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Sample records for equilibrium fe isotope

  1. Equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganic aqueous Fe(III) and the siderophore complex, Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Baker, Joel A.; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2008-01-01

    be controlled by isotope fractionation between the free and complexed iron.We have determined the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation induced by organic ligand activity in experiments with solutions having co-existing inorganic Fe(III) species and siderophore complexes, Fedesferrioxamine B (at pH 2). The two......-type fractionation during precipitation, this experiment yielded an isotope fractionation factor of a56Fesolution-solid=1.00027. Calculations based on these results indicate that isotopic re-equilibration is unlikely to significantly affect our determined equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganically...... and organically complexed Fe. To determine the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganically and organically bound Fe(III), experiments with variable proportions of inorganic Fe were carried out at 25 °C. Irrespective of the proportion of inorganic Fe, equilibrium fractionation factors were within...

  2. Modeling Equilibrium Fe Isotope Fractionation in Fe-Organic Complexes: Implications for the use of Fe Isotopes as a Biomarker and Trends Based on the Properties of Bound Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagal-Goldman, S.; Kubicki, J. D.

    2006-05-01

    Fe Isotopes have been proposed as a useful tracer of biological and geochemical processes. Key to understanding the effects these various processes have on Fe isotopes is accurate modeling of the reactions responsible for the isotope fractionations. In this study, we examined the theoretical basis for the claims that Fe isotopes can be used as a biomarker. This was done by using molecular orbital/density functional theory (MO/DFT) calculations to predict the equilibrium fractionation of Fe isotopes due to changes in the redox state and the bonding environment of Fe. Specifically, we predicted vibrational frequencies for iron desferrioxamine (Fe-DFOB), iron triscatechol (Fe(cat)3), iron trisoxalate (Fe(ox)3), and hexaaquo iron (Fe(H2O)6) for complexes containing both ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) iron. Using these vibrational frequencies, we then predicted fractionation factors between these six complexes. The predicted fractionation factors resulting from changes in the redox state of Fe fell in the range 2.5- 3.5‰. The fractionation factors resulting from changes in the bonding environment of Fe ranged from 0.2 to 1.4‰. These results indicate that changes in the bonding strength of Fe ligands are less important to Fe isotope fractionation processes than are changes to the redox state of Fe. The implications for use of Fe as a tracer of biological processes is clear: abiological redox changes must be ruled out in a sample before Fe isotopes are considered as a potential biomarker. Furthermore, the use of Fe isotopes to measure the redox state of the Earths surface environment through time is supported by this work, since changes in the redox state of Fe appear to be the more important driver of isotopic fractionations. In addition to the large differences between redox-driven fractionations and ligand-driven fractionations, we will also show general trends in the demand for heavy Fe isotopes as a function of properties of the bound ligand. This will help the

  3. Pre-equilibrium emission and nuclear level densities in neutron induced reactions on Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivascu, M.; Avrigeanu, M.; Ivascu, I.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1989-01-01

    The experimentally well known (n,p), (n,α) and (n,2n) reaction excitation functions, from threshold to 20 MeV incident energy, and neutron, proton and alpha-particle emission spectra at 14.8 MeV from Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes are calculated in the frame of a generalized Geometry-Dependent-Hybrid pre-equilibrium emission model, including angular momentum and parity conservation and alpha-particle emission, and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Use of a consistent statistical model parameter set enables the validation of the pre-equilibrium emission model. Moreover, an enhanced pre-equilibrium emission from higher spin composite system states, associated with higher incident orbital momenta, has been evidenced. Higher orbital momenta involved also in the emergent channels of this process are suggested by calculations of the residual nuclei level populations. Finally, the unitary account of the (n, p) and (n, 2n) reaction excitation functions for Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes has allowed the proper establishment of the limits of the transition excitation range between the two different nuclear level density models used at medium and higher excitation energies, respectively. (author). 83 refs, 15 figs

  4. Isotope anomalies in oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaka, M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the isotope anomalies in oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium systems, according to the calculations of the equilibrium constants for oxygen isotopic exchange reactions, and the calculations of the oxygen isotope separation factors between two phases. The equilibrium constants (K65, K67, K68 and K69) of 16 O- 15 O, 16 O 17 O, 16 O- 18 O, and 16 O- 19 O exchange reactions between diatomic oxides were calculated in a wide temperature range on the basis of quantum statistical mechanics. Many equilibrium constants showed the anomalous mass effects, and then had the crossover temperatures and the mass independent fractionation (MIF) temperatures which held K67 = K65, K67 = K68, or K67 = K69, etc. For example, the equilibrium constants for the reactions between OH and the other diatomic oxides (MO) showed the anomalous mass effects, when M was Li, Na, Mg, K, Fe, Al, Ge, Zr, Pt, etc. The 16 O 15 O, 16 O 17 O, 16 O- 18 O, and 16 O- 19 O oxygen isotope separation factors (S65, S67, S68 and S69) between two phases were calculated, when OH and CO were in the first phase, and SiO was in the second phase. Although the oxygen isotopic exchange equilibria in the two phases had no MIF and crossover temperatures, the separation factors showed the anomalous mass effects and had the temperatures. According to what is called the normal mass effects for the equilibrium constant of isotopic exchange reaction, the value of InK68/InK67 is 1.885. Therefore, the value of InS68/InS67 should be 1.885 too. The value calculated, however, widely changed. It can be concluded from the results obtained in the present work that some oxygen isotopic exchange equilibria cause the anomalous mass effects, the anomalous oxygen isotope separation factors, and then isotope anomalies

