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Czarnota, G.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.; Kasprzyk, G.; Gumolka, L.; Staedter, W.

    1993-01-01

    The 13 C kinetic isotope effect fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid (LA) of natural isotopic composition by concentrated phosphoric acids (PA) and by 85% H 3 PO 4 has been studied in the temperature interval of 60-150 deg C. The values of the 13 C (1) isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid in 100% H 3 PO 4 , in pyrophosphoric acid and in more concentrated phosphoric acids are intermediate between the values calculated assuming that the C (1)- OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of dehydration and those calculated for rupture of the carbon-carbon bond in the transition state. In the temperature interval of 90-130 deg C the experimental 13 C fractionation factors determined in concentrated PA approach quite closely the 13 C fractionation corresponding to C (2)- C (1) bond scission. The 13 C (1) kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of LA in 85% orthophosphoric acid in the temperature range of 110-150 deg C coincide with the 13 C isotope effects calculated assuming that the frequency corresponding to the C (1) -OH vibration is lost in the transition state of decarbonylation. A change of the mechanism of decarbonylation of LA in going from concentrated PA medium to 85% H 3 PO 4 has been suggested. A possible secondary 18 O and a primary 18 O kinetic isotope effect in decarbonylation of lactic acid in phosphoric acids media have been discussed, too. (author) 21 refs.; 3 tabs

  11. Effect of the size of charged spherical macroparticles on their electrostatic interaction in an equilibrium plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippov, A. V., E-mail: fav@triniti.ru; Derbenev, I. N. [State Research Center of the Russian Federation, Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The effect of the size of two charged spherical macroparticles on their electrostatic interaction in an equilibrium plasma is analyzed within the linearized Poisson–Botzmann model. It is established that, under the interaction of two charged dielectric macroparticles in an equilibrium plasma, the forces acting on each particle turn out to be generally unequal. The forces become equal only in the case of conducting macroparticles or in the case of dielectric macroparticles of the same size and charge. They also turn out to be equal when the surface potentials of the macroparticles remain constant under the variation of interparticle distances. Formulas are proposed that allow one to calculate the interaction force with a high degree of accuracy under the condition that the radii of macroparticles are much less than the screening length, which is usually satisfied in experiments with dusty plasmas.

  12. Isotope effects in ion-exchange equilibria in aqueous and mixed solvent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Isotope effects in ion-exchange equilibria in aqueous and mixed solvents are analyzed in terms of the general features of ion-exchange equilibria and of isotope effects in chemical equilibria. The special role of solvent fractionation effects in ion-exchange equilibria in mixed solvents is pointed out. The various situations arising in isotope fractionation in ion exchange in mixed solvents due to solvent fractionation effects are theoretically discussed. The experimental data on lithium isotope effects in ion-exchange equilibria in mixed solvents are shown to conform to the above situations. The limitations of ion-exchange equilibria in mixed solvents for isotope fractionation are pointed out. 3 tables

  13. Aerodynamic effects in isotope separation by gaseous diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bert, L.A.; Prosperetti, A.; Fiocchi, R.

    1978-01-01

    The turbulent flow of an isotopic mixture in a porous-walled pipe is considered in the presence of suction through the wall. A simple model is formulated for the evaluation of aerodynamic effects on the separation efficiency. The predictions of the model are found to compare very favourably with experiment. In the limit of small suction velocities, results obtained by other investigators for diffusion in a turbulent steam are recovered. (author)

  14. Vapour pressure isotope effects in liquid hydrogen chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, J.N.C.; Calado, J.C.G. (Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)); Jancso, Gabor (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Central Research Inst. for Physics)

    1992-08-10

    The difference between the vapour pressures of HCl and DCl has been measured over the temperature range 170-203 K by a differential manometric technique in a precision cryostat. In this range the vapour pressure of HCl is higher than that of DCl by 3.2% at 170 K, decreasing to 0.9% at 200 K. The reduced partition function ratios f[sub l]/f[sub g] derived from the vapour pressure data can be described by the equation ln(f[sub l]/f[sub g]) = (3914.57[+-]10)/T[sup 2] - (17.730[+-]0.055)/T. The experimentally observed H-D vapour pressure isotope effect, together with the values on the [sup 35]Cl-[sup 37]Cl isotope effect available in the literature, is interpreted in the light of the statistical theory of isotope effects in condensed systems by using spectroscopic data of the vapour and liquid phases. The results indicate that the rotation in liquid hydrogen chloride is hindered. Temperature-dependent force constants for the hindered translational and rotational motions were invoked in order to obtain better agreement between the model calculation and experiment. (author).

  15. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Kinetic Isotope Effect During Snow Crystal Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Depaolo, D. J.; Kang, Q.; Zhang, D.

    2007-12-01

    and allows us to scale the numerical calculations to atmospheric conditions. Our calculations confirm that the crystal/vapor isotopic fractionation approaches the equilibrium value, and the crystals are compact (circular in 2D) as the saturation factor approaches unity (S= 1.0). However, few natural crystals form under such conditions. At higher oversaturation (e.g. S = 1.2), dendritic crystals of millimeter size develop on timescales appropriate to cloud processes, and kinetic effects control isotopic fractionation. Fractionation factors for dendritic crystals are similar to those predicted by the spherical diffusion model, but the model also gives estimates of crystal heterogeneity. Dendritic crystals are constrained to be relatively large, with dimension much greater than about 20D/k. The most difficult aspect of the modeling is to account for the large density difference between air and ice, which requires us to use a fictitious higher density for the vapor-oversaturated air and scale the crystal growth time accordingly. An approach using a larger scale simulation and the domain decomposition method can provide a vapor flux for a nested smaller scale calculation. The results clarify the controls on crystal growth, and the relationships between saturation state, growth rate, crystal morphology and isotopic fractionation.

  16. Lithium isotope effects in chemical exchange with (2,2,1) cryptand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepson, B.E.; Cairns, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Equilibrium single-stage separation factors were determined for three lithium - (2,2,1) cryptand two-phase chemical exchange systems. The equilibrated phases consisted of an aqueous solution of a lithium salt and a chloroform solution of lithium cryptate salt complex. Lithium-6 concentrated in the organic phase in all cases, and the lithium isotope exchange rate with (2,2,1) cryptand was rapid. The separation factors were α = 1.026 +- 0.006 (LiBr exchange), α = 1.035 +- 0.003 (LiTFA), and α = 1.041 +- 0.006 (LiTFA + HTFA), where TFA represents trifluoroacetate. These values were compared with separation factors of other lithium chemical exchange systems. This work has shown that separation factors are influenced by the choice of chemical species and parameters. It has also demonstrated that significant lithium isotope effects can be obtained without a valence change of the metal exchanging between the aquo and cryptate complexes

  17. Remarkable nanoconfinement effects on chemical equilibrium manifested in nucleotide dimerization and H-D exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Micha; Rubinovich, Leonid

    2011-10-06

    Nanoconfinement entropic effects on chemical equilibrium involving a small number of molecules, which we term NCECE, are revealed by two widely diverse types of reactions. Employing statistical-mechanical principles, we show how the NCECE effect stabilizes nucleotide dimerization observed within self-assembled molecular cages. Furthermore, the effect provides the basis for dimerization even under an aqueous environment inside the nanocage. Likewise, the NCECE effect is pertinent to a longstanding issue in astrochemistry, namely the extra deuteration commonly observed for molecules reacting on interstellar dust grain surfaces. The origin of the NCECE effect is elucidated by means of the probability distributions of the reaction extent and related variations in the reactant-product mixing entropy. Theoretical modelling beyond our previous preliminary work highlights the role of the nanospace size in addition to that of the nanosystem size, namely the limited amount of molecules in the reaction mixture. Furthermore, the NCECE effect can depend also on the reaction mechanism, and on deviations from stoichiometry. The NCECE effect, leading to enhanced, greatly variable equilibrium "constants", constitutes a unique physical-chemical phenomenon, distinguished from the usual thermodynamical properties of macroscopically large systems. Being significant particularly for weakly exothermic reactions, the effects should stabilize products in other closed nanoscale structures, and thus can have notable implications for the growing nanotechnological utilization of chemical syntheses conducted within confined nanoreactors.

  18. Effect of Interband Interaction on Isotope Effect Coefficient of Mg B2 Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udomsamuthirun, P.; Kumvongsa, C.; Burakorn, A.; Changkanarth, P.; Maneeratanakul, S.

    2005-10-01

    In this research, the exact formula of Tc s equation and the isotope effect coefficient of two-band s-wave superconductors in weak-coupling limit are derived by considering the influence of interband interaction .In each band ,our model consist of two paring interactions : the electron-phonon interaction and non-electron-phonon interaction . According to the numerical calculation, we find that the isotope effect coefficient of MgB 2 , α=3 . 0 with T c 40 K can be found in the weak coupling regime and interband interaction of electron-phonon show more effect on isotope effect coefficient than interband interaction of non-phonon-electron

  19. Isotopic modeling of the sub-cloud evaporation effect in precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamalikis, V., E-mail: vsalamalik@upatras.gr [Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Department of Physics, University of Patras, GR 26500 Patras (Greece); Argiriou, A.A. [Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Department of Physics, University of Patras, GR 26500 Patras (Greece); Dotsika, E. [Stable Isotope Unit, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Center of Scientific Research ‘Demokritos’, Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, 15310 Athens (Greece)

    2016-02-15

    In dry and warm environments sub-cloud evaporation influences the falling raindrops modifying their final stable isotopic content. During their descent from the cloud base towards the ground surface, through the unsaturated atmosphere, hydrometeors are subjected to evaporation whereas the kinetic fractionation results to less depleted or enriched isotopic signatures compared to the initial isotopic composition of the raindrops at cloud base. Nowadays the development of Generalized Climate Models (GCMs) that include isotopic content calculation modules are of great interest for the isotopic tracing of the global hydrological cycle. Therefore the accurate description of the underlying processes affecting stable isotopic content can improve the performance of iso-GCMs. The aim of this study is to model the sub-cloud evaporation effect using a) mixing and b) numerical isotope evaporation models. The isotope-mixing evaporation model simulates the isotopic enrichment (difference between the ground and the cloud base isotopic composition of raindrops) in terms of raindrop size, ambient temperature and relative humidity (RH) at ground level. The isotopic enrichment (Δδ) varies linearly with the evaporated raindrops mass fraction of the raindrop resulting to higher values at drier atmospheres and for smaller raindrops. The relationship between Δδ and RH is described by a ‘heat capacity’ model providing high correlation coefficients for both isotopes (R{sup 2} > 80%) indicating that RH is an ideal indicator of the sub-cloud evaporation effect. Vertical distribution of stable isotopes in falling raindrops is also investigated using a numerical isotope-evaporation model. Temperature and humidity dependence of the vertical isotopic variation is clearly described by the numerical isotopic model showing an increase in the isotopic values with increasing temperature and decreasing RH. At an almost saturated atmosphere (RH = 95%) sub-cloud evaporation is negligible and the

  20. Isotopic modeling of the sub-cloud evaporation effect in precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamalikis, V.; Argiriou, A.A.; Dotsika, E.

    2016-01-01

    In dry and warm environments sub-cloud evaporation influences the falling raindrops modifying their final stable isotopic content. During their descent from the cloud base towards the ground surface, through the unsaturated atmosphere, hydrometeors are subjected to evaporation whereas the kinetic fractionation results to less depleted or enriched isotopic signatures compared to the initial isotopic composition of the raindrops at cloud base. Nowadays the development of Generalized Climate Models (GCMs) that include isotopic content calculation modules are of great interest for the isotopic tracing of the global hydrological cycle. Therefore the accurate description of the underlying processes affecting stable isotopic content can improve the performance of iso-GCMs. The aim of this study is to model the sub-cloud evaporation effect using a) mixing and b) numerical isotope evaporation models. The isotope-mixing evaporation model simulates the isotopic enrichment (difference between the ground and the cloud base isotopic composition of raindrops) in terms of raindrop size, ambient temperature and relative humidity (RH) at ground level. The isotopic enrichment (Δδ) varies linearly with the evaporated raindrops mass fraction of the raindrop resulting to higher values at drier atmospheres and for smaller raindrops. The relationship between Δδ and RH is described by a ‘heat capacity’ model providing high correlation coefficients for both isotopes (R"2 > 80%) indicating that RH is an ideal indicator of the sub-cloud evaporation effect. Vertical distribution of stable isotopes in falling raindrops is also investigated using a numerical isotope-evaporation model. Temperature and humidity dependence of the vertical isotopic variation is clearly described by the numerical isotopic model showing an increase in the isotopic values with increasing temperature and decreasing RH. At an almost saturated atmosphere (RH = 95%) sub-cloud evaporation is negligible and the

  1. The second-order description of rotational non-equilibrium effects in polyatomic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myong, Rho Shin

    2017-11-01

    The conventional description of gases is based on the physical laws of conservation (mass, momentum, and energy) in conjunction with the first-order constitutive laws, the two-century old so-called Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NSF) equation based on a critical assumption made by Stokes in 1845 that the bulk viscosity vanishes. While the Stokes' assumption is certainly legitimate in the case of dilute monatomic gases, ever increasing evidences, however, now indicate that such is not the case, in particular, in the case of polyatomic gases-like nitrogen and carbon dioxide-far-from local thermal equilibrium. It should be noted that, from room temperature acoustic attenuation data, the bulk viscosity for carbon dioxide is three orders of magnitude larger than its shear viscosity. In this study, this fundamental issue in compressible gas dynamics is revisited and the second-order constitutive laws are derived by starting from the Boltzmann-Curtiss kinetic equation. Then the topology of the second-order nonlinear coupled constitutive relations in phase space is investigated. Finally, the shock-vortex interaction problem where the strong interaction of two important thermal (translational and rotational) non-equilibrium phenomena occurs is considered in order to highlight the rotational non-equilibrium effects in polyatomic gases. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of South Korea (NRF 2017-R1A2B2-007634).

  2. Carbon-13 isotope effects on 199Hg nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebald, Angelika; Wrackmeyer, Bernd

    1985-01-01

    Secondary 13 C/ 12 C isotope effects on 199 Hg nuclear shielding (Δdeltasup(i)( 199 Hg)) are of interest because of the unusual shift to high frequency which has been observed for a few alkyl mercury compounds. Continuing interest in the NMR parameters of mercury compounds prompted a search for the values Δdeltasup(i)( 199 Hg) in a greater variety of organomercurials. This should help to find out about the range of Δdeltasup(i)( 199 Hg) and to obtain a firmer basis for the discussion of the high-frequency shifts. The data and experimental conditions are given for chemical shifts delta 199 Hg, coupling constants sup(n)J( 199 Hg 13 C) and 13 C/ 12 C isotope shifts Δdeltasup(i)( 199 Hg) of fourteen 199 Hg organomercury compounds. The results are discussed. (author)

  3. Selected bibliography on deuterium isotope effects and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, S.M.; Donde, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in using deuterium and heavy water not only in nuclear industry but also in various fields of basic as well as applied research in physics, chemistry and biology. As a result, the literature is being enriched with a large number of research papers and technical reports published each year. Thus, to enable the scientists to have an easy reference to these works, an endeavour has been made in this selected bibliography, to enlist the publications related to these fields. Since the interest is concerned mainly with heavy water production processes, deuterium isotope effects etc., several aspects (e.g. nuclear) of deuterium have not been covered here. The material in this bibliography which cites 2388 references has been classified under six broad headings, viz. (1) Production of heavy water, (2) Study of deuterium isotope effects, (3) Analysis and Properties of heavy water, (4) Laser Separation of deuterium, (5) Isotopic exchange reactions, and (6) Miscellaneous. The sources of information used for this compilation are chemical abstracts, nuclear science abstracts, INIS Atomindex and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in the B.A.R.C. library. However, in spite of sincere attempts for a wide coverage, no claim is being made towards the exhaustiveness of this bibliography. (author)

  4. Kinetic isotope effects and how to describe them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Karandashev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We review several methods for computing kinetic isotope effects in chemical reactions including semiclassical and quantum instanton theory. These methods describe both the quantization of vibrational modes as well as tunneling and are applied to the ⋅H + H2 and ⋅H + CH4 reactions. The absolute rate constants computed with the semiclassical instanton method both using on-the-fly electronic structure calculations and fitted potential-energy surfaces are also compared directly with exact quantum dynamics results. The error inherent in the instanton approximation is found to be relatively small and similar in magnitude to that introduced by using fitted surfaces. The kinetic isotope effect computed by the quantum instanton is even more accurate, and although it is computationally more expensive, the efficiency can be improved by path-integral acceleration techniques. We also test a simple approach for designing potential-energy surfaces for the example of proton transfer in malonaldehyde. The tunneling splittings are computed, and although they are found to deviate from experimental results, the ratio of the splitting to that of an isotopically substituted form is in much better agreement. We discuss the strengths and limitations of the potential-energy surface and based on our findings suggest ways in which it can be improved.

  5. Cosolutes effects on aqueous two-phase systems equilibrium formation studied by physical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoluzzo, M Guadalupe; Rigatuso, Rubén; Farruggia, Beatriz; Nerli, Bibiana; Picó, Guillermo

    2007-10-01

    The effect of urea and sodium salts of monovalent halides on the aqueous polyethyleneglycol solution and binodal diagrams of polyethyleneglycol-potassium phosphate (polyethyleneglycol of molecular mass 1500, 4000, 6000 and 8000) were studied using different physical approaches. The effect of these solutes on the binodal diagram for polyethyleneglycol-potassium phosphate was also investigated. The cosolutes affected in a significant manner the water structured around the ethylene chain of polyethyleneglycol inducing a lost of this. The equilibrium curves for the aqueous two-phase systems were fitting very well by a sigmoidal function with two parameters, which are closely related with the cosolute structure making or breaking capacity on the water ordered.

  6. Magnetic field and magnetic isotope effects on photochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasa, Masanobu

    1999-01-01

    By at present exact experiments and the theoretical analysis, it was clear that the magnetic field less than 2 T affected a radical pair reaction and biradical reaction. The radical pair life and the dissipative radical yield showed the magnetic field effects on chemical reactions. The radical pair mechanism and the triplet mechanism were known as the mechanism of magnetic field effects. The radical pair mechanism consists of four mechanisms such as the homogeneous hyperfine interaction (HFC), the delta-g mechanism, the relaxation mechanism and the level cross mechanism. In order to observe the magnetic effects of the radical pair mechanism, two conditions need, namely, the recombination rate of singlet radical pair > the dissipation rate and the spin exchange rate > the dissipation rate. A nanosecond laser photo-decomposition equipment can observe the magnetic field effects. The inversion phenomena of magnetic field effect, isolation of the relaxation mechanism and the delta-g mechanism, the magnetic field effect of heavy metal radical reaction, the magnetic field effect in homogeneous solvent, saturation of delta-g mechanism are explained. The succeeded examples of isotope concentration by the magnetic isotope effect are 17 O, 19 Si, 33 S, 73 Ge and 235 U. (S.Y.)

  7. Experimental and theoretical studies of the effects of nonuniformities in equilibrium MHD generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, M.; Shamma, S.E.; Louis, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental study of the effects of thermal and velocity nonuniformities is performed in an equilibrium plasma for a range of Hall parameters. An electrodeless MHD disk generator with radial flow is chosen as the ideal geometry for these experiments. By introducing equally spaced cold blades in the flow, it is possible to create well defined two-dimensional wake nonuniformities with strong variations of the plasma properties in the direction normal to the magnetic field and the flow. This type of nonuniformity is predicted to provide the strongest reduction of Hall coefficient and effective conductivity for high values of Hall parameter. This degradation is controlled by both the level of nonuniformities and the value of the ideal Hall parameter. The former is dependent upon the number of blades (root mean square deviation of the conductivity), and the latter is dependent upon the values of the magnetic field intensities. The results provide basic quantitative information about the effects of conductivity and velocity nonuniformities on the performance of equilibrium MHD generators over a wide range of Hall coefficients, between 2 and 7. Reduction formulae are established between the effective and ideal Hall parameters for different levels of nonuniformities intensities. Theoretical predictions are derived from a detailed two-dimensional electrodynamic analysis and a simplified engineering model based on a generalization of Rosa's layer model. These experiments validate the analytical studies and support the use of the theoretical layer models in describing the effect of boundary layers on the performance of linear generators

  8. Isotope enrichment effect of gaseous mixtures in standing sound vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knesebeck, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    When standing acoustic waves are excited in a tube containing a mixture of two gases, a partial zonal fractioning of the components arises as consequence of mass transport by diffusion, driven by the thermal and pressure gradients which are associeted with the standing waves. This effect is present in each zone corresponding to a quarter wavelength, with the heavier component becoming enriched at the nodes fo the standing waves and deplected at the crests. The magnitude of the enrichment in one of the components of a binary gas mixture is given by Δω=ap 2 /lambda [b + (1-bω)] 2 . Where ω is the mass concentration of the component in the mixture, a and b are parameters which are related to molecular proprieties of the gases, p is the relative pressure amplitude of the standing wave and lambda is its wavelength. For a natural mixture of uranium hexafluorate, with 0.715% of the uranium isotope 340 an enrichment of about 2 x 10 -6 % in the concentration of this isotope is theorecticaly attainable per stage consisting of a quarter wavelenght, when a standing acoustical wave of relative pressure amplitude of 0,2 and wavelenght of 20 cm is used. Since standing acoustical waves are easely excited in gas columns, an isotope enrichment plant made of a cascade of tubes in which standing waves are excited, is presumably feasible with relatively low investment and operation costs. (Author) [pt

  9. Effects of intravenous solutions on acid-base equilibrium: from crystalloids to colloids and blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Thomas; Ferrari, Michele; Zazzeron, Luca; Gattinoni, Luciano; Caironi, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous fluid administration is a medical intervention performed worldwide on a daily basis. Nevertheless, only a few physicians are aware of the characteristics of intravenous fluids and their possible effects on plasma acid-base equilibrium. According to Stewart's theory, pH is independently regulated by three variables: partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strong ion difference (SID), and total amount of weak acids (ATOT). When fluids are infused, plasma SID and ATOT tend toward the SID and ATOT of the administered fluid. Depending on their composition, fluids can therefore lower, increase, or leave pH unchanged. As a general rule, crystalloids having a SID greater than plasma bicarbonate concentration (HCO₃-) cause an increase in plasma pH (alkalosis), those having a SID lower than HCO₃- cause a decrease in plasma pH (acidosis), while crystalloids with a SID equal to HCO₃- leave pH unchanged, regardless of the extent of the dilution. Colloids and blood components are composed of a crystalloid solution as solvent, and the abovementioned rules partially hold true also for these fluids. The scenario is however complicated by the possible presence of weak anions (albumin, phosphates and gelatins) and their effect on plasma pH. The present manuscript summarises the characteristics of crystalloids, colloids, buffer solutions and blood components and reviews their effect on acid-base equilibrium. Understanding the composition of intravenous fluids, along with the application of simple physicochemical rules best described by Stewart's approach, are pivotal steps to fully elucidate and predict alterations of plasma acid-base equilibrium induced by fluid therapy.

  10. Carbon isotope effects in carbohydrates and amino acids of photosynthesizing organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivlev, A.A.; Kaloshin, A.G.; Koroleva, M.Ya.

    1982-01-01

    The analysis of the carbon isotope distribution in carbohydrates and amino acids of some photosynthesizing organisms revealed the close relationship between distribution and the pathways of biosynthesis of the molecules. This relationship is explained on the basis of the previously proposed mechanism of carbon isotope fractionation in a cell, in which the chief part is played by kinetic isotope effects in the pyruvate decarboxylation reaction progressively increased in the conjugated processes of gluconeogenesis. Isotope differences of C 2 and C 3 fragments arising in decarboxylation of pyruvate, as well as isotope differences of biogenic acceptor and environmental CO 2 appearing in assimilation are the main reasons of the observed intramolecular isotopic heterogeneity of biomolecules. The heterogeneity is preserved in metabolites owing to an incomplete mixing of carbon atoms in biochemical reactions. The probable existence of two pools of carbohydrates in photosynthesizing organisms different in isotopic composition is predicted. Two types of intramolecular isotope distribution in amino acids are shown. (author)

  11. On the Effect of Planetary Stable Isotope Compositions on Growth and Survival of Terrestrial Organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueshu Xie

    Full Text Available Isotopic compositions of reactants affect the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. Usually it is assumed that heavy stable isotope enrichment leads to progressively slower reactions. Yet the effect of stable isotopes may be nonlinear, as exemplified by the "isotopic resonance" phenomenon. Since the isotopic compositions of other planets of Solar system, including Mars and Venus, are markedly different from terrestrial (e.g., deuterium content is ≈5 and ≈100 times higher, respectively, it is far from certain that terrestrial life will thrive in these isotopic conditions. Here we found that Martian deuterium content negatively affected survival of shrimp in semi-closed biosphere on a year-long time scale. Moreover, the bacterium Escherichia coli grows slower at Martian isotopic compositions and even slower at Venus's compositions. Thus, the biological impact of varying stable isotope compositions needs to be taken into account when planning interplanetary missions.

  12. International nuclear model and code comparison on pre-equilibrium effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruppelaar, H.; van der Kamp, H.A.J.; Nagel, P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper gives the specification of an intercomparison of statistical nuclear models and codes with emphasis on pre-equilibrium effects. It is partly based upon the conclusions of a meeting of an ad-hoc working group on this subject. The parameters studied are: masses, Q values, level scheme data, optical model parameters, X-ray competition parameters, total level-density specifications, for 86 Rb, 89 Sr, 90 Y, 92 Y, 92 Zr, 93 Zr, 89 Y, 91 Nb, 92 Nb and 93 Nb

  13. The effect of SNR structure on non-equilibrium X-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, A.J.S.; Sarazin, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is presented for characterizing the ionization structure and consequent thermal X-ray emission of a SNR when non-equilibrium ionization effects are important. The technique allows different theoretical SNR models to be compared and contrasted rapidly in advance of detailed numerical computations. In particular it is shown that the spectrum of a Sedov remnant can probably be applied satisfactorily in a variety of SNR structures, including the reverse shock model advocated by Chevalier (1982) for Type I SN, the isothermal similarity solution of Solinger, Rappaport and Buff (1975), and various inhomogenous or 'messy' structures. (Auth.)

  14. The Effect of Phytase on the Oxygen Isotope Composition of Phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Sperber, C.; Tamburini, F.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2013-12-01

    Plants and microorganisms under phosphorus (P) stress release extracellular phosphatases as a strategy to acquire inorganic phosphate (Pi) (1-2). These enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphoesters leading to a release of Pi. The enzymatic hydrolysis leads, via a nucleophilic attack, to the incorporation of one oxygen atom from the water into the newly formed Pi molecule. During the incorporation, an isotopic fractionation occurs, which might be used to identify the origin of Pi in the environment (3-6). While the effect of phosphomonoesterases and phosphodiesterases on the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate has been examined, there are, so far, no studies dealing with the effect of phytases (4-6). Phytases catalyze the hydrolysis of myo-inositol-hexakis-phosphate (IP6), which is an important component of organic P in many ecosystems (7). Enzymatic assays with phytase from wheat germ and Aspergillus niger were prepared under sterile and temperature controlled conditions in order to determine the effect of phytases on the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate, which has been liberated from IP6 via enzymatic hydrolysis. Assays with phytase from wheat germ lead to a turnover of the substrate close to 100%, while assays with phytase from Aspergillus niger lead to a turnover of the substrate close to 80%. In the case of the assays with phytase from wheat germ, our results indicate that one sixth of the total 24 oxygen which are associated to the phosphates in IP6 are exchanged with oxygen from water. From this we conclude that the incorporation of one oxygen atom from water occurs only at four phosphate molecules of IP6, while two phosphate molecules do not experience an incorporation of oxygen. This suggests that during the enzymatic hydrolysis, four P-O bonds and two C-O bonds are broken. Provided that, the isotopic fractionation can be calculated with an isotopic mass balance resulting in -8.4‰ (×3.6 SD). This is a value very similar to those reported

  15. Burnup effect on nuclear fuel cycle cost using an equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, S. R.; Kim, S. K.; Ko, W. I.

    2014-01-01

    The degree of fuel burnup is an important technical parameter to the nuclear fuel cycle, being sensitive and progressive to reduce the total volume of process flow materials and eventually cut the nuclear fuel cycle costs. This paper performed the sensitivity analysis of the total nuclear fuel cycle costs to changes in the technical parameter by varying the degree of burnups in each of the three nuclear fuel cycles using an equilibrium model. Important as burnup does, burnup effect was used among the cost drivers of fuel cycle, as the technical parameter. The fuel cycle options analyzed in this paper are three different fuel cycle options as follows: PWR-Once Through Cycle(PWR-OT), PWR-MOX Recycle, Pyro-SFR Recycle. These fuel cycles are most likely to be adopted in the foreseeable future. As a result of the sensitivity analysis on burnup effect of each three different nuclear fuel cycle costs, PWR-MOX turned out to be the most influenced by burnup changes. Next to PWR-MOX cycle, in the order of Pyro-SFR and PWR-OT cycle turned out to be influenced by the degree of burnup. In conclusion, the degree of burnup in the three nuclear fuel cycles can act as the controlling driver of nuclear fuel cycle costs due to a reduction in the volume of spent fuel leading better availability and capacity factors. However, the equilibrium model used in this paper has a limit that time-dependent material flow and cost calculation is impossible. Hence, comparative analysis of the results calculated by dynamic model hereafter and the calculation results using an equilibrium model should be proceed. Moving forward to the foreseeable future with increasing burnups, further studies regarding alternative material of high corrosion resistance fuel cladding for the overall

  16. Simulation and experimental investigation of mechanical and thermal non-equilibrium effect on choking flow at low pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, H.J.; Ishii, M.; Revankar, S.T.

    2004-01-01

    The prediction of two-phase choking flow at low pressure (<1MPa) is much more difficult than at relatively higher pressure due to the large density ratio and relatively large thermal and mechanical non-equilibrium between the phases. At low pressure currently available choking flow models are not reliable and satisfactory. In view of this, separate effect tests were conducted to systematically investigate the effects of mechanical and thermal non-equilibrium on the two-phase choking flow in a pipe. The systematic studies is not available in literature, therefore no clear understanding of these effects has been attained until now. A scaled integral facility called PUMA was used for these tests with specific boundary condition with several unique in-;line instruments. The mechanical non-equilibrium effect was studied with air-water choking flow. Subcooled water two-phase choking flow was studied to identify the effects of mechanical and thermal non-equilibrium. A typical nozzle and orifice were used as the choking flow section to evaluate the degree of non-equilibrium due to geometry. The slip ratio, which is a key parameter to express the mechanical non-equilibrium, is obtained upstream of the choking section in the air-water test. The measured choking mass flux for the nozzle was higher than the orifice at low flow quality (<0.05) for the same upstream flow quality indicating that there is a strong mechanical non-equilibrium at the choking plane. The thermal non-equilibrium effect was very strong at low pressure, however, no major influence of the geometry on this effect was observed. Experimental data were compared with RELAP5/MOD3.2.1.2, MOD3.3 beta and TRAC-M code predictions. The code predictions in general were not in agreement with the air-water choking flow test data. This indicated that the mechanical non-equilibrium effects were not properly modeled in the codes. The test data for subcooled water showed moderate decrease of choking mass flux with decrease

  17. Computational Replication of the Primary Isotope Dependence of Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effects in Solution Hydride-Transfer Reactions: Supporting the Isotopically Different Tunneling Ready State Conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshani-Molayousefi, Mortaza; Kashefolgheta, Sadra; Eilers, James E; Lu, Yun

    2016-06-30

    We recently reported a study of the steric effect on the 1° isotope dependence of 2° KIEs for several hydride-transfer reactions in solution (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 6653). The unusual 2° KIEs decrease as the 1° isotope changes from H to D, and more in the sterically hindered systems. These were explained in terms of a more crowded tunneling ready state (TRS) conformation in D-tunneling, which has a shorter donor-acceptor distance (DAD) than in H-tunneling. To examine the isotopic DAD difference explanation, in this paper, following an activated motion-assisted H-tunneling model that requires a shorter DAD in a heavier isotope transfer process, we computed the 2° KIEs at various H/D positions at different DADs (2.9 Å to 3.5 Å) for the hydride-transfer reactions from 2-propanol to the xanthylium and thioxanthylium ions (Xn(+) and TXn(+)) and their 9-phenyl substituted derivatives (Ph(T)Xn(+)). The calculated 2° KIEs match the experiments and the calculated DAD effect on the 2° KIEs fits the observed 1° isotope effect on the 2° KIEs. These support the motion-assisted H-tunneling model and the isotopically different TRS conformations. Furthermore, it was found that the TRS of the sterically hindered Ph(T)Xn(+) system does not possess a longer DAD than that of the (T)Xn(+) system. This predicts a no larger 1° KIE in the former system than in the latter. The observed 1° KIE order is, however, contrary to the prediction. This implicates the stronger DAD-compression vibrations coupled to the bulky Ph(T)Xn(+) reaction coordinate.

  18. Monopole Effect on Isotopes in Sn and Pb Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. KHITER

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. When going toward in description of neutron-rich nuclei, the monopole field plays a determining role in the properties of the quasiparticle states and their interactions. Detailed theoretical in shell model calculations of the characteristics of the neutron-rich isotopes in 132Sn and 208Pb regions are performed using the monopole hamiltonien effect. Some modification mentioned in literatures of effectives interactions are introduced for evaluated the effective single-particle energies. Their effect show a successful and consistent description of excitation energies spectra of these nuclei.Keywords:Nuclear Structure, Monopole Hamiltonian, Odd-Odd Nuclei,Three body Effects, Similarity, 21.60.Cs; 27.60. +j; 21.30.Fe

  19. Effects of soil water saturation on sampling equilibrium and kinetics of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pil-Gon; Roh, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Yongseok; Kwon, Jung-Hwan

    2017-10-01

    Passive sampling can be applied for measuring the freely dissolved concentration of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in soil pore water. When using passive samplers under field conditions, however, there are factors that might affect passive sampling equilibrium and kinetics, such as soil water saturation. To determine the effects of soil water saturation on passive sampling, the equilibrium and kinetics of passive sampling were evaluated by observing changes in the distribution coefficient between sampler and soil (K sampler/soil ) and the uptake rate constant (k u ) at various soil water saturations. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) passive samplers were deployed into artificial soils spiked with seven selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In dry soil (0% water saturation), both K sampler/soil and k u values were much lower than those in wet soils likely due to the contribution of adsorption of PAHs onto soil mineral surfaces and the conformational changes in soil organic matter. For high molecular weight PAHs (chrysene, benzo[a]pyrene, and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene), both K sampler/soil and k u values increased with increasing soil water saturation, whereas they decreased with increasing soil water saturation for low molecular weight PAHs (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene). Changes in the sorption capacity of soil organic matter with soil water content would be the main cause of the changes in passive sampling equilibrium. Henry's law constant could explain the different behaviors in uptake kinetics of the selected PAHs. The results of this study would be helpful when passive samplers are deployed under various soil water saturations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A study of hydrogen isotopes fuel control by wall effect in magnetic fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motevalli, S.M., E-mail: motavali@umz.ac.ir; Safari, M.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A particle balance model for the main plasma and wall inventory in magnetic fusion device has been represented. • The dependence of incident particles energy on the wall has been considered in 10–300 eV for the sputtering yield and recycling coefficient. • The effect of fueling methods on plasma density behavior has been studied. - Abstract: Determination of plasma density behavior in magnetic confinement system needs to study the plasma materials interaction in the facing components such as first wall, limiter and divertor. Recycling of hydrogen isotope is an effective parameter in plasma density rate and plasma fueling. Recycling coefficient over the long pulse operation, gets to the unity, so it has a significant effect on steady state in magnetic fusion devices. Typically, sputtered carbon atoms from the plasma facing components form hydrocarbons and they redeposit on the wall. In this case little rate of hydrogen loss occurs. In present work a zero dimensional particle equilibrium model has been represented to determine particles density rate in main plasma and wall inventory under recycling effect and codeposition of hydrogen in case of continues and discontinues fueling methods and effective parameters on the main plasma decay has been studied.