  5. Equilibrium deuterium isotope effect of surprising magnitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.J.; Pressman, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Seemingly large deuterium isotope effects are reported for the preference of deuterium for the α-chloro site to the bridgehead or to the vinyl site in samples of anti-7-chlorobicyclo[4.3.2]undecatetraene-d 1 . Studies of molecular models did not provide a basis for these large equilibrium deuterium isotope effects. The possibility is proposed that these isotope effects only appear to be large for want of comparison with isotope effects measured for molecules that might provide even greater contrasts in local force fields

  6. Preservation of Fe Isotope Proxies in the Rock Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.; Beard, B.; Valley, J.; Valaas, E.

    2005-12-01

    Iron isotope variations provide powerful constraints on redox conditions and pathways involved during biogeochemical cycling of Fe in surface and near-surface environments. The relative isotopic homogeneity of igneous rocks and most bulk weathering products contrasts with the significant isotopic variations (4 per mil in 56Fe/54Fe) that accompany oxidation of Fe(II)aq, precipitation of sulfides, and reduction by bacteria. These isotopic variations often reflect intrinsic (equilibrium) Fe isotope fractionations between minerals and aqueous species whose interactions may be directly or indirectly catalyzed by bacteria. In addition, Fe isotope exchange may be limited between reactive Fe pools in low-temperature aqueous-sediment environments, fundamentally reflecting disequilibrium effects. In the absence of significant sulfide, dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction by bacteria produces relatively low 56Fe/54Fe ratios for Fe(II)aq and associated biogenic minerals such as magnetite and siderite. In contrast, Fe(II)aq that exchanges with Fe sulfides (FeS and pyrite) is relatively enriched in 56Fe/54Fe ratios. In modern and ancient environments, anoxic diagenesis tends to produce products that have low 56Fe/54Fe ratios, whereas oxidation of Fe(II)aq from hydrothermal sources tends to produce ferric Fe products that have high 56Fe/54Fe ratios. Redox cycling by bacteria tends to produce reactive ferric Fe reservoirs that have low 56Fe/54Fe ratios. Application of Fe isotopes as a proxy for redox conditions in the ancient rock record depends upon the preservation potential during metamorphism, given the fact that most Archean sedimentary sequences have been subjected to regional greenschist- to granulite-facies metamorphism. The 1.9 Ga banded iron formations (BIFs) of the Lake Superior region that are intruded by large ~1 Ga intrusions (e.g., Duluth gabbro) provide a test of the preservation potential for primary, low-temperature Fe isotope variations in sedimentary rocks. 56Fe/54

  7. Concentration effect on inter-mineral equilibrium isotope fractionation: insights from Mg and Ca isotopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Wang, W.; Zhou, C.; Kang, J.; Wu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Many naturally occurring minerals, such as carbonate, garnet, pyroxene, and feldspar, are solid solutions with large variations in chemical compositions. Such variations may affect mineral structures and modify the chemical bonding environment around atoms, which further impacts the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors among minerals. Here we investigated the effects of Mg content on equilibrium Mg and Ca isotope fractionation among carbonates and Ca content on equilibrium Ca isotope fractionation between orthopyroxene (opx) and clinopyroxene (cpx) using first-principles calculations. Our results show that the average Mg-O bond length increases with decreasing Mg/(Mg+Ca) in calcite when it is greater than 1/48[1] and the average Ca-O bond length significantly decreases with decreasing Ca/(Ca+Mg+Fe) in opx when it ranges from 2/16 to 1/48[2]. Equilibrium isotope fractionation is mainly controlled by bond strengths, which could be measured by bond lengths. Thus, 103lnα26Mg/24Mg between dolomite and calcite dramatically increases with decreasing Mg/(Mg+Ca) in calcite [1] and it reaches a constant value when it is lower than 1/48. 103lnα44Ca/40Ca between opx and cpx significantly increases with decreasing Ca content in opx when Ca/(Ca+Mg+Fe) ranges from 2/16 to 1/48 [2]. If Ca/(Ca+Mg+Fe) is below 1/48, 103lnα44Ca/40Ca is not sensitive to Ca content. Based on our results, we conclude that the concentration effect on equilibrium isotope fractionation could be significant within a certain range of chemical composition of minerals, which should be a ubiquitous phenomenon in solid solution systems. [1] Wang, W., Qin, T., Zhou, C., Huang, S., Wu, Z., Huang, F., 2017. GCA 208, 185-197. [2] Feng, C., Qin, T., Huang, S., Wu, Z., Huang, F., 2014. GCA 143, 132-142.