  1. Co-solvent effects on reaction rate and reaction equilibrium of an enzymatic peptide hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangler, A; Canales, R; Held, C; Luong, T Q; Winter, R; Zaitsau, D H; Verevkin, S P; Sadowski, G

    2018-04-25

    This work presents an approach that expresses the Michaelis constant KaM and the equilibrium constant Kth of an enzymatic peptide hydrolysis based on thermodynamic activities instead of concentrations. This provides KaM and Kth values that are independent of any co-solvent. To this end, the hydrolysis reaction of N-succinyl-l-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide catalysed by the enzyme α-chymotrypsin was studied in pure buffer and in the presence of the co-solvents dimethyl sulfoxide, trimethylamine-N-oxide, urea, and two salts. A strong influence of the co-solvents on the measured Michaelis constant (KM) and equilibrium constant (Kx) was observed, which was found to be caused by molecular interactions expressed as activity coefficients. Substrate and product activity coefficients were used to calculate the activity-based values KaM and Kth for the co-solvent free reaction. Based on these constants, the co-solvent effect on KM and Kx was predicted in almost quantitative agreement with the experimental data. The approach presented here does not only reveal the importance of understanding the thermodynamic non-ideality of reactions taking place in biological solutions and in many technological applications, it also provides a framework for interpreting and quantifying the multifaceted co-solvent effects on enzyme-catalysed reactions that are known and have been observed experimentally for a long time.

  2. Molecular finite-size effects in stochastic models of equilibrium chemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Claudia; Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2016-02-28

    The reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a standard modelling approach for understanding stochastic and spatial chemical kinetics. An inherent assumption is that molecules are point-like. Here, we introduce the excluded volume reaction-diffusion master equation (vRDME) which takes into account volume exclusion effects on stochastic kinetics due to a finite molecular radius. We obtain an exact closed form solution of the RDME and of the vRDME for a general chemical system in equilibrium conditions. The difference between the two solutions increases with the ratio of molecular diameter to the compartment length scale. We show that an increase in the fraction of excluded space can (i) lead to deviations from the classical inverse square root law for the noise-strength, (ii) flip the skewness of the probability distribution from right to left-skewed, (iii) shift the equilibrium of bimolecular reactions so that more product molecules are formed, and (iv) strongly modulate the Fano factors and coefficients of variation. These volume exclusion effects are found to be particularly pronounced for chemical species not involved in chemical conservation laws. Finally, we show that statistics obtained using the vRDME are in good agreement with those obtained from Brownian dynamics with excluded volume interactions.

  3. Determination of the Tautomeric Equilibria of Pyridoyl Benzoyl -Diketones in the Liquid and Solid State through the use of Deuterium Isotope Effects on 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shifts and Spin Coupling Constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V.; Lindon, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The tautomeric equilibria for 2-pyridoyl-, 3-pyridoyl-, and 4-pyridoyl-benzoyl methane have been investigated using deuterium isotope effects on 1H and 13C chemical shifts both in the liquid and the solid state. Equilibria are established both in the liquid and the solid state. In addition......, in the solution state the 2-bond and 3-bond J(1H–13C) coupling constants have been used to confirm the equilibrium positions. The isotope effects due to deuteriation at the OH position are shown to be superior to chemical shift in determination of equilibrium positions of these almost symmetrical -pyridoyl......-benzoyl methanes. The assignments of the NMR spectra are supported by calculations of the chemical shifts at the DFT level. The equilibrium positions are shown to be different in the liquid and the solid state. In the liquid state the 4-pyridoyl derivative is at the B-form (C-1 is OH), whereas the 2-and 3-pyridoyl...

  4. Absolute isotopic abundances of Ti in meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederer, F.R.; Papanastassiou, D.A.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute isotope abundance of Ti has been determined in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites and in samples of whole meteorites. The absolute Ti isotope abundances differ by a significant mass dependent isotope fractionation transformation from the previously reported abundances, which were normalized for fractionation using 46 Ti/ 48 Ti. Therefore, the absolute compositions define distinct nucleosynthetic components from those previously identified or reflect the existence of significant mass dependent isotope fractionation in nature. We provide a general formalism for determining the possible isotope compositions of the exotic Ti from the measured composition, for different values of isotope fractionation in nature and for different mixing ratios of the exotic and normal components. The absolute Ti and Ca isotopic compositions still support the correlation of 50 Ti and 48 Ca effects in the FUN inclusions and imply contributions from neutron-rich equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium nucleosynthesis. The present identification of endemic effects at 46 Ti, for the absolute composition, implies a shortfall of an explosive-oxygen component or reflects significant isotope fractionation. Additional nucleosynthetic components are required by 47 Ti and 49 Ti effects. Components are also defined in which 48 Ti is enhanced. Results are given and discussed. (author)

  5. A chaotic jerk system with non-hyperbolic equilibrium: Dynamics, effect of time delay and circuit realisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Karthikeyan; Pham, Viet-Thanh; Tahir, Fadhil Rahma; Akgul, Akif; Abdolmohammadi, Hamid Reza; Jafari, Sajad

    2018-04-01

    The literature on chaos has highlighted several chaotic systems with special features. In this work, a novel chaotic jerk system with non-hyperbolic equilibrium is proposed. The dynamics of this new system is revealed through equilibrium analysis, phase portrait, bifurcation diagram and Lyapunov exponents. In addition, we investigate the time-delay effects on the proposed system. Realisation of such a system is presented to verify its feasibility.

  6. Effect of heavy ion irradiation on thermodynamically equilibrium Zr-Excel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbing; Liang, Jianlie; Yao, Zhongwen; Kirk, Mark A.; Daymond, Mark R.

    2017-05-01

    The thermodynamically equilibrium state was achieved in a Zr-Sn-Nb-Mo alloy by long-term annealing at an intermediate temperature. The fcc intermetallic Zr(Mo, Nb)2 enriched with Fe was observed at the equilibrium state. In-situ 1 MeV Kr2+ heavy ion irradiation was performed in a TEM to study the stability of the intermetallic particles under irradiation and the effects of the intermetallic particle on the evolution of type dislocation loops at different temperatures from 80 to 550 °C. Chemi-STEM elemental maps were made at the same particles before and after irradiation up to 10 dpa. It was found that no elemental redistribution occurs at 200 °C and below. Selective depletion of Fe was observed from some precipitates under irradiation at higher temperatures. No change in the morphology of particles and no evidence showing a crystalline to amorphous transformation were observed at all irradiation temperatures. The formation of type dislocation loops was observed under irradiation at 80 and 200 °C, but not at 450 and 550 °C. The loops were non-uniformly distributed; a localized high density of type dislocation loops were observed near the second phase particles; we suggest that loop nucleation is favored as a result of the stress induced by the particles, rather than by elemental redistribution. The stability of the second phase particles and the formation of the type loops under heavy ion irradiation are discussed.

  7. General equilibrium effects of a supply side GHG mitigation option under the Clean Development Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsina, Govinda R; Shrestha, Ram M

    2006-09-01

    The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) under the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is considered a key instrument to encourage developing countries' participation in the mitigation of global climate change. Reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through the energy supply and demand side activities are the main options to be implemented under the CDM. This paper analyses the general equilibrium effects of a supply side GHG mitigation option-the substitution of thermal power with hydropower--in Thailand under the CDM. A static multi-sector general equilibrium model has been developed for the purpose of this study. The key finding of the study is that the substitution of electricity generation from thermal power plants with that from hydropower plants would increase economic welfare in Thailand. The supply side option would, however, adversely affect the gross domestic product (GDP) and the trade balance. The percentage changes in economic welfare, GDP and trade balance increase with the level of substitution and the price of certified emission reduction (CER) units.

  8. Effect of Non-Equilibrium Condensation on Force Coefficients in Transonic Airfoil Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Min; Kang, Hui Bo; Kwon, Young Doo; Kwon, Soon Bum [Kyungpook National Univeristy, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heung Kyun [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The present study investigated the effects of non-equilibrium condensation with the angle of attack on the coefficients of pressure, lift, and drag in the transonic 2-D flow of NACA0012 by numerical analysis of the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme. At T{sub 0}=298 K and α=3°, the lift coefficients for M{sub ∞}=0.78 and 0.81 decreased monotonically with increasing Φ{sub 0}. In contrast, for M{sub ∞} corresponding to the Mach number of the force break, CL increased with Φ{sub 0}. For α=3° and Φ{sub 0}=0%, CD increased markedly as M{sub ∞} increased. However, at Φ{sub 0}=60% and α=3°, which corresponded to the case of the condensation having a large influence, CD increased slightly as M{sub ∞} increased. The decrease in profile drag by non-equilibrium condensation grew as the angle of attack and stagnation relative humidity increased for the same free stream transonic Mach number. At Φ{sub 0}=0%, the coefficient of the wave drag increased with the attack angle and free stream Mach number. When Φ{sub 0}>50%, the coefficient of the wave drag decreased as α and M{sub ∞} increased. Lowering Φ{sub 0} and increasing M{sub ∞} increased the maximum Mach number.

  9. Non local-thermodynamical-equilibrium effects in the simulation of laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapisch, M.; Bar-Shalom, A.; Oreg, J.; Colombant, D.

    1998-05-01

    Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) breaks down in directly or indirectly driven laser plasmas because of sharp gradients, energy deposition, etc. For modeling non-LTE effects in hydrodynamical simulations, Busquet's model [Phys. Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] is very convenient and efficient. It uses off-line generated LTE opacities and equation of states via an effective, radiation-dependent ionization temperature Tz. An overview of the model is given. The results are compared with an elaborate collisional radiative model based on superconfigurations. The agreements for average charge Z* and opacities are surprisingly good, even more so when the plasma is immersed in a radiation field. Some remaining discrepancy at low density is attributed to dielectronic recombination. Improvement appears possible, especially for emissivities, because the concept of ionization temperature seems to be validated.

  10. Non local-thermodynamical-equilibrium effects in the simulation of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapisch, M.; Bar-Shalom, A.; Oreg, J.; Colombant, D.

    1998-01-01

    Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) breaks down in directly or indirectly driven laser plasmas because of sharp gradients, energy deposition, etc. For modeling non-LTE effects in hydrodynamical simulations, Busquet close-quote s model [Phys. Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] is very convenient and efficient. It uses off-line generated LTE opacities and equation of states via an effective, radiation-dependent ionization temperature T z . An overview of the model is given. The results are compared with an elaborate collisional radiative model based on superconfigurations. The agreements for average charge Z * and opacities are surprisingly good, even more so when the plasma is immersed in a radiation field. Some remaining discrepancy at low density is attributed to dielectronic recombination. Improvement appears possible, especially for emissivities, because the concept of ionization temperature seems to be validated. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  11. Effect of Iron Redox Equilibrium on the Foaming Behavior of MgO-Saturated Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngjoo; Min, Dong Joon

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the foaming index of CaO-SiO2-FetO and CaO-SiO2-FetO-Al2O3 slags saturated with MgO was measured to understand the relationship between their foaming behavior and physical properties. The foaming index of MgO-saturated slags increases with the FetO content due to the redox equilibrium of FetO. Experimental results indicated that MgO-saturated slag has relatively high ferric ion concentration, and the foaming index increases due to the effect of ferric ion. Therefore, the foaming behavior of MgO-saturated slag is more reasonably explained by considering the effect of ferric ion on the estimation of slag properties such as viscosity, surface tension, and density. Specifically, the estimation of slag viscosity was additionally verified by NBO/T, and this is experimentally obtained through Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Isotope effects in mass-spectrometry; Les effets isotopiques en spectrometrie de masse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leicknam, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Departement de physico-chimie, service des isotopes stables, section de spectrometrie de masse

    1967-05-01

    In the first part, a review is made of the work concerning the influence of isotopic substitution on the stabilities of ionised molecules and the bond-breaking probabilities; metastable transitions are also affected by this substitution. A model based on the Franck-Condon principle accounts for the experimentally observed isotopic effects for diatomic molecules; to a certain extent it is possible to generalise the calculation for the case of isotopic molecules of carbon dioxide gas. For deuterated polyatomic molecules there exist a {pi} effect making it possible to compare the relative stabilities of the X-H and X-D bonds, and a {gamma} effect which characterizes the different behaviours of the X-H bond in a normal molecule and in its partially deuterated homologue. Usually there is a very marked {pi} effect (e.g. the C-D bonds are more difficult to break than the homologous C-H bonds) and a {gamma} effect, the partial deuteration of a molecule leading in general to an increase in the probability of breakage of a given bond. An interpretation of {pi} and {gamma} effects based on Rosenstock near-equilibrium theory accounts for the observed phenomena, qualitatively at least, in the case of propane and acetylene. In the second part are gathered together results concerning isotopic effects produced during the formation of rearranged ions. The existence of cyclic transition ions has made it possible for Mc Lafferty to explain the existence of these ions in the mass spectrum; isotopic substitution leads to a modification of the rearrangement mechanism, the bonding forces being no longer the same. (author) [French] Dans une premiere partie, on rassemble les travaux concernant l'influence de la substitution isotopique sur les stabilites des molecules ionisees et les probabilites de rupture des liaisons; les transitions metastables sont egalement modifiees par cette substitution. Un modele base sur le principe de Franck-Condon rend compte des effets isotopiques

  13. Secondary deuterium isotope effects and transition state structure in the aromatic claisen rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMichael, K.D.; Korver, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetic experiments were carried out simultaneously on separate methyl salicylate solutions of allyl phenyl ether and its deuterated phenyl analogues at 170 to 195 0 C. Gas chromatographic analysis for allyl phenyl ether using an internal standard (anisole) and mechanical integration produced concentration/time data which were fitted to the exponential form of the first-order rate equation by a standard and nonlinear least-square program. At least 15 points were obtained for each run, covering 10 to 85% reaction. The derived isotope effects show no temperature dependence. Averages for 6 runs with each compound are k/sub H//k/sub α-D 2 / = 1.18 and K/sub H//k/sub γ-D 2 / = 0.95. An equilibrium α effect of 1.30 and a γ effect of 0.87 may be calculated for both deuterium atoms at 185 0 C. These results show that the C--H vibration frequencies are approximately (1.18 - 1)/(1.27 - 1) or 57 to 77% of the way from those of allyl phenyl ether to those of the cyclohexadiene intermediate. The C--H frequencies of the γ carbon in the transition state are about (0.95 - 1)/(0.88 - 1) or 22 to 62% of the way to those of the intermediate. The structure of the transition state, as far as these bonding frequencies are concerned, is consistent with the Claisen rearrangement

  14. Adsorption isotope effects of water on mesoporous silica and alumina with implications for the land-vegetation-atmosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying; Horita, Juske; Abe, Osamu

    2018-02-01

    Soil water dynamics within a vadose (unsaturated) zone is a key component in the hydrologic cycle, especially in arid regions. In applying the Craig-Gordon evaporation model to obtain isotopic compositions of soil water and the evaporated vapor in land-surface models (LSMs), it has been assumed that the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors between soil water and water vapor, α(2H) and α(18O), are identical to those between liquid and vapor of bulk water. Isotope effects in water condensation arise from intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the condensed phase and the appearance of hindered rotation/translation. Hydrogen bonding between water molecules and pore surface hydroxyl groups influences adsorption isotope effects. To test whether equilibrium fractionation factors between soil water and water vapor are identical to those between liquid and vapor of bulk water and to evaluate the influence of pore size and chemical composition upon adsorption isotope effects, we extended our previous experiments of a mesoporous silica (15 nm) to two other mesoporous materials, a silica (6 nm) and an alumina (5.8 nm). Our results demonstrated that α(2H) and α(18O) between adsorbed water and water vapor are 1.057 and 1.0086 for silica (6 nm) and 1.041 and 1.0063 for alumina (5.8 nm), respectively, at saturation pressure (po), which are smaller than 1.075 and 1.0089, respectively, between liquid and vapor phases of free water at 30 °C and that the differences exaggerate at low water contents. However, the profiles of α values with relative pressures (p/po) for these three materials differ due to the differences in chemical compositions and pore sizes. Empirical formula relating α(2H) and α(18O) values to the proportions of filled pores (f) are developed for potential applications to natural soils. Our results from triple oxygen isotope analyses demonstrated that the isotope fractionation does not follow a canonical law. For the silica (15 nm), fractionation exponents

  15. Quantum tunneling observed without its characteristic large kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Ueta, Hirokazu; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2015-06-16

    Classical transition-state theory is fundamental to describing chemical kinetics; however, quantum tunneling is also important in explaining the unexpectedly large reaction efficiencies observed in many chemical systems. Tunneling is often indicated by anomalously large kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), because a particle's ability to tunnel decreases significantly with its increasing mass. Here we experimentally demonstrate that cold hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms can add to solid benzene by tunneling; however, the observed H/D KIE was very small (1-1.5) despite the large intrinsic H/D KIE of tunneling (≳ 100). This strong reduction is due to the chemical kinetics being controlled not by tunneling but by the surface diffusion of the H/D atoms, a process not greatly affected by the isotope type. Because tunneling need not be accompanied by a large KIE in surface and interfacial chemical systems, it might be overlooked in other systems such as aerosols or enzymes. Our results suggest that surface tunneling reactions on interstellar dust may contribute to the deuteration of interstellar aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, which could represent a major source of the deuterium enrichment observed in carbonaceous meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. These findings could improve our understanding of interstellar physicochemical processes, including those during the formation of the solar system.

  16. Charge exchange effect on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Hideaki; Izawa, Yasukazu; Otani, Hiroyasu; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1982-01-01

    Uranium isotope separating experiment was performed using the two-step photoionization technique with dye laser and nitrogen laser by heating uranium metal with electron beam and producing atomic beam using generated vapour. The experimental results are described after explaining the two-step photoionization by laser, experimental apparatus, the selection of exciting wavelength and others. Enrichment factor depends largely on the spectrum purity of dye laser which is the exciting source. A large enrichment factor of 48.3 times was obtained for spectrum width 0.03A. To put the uranium isotope separation with laser into practice, the increase of uranium atomic density is considered to be necessary for improving the yield. Experimental investigation was first carried out on the charge exchange effect that seems most likely to affect the decrease of enrichment factor, and the charge exchange cross-section was determined. The charge exchange cross-section depends on the relative kinetic energy between ions and atoms. The experimental result showed that the cross-section was about 5 x 10 -13 cm 2 at 1 eV and 10 -13 cm 2 at 90 eV. These values are roughly ten times as great as those calculated in Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, and it is expected that they become the greatest factor for giving the upper limit of uranium atomic density in a process of practical application. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Introduction to chemistry and applications in nature of mass independent isotope effects special feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented.

  18. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found to be nega...

  19. Ionic conductivity in aqueous solutions: deuterium isotope effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Alok; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    1997-01-01

    A simple theoretical investigation of the calculation of ionic conductivity in aqueous solution is presented. The dipolar hard sphere model for the solvent which has been successful elsewhere has been employed here and it has been possible to reproduce the experimental results quite accurately for both water and heavy water using only two parameters. In a more detailed theoretical approach one should employ better models for water with proper account of its vibrations, liberations and also hydrogen bonding. It is also of interest to study the temperature effect and the concentration dependence of the conductivity. The time-dependent friction can also be calculated from the present formalism and be used for the study of isotope effect in proton transfer reactions or other aspects of chemical dynamics

  20. The effect of warming on grassland evapotranspiration partitioning using laser-based isotope monitoring techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Lixin; Niu, Shuli; Good, Stephen P.; Soderberg, Keir; McCabe, Matthew; Sherry, Rebecca A.; Luo, Yiqi; Zhou, Xuhui; Xia, Jianyang; Caylor, Kelly K.

    2013-01-01

    The proportion of transpiration (T) in total evapotranspiration (ET) is an important parameter that provides insight into the degree of biological influence on the hydrological cycles. Studies addressing the effects of climatic warming on the ecosystem total water balance are scarce, and measured warming effects on the T/ET ratio in field experiments have not been seen in the literature. In this study, we quantified T/ET ratios under ambient and warming treatments in a grassland ecosystem using a stable isotope approach. The measurements were made at a long-term grassland warming site in Oklahoma during the May-June peak growing season of 2011. Chamber-based methods were used to estimate the δ2H isotopic composition of evaporation (δE), transpiration (δT) and the aggregated evapotranspiration (δET). A modified commercial conifer leaf chamber was used for δT, a modified commercial soil chamber was used for δE and a custom built chamber was used for δET. The δE, δET and δT were quantified using both the Keeling plot approach and a mass balance method, with the Craig-Gordon model approach also used to calculate δE. Multiple methods demonstrated no significant difference between control and warming plots for both δET and δT. Though the chamber-based estimates and the Craig-Gordon results diverged by about 12‰, all methods showed that δE was more depleted in the warming plots. This decrease in δE indicates that the evaporation flux as a percentage of total water flux necessarily decreased for δET to remain constant, which was confirmed by field observations. The T/ET ratio in the control treatment was 0.65 or 0.77 and the ratio found in the warming treatment was 0.83 or 0.86, based on the chamber method and the Craig-Gordon approach. Sensitivity analysis of the Craig-Gordon model demonstrates that the warming-induced decrease in soil liquid water isotopic composition is the major factor responsible for the observed δE depletion and the temperature

  1. The effect of warming on grassland evapotranspiration partitioning using laser-based isotope monitoring techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Lixin

    2013-06-01

    The proportion of transpiration (T) in total evapotranspiration (ET) is an important parameter that provides insight into the degree of biological influence on the hydrological cycles. Studies addressing the effects of climatic warming on the ecosystem total water balance are scarce, and measured warming effects on the T/ET ratio in field experiments have not been seen in the literature. In this study, we quantified T/ET ratios under ambient and warming treatments in a grassland ecosystem using a stable isotope approach. The measurements were made at a long-term grassland warming site in Oklahoma during the May-June peak growing season of 2011. Chamber-based methods were used to estimate the δ2H isotopic composition of evaporation (δE), transpiration (δT) and the aggregated evapotranspiration (δET). A modified commercial conifer leaf chamber was used for δT, a modified commercial soil chamber was used for δE and a custom built chamber was used for δET. The δE, δET and δT were quantified using both the Keeling plot approach and a mass balance method, with the Craig-Gordon model approach also used to calculate δE. Multiple methods demonstrated no significant difference between control and warming plots for both δET and δT. Though the chamber-based estimates and the Craig-Gordon results diverged by about 12‰, all methods showed that δE was more depleted in the warming plots. This decrease in δE indicates that the evaporation flux as a percentage of total water flux necessarily decreased for δET to remain constant, which was confirmed by field observations. The T/ET ratio in the control treatment was 0.65 or 0.77 and the ratio found in the warming treatment was 0.83 or 0.86, based on the chamber method and the Craig-Gordon approach. Sensitivity analysis of the Craig-Gordon model demonstrates that the warming-induced decrease in soil liquid water isotopic composition is the major factor responsible for the observed δE depletion and the temperature

  2. Hyperfine magnetic fields for 5d impurities in iron: pre-equilibrium effects, texture and the Aharoni effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuchbery, A.E.; Bezakova, E.

    1998-01-01

    Static magnetic hyperfine fields acting on impurities recoil-implanted into ferromagnetic hosts following heavy-ion induced reactions have been studied using the implantation perturbed angular correlation (IMPAC) technique to determine the magnetic moments of subnanosecond excited states in neutron-deficient nuclei. Problems, which in time-integral measurements cannot always be treated independently were studied and include: (i) corrections for the transient field effect, (ii) whether the hyperfine field is parallel to the applied field, (iii) whether the implanted nuclei all experience the same magnetic interaction, (iv) the time the static field takes to reach equilibrium after implantation. The focus here is on pre-equilibrium phenomena associated with the implantation process and the direction of the internal magnetic field at implanted impurities after equilibrium is reached. It was found that the internal field does become increasingly misaligned with respect to external field direction at fields below 0.08 T. This is due to the incomplete saturation of the foil and not to the microscopic effect as proposed by Aharoni

  3. Effect of 60Co γ-rays irradiation on equilibrium moisture content of rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yong; Wang Jun; Jin Shuifeng; Teng Bin

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to study the effect of irradiation on the EMC (equilibrium moisture content) of rice. Irradiation dose was included in three widely used models for EMC, the parameters in models based on the experimental data, and correlation coefficient, mean relative error and standard error of moisture were studied for the better model. Experimental results show that gamma irradiation dose affects the values of EMC of grain at the same relative humidity and temperature of ambient. Values of the EMC decreased with increass of γ-rays irradiation dose during both adsorption and desorption process. Based on the correlation coefficient, mean relative error and standard error of moisture, the modified Chung-Pfost equation and the modified Henderson equation were found to fit the desorption and adsorption isotherms for rough rice grain in the range of experimental conditions. (authors)

  4. Effective temperature of the non-equilibrium electrons in a degenerate semiconductor at low lattice temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, B.; Basu, A.; Das, J.; Bhattacharya, D.P., E-mail: d_p_bhattacharya@rediffmail.com

    2015-10-01

    The energy balance equation for the electron–phonon system is recast taking the degeneracy of the carrier ensemble into account. The effect of degeneracy on the field dependence of the temperature of the non-equilibrium carriers has been studied by solving the same equation. The high field distribution function of the carriers is assumed to be given by the Fermi Dirac function at the field dependent carrier temperature. The distribution function has been approximated in a way that facilitates analytical solution of the problem without any serious loss of accuracy. The field dependence of the electron temperature thus obtained seems to be significantly different from what follows had the degeneracy not been taken into account. The agreement of the results obtained from the present analysis with the available experimental data for Ge and InSb are quite satisfactory. The scope of further refinement of the present theory is highlighted.

  5. Thermal treatments effect on the austenite-ferrite equilibrium in a duplex stainless steel weld beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkessa, Brahim; Badji, Riad; Bettahar, Kheireddine; Maza, Halim

    2006-01-01

    Heat treatments in the temperature range between 800 to 1200 C, with a keeping at high temperature of 60 min, followed by a water quenching at 20 C, have been carried out on austeno-ferritic stainless steel welds (of type SAF 2205-UNS S31803). The heat treatments carried out at temperatures below 1000 C have modified the structure of the duplex stainless steel 2205 in inducing the formation of precipitates, identified by X-ray diffraction as being the intermetallic compound σ and the chromium carbides M 23 C 6 . The treatments applied to temperatures superior to 1000 C shift the δ-γ equilibrium towards the δ phase. Indeed, the increase of the ferrite rate with the treatment temperature is approximately linear. The ferrite rates are higher in the heat-affected zone, which has been submitted to a ferritizing due to the welding thermal effects. (O.M.)

  6. The isotope altitude effect reflected in groundwater: a case study from Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezga, Kim; Urbanc, Janko; Cerar, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the stable isotope data of oxygen (δ(18)O) and hydrogen (δ(2)H) in groundwater from 83 sampling locations in Slovenia and their interpretation. The isotopic composition of water was monitored over 3 years (2009-2011), and each location was sampled twice. New findings on the isotopic composition of sampled groundwater are presented, and the data are also compared to past studies regarding the isotopic composition of precipitation, surface water, and groundwater in Slovenia. This study comprises: (1) the general characteristics of the isotopic composition of oxygen and hydrogen in groundwater in Slovenia, (2) the spatial distribution of oxygen isotope composition (δ(18)O) and d-excess in groundwater, (3) the groundwater isotope altitude effect, (4) the correlation between groundwater d-excess and the recharge area altitude of the sampling location, (5) the relation between hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in groundwater in comparison to the global precipitation isotope data, (6) the groundwater isotope effect of distance from the sea, and (7) the estimated relation between the mean temperature of recharge area and δ(18)O in groundwater.

  7. Isotope effect on superconductivity and Raman phonons of Pyrochlore Cd2Re2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, F. S.; Hajialamdari, M.; Reedyk, M.; Kremer, R. K.

    2018-06-01

    Cd2Re2O7 is the only α-Pyrochlore exhibiting superconductivity with a transition temperature (Tc) of ∼ 1 K. In this study, we present the effect of oxygen isotope (18O) as well as combined 18O and cadmium isotope (116Cd) substitution on the superconductivity and Raman scattering spectrum of Cd2Re2O7. The change of Tc and the energy gap Δ(T) are reported using various techniques including point contact spectroscopy. The shift in Raman phonon frequencies upon isotope substitution will be compared with measurement of the isotope effect on the superconducting transition temperature.

  8. Effect of a Perturbation on the Chemical Equilibrium: Comparison with Le Chatelier's Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Emilio Martinez

    2007-01-01

    This article develops a general thermodynamic treatment to predict the direction of shift in a chemical equilibrium when it is subjected to a stress. This treatment gives an inequality that relates the change in the perturbed variable and the change that the equilibrium shift produces in the conjugated variable. To illustrate the generality of…

  9. The Adverse Effects of Le Chatelier's Principle on Teacher Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Although the scientific inadequacy of Le Chatelier's principle has long been documented in the literature, the principle is still treated as a central concept of chemical equilibrium by textbook writers and teachers in many countries. In the past, researchers' interest has focused on student misconceptions about chemical equilibrium and has…

  10. The effect of additional equilibrium stress functions on the three-node hybrid-mixed curved beam element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Gon; Park, Yong Kuk

    2008-01-01

    To develop an effective hybrid-mixed element, it is extremely critical as to how to assume the stress field. This research article demonstrates the effect of additional equilibrium stress functions to enhance the numerical performance of the locking-free three-node hybrid-mixed curved beam element, proposed in Saleeb and Chang's previous work. It is exceedingly complicated or even infeasible to determine the stress functions to satisfy fully both the equilibrium conditions and suppression of kinematic deformation modes in the three-node hybrid-mixed formulation. Accordingly, the additional stress functions to satisfy partially or fully equilibrium conditions are incorporated in this study. Several numerical examples for static and dynamic problems confirm that the newly proposed element with these additional stress functions is highly effective regardless of the slenderness ratio and curvature of arches in static and dynamic analyses

  11. Effect of heavy ion irradiation on thermodynamically equilibrium Zr-Excel alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hongbing [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Liang, Jianlie [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); College of Science, Guangxi University for Nationalities, 188, East Da Xue Rd., Nanning, Guangxi, 530006 P.R.C (China); Yao, Zhongwen, E-mail: yaoz@queensu.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Kirk, Mark A. [Material Science Division Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Daymond, Mark R., E-mail: mark.daymond@queensu.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    The thermodynamically equilibrium state was achieved in a Zr-Sn-Nb-Mo alloy by long-term annealing at an intermediate temperature. The fcc intermetallic Zr(Mo, Nb){sub 2} enriched with Fe was observed at the equilibrium state. In-situ 1 MeV Kr{sup 2+} heavy ion irradiation was performed in a TEM to study the stability of the intermetallic particles under irradiation and the effects of the intermetallic particle on the evolution of type dislocation loops at different temperatures from 80 to 550 °C. Chemi-STEM elemental maps were made at the same particles before and after irradiation up to 10 dpa. It was found that no elemental redistribution occurs at 200 °C and below. Selective depletion of Fe was observed from some precipitates under irradiation at higher temperatures. No change in the morphology of particles and no evidence showing a crystalline to amorphous transformation were observed at all irradiation temperatures. The formation of type dislocation loops was observed under irradiation at 80 and 200 °C, but not at 450 and 550 °C. The loops were non-uniformly distributed; a localized high density of type dislocation loops were observed near the second phase particles; we suggest that loop nucleation is favored as a result of the stress induced by the particles, rather than by elemental redistribution. The stability of the second phase particles and the formation of the type loops under heavy ion irradiation are discussed.

  12. In-situ observation of equilibrium transitions in Ni films; agglomeration and impurity effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thron, Andrew M., E-mail: AMThron@lbl.gov [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Greene, Peter; Liu, Kai [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Benthem, Klaus van [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Dewetting of ultra-thin Ni films deposited on SiO{sub 2} layers was observed, in cross-section, by in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy. Holes were observed to nucleate by voids which formed at the Ni/SiO{sub 2} interface rather than at triple junctions at the free surface of the Ni film. Ni islands were observed to retract, in attempt to reach equilibrium on the SiO{sub 2} layer. SiO{sub 2} layers with 120 nm thickness were found to limit in situ heating experiments due to poor thermal conductivity of SiO{sub 2}. The formation of graphite was observed during the agglomeration of ultra-thin Ni films. Graphite was observed to wet both the free surface and the Ni/SiO{sub 2} interface of the Ni islands. Cr forms surface oxide layers on the free surface of the SiO{sub 2} layer and the Ni islands. Cr does not prevent the dewetting of Ni, however it will likely alter the equilibrium shape of the Ni islands. - Highlights: • In Situ observation of dewetting in ultra-thin Ni films sputtered on SiO{sub 2} layers. • Dewetting is observed in an edge-on position by in situ STEM. • Characterization of interface structure pre and post in situ annealing by STEM and EELS. • Analyze the effects of Cr{sub 1−x}O{sub x} and graphite impurities on the Ni film agglomeration. • Examine influence of the SiO{sub 2} layers on the dewetting process.

  13. [The effect of spermine on acid-base equilibrium in DNA molecule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonitskiĭ, S V; Kuptsov, V Iu

    1990-01-01

    The influence of spermine (Sp) on the acid-induced predenaturational and denaturational transitions in the DNA molecule structure has been studied by means of circular dichroism, spectrophotometric and viscometric titration at supporting electrolyte concentration 10 mM NaCl. The data available indicate that at [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.60 (here [N] and [P] are molar concentrations of Sp nitrogen and DNA phosphours, respectively) the cooperative structural B----B(+)----S transitions are accompanied by the DNA double-helice winding. No competition for proton acceptor sites in the DNA molecule between H+ and Sp4+ cations has been observed when binding to neutral macromolecule. At 0.60 less than or equal to [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.75 the displacement of the B----B(+)----S transitions midpoints to acidic pH region has been established. This is accompanied by DNA condensation and the appearance of differential scattering of circularly polarized light. The calculations carried out in the framework of the two-variable Manning theory have shown that the acid-induced reduction of the effective polyion charge density facilitates the Sp-induced DNA condensation. It has been shown that the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule is determined by local [H+] in the 2-3 A hydrated monolayer of the macromolecule. An adequate estimation of [H+] can be obtained on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzman approach. The data obtained are consistent with recently proposed hypothesis of polyelectrolyte invariance of the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule.

  14. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, X., E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Naidis, G.V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Laroussi, M. [Plasma Engineering & Medicine Institute, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Reuter, S. [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Felix-Hausdorff-Strasse 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Graves, D.B. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ostrikov, K. [Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); School of Physics, Chemistry, and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P.O.Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-05-04

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors’ vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  15. Cross-coupling effects in chemically non-equilibrium viscous compressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustova, E.V.; Giordano, D.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Self-cosistent kinetic-theory description of chemical-reaction rates and mean normal stress in one-temperature viscous compressible gas flows. Reaearch highlights: → In chemically non-equilibrium viscous compressible flows, the rate of each reaction depends on the velocity divergence and rates of all other reactions. → Cross effects between the rates of chemical reactions and normal mean stress can be found in the symmetric form and expressed in terms of the reaction affinities. → In the case of small affinities, the entropy production is unconditionally non-negative; in the case of finite affinities, the entropy production related to the scalar forces has no definite sign. - Abstract: A closed self-consistent description of a one-temperature non-equilibrium reacting flow is presented on the basis of the kinetic theory methods. A general case including internal degrees of freedom, dissociation-recombination and exchange reactions, and arbitrary values of affinities of chemical reactions is considered. Chemical-reaction rates and mean normal stress in viscous compressible flows are studied and a symmetric cross coupling between these terms is found. It is shown that the rate of each chemical reaction and the mean normal stress depend on velocity divergence and affinities of all chemical reactions; the law of mass action is violated in viscous flows. The results obtained in the frame of linear irreversible thermodynamics can be deduced from the proposed model for the particular case of small affinities. The reciprocal Onsager-Casimir relations are verified, the symmetry of kinetic coefficients is demonstrated, and the entropy production in a viscous flow is studied.

  16. Multiple stable isotope fronts during non-isothermal fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Stable isotope signatures of oxygen, hydrogen and other elements in minerals from hydrothermal veins and metasomatized host rocks are widely used to investigate fluid sources and paths. Previous theoretical studies mostly focused on analyzing stable isotope fronts developing during single-phase, isothermal fluid flow. In this study, numerical simulations were performed to assess how temperature changes, transport phenomena, kinetic vs. equilibrium isotope exchange, and isotopic source signals determine mineral oxygen isotopic compositions during fluid-rock interaction. The simulations focus on one-dimensional scenarios, with non-isothermal single- and two-phase fluid flow, and include the effects of quartz precipitation and dissolution. If isotope exchange between fluid and mineral is fast, a previously unrecognized, significant enrichment in heavy oxygen isotopes of fluids and minerals occurs at the thermal front. The maximum enrichment depends on the initial isotopic composition of fluid and mineral, the fluid-rock ratio and the maximum change in temperature, but is independent of the isotopic composition of the incoming fluid. This thermally induced isotope front propagates faster than the signal related to the initial isotopic composition of the incoming fluid, which forms a trailing front behind the zone of transient heavy oxygen isotope enrichment. Temperature-dependent kinetic rates of isotope exchange between fluid and rock strongly influence the degree of enrichment at the thermal front. In systems where initial isotope values of fluids and rocks are far from equilibrium and isotope fractionation is controlled by kinetics, the temperature increase accelerates the approach of the fluid to equilibrium conditions with the host rock. Consequently, the increase at the thermal front can be less dominant and can even generate fluid values below the initial isotopic composition of the input fluid. As kinetics limit the degree of isotope exchange, a third front may

  17. Mechanism of the flame ionization detector. II. Isotope effects and heteroatom effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1997-01-01

    The relative molar flame ionization detecton (FID) response (RMR) for a hydrocarbon does not change when deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. The exception is methane for which an inverse deuterium effect of 3..5% is observed for tetradeuteriomethane. [13C]Methane shows an inverse isotope effect...... of 2%. The reason for the small or non-existent isotope effects is that H/2H exchange takes place in the pre-combustion hydrogenolysis in the flame. This was shown by taking samples from the lower part of the flame by means of a fused silica capillary probe. By the same technique the hydrogenolytic...

  18. Electrochemical H-D isotope effect at metal-perovskite proton conductor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kek, D.; Bonanos, N.

    1999-01-01

    The H-D isotope effect on the electrode kinetics of a metal-proton conductor interface has been investigated. The current-voltage behaviour depends on the nature of the electrode (Ni, Ag), the atmosphere (H(2), D(2)), the partial pressures of the gases, and the temperature. The isotope effect was...

  19. Macrocyclic ligand decorated ordered mesoporous silica with large-pore and short-channel characteristics for effective separation of lithium isotopes: synthesis, adsorptive behavior study and DFT modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuekun; Liu, Fei; Ye, Gang; Pu, Ning; Wu, Fengcheng; Wang, Zhe; Huo, Xiaomei; Xu, Jian; Chen, Jing

    2016-10-18

    Effective separation of lithium isotopes is of strategic value which attracts growing attention worldwide. This study reports a new class of macrocyclic ligand decorated ordered mesoporous silica (OMS) with large-pore and short-channel characteristics, which holds the potential to effectively separate lithium isotopes in aqueous solutions. Initially, a series of benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C5) derivatives containing different electron-donating or -withdrawing substituents were synthesized. Extractive separation of lithium isotopes in a liquid-liquid system was comparatively studied, highlighting the effect of the substituent, solvent, counter anion and temperature. The optimal NH 2 -B15C5 ligands were then covalently anchored to a short-channel SBA-15 OMS precursor bearing alkyl halides via a post-modification protocol. Adsorptive separation of the lithium isotopes was fully investigated, combined with kinetics and thermodynamics analysis, and simulation by using classic adsorption isotherm models. The NH 2 -B15C5 ligand functionalized OMSs exhibited selectivity to lithium ions against other alkali metal ions including K(i). Additionally, a more efficient separation of lithium isotopes could be obtained at a lower temperature in systems with softer counter anions and solvents with a lower dielectric constant. The highest value separation factor (α = 1.049 ± 0.002) was obtained in CF 3 COOLi aqueous solution at 288.15 K. Moreover, theoretical computation based on the density functional theory (DFT) was performed to elucidate the complexation interactions between the macrocyclic ligands and lithium ions. A suggested mechanism involving an isotopic exchange equilibrium was proposed to describe the lithium isotope separation by the functionalized OMSs.

  20. Rebound effect of improved energy efficiency for different energy types: A general equilibrium analysis for China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yingying; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Meifang

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the rebound effect of different energy types in China based on a static computable general equilibrium model. A one-off 5% energy efficiency improvement is imposed on five different types of energy, respectively, in all the 135 production sectors in China. The rebound effect is measured both on the production level and on the economy-wide level for each type of energy. The results show that improving energy efficiency of using electricity has the largest positive impact on GDP among the five energy types. Inter-fuel substitutability does not affect the macroeconomic results significantly, but long-run impact is usually greater than the short-run impact. For the exports-oriented sectors, those that are capital-intensive get big negative shock in the short run while those that are labour-intensive get hurt in the long run. There is no “backfire” effect; however, improving efficiency of using electricity can cause negative rebound, which implies that improving the energy efficiency of using electricity might be a good policy choice under China's current energy structure. In general, macro-level rebound is larger than production-level rebound. Primary energy goods show larger rebound effect than secondary energy goods. In addition, the paper points out that the policy makers in China should look at the rebound effect in the long term rather than in the short term. The energy efficiency policy would be a good and effective policy choice for energy conservation in China when it still has small inter-fuel substitution. - Highlights: • Primary energy goods show larger rebound effect than secondary energy goods. • Improving efficiency of using electricity can cause negative rebound. • The energy efficiency policy would be an effective policy choice for China. • Policy-makers should consider the rebound effect in the longer term.

  1. Effect of density of state on isotope effect exponent of two-band superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udomsamuthirun, P.; Kumvongsa, C.; Burakorn, A.; Changkanarth, P.; Yoksan, S.

    2005-01-01

    The exact formula of T c 's equation and the isotope effect exponent of two-band s-wave superconductors in weak-coupling limit are derived by considering the influence of two kinds of density of state: constant and van Hove singularity. The paring interaction in each band consisted of two parts: the electron-phonon interaction and non-electron-phonon interaction are included in our model. We find that the interband interaction of electron-phonon show more effect on isotope exponent than the intraband interaction and the isotope effect exponent with constant density of state can fit to experimental data, MgB 2 and high-T c superconductor, better than van Hove singularity density of state

  2. MEASURING NEBULAR TEMPERATURES: THE EFFECT OF NEW COLLISION STRENGTHS WITH EQUILIBRIUM AND {kappa}-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRON ENERGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Kewley, Lisa J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Rd., Weston ACT 2611 (Australia); Palay, Ethan, E-mail: david@mso.anu.edu.au [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    In this paper we develop tools for observers to use when analyzing nebular spectra for temperatures and metallicities, with two goals: to present a new, simple method to calculate equilibrium electron temperatures for collisionally excited line flux ratios, using the latest atomic data; and to adapt current methods to include the effects of possible non-equilibrium ''{kappa}'' electron energy distributions. Adopting recent collision strength data for [O III], [S III], [O II], [S II], and [N II], we find that existing methods based on older atomic data seriously overestimate the electron temperatures, even when considering purely Maxwellian statistics. If {kappa} distributions exist in H II regions and planetary nebulae as they do in solar system plasmas, it is important to investigate the observational consequences. This paper continues our previous work on the {kappa} distribution. We present simple formulaic methods that allow observers to (1) measure equilibrium electron temperatures and atomic abundances using the latest atomic data, and (2) to apply simple corrections to existing equilibrium analysis techniques to allow for possible non-equilibrium effects. These tools should lead to better consistency in temperature and abundance measurements, and a clearer understanding of the physics of H II regions and planetary nebulae.

  3. Stability analysis of a model equilibrium for a gravito-electrostatic sheath in a colloidal plasma under external gravity effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkhowa, Kavita Rani; Bujarbarua, S.; Dwivedi, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The present contribution tries to find a scientific answer to the question of stability of an equilibrium plasma sheath in a colloidal plasma system under external gravity effect. A model equilibrium of hydrodynamical character has been discussed on the basis of quasi-hydrostatic approximation of levitational condition. It is found that such an equilibrium is highly unstable to a modified-ion acoustic wave with a conditional likelihood of linear driving of the so-called acoustic mode too. Thus, it is reported (within fluid treatment) that a plasma-sheath edge in a colloidal plasma under external gravity effect could be highly sensitive to the acoustic turbulence. Its consequential role on possible physical mechanism of Coulomb phase transition has been conjectured. However, more rigorous calculations as future course of work are required to corroborate our phenomenological suggestions. (author)

  4. Study of energy fluctuation effect on the statistical mechanics of equilibrium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysogorskiy, Yu V; Wang, Q A; Tayurskii, D A

    2012-01-01

    This work is devoted to the modeling of energy fluctuation effect on the behavior of small classical thermodynamic systems. It is known that when an equilibrium system gets smaller and smaller, one of the major quantities that becomes more and more uncertain is its internal energy. These increasing fluctuations can considerably modify the original statistics. The present model considers the effect of such energy fluctuations and is based on an overlapping between the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics and the statistics of the fluctuation. Within this o verlap statistics , we studied the effects of several types of energy fluctuations on the probability distribution, internal energy and heat capacity. It was shown that the fluctuations can considerably change the temperature dependence of internal energy and heat capacity in the low energy range and at low temperatures. Particularly, it was found that, due to the lower energy limit of the systems, the fluctuations reduce the probability for the low energy states close to the lowest energy and increase the total average energy. This energy increasing is larger for lower temperatures, making negative heat capacity possible for this case.

  5. Effect of Local Thermal Equilibrium Misbalance on Long-wavelength Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakariakov, V. M. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Afanasyev, A. N. [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics SB RAS, P.O. Box 291, Lermontov St. 126A, Irkutsk 664033 (Russian Federation); Kumar, S.; Moon, Y.-J., E-mail: V.Nakariakov@warwick.ac.uk [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, 446-701, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-01

    Evolution of slow magnetoacoustic waves guided by a cylindrical magnetic flux tube that represents a coronal loop or plume, is modeled accounting for the effects of finite gas pressure, weak nonlinearity, dissipation by thermal conduction and viscosity, and the misbalance between the cooling by optically thin radiation and unspecified heating of the plasma. An evolutionary equation of the Burgers–Malthus type is derived. It is shown that the cooling/heating misbalance, determined by the derivatives of the combined radiative cooling and heating function, with respect to the density, temperature, and magnetic field at the thermal equilibrium affect the wave rather strongly. This effect may either cause additional damping, or counteract it, or lead to the gradual amplification of the wave. In the latter case, the coronal plasma acts as an active medium for the slow magnetoacoustic waves. The effect of the cooling/heating misbalance could be important for coronal slow waves, and could be responsible for certain discrepancies between theoretical results and observations, in particular, the increased or decreased damping lengths and times, detection of the waves at certain heights only, and excitation of compressive oscillations. The results obtained open up a possibility for the diagnostics of the coronal heating function by slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  6. Isotope effect and deuterium excess parameter revolution in ice and snow melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Guan; Ni Shijun; Fan Xiao; Wu Hao

    2003-01-01

    The change of water isotope composition actually is a integrated reaction depending on the change of environment. The ice and snow melt of different seasons in high mountain can obviously influence the change of isotope composition and deuterium excess parameter of surface flow and shallow groundwater. To know the isotopic fractionation caused by this special natural background, explore its forming and evolvement, is unusually important for estimating, the relationship between the environment, climate and water resources in an area. Taking the example of isotope composition of surface flow and shallow groundwater in Daocheng, Sichuan, this paper mainly introduced the changing law of isotope composition and deuterium excess parameter of surface flow and hot-spring on conditions of ice and snow melt with different seasons in high mountain; emphatically discussed the isotope effect and deuterium excess parameter revolution in the process of ice and snow melting and its reason. (authors)

  7. Non-equilibrium effects of core-cooling and time-dependent internal heating on mantle flush events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Yuen

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the non-equilibrium effects of core-cooling and time-dependent internal-heating on the thermal evolution of the Earth's mantle and on mantle flush events caused by the two major phase transitions. Both two- and three-dimensional models have been employed. The mantle viscosity responds to the secular cooling through changes in the averaged temperature field. A viscosity which decreases algebraically with the average temperature has been considered. The time-dependent internal-heating is prescribed to decrease exponentially with a single decay time. We have studied the thermal histories with initial Rayleigh numbers between 2 x 107 and 108 . Flush events, driven by the non-equilibrium forcings, are much more dramatic than those produced by the equilibrium boundary conditions and constant internal heating. Multiple flush events are found under non-equilibrium conditions in which there is very little internal heating or very fast decay rates of internal-heating. Otherwise, the flush events take place in a relatively continuous fashion. Prior to massive flush events small-scale percolative structures appear in the 3D temperature fields. Time-dependent signatures, such as the surface heat flux, also exhibits high frequency oscillatory patterns prior to massive flush events. These two observations suggest that the flush event may be a self-organized critical phenomenon. The Nusselt number as a function of the time-varying Ra does not follow the Nusselt vs. Rayleigh number power-law relationship based on equilibrium (constant temperature boundary conditions. Instead Nu(t may vary non-monotonically with time because of the mantle flush events. Convective processes in the mantle operate quite differently under non-equilibrium conditions from its behaviour under the usual equilibrium situations.

  8. Effects of the magnetic equilibrium on gyrokinetic simulations of tokamak microinstabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Weigang; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott E. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Groebner, Richard J. [General Atomics, Post Office Box 85068, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The general geometry of the experimental tokamak magnetic equilibrium is implemented in the global gyrokinetic simulation code GEM. Compared to the general geometry, the well used Miller parameterization of the magnetic equilibrium is a good approximation in the core region and up to the top of the pedestal. Linear simulations indicate that results with the two geometries agree for r/a ≤ 0.9. However, in the edge region, the instabilities are sensitive to the magnetic equilibrium in both the L-mode and the H-mode plasmas. A small variation of the plasma shaping parameters leads to large changes to the edge instability.

  9. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  10. Silver diffusion and isotope effect in silver rubidium iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzigian, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of silver in RbAg 4 I 5 was measured in both superionic phases using radiotracer Ag-110m and serial sectioning with a low temperature sectioning apparatus. The activation energies for diffusion in alpha-RbAg 4 I 5 and beta-RbAg 4 I 5 , respectively, are 0.11 +- 0.01 eV and 0.20 +- 0.04 eV. An isotope effect for diffusion was also measured in both superionic phases. Ag-105 and Ag-110m radioisotopes were used with gamma spectroscopy and energy discrimination. The effect is small, with no significant temperature variation, with the value at 333 0 K being 0.12 +- 0.01. The second-order phase transition at 208 0 K has a small effect, if any, on the magnitude of the effect. The data suggest that a highly cooperative transport mechanism is responsible for the unusually high values of both the conductivity and diffusion coefficient. Although it is not possible to deduce the particular mechanism involved, theories inolving ionic polarons, or cooperative motion, such as crowdions or solitons, seem consistent with the observed results

  11. A statistical investigation of the effects of edge localized modes on the equilibrium reconstruction in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murari, A; Peluso, E; Gaudio, P; Gelfusa, M; Maviglia, F; Hawkes, N

    2012-01-01

    The configuration of magnetic fields is an essential ingredient of tokamak physics. In modern day devices, the magnetic topology is normally derived from equilibrium codes, which solve the Grad–Shafranov equation with constraints imposed by the available measurements. On JET, the main code used for this purpose is EFIT and the more commonly used diagnostics are external pick-up coils. Both the code and the measurements present worse performance during edge localized modes (ELMs). To quantify this aspect, various statistical indicators, based on the values of the residuals and their probability distribution, are defined and calculated. They all show that the quality of EFIT reconstructions is clearly better in the absence of ELMs. To investigate the possible causes of the detrimental effects of ELMs on the reconstruction, the pick-up coils are characterized individually and both the spatial distribution and time behaviour of their residuals are analysed in detail. The coils with a faster time response are the ones reproduced less well by EFIT. The constraints of current and pressure at the separatrix are also varied but the effects of such modifications do not result in decisive improvements in the quality of the reconstructions. The interpretation of this experimental evidence is not absolutely compelling but strongly indicative of deficiencies in the physics model on which the JET reconstruction code is based. (paper)

  12. Thermal effects in equilibrium surface segregation in a copper/10-atomic-percent-aluminum alloy using Auger electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, J.

    1972-01-01

    Equilibrium surface segregation of aluminum in a copper-10-atomic-percent-aluminum single crystal alloy oriented in the /111/ direction was demonstrated by using Auger electron spectroscopy. This crystal was in the solid solution range of composition. Equilibrium surface segregation was verified by observing that the aluminum surface concentration varied reversibly with temperature in the range 550 to 850 K. These results were curve fitted to an expression for equilibrium grain boundary segregation and gave a retrieval energy of 5780 J/mole (1380 cal/mole) and a maximum frozen-in surface coverage three times the bulk layer concentration. Analyses concerning the relative merits of sputtering calibration and the effects of evaporation are also included.

  13. Determination of the variation of mercury isotope concentration based on spectral-phase effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeev, A.A.; Man', D.D.; Turkin, Yu.I.

    1988-01-01

    A method of isotopic atomic-absorption analysis, based on spectral-phase effects in which there is no need to use several sources of radiation with pure isotopes of the analyte element, was developed. The method made it possible to simplify the analysis and to determine the variation of the concentration of mercury isotopes from one deposit to another with an accuracy several times higher that of traditional methods of spectral isotopic analysis. The method was tested on mercury 198 and mercury 202. The isotopic analyzer is diagramed and described. The mechanism of spectral-phase effects was determined by the difference in effective photon lifetimes, corresponding to different components of the hyperfine structure of the resonance line of mercury at 254 nm

  14. Deuterium isotope effects and fractionation factors of hydrogen-bonded A:T base pairs of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakonakis, Ioannis; Salazar, Miguel; Kang, Mijeong; Dunbar, Kim R.; Li Wang, Andy C.

    2003-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects and fractionation factors of N1...H3-N3 hydrogen bonded Watson-Crick A:T base pairs of two DNA dodecamers are presented here. Specifically, two-bond deuterium isotope effects on the chemical shifts of 13 C2 and 13 C4, 2 Δ 13 C2 and 2 Δ 13 C4, and equilibrium deuterium/protium fractionation factors of H3, Φ, were measured and seen to correlate with the chemical shift of the corresponding imino proton, δ H3 . Downfield-shifted imino protons associated with larger values of 2 Δ 13 C2 and 2 Δ 13 C4 and smaller Φ values, which together suggested that the effective H3-N3 vibrational potentials were more anharmonic in the stronger hydrogen bonds of these DNA molecules. We anticipate that 2 Δ 13 C2, 2 Δ 13 C4 and Φ values can be useful gauges of hydrogen bond strength of A:T base pairs

  15. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium controls on the abundances of clumped isotopologues of methane during thermogenic formation in laboratory experiments: Implications for the chemistry of pyrolysis and the origins of natural gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yanhua; Douglas, Peter M.J.; Zhang, Shuichang; Stolper, Daniel A.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lawson, Michael; Lewan, Michael; Formolo, Michael; Mi, Jingkui; He, Kun; Hu, Guoyi; Eiler, John M.

    2018-01-01

    Multiply isotopically substituted molecules (‘clumped’ isotopologues) can be used as geothermometers because their proportions at isotopic equilibrium relative to a random distribution of isotopes amongst all isotopologues are functions of temperature. This has allowed measurements of clumped-isotope abundances to be used to constrain formation temperatures of several natural materials. However, kinetic processes during generation, modification, or transport of natural materials can also affect their clumped-isotope compositions. Herein, we show that methane generated experimentally by closed-system hydrous pyrolysis of shale or nonhydrous pyrolysis of coal yields clumped-isotope compositions consistent with an equilibrium distribution of isotopologues under some experimental conditions (temperature–time conditions corresponding to ‘low,’ ‘mature,’ and ‘over-mature’ stages of catagenesis), but can have non-equilibrium (i.e., kinetically controlled) distributions under other experimental conditions (‘high’ to ‘over-mature’ stages), particularly for pyrolysis of coal. Non-equilibrium compositions, when present, lead the measured proportions of clumped species to be lower than expected for equilibrium at the experimental temperature, and in some cases to be lower than a random distribution of isotopes (i.e., negative Δ18 values). We propose that the consistency with equilibrium for methane formed by relatively low temperature pyrolysis reflects local reversibility of isotope exchange reactions involving a reactant or transition state species during demethylation of one or more components of kerogen. Non-equilibrium clumped-isotope compositions occur under conditions where ‘secondary’ cracking of retained oil in shale or wet gas hydrocarbons (C2-5, especially ethane) in coal is prominent. We suggest these non-equilibrium isotopic compositions are the result of the expression of kinetic isotope effects during the irreversible generation

  16. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium controls on the abundances of clumped isotopologues of methane during thermogenic formation in laboratory experiments: Implications for the chemistry of pyrolysis and the origins of natural gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yanhua; Douglas, Peter M. J.; Zhang, Shuichang; Stolper, Daniel A.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lawson, Michael; Lewan, Michael D.; Formolo, Michael; Mi, Jingkui; He, Kun; Hu, Guoyi; Eiler, John M.

    2018-02-01

    Multiply isotopically substituted molecules ('clumped' isotopologues) can be used as geothermometers because their proportions at isotopic equilibrium relative to a random distribution of isotopes amongst all isotopologues are functions of temperature. This has allowed measurements of clumped-isotope abundances to be used to constrain formation temperatures of several natural materials. However, kinetic processes during generation, modification, or transport of natural materials can also affect their clumped-isotope compositions. Herein, we show that methane generated experimentally by closed-system hydrous pyrolysis of shale or nonhydrous pyrolysis of coal yields clumped-isotope compositions consistent with an equilibrium distribution of isotopologues under some experimental conditions (temperature-time conditions corresponding to 'low,' 'mature,' and 'over-mature' stages of catagenesis), but can have non-equilibrium (i.e., kinetically controlled) distributions under other experimental conditions ('high' to 'over-mature' stages), particularly for pyrolysis of coal. Non-equilibrium compositions, when present, lead the measured proportions of clumped species to be lower than expected for equilibrium at the experimental temperature, and in some cases to be lower than a random distribution of isotopes (i.e., negative Δ18 values). We propose that the consistency with equilibrium for methane formed by relatively low temperature pyrolysis reflects local reversibility of isotope exchange reactions involving a reactant or transition state species during demethylation of one or more components of kerogen. Non-equilibrium clumped-isotope compositions occur under conditions where 'secondary' cracking of retained oil in shale or wet gas hydrocarbons (C2-5, especially ethane) in coal is prominent. We suggest these non-equilibrium isotopic compositions are the result of the expression of kinetic isotope effects during the irreversible generation of methane from an alkyl

  17. The Effect of Context-Based Chemical Equilibrium on Grade 11 Students' Learning, Motivation and Constructivist Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ilhan, Nail; Yildirim, Ali; Yilmaz, Sibel Sadi

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, many countries have adopted a context-based approach for designing science curricula for education at all levels. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a Context-Based Chemistry Course (CBCC) as compared with traditional/existing instruction, on 11th grade students' learning about chemical equilibrium,…

  18. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Approach Based on Conceptual Change Condition on Students' Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Ibrahim; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the cooperative learning approach based on conceptual change conditions over traditional instruction on 10th grade students' conceptual understanding and achievement of computational problems related to chemical equilibrium concepts. The subjects of this study consisted of 87 tenth grade…

  19. Observation of non-chemical equilibrium effect on Ar-CO2-H2 thermal plasma model by changing pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mamun, Sharif Abdullah; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed a two-dimensional one-temperature chemical non-equilibrium (1T-NCE) model of Ar-CO 2 -H 2 inductively coupled thermal plasmas (ICTP) to investigate the effect of pressure variation. The basic concept of one-temperature model is the assumption and treatment of the same energy conservation equation for electrons and heavy particles. The energy conservation equations consider reaction heat effects and energy transfer among the species produced as well as enthalpy flow resulting from diffusion. Assuming twenty two (22) different particles in this model and by solving mass conservation equations for each particle, considering diffusion, convection and net production terms resulting from hundred and ninety eight (198) chemical reactions, chemical non-equilibrium effects were taken into account. Transport and thermodynamic properties of Ar-CO 2 -H 2 thermal plasmas were self-consistently calculated using the first-order approximation of the Chapman-Enskog method. Finally results obtained at atmospheric pressure (760 Torr) and at reduced pressure (500, 300 Torr) were compared with results from one-temperature chemical equilibrium (1T-CE) model. And of course, this comparison supported discussion of chemical non-equilibrium effects in the inductively coupled thermal plasmas (ICTP).

  20. Glutamate Induced Thermal Equilibrium Intermediate and Counteracting Effect on Chemical Denaturation of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumalla, Bramhini; Prabhu, N Prakash

    2018-01-25

    When organisms are subjected to stress conditions, one of their adaptive responses is accumulation of small organic molecules called osmolytes. These osmolytes affect the structure and stability of the biological macromolecules including proteins. The present study examines the effect of a negatively charged amino acid osmolyte, glutamate (Glu), on two model proteins, ribonuclease A (RNase A) and α-lactalbumin (α-LA), which have positive and negative surface charges at pH 7, respectively. These proteins follow two-state unfolding transitions during both heat and chemical induced denaturation processes. The addition of Glu stabilizes the proteins against temperature and induces an early equilibrium intermediate during unfolding. The stability is found to be enthalpy-driven, and the free energy of stabilization is more for α-LA compared to RNase A. The decrease in the partial molar volume and compressibility of both of the proteins in the presence of Glu suggests that the proteins attain a more compact state through surface hydration which could provide a more stable conformation. This is also supported by molecule dynamic simulation studies which demonstrate that the water density around the proteins is increased upon the addition of Glu. Further, the intermediates could be completely destabilized by lower concentrations (∼0.5 M) of guanidinium chloride and salt. However, urea subverts the Glu-induced intermediate formed by α-LA, whereas it only slightly destabilizes in the case of RNase A which has a positive surface charge and could possess charge-charge interactions with Glu. This suggests that, apart from hydration, columbic interactions might also contribute to the stability of the intermediate. Gdm-induced denaturation of RNase A and α-LA in the absence and the presence of Glu at different temperatures was carried out. These results also show the Glu-induced stabilization of both of the proteins; however, all of the unfolding transitions followed two

  1. Effect of Sediment Availability in Bedload-Dominated Rivers on Fluvial Geomorphic Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, M.

    2016-12-01

    Channels are known to compensate for changes in sediment supply via covariate changes in channel properties, yet the timescale for adjustment remains poorly constrained. We propose that reductions in sediment flux inhibit equilibrium re-establishment and thus impact the timescale of system adjustment. Using run-of-river dams as natural experiments, this study quantifies the geomorphic response of channels to sediment supply reduction. Channel traits that facilitate increased sediment trapping behind the dam, such as large reservoir storage capacity relative to annual inflow and low slope, were expected to inhibit a channel's ability to re-establish equilibrium following impoundment, lengthening the equilibrium establishment timescale to tens or hundreds of years. Reaches associated with increased trapping were therefore anticipated to exhibit non-equilibrium forms. Channel equilibrium was evaluated downstream of 8 ROR dams in New England with varying degrees of sediment trapping. Sites cover a range of watershed sizes (3-155 km2), channel slopes (.05-5%), 2-year discharges (1.5-60 m3/s) and storage capacity volumes. Because equilibrium channel form is just sufficient to mobilize grains under bankfull conditions in bedload-dominated rivers, the Shields parameter was used to assess equilibrium form. Unregulated, upstream Shields values and regulated, downstream values were calculated at 14 total cross-sections extending 300-450 m upstream and downstream of each dam. Sediment trapping was estimated using Brune's curve (1953). On the Charles Brown Brook (VT), a marginally significant (p=0.08) increase in Shields values from a mean of 0.14 upstream to 0.41 downstream of a 100+ year old dam was observed. In contrast, reaches downstream of the 100+ year old Pelham dam (MA) exhibit significantly lower Shields values. This suggests that trapping behind the dam inhibits the downstream channel from reaching an equilibrium state, but not always in the same way. Better

  2. Effects of periodic boundary conditions on equilibrium properties of computer simulated fluids. I. Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, L.R.; Haan, S.W.

    1981-01-01

    An exact formal theory for the effects of periodic boundary conditions on the equilibrium properties of computer simulated classical many-body systems is developed. This is done by observing that use of the usual periodic conditions is equivalent to the study of a certain supermolecular liquid, in which a supermolecule is a polyatomic molecule of infinite extent composed of one of the physical particles in the system plus all its periodic images. For this supermolecular system in the grand ensemble, all the cluster expansion techniques used in the study of real molecular liquids are directly applicable. As expected, particle correlations are translationally uniform, but explicitly anisotropic. When the intermolecular potential energy functions are of short enough range, or cut off, so that the minimum image method is used, evaluation of the cluster integrals is dramatically simplified. In this circumstance, a large and important class of cluster expansion contributions can be summed exactly, and expressed in terms of the correlation functions which result when the system size is allowed to increase without bound. This result yields a simple and useful approximation to the corrections to the particle correlations due to the use of periodic boundary conditions with finite systems. Numerical application of these results are reported in the following paper

  3. Biological isotopy. Introduction to the isotopic effects and to their applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcherkez, G.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20. century, the study of stable isotopes has considerably developed. This domain, which remained limited in its applications until the 1990's, has become particularly important thereafter thanks to its practical applications and in particular to its economical impacts. Many techniques used in fraud control, in drugs use control, in selection of high-yield plants etc are based on isotopic abundance measurements. This reference book gives a synthesis of our actual knowledge on the use of stable isotopes and of isotope fractionation in biology. It presents the basic notions of isotopic biochemistry and explains the origin of the isotopic effects. The application principles of these effects to metabolism, to organisms physiology, to environmental biology etc are explained and detailed using examples and exercises. The first chapters present the basic knowledge which defines, from a mathematical point-of-view, the isotopic effects of chemical reactions or of physical processes taking place in biology. The measurements principle of natural isotopes abundance is then synthesised. Finally, all these notions are applied at different scales: enzymes, physiology, metabolism, environment, ecosystems and fraud crackdown. (J.S.)

  4. Isotope effect of impurity diffusion of cadmium in silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockosch, H.J.; Herzig, C.

    1984-01-01

    The isotope effect of impurity diffusion of cadmium in silver single crystals was measured with the radioisotopes 115 Cd/ 109 Cd by gamma spectrometry. As a mean value E = 0.37 at T = 1060 K was obtained. The correlation factor f /SUB Cd/ = 0.41 is in disagreement with previous results of other investigators due to their unfavourable experimental approach. The present value of f /SUB Cd/ , however, is consistent with those of In and Sn in Ag. A comparison with the corresponding correlation factors in the copper solvent reveals a distinct influence of lattice perturbations because of the different atomic volumes of the solvents. Since the size effect is neglected in the electrostatic diffusion model, the agreement with this model is only qualitative. The frequency ratios for vacancy jumps were calculated. The free binding enthalpy of the vacancy-impurity complex was estimated to be Δg /SUB Cd/ = -0.064 eV. This value is smaller than those for In and Sn in Ag and complies with the relative diffusivities of these impurities in Ag

  5. Effect of interband interaction on isotope effect exponent of MgB2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interband interaction of the electron–phonon interaction shows more effect on the isotope exponent than on the non-phonon interaction. Acknowledgement. The authors would like to thank Thailand Research Fund for financial support and the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce for partial financial support and.

  6. Thermal and Mechanical Non-Equilibrium Effects on Turbulent Flows: Fundamental Studies of Energy Exchanges Through Direct Numerical Simulations, Molecular Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    photochemical TNE generation, and chemistry of non- equilibrium phenomena. We have investigated a new concept to generate turbulence using photo-initiated...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0104 Thermal and mechanical non- equilibrium effects on turbulent flows:fundamental studies of energy exchanges through direct...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-09-2012 to 14-11-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Thermal and mechanical non- equilibrium effects on turbulent

  7. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  8. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure , particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  9. Isotope effects in lithium hydride and lithium deuteride crystals by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammak, Hichem; Antoshchenkova, Ekaterina; Hayoun, Marc; Finocchi, Fabio

    2012-10-31

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to study isotope effects in lithium hydride and lithium deuteride crystals. Quantum effects on nuclear motion have been included through a quantum thermal bath (QTB). The interatomic forces were described either within the density functional theory (DFT) in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) or by the phenomenological approach using the shell model. For both models, the isotopic shift in the lattice parameter can be successfully predicted by QTB-MD simulations. The slope of the experimental isotopic shift in pressure is satisfactorily reproduced by QTB-MD within DFT-GGA, in contrast to both density functional perturbation theory and QTB-MD with the shell model. We have analyzed the reasons for these discrepancies through the vibrational densities of states and the isotopic shifts in bulk modulus. The results illustrate the importance of anharmonic contributions to vibrations and to the isotopic pressure shift between LiH and LiD.

  10. Thermal Conductivity of Nanotubes: Effects of Chirality and Isotope Impurity

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, Zhang; Li, Baowen

    2005-01-01

    We study the dependence of thermal conductivity of single walled nanotubes (SWNT) on chirality and isotope impurity by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with accurate potentials. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the chirality. The isotope impurity, however, can reduce the thermal conductivity up to 60% and change the temperature dependence behavior. We also study the dependence of thermal conductivity on tube length for t...