  8. Variability of Fe isotope compositions of hydrothermal sulfides and oxidation products at mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohu; Wang, Jianqiang; Chu, Fengyou; Wang, Hao; Li, Zhenggang; Yu, Xing; Bi, Dongwei; He, Yongsheng

    2018-04-01

    Fe isotopes compositions of the sulfides from the SMAR may suggest the equilibrium fractionation process under high temperature conditions. The red Fe oxides are enriched in heavy Fe isotopes, indicating that the oxidative weathering processes result in the occurrence of significant Fe-isotope fractionation and the preferential enrichment of heavy Fe isotopes in the oxidation product.

  9. Isotope effects in the equilibrium and non-equilibrium vaporization of tritiated water and ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgaertner, F.; Kim, M.-A.

    1990-01-01

    The vaporization isotope effect of the HTO/H 2 O system has been measured at various temperatures and pressures under equilibrium as well as non-equilibrium conditions. The isotope effect values measured in equilibrium sublimation or distillation are in good agreement with the theoretical values based on the harmonic oscillator model. In non-equilibrium vaporization at low temperatures ( 0 C), the isotope effect decreases rapidly with decreasing system pressure and becomes negligible when the system pressure is lowered more than one tenth of the equilibrium vapor pressure. At higher temperatures, the isotope effect decreases very slowly with decreasing system pressure. Discussion is extended for the application of the present results to the study of biological enrichment of tritium. (author)

  10. Identifying apparent local stable isotope equilibrium in a complex non-equilibrium system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuyang; Cao, Xiaobin; Wang, Jianwei; Bao, Huiming

    2018-02-28

    Although being out of equilibrium, biomolecules in organisms have the potential to approach isotope equilibrium locally because enzymatic reactions are intrinsically reversible. A rigorous approach that can describe isotope distribution among biomolecules and their apparent deviation from equilibrium state is lacking, however. Applying the concept of distance matrix in graph theory, we propose that apparent local isotope equilibrium among a subset of biomolecules can be assessed using an apparent fractionation difference (|Δα|) matrix, in which the differences between the observed isotope composition (δ') and the calculated equilibrium fractionation factor (1000lnβ) can be more rigorously evaluated than by using a previous approach for multiple biomolecules. We tested our |Δα| matrix approach by re-analyzing published data of different amino acids (AAs) in potato and in green alga. Our re-analysis shows that biosynthesis pathways could be the reason for an apparently close-to-equilibrium relationship inside AA families in potato leaves. Different biosynthesis/degradation pathways in tubers may have led to the observed isotope distribution difference between potato leaves and tubers. The analysis of data from green algae does not support the conclusion that AAs are further from equilibrium in glucose-cultured green algae than in the autotrophic ones. Application of the |Δα| matrix can help us to locate potential reversible reactions or reaction networks in a complex system such as a metabolic system. The same approach can be broadly applied to all complex systems that have multiple components, e.g. geochemical or atmospheric systems of early Earth or other planets. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Solvent Isotope-induced Equilibrium Perturbation for Isocitrate Lyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartararo, Christine E.; Hadi, Timin; Cahill, Sean M.; Blanchard, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Isocitrate lyase (ICL) catalyzes the reversible retro-aldol cleavage of isocitrate to generate glyoxylate and succinate. ICL is the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, which allows for the anaplerosis of citric acid cycle intermediates under nutrient limiting conditions. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the source of ICL for these studies, ICL is vital for the persistence phase of the bacteria’s life cycle. Solvent kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) in the direction of isocitrate cleavage of D2OV = 2.0 ± 0.1 and D2O[V/Kisocitrate] = 2.2 ± 0.3 arise from the initial deprotonation of the C2 hydroxyl group of isocitrate or the protonation of the aci-acid of succinate product of the isocitrate aldol cleavage by a solvent-derived proton. This KIE suggested that an equilibrium mixture of all protiated isocitrate, glyoxylate and succinate prepared in D2O, would undergo transient changes in equilibrium concentrations as a result of the solvent KIE and solvent-derived deuterium incorporation into both succinate and isocitrate. No change in the isotopic composition of glyoxylate was expected or observed. We have directly monitored the changing concentrations of all isotopic species of all reactants and products using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Continuous monitoring of glyoxylate by 1H NMR spectroscopy shows a clear equilibrium perturbation in D2O. The final equilibrium isotopic composition of reactants in D2O revealed di-deuterated succinate, protiated glyoxylate, and mono-deuterated isocitrate, with the transient appearance and disappearance of mono-deuterated succinate. A model for the equilibrium perturbation of substrate species, and their time-dependent isotopic composition is presented. PMID:24261638

  12. Low-temperature, non-stoichiometric oxygen isotope exchange coupled to Fe(II)-goethite interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frierdich, Andrew J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Beard, Brian L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Scherer, Michelle M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Spicuzza, Michael J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Valley, John W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Johnson, Clark M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of natural iron oxide minerals has been widely used as a paleoclimate proxy. Interpretation of their stable isotope compositions, however, requires accurate knowledge of isotopic fractionation factors and an understanding of their isotopic exchange kinetics, the latter of which informs us how diagenetic processes may alter their isotopic compositions. Prior work has demonstrated that crystalline iron oxides do not significantly exchange oxygen isotopes with pure water at low temperature, which has restricted studies of isotopic fractionation factors to precipitation experiments or theoretical calculations. Using a double three-isotope method (¹⁸O-¹⁷O-¹⁶O and ⁵⁷Fe-⁵⁶Fe-⁵⁴Fe) we compare O and Fe isotope exchange kinetics, and demonstrate, for the first time, that O isotope exchange between structural O in crystalline goethite and water occurs in the presence of aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) at ambient temperature (i.e., 22–50 °C). The three-isotope method was used to extrapolate partial exchange results to infer the equilibrium, mass-dependent isotope fractionations between goethite and water. In addition, this was combined with a reversal approach to equilibrium by reacting goethite in two unique waters that vary in composition by about 16‰ in ¹⁸O/¹⁶O ratios. Our results show that interactions between Fe(II)aq and goethite catalyzes O isotope exchange between the mineral and bulk fluid; no exchange (within error) is observed when goethite is suspended in ¹⁷O-enriched water in the absence of Fe(II)aq. In contrast, Fe(II)-catalyzed O isotope exchange is accompanied by significant changes in ¹⁸O/¹⁶O ratios. Despite significant O exchange, however, we observed disproportionate amounts of Fe versus O exchange, where Fe isotope exchange in goethite was roughly three times that of O. This disparity provides novel insight into the reactivity of oxide minerals in aqueous

  13. Glutathione reductase: solvent equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.K.; Vanoni, M.A.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Glutathione reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG). The kinetic mechanism is ping-pong, and we have investigated the rate-limiting nature of proton-transfer steps in the reactions catalyzed by the spinach, yeast, and human erythrocyte glutathione reductases using a combination of alternate substrate and solvent kinetic isotope effects. With NADPH or GSSG as the variable substrate, at a fixed, saturating concentration of the other substrate, solvent kinetic isotope effects were observed on V but not V/K. Plots of Vm vs mole fraction of D 2 O (proton inventories) were linear in both cases for the yeast, spinach, and human erythrocyte enzymes. When solvent kinetic isotope effect studies were performed with DTNB instead of GSSG as an alternate substrate, a solvent kinetic isotope effect of 1.0 was observed. Solvent kinetic isotope effect measurements were also performed on the asymmetric disulfides GSSNB and GSSNP by using human erythrocyte glutathione reductase. The Km values for GSSNB and GSSNP were 70 microM and 13 microM, respectively, and V values were 62 and 57% of the one calculated for GSSG, respectively. Both of these substrates yield solvent kinetic isotope effects greater than 1.0 on both V and V/K and linear proton inventories, indicating that a single proton-transfer step is still rate limiting. These data are discussed in relationship to the chemical mechanism of GSSG reduction and the identity of the proton-transfer step whose rate is sensitive to solvent isotopic composition. Finally, the solvent equilibrium isotope effect measured with yeast glutathione reductase is 4.98, which allows us to calculate a fractionation factor for the thiol moiety of GSH of 0.456