  11. Hydrogen isotope effect through Pd in hydrogen transport pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    This investigation concerns hydrogen system with hydrogen transport pipes for transportation, purification, isotope separation and storage of hydrogen and its isotopes. A principle of the hydrogen transport pipe (heat pipe having hydrogen transport function) was proposed. It is comprised of the heat pipe and palladium alloy tubes as inlet, outlet, and the separation membrane of hydrogen. The operation was as follows: (1) gas was introduced into the heat pipe through the membrane in the evaporator; (2) the introduced gas was transported toward the condenser by the vapor flow; (3) the transported gas was swept and compressed to the end of the condenser by the vapor pressure; and (4) the compressed gas was exhausted from the heat pipe through the membrane in the condenser. The characteristics of the hydrogen transport pipe were examined for various working conditions. Basic performance concerning transportation, evacuation and compression was experimentally verified. Isotopic dihydrogen gases (H 2 and D 2 ) were used as feed gas for examining the intrinsic performance of the isotope separation by the hydrogen transport pipe. A simulated experiment for hydrogen isotope separation was carried out using a hydrogen-helium gas mixture. The hydrogen transport pipe has a potential for isotope separation and purification of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium in fusion reactor technology. (author)

  12. Matrix effects in laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Staci, E-mail: staci.brown@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Ford, Alan, E-mail: alan.ford@alakaidefense.com [Alakai Defense Systems, 197 Replacement Ave, Suite 102, Fort Leonard Wood, MO 65473 (United States); Akpovo, Charlemagne C., E-mail: charlemagne.akpovo@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Martinez, Jorge, E-mail: jmartinez@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Johnson, Lewis, E-mail: lewis@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) can be used for the detection of isotopes of elements via isotopic shifts in diatomic species in a technique known as laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). While LAMIS works quite well for isotopic analysis of pure compounds under optimal conditions, it is desirable for it to be applicable for a variety of compounds and matrices. However, the LIBS plasma emission associated with LAMIS depends on several parameters, including the applied electric field of the laser pulse, the physical properties of the material being investigated, and the presence of additional elements other than the element of interest. In this paper, we address some of the pitfalls arising from these dependencies when using LAMIS for the determination of the relative isotopic abundance of boron-containing materials with varying chemical matrices. - Highlights: • LAMIS usually determines isotopic composition of boron compounds within 3 percent. • LaBO{sub 3} and some boron-containing mixtures yield inaccurate LAMIS results. • Higher laser energy reduces variability but does not remedy poor LAMIS outcomes.

  13. Investigation of the feeding effect on the 13C/12C isotope ratio of the hormones in bovine urine using gas chromatography/combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balizs, Gabor; Jainz, Annett; Horvatovich, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the feeding on the 13C/12C isotope ratio of four endogenous steroid hormones testosterone (T), epi-testosterone (epi-T), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and etiocholanolone (ETIO) in bovine urine was investigated. An analytical method to determine the accurate isotope ratio was developed

  14. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects on isentropic coefficient in argon and helium thermal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, two cases of thermal plasma have been considered; the ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and the excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The variation of Zγ, frozen isentropic coefficient and the isentropic coefficient with degree of ionization and non-equilibrium parameter θ(= T e /T h ) has been investigated for the ground and excited state helium and argon plasmas at pressures 1 atm, 10 atm, and 100 atm in the temperature range from 6000 K to 60 000 K. For a given value of non-equilibrium parameter, the relationship of Zγ with degree of ionization does not show any dependence on electronically excited states in helium plasma whereas in case of argon plasma this dependence is not appreciable till degree of ionization approaches 2. The minima of frozen isentropic coefficient shifts toward lower temperature with increase of non-equilibrium parameter for both the helium and argon plasmas. The lowering of non-equilibrium parameter decreases the frozen isentropic coefficient more emphatically in helium plasma at high pressures in comparison to argon plasma. The increase of pressure slightly reduces the ionization range over which isentropic coefficient almost remains constant and it does not affect appreciably the dependence of isentropic coefficient on non-equilibrium parameter

  15. Intramolecular kinetic isotope effect in gas-phase proton-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellman, K.M.; Victoriano, M.E.; Isolani, P.C.; Riveros, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The k/sub H//k/sub D/ isotope effects were determined by ICR for the reaction of substituted toluenes with several alkoxides. The results showed a definite trend for k/sub H//k/sub D/ starting as a normal isotope effect for appreciably exothermic reaction (> 3 kcal mol -1 ) and proceeding smoothly toward an inverse isotope effect as the reaction approached thermoneutrality or becomes endothermic. These observations were explained by a reaction which involved a double minima potential with a central energy barrier

  16. Tritium isotope fractionation in biological systems and in analytical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.A.; Baumgaertner, Franz

    1989-01-01

    The organically bound tritium (OBT) is evaluated in biological systems by determining the tritium distribution ratio (R-value), i.e. tritium concentrations in organic substance to cell water. The determination of the R-value always involves isotope fractionation is applied analytical procedures and hence the evaluation of the true OBT -value in a given biological system appears more complicated than hitherto known in the literature. The present work concentrates on the tritium isotope fractionation in the cell water separation and on the resulting effects on the R-value. The analytical procedures examined are vacuum freeze drying under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions and azeotropic distillation. The vaporization isotope effects are determined separately in the phase transition of solid or liquid to gas in pure tritium water systems as well as in real biological systems, e.g. corn plant. The results are systematically analyzed and the influence of isotope effects on the R-value is rigorously quantified

  17. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains non-steady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggi, F.M.; Riley, W.J.

    2009-06-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic reactions in isotopic applications often assume first-order or Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics under the quasi-steady-state assumption to simplify the system kinetics. However, isotopic e ects have the same order of magnitude as the potential error introduced by these simpli cations. Both formulations lead to a constant fractionation factor which may yield incorrect estimations of the isotopic effect and a misleading interpretation of the isotopic signature of a reaction. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitri cation in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate [2006], where high {sup 15}N{sub 2}O enrichment during N{sub 2}O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N{sub 2}O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with the quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics. When the quasi-steady-state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observations and aided in interpretation of experimental isotopic signatures. These results may imply a substantial revision in using the Rayleigh equation for interpretation of isotopic signatures and in modeling biological kinetic isotope fractionation with first-order kinetics or quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics.

  18. Effect Of Substrates On The Fractionation Of Hydrogen Isotopes During Lipid-Biosynthesis By Haloarcula marismortui

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirghangi, S. S.; Pagani, M.

    2010-12-01

    Lipids form an important class of proxies for paleoclimatological research, and hydrogen isotope ratios of lipids are being increasingly used for understanding changes in the hydrological system. Proper understanding of hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis is therefore important and attention has been directed toward understanding the magnitude of hydrogen isotope fractionation that occurs during lipid biosynthesis in various organisms. Hydrogen isotope ratios of lipids depend on the hydrogen isotopic composition of the ambient water, hydrogen isotopic composition of NADPH used during biosynthesis, growth conditions, pathways of lipid biosynthesis, and substrates in the case of heterotrophic organisms. Recently it has been observed that NADPH contributes a significant part of the hydrogen in fatty acids synthesized by bacteria during heterotrophic growth (Zhang et al, 2009). As NADPH is formed by reduction of NADP+ during metabolism of substrates, different metabolic pathways form NADPH with different D/H ratios, which in turn results in variation in D/H ratios of lipids (Zhang et al, 2009). Therefore, substrates play a significant role in hydrogen isotopic compositions of lipids. For this study, we are investigating the effects of substrates on hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis of isoprenoidal lipids by heterotrophically growing halophilic archaea. Haloarcula marismortui is a halophilic archaea which synthesizes Archaeol (a diether lipid) and other isoprenoidal lipids. We have grown Haloarcula marismortui in pure cultures on three different substrates and are in the process of evaluating isotopic variability of Archaeol and other lipids associated with substrate and the D/H composition of ambient water. Our results will be helpful for a better understanding of hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid synthesis by archaea. Also, halophilic archaea are the only source of archaeol in hypersaline environments. Therefore, our

  19. Continuum model of non-equilibrium solvation and solvent effect on ultra-fast processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiangyuan; Fu Kexiang; Zhu Quan

    2006-01-01

    In the past 50 years, non-equilibrium solvation theory for ultra-fast processes such as electron transfer and light absorption/emission has attracted particular interest. A great deal of research efforts was made in this area and various models which give reasonable qualitative descriptions for such as solvent reorganization energy in electron transfer and spectral shift in solution, were developed within the framework of continuous medium theory. In a series of publications by the authors, we clarified that the expression of the non-equilibrium electrostatic free energy that is at the dominant position of non-equilibrium solvation and serves as the basis of various models, however, was incorrectly formulated. In this work, the authors argue that reversible charging work integration was inappropriately applied in the past to an irreversible path linking the equilibrium or the non-equilibrium state. Because the step from the equilibrium state to the nonequilibrium state is factually thermodynamically irreversible, the conventional expression for non-equilibrium free energy that was deduced in different ways is unreasonable. Here the authors derive the non-equilibrium free energy to a quite different form according to Jackson integral formula. Such a difference throws doubts to the models including the famous Marcus two-sphere model for solvent reorganization energy of electron transfer and the Lippert-Mataga equation for spectral shift. By introducing the concept of 'spring energy' arising from medium polarizations, the energy constitution of the non-equilibrium state is highlighted. For a solute-solvent system, the authors separate the total electrostatic energy into different components: the self-energies of solute charge and polarized charge, the interaction energy between them and the 'spring energy' of the solvent polarization. With detailed reasoning and derivation, our formula for non-equilibrium free energy can be reached through different ways. Based on the

  20. Equilibrium Dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    context of antimicrobial therapy in malnutrition. Dialysis has in the past presented technical problems, being complicated and time-consuming. A new dialysis system based on the equilibrium technique has now become available, and it is the principles and practical application of this apparatus (Kontron Diapack; Kontron.

  1. Strategic Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.

    2000-01-01

    An outcome in a noncooperative game is said to be self-enforcing, or a strategic equilibrium, if, whenever it is recommended to the players, no player has an incentive to deviate from it.This paper gives an overview of the concepts that have been proposed as formalizations of this requirement and of

  2. Maximin equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new concept which extends von Neumann and Morgenstern's maximin strategy solution by incorporating `individual rationality' of the players. Maximin equilibrium, extending Nash's value approach, is based on the evaluation of the strategic uncertainty of the whole game. We show that

  3. The effect of time-dependent coupling on non-equilibrium steady states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Neidhardt, Hagen; Zagrebnov, Valentin

    Consider (for simplicity) two one-dimensional semi-infinite leads coupled to a quantum well via time dependent point interactions. In the remote past the system is decoupled, and each of its components is at thermal equilibrium. In the remote future the system is fully coupled. We define...... and compute the non equilibrium steady state (NESS) generated by this evolution. We show that when restricted to the subspace of absolute continuity of the fully coupled system, the state does not depend at all on the switching. Moreover, we show that the stationary charge current has the same invariant...

  4. The effect of time-dependent coupling on non-equilibrium steady states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Neidhardt, Hagen; Zagrebnov, Valentin A.

    2009-01-01

    Consider (for simplicity) two one-dimensional semi-infinite leads coupled to a quantum well via time dependent point interactions. In the remote past the system is decoupled, and each of its components is at thermal equilibrium. In the remote future the system is fully coupled. We define...... and compute the non equilibrium steady state (NESS) generated by this evolution. We show that when restricted to the subspace of absolute continuity of the fully coupled system, the state does not depend at all on the switching. Moreover, we show that the stationary charge current has the same invariant...

  5. Mechanistic studies on the bovine liver mitochondrial dihydroorotate dehydrogenase using kinetic deuterium isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, V.; Johnston, M.

    1989-01-01

    Dihydroorotates deuteriated at both C 5 and C 6 have been prepared and used to probe the mechanism of the bovine liver mitochondrial dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. Primary deuterium isotope effects on k cat are observed with both (6RS)-[5(S)- 2 H]- and (6RS)-[6- 2 H]dihydroorotates (3 and 6, respectively); these effects are maximal at low pH. At pH 6.6, D V = 3.4 for the C 5 -deuteriated dihydroorotate (3), and D V = 2.3 for the C 6 -deuteriated compound (6). The isotope effects approach unity at pH 8.8. Analysis of the pH dependence of the isotope effects on k cat reveals a shift in the rate-determining step of the enzyme mechanism as a function of pH. Dihydroorotate oxidation appears to require general base catalysis; this step is completely rate-determining at low pH and isotopically sensitive. Reduction of the cosubstrate, coenzyme Q 6 , is rate-limiting at high pH and is isotopically insensitive; this step appears to require general acid catalysis. The results of double isotope substitution studies and analysis for substrate isotope exchange with solvent point toward a concerted mechanism for oxidation of dihydroorotate. This finding serves to distinguish further the mammalian dehydrogenase from its parasitic cognate, which catalyzes a stepwise oxidation reaction

  6. Carbon isotope effects in carbohydrates and amino acids of photosynthesizing organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivlev, A.A.; Kaloshin, A.G.; Koroleva, M.Ya. (Ministerstvo Geologii SSR, Moscow)

    1982-02-10

    The analysis of the carbon isotope distribution in carbohydrates and amino acids of some photosynthesizing organisms revealed the close relationship between distribution and the pathways of biosynthesis of the molecules. This relationship is explained on the basis of the previously proposed mechanism of carbon isotope fractionation in a cell, in which the chief part is played by kinetic isotope effects in the pyruvate decarboxylation reaction progressively increased in the conjugated processes of gluconeogenesis. Isotope differences of C/sub 2/ and C/sub 3/ fragments arising in decarboxylation of pyruvate, as well as isotope differences of biogenic acceptor and environmental CO/sub 2/ appearing in assimilation are the main reasons of the observed intramolecular isotopic heterogeneity of biomolecules. The heterogeneity is preserved in metabolites owing to an incomplete mixing of carbon atoms in biochemical reactions. The probable existence of two pools of carbohydrates in photosynthesizing organisms different in isotopic composition is predicted. Two types of intramolecular isotope distribution in amino acids are shown.

  7. Effect of the magnetic isotope of magnesium, 25Mg, on post-radiation recovery of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodzinskij, D.M.; Evstyukhina, T.A.; Kol'tover, V.K.; Korolev, V.G.; Kutlakhmedov, Yu.A.; Grodzinskij, D.M.; Evstyukhina, T.A.; Kol'tover, V.K.; Korolev, V.G.; Kutlakhmedov, Yu.A.; Grodzinskij, D.M.; Evstyukhina, T.A.; Kol'tover, V.K.; Korolev, V.G.; Kutlakhmedov, Yu.A.

    2011-01-01

    Among three stable magnesium isotopes, 24 Mg, 25 Mg, and 26 Mg with natural abundance 79, 10, and 11%, only 25 Mg has the nuclear spin (I=5/2) and, therefore, the nuclear magnetic moment. Two other isotopes are spinless (I=0) and, hence, have no magnetic moment. We have revealed that magnetic isotope 25 Mg, by comparison to nonmagnetic isotope 24 Mg, essentially stimulates the recovery process in the yeast cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, after UV irradiation. Thus, we have first documented the magnetic isotope effect in radiation biology. This finding opens up the way to the development of novel radio-protectors based on the stable magnetic isotopes.

  8. Effect of dissolved organic matter on pre-equilibrium passive sampling: A predictive QSAR modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Jiang, Ruifen; Shen, Yong; Xiong, Yaxin; Hu, Sizi; Xu, Jianqiao; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2018-04-13

    Pre-equilibrium passive sampling is a simple and promising technique for studying sampling kinetics, which is crucial to determine the distribution, transfer and fate of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in environmental water and organisms. Environmental water samples contain complex matrices that complicate the traditional calibration process for obtaining the accurate rate constants. This study proposed a QSAR model to predict the sampling rate constants of HOCs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and pesticides) in aqueous systems containing complex matrices. A homemade flow-through system was established to simulate an actual aqueous environment containing dissolved organic matter (DOM) i.e. humic acid (HA) and (2-Hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin (β-HPCD)), and to obtain the experimental rate constants. Then, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model using Genetic Algorithm-Multiple Linear Regression (GA-MLR) was found to correlate the experimental rate constants to the system state including physicochemical parameters of the HOCs and DOM which were calculated and selected as descriptors by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Chem 3D. The experimental results showed that the rate constants significantly increased as the concentration of DOM increased, and the enhancement factors of 70-fold and 34-fold were observed for the HOCs in HA and β-HPCD, respectively. The established QSAR model was validated as credible (R Adj. 2 =0.862) and predictable (Q 2 =0.835) in estimating the rate constants of HOCs for complex aqueous sampling, and a probable mechanism was developed by comparison to the reported theoretical study. The present study established a QSAR model of passive sampling rate constants and calibrated the effect of DOM on the sampling kinetics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Studies of isotopic effects in the excited electronic states of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Rare gas halogen (RGH) lasers serve as convenient tools for a range of photophysical processes which exhibit isotope effects. This document summarizes progress in the production of molecular systems in their electronic excited states with the aid of RGH lasers, and the various isotopic effects one can study under these conditions. We conclude that the basic physical mechanisms involved in the isotopically sensitive characteristics of excited molecular electronic states are sufficiently selective to be useful in both the detection and separation of many atomic materials

  10. D/H isotope effects in π-complexes of deuterated hexamethylbenzenes with the nitrosonium cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodkin, G.I.; Elanov, I.R.; Shakirov, M.M.; Shubin, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    The isotope effects of deuterium, manifested in the 13 C NMR spectra of complexes of deuterated hexamethylbenzenes C 6 (CD 3 ) n ·(CH 3 ) 6-n with the nitrosonium cation, have been studied. The small values observed for the isotopic perturbation are evidence of π-bonding of the NO + group to the hexamethylbenzene molecule. The applicability of an additive scheme of calculation of isotope effects for the ring carbon atoms of the complexes, based on the increment of replacement of the CH 3 group by CD 3 in hexamethylbenzene, has been demonstrated

  11. Secondary partitioning isotope effects on solvolytic ion pair intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbey, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of N-benzhydryl N-nitrosobenzamide (BNB) has been shown to produce an ion pair which either forms ester or reacts with the solvent. In ethanol, the fraction of ester produced, R, was much smaller than R values obtained from solvolysis or from the diphenyldiazomethane (DDM)-benzoic acid reaction, which was suggested to yield the same ion pair as solvolysis. This difference led to the conclusion that the ionic species for the nitrosamide decomposition is a nitrogen-separated ion pair. This study was initiated on the assumption that BNB led to solvolytic ion pairs, but that both the intimate and solvent-separated ion pairs were produced directly from the nitrosamide. The use of α-tritiated BNB for the study of partitioning isotope effects (PIE's) in this system led to activity ratios much lower than expected from other reported work. Results of studies of ''special'' salt effect were not consistent for all situations, but the results do suggest that the assumption that BNB leads to solvolytic ion pairs is probably valid. The investigation of the more stable p-methoxybenzhydryl benzoate system proved to be highly productive. The ester fraction produced, R, responded dramatically to the addition of common-ion as well as ''special'' salts. The functional relationship of R on salt concentration could be explained in terms of Winstein's solvolytic scheme where the intimate ion pair, the solvent-separated ion pair, and the dissociated ion were important. Tritium-labelled compounds were used for PIE studies on 3 different compounds, and three different methods of reaction are proposed

  12. Limits on the expression of enzyme-mediated solvent isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northrop, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    Steady-state analysis of primary solvent isotope effects on enzyme-catalyzed reactions, mediated by solvent-shielded di- or triprotic groups on the enzyme, yields equations describing the upper limit of intramolecular isotopic discrimation. For diprotic groups [P/sub H]/[P/sub D/] = 3k/sub H//k/sub D/ + 3), and for triprotic groups [P/sub H/]/[P/sub D/] = [7(k/sub H//k/sub D/ 2 = 10k/sub H/k/sub D/ + 1]/[(k/sub H//k/sub D/) 2 + 10k/sub H//k/sub D/ + 7]. Given a normal intrinsic isotope effect of k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 7, maximal isotopic discrimation in 50:50 H 2 O:D 2 O is therefore 2.2 and 3.3, respectively, versus 1.0 for a monoprotic group. Intermediate values of isotope discrimination may be interpreted with respect to distinguishing enzyme-mediated catalytic mechanisms from those of direct transfer between solvent and substrate, and to identifying mediating groups, by comparisons of isotopic discrimination at high and low concentrations of substrates and by reference to intrinsic and intermolecular isotope effects

  13. Solvent-dependent deuterium isotope effects in the 15N NMR spectra of an ammonium ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielogorska, E.; Jackowski, K.

    2000-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 15 N NMR chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants have been investigated for the 15 N enriched ammonium chloride (conc. 15 NH 4 + ion has been observed in water, methanol, ethanol and dimethylsulfoxide, while the 15 ND 4 + has been monitored in the analogous deuterated liquids. It is shown that the isotope effect in nitrogen chemical shifts ( 1 Δ 15 N( 2/1 H)), significantly different in various solvents, changes from -1.392 ppm in dimethylsulfoxide to -0.071 ppm in ethanol. The 1 J(N,H) and 1 J(N,D) coupling constants have been measured for acidic solutions under conditions of slow proton (or deuterium) exchange. The reduced coupling constants have been estimated to present isotope effects in the spin-spin coupling constants. The latter isotope effects are fairly small. (author)

  14. Effect of magnetic field on charge imbalance relaxation of non-equilibrium superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, Kazuki; Yagi, Ryuta

    2010-01-01

    We have studied relaxation of charge imbalance of non-equilibrium superconductivity in magnetic field. We found that excess current due to charge imbalance showed striking dependence on magnitude of magnetic field and its orientation. We discussed origin of the relaxation.

  15. Global low-frequency modes in weakly ionized magnetized plasmas: effects of equilibrium plasma rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosenko, P.; Pierre, Th.; Zagorodny, A.

    2004-01-01

    The linear and non-linear properties of global low-frequency oscillations in cylindrical weakly ionized magnetized plasmas are investigated analytically for the conditions of equilibrium plasma rotation. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental observations of rotating plasmas in laboratory devices, such as Mistral and Mirabelle in France, and KIWI in Germany. (authors)

  16. An Easy and Effective Demonstration of Enzyme Stereospecificity and Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdman, Chelsea; Dickman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme stereospecificity and equilibrium thermodynamics can be demonstrated using the coupling of two amino acid derivatives by Thermoase C160. This protease will catalyze peptide bond formation between Z-L-AspOH and L-PheOMe to form the Aspartame precursor Z-L-Asp-L-PheOMe. Reaction completion manifests itself by precipitation of the product. As…

  17. Distillation Separation of Hydrofluoric Acid and Nitric Acid from Acid Waste Using the Salt Effect on Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Sumoge, Iwao

    2011-03-01

    This study presents the distillation separation of hydrofluoric acid with use of the salt effect on the vapor-liquid equilibrium for acid aqueous solutions and acid mixtures. The vapor-liquid equilibrium of hydrofluoric acid + salt systems (fluorite, potassium nitrate, cesium nitrate) was measured using an apparatus made of perfluoro alkylvinylether. Cesium nitrate showed a salting-out effect on the vapor-liquid equilibrium of the hydrofluoric acid-water system. Fluorite and potassium nitrate showed a salting-in effect on the hydrofluoric acid-water system. Separation of hydrofluoric acid from an acid mixture containing nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid was tested by the simple distillation treatment using the salt effect of cesium nitrate (45 mass%). An acid mixture of nitric acid (5.0 mol · dm-3) and hydrofluoric acid (5.0 mol · dm-3) was prepared as a sample solution for distillation tests. The concentration of nitric acid in the first distillate decreased from 5.0 mol · dm-3 to 1.13 mol · dm-3, and the concentration of hydrofluoric acid increased to 5.41 mol · dm-3. This first distillate was further distilled without the addition of salt. The concentrations of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid in the second distillate were 7.21 mol · dm-3 and 0.46 mol · dm-3, respectively. It was thus found that the salt effect on vapor-liquid equilibrium of acid mixtures was effective for the recycling of acids from acid mixture wastes.

  18. Sweatshop equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Nancy H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a capability-augmented model of on the job search, in which sweatshop conditions stifle the capability of the working poor to search for a job while on the job. The augmented setting unveils a sweatshop equilibrium in an otherwise archetypal Burdett-Mortensen economy, and reconciles a number of oft noted yet perplexing features of sweatshop economies. We demonstrate existence of multiple rational expectation equilibria, graduation pathways out of sweatshops in complete abs...

  19. Effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunde [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Laboratory of Basin Hydrology and Wetland Eco-restoration, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhou, Aiguo, E-mail: aiguozhou@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • The effect of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation was evaluated. • The enrichment factors was independent concentration of NO{sub 3}{sup −}, or SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}. • Cl{sup −} significantly influenced the carbon isotope fractionation. - Abstract: Understanding the magnitude and variability in isotope fractionation with respect to specific processes is crucial to the application of stable isotopic analysis as a tool to infer and quantify transformation processes. The variability of carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of different inorganic ions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride), was investigated to evaluate the potential effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope enrichment factor (ε value). A comparison of ε values obtained in deionized water, nitrate solution, and sulfate solution demonstrated that the ε values were identical and not affected by the presence of nitrate and sulfate. In the presence of chloride, however, the ε values (ranging from −6.3 ± 0.8 to 10 ± 1.3‰) were variable and depended on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of TCE. Thus, caution should be exercised in selecting appropriate ε values for the field application of stable isotope analysis, as various chloride concentrations may be present due to naturally present or introduced with pH adjustment and iron salts during Fenton-like remediation. Furthermore, the effects of chloride on carbon isotope fractionation may be able to provide new insights about reaction mechanisms of Fenton-like processes.

  20. Effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation was evaluated. • The enrichment factors was independent concentration of NO_3"−, or SO_4"2"−. • Cl"− significantly influenced the carbon isotope fractionation. - Abstract: Understanding the magnitude and variability in isotope fractionation with respect to specific processes is crucial to the application of stable isotopic analysis as a tool to infer and quantify transformation processes. The variability of carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of different inorganic ions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride), was investigated to evaluate the potential effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope enrichment factor (ε value). A comparison of ε values obtained in deionized water, nitrate solution, and sulfate solution demonstrated that the ε values were identical and not affected by the presence of nitrate and sulfate. In the presence of chloride, however, the ε values (ranging from −6.3 ± 0.8 to 10 ± 1.3‰) were variable and depended on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of TCE. Thus, caution should be exercised in selecting appropriate ε values for the field application of stable isotope analysis, as various chloride concentrations may be present due to naturally present or introduced with pH adjustment and iron salts during Fenton-like remediation. Furthermore, the effects of chloride on carbon isotope fractionation may be able to provide new insights about reaction mechanisms of Fenton-like processes.

  1. Isotope effects in interstellar molecules by chemical hyperfine interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberkorn, R.; Michel-Beyerle, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    If free radicals recombine on grain surfaces, not only the different masses of isotopes but also their differing nuclear spin moments (e.g. 12 C/ 13 C, 14 N/ 15 N, 17 O/ 18 O) may imply variations in the recombination probability due to hyperfine interaction. This mechanism has not been accounted for so far. (orig.) [de

  2. Solvent isotope effect on the fluorescence of azoalkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirbach, M.J.; Mirbach, M.F.; Cherry, W.R.; Turro, N.J.; Engel, P.

    1977-01-01

    A study of fluorescence quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes of two cyclic azoalkanes reveal a striking dependence of phisub(F) and tausub(F) on solvent and on isotopic substitution (OH → OD). A mechanism involving specific deactivation of the fluorescent state from a hydrogen bonded complex is proposed to rationalize the data. (orig./HK) [de

  3. Radioactive isotope and isomer separation with using light induced drift effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hradecny, C.; Slovak, J.; Tethal, T.; Ermolaev, I.M.; Shalagin, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The isotope separation with using light induced drift (LID) is discussed. The basic theoretical characteristics of the method are deduced: separation simultaneously with an arbitrary high enrichment and without significant losses; separation productivity up to 100 μg/h. These characteristics are sufficient and very convenient for separation of expensive radioactive isotopes and isomers which are applied in medicine and science. The first experimental separation of the radioactive isotopes ( 22,24 Na) by using the LID effect is reported. 13 refs.; 5 figs

  4. Transition-state structure in the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase reaction: the magnitude of solvent and alpha-secondary hydrogen isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, K.M.; Creighton, D.J.; Klinman, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Solvent and alpha-secondary isotope effects have been measured in the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase reaction, under conditions of a rate-limiting transfer of hydrogen between coenzyme and substrate. Determination of catalytic constants in H20 and D20 as a function of pH(D) has allowed the separation of solvent effects on pKa from kcat. The small effect of D20 on pKa is tentatively assigned to ionization of an active-site ZnOH 2 . The near absence of an isotope effect on kcat in the direction of alcohol oxidation rules out a mechanism involving concerted catalysis by an active-site base of hydride transfer. The near identity of kinetic and equilibrium alpha-secondary isotope effects in the direction of alcohol oxidation implicates a transition-state structure which resembles aldehyde with regard to bond hybridization properties. The result contrasts sharply with previously reported structure - reactivity correlations, which implicate a transition-state structure resembling alcohol with regard to charge properties. The significance of these findings to the mechanism of NAD(P)H-dependent redox reactions is discussed

  5. Effect of temperature on equilibrium and thermodynamic parameters of Cd (II) adsorption onto turmeric powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayoom, A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Batch adsorption of Cd (II) onto turmeric powder was conducted as a function of temperature. Nonlinear Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevish (D-R) and Temkin equilibrium models were employed. In addition to R 2, five different error functions were used to determine best fit equilibrium isotherm model. It was found that Freundlich isotherm model provided better fit for adsorption data at 298 and 303 K and Langmuir model was suitable for the experimental data obtained at 310 and 313 K. It was found that increase in temperature decreased maximum adsorption capacities, showing that the adsorption of Cd (II) onto turmeric powder is exothermic. Enthalpy values also confirmed the same trend. Entropy values were negative which means that randomness decreased on increasing temperature. Gibbs free energies were non spontaneous at all the temperatures studied. E values were in the range of 2.73-3.23 kJ mol/sup -1/ which indicated that adsorption mechanism is essentially physical. (author)

  6. An investigation of non-equilibrium effects in thermal argon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosado, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis deals with the study of the validity of the assumption of Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) in the description of the parameters of a thermal argon plasma. The aim is twofold. As the studied plasma is close to, but not completely in equilibrium, the author first attempts to obtain a simple description of the plasma in terms of an LTE model in which suitable corrections for the deviations of the plasma parameters from their LTE values is introduced. To this end the plasma parameters are studied by means of a diagnostic method in which the assumption of LTE is not made. The evaluation of the usefulness of this method is the second aim of this thesis. (Auth.)

  7. Analyzing the Effects of Technological Change: A Computable General Equilibrium Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    present important simplifying assumptions about the nature of consumer preferences and production possibility sets. If a general equilibrium model...important assumptions are in such areas as consumer preferences , the actions of the government, and the financial structure of the model. Each of these is...back in the future. 4.3.2 Consumer demand Consumer preferences are a second important modeling assumption affecting the results of the study. The PILOT

  8. Effects of Risk Aversion on Market Outcomes: A Stochastic Two-Stage Equilibrium Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazempour, Jalal; Pinson, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates how different risk preferences of electricity producers alter the market-clearing outcomes. Toward this goal, we propose a stochastic equilibrium model for electricity markets with two settlements, i.e., day-ahead and balancing, in which a number of conventional and stochastic...... by its optimality conditions, resulting in a mixed complementarity problem. Numerical results from a case study based on the IEEE one-area reliability test system are derived and discussed....

  9. Effect of synthesis parameters on polymethacrylic acid xerogel structures and equilibrium swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panić, V.; Jovanović, J.; Adnadjević, B.; Velicković, S.

    2009-09-01

    Hydrogels based on crosslinked polymethacrylic acid were synthesized via free-radical polymerization in aqueous solution, using N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide as a crosslinking agent and 2,2'-azobis-[2-(2-imidazolin-2-yl)propane] dihydrochloride as an initiator. The influence of the reaction parameters (the neutralization degree of methacrylic acid and the initial monomer concentration) on the equilibrium swelling degree, the swelling kinetic parameters and the basic structural properties of xerogels was investigated. The change of synthesis parameters leads to the change of the basic structural parameters of xerogel, as well as the equilibrium swelling degree and the initial swelling rate of the hydrogels. It is found that there are power form relationships between the equilibrium swelling degree, the initial swelling rate and the structural xerogel’s properties and the change of the neutralization degree of monomer, i.e. the monomer concentration. The examined correlations proved that the crosslinking density is the crucial parameter which determines all the other investigated structural and swelling parameters.

  10. Temperature and Pressure Depences on the Isotopic Fractionation Effect in the Thermal Decomposition of Ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Ju Kim

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available To understand the mass-independent isotopic fractionation effects, thermal decomposition of ozone was performed. Initial oxygen gas was converted to ozone completely. Then, the ozone was decomposed to oxygen at various temperatures(30~150C. Isotopic compositions of product oxygen and residual ozone were measured using a stable isotope mass spectrometer. The experimental results were compared with the studies which were peformed at the similar conditions. From the raw experimental data, the functions of the instantaneous fractionation factors were calculated by the least square fit. The results clearly showed the temperature dependence. They also showed the pressure dependence and the surface effect. This study may play an important role in the study of ozone decomposition mechanism. It can be applied to explain the mass-independent isotopic pattern found in stratospheric ozone and in meteorites.

  11. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  12. Mechanistic investigations of the hydrolysis of amides, oxoesters and thioesters via kinetic isotope effects and positional isotope exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lori I; Fogle, Emily J; Marlier, John F

    2015-11-01

    The hydrolysis of amides, oxoesters and thioesters is an important reaction in both organic chemistry and biochemistry. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are one of the most important physical organic methods for determining the most likely transition state structure and rate-determining step of these reaction mechanisms. This method induces a very small change in reaction rates, which, in turn, results in a minimum disturbance of the natural mechanism. KIE studies were carried out on both the non-enzymatic and the enzyme-catalyzed reactions in an effort to compare both types of mechanisms. In these studies the amides and esters of formic acid were chosen because this molecular structure allowed development of methodology to determine heavy-atom solvent (nucleophile) KIEs. This type of isotope effect is difficult to measure, but is rich in mechanistic information. Results of these investigations point to transition states with varying degrees of tetrahedral character that fit a classical stepwise mechanism. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Isotopic incorporation and the effects of fasting and dietary lipid content on isotopic discrimination in large carnivorous mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D.; Stricker, Craig A.; Erlenbach, Joy; Robbins, Charles T.; Cherry, Seth; Newsome, Seth D.; Cutting, Amy; Jensen, Shannon; Stenhouse, Gordon; Brooks, Matt; Hash, Amy; Nicassio, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable emphasis on understanding isotopic discrimination for diet estimation in omnivores. However, discrimination may differ for carnivores, particularly species that consume lipid-rich diets. Here, we examined the potential implications of several factors when using stable isotopes to estimate the diets of bears, which can consume lipid-rich diets and, alternatively, fast for weeks to months. We conducted feeding trials with captive brown bears (Ursus arctos) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus). As dietary lipid content increased to ∼90%, we observed increasing differences between blood plasma and diets that had not been lipid extracted (∆13Ctissue-bulk diet) and slightly decreasing differences between plasma δ13C and lipid-extracted diet. Plasma Δ15Ntissue-bulk diet increased with increasing protein content for the four polar bears in this study and data for other mammals from previous studies that were fed purely carnivorous diets. Four adult and four yearling brown bears that fasted 120 d had plasma δ15N values that changed by <±2‰. Fasting bears exhibited no trend in plasma δ13C. Isotopic incorporation in red blood cells and whole blood was ≥6 mo in subadult and adult bears, which is considerably longer than previously measured in younger and smaller black bears (Ursus americanus). Our results suggest that short-term fasting in carnivores has minimal effects on δ13C and δ15N discrimination between predators and their prey but that dietary lipid content is an important factor directly affecting δ13C discrimination and indirectly affecting δ15N discrimination via the inverse relationship with dietary protein content.