  14. Ab initio calculations of the Fe(II) and Fe(III) isotopic effects in citrates, nicotianamine, and phytosiderophore, and new Fe isotopic measurements in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Wang, Kun; Foriel, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant transition metal in higher plants and variations in its isotopic compositions can be used to trace its utilization. In order to better understand the effect of plant-induced isotopic fractionation on the global Fe cycling, we have estimated by quantum chemical calculations the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation between different Fe species relevant to the transport and storage of Fe in higher plants: Fe(II)-citrate, Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(II)-nicotianamine, and Fe(III)-phytosiderophore. The ab initio calculations show firstly, that Fe(II)-nicotianamine is ˜3‰ (56Fe/54Fe) isotopically lighter than Fe(III)-phytosiderophore; secondly, even in the absence of redox changes of Fe, change in the speciation alone can create up to ˜1.5‰ isotopic fractionation. For example, Fe(III)-phytosiderophore is up to 1.5‰ heavier than Fe(III)-citrate2 and Fe(II)-nicotianamine is up to 1‰ heavier than Fe(II)-citrate. In addition, in order to better understand the Fe isotopic fractionation between different plant components, we have analyzed the iron isotopic composition of different organs (roots, seeds, germinated seeds, leaves and stems) from six species of higher plants: the dicot lentil (Lens culinaris), and the graminaceous monocots Virginia wild rye (Elymus virginicus), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis), river oat (Uniola latifolia), and Indian goosegrass (Eleusine indica). The calculations may explain that the roots of strategy-II plants (Fe(III)-phytosiderophore) are isotopically heavier (by about 1‰ for the δ56Fe) than the upper parts of the plants (Fe transported as Fe(III)-citrate in the xylem or Fe(II)-nicotianamine in the phloem). In addition, we suggest that the isotopic variations observed between younger and older leaves could be explained by mixing of Fe received from the xylem and the phloem.

  15. Assessment of local and regional isotopic equilibrium in the mantle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, A W; Hart, S R [Carnegie Institution of Washington, D.C. (USA). Dept. of Terrestrial Magnetism

    1978-02-01

    The assumption of local equilibrium during partial melting is fundamental to the interpretation of isotope and trace element data for mantle-derived rocks. If disequilibrium melting is significant, the scale of the chemical and isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle indicated by the data could be as small as the grain size of the mantle rock, and the isotope data themselves are then of doubtful value to the understanding of mantle processes. To assess the scale of isotopic heterogeneity in a partially molten asthenosphere the authors review the Sr isotopic data of volcanic rocks from oceanic regions and the available experimental data on diffusion kinetics in minerals and melts similar to those existing in the mantle. Although diffusion data are scarce and afflicted with uncertainties, most of the diffusion coefficients for cations in mantle minerals at temperatures of 1000 to 1200/sup 0/C appear to be greater than 10/sup -13/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/. Struntium diffusion in liquid basalt is more rapid, with diffusion coefficients of D = 10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ near 1300/sup 0/C. Simple model calculations show that, with these D values, a fluid-free mantle can maintain a state of disequilibrium on a centimeter scale for periods of 10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ years. The state of disequilibrium found in many mantle-derived xenoliths is thus easily explained. A partially molten mantle, on the other hand, will tend to equilibrate locally in less than 10/sup 5/ to 10/sup 6/ years. The analytical data on natural rocks likewise indicate that the inhomogeneities are both old (> 1.5 b.y.) and regional in character and that the consistent isotopic differences between ocean island and ocean floor volcanics cannot be explained by small-scall hetorogeneity of the source rock.

  16. Isotopic Evidence of Unaccounted for Fe and Cu Erythropoietic Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarede, F.; Telouk, P.; Lamboux, A.; Jaouen, K.; Balter, V.

    2011-12-01

    Despite its potential importance for understanding perturbations in the Fe-Cu homeostatic pathways, the natural isotopic variability of these metals in the human body remains unexplored. We measured the Fe, Cu, and Zn isotope compositions of total blood, serum, and red blood cells of ~50 young blood donors by multiple-collector ICP-MS after separation and purification by anion exchange chromatography. Zn is on average 0.2 permil heavier in erythrocytes (δ 66Zn=0.44±0.33 permil) with respect to serum but shows much less overall isotopic variability than Fe and Cu, which indicates that isotope fractionation depends more on redox conditions than on ligand coordination. On average, Fe in erythrocytes (δ 56Fe=-2.59±0.47 permil) is isotopically light by 1-2 permil with respect to serum, whereas Cu in erythrocytes (δ 65Cu=0.56±0.50 permil) is 0.8 percent heavier. Fe and Cu isotope compositions clearly separate erythrocytes of men and women. Fe and Cu from B-type men erythrocytes are visibly more fractionated than all the other blood types. Isotope compositions provide an original method for evaluating metal mass balance and homeostasis. Natural isotope variability shows that the current models of Fe and Cu erythropoiesis, which assume that erythropoiesis is restricted to bone marrow, violate mass balance requirements. It unveils unsuspected major pathways for Fe, with erythropoietic production of isotopically heavy ferritin and hemosiderin, and for Cu, with isotopically light Cu being largely channeled into blood and lymphatic circulation rather than into superoxide dismutase-laden erythrocytes. Iron isotopes provide an intrinsic measuring rod of the erythropoietic yield, while Cu isotopes seem to gauge the relative activity of erythropoiesis and lymphatics.