  14. Normal coordinate treatment of liquid water and calculation of vapor pressure isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gellai, B.; Van Hook, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    A vibrational analysis of liquid water is reported, assuming a completely hydrogen-bonded network with continuously varying strengths of the hydrogen bonds. Frequency distribution calculations are made for intramolecular stretching and bending modes and for the intramolecular frequency region. The calculated distributions are compared with the experimental spectroscopic ones. As another test, vapor pressure isotope effects are calculated from the theoretical distributions for some isotopic water molecules. Results are compared with those of other authors obtained from a mixture model. (author)

  15. Overview of equilibrium reconstruction on DIII-D using new measurements from an expanded motional Stark effect diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, C; Makowski, M; Allen, S; Meyer, W; Van Zeeland, M

    2008-01-01

    Motional Stark effect (MSE) measurements constrain equilibrium reconstruction of DIII-D tokamak plasmas using the equilibrium code EFIT. In 2007, two new MSE arrays were brought online, bringing the system to three core arrays, two edge arrays, and 64 total channels. We present the first EFIT reconstructions using this expanded system. Safety factor and E R profiles produced by fitting to data from the two new arrays and one of the other three agree well with independent measurements. Comparison of the data from the three arrays that view the core shows that one of the older arrays is inconsistent with the other two unless the measured calibration factors for this array are adjusted. The required adjustments depend on toroidal field and plasma current direction, and on still other uncertain factors that change as the plasma evolves. We discuss possible sources of calibration error for this array

  16. Precipitation in as-solidified undercooled Ni-Si hypoeutectic alloy: Effect of non-equilibrium solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Kai; Liu Feng; Yang Gencang; Zhou Yaohe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The solid solubility of Si atom in α-Ni matrix increased with undercooling in the as-solidified sample. → The effect of non-equilibrium solidification on precipitation has been theoretically described. → The nucleation density, the real-time particle size and the precipitation rate are all increased upon annealing. → The precipitate process can be artificially controlled by modifying the initial melt undercooling and the annealing time. - Abstract: Applying glass fluxing and cyclic superheating, high undercooling up to ∼350 K was achieved for Ni-Si hypoeutectic alloy melt. By isothermally annealing the as-solidified alloy subjected to different undercoolings, precipitation behavior of Ni 3 Si particle, at 973 K, was systematically studied. It was found that, the nucleation density and the real-time particle size, as well as the precipitation rate, were all increased, provided the sample was solidified subjected to higher undercooling. This was ascribed mainly to the increased solid solubility of Si atom in α-Ni matrix upon non-equilibrium solidification. On this basis, the non-equilibrium dendrite growth upon solidification and the soft impingement prevailing upon solid-state precipitation have been quantitatively connected. As such, the effect of liquid/solid transformation on subsequent precipitation was described.

  17. Precipitation in as-solidified undercooled Ni-Si hypoeutectic alloy: Effect of non-equilibrium solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Kai [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Liu Feng, E-mail: liufeng@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Yang Gencang; Zhou Yaohe [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China)

    2011-08-25

    Highlights: {yields} The solid solubility of Si atom in {alpha}-Ni matrix increased with undercooling in the as-solidified sample. {yields} The effect of non-equilibrium solidification on precipitation has been theoretically described. {yields} The nucleation density, the real-time particle size and the precipitation rate are all increased upon annealing. {yields} The precipitate process can be artificially controlled by modifying the initial melt undercooling and the annealing time. - Abstract: Applying glass fluxing and cyclic superheating, high undercooling up to {approx}350 K was achieved for Ni-Si hypoeutectic alloy melt. By isothermally annealing the as-solidified alloy subjected to different undercoolings, precipitation behavior of Ni{sub 3}Si particle, at 973 K, was systematically studied. It was found that, the nucleation density and the real-time particle size, as well as the precipitation rate, were all increased, provided the sample was solidified subjected to higher undercooling. This was ascribed mainly to the increased solid solubility of Si atom in {alpha}-Ni matrix upon non-equilibrium solidification. On this basis, the non-equilibrium dendrite growth upon solidification and the soft impingement prevailing upon solid-state precipitation have been quantitatively connected. As such, the effect of liquid/solid transformation on subsequent precipitation was described.

  18. Equilibrium Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Anderlini; Daniele Terlizzese

    2009-01-01

    We build a simple model of trust as an equilibrium phenomenon, departing from standard "selfish" preferences in a minimal way. Agents who are on the receiving end of an other to transact can choose whether to cheat and take away the entire surplus, taking into account a "cost of cheating." The latter has an idiosyncratic component (an agent's type), and a socially determined one. The smaller the mass of agents who cheat, the larger the cost of cheating suffered by those who cheat. Depending o...

  19. Effectiveness of different pre-treatments in recovering pre-burial isotopic ratios of charred plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkkemper, O; Braadbaart, F; van Os, B; van Hoesel, A; van Brussel, A A N; Fernandes, R

    2018-02-15

    Isotopic analysis of archaeological charred plant remains offers useful archaeological information. However, adequate sample pre-treatment protocols may be necessary to provide a contamination-free isotopic signal while limiting sample loss and achieving a high throughput. Under these constraints, research was undertaken to compare the performance of different pre-treatment protocols. Charred archaeological plant material was selected for isotopic analysis (δ 13 C and δ 15 N values) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry from a variety of plant species, time periods and soil conditions. Preservation conditions and the effectiveness of cleaning protocols were assessed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry. An acid-base-acid protocol, successfully employed in radiocarbon dating, was used to define a contamination-free isotopic reference. Acid-base-acid isotopic measurements were compared with those obtained from untreated material and an acid-only protocol. The isotopic signals of untreated material and the acid-only protocol typically did not differ more than 1‰ from those of the acid-base-acid reference. There were no significant isotopic offsets between acid-base-acid and acid-only or untreated samples. Sample losses in the acid-base-acid protocol were on average 50 ± 17% (maximum = 98.4%). Elemental XRF measurements showed promising results in the detection of more contaminated samples albeit with a high rate of false positives. For the large range of preservation conditions described in the study, untreated charred plant samples, water cleaned of sediments, provide reliable stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen. The use of pre-treatments may be necessary under different preservation conditions or more conservative measurement uncertainties should be reported. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The effective management of medical isotope production in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, D.T.

    1993-01-01

    During the 50-yr history of the use of radioisotopes for medical applications, research reactors have played a pivotal role in the production of many if not most of the key products. The marriage between research reactors and production operations is subject to significant challenges on two fronts. The medical applications of the radioisotope products impose some unique constraints and requirements on the production process. In addition, the mandates and priorities of a research reactor are not always congruent with the demands of a production environment. This paper briefly reviews the historical development of medical isotope production, identifies the unique challenges facing this endeavor, and discusses the management of the relationship between the isotope producer and the research reactor operator. Finally, the key elements of a successful relationship are identified

  1. Investigating the effects of abyssal peridotite alteration on Si, Mg and Zn isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, P. S.; Wimpenny, J.; Harvey, J.; Yin, Q.; Moynier, F.

    2013-12-01

    Around 1/3 of Earth's divergent ridge system is now classified as "slow" spreading [1], exposing ultramafic rocks (abyssal peridotites) at the seafloor. Such material is often highly altered by serpentinisation and steatisation (talc formation). It is crucial to understand such processes in order to access the original composition of the mantle, and to quantify any impact on ocean composition. Here we examine the effect of both serpentinisation and steatisation on Si, Mg and Zn isotopes. Hydrothermal alteration and seafloor weathering are both sources of oceanic Si [2] and weathering of abyssal peridotites is a source of oceanic Mg [3]; hence isotopic fractionation as a result of seafloor alteration could affect oceanic Si and Mg isotope composition. Zinc isotopes can provide complimentary information; the magnitude and direction of fractionation is highly dependent on complexing ligand [4] and can provide compositional information on the fluids driving metasomatism. For this study, two cores from the well-characterised abyssal peridotites recovered on ODP Leg 209 were examined [5]. Hole 1274a peridotites exhibit variable serpentinisation at ~200°C, whereas samples from Hole 1268a have been comprehensively serpentinised and then subsequently steatised to talc facies at ~350°C, by a low Mg/Si, low pH fluid. The Si, Mg and Zn isotope compositions of 1274a samples are extremely homogeneous, identical to that of pristine mantle rocks (BSE) i.e., serpentinisation at this locality was predominantly isochemical [5]. In contrast, samples from 1268a show greater isotopic variability. In all samples, Mg is enriched in the heavier isotopes relative to BSE, consistent with formation of isotopically heavy secondary phases [6]. For Si, serpentinised samples are slightly enriched in the lighter isotopes compared to BSE, again consistent with the behaviour of Si during formation of secondary phases [7]. Within the steatised samples, some exhibit enrichments in the lighter Si

  2. ICP-MS as the method of the determination of gallium, indium and thallium isotope ratios in the studies of isotope effects in the chromatography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herdzik, I.

    2006-01-01

    The procedure of the determination of gallium, indium and thallium isotope ratios and its application to the studies of the isotope effects in chromatography systems by the ICP-MS method (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry) are presented. It was shown that it is possible to determine the isotope ratios of gallium ( 69/71 Ga), indium ( 113/115 In) and thallium ( 203/205 Tl) with the relative standard deviation 0.03-0.07%. Such precision appeared to be sufficient to calculate the unit separation factors in the column chromatographic processes. (author) [pl

  3. Calculation of carbon-14, chlorine-37, and deuterium kinetic isotope effects in the solvolysis of tert-butyl chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, G.W.; Sims, L.B.; Wilson, J.C.; Fry, A.

    1977-01-01

    In the solvolysis of tert-butyl chloride, satisfactory α-carbon-14, β-deuterium, and chlorine kinetic isotope effects (KIE) may be calculated for a productlike transition state characterized by bond orders n/sub C Cl/ = 0.2, n/sub C C/ = 1.18, and n/sub C H/ = 0.94, employing a diagonal valence force field, provided that allowance is made for hydrogen-bonded solvation of the developing chloride ion with n/sub Cl H/ approx. 0.05 (approx. 7 kcal/mole hydrogen bonds). The effect of the three solvating molecules appears to be to increase the ''effective'' mass of the incipient chloride ion and to decrease the loss of zero-point energy in going to the transition state. Reaction coordinates more complicated than a simple heterolysis of the carbon-chlorine bond appear to be unnecessary and there is no advantage in employing force fields more complex than a simple valence force field containing only diagonal elements for both the reactant and the transition state model. The structural and bonding features of the proposed transition state are in accord with earlier more qualitative conclusions concerning the polar nature and productlike character of the transition state, and provide a reasonable explanation of the kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects (EIE) for the reaction. An alternative transition state model involving weak solvent nucleophilic assistance provides reasonable calculated values for the KIE, but the EIE strongly suggest the importance of solvation of the leaving group which, together with the hyperconjugation of the β hydrogens, provides a preferred explanation of the tert-butyl solvolysis results

  4. Effects of the buffering capacity of the soil on the mobilization of heavy metals. Equilibrium and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villen-Guzman, Maria; Paz-Garcia, Juan M; Amaya-Santos, Gema; Rodriguez-Maroto, Jose M; Vereda-Alonso, Carlos; Gomez-Lahoz, Cesar

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the possible pH-buffering processes is of maximum importance for risk assessment and remediation feasibility studies of heavy-metal contaminated soils. This paper presents the results about the effect of the buffering capacity of a polluted soil, rich in carbonates, on the pH and on the leaching evolution of its main contaminant (lead) when a weak acid (acetic acid) or a strong one (nitric acid) are slowly added. In both cases, the behavior of lead dissolution could be predicted using available (scientifically verified freeware) models assuming equilibrium between the solid and the aqueous phase. However, the experimental results indicate that the dissolution of calcium and magnesium carbonates is kinetically controlled. These kinetic limitations affect the overall behavior, and should be considered to understand also the response of the metals under local equilibrium. The well-known BCR sequential extraction procedure was used before- and after-treatment, to fractionate the lead concentration in the soil according to its mobility. The BCR results were also in agreement with the predictions of the equilibrium model. This agreement allows new insights about the information that could be derived from the BCR fractionation analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of massive graviton on the equilibrium between the black hole and radiation gas in an isolated box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Peng Hu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the black hole can have temperature and radiate the particles with black body spectrum, i.e. Hawking radiation. Therefore, if the black hole is surrounded by an isolated box, there is a thermal equilibrium between the black hole and radiation gas. A simple case considering the thermal equilibrium between the Schwarzschild black hole and radiation gas in an isolated box has been well investigated previously in detail, i.e. taking the conservation of energy and principle of maximal entropy for the isolated system into account. In this paper, following the above spirit, the effects of massive graviton on the thermal equilibrium will be investigated. For the gravity with massive graviton, we will use the de Rham–Gabadadze–Tolley (dRGT massive gravity which has been proven to be ghost free. Because the graviton mass depends on two parameters in the dRGT massive gravity, here we just investigate two simple cases related to the two parameters, respectively. Our results show that in the first case the massive graviton can suppress or increase the condensation of black hole in the radiation gas although the T–E diagram is similar as the Schwarzschild black hole case. For the second case, a new T–E diagram has been obtained. Moreover, an interesting and important prediction is that the condensation of black hole just increases from the zero radius of horizon in this case, which is very different from the Schwarzschild black hole case.

  6. Effect of second spherical cations on ionic equilibrium displacement of pentavalent tantalum complexes in fluoride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agulyanskij, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    The melts of the systems M 2 TaF 7 -MF (where M-Na, K, Rb) and CsTaF 4 -CsF are investigated at 850 deg using the method of IR spectroscopy. It is shown that ion equilibrium TaF 7 2- reversible TaF 6 - +F - is shifted to the left when sodium to cesium electrolytes are used. The change of vibrational frequencies of TaF 7 2- and TaF 6 - ions is explained by the change of the ratio of ion and covalent contributions to the interaction energy in the inner and outer spheres of coordination in pentavalent tantalum

  7. Effect of Initial Moisture on the Adsorption and Desorption Equilibrium Moisture Contents of Polished Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Murata, Satoshi; Amaratunga, K.S.P.; Tanaka, Fumihiko; Hori, Yoshiaki; 村田, 敏; 田中, 史彦; 堀, 善昭

    1993-01-01

    The moisture adsorption and desorption properties for polished rice have been measured using a dynamic ventilatory method. Air temperatures of 10,20,30 and 40℃, relative humidities of 50,60,70,80 and 90%, and five levels of initial moisture contents ranging approximately from 8% to 19% d.b. were used to obtain moisture content data. The value of equilibrium moisture content for each initial moisture content at the range of air condition was determined by a method of nonlinear least squares. R...

  8. Economic effects of a carbon tax: with a general equilibrium illustration for Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proost, S.; Regemorter, D. Van

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility and efficiency arguments of an international and a national carbon tax are analysed. It is argued that an internationally organized carbon tax can be a good instrument for implementing an international CO 2 abatement strategy. Less efficient instruments like national CO 2 reduction emission objectives are more likely to be implemented. A national carbon tax is analysed as a policy instrument to reach such an internationally agreed national CO 2 emission reduction objective. This is done for Belgium using a dynamic general equilibrium model. (author)

  9. Chemical Ligation and Isotope Labeling to Locate Dynamic Effects during Catalysis by Dihydrofolate Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Louis Y P; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Adesina, Aduragbemi S; Loveridge, E Joel; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vincent; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2015-07-27

    Chemical ligation has been used to alter motions in specific regions of dihydrofolate reductase from E. coli and to investigate the effects of localized motional changes on enzyme catalysis. Two isotopic hybrids were prepared; one with the mobile N-terminal segment containing heavy isotopes ((2) H, (13) C, (15) N) and the remainder of the protein with natural isotopic abundance, and the other one with only the C-terminal segment isotopically labeled. Kinetic investigations indicated that isotopic substitution of the N-terminal segment affected only a physical step of catalysis, whereas the enzyme chemistry was affected by protein motions from the C-terminal segment. QM/MM studies support the idea that dynamic effects on catalysis mostly originate from the C-terminal segment. The use of isotope hybrids provides insights into the microscopic mechanism of dynamic coupling, which is difficult to obtain with other studies, and helps define the dynamic networks of intramolecular interactions central to enzyme catalysis. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  10. Radioactive Emissions from Fission-Based Medical Isotope Production and Their Effect on Global Nuclear Explosion Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, T.; Saey, P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of medical isotopes, such as Tc-99m, is widespread with over 30 million procedures being performed every year, but the fission-based production of isotopes used for medical procedures causes emissions into the environment. This paper will show that gaseous radioactive isotopes of xenon, such as Xe-133, are released in high quantities, because they have a high fission cross section and they are difficult to scrub from the processes used to produce the medical isotopes due to their largely unreactive nature. Unfortunately, the reasons that large amounts of radioactive xenon isotopes are emitted from isotope production are the same as those that make these isotopes the most useful isotopes for the detection of underground nuclear explosions. Relatively recently, the nuclear explosion monitoring community has established a provisional monitoring network for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) that includes radioactive xenon monitoring as a major component. This community has discovered that emissions from medical isotope production present a more serious problem to nuclear explosion monitoring than thought when the network was first conceived. To address the growing problem, a group of scientists in both the monitoring and the isotope production communities have come together to attempt to find scientific and pragmatic ways to address the emissions problems, recognizing that medical isotope production should not be adversely affected, while monitoring for nuclear explosions should remain effective as isotope production grows, changes, and spreads globally. (author)

  11. Isotope effects in the evaporation of water: a status report of the Craig-Gordon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Juske; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Cohen, Shabtai

    2008-03-01

    The Craig-Gordon model (C-G model) [H. Craig, L.I. Gordon. Deuterium and oxygen 18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. In Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperatures, E. Tongiorgi (Ed.), pp. 9-130, Laboratorio di Geologia Nucleare, Pisa (1965).] has been synonymous with the isotope effects associated with the evaporation of water from surface waters, soils, and vegetations, which in turn constitutes a critical component of the global water cycle. On the occasion of the four decades of its successful applications to isotope geochemistry and hydrology, an attempt is made to: (a) examine its physical background within the framework of modern evaporation models, (b) evaluate our current knowledge of the environmental parameters of the C-G model, and (c) comment on a general strategy for the use of these parameters in field applications. Despite its simplistic representation of evaporation processes at the water-air interface, the C-G model appears to be adequate to provide the isotopic composition of the evaporation flux. This is largely due to its nature for representing isotopic compositions (a ratio of two fluxes of different isotopic water molecules) under the same environmental conditions. Among many environmental parameters that are included in the C-G model, accurate description and calculations are still problematic of the kinetic isotope effects that occur in a diffusion-dominated thin layer of air next to the water-air interface. In field applications, it is of importance to accurately evaluate several environmental parameters, particularly the relative humidity and isotopic compositions of the 'free-atmosphere', for a system under investigation over a given time-scale of interest (e.g., hourly to daily to seasonally). With a growing interest in the studies of water cycles of different spatial and temporal scales, including paleoclimate and water resource studies, the importance and utility of the C-G model is also likely to

  12. Isotope effect study of κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu(NCS)2: Labeling in the anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kini, A.M.; Wang, H.H.; Schlueter, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Since the initial discovery of organic superconductivity in 1979, a large number of organic superconductors have now been synthesized. However, the mechanism of electron-pairing in these novel superconductors has remained largely unresolved. Isotope effect studies constitute an important experimental tool for the investigation of whether or not the electron-pairing mechanism in organic superconductors is phonon-mediated, as in conventional superconductors. Recent isotope effect studies in the authors' laboratory, involving seven different isotopically labeled BEDT-TTF (or ET) derivatives, have demonstrated the following: (1) intramolecular phonon modes involving C double-bond C and Csingle bondS stretching vibrations in the ET donor molecule are not the dominant mediators of electron-pairing, and (2) in κ-(ET) 2 Cu(NCS) 2 , there exist two competing isotope effects--a normal mass effect, i.e., lowering of T c upon isotopic labeling, when the ET molecular mass is increased by concurrent 13 C and 34 S labeling, in addition to an inverse isotope effect upon deuterium labeling in ET. It is of great interest to investigate if there is an isotope effect when the charge-compensating anions, which are also located within the non-conducting layer in the superconducting cation-radical salts, are isotopically labeled. The existence of an isotope effect when the anions are labeled would be indicative of electron-pairing with the mediation of vibrational frequencies associated with the anions. In this paper, the authors present the results of the first isotope effect study in which isotopic labeling in the anion portion of κ-(ET) 2 Cu(NCS) 2 is carried out. The authors find no isotope effect when the carbon and nitrogen atoms of the thiocyanate groups in the anion are replaced with 13 C and 15 N isotopes

  13. Cl and C isotope analysis to assess the effectiveness of chlorinated ethene degradation by zero-valent iron: Evidence from dual element and product isotope values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audí-Miró, Carme; Cretnik, Stefan; Otero, Neus; Palau, Jordi; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Soler, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► TCE and cis-DCE Cl isotope fractionation was investigated for the first time with ZVI. ► A C–Cl bond is broken in the rate-limiting step during ethylene ZVI dechlorination. ► Dual C/Cl isotope plot is a promising tool to discriminate abiotic degradation. ► Product-related carbon isotopic fractionation gives evidence of abiotic degradation. ► Hydrogenolysis and β-dichloroelimination pathways occur simultaneously. - Abstract: This study investigated C and, for the first time, Cl isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) during reductive dechlorination by cast zero-valent iron (ZVI). Hydrogenolysis and β-dichloroelimination pathways occurred as parallel reactions, with ethene and ethane deriving from the β-dichloroelimination pathway. Carbon isotope fractionation of TCE and cis-DCE was consistent for different batches of Fe studied. Transformation of TCE and cis-DCE showed Cl isotopic enrichment factors (ε Cl ) of −2.6‰ ± 0.1‰ (TCE) and −6.2‰ ± 0.8‰ (cis-DCE), with Apparent Kinetic Isotope Effects (AKIE Cl ) for Cl of 1.008 ± 0.001 (TCE) and 1.013 ± 0.002 (cis-DCE). This indicates that a C–Cl bond breakage is rate-determining in TCE and cis-DCE transformation by ZVI. Two approaches were investigated to evaluate if isotope fractionation analysis can distinguish the effectiveness of transformation by ZVI as opposed to natural biodegradation. (i) Dual isotope plots. This study reports the first dual (C, Cl) element isotope plots for TCE and cis-DCE degradation by ZVI. The pattern for cis-DCE differs markedly from that reported for biodegradation of the same compound by KB-1, a commercially available Dehalococcoides-containing culture. The different trends suggest an expedient approach to distinguish abiotic and biotic transformation, but this needs to be confirmed in future studies. (ii) Product-related isotope fractionation. Carbon isotope ratios of the hydrogenolysis product cis

  14. Ab initio calculations of the Fe(II) and Fe(III) isotopic effects in citrates, nicotianamine, and phytosiderophore, and new Fe isotopic measurements in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Wang, Kun; Foriel, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant transition metal in higher plants and variations in its isotopic compositions can be used to trace its utilization. In order to better understand the effect of plant-induced isotopic fractionation on the global Fe cycling, we have estimated by quantum chemical calculations the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation between different Fe species relevant to the transport and storage of Fe in higher plants: Fe(II)-citrate, Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(II)-nicotianamine, and Fe(III)-phytosiderophore. The ab initio calculations show firstly, that Fe(II)-nicotianamine is ˜3‰ (56Fe/54Fe) isotopically lighter than Fe(III)-phytosiderophore; secondly, even in the absence of redox changes of Fe, change in the speciation alone can create up to ˜1.5‰ isotopic fractionation. For example, Fe(III)-phytosiderophore is up to 1.5‰ heavier than Fe(III)-citrate2 and Fe(II)-nicotianamine is up to 1‰ heavier than Fe(II)-citrate. In addition, in order to better understand the Fe isotopic fractionation between different plant components, we have analyzed the iron isotopic composition of different organs (roots, seeds, germinated seeds, leaves and stems) from six species of higher plants: the dicot lentil (Lens culinaris), and the graminaceous monocots Virginia wild rye (Elymus virginicus), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis), river oat (Uniola latifolia), and Indian goosegrass (Eleusine indica). The calculations may explain that the roots of strategy-II plants (Fe(III)-phytosiderophore) are isotopically heavier (by about 1‰ for the δ56Fe) than the upper parts of the plants (Fe transported as Fe(III)-citrate in the xylem or Fe(II)-nicotianamine in the phloem). In addition, we suggest that the isotopic variations observed between younger and older leaves could be explained by mixing of Fe received from the xylem and the phloem.

  15. Effects of body lean and visual information on the equilibrium maintenance during stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Marcos; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2002-09-01

    Maintenance of equilibrium was tested in conditions when humans assume different leaning postures during upright standing. Subjects ( n=11) stood in 13 different body postures specified by visual center of pressure (COP) targets within their base of support (BOS). Different types of visual information were tested: continuous presentation of visual target, no vision after target presentation, and with simultaneous visual feedback of the COP. The following variables were used to describe the equilibrium maintenance: the mean of the COP position, the area of the ellipse covering the COP sway, and the resultant median frequency of the power spectral density of the COP displacement. The variability of the COP displacement, quantified by the COP area variable, increased when subjects occupied leaning postures, irrespective of the kind of visual information provided. This variability also increased when vision was removed in relation to when vision was present. Without vision, drifts in the COP data were observed which were larger for COP targets farther away from the neutral position. When COP feedback was given in addition to the visual target, the postural control system did not control stance better than in the condition with only visual information. These results indicate that the visual information is used by the postural control system at both short and long time scales.

  16. In-situ observation of equilibrium transitions in Ni films; agglomeration and impurity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thron, Andrew M; Greene, Peter; Liu, Kai; van Benthem, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    Dewetting of ultra-thin Ni films deposited on SiO2 layers was observed, in cross-section, by in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy. Holes were observed to nucleate by voids which formed at the Ni/SiO2 interface rather than at triple junctions at the free surface of the Ni film. Ni islands were observed to retract, in attempt to reach equilibrium on the SiO2 layer. SiO2 layers with 120 nm thickness were found to limit in situ heating experiments due to poor thermal conductivity of SiO2. The formation of graphite was observed during the agglomeration of ultra-thin Ni films. Graphite was observed to wet both the free surface and the Ni/SiO2 interface of the Ni islands. Cr forms surface oxide layers on the free surface of the SiO2 layer and the Ni islands. Cr does not prevent the dewetting of Ni, however it will likely alter the equilibrium shape of the Ni islands. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Effects of anisotropy on the equilibrium shape of nanoscale pores at grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynblatt, Paul; Chatain, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the interaction between a faceted pore and an anisotropic grain boundary (GB). Nickel was chosen as a convenient model system. In order to establish the equilibrium crystal shape (ECS) of the pore, studies were also conducted on isolated pores. Isolated pores were found to be subject to the nucleation inhibition of equilibration that has been predicted by Rohrer et al. (J Am Ceram Soc 2000;83:214, 2001;84: 2099). This work shows that configurations close to the ECS can be obtained if supersaturation within a pore is artificially increased by adding mobile adatoms to the internal surfaces of the pores. In the case of pores located at GBs, the nucleation energy barriers to facet displacement are not present for facets in contact with the GB at the triple line, but may still persist for facets that have no contact with the GB. This problem can be overcome by approaching the equilibrium shape from different initial configurations. The configuration of the GB in the vicinity of the pore has been found to be essentially planar, indicating that GB puckering in the vicinity of anisotropic pores is not generally necessary. The present calculations show that incompatibilities between misoriented pore facets that meet at the triple line with the GB are easily accommodated by local atomic rearrangements at the disordered region of intersection with the GB

  18. Kinetic isotope effects and tunnelling in the proton-transfer reaction between 4-nitrophenylnitromethane and tetramethylguanidine in various aprotic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldin, E.F.; Mateo, S.

    1975-01-01

    Rates and equilibrium constants have been determined for the proton-transfer reaction of 4-nitrophenylnitromethane, NO 2 C 6 H 4 CH 2 NO 2 , and its αα-deuterated analogue NO 2 C 6 H 4 CD 2 NO 2 , with the strong base tetramethylguanidine [HN=C(NMe 2 ) 2 ), at temperatures between -60 0 C and +65 0 in a range of aprotic solvents. Spectrophotometry and the stopped-flow technique were used. The reaction is a simple proton-transfer process leading to an ion-pair. The kinetic isotope effects are correlated with the polarity of the solvents, as measured by the dielectric constant or by the empirical parameter Esub(T). In the less polar solvents they are exceptionally large. In toluene, for example, at 25 0 C the rate ratio ksup(H)/ksup(D) = 45 +- 2, the activation energy difference Esub(a)sup(D) - Esub(a)sup(H) =4.3 +- 0.3 kcal molsup(-1) (16 kJ molsup(-1), and the ratio of the pre-exponential factors logsub(10) (Asup(D)/Asup(H)) = 1.5 +- 0.2+ and even larger values of logsub(10)(Asup(D)/Asup(H)) are found for mesitylene (1.94 +- 0.06) and cyclohexane (2.4 +- 0.2). Positive deviations from linear Arrhenius plots are found for these solvents. Tunnelling is the only interpretation that cannot account for these results. For the more polar solvents (dielectric constant 7 to 37), the isotope effects are closer to the range predicted by semi-classical theory. The isotope effects in all solvents have been fitted to Bell's equation for a parabolic barrier, and the barrier dimensions calculated for each solvent. The suggested interpretation of the results is that the solvent-solute interactions affect the height of the barrier and that motions of solvent molecules are coupled with the motion of the proton in the more polar solvents but not in the less polar ones; reorganization of solvent molecules accompanies the proton-transfer in the more polar solvents, but only electron-polarization in the less polar. Tunnelling has large effects in the less polar solvents, where the

  19. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Mário J

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions. These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This new edit...

  20. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have measured the 13 C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D 2 O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D 2 O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The 13 C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the 13 C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier

  1. The stable isotope amount effect: New insights from NEXRAD echo tops, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Martha A.; Shanley, James B.; Zegarra, Jan Paul; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2009-01-01

    The stable isotope amount effect has often been invoked to explain patterns of isotopic composition of rainfall in the tropics. This paper describes a new approach, correlating the isotopic composition of precipitation with cloud height and atmospheric temperature using NEXRAD radar echo tops, which are a measure of the maximum altitude of rainfall within the clouds. The seasonal differences in echo top altitudes and their corresponding temperatures are correlated with the isotopic composition of rainfall. These results offer another factor to consider in interpretation of the seasonal variation in isotopic composition of tropical rainfall, which has previously been linked to amount or rainout effects and not to temperature effects. Rain and cloud water isotope collectors in the Luquillo Mountains in northeastern Puerto Rico were sampled monthly for three years and precipitation was analyzed for δ18O and δ2H. Precipitation enriched in 18O and 2H occurred during the winter dry season (approximately December–May) and was associated with a weather pattern of trade wind showers and frontal systems. During the summer rainy season (approximately June–November), precipitation was depleted in 18O and 2H and originated in low pressure systems and convection associated with waves embedded in the prevailing easterly airflow. Rain substantially depleted in 18O and 2H compared to the aforementioned weather patterns occurred during large low pressure systems. Weather analysis showed that 29% of rain input to the Luquillo Mountains was trade wind orographic rainfall, and 30% of rainfall could be attributed to easterly waves and low pressure systems. Isotopic signatures associated with these major climate patterns can be used to determine their influence on streamflow and groundwater recharge and to monitor possible effects of climate change on regional water resources.

  2. Alternate substrates and isotope effects as a probe of the malic enzyme reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavva, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    Dissociation constants for alternative dinucleotide substrates and competitive inhibitors suggest that the dinucleotide binding site of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme is hydrophobic in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Changes in the divalent metal ion activator from Mg 2+ to Mn 2+ or Cd 2+ results in a decrease in the dinucleotide affinity and an increase in the affinity for malate. Primary deuterium and 13 C isotope effects obtained with the different metal ions suggest either a change in the transition state structure for the hydride transfer or decarboxylation steps or both. Deuterium isotope effects are finite whether reactants are maintained at saturating or limiting concentrations with all the metal ions and dinucleotide substrates used. For the native enzyme, primary deuterium isotope effects increase with a concomitant decrease in the 13 C effects when NAD is replaced by an alternate dinucleotide substrate different in redox potential

  3. Determination of the mechanism of demethylenation of (methylenedioxy)phenyl compounds by cytochrome P450 using deuterium isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuto, J.M.; Kumagai, Y.; Cho, A.K.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of demethylenation of (methylenedioxy)benzene (MDB), (methylenedioxy)amphetamine (MDA), and (methylenedioxy)methamphetamine (MDMA) by purified rabbit liver cytochrome P450IIB4 has been investigated by using deuterium isotope effects. A comparison of the magnitude and direction of the observed kinetic isotope effects indicates that the three compounds are demethylenated by different mechanisms. The different mechanisms of demethylenation have been proposed on the basis of comparisons of the observed biochemical isotope effects with the isotope effects from purely chemical systems

  4. Kinetic isotope effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of tritium-labelled D-galactosamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Korsakova, N.A.

    1992-01-01

    Primary, secondary and intramolecular kinetic isotopic effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of D-galactosamine labelled by tritium in position 6, were measured. When comparing values of the effects with previously obtained results for similar reaction D-[6- 3 H]galactose, it was ascertained that the presence of aminogroup in galactopyranosyl mainly affects kinetics of substrate-ferment complex formation stage. The possibility to use kinetic isotope effects for increase in molar activity of D-galactosamine, labelled by tritium in position 6, is shown

  5. Gamma-radiation and isotopic effect on the critical behavior in triglycine selenate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, M. E.; Hamed, A. E.; Abulnasr, L.; Abboudy, S.

    1994-11-01

    Isotopic effects in pure and γ-irradiated triglycine selenate crystals were investigated using the specific heat ( Cp) technique. The obtained results showed an interesting dependence of the critical behavior of Cp on the deuterium content. With increasing content of deuterium, the character of the phase transition changed from a second order (γ-type) to a first order transition. After γ-irradiation, the behavior of Cp around the phase transition region was essentially affected. The transition temperature, Tc, decreased and Δ Cp depressed, and the transition became broad. It was noted that the effect of γ-irradiation is opposite to the isotopic effect.

  6. Gamma-radiation and isotopic effect on the critical behavior in triglycine selenate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, M.E.; Hamed, A.E.; Abulnasr, L.; Abboudy, S.

    1994-01-01

    Isotopic effects in pure and γ-irradiated triglycine selenate crystals were investigated using the specific heat (C p ) technique. The obtained results showed an interesting dependence of the critical behavior of C p on the deuterium content. With increasing content of deuterium, the character of the phase transition changed from a second order (λ-type) to a first order transition. After γ-irradiation, the behavior of C p around the phase transition region was essentially affected. The transition temperature, T c , decreased and ΔC p depressed, and the transition became broad. It was noted that the effect of γ-irradiation is opposite to the isotopic effect. (author)

  7. Effect of non-local equilibrium on minimal thermal resistance porous layered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, Genevieve; Gosselin, Louis

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the cooling of a heat-generating surface by a stacking of porous media (e.g., metallic foam) through which fluid flows parallel to the surface is considered. A two-temperature model is proposed to account for non-local thermal equilibrium (non-LTE). A scale analysis is performed to determine temperatures profiles in the boundary layer regime. The hot spot temperature is minimized with respect to the three design variables of each layer: porosity, pore diameter, and material. Global cost and mass are constrained. The optimization is performed with a hybrid genetic algorithm (GA) including local search to enhance convergence and repeatability. Results demonstrate that the optimized stacks do not operate in LTE. Therefore, we show that assuming LTE might result in underestimation of the hot spot temperature, and into different final designs as well

  8. Effect of including decay chains on predictions of equilibrium-type terrestrial food chain models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, G.

    1990-01-01

    Equilibrium-type food chain models are commonly used for assessing the radiological impact to man from environmental releases of radionuclides. Usually these do not take into account build-up of radioactive decay products during environmental transport. This may be a potential source of underprediction. For estimating consequences of this simplification, the equations of an internationally recognised terrestrial food chain model have been extended to include decay chains of variable length. Example calculations show that for releases from light water reactors as expected both during routine operation and in the case of severe accidents, the build-up of decay products during environmental transport is generally of minor importance. However, a considerable number of radionuclides of potential radiological significance have been identified which show marked contributions of decay products to calculated contamination of human food and resulting radiation dose rates. (author)

  9. The macroeconomic deviation effects of the actual exchange rate from the equilibrium level of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Shevchuk

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available By means of VAR and 2SLS assessments in the article researches the influence of the RER deviations from the equilibrium signification received through the Hodrick-Prescott filter. The author proved that understated RER worsens the GDP dynamics and accelerates the inflation simultaneously restricting the export and import demand. The results obtained testify to the benefit of hryvnia exchange rate growth as a means of dynamic acceleration of the economic growth in the low-inflation environment. It’s appropriate to neutralize possible balance deterioration of the trade balance is with the use of nonprice factors like reduction of the budget deficit and limitation of the money stock offers.

  10. Nonequilibrium Kondo effect by the equilibrium numerical renormalization group method: The hybrid Anderson model subject to a finite spin bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tie-Feng; Guo, Ai-Min; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2018-06-01

    We investigate Kondo correlations in a quantum dot with normal and superconducting electrodes, where a spin bias voltage is applied across the device and the local interaction U is either attractive or repulsive. When the spin current is blockaded in the large-gap regime, this nonequilibrium strongly correlated problem maps into an equilibrium model solvable by the numerical renormalization group method. The Kondo spectra with characteristic splitting due to the nonequilibrium spin accumulation are thus obtained at high precision. It is shown that while the bias-induced decoherence of the spin Kondo effect is partially compensated by the superconductivity, the charge Kondo effect is enhanced out of equilibrium and undergoes an additional splitting by the superconducting proximity effect, yielding four Kondo peaks in the local spectral density. In the charge Kondo regime, we find a universal scaling of charge conductance in this hybrid device under different spin biases. The universal conductance as a function of the coupling to the superconducting lead is peaked at and hence directly measures the Kondo temperature. Our results are of direct relevance to recent experiments realizing a negative-U charge Kondo effect in hybrid oxide quantum dots [Nat. Commun. 8, 395 (2017), 10.1038/s41467-017-00495-7].

  11. Influence of Penning effect on the plasma features in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Zhengshi; Zhang, Guanjun [School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Jiang, Nan; Cao, Zexian, E-mail: zxcao@iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-03-14

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a cold plasma source that promises various innovative applications. The influence of Penning effect on the formation, propagation, and other physical properties of the plasma bullets in APPJ remains a debatable topic. By using a 10 cm wide active electrode and a frequency of applied voltage down to 0.5 Hz, the Penning effect caused by preceding discharges can be excluded. It was found that the Penning effect originating in a preceding discharge helps build a conductive channel in the gas flow and provide seed electrons, thus the discharge can be maintained at a low voltage which in turn leads to a smaller propagation speed for the plasma bullet. Photographs from an intensified charge coupled device reveal that the annular structure of the plasma plume for He is irrelevant to the Penning ionization process arising from preceding discharges. By adding NH{sub 3} into Ar to introduce Penning effect, the originally filamentous discharge of Ar can display a rather extensive plasma plume in ambient as He. These results are helpful for the understanding of the behaviors of non-equilibrium APPJs generated under distinct conditions and for the design of plasma jet features, especially the spatial distribution and propagation speed, which are essential for application.

  12. Some measurements of H/D polarizability isotope effects using differential refractometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster Smith, M; Van Hook, W A [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1989-05-01

    Refractive index differences between the H and D isomers of some common molecules in the liquid phase were measured between 404.7 and 690.0 nm. The data are combined with information on molar volume isotope effects to yield values for H/D isotope effects on the static polarizability, the vibrational contribution to the static and frequency dependent parts of the polarizability, and the H/D isotope effect on the second moment of the electronic charge distribution. The present results suffice to demonstrate the practicability of this technique to measure the components of the polarizability listed above. However for accurate resolution of the vibrational and second moment contributions, refractive index data of still greater precision will be required. (orig.).

  13. Some measurements of H/D polarizability isotope effects using differential refractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster Smith, M.; Van Hook, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    Refractive index differences between the H and D isomers of some common molecules in the liquid phase were measured between 404.7 and 690.0 nm. The data are combined with information on molar volume isotope effects to yield values for H/D isotope effects on the static polarizability, the vibrational contribution to the static and frequency dependent parts of the polarizability, and the H/D isotope effect on the second moment of the electronic charge distribution. The present results suffice to demonstrate the practicability of this technique to measure the components of the polarizability listed above. However for accurate resolution of the vibrational and second moment contributions, refractive index data of still greater precision will be required. (orig.)

  14. A multielement isotopic study of refractory FUN and F CAIs: Mass-dependent and mass-independent isotope effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kööp, Levke; Nakashima, Daisuke; Heck, Philipp R.; Kita, Noriko T.; Tenner, Travis J.; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Park, Changkun; Davis, Andrew M.

    2018-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the oldest dated objects that formed inside the Solar System. Among these are rare, enigmatic objects with large mass-dependent fractionation effects (F CAIs), which sometimes also have large nucleosynthetic anomalies and a low initial abundance of the short-lived radionuclide 26Al (FUN CAIs). We have studied seven refractory hibonite-rich CAIs and one grossite-rich CAI from the Murchison (CM2) meteorite for their oxygen, calcium, and titanium isotopic compositions. The 26Al-26Mg system was also studied in seven of these CAIs. We found mass-dependent heavy isotope enrichment in all measured elements, but never simultaneously in the same CAI. The data are hard to reconcile with a single-stage melt evaporation origin and may require reintroduction or reequilibration for magnesium, oxygen and titanium after evaporation for some of the studied CAIs. The initial 26Al/27Al ratios inferred from model isochrons span a range from <1 × 10-6 to canonical (∼5 × 10-5). The CAIs show a mutual exclusivity relationship between inferred incorporation of live 26Al and the presence of resolvable anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti. Furthermore, a relationship exists between 26Al incorporation and Δ17O in the hibonite-rich CAIs (i.e., 26Al-free CAIs have resolved variations in Δ17O, while CAIs with resolved 26Mg excesses have Δ17O values close to -23‰). Only the grossite-rich CAI has a relatively enhanced Δ17O value (∼-17‰) in spite of a near-canonical 26Al/27Al. We interpret these data as indicating that fractionated hibonite-rich CAIs formed over an extended time period and sampled multiple stages in the isotopic evolution of the solar nebula, including: (1) an 26Al-poor nebula with large positive and negative anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti and variable Δ17O; (2) a stage of 26Al-admixture, during which anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti had been largely diluted and a Δ17O value of ∼-23‰ had been achieved in the CAI formation region; and (3

  15. Cytochrome P-450 dependent ethanol oxidation. Kinetic isotope effects and absence of stereoselectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekstroem, G.; Norsten, C.; Cronholm, T.; Ingelman-Sundberg, M.

    1987-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects [/sup D/(V/K)] and stereoselectivity of ethanol oxidation in cytochrome P-450 containing systems and in the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system were compared with those of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. The isotope effects were determined by using both a noncompetitive method, including incubation of unlabeled of [1,1- 2 H 2 ] ethanol at various concentrations, and a competitive method, where 1:1 mixtures of [1- 13 C]- and [ 2 H 6 ] ethanol or [2,2,2- 2 H 3 ]- and [1,1- 2 H 2 ] ethanol were incubated and the acetaldehyde formed was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The /sup D/(V/K) isotope effects of the cytochrome P-450 dependent ethanol oxidation were about 4 with liver microsomes from imidazole-, phenobarbital- or acetone-treated rabbits or with microsomes from acetone- or ethanol-treated rats. Similar isotope effects were reached with reconstituted membranes containing the rabbit ethanol-inducible cytochrome P-450 (LMeb), whereas control rat microsomes and membranes containing rabbit phenobarbital-inducible P-450 LM 2 oxidized the alcohol with /sup D/(V/K) of about 2.8 and 1.8, respectively. Addition of Fe/sup III/EDTA either to microsomes from phenobarbital-treated rabbits or to membranes containing P-450 LMeb significantly lowered the isotope effect. Incubations of all cytochrome P-450 containing systems of the xanthine-xanthine oxidase systems with (1R)- and (1S)-[1- 2 H] ethanol, revealed, taking the isotope effects into account, that 44-66% of the ethanol oxidized had lost the 1-pro-R hydrogen. The data indicate that cytochrome P-450 dependent ethanol oxidation is not stereospecific and that cleavage of the C 1 -H bond appears to be a rate-determining step in the catalysis by the ethanol-inducible form of P-450. The contribution of hydroxyl radicals in ethanol oxidation by the various enzymic systems is discussed

  16. Bond-equilibrium theory of liquid Se-Te alloys. II. Effect of singly attached ring molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Melvin; Bez, Wolfgang G.

    1981-06-01

    A statistical-mechanical theory for bond equilibrium of chain polymers containing threefold (3F) and onefold (1F) bond defects is extended to include the effects of free ring molecules and ring molecules attached to chains by a single 3F atom. Positively charged singly attached rings are shown to play a key role in bond equilibrium in liquid Sex Te1-x by permitting the formation of ion pairs in which both constituents are effectively chain terminators, thus decreasing the average polymer size. The theory is applied to explain the behavior of the paramagnetic susceptibility, χp, and electronic transport as affected by the Fermi energy EF. It is found that the increase in χp with the concentration of Te is primarily the result of the smaller energy for breaking Te bonds. In addition, attached rings play an important role in determining the effect of temperature on χp. At x<~0.5, the concentrations of both free and attached rings becomes small at high T because of the high concentration of bond defects.

  17. Unusually large secondary deuterium isotope effect. Thermal trans-cis isomerization of trans-1-phenylcyclohexene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, R.A.; Misawa, H.; Healy, E.F.; Dewar, M.J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The magnitudes of secondary deuterium isotope effects (SDIE) are generally in the range of 0.9 < k/sub H//k/sub D/ < 1.25, and are often satisfactorily rationalized by the zero-point energy (ZPE) change on going from reactant to transition state due to C-H rehybridization. They now report a far larger SDIE for the title reaction. Its rationalization on the basis of transition state theory suggests that it more closely resembles a primary isotope effect

  18. Deuterium isotope effect on the intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O.; Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin

    2001-01-01

    rather than negative. Isotope effects are, however, also inherent in the nuclear reorganization Gibbs free energy and in the tunneling factor for the electron transfer process. A slightly larger thermal protein expansion in H2O than in D2O (0.001 nm K-1) is sufficient both to account for the activation......Intramolecular electron transfer in azurin in water and deuterium oxide has been studied over a broad temperature range. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect, k(H)/k(D), is smaller than unity (0.7 at 298 K), primarily caused by the different activation entropies in water (-56.5 J K-1 mol(-1...

  19. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase from methanogenic archaea: isotope effects on label exchange and ethane formation with the homologous substrate ethyl-coenzyme M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Silvan; Goenrich, Meike; Thauer, Rudolf K; Jaun, Bernhard

    2013-10-09

    Ethyl-coenzyme M (CH3CH2-S-CH2CH2-SO3(-), Et-S-CoM) serves as a homologous substrate for the enzyme methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) resulting in the product ethane instead of methane. The catalytic reaction proceeds via an intermediate that already contains all six C-H bonds of the product. Because product release occurs after a second, rate-limiting step, many cycles of intermediate formation and reconversion to substrate occur before a substantial amount of ethane is released. In deuterated buffer, the intermediate becomes labeled, and C-H activation in the back reaction rapidly leads to labeled Et-S-CoM, which enables intermediate formation to be detected. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of this pre-equilibrium. (2)H- and (13)C-labeled isotopologues of Et-S-CoM were used as the substrates, and the time course of each isotopologue was followed by NMR spectroscopy. A kinetic simulation including kinetic isotope effects allowed determination of the primary and α- and β-secondary isotope effects for intermediate formation and for the C-H/C-D bond activation in the ethane-containing intermediate. The values obtained are in accordance with those found for the native substrate Me-S-CoM (see preceding publication, Scheller, S.; Goenrich, M.; Thauer, R. K.; Jaun, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, DOI: 10.1021/ja406485z) and thus imply the same catalytic mechanism for both substrates. The experiment by Floss and co-workers, demonstrating a net inversion of configuration to chiral ethane with CH3CDT-S-CoM as the substrate, is compatible with the observed rapid isotope exchange if the isotope effects measured here are taken into account.

  20. Innovating in the teaching of Chemical Equilibrium: Taking effective advantage of Information and Communication Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Susana Cristina Morais da

    Chemical Equilibrium (CE) is a good example of the specific nature of chemistry. The understanding of this theme requires the conceptualization of macroscopic events, as well as explanations of sub microscopic nature, application of symbolic language and mathematics. CE is commonly identified as a topic suitable for the pedagogical use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). However, the growth in the roll of digital resources for the teaching of CE, that took place in the last decades, was not accompanied by a decrease in the signalling of students' difficulties and misconceptions in the subject. This fact, points out the relevance of clarifying the circumstances under which digital resources turn out to be useful in the teaching of CE and develop educative modules that take into account the findings and recommendations from the literature. This project aims to bring a contribution to take advantage form ICT potential in the teaching of CE. The objectives underlying the main purpose of the project were defined according to literature review, which crosses three fundamental dimensions (scientific, pedagogical and technological). The project also benefited from the previous experience of the group and the collaboration with an European project (CROSSNET). The level of abstraction necessary for the understanding of the scientific model is pointed out as the major source of difficulties in the learning of CE, while also referred as a privileged target for the intervention of ICT. In this context, we introduce the expression "facilitating abstraction" to summarize the idea of supporting students' abstract thinking process during the learning of formal concepts. This idea has gained importance throughout the project leading to the development of a pedagogical approach to facilitate abstraction in the learning of CE. Although based on the use of ICT, the main purpose wasn't to introduce new digital resources in the saturated field of CE. Instead, the

  1. Effects of trace element concentration on enzyme controlled stable isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Silvia A; Hirschorn, Sarah K; Elsner, Martin; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sleep, Brent E; Edwards, Elizabeth A; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood

    2006-12-15

    The effects of iron concentration on carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of toluene by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 were investigated using a low iron medium and two different high iron media. Mean carbon enrichment factors (epsilonc) determined using a Rayleigh isotopic model were smaller in culture grown under high iron conditions (epsilonc = -1.7+/-0.1%) compared to low iron conditions (epsilonc = -2.5+/-0.3%). Mean hydrogen enrichment factors (epsilonH) were also significantly smaller for culture grown under high iron conditions (epsilonH = -77 +/-4%) versus low iron conditions (EpsilonH = -159+/-11%). A mechanistic model for enzyme kinetics was used to relate differences in the magnitude of isotopic fractionation for low iron versus high iron cultures to the efficiency of the enzymatic transformation. The increase of carbon and hydrogen enrichment factors at low iron concentrations suggests a slower enzyme-catalyzed substrate conversion step (k2) relative to the enzyme-substrate binding step (k-l) at low iron concentration. While the observed differences were subtle and, hence, do not significantly impact the ability to use stable isotope analysis in the field, these results demonstrated that resolvable differences in carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation were related to low and high iron conditions. This novel result highlights the need to further investigate the effects of other trace elements known to be key components of biodegradative enzymes.

  2. Correlation of the vapor pressure isotope effect with molecular force fields in the liquid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollin, J.S.; Ishida, T.

    1976-07-01

    The present work is concerned with the development and application of a new model for condensed phase interactions with which the vapor pressure isotope effect (vpie) may be related to molecular forces and structure. The model considers the condensed phase as being represented by a cluster of regularly arranged molecules consisting of a central molecule and a variable number of molecules in the first coordination shell. The methods of normal coordinate analysis are used to determine the modes of vibration of the condensed phase cluster from which, in turn, the isotopic reduced partition function can be calculated. Using the medium cluster model, the observed vpie for a series of methane isotopes has been successfully reproduced with better agreement with experiment than has been possible using the simple cell model. We conclude, however, that insofar as the medium cluster model provides a reasonable picture of the liquid state, the vpie is not sufficiently sensitive to molecular orientation to permit an experimental determination of intermolecular configuration in the condensed phase through measurement of isotopic pressure ratios. The virtual independence of vapor pressure isotope effects on molecular orientation at large cluster sizes is a demonstration of the general acceptability of the cell model assumptions for vpie calculations

  3. Dynamical barrier and isotope effects in the simplest substitution reaction via Walden inversion mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Zhaojun; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.

    2017-02-01

    Reactions occurring at a carbon atom through the Walden inversion mechanism are one of the most important and useful classes of reactions in chemistry. Here we report an accurate theoretical study of the simplest reaction of that type: the H+CH4 substitution reaction and its isotope analogues. It is found that the reaction threshold versus collision energy is considerably higher than the barrier height. The reaction exhibits a strong normal secondary isotope effect on the cross-sections measured above the reaction threshold, and a small but reverse secondary kinetic isotope effect at room temperature. Detailed analysis reveals that the reaction proceeds along a path with a higher barrier height instead of the minimum-energy path because the umbrella angle of the non-reacting methyl group cannot change synchronously with the other reaction coordinates during the reaction due to insufficient energy transfer from the translational motion to the umbrella mode.

  4. Isotopic effects in the neon fixed point: uncertainty of the calibration data correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steur, Peter P. M.; Pavese, Franco; Fellmuth, Bernd; Hermier, Yves; Hill, Kenneth D.; Seog Kim, Jin; Lipinski, Leszek; Nagao, Keisuke; Nakano, Tohru; Peruzzi, Andrea; Sparasci, Fernando; Szmyrka-Grzebyk, Anna; Tamura, Osamu; Tew, Weston L.; Valkiers, Staf; van Geel, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The neon triple point is one of the defining fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). Although recognizing that natural neon is a mixture of isotopes, the ITS-90 definition only states that the neon should be of ‘natural isotopic composition’, without any further requirements. A preliminary study in 2005 indicated that most of the observed variability in the realized neon triple point temperatures within a range of about 0.5 mK can be attributed to the variability in isotopic composition among different samples of ‘natural’ neon. Based on the results of an International Project (EUROMET Project No. 770), the Consultative Committee for Thermometry decided to improve the realization of the neon fixed point by assigning the ITS-90 temperature value 24.5561 K to neon with the isotopic composition recommended by IUPAC, accompanied by a quadratic equation to take the deviations from the reference composition into account. In this paper, the uncertainties of the equation are discussed and an uncertainty budget is presented. The resulting standard uncertainty due to the isotopic effect (k = 1) after correction of the calibration data is reduced to (4 to 40) μK when using neon of ‘natural’ isotopic composition or to 30 μK when using 20Ne. For comparison, an uncertainty component of 0.15 mK should be included in the uncertainty budget for the neon triple point if the isotopic composition is unknown, i.e. whenever the correction cannot be applied.

  5. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Böhlke, John Karl; Bekins, Barbara A.; Phillips, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field‐scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local‐scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample‐based estimates of “apparent” parameters with “true“ (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non‐Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport.

  6. Effect of stress on the diffusion kinetics of methane during gas desorption in coal matrix under different equilibrium pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengwu; Xue, Honglai; Hu, Po; Guan, Cheng; Liu, Wenbiao

    2018-06-01

    Stress has a significant influence on gas diffusion, which is a key factor for methane recovery in coal mines. In this study, a series of experiments were performed to investigate effect of stress on the gas diffusivity during desorption in tectonic coal. Additionally, the desorbed data were modeled using the unipore and bidisperse models. The results show that the bidisperse model better describes the diffusion kinetics than the unipore model in this study. Additionally, the modeling results using the bidisperse approach suggest that the stress impact on the macropore diffusivity is greater than the stress on the micropore diffusivity. Under the same equilibrium pressure, the diffusivity varies with stress according to a four-stage function, which shows an ‘M-shape’. As the equilibrium gas pressure increased from 0.6 to 1.7 MPa, the critical point between stage 2 and stage 3 and between stage 3 and stage 4 transferred to a low stress. This difference is attributed to the gas pressure effects on the physical and mechanical properties of coal. These observations indicate that both the stress and gas pressure can significantly impact gas diffusion and may have significant implications on methane recovery in coal mines.

  7. The Effect of Composition on Spinel Crystals Equilibrium in Low-Silica High-Level Waste Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiricka, Milos; Hrma, Pavel R.; Vienna, John D.

    2003-01-01

    The liquidus temperature (TL) and the equilibrium mass fraction of spinel were measured in the regions of low-silica (less than 42 mass% SiO2) high-level waste borosilicate glasses within the spinel primary phase field as functions of glass composition. The components that varied, one at a time, were Al2O3, B2O3, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, Li2O, MnO, Na2O, NiO, SiO2, and ZrO2. The effects of Al2O3, B2O3, Fe2O3, NiO, SiO2, and ZrO2 on the TL in this region and in glasses with 42 to 56 mass% SiO2 were similar. However, in the low-silica region, Cr2O3 increased the TL substantially less, and Li2O and Na2O decreased the TL significantly less than in the region with 42 to 56 mass% SiO2. The effect of MnO on the TL of the higher SiO2 glasses is not yet understood with sufficient accuracy. The temperature at which the equilibrium mass fraction of spinel was 1 mass% was 25C to 64C below the TL

  8. A Distinct Magnetic Isotope Effect Measured in Atmospheric Mercury in Epiphytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Odom, A. L.

    2007-12-01

    Due to the importance of Mercury as an environmental contaminant, mercury cycling in the atmosphere has been extensively studied. However, there still remain uncertainties in the relative amounts of natural and anthropogenic emissions, atmospheric deposition rates as well as the spatial variation of atmospheric mercury. Part of a study to determine the isotopic composition of mercury deposited from the atmosphere has involved the use of epiphytes as monitors. The greatest advantage of such natural monitors is that a widespread, high-density network is possible at low cost. One of the disadvantages at present is that these monitors likely contain different mercury species (for example both gaseous, elemental mercury trapped by adsorption and Hg (II) by wet deposition). The project began with the understanding that biochemical reactions involving metallothioneins within the epiphytes might have produced an isotopic effect. One such regional network was composed of samples of Tillandsia usenoides (common name: Spanish moss) collected along the eastern Coastal Plain of the U.S. from northern Florida to North Carolina. The isotopic composition of a sample is expressed as permil deviations from a standard. The deviations are defined as δAHg = \\left(\\frac{Rsample}{Rstd}-1 \\right)1000 ‰ , where A represents the atomic mass number. R=\\frac{AHg}{202Hg} were measured for the isotopes 198Hg, 199Hg, 200Hg, 201Hg, 202Hg and 204Hg relative to the mercury standard SRM NIST 3133, by a standard-sample bracketing technique. For all samples, the delta values of the even-N plotted against atomic mass numbers define a linear curve. For the odd-N isotopes, δ199Hg and δ201Hg deviate from this mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) relationship and indicate a mass-independent fractionation (MIF) effect and a negative anomaly, i.e. a depletion in 199Hg and 201Hg relative to the even-N isotopes. These deviations are expressed as Δ199Hg = δ199Hgtotal - δ199HgMDF. A Δ201Hg/Δ199Hg

  9. Isotopic and spin-nuclear effects in solid hydrogens (Review Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiman, Yuri A.; Crespo, Yanier

    2017-12-01

    The multiple isotopic family of hydrogens (H2, HD, D2, HT, DT, T2) due to large differences in the de Boer quantum parameter and inertia moments displays a diversity of pronounced quantum isotopic solid-state effects. The homonuclear members of this family (H2, D2, T2) due to the permutation symmetry are subjects of the constraints of quantum mechanics which link the possible rotational states of these molecules to their total nuclear spin giving rise to the existence of two spin-nuclear modifications, ortho- and parahydrogens, possessing substantially different properties. Consequently, hydrogen solids present an unique opportunity for studying both isotope and spin-nuclear effects. The rotational spectra of heteronuclear hydrogens (HD, HT, DT) are free from limitations imposed by the permutation symmetry. As a result, the ground state of these species in solid state is virtually degenerate. The most dramatic consequence of this fact is an effect similar to the Pomeranchuk effect in 3He which in the case of the solid heteronuclear hydrogens manifests itself as the reentrant broken symmetry phase transitions. In this review article we discuss thermodynamic and kinetic effects pertaining to different isotopic and spin-nuclear species, as well as problems that still remain to be solved.

  10. Memory Effects Study of Measuring Radioactive Xenon Isotopes With β-γ Coincidence Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Huaimao; Wang Shilian; Wang Jun; Li Qi; Zhao Yungang; Fan Yuanqing; Zhang Xinjun

    2010-01-01

    The β-γ coincidence technique is a kind of the key important method to detect radioactive xenon isotopes for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). This paper describes noble gases memory effects of β-γ coincidence detector. Xenon memory effects were measured and its influence on detector's minimum detectable activity (MDA) was evaluated. The methods of reducing xenon memory effects were studied. In conclusion, aluminium coated plastic scintillator and YAP scintillator can remarkably decrease xenon memory effects. (authors)

  11. Study on the Effect of the Separating Unit Optimization on the Economy of Stable Isotope Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Kun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An economic criterion called as yearly net profit of single separating unit (YNPSSU was presented to evaluate the influence of structure optimization on the economy. Using YNPSSU as a criterion, economic analysis was carried out for the structure optimization of separating unit in the case of separating SiF4 to obtain the 28Si and 29Si isotope. YNPSSU was calculated and compared with that before optimization. The results showed that YNPSSU was increased by 12.3% by the structure optimization. Therefore, the structure optimization could increase the economy of the stable isotope separation effectively.

  12. Effect of Different Carbon Substrates on Nitrate Stable Isotope Fractionation During Microbial Denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderlich, Anja; Meckenstock, Rainer; Einsiedl, Florian

    2012-01-01

    -labeled water and 18O-labeled nitrite were added to the microcosm experiments to study the effect of putative backward reactions of nitrite to nitrate on the stable isotope fractionation. We found no evidence for a reverse reaction. Significant variations of the stable isotope enrichment factor ε were observed......In batch experiments, we studied the isotope fractionation in N and O of dissolved nitrate during dentrification. Denitrifying strains Thauera aromatica and “Aromatoleum aromaticum strain EbN1” were grown under strictly anaerobic conditions with acetate, benzoate, and toluene as carbon sources. 18O...... of nitrate transport across the cell wall compared to the kinetics of the intracellular nitrate reduction step of microbial denitrification....

  13. Effect of Non-Equilibrium Surface Thermochemistry in Simulation of Carbon Based Ablators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coupling of a material thermal response code and a flow solver using non-equilibrium gas/surface interaction model provides time-accurate solutions for the multidimensional ablation of carbon based charring ablators. The material thermal response code used in this study is the Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal-response and AblatioN Program (TITAN), which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. Its governing equations include total energy balance, pyrolysis gas mass conservation, and a three-component decomposition model. The flow code solves the reacting Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) method. Loose coupling between the material response and flow codes is performed by solving the surface mass balance in DPLR and the surface energy balance in TITAN. Thus, the material surface recession is predicted by finite-rate gas/surface interaction boundary conditions implemented in DPLR, and the surface temperature and pyrolysis gas injection rate are computed in TITAN. Two sets of nonequilibrium gas/surface interaction chemistry between air and the carbon surface developed by Park and Zhluktov, respectively, are studied. Coupled fluid-material response analyses of stagnation tests conducted in NASA Ames Research Center arc-jet facilities are considered. The ablating material used in these arc-jet tests was Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). Computational predictions of in-depth material thermal response and surface recession are compared with the experimental measurements for stagnation cold wall heat flux ranging from 107 to 1100 Watts per square centimeter.

  14. Kinetic isotope effect studies of the S-adenosylmethionine synthetase reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markham, G.D.; Parkin, D.W.; Schramm, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes a unique substitution reaction at the 5' carbon of MgATP. Kinetic isotope effect (V/K) measurements have been used to investigate the mechanism of AdoMet synthetase from E. coli. Changes in 3 H/ 14 C ratios when AdoMet is formed from a mixture of either ([5'- 14 C]ATP and [5'- 12 C,1'- 3 H]ATP) or ([5'- 3 H]ATP and [5'- 1 H,1'- 14 C]ATP) were examined. The effects of varying the concentrations of the co-substrate methionine and the monovalent cation activator K + were investigated. Substitution of 14 C for 12 C at the 5' position of ATP yields a primary V/K kinetic isotope effect ( 12 C/ 14 C) of 1.128 +/- 0.004 at low K + and methionine concentrations. The observed isotope effect diminishes slightly to 1.107 +/- 0.003 when both K + and methionine are present at saturating concentrations, suggesting that MgATP has only a low commitment to catalysis from at conditions near Vmax. No secondary V/K 3 H isotope effect from [5'- 3 H]ATP was detected ( 1 H/ 3 H) = 0.997 +/- 0.003. The magnitude of the primary 14 C isotope effect and the small secondary 3 H effect demonstrate that AdoMet synthesis occurs with a S/sub N/ 2 transition state which is symmetric with respect to the sulfur nucleophile and the departing tripolyphosphate group

  15. Effect of Calcium Oxide Microstructure on the Diffusion of Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes Ramos, João Pedro; Stora, T

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxide (CaO) powder targets have been successfully used at CERN-ISOLDE to produce neutron deficient exotic argon and carbon isotopes under proton irradiation at high temperatures (>1000°C). These targets outperform the other related targets for the production of the same beams. However, they presented either slow release rates (yields) from the beginning or a rapid decrease over time. This problem was believed to come from the target microstructure degradation, justifying the material investigation. In order to do so, the synthesis, reactivity in ambient air and sintering kinetics of CaO were studied, through surface area determination by N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction for crystalline phase identification and crystallite size determination, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy to investigate the microstructure. The synthesis studies revealed that a nanometric material is obtained from the decarbonation of CaCO3 in vacuum at temperatures higher than 550°C, which is very reactive in air....

  16. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylations of lactic acid containing 13C at the natural abundance level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Czarnota, G.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.

    1992-01-01

    The 13 C kinetic isotope fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition by sulfuric acid has been studied in the temperature range of 20-80 deg C. The 13 C (1) isotope separation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated sulfuric acid depends strongly on the temperature above 40 deg C. Below this temperature the 13 C isotope effect in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated sulfuric acid is normal similarly as has been found in the decarbonylation of lactic [1- 14 C] acid. The experimental values of k (12C) /k (13C) ratios of isotopic rate constants for 12 C and 13 C are close to, but slightly higher than theoretical 13 C-kinetic isotope effects calculated (neglecting tunneling) under the asumption that the C (1) -OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of the dehydration reaction. Dilution of concentrated sulfuric acid with water up to 1.4 molar (H 2 O)/(H 2 SO 4 ) ratio caused the increase of the 13 C isotope fractionation from 1.0273 found in concentrated sulfuric acid at 80.5 deg C to 1.0536±0.0008 (at 80.6 deg C). A discussion of the abnormally high temperature dependence of 14 C and 13 C isotope fractionation in this reaction and the discussion of the problem of relative 14 C/ 13 C kinetic isotope effects is given. (author) 18 refs.; 2 tabs

  17. Anomalous H/D isotope effect on 35Cl NQR frequencies and H/D isotope effect on 1H MAS NMR spectra in pyrrolidinium p-chlorobenzoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Ryo; Honda, Hisashi; Nakata, Eiichi; Takamizawa, Satoshi; Noro, Sumiko; Kimura, Taiki; Kyo, Shin-shin; Ishimaru, Shin'ichi; Miyake, Ryosuke

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous isotope effect was observed in the 35 Cl NQR frequency of pyrrolidinium p-chlorobenzoate (C 4 H 8 NH 2 + ·ClC 6 H 4 COO - ) by deuterium substitution of hydrogen atoms which form two kinds of N-H...O type hydrogen bonds. Large negative frequency shifts of the 35 Cl resonance lines, reaching 309 kHz at 77 K and 267 kHz at 293 K, were obtained upon deuteration, although the Cl atom in the molecule formed no hydrogen bonds in the crystal. 1 H MAS NMR lines showed significant changes by the deuterium substitution, while in contrast, small shifts of 13 C CP/MAS NMR signals were obtained. Our measurements of 1 H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times (T 1 ) suggested that the H/D isotope shifts detected from the 35 Cl NQR frequencies and 1 H NMR spectra are due to structural changes rather than molecular dynamics. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements showed two remarkable H/D isotope differences in the molecular arrangements, (1) the N-H length along the crystallographic a axis became 1 pm shorter, and (2) the dihedral angle between benzene and the pyrrolidine ring changed by 1.1(2)deg upon deuteration. Using density functional theory estimations, the anomalous 35 Cl NQR frequency shifts and 1 H MAS NMR line-shape changes could be explained by the dihedral angle change rather than the N-H length difference. (author)

  18. Kinetic secondary deuterium isotope effect in addition of nucleophile to m-bromobenzaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, L. do; Rossi, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic secondary deuterium isotope effects, KD/KH for hydrated proton catalyzed addition of semicarbazide, methoxyamine and hydroxylamine to m-bromobenzaldehyde is studied. The nature of the nucleophile, addition of the carbonyl group and the chemical reactions are evaluated. (M.J.C.) [pt

  19. Studies on the magnetic after-effect of hydrogen isotopes in hexagonal crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, G.

    1979-01-01

    The behaviour of hydrogen isotopes in hexagonal gadolinium, in intermetallic compounds of the RECo 5 type (RE = rare earth metal), and in cobalt alloys with small concentrations of alloyed impurity atoms was studied using the magnetic after-effect method in the temperature range between 4.2 K and 300 K. (orig./WBU) [de

  20. Synthesis of seven deuteromethyl-caffeine analogues observation of deuterium isotope effects on CMR analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falconnet, J.B.; Brazier, J.L.; Desage, M.