  17. Equilibrium mass-dependent fractionation relationships for triple oxygen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaobin; Liu, Yun

    2011-12-01

    With a growing interest in small 17O-anomaly, there is a pressing need for the precise ratio, ln 17α/ln 18α, for a particular mass-dependent fractionation process (MDFP) (e.g., for an equilibrium isotope exchange reaction). This ratio (also denoted as " θ") can be determined experimentally, however, such efforts suffer from the demand of well-defined process or a set of processes in addition to high precision analytical capabilities. Here, we present a theoretical approach from which high-precision ratios for MDFPs can be obtained. This approach will complement and serve as a benchmark for experimental studies. We use oxygen isotope exchanges in equilibrium processes as an example. We propose that the ratio at equilibrium, θE ≡ ln 17α/ln 18α, can be calculated through the equation below: θa-bE=κa+(κa-κb){ln18βb}/{ln18α} where 18βb is the fractionation factor between a compound "b" and the mono-atomic ideal reference material "O", 18αa-b is the fractionation factor between a and b and it equals to 18βa/ 18βb and κ is a new concept defined in this study as κ ≡ ln 17β/ln 18β. The relationship between θ and κ is similar to that between α and β. The advantages of using κ include the convenience in documenting a large number of θ values for MDFPs and in estimating any θ values using a small data set due to the fact that κ values are similar among O-bearing compounds with similar chemical groups. Frequency scaling factor, anharmonic corrections and clumped isotope effects are found insignificant to the κ value calculation. However, the employment of the rule of geometric mean (RGM) can significantly affect the κ value. There are only small differences in κ values among carbonates and the structural effect is smaller than that of chemical compositions. We provide κ values for most O-bearing compounds, and we argue that κ values for Mg-bearing and S-bearing compounds should be close to their high temperature limitation (i.e., 0.5210 for

  18. Stable Fe isotope fractionation during anaerobic microbial dissimilatory iron reduction at low pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, P.; Amenabar, M. J.; Boyd, E. S.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.

    2017-12-01

    In low-temperature anaerobic environments microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) plays an important role in Fe cycling. At neutral pH, sorption of aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq, produced by DIR) catalyzes isotopic exchange between Fe(II) and solid Fe(III), producing 56Fe/54Fe fractionations on the order of 3‰ during DIR[1,2,3]. At low pH, however, the absence of sorbed Fe(II) produces only limited abiologic isotopic exchange[4]. Here we investigated the scope of isotopic exchange between Fe(II)aq and ferric (hydr)oxides (ferrihydrite and goethite) and the associated stable Fe isotope fractionation during DIR by Acidianus strain DS80 at pH 3.0 and 80°C[5]. Over 19 days, 13% reduction of both minerals via microbial DIR was observed. The δ56Fe values of the fluid varied from -2.31 to -1.63‰ (ferrihydrite) and -0.45 to 0.02‰ (goethite). Partial leaching of bulk solid from each reactor with dilute HCl showed no sorption of Fe(II), and the surface layers of the solids were composed of Fe(III) with high δ56Fe values (ferrihydrite: 0.20 to 0.48‰ and goethite: 1.20 to 1.30‰). These results contrast with the lack of Fe isotope exchange in abiologic low-pH systems and indicate a key role for biology in catalyzing Fe isotope exchange between Fe(II)aq and Fe(III) solids, despite the absence of sorbed Fe(II). The estimated fractionation factor (ΔFeFe(III) -Fe(II)aq 2.6‰) from leaching of ferrihydrite is similar to the abiologic equilibrium fractionation factor ( 3.0‰)[3]. The fractionation factor (ΔFeFe(III) -Fe(II)aq 2.0‰) for goethite is higher than the abiologic fractionation factor ( 1.05‰)[2], but is consistent with the previously proposed "distorted surface layer" of goethite produced during the exchange with Fe(II)aq at neutral pH[1]. This study indicates that significant variations in Fe isotope compositions may be produced in low-pH environments where biological cycling of Fe occurs, in contrast to the expected lack of isotopic fractionation in

  19. Isotopic fractionation associated with [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hui; Gandhi, Hasand; Cornish, Adam J.; Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ostrom, Nathaniel; Hegg, Eric L.

    2016-01-30

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible formation of H2 from electrons and protons with high efficiency. Understanding the relationships between H2 production, H2 uptake, and H2-H2O exchange can provide insight into the metabolism of microbial communities in which H2 is an essential component in energy cycling. In this manuscript, we used stable H isotopes (1H and 2H) to probe the isotope effects associated with three [FeFe]-hydrogenases and three [NiFe]-hydrogenases. All six hydrogenases displayed fractionation factors for H2 formation that were significantly less than 1, producing H2 that was severely depleted in 2H relative to the substrate, water. Consistent with differences in their active site structure, the fractionation factors for each class appear to cluster, with the three [NiFe]-hydrogenases (α = 0.27-0.40) generally having smaller values than the three [FeFe]-hydrogenases (α = 0.41-0.55). We also obtained isotopic fractionation factors associated with H2 uptake and H2-H2O exchange under conditions similar to those utilized for H2 production, providing us with a more complete picture of the three reactions catalyzed by hydrogenases. The fractionation factors determined in our studies can be used as signatures for different hydrogenases to probe their activity under different growth conditions and to ascertain which hydrogenases are most responsible for H2 production and/or uptake in complex microbial communities.

  20. Fe and Cu isotope mass balances in the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, V.; Albarede, F.; Jaouen, K.

    2011-12-01

    The ranges of the Fe and Cu isotope compositions in the human body are large, i.e. ~3% and ~2%, respectively. Both isotopic fractionations appear to be mainly controlled by redox conditions. The Fe and Cu isotope compositions of the tissues analyzed so far plot on a mixing hyperbolae between a reduced and an oxidized metals pools. The reduced metals pool is composed by erythrocytes, where Fe is bounded to hemoglobin as Fe(II) and Cu to superoxide-dismutase as Cu(I). The oxidized metals pool is composed by hepatocytes, where Fe and Cu are stored as Fe(III) ferritin and as Cu(II) ceruloplasmine, respectively. The position of each biological component in the δ56Fe-δ65Cu diagram therefore reflects the oxidation state of Fe and Cu of the predominant metal carrier protein and allows to quantify Fe and Cu fluxes between organs using mass balance calculations. For instance, serum and clot Fe and Cu isotope compositions show that current biological models of erythropoiesis violates mass conservation requirements, and suggest hidden Fe and Cu pathways during red blood cells synthesis. The results also show that a coupled Fe-Cu strong gender isotopic effect is observed in various organs. The isotopic difference between men and women is unlikely to be due to differential dietary uptake or endometrium loss, but rather reflects the effect of menstrual losses and a correlative solicitation of hepatic stores. We speculate that thorough studies of the metabolism of stable isotopes in normal conditions is a prerequisite for the understanding of the pathological dysregulations.

  1. EQUILIBRIUM AND KINETIC NITROGEN AND OXYGEN-ISOTOPE FRACTIONATIONS BETWEEN DISSOLVED AND GASEOUS N2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    INOUE, HY; MOOK, WG

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the equilibrium as well as kinetic stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionations between aqueous dissolved and gaseous N2O. The equilibrium fractionations, defined as the ratio of the isotopic abundance ratios (15R and 18R, respectively) of gaseous and

  2. What can Fe stable isotopes tell us about magmas?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stausberg, Niklas

    the differentiation of magmas from the perspective of Fe stable isotopes, integrated with petrology, by studying igneous rocks and their constituent phases (minerals and glasses) from the Bushveld Complex, South Africa, Thingmuli, Iceland, Pantelleria, Italy, and the Bishop Tuff, USA. The findings are interpreted......The majority of the Earth’s crust is formed by magmas, and understanding their production and differentiation is important to interpret the geologic rock record. A powerful tool to investigate magmatic processes is the distribution of the stable isotopes of the major redox-sensitive element...... in magmas, Fe. Fe isotope compositions of magmatic rocks exhibit systematic differences, where the heaviest compositions are found in rhyolites and granites. Understanding of these systematics is complicated by a lack of constraints on Fe isotope fractionation among minerals and liquids under magmatic...

  3. Non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model for the design of boron isotopes chemical exchange column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Peng; Fan, Kaigong; Guo, Xianghai; Zhang, Haocui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model instead of a distillation equilibrium model to calculate boron isotopes separation. • We apply the model to calculate the needed column height to meet prescribed separation requirements. - Abstract: To interpret the phenomenon of chemical exchange in boron isotopes separation accurately, the process is specified as an absorption–reaction–desorption hybrid process instead of a distillation equilibrium model, the non-equilibrium mass transfer absorption model is put forward and a mass transfer enhancement factor E is introduced to find the packing height needed to meet the specified separation requirements with MATLAB.

  4. Viscosity Measurements of "FeO"-SiO2 Slag in Equilibrium with Metallic Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao; Raghunath, Sreekanth; Zhao, Baojun

    2013-06-01

    The current study delivered the measurements of viscosities in the system "FeO"-SiO2 in equilibrium with metallic Fe in the composition range between 15 and 40 wt pct SiO2. The experiments were carried out in the temperature range of 1473 K to 1773 K (1200 °C to 1500 °C) using a rotational spindle technique. An analysis of the quenched sample by electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) after the viscosity measurement enables the composition and microstructure of the slag to be directly linked with the viscosity. The current results are compared with available literature data. The significant discrepancies of the viscosity measurements in this system have been clarified. The possible reasons affecting the accuracy of the viscosity measurement have been discussed. The activation energies derived from the experimental data have a sharp increase at about 33 wt pct SiO2, which corresponds to the composition of fayalite (Fe2SiO4). The modified quasi-chemical model was constructed in the system "FeO"-SiO2 to describe the current viscosity data.

  5. Mg-Fe Isotope Systems of Mantle Xenoliths: Constrains on the Evolution of Siberian Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Y.; Kiseeva, E. S.; Sobolev, N. V.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Mantle xenoliths bring to the surface a variety of lithologies (dunites, lherzolites, harzburgites, wehrlites, eclogites, pyroxenites, and websterites) and represent snapshots of the geochemical processes that occur deep within the Earth. Recent improvements in the precision of the MC-ICP-MS measurements have allowed us to expand the amount of data on Mg and Fe isotopes for mantle-derived samples. For instance, to constrain the isotopic composition of the Earth based on the study of spinel and garnet peridotites (An et al., 2017; Teng et al., 2010), to trace the origin and to investigate the isotopic fractionation mechanism during metamorphic process using cratonic or orogenic eclogites (Li et al., 2011; Wang et al., 2012) and to reveal the metasomatism-induced mantle heterogeneity by pyroxenites (Hu et al., 2016). Numerous multi-stage modification events and mantle layering are detected in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle under the Siberian craton (Ashchepkov et al., 2008a; Sobolev et al., 1975, etc). Combined analyses of Mg and Fe isotopic systems could provide new constraints on the formation and evolution of the ancient cratonic mantle. In order to better constrain the magnitude and mechanism of inter-mineral Mg and Fe isotopic fractionations at high temperatures, systematic studies of mantle xenoliths are needed. For example, theoretical calculations and natural samples measurements have shown that large equilibrium Mg isotope fractionations controlled by the difference in coordination number of Mg among minerals could exist (Huang et al., 2013; Li et al., 2011). Thus, the Mg isotope geothermometer could help us trace the evolution history of ancient cratons. In this study we present Mg and Fe isotopic data for whole rocks and separated minerals (clinopyroxene (cpx) and garnet (grt)) from different types of mantle xenoliths (garnet pyroxenites, eclogites, grospydites and garnet peridotites) from a number of kimberlite pipes in Siberian craton (Udachnaya

  6. NMR spectroscopic determination of an equilibrium isotope effect on the hydration of cobalt(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evilia, R.F.; Saunders, M.

    1985-01-01

    A recently reported NMR method for the measurement of deuterium equilibrium isotope effects is applied to the hydration of the paramagnetic cobalt(II) ion. An isotope effect of about 1.3% is measured. A substantial difference between the intrinsic shift of H 2 O and D 2 O when coordinated to cobalt is also measured

  7. Equilibrium mercury isotope fractionation between dissolved Hg(II) species and thiol-bound Hg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiederhold, Jan G.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Daniel, Kelly; Infante, Ivan; Bourdon, Bernard; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    Stable Hg isotope ratios provide a new tool to trace environmental Hg cycling. Thiols (-SH) are the dominant Hg-binding groups in natural organic matter. Here, we report experimental and computational results on equilibrium Hg isotope fractionation between dissolved Hg(II) species and thiol-bound

  8. Crystallization history of enriched shergottites from Fe and Mg isotope fractionation in olivine megacrysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinet, Max; Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Oeser, Martin; Médard, Etienne; Weyer, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Martian meteorites are the only samples available from the surface of Mars. Among them, olivine-phyric shergottites are basalts containing large zoned olivine crystals with highly magnesian cores (Fo 70-85) and rims richer in Fe (Fo 45-60). The Northwest Africa 1068 meteorite is one of the most primitive "enriched" shergottites (high initial 87Sr/86Sr and low initial ε143Nd). It contains olivine crystals as magnesian as Fo 77 and is a major source of information to constrain the composition of the parental melt, the composition and depth of the mantle source, and the cooling and crystallization history of one of the younger magmatic events on Mars (∼180 Ma). In this study, Fe-Mg isotope profiles analyzed in situ by femtosecond-laser ablation MC-ICP-MS are combined with compositional profiles of major and trace elements in olivine megacrysts. The cores of olivine megacrysts are enriched in light Fe isotopes (δ56FeIRMM-14 = -0.6 to -0.9‰) and heavy Mg isotopes (δ26MgDSM-3 = 0-0.2‰) relative to megacryst rims and to the bulk martian isotopic composition (δ56Fe = 0 ± 0.05‰, δ26Mg = -0.27 ± 0.04‰). The flat forsterite profiles of megacryst cores associated with anti-correlated fractionation of Fe-Mg isotopes indicate that these elements have been rehomogenized by diffusion at high temperature. We present a 1-D model of simultaneous diffusion and crystal growth that reproduces the observed element and isotope profiles. The simulation results suggest that the cooling rate during megacryst core crystallization was slow (43 ± 21 °C/year), and consistent with pooling in a deep crustal magma chamber. The megacryst rims then crystallized 1-2 orders of magnitude faster during magma transport toward the shallower