    1986-03-01

    The synthesis of all 7 N-trideuteromethyl isotopomers of caffeine by reaction of trideuteromethyl iodide (C/sup 2/H/sub 3/I) with the appropriate xanthine molecules is described. The use of proton, deuterium and carbon-13-NMR as a first step in purity assessment revealed /sup 13/C-NMR deuterium isotope effects on the resonance of perdeuteromethyl carbons.

  1. Kinetic isotope effect in the reaction of dehydration of fructose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grin', S.A.; Tsimbaliev, S.R.; Gel'fand, S.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic isotopic effect in the reaction of fructose dehydration into 5- hydroxymethylfurfural was determined. The results suggest hydrogen participation in the limiting stage of the process. The assumption that proton addition to 4, 5, 6 -trihydroxy - 2- on - hexal is the limiting stage is made

  2. A new cascade method for studying isotope effect in chemical exchange system without valance change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xiaoning; Luo Wenzong

    1987-01-01

    A new cascade method for studying isotope effect in chemical exchange system without valance change is developed and described. This method is simple to use and consumes less extractant as compared with the commonly used Woodward method. It is also convenient for unstable systems

  3. Kinetic mechanism and isotope effects of Pseudomonas cepacia 3-hydroxybenzoate-t-hydroxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.H.; Yu, Y.; Hamzah, R.Y.; Tu, S.C.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetic mechanism of Pseudomonas cepacia 3-hydroxybenzoate-6-hydroxylase has been delineated. Double reciprocal plots of initial rate versus m-hydroxybenzoate concentration at a constant level of oxygen and several fixed concentrations of NADH yielded a set of converging lines. Similar reciprocal plots of velocity versus NADH concentration at a constant oxygen level and several fixed m-hydroxybenzoate concentrations also showed converging lines. In contrast, double reciprocal plots of initial rate versus NADH concentration at a fixed m-hydroxybenzoate level and several oxygen concentrations showed a series of parallel lines. Parallel lines were also obtained from double reciprocal plots of initial rate versus m-hydroxybenzoate concentration at a fixed NADH level and varying oxygen concentrations. These results suggest a sequential binding of m-hydroxybenzoate and NADH by the hydroxylase. The enzyme-bound FAD is reduced and NAD is released. The reduced enzyme subsequently reacts with oxygen leading to the formation of other products. This hydroxylase exhibited a primary isotope effect of /sup D/V = 3.5 for (4R)-[4- 2 H] NADH but no isotope effect was observed with (4S)-[4- 2 H]NADH. An isotope effect of /sup T/V/K = 5.0 was also observed using (4R)-[4- 3 H]NADH. This tritium isotope effect was apparently independent of m-hydroxybenzoate concentration

  4. Stable isotope enrichment in laboratory ant colonies: effects of colony age, metamorphosis, diet, and fat storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecologists use stable isotopes to infer diets and trophic levels of animals in food webs, yet some assumptions underlying these inferences have not been thoroughly tested. We used laboratory-reared colonies of Solenopsis invicta Buren (Formicidae: Solenopsidini) to test the effects of metamorphosis,...

  5. Calcium isotope effects in ion exchange electromigration and calcium isotope analysis by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Y.; Hoshi, J.; Iwamoto, H.; Okamoto, M.; Kakihana, H.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium ions were made to electromigrate along a cation exchange membrane. The abundance ratios of the calcium isotopes (Ca-40, 42, 43, 44, 48) in the migrated bands were measured by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry. The lighter isotopes were enriched in the front part of the migrated band. The increments in the isotope abundance ratios were found to be proportional to the mass difference of the isotopes. The observed epsilon-values per unit mass difference (epsilon/ΔM) were 1.26 x 10 -4 (at 20 0 C), 1.85 x 10 -4 (at 25 0 C) and 2.4 x 10 -4 (at 40 0 C). The mass spectrometry was improved by using a low temperature for the evaporation of CaI 2 . (orig.)

  6. Effects of post-Kyoto policy on the Swiss national economy - Analysis using a single-country equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-08-01

    This final report elaborated for the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN) deals with questions concerning Swiss climate policy after 2012. In 2012, existing climate legislation as defined in CO 2 emission legislation is to be revised and brought in line with European legislation on greenhouse gases. The paper presents and discusses the proposals of the Swiss government that are to make Switzerland climate-neutral. These questions include how high a steering-tax must be in order to provide a 20% reduction in CO 2 emissions, which effects on the economy in general (BIP) and on particular sectors are to be expected, how households will be affected and how large the positive secondary side-effects are. The methods used in the study and their limitations are examined. In particular, a dynamic, single-country equilibrium model is introduced and various scenarios are discussed

  7. Flat-roof phenomenon of dynamic equilibrium phase in the negative bias temperature instability effect on a power MOSFET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yue; Zhuo Qing-Qing; Liu Hong-Xia; Ma Xiao-Hua; Hao Yue

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the static negative bias temperature (NBT) stress on a p-channel power metal—oxide—semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is investigated by experiment and simulation. The time evolution of the negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) degradation has the trend predicted by the reaction—diffusion (R—D) model but with an exaggerated time scale. The phenomena of the flat-roof section are observed under various stress conditions, which can be considered as the dynamic equilibrium phase in the R—D process. Based on the simulated results, the variation of the flat-roof section with the stress condition can be explained. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  8. Effect of mixing rule boundary conditions on high pressure (liquid + liquid) equilibrium prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Min-Kang; Lin, Shiang-Tai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Prediction of LLE from the combined use of EOS and liquid model are examined. ► The mixing rule used affects the predicted pressure dependence of LLE. ► MHV1 mixing rule predicts decent LLE at low pressures. ► WS mixing rule predicts more accurate excess volume and LLE at high pressures. ► The hybrid of MHV1 and WS mixing rule gives overall the best predictions. - Abstract: We examine the prediction of high pressure (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) from the Peng–Robinson equation with three excess Gibbs free energy (G ex )-based mixing rules (MR): the first order modified Huron–Vidal (MHV1), the Wong–Sandler (WS), and a hybrid of these two (referred to as G ex B 2 ). These mixing rules differ by the boundary conditions used for determination of the temperature and composition dependence of parameters a and b in the PR EOS. The condition of matching the excess Gibbs free energy from the EOS at zero pressure to that from the G ex model, used in MHV1 and G ex B 2 MR, leads to a similar miscibility gap from PR EOS and the G ex model used. On the other hand, the condition of matching excess Helmholtz energy from the EOS at infinite pressure to that from the G ex model, used in the WS MR, shows remarkable deviations. The condition of quadratic composition dependence in the second virial coefficient (B 2 ), used in WS and G ex B 2 MR, allows for both positive and negative values in the molar excess volume. Depending on the mixture, either the increase or decrease of the miscibility gap with pressure can be observed when the WS or the G ex B 2 MR is used. The condition of linear combination of molecular sizes of each component used in the MHV1 MR, however, often leads to small, positive molar excess volumes. As a consequence, the predicted LLE from using the MHV1 MR are insensitive to pressure. Therefore, we find that the G ex B 2 mixing rule provides the best predictive power for the LLE over a wide range of temperature and pressure.

  9. Isotope puzzle in sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liping

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms affecting multicomponent material sputtering are complex. Isotope sputtering is the simplest in the multicomponent materials sputtering. Although only mass effect plays a dominant role in the isotope sputtering, there is still an isotope puzzle in sputtering by ion bombardment. The major arguments are as follows: (1) At the zero fluence, is the isotope enrichment ejection-angle-independent or ejection-angle-dependent? (2) Is the isotope angular effect the primary or the secondary sputter effect? (3) How to understand the action of momentum asymmetry in collision cascade on the isotope sputtering?

  10. An unusual isotope effect in a high-transition-temperature superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gweon, G.-H.; Sasagawa, T.; Zhou, S.Y.; Graf, J.; Takagi, H.; Lee, D.-H.; Lanzara, A.

    2004-01-01

    In conventional superconductors, the electron pairing that allows superconductivity is caused by exchange of virtual phonons, which are quanta of lattice vibration. For high-transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors, it is far from clear that phonons are involved in the pairing at all. For example, the negligible change in Tc of optimally doped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 (Bi2212) upon oxygen isotope substitution (16O to 18O leads to Tc decreasing from 92 to 91 K) has often been taken to mean that phonons play an insignificant role in this material. Here we provide a detailed comparison of the electron dynamics of Bi2212 samples containing different oxygen isotopes, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Our data show definite and strong isotope effects. Surprisingly, the effects mainly appear in broad high-energy humps, commonly referred to as ''incoherent peaks''. As a function of temperature and electron momentum, the magnitude of the isotope effect closely correlates with the superconducting gap--that is, the pair binding energy. We suggest that these results can be explained in a dynamic spin-Peierls picture, where the singlet pairing of electrons and the electron-lattice coupling mutually enhance each other

  11. Isotope effects in the non enzymic glycation of hemoglobin catalyzed by DPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Herminia; Uzcategui, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    The paradigmatic reaction of glucose with hemoglobin (Hb A o ) has been studied and is known to occur most rapidly at the N-terminal valine of the β-subunit. An initial, rapid imine formation is succeeded by slower Amadori rearrangement. Non enzymic glycation of Hb A o was studied in vitro in buffer Tris 10 mM in H 2 O and D 2 O, pH 7.3, pD 7.8 at 37 deg C at a fixed concentration of 2,3 diphosphoglycerate (DPG). The reaction exhibits identical rates in protium and deuterium oxides. When D-glucose-2-h is compared with D-glucose-2-d, the kinetic isotope effect for the DPG-dependent rate is 2.1 ± 0.3, while the DPG-independent rate constant shows no isotope effect (1.1 ± 0.1). The absence of a rate in isotopic water solvents shows that proton donation for solvent, lyons or DPG does not limit the rate. The substrate isotope effect of around 2 for the DPG kinetic term indicates that the proton abstraction step of the Amadori rearrangement by DPG is wholly or partially rate-limiting for this reaction. (author)

  12. Isotope effects in the non enzymic glycation of hemoglobin catalyzed by DPG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Herminia; Uzcategui, Jorge [Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela). Dept. de Quimica

    1993-12-31

    The paradigmatic reaction of glucose with hemoglobin (Hb A{sub o}) has been studied and is known to occur most rapidly at the N-terminal valine of the {beta}-subunit. An initial, rapid imine formation is succeeded by slower Amadori rearrangement. Non enzymic glycation of Hb A{sub o} was studied in vitro in buffer Tris 10 mM in H{sub 2} O and D{sub 2} O, pH 7.3, pD 7.8 at 37 deg C at a fixed concentration of 2,3 diphosphoglycerate (DPG). The reaction exhibits identical rates in protium and deuterium oxides. When D-glucose-2-h is compared with D-glucose-2-d, the kinetic isotope effect for the DPG-dependent rate is 2.1 {+-} 0.3, while the DPG-independent rate constant shows no isotope effect (1.1 {+-} 0.1). The absence of a rate in isotopic water solvents shows that proton donation for solvent, lyons or DPG does not limit the rate. The substrate isotope effect of around 2 for the DPG kinetic term indicates that the proton abstraction step of the Amadori rearrangement by DPG is wholly or partially rate-limiting for this reaction. (author) 23 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Towards the unified non-classical physics: account for quantum fluctuations in equilibrium thermodynamics via the effective temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.G.Rudoy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of effective temperature (ET T*(T0, T is used in order to approximately "quantize" the thermodynamic functions of the dynamical object which is in the thermal equilibrium with thermal bath being at constant temperature T (T0=E0/kB, where E0 is the ground-state energy, kB - Boltzmann constant, is the characteristic ``quantum'' temperature of the system itself. On these grounds the extensive comparative investigation is carried out for the ``standard model'' of statistical mechanics - the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator (HO. Three well-known approaches are considered and their thermodynamic consequences thoroughly studied. These are: the exact quantum, or non-classical Planck-Einstein approach, intermediate, or semiclassical Bloch-Wigner approach and, finally, the pure classical, or Maxwell-Boltzmann approach.

  14. Numerical analysis of the air chemical non-equilibrium effect in combustion for a semi-sphere with opposing jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fa-Ming; Wang, Jiang-Feng; Li, Long-Fei

    2018-05-01

    The air chemical non-equilibrium effect (ACNEE) on hydrogen-air combustion flow fields at Mach number of 10 is numerically analyzed for a semi-sphere with a sonic opposing-hydrogen jet. The 2D axisymmetric multi-components N-S equations are solved by using the central scheme with artificial dissipation and the S-A turbulence model. Numerical results show that as compared to the result without ACNEE, the ACNEE has little influence on the structure of flow field, but has a considerable impact on fluid characteristics which reduces the maximum value of mass fraction of water in the flow field and increases the maximum value of mass fraction of water on solid surface, as well as the maximum surface temperature.

  15. Effect of temperature on the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium for aqueous solution of nonionic surfactant and salt: Experimental and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroutan, Masumeh [Physical Chemistry Department, School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, 14155-6455 Enghelab Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: foroutan@khayam.ut.ac.ir; Heidari, Nosrat; Mohammadlou, Maryam [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Uremia University, Uremia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sojahrood, Amin Jafari [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Uremia University, Uremia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    The effect of temperature on the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium of the aqueous solution of surfactant polyoxyethylene cetylether (with abbreviation name Brij 58) and diammonium hydrogen phosphate has been investigated at T = (303.15, 313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K. The Flory-Huggins equation with two electrostatic terms (Debye-Huckle and Pitzer-Debye-Huckle equations) was used to correlate the phase behavior of this system. Good agreement has been found between experimental and calculated data from both models. The results indicated that the enlargement of the two-phase region upon increasing the temperature. Additionally temperature dependency of the parameters of the Flory-Huggins model has been calculated.

  16. The effect of the initial exciton numbers on 54,56Fe(p, xp) Pre-Equilibrium Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bölükdemir, M. H.; Tel, E.; Aydın, A.; Okuducu, S.; Kaplan, A.

    2011-01-01

    In pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions, the geometry-dependent hybrid model is applied with the use of the neutron and proton densities to investigate the effect of initial exciton numbers on the nucleon emission spectra. The initial exciton numbers calculated with the theoretical neutron and proton densities have been obtained within the Skryme-Hartree-Fock method with SKM* and SLy4 forces on target nuclei in the 54,56 Fe(p, xp) reaction at 61.5-MeV incident proton energy by using a new calculationmethod of Tel et al. Also, the differences between the initial exciton numbers for protons and neutrons as a function of nuclear radius, focusing on systematic discrepancies correlated to differences in the proton and neutron densities have been investigated.

  17. Catalytic Effect of Activated Carbon and Activated Carbon Fiber in Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Based Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanzong; Zheng, Jingtang; Qu, Xianfeng; Yu, Weizhao; Chen, Honggang

    2008-06-01

    Catalysis and regeneration efficiency of granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) were investigated in a non-equilibrium plasma water treatment reactor with a combination of pulsed streamer discharge and GAC or ACF. The experimental results show that the degradation efficiency of methyl orange (MO) by the combined treatment can increase 22% (for GAC) and 24% (for ACF) respectively compared to pulsed discharge treatment alone, indicating that the combined treatment has a synergetic effect. The MO degradation efficiency by the combined treatment with pulsed discharge and saturated GAC or ACF can increase 12% and 17% respectively compared to pulsed discharge treatment alone. Both GAC and ACF show catalysis and the catalysis of ACF is prominent. Meanwhile, the regeneration of GAC and ACF are realized in this process. When H2O2 is introduced into the system, the utilization efficiency of ozone and ultraviolet light is improved and the regeneration efficiency of GAC and ACF is also increased.

  18. Catalytic Effect of Activated Carbon and Activated Carbon Fiber in Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Based Water Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yanzong; Zheng Jingtang; Qu Xianfeng; Yu Weizhao; Chen Honggang

    2008-01-01

    Catalysis and regeneration efficiency of granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) were investigated in a non-equilibrium plasma water treatment reactor with a combination of pulsed streamer discharge and GAC or ACF. The experimental results show that the degradation efficiency of methyl orange (MO) by the combined treatment can increase 22% (for GAC) and 24% (for ACF) respectively compared to pulsed discharge treatment alone, indicating that the combined treatment has a synergetic effect. The MO degradation efficiency by the combined treatment with pulsed discharge and saturated GAC or ACF can increase 12% and 17% respectively compared to pulsed discharge treatment alone. Both GAC and ACF show catalysis and the catalysis of ACF is prominent. Meanwhile, the regeneration of GAC and ACF are realized in this process. When H 2 O 2 is introduced into the system, the utilization efficiency of ozone and ultraviolet light is improved and the regeneration efficiency of GAC and ACF is also increased.

  19. Isotope effect of optical activity measurements on L-α-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darge, W.; Laczko, I.; Thiemann, W.

    1976-01-01

    If an optically active organic substance is labelled in the chirality center with another isotopic species (such as 15 N for 14 N) a pronounced variation of rotatory power is predicted. It was tried to varify this idea experimentally on L-α-alanine and found an isotope effect in ORD (optical rotatory dispersion). The magnitude of the rotation is mainly dependent on the pH of the solvent. The ratio of the optical activity alanine- 14 N/alanine- 15 N is about 1.02. It can be seen that the ratios of the molecular rotations are consistently lower than the corresponding ratios of the specific rotations. This is of course due to the fact that the molecular mass 15 M is larger than 14 M. This means tthat the mass difference is already taken into account so that the ratio of the molecular rotations could be defined as the ''net'' isotope effect in the ORDs of 15 N-substitued alanine. From the fact the ORD is different for the isotope-substitued alanine, one can reasonably assume that the absorption coefficient is also different. This leads to speculations about certain problems in the chemical evolution of the biosphere, such as the origin of optical activity. (T.G.)

  20. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joël [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Copenhagen Center for Atmospheric Research (CCAR), Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jost, Rémy [Laboratoire de Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPHY) Univ. de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Bhattacharya, S. K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Nangang, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [“Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry,” J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 18}O, and Δ{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from −40 to −74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying

  1. Preliminary Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) of the conceptual Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Flight System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.G.

    1976-01-01

    A failure modes, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) was made of the Brayton Isotope Power System Flight System (BIPS-FS) as presently conceived. The components analyzed include: Mini-BRU; Heat Source Assembly (HSA); Mini-Brayton Recuperator (MBR); Space Radiator; Ducts and Bellows, Insulation System; Controls; and Isotope Heat Source (IHS)

  2. Solvent effects and secondary isotope effects for probing diradical character in the thermal decarboxylation of β-peroxylactones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Cueto, O.; Guedes, L.N.; Rodriguez, L.O.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of solvent effects in the activation parameters and product distribution and the lack of secondary deuterium isotope effects at the α-carbon and β-alkyl migrant substantiates that the thermal decarboxylation of β-peroxy lactones proceeds via a 1,5-diradical

  3. Large effect of irradiance on hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones in Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Benthien, Albert; French, Katherine L.; Epping, Eric; Zondervan, Ingrid; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bijma, Jelle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen isotopic (δD) composition of long-chain alkenones produced by certain haptophyte algae has been suggested as a potential proxy for reconstructing paleo sea surface salinity. However, environmental parameters other than salinity may also affect the δD of alkenones. We investigated the impact of the level of irradiance on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of alkenones versus growth water by cultivating two strains of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi at different light intensities. The hydrogen isotope fractionation decreased by approximately 40‰ when irradiance was increased from 15 to 200 μmol photons m-2 s-1 above which it was relatively constant. The response is likely a direct effect of photosystem I and II activity as the relationship of the fractionation factor α versus light intensity can be described by an Eilers-Peeters photosynthesis model. This irradiance effect is in agreement with published δD data of alkenones derived from suspended particulate matter collected from different depths in the photic zone of the Gulf of California and the eastern tropical North Pacific. However, haptophyte algae tend to bloom at relatively high light intensities (>500 μmol photons m-2 s-1) occurring at the sea surface, at which hydrogen isotope fractionation is relatively constant and not affected by changes in light intensity. Alkenones accumulating in the sediment are likely mostly derived from these surface water haptophyte blooms, when the largest amount of biomass is produced. Therefore, the observed irradiance effect is unlikely to affect the applicability of the hydrogen isotopic composition of sedimentary long chain alkenones as a proxy for paleosalinity.

  4. Solvent isotope effects upon the thermodynamics of some transition-metal redox couples in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, M.J.; Nettles, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of substituting D 2 O for H 2 O as solvent upon the formal potentials of a number of transition-metal redox couples containing aquo, ammine, and simple chelating ligands have been investigated with the intention of evaluating the importance of specific solvation factors in the thermodynamics of such couples. The solvent liquid junction formed between H 2 O and D 2 O was shown to have a negligible effect on the measured formal potentials. Substantial solvent isotope effects were observed for a number of these systems, particularly for couples containing aquo ligands. The effects of separately deuterating the ligands and the surrounding solvent were investigated for some ammine couples. Possible origins of the solvent isotope effects are discussed in terms of changes in metal-ligand and ligand-solvent interactions. It is tentatively concluded that the latter influence provides the predominant contribution to the observed effects for aquo couples arising from increases in the extent of hydrogen bonding between the aquo ligands and surrounding solvent when D 2 O replaces H 2 O. The implications of these results in unraveling the solvent isotope effects upon the kinetics of simple redox reactions are also considered

  5. Volatility in Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Sizova, Natalia; Tauchen, George

    Stock market volatility clusters in time, carries a risk premium, is fractionally inte- grated, and exhibits asymmetric leverage effects relative to returns. This paper develops a first internally consistent equilibrium based explanation for these longstanding empirical facts. The model is cast i......, and the dynamic cross-correlations of the volatility measures with the returns calculated from actual high-frequency intra-day data on the S&P 500 aggregate market and VIX volatility indexes....

  6. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, C.M.; Huebner, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated. 18 refs

  7. Gluconeogenesis from labeled carbon: estimating isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    To estimate the rate of gluconeogenesis from steady-state incorporation of labeled 3-carbon precursors into glucose, isotope dilution must be considered so that the rate of labeling of glucose can be quantitatively converted to the rate of gluconeogenesis. An expression for the value of this isotope dilution can be derived using mathematical techniques and a model of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The present investigation employs a more complex model than that used in previous studies. This model includes the following pathways that may affect the correction for isotope dilution: 1) flux of 3-carbon precursor to the oxaloacetate pool via acetyl-CoA and the TCA cycle; 2) flux of 4- or 5-carbon compounds into the TCA cycle; 3) reversible flux between oxaloacetate (OAA) and pyruvate and between OAA and fumarate; 4) incomplete equilibrium between OAA pools; and 5) isotope dilution of 3-carbon tracers between the experimentally measured pool and the precursor for the TCA-cycle OAA pool. Experimental tests are outlined which investigators can use to determine whether these pathways are significant in a specific steady-state system. The study indicated that flux through these five pathways can significantly affect the correction for isotope dilution. To correct for the effects of these pathways an alternative method for calculating isotope dilution is proposed using citrate to relate the specific activities of acetyl-CoA and OAA

  8. Effectiveness of unit-based pricing of waste in the Netherlands: Applying a general equilibrium model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beukering, P.J.H.; Bartelings, H.; Linderhof, V.G.M.; Oosterhuis, F.H.

    2009-01-01

    Differential and variable rates (DVR) in waste collection charging give a price incentive to households to reduce their waste and increase recycling. International empirical evidence confirms the effectiveness of DVR schemes, with limited unwanted side effects. In the Netherlands, currently some 20%

  9. Effectiveness of unit-based pricing of waste in the Netherlands: applying a general equilibrium model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukering, van P.J.H.; Bartelings, H.; Linderhof, V.G.M.; Oosterhuis, F.H.

    2009-01-01

    Differential and variable rates (DVR) in waste collection charging give a price incentive to households to reduce their waste and increase recycling. International empirical evidence confirms the effectiveness of DVR schemes, with limited unwanted side effects. In the Netherlands, currently some 20%

  10. Dose formation and hematologic effects with prolonged internal exposure of rats by isotope 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sova, O.A.; Drozd, Yi.P.

    2013-01-01

    Processes in single dose formation and long-term domestic revenue 131 I in rats was investigated. Original method of estimating absorbed doses in hemacyte for macro-dosemeters indicators was proposed. Dose factors for hemacyte and the dynamics of the blood-forming organs doses for prolonged two cases of prolonged exposure was calculated. Hematologic effects were studied for two variants of entry of the isotope. Peculiarities of doses formation and identified hematological effects are discussed

  11. Isotope effect on the zero point energy shift upon condensation. I. Formulation and application to ethylene, methane, and fluoromethanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornblum, Z.C.; Ishida, T.

    1978-01-01

    A method of evaluating the isotope effect (IE) on the zero point energy (ZPE) shift upon condensation due to the London dispersion forces in the liquid has been formulated. It is expressed to the first order, as a product of an isotope-independent liquid factor and a factor of isotopic differences in gas-phase properties. The theory has been tested by calculating the effective atomic charges for carbon and hydrogen in ethylene, according to the CNDO/2 molecular orbital algorithm, and it correctly predicts the magnitude of the IE on the ZPE shift and the first-order sum rules involving the isotopic ethylenes. However, it fails to explain the difference in vapor pressures of isotopic isomers. The theory has also been applied to the D/H and to the 13 C/ 12 C isotope effects in methane and fluoromethanes. The results obtained from the CNDO/2 calculations have been compared with the experimental values of the total infrared absorption intensities and of the IE on the ZPE shift of isotopic methanes. Based on these calculations, the molecular properties that enhance the stronger dispersion forces in the liquid phase between the lighter molecules than between the isotopically heavier molecules, and hence favor a large IE on the ZPE shift, have been deduced

  12. Development of effect assessment methodology for the deployment of fast reactor cycle system with dynamic computable general equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiotani, Hiroki; Ono, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) is a widely used computable general equilibrium (CGE) model developed by Purdue University. Although the GTAP-E, an energy environmental version of the GTAP model, is useful for surveying the energy-economy-environment-trade linkage is economic policy analysis, it does not have the decomposed model of the electricity sector and its analyses are comparatively static. In this study, a recursive dynamic CGE model with a detailed electricity technology bundle with nuclear power generation including FR was developed based on the GTAP-E to evaluate the long-term socioeconomic effects of FR deployment. The capital stock changes caused by international investments and some dynamic constraints of the FR deployment and operation (e.g., load following capability and plutonium mass balance) were incorporated in the analyses. The long-term socioeconomic effects resulting from the deployment of economic competitive FR with innovative technologies can be assessed; the cumulative effects of the FR deployment on GDP calculated using this model costed over 40 trillion yen in Japan and 400 trillion yen worldwide, which were several times more than the cost of the effects calculated using the conventional cost-benefit analysis tool, because of ripple effects and energy substitutions among others. (author)

  13. Isotope exchange reactions on ceramic breeder materials and their effect on tritium inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, M; Baba, A [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawamura, Y; Nishi, M

    1998-03-01

    Though lithium ceramic materials such as Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} are considered as breeding materials in the blanket of a D-T fusion reactor, the release behavior of the bred tritium in these solid breeder materials has not been fully understood. The isotope exchange reaction rate between hydrogen isotopes in the purge gas and tritium on the surface of breeding materials have not been quantified yet, although helium gas with hydrogen or deuterium is planned to be used as the blanket purge gas in the recent blanket designs. The mass transfer coefficient representing the isotope exchange reaction between H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}O or that between D{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O in the ceramic breeding materials bed is experimentally obtained in this study. Effects of isotope exchange reactions on the tritium inventory in the bleeding blanket is discussed based on data obtained in this study where effects of diffusion of tritium in the grain, absorption of water in the bulk of grain, and adsorption of water on the surface of grain, together with two types of isotope exchange reactions are considered. The way to estimate the tritium inventory in a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} blanket used in this study shows a good agreement with data obtained in such in-situ experiments as MOZART, EXOTIC-5, 6 and TRINE experiments. (author)

  14. First-principles theory of anharmonicity and the inverse isotope effect in superconducting palladium-hydride compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errea, Ion; Calandra, Matteo; Mauri, Francesco

    2013-10-25

    Palladium hydrides display the largest isotope effect anomaly known in the literature. Replacement of hydrogen with the heavier isotopes leads to higher superconducting temperatures, a behavior inconsistent with harmonic theory. Solving the self-consistent harmonic approximation by a stochastic approach, we obtain the anharmonic free energy, the thermal expansion, and the superconducting properties fully ab initio. We find that the phonon spectra are strongly renormalized by anharmonicity far beyond the perturbative regime. Superconductivity is phonon mediated, but the harmonic approximation largely overestimates the superconducting critical temperatures. We explain the inverse isotope effect, obtaining a -0.38 value for the isotope coefficient in good agreement with experiments, hydrogen anharmonicity being mainly responsible for the isotope anomaly.

  15. Tungsten isotopic compositions of iron meteorites: Chronological constraints vs. cosmogenic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowski, A.; Quitté, G.; Halliday, A. N.; Kleine, T.

    2006-02-01

    High-precision W isotopic compositions are presented for 35 iron meteorites from 7 magmatic groups (IC, IIAB, IID, IIIAB, IIIF, IVA, and IVB) and 3 non-magmatic groups (IAB, IIICD, and IIE). Small but resolvable isotopic variations are present both within and between iron meteorite groups. Variations in the 182W/ 184W ratio reflect either time intervals of metal-silicate differentiation, or result from the burnout of W isotopes caused by a prolonged exposure to galactic cosmic rays. Calculated apparent time spans for some groups of magmatic iron meteorites correspond to 8.5 ± 2.1 My (IID), 5.1 ± 2.3 My (IIAB), and 5.3 ± 1.3 My (IVB). These time intervals are significantly longer than those predicated from models of planetesimal accretion. It is shown that cosmogenic effects can account for a large part of the W isotopic variation. No simple relationship exists with exposure ages, compromising any reliable method of correction. After allowance for maximum possible cosmogenic effects, it is found that there is no evidence that any of the magmatic iron meteorites studied here have initial W isotopic compositions that differ from those of Allende CAIs [ ɛ182W = - 3.47 ± 0.20; [T. Kleine, K. Mezger, H. Palme, E. Scherer and C. Münker, Early core formation in asteroids and late accretion of chondrite parent bodies: evidence from 182Hf- 182W in CAIs, metal-rich chondrites and iron meteorites, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta (in press)]. Cosmogenic corrections cannot yet be made with sufficient accuracy to obtain highly precise ages for iron meteorites. Some of the corrected ages nevertheless require extremely early metal-silicate segregation no later than 1 My after formation of CAIs. Therefore, magmatic iron meteorites appear to provide the best examples yet identified of material derived from the first planetesimals that grew by runaway growth, as modelled in dynamic simulations. Non-magmatic iron meteorites have a more radiogenic W isotopic composition than magmatic

  16. Modeling the nonequilibrium effects in a nonquasi-equilibrium thermodynamic cycle based on steepest entropy ascent and an isothermal-isobaric ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guanchen; Spakovsky, Michael R. von

    2016-01-01

    Conventional first principle approaches for studying nonequilibrium or far-from-equilibrium processes depend on the mechanics of individual particles or quantum states. They also require many details of the mechanical features of a system to arrive at a macroscopic property. In contrast, thermodynamics provides an approach for determining macroscopic property values without going into these details, because the overall effect of particle dynamics results, for example, at stable equilibrium in an invariant pattern of the “Maxwellian distribution”, which in turn leads to macroscopic properties. However, such an approach is not generally applicable to a nonequilibrium process except in the near-equilibrium realm. To adequately address these drawbacks, steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEAQT) provides a first principle, thermodynamic-ensemble approach applicable to the entire nonequilibrium realm. Based on prior developments by the authors, this paper applies the SEAQT framework to modeling the nonquasi-equilibrium cycle, which a system with variable volume undergoes. Using the concept of hypoequilibrium state and nonequilibrium intensive properties, this framework provides a complete description of the nonequilibrium evolution in state of the system. Results presented here reveal how nonequilibrium effects influence the performance of the cycle. - Highlights: • First-principles nonequilibrium model of thermodynamic cycles. • Study of thermal efficiency losses due to nonequilibrium effects. • Study of systems undergoing nonquasi-equilibrium processes. • Study of the coupling of system relaxation and interaction with a reservoir.

  17. The Conceptual Change Approach to Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canpolat, Nurtac; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts (e.g. dynamic nature of equilibrium, definition of equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, qualitative interpreting of equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions). This…

  18. Isotope and fast ions turbulence suppression effects: Consequences for high-β ITER plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J.; Görler, T.; Jenko, F.

    2018-05-01

    The impact of isotope effects and fast ions on microturbulence is analyzed by means of non-linear gyrokinetic simulations for an ITER hybrid scenario at high beta obtained from previous integrated modelling simulations with simplified assumptions. Simulations show that ITER might work very close to threshold, and in these conditions, significant turbulence suppression is found from DD to DT plasmas. Electromagnetic effects are shown to play an important role in the onset of this isotope effect. Additionally, even external ExB flow shear, which is expected to be low in ITER, has a stronger impact on DT than on DD. The fast ions generated by fusion reactions can additionally reduce turbulence even more although the impact in ITER seems weaker than in present-day tokamaks.

  19. Gamma-radiation and isotopic effect on the critical behavior in triglycine selenate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassem, M.E.; Hamed, A.E.; Abulnasr, L.; Abboudy, S. [Alexandria Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Physics

    1994-11-01

    Isotopic effects in pure and {gamma}-irradiated triglycine selenate crystals were investigated using the specific heat (C{sub p}) technique. The obtained results showed an interesting dependence of the critical behavior of C{sub p} on the deuterium content. With increasing content of deuterium, the character of the phase transition changed from a second order ({lambda}-type) to a first order transition. After {gamma}-irradiation, the behavior of C{sub p} around the phase transition region was essentially affected. The transition temperature, T{sub c}, decreased and {Delta}C{sub p} depressed, and the transition became broad. It was noted that the effect of {gamma}-irradiation is opposite to the isotopic effect. (author).

  20. Equilibrium leach testing of Magnox swarf and sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A.; Angus, M.J.; Kirkham, I.A.; Tyson, A.

    1988-10-01

    A static equilibrium leach test has been developed to simulate repository conditions after ground water has penetrated the near field barrier. The repository components - waste, matrix and backfill - have been equilibrated with water for up to one year. Leachates were analysed for U, Pu, Np 237 , Am 241 , Cs 137 , Sr 90 , Tc 99 , I 129 and C 14 . Results are presented for leaching from Magnox fuel cladding wastes using a combination of matrices, backfills and atmospheric conditions. The equilibrium concentrations were generally very low and have been compared with the concentration of each isotope in drinking water that would give an adult an annual effective dose equivalent of 0.1mSv. (author)

  1. Equilibrium leach testing of Magnox swarf and sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A.; Angus, M.J.; Kirkham, I.A.; Tyson, A.

    1987-10-01

    A static equilibrium leach test has been developed to simulate repository conditions after ground water has penetrated the near field barrier. The repository components - waste, matrix and backfill - have been equilibrated with water for up to one year. Leachates were analysed for U, Pu, Np 237 , Am 241 , Cs 137 , Sr 90 , Tc 99 , I 129 and C 14 . Results are presented for leaching from Magnox fuel cladding wastes using a combination of matrices, backfills and atmospheric conditions. The equilibrium concentrations were generally very low and have been compared with the concentration of each isotope in drinking water that would give an adult an annual effective dose equivalent of 0.1mSv. (author)

  2. Thermal transport across solid-solid interfaces enhanced by pre-interface isotope-phonon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eungkyu; Luo, Tengfei

    2018-01-01

    Thermal transport across solid interfaces can play critical roles in the thermal management of electronics. In this letter, we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the isotope effect on the thermal transport across SiC/GaN interfaces. It is found that engineered isotopes (e.g., 10% 15N or 71Ga) in the GaN layer can increase the interfacial thermal conductance compared to the isotopically pure case by as much as 23%. Different isotope doping features, such as the isotope concentration, skin depth of the isotope region, and its distance from the interface, are investigated, and all of them lead to increases in thermal conductance. Studies of spectral temperatures of phonon modes indicate that interfacial thermal transport due to low-frequency phonons (transport. This work may provide insights into interfacial thermal transport and useful guidance to practical material design.

  3. Adsorption of selected emerging contaminants onto PAC and GAC: Equilibrium isotherms, kinetics, and effect of the water matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Francisco J; Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Casas, Francisco

    2017-07-03

    The removal of three emerging contaminants (ECs) (amitriptyline hydrochloride (AH), methyl salicylate (MS) and 2-phenoxyethanol (PE)) dissolved in several water matrices by means of their adsorption onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) and granular activated carbon (GAC) has been investigated. When dissolved in ultrapure water, adsorption of the ECs followed the trend of AH > MS > PE, with a positive effect of the adsorbent dose. According to the analysis of the adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics, PAC showed strongly higher adsorption efficiency in both capacity and velocity of the adsorption, in agreement with its higher mesoporosity. Equilibrium isotherm data were fitted by Langmuir and Freundlich models. Pseudo-second order kinetics modeled very successfully the adsorption process. Finally, the effect of the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the water matrices (ultrapure water, surface water and two effluents from wastewater treatment plants) on the adsorption of the selected ECs onto PAC was established, as well as its performance on the removal of water quality parameters. Results show a negative effect of the DOM content on the adsorption efficiency. Over 50% of organic matter was removed with high PAC doses, revealing that adsorption onto PAC is an effective technology to remove both micro-pollutants and DOM from water matrices.

  4. The rate of second electron transfer to QB(-) in bacterial reaction center of impaired proton delivery shows hydrogen-isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, Ágnes; Wraight, Colin A; Maróti, Péter

    2015-02-01

    The 2nd electron transfer in reaction center of photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a two step process in which protonation of QB(-) precedes interquinone electron transfer. The thermal activation and pH dependence of the overall rate constants of different RC variants were measured and compared in solvents of water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O). The electron transfer variants where the electron transfer is rate limiting (wild type and M17DN, L210DN and H173EQ mutants) do not show solvent isotope effect and the significant decrease of the rate constant of the second electron transfer in these mutants is due to lowering the operational pKa of QB(-)/QBH: 4.5 (native), 3.9 (L210DN), 3.7 (M17DN) and 3.1 (H173EQ) at pH7. On the other hand, the proton transfer variants where the proton transfer is rate limiting demonstrate solvent isotope effect of pH-independent moderate magnitude (2.11±0.26 (WT+Ni(2+)), 2.16±0.35 (WT+Cd(2+)) and 2.34±0.44 (L210DN/M17DN)) or pH-dependent large magnitude (5.7 at pH4 (L213DN)). Upon deuteration, the free energy and the enthalpy of activation increase in all proton transfer variants by about 1 kcal/mol and the entropy of activation becomes negligible in L210DN/M17DN mutant. The results are interpreted as manifestation of equilibrium and kinetic solvent isotope effects and the structural, energetic and kinetic possibility of alternate proton delivery pathways are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of chemical equilibrium on turbine engine performance for various fuels and combustor temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Donald H.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1992-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the differences in turbine engine performance with and without the chemical dissociation effects for various fuel types over a range of combustor temperatures. Both turbojet and turbofan engines were studied with hydrocarbon fuels and cryogenic, nonhydrocarbon fuels. Results of the study indicate that accuracy of engine performance decreases when nonhydrocarbon fuels are used, especially at high temperatures where chemical dissociation becomes more significant. For instance, the deviation in net thrust for liquid hydrogen fuel can become as high as 20 percent at 4160 R. This study reveals that computer central processing unit (CPU) time increases significantly when dissociation effects are included in the cycle analysis.

  6. Persistence and toxicological effects of pesticides in topsoil: use of the equilibrium partitioning theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronday, R.; Kammen-Polman, van A.M.M.; Dekker, A.; Houx, N.W.H.; Leistra, M.

    1997-01-01

    The springtail Folsomia candida was exposed to the insecticide parathion in loamy, sandy and peaty soils. The dose-response relationships were measured and used to calculate the 50%-effect (EC50) values. The toxicity of parathion in the three soils could be explained from its bio-availability, as a

  7. Effects of habitat size and quality on equilibrium density and extinction time of Sorex araneus populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, C.; Roos, de A.M.

    1998-01-01

    1. The effects of changes in habitat size and quality on the expected population density and the expected time to extinction of Sorex araneus are studied by means of mathematical models that incorporate demographic stochasticity. 2. Habitat size is characterized by the number of territories, while

  8. Effectiveness of unit-based pricing of waste in the Netherlands: applying a general equilibrium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beukering, Pieter J H; Bartelings, Heleen; Linderhof, Vincent G M; Oosterhuis, Frans H

    2009-11-01

    Differential and variable rates (DVR) in waste collection charging give a price incentive to households to reduce their waste and increase recycling. International empirical evidence confirms the effectiveness of DVR schemes, with limited unwanted side effects. In the Netherlands, currently some 20% of the population is charged at DVR. This is less than in several other countries. Taking into account differences between types of households and dwellings, this study analyses various scenarios for extended use of DVR in the Netherlands. The analysis shows that further penetration of DVR is a cost-effective instrument for waste reduction and more recycling. Moreover, DVR can itself be seen as a necessary condition for the successful implementation of other economic instruments, such as waste taxes. It is therefore recommended to stimulate municipalities to adopt DVR schemes in the Netherlands, accompanied by the provision of adequate facilities for waste separation by households. Before introducing DVR in 'very strongly urbanized' municipalities (i.e. the 12 largest cities in the Netherlands) a pilot experiment in one of them might be useful to test the behavioral response in this category.

  9. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Analysis of Double Diffusive, Nanofluid Forced Convection in Catalytic Microreactors with Radiation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Govone

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical investigation of the second law performance of double diffusive forced convection in microreactors with the inclusion of nanofluid and radiation effects. The investigated microreactors consist of a single microchannel, fully filled by a porous medium. The transport of heat and mass are analysed by including the thick walls and a first order, catalytic chemical reaction on the internal surfaces of the microchannel. Two sets of thermal boundary conditions are considered on the external surfaces of the microchannel; (1 constant temperature and (2 constant heat flux boundary condition on the lower wall and convective boundary condition on the upper wall. The local thermal non-equilibrium approach is taken to thermally analyse the porous section of the system. The mass dispersion equation is coupled with the transport of heat in the nanofluid flow through consideration of Soret effect. The problem is analytically solved and illustrations of the temperature fields, Nusselt number, total entropy generation rate and performance evaluation criterion (PEC are provided. It is shown that the radiation effect tends to modify the thermal behaviour within the porous section of the system. The radiation parameter also reduces the overall temperature of the system. It is further demonstrated that, expectedly, the nanoparticles reduce the temperature of the system and increase the Nusselt number. The total entropy generation rate and consequently PEC shows a strong relation with radiation parameter and volumetric concentration of nanoparticles.

  10. Study of isotope effects in the hydrogen transport of an 8% CrWVTa martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, G.A.; Sedano, L.A.; Perujo, A.; Douglas, K.

    2001-01-01

    A time-dependent gas-phase isovolumetric desorption technique has been used to assess the isotope effects in the diffusive transport parameters of hydrogen in an 8% CrWVTa reduced activation martensitic steel in the temperature range of 423-892 K and driving pressures from 4 x 10 4 - 1 x 10 5 Pa. The experiments have been run with both protium and deuterium obtaining their respective transport parameters, diffusivity (D), Sieverts' constant (K S ), permeability (Φ), trap site density (η t ) and the trapping activation energy (E t ). Isotope effects on steel are analysed and compared with α-iron. A new way to derive more accurate tritium transport parameters is proposed. (orig.)

  11. Isotope Effects in the Reactions of Chloroform Isotopologues with Cl, OH and OD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Elna Johanna Kristina; Johnson, Matthew Stanley; Nielsen, Claus J.

    2009-01-01

    The kinetic isotope effects in the reactions of CHCl3, CDCl3, and 13CHCl3 with Cl, OH, and OD radicals have been determined in relative rate experiments at 298 ( 1 K and atmospheric pressure monitored by long path FTIR spectroscopy. The spectra were analyzed using a nonlinear least-squares spectral.......002, kCHCl3+OD/kCDCl3+OD ) 3.95 ( 0.03, and kCHCl3+OD/k13CHCl3+OD ) 1.032 ( 0.004. Larger isotope effects in the OH reactions than in the Cl reactions are opposite to the trends for CH4 and CH3Cl reported in the literature. The origin of these differences was investigated using electronic structure...

  12. A study on the isotope effects in the reduction of carbon dioxide by zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senegacnik, M.

    1957-06-01

    We have determined the isotope effects which occur in the reduction of carbon dioxide by zinc. It has been shown that in the case of irreversible surface reactions, Bernstein's equation which permits the calculation of the fractionation factor is still valid. These experimental factors are in good agreement with those obtained by calculating the partition functions of the adsorbed activated complexes. In the reaction mechanism used, the model of the activated complex corresponds to the dissociation of one of the carbon oxygen bonds CO 2 → CO + O. Perturbations arising from the slight reversibility of the reaction Zn + CO 2 ↔ ZnO + CO on the isotope effects on the carbon and oxygen atoms have also been calculated. (author) [fr

  13. Equilibrium sampling of environmental pollutants in fish: Comparison with lipid- normalized concentrations and homogenization effects on chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha

    2011-01-01

    of the equilibrium sampling technique, while at the same time confirming that the fugacity capacity of these lipid-rich tissues for PCBs was dominated by the lipid fraction. Equilibrium sampling was also applied to homogenates of the same fish tissues. The PCB concentrations in the PDMS were 1.2 to 2.0 times higher...... in the homogenates (statistically significant in 18 of 21 cases, phomogenization increased the chemical activity of the PCBs and decreased the fugacity capacity of the tissue. This observation has implications for equilibrium sampling and partition coefficients determined using tissue...... homogenates....

  14. The odd-proton effects on the potential energy surfaces of odd mass Tl, Au, Ir and Re isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    De Wieclawik, W; Larsson, S E; Leander, G; Vieu, C; Dionisio, J S

    1976-01-01

    The total potential energy surfaces of thallium, gold, iridium and rhenium odd mass isotopes are calculated microscopically as functions of the quadrupole deformation, epsilon /sub 2/, when the odd protons occupy definite orbitals. The nuclear shapes and the static equilibrium deformations of these nuclei are deduced from the results of these calculations for the proton orbitals nearest to the Fermi level. The influence of the hexadecapole deformation, epsilon /sub 4/, on these results is investigated too. Finally, a few experimental data available for these odd mass nuclei are correlated to the corresponding theoretical results. (16 refs).

  15. Understanding non-equilibrium collisional and expansion effects in the solar wind with Parker Solar Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korreck, K. E.; Klein, K. G.; Maruca, B.; Alterman, B. L.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of the solar wind from the corona to the Earth and throughout the heliosphere is a complex interplay between local micro kinetics and large scale expansion effects. These processes in the solar wind need to be separated in order to understand and distinguish the dominant mechanism for heating and acceleration of the solar wind. With the upcoming launch in 2018 of Parker Solar Probe and the launch of Solar Orbiter after, addressing the local and global phenomena will be enabled with in situ measurements. Parker Solar Probe will go closer to the Sun than any previous mission enabling the ability to examine the solar wind at an early expansion age. This work examines the predictions for what will be seen inside of the 0.25 AU (54 solar radii) where Parker Solar Probe will take measurements and lays the groundwork for disentangling the expansion and collisional effects. In addition, methods of thermal plasma data analysis to determine the stability of the plasma in the Parker Solar Probe measurements will be discussed.

  16. Equilibrium charge fluctuations of a charge detector and its effect on a nearby quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tijerina, David; Vernek, Edson; Ulloa, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    We study the Kondo state of a spin-1/2 quantum dot (QD), in close proximity to a quantum point contact (QPC) charge detector near the conductance regime of the 0.7 anomaly. The electrostatic coupling between the QD and QPC introduces a remote gate on the QD level, which varies with the QPC gate voltage. Furthermore, models for the 0.7 anomaly [Y. Meir et al., PRL 89,196802(2002)] suggest that the QPC lodges a Kondo-screened level with charge-correlated hybridization, which may be also affected by capacitive coupling to the QD, giving rise to a competition between the two Kondo ground states. We model the QD-QPC system as two capacitively-coupled Kondo impurities, and explore the zero-bias transport of both the QD and the QPC for different local gate voltages and coupling strengths, using the numerical renormalization group and variational methods. We find that the capacitive coupling produces a remote gating effect, non-monotonic in the gate voltages, which reduces the gate voltage window for Kondo screening in either impurity, and which can also drive a quantum phase transition out of the Kondo regime. Our study is carried out for intermediate coupling strengths, and as such is highly relevant to experiments; particularly, to recent studies of decoherence effects on QDs. Supported by MWN/CIAM and NSF PIRE.

  17. Concerted and stepwise mechanisms in cycloaddition reactions: potential surfaces and isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houk, K.N.; Yi Li; Storer, Joey; Raimondi, Laura; Beno, Brett

    1994-01-01

    CASSCF/6-31G * calculations have been performed on concerted and stepwise Diels-Alder reactions of butadiene with ethene, the dimerization of butadiene, and the dimerization of cyclobutadiene. The relative energies of concerted and stepwise mechanisms are compared, and the factors influencing these ''energies of concert'' are discussed. The comparison of calculated isotope effects to experimental data provides support for theoretical results. (Author)

  18. Kinetic tritium isotopic effects in the position 2 for 5'-hydroxy-L-tryptophane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroda, E.; Kanska, M.

    2006-01-01

    Tryptophanase converts 5'-hydroxy-L-tryptophane to pyrogronic acid and ammonia, however there are known conditions for the reversed reaction. Mechanism of the processes are not known till now. Kinetic isotopic effect (KIE) permits finding the rate determining stage in the multistage process. In presented communication, 5'-hydroxy-[2- 3 H]-L-tryptophane was synthesized and the KIE in the room temperature determined for different reaction stages

  19. Relative rate study of the kinetic isotope effect in the 13CH3D + Cl reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joelsson, Lars Magnus Torvald; Forecast, Roslyn; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    The 13CH3D/12CH4kinetic isotope effect, α13CH3D, of CH4 + Cl is determined for the first time, using the relative rate technique and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. α13CH3D is found to be 1.60 ± 0.04. In addition, a quantum chemistry/transition state theory model with tunneling...

  20. Kinetic Isotope Effects (KIE) and Density Functional Theory (DFT): A Match Made in Heaven?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Fristrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Determination of experimental kinetic isotope effects (KIE) is one of the most useful tools for the exploration of reaction mechanisms in organometallic chemistry. The approach has been further strengthened during the last decade with advances in modern computational chemistry. This allows for th...... reaction). The approach is highlighted by using recent examples from both stoichiometric and catalytic reactions, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, and enzyme catalysis to illustrate the expected accuracy and utility of this approach....

  1. Environmental effects on the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... which may be influenced by the river run-off due to heavy rainfall. The coral skeleton was ... including cloud cover (Weber and Woodhead, 1972;. Muscatine et al. ..... The effect of colony topography on climate signals in coral ...

  2. Association equilibrium constants and populations of clusters (H2O)n(g) and (D2O)n(g): differences between isotopomers and a possible relation to isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slanina, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Equilibrium constants of H 2 O(g) and D 2 O(g) associations to clusters (H 2 O) n (g) and (D 2 O) n (g) were calculated on the basis of the ab initio SCF CI MCY-B water-water pair potential. Populations of the components of equilibrium cluster mixtures were evaluated at various temperatures and pressures for both isotopomeric series. Differences between the H and D steam are pointed out and possible consequences are discussed. (author)

  3. The Effect of Non-equilibrium Kinetics on Oxygen Chemistry in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naduvalath, Balakrishnan

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that in photon-dominated regions, oxygen chemistry is initiated by the O+H2 yields OH+H reaction. The reaction has an energy barrier of about 0.4 eV with ground state reactants and it is slow at low temperatures. There is strong experimental evidence that vibrational excitation of the H2 molecule increases the reactivity significantly. We present extensive quantum calculations of cross sections and rate coefficients for the O+H2(v) reaction for v = 0 - 3 of the H2 molecule and show that the vibrational excitation of the molecule has a significant effect on reactivity, especially at low temperatures.

  4. Effect of non-equilibrium flow chemistry and surface catalysis on surface heating to AFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Henline, William D.; Chen, Yih-Kanq

    1991-01-01

    The effect of nonequilibrium flow chemistry on the surface temperature distribution over the forebody heat shield on the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle was investigated using a reacting boundary-layer code. Computations were performed by using boundary-layer-edge properties determined from global iterations between the boundary-layer code and flow field solutions from a viscous shock layer (VSL) and a full Navier-Stokes solution. Surface temperature distribution over the AFE heat shield was calculated for two flight conditions during a nominal AFE trajectory. This study indicates that the surface temperature distribution is sensitive to the nonequilibrium chemistry in the shock layer. Heating distributions over the AFE forebody calculated using nonequilibrium edge properties were similar to values calculated using the VSL program.

  5. Effective equilibrium states in mixtures of active particles driven by colored noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, René; Brader, J. M.; Sharma, A.; Marconi, U. Marini Bettolo

    2018-01-01

    We consider the steady-state behavior of pairs of active particles having different persistence times and diffusivities. To this purpose we employ the active Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model, where the particles are driven by colored noises with exponential correlation functions whose intensities and correlation times vary from species to species. By extending Fox's theory to many components, we derive by functional calculus an approximate Fokker-Planck equation for the configurational distribution function of the system. After illustrating the predicted distribution in the solvable case of two particles interacting via a harmonic potential, we consider systems of particles repelling through inverse power-law potentials. We compare the analytic predictions to computer simulations for such soft-repulsive interactions in one dimension and show that at linear order in the persistence times the theory is satisfactory. This work provides the toolbox to qualitatively describe many-body phenomena, such as demixing and depletion, by means of effective pair potentials.

  6. Calcium Isotope Geochemistry: Research Horizons and Nanoscale Fractionation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, J. M.; Depaolo, D. J.; Richter, F. M.; Fantle, M. S.; Simon, J. I.; Ryerson, F. J.; Ewing, S. A.; Turchyn, A. V.; Yang, W.; Owens, T. L.

    2008-12-01

    Interest in studies of calcium isotope variations in nature continues to increase. Investigations span human biology, plants and soils, oceanography and paleoclimate, early solar system processes, aqueous geochemistry, and silicate liquid structure. Variations in the 44Ca/40Ca ratio are generally small, about 5 ‰, but gradual small improvements in analytical capability now yield 0.05 to 0.1 ‰ resolution. The field is still plagued by a lack of universal standards for isotope ratios and data representation, but these are secondary issues. Traditional isotopic systems have been based in equilibrium thermodynamics, which can explain the magnitude and sign of observed mass-dependent fractionation behavior. For Ca isotopes this is not the case. There is still no reliable way to estimate the equilibrium free energy associated with isotopic exchange between most phases of interest. Experiments are difficult to interpret because it is almost impossible to precipitate minerals from aqueous solution at equilibrium at low temperature. Some studies suggest that, for example, there is no equilibrium isotopic fractionation between calcite and dissolved aqueous Ca. There is good evidence that most Ca isotopic fractionation is caused by kinetic effects. The details of the controlling processes are still missing, and without this mechanistic understanding it is difficult to fully understand the implications of natural isotopic variations. Recent work on dissolved Ca, calcite, and sulfates in both laboratory and natural settings is shedding light on where the fractionation may arise. There is emerging evidence for mass dependent fractionation associated with aqueous diffusion, but probably the primary source of the effects is in the details of precipitation of minerals from solution. This makes the fractionation potentially dependent on a number of factors, including solution composition and mineral growth rate. The next challenge is to develop appropriate experimental tests and

  7. Solvent and solute isotope effects in the aqueous solution of gases. Progress report, July 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, B.B.; Krause, D. Jr.

    1979-10-01

    After developing a 3 He/ 4 He dual beam collection system for the mass spectrometer, the isotopic fractionation factor was determined for helium dissolved in H 2 O, D 2 O, seawater and ethanol. In all solvents the temperature dependence of the fractionation is different from that for a simple isotope vapor pressure effect. Addition of salt to H 2 O increases the fractionation, and the relative salting-out coefficient changes with temperature. A double isotopic effect occurs - the fractionations in D 2 O and H 2 O differ. In ethanol the fractionation is 25% less than in H 2 O

  8. The effect of metallicity on the atmospheres of exoplanets with fully coupled 3D hydrodynamics, equilibrium chemistry, and radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, B.; Mayne, N. J.; Baraffe, I.; Tremblin, P.; Manners, J.; Amundsen, D. S.; Goyal, J.; Acreman, D.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we have performed a series of simulations of the atmosphere of GJ 1214b assuming different metallicities using the Met Office Unified Model (UM). The UM is a general circulation model (GCM) that solves the deep, non-hydrostatic equations of motion and uses a flexible and accurate radiative transfer scheme, based on the two-stream and correlated-k approximations, to calculate the heating rates. In this work we consistently couple a well-tested Gibbs energy minimisation scheme to solve for the chemical equilibrium abundances locally in each grid cell for a general set of elemental abundances, further improving the flexibility and accuracy of the model. As the metallicity of the atmosphere is increased we find significant changes in the dynamical and thermal structure, with subsequent implications for the simulated phase curve. The trends that we find are qualitatively consistent with previous works, though with quantitative differences. We investigate in detail the effect of increasing the metallicity by splitting the mechanism into constituents, involving the mean molecular weight, the heat capacity and the opacities. We find the opacity effect to be the dominant mechanism in altering the circulation and thermal structure. This result highlights the importance of accurately computing the opacities and radiative transfer in 3D GCMs.

  9. Nonlocal effects in nonisothermal hydrodynamics from the perspective of beyond-equilibrium thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütter, Markus; Brader, Joseph M

    2009-06-07

    We examine the origins of nonlocality in a nonisothermal hydrodynamic formulation of a one-component fluid of particles that exhibit long-range correlations, e.g., due to a spherically symmetric, long-range interaction potential. In order to furnish the continuum modeling with physical understanding of the microscopic interactions and dynamics, we make use of systematic coarse graining from the microscopic to the continuum level. We thus arrive at a thermodynamically admissible and closed set of evolution equations for the densities of momentum, mass, and internal energy. From the consideration of an illustrative special case, the following main conclusions emerge. There are two different source terms in the momentum balance. The first is a body force, which in special circumstances can be related to the functional derivative of a nonlocal Helmholtz free energy density with respect to the mass density. The second source term is proportional to the temperature gradient, multiplied by the nonlocal entropy density. These two source terms combine into a pressure gradient only in the absence of long-range effects. In the irreversible contributions to the time evolution, the nonlocal contributions arise since the self-correlations of the stress tensor and heat flux, respectively, are nonlocal as a result of the microscopic nonlocal correlations. Finally, we point out specific points that warrant further discussions.

  10. A Tale of Two Gases: Isotope Effects Associated with the Enzymatic Production of H2 and N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Gandhi, H.; Kreuzer, H. W.; Moran, J.; Hill, E. A.; McQuarters, A.; Lehnert, N.; Ostrom, N. E.; Hegg, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    Stable isotopes can provide considerable insight into enzymatic mechanisms and fluxes in various biological processes. In our studies, we used stable isotopes to characterize both enzyme-catalyzed H2 and N2O production. H2 is a potential alternative clean energy source and also a key metabolite in many microbial communities. Biological H2 production is generally catalyzed by hydrogenases, enzymes that combine protons and electrons to produce H2 under anaerobic conditions. In our study, H isotopes and fractionation factors (α) were used to characterize two types of hydrogenases: [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Due to differences in the active site, the α associated with H2 production for [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases separated into two distinct clusters (αFeFe > αNiFe). The calculated kinetic isotope effects indicate that hydrogenase-catalyzed H2 production has a preference for light isotopes, consistent with the relative bond strengths of O-H and H-H bonds. Interestingly, the isotope effects associated with H2 consumption and H2-H2O exchange reactions were also characterized, but in this case no specific difference was observed between the different enzymes. N2O is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 300 times that of CO2, and the concentration of N2O is currently increasing at a rate of ~0.25% per year. Thus far, bacterial and fungal denitrification processes have been identified as two of the major sources of biologically generated N2O. In this study, we measured the δ15N, δ18O, δ15Nα (central N atom in N2O), and δ15Nβ (terminal N atom in N2O) of N2O generated by purified fungal P450 nitric oxide reductase (P450nor) from Histoplasma capsulatum. We observed normal isotope effects for δ18O and δ15Nα, and inverse isotope effects for bulk δ15N (the average of Nα and Nβ) and δ15Nβ. The observed isotope effects have been used in conjunction with DFT calculations to provide important insight into the mechanism of P450nor. Similar

  11. Solvent effect on the rate and equilibrium of reaction between 10-phenylphenoxarsine and methyl iodide. Vliyanie rastvoritelya na skorost' i ravnovesie reaktsii 10-fenilfenoksarsina s iodistym metilom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, V I; Gumerov, N S; Rakhmatullin, R R [Kazanskij Khimiko-Tekhnologicheskij Inst., Kazan (USSR)

    1990-02-01

    Effect of solvent nature on nucleophilic capacity of three-coordinated arsenic and the equilibrium state of 10-phenylphenoxarsine (PA) reaction with methyl iodide are studied. Kinetic investigations are carried out by the conductometry at 24,35,45 deg C. It is established that quaternization of PA with methyl iodide when substituting a solvent (ketone for alcohol) increases 3-14 times with simultaneous growth of the activation energy value. When transforming from aprotic solvents to protic ones PA interaction equilibrium with methyl iodide shifts to the side of arsonic salt formation.

  12. Communication: Isotopic effects on tunneling motions in the water trimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videla, Pablo E.; Rossky, Peter J.; Laria, D.

    2016-01-01

    We present results of ring polymer molecular dynamics simulations that shed light on the effects of nuclear quantum fluctuations on tunneling motions in cyclic [H 2 O] 3 and [D 2 O] 3 , at the representative temperature of T = 75 K. In particular, we focus attention on free energies associated with two key isomerization processes: The first one corresponds to flipping transitions of dangling OH bonds, between up and down positions with respect to the O–O–O plane of the cluster; the second involves the interchange between connecting and dangling hydrogen bond character of the H-atoms in a tagged water molecule. Zero point energy and tunneling effects lead to sensible reductions of the free energy barriers. Due to the lighter nature of the H nuclei, these modifications are more marked in [H 2 O] 3 than in [D 2 O] 3 . Estimates of the characteristic time scales describing the flipping transitions are consistent with those predicted based on standard transition-state-approximation arguments

  13. Communication: Isotopic effects on tunneling motions in the water trimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videla, Pablo E. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rossky, Peter J. [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Laria, D., E-mail: dhlaria@cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-02-14

    We present results of ring polymer molecular dynamics simulations that shed light on the effects of nuclear quantum fluctuations on tunneling motions in cyclic [H{sub 2}O]{sub 3} and [D{sub 2}O]{sub 3}, at the representative temperature of T = 75 K. In particular, we focus attention on free energies associated with two key isomerization processes: The first one corresponds to flipping transitions of dangling OH bonds, between up and down positions with respect to the O–O–O plane of the cluster; the second involves the interchange between connecting and dangling hydrogen bond character of the H-atoms in a tagged water molecule. Zero point energy and tunneling effects lead to sensible reductions of the free energy barriers. Due to the lighter nature of the H nuclei, these modifications are more marked in [H{sub 2}O]{sub 3} than in [D{sub 2}O]{sub 3}. Estimates of the characteristic time scales describing the flipping transitions are consistent with those predicted based on standard transition-state-approximation arguments.

  14. Equilibrium sampling of environmental pollutants in fish: comparison with lipid-normalized concentrations and homogenization effects on chemical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; McLachlan, Michael S

    2011-07-01

    Equilibrium sampling of organic pollutants into the silicone polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has recently been applied in biological tissues including fish. Pollutant concentrations in PDMS can then be multiplied with lipid/PDMS distribution coefficients (D(Lipid,PDMS) ) to obtain concentrations in fish lipids. In the present study, PDMS thin films were used for equilibrium sampling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in intact tissue of two eels and one salmon. A classical exhaustive extraction technique to determine lipid-normalized PCB concentrations, which assigns the body burden of the chemical to the lipid fraction of the fish, was additionally applied. Lipid-based PCB concentrations obtained by equilibrium sampling were 85 to 106% (Norwegian Atlantic salmon), 108 to 128% (Baltic Sea eel), and 51 to 83% (Finnish lake eel) of those determined using total extraction. This supports the validity of the equilibrium sampling technique, while at the same time confirming that the fugacity capacity of these lipid-rich tissues for PCBs was dominated by the lipid fraction. Equilibrium sampling was also applied to homogenates of the same fish tissues. The PCB concentrations in the PDMS were 1.2 to 2.0 times higher in the homogenates (statistically significant in 18 of 21 cases, p equilibrium sampling and partition coefficients determined using tissue homogenates. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  15. On the Isotopic Altitude Effect of Precipitation in the Northern Adriatic (Croatia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roller-Lutz, Z.; Mance, D.; Hunjak, T., E-mail: Roller@medri.hr [Stable Isotope Laboratory, Medical Faculty, University of Rijeka, Rijeka (Croatia); Lutz, H. O. [Stable Isotope Laboratory, Medical Faculty, University of Rijeka, Rijeka (Croatia); Physics Faculty, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    The upper (northern) Adriatic is very rich in precipitation. This input into the water system and its stable isotope composition is a basic factor, knowledge of which is required for proper use and management of water resources. The geomorphology of the region (e.g., mountains of 1400 m next to the sea) can cause specific local conditions. The isotopic composition of precipitation has been measured in various locations at different altitudes. For {delta}{sup 18}O this 'altitude effect' is found to lie around -0.2 per mille /100 m; its exact value depends on the specific location and the season. The {delta}{sup 2}H values and the d-excess vary correspondingly. (author)

  16. Sensitized charge carrier injection into organic crystals studied by isotope effects in weak magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bube, W.; Michel-Beyerle, M.E.; Haberkorn, R.; Steffens, E.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic field (H approximately 50 Oe) dependence of the rhodamine sensitized triplet exciton density in anthracene crystals is influenced by isotopic substitution. This confirms the hyperfine interaction as mechanism explaining the change of the spin multiplicity in the initially formed singlet state of the radical pair. The isotope effect occurs in the sensitizing dye ( 14 N/ 15 N) rather than at the molecular site of the injected charge within the crystal. This can be understood in terms of the high hopping frequency of the charge carriers as compared to the time constant of the hyperfine induced singlet-triplet transition. Since the dye molecules adsorb in an oriented fashion, the angular dependence of the magnetic field modulation of the triplet exciton density can be interpreted without assuming any additional interactions. (Auth.)

  17. Isotope effect on hydrated electron relaxation dynamics studied with time-resolved liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-05-01

    The excited state relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron in H2O and D2O are investigated using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy in a liquid microjet. The data show that the initial excited state decays on a time scale of 75 ± 12 fs in H2O and 102 ± 8 fs in D2O, followed by slower relaxation on time scales of 400 ± 70 fs and 390 ± 70 fs that are isotopically invariant within the precision of our measurements. Based on the time evolution of the transient signals, the faster and slower time constants are assigned to p → s internal conversion (IC) of the hydrated electron and relaxation on the ground electronic state, respectively. This assignment is consistent with the non-adiabatic mechanism for relaxation of the hydrated electron and yields an isotope effect of 1.4 ± 0.2 for IC of the hydrated electron.

  18. Isotopic spin effect in three-pion Bose-Einstein correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, N.

    1998-01-01

    Bose-Einstein (BE) correlations of identical particles in multiple production processes are extensively studied last years because they give an information on the space-time region of interaction. The basic effect is analogous to Hanbury-Brown - Twiss (HBT) interferometry in optics and suggests statistical production of the particles (mainly π mesons). The possible presence of coherent pionic component (for example, in the case of disoriented chiral condensate formation) modifies the HBT effect. On the other hand, the pions (contrary to photons) are subject to isotopic spin (and electric charge) conservation and so they can not be emitted independently. While the corresponding change of the statistical part is not essential for large multiplicities, the coherent part changes substantially when isotopic spin conservation is taken into account. BE correlations of the pions in the presence of both statistical and coherent components are reconsidered taking into account isotopic spin conservation in the coherent part. That will result in appearance of additional contribution to pionic correlation function. (author)

  19. Quantum Dynamics Study of the Isotopic Effect on Capture Reactions: HD, D2 + CH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dunyou; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Time-dependent wave-packet-propagation calculations are reported for the isotopic reactions, HD + CH3 and D2 + CH3, in six degrees of freedom and for zero total angular momentum. Initial state selected reaction probabilities for different initial rotational-vibrational states are presented in this study. This study shows that excitations of the HD(D2) enhances the reactivities; whereas the excitations of the CH3 umbrella mode have the opposite effects. This is consistent with the reaction of H2 + CH3. The comparison of these three isotopic reactions also shows the isotopic effects in the initial-state-selected reaction probabilities. The cumulative reaction probabilities (CRP) are obtained by summing over initial-state-selected reaction probabilities. The energy-shift approximation to account for the contribution of degrees of freedom missing in the six dimensionality calculation is employed to obtain approximate full-dimensional CRPs. The rate constant comparison shows H2 + CH3 reaction has the biggest reactivity, then HD + CH3, and D2 + CH3 has the smallest.

  20. The effect of aromatization on the isotopic compositions of hydrocarbons during early diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, K. H.; Boreham, C. J.; Summons, R. E.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with varying degrees of aromatization were isolated from the Eocene Messel Shale (Rheingraben, Germany). The high abundances of these compounds and their structural resemblances to cyclic triterpenoid lipids are consistent with derivation from microbial rather than thermal processes. Compounds structurally related to oleanane contain from five to nine double bonds; those within a series of aromatized hopanoids contain from three to nine. All are products of diagenetic reactions that remove hydrogen or methyl groups, and, in several cases, break carbon-carbon bonds to open rings. Aromatized products are on average depleted in 13C relative to possible precursors by l.2% (range: l.5% enrichment to 4% depletion, n = 9). The dependence of 13C content on the number of double bonds is not, however, statistically significant and it must be concluded that there is no strong evidence for isotopic fractionation accompanying diagenetic aromatization. Isotopic differences between series (structures related to ursane, des-A-ursane, des-A-lupane, des-A-arborane, and possibly, des-A-gammacerane are present) are much greater, indicating that 13C contents are controlled primarily by source effects. Fractionations due to chromatographic isotope effects during HPLC ranged from 0.1 to 2.8%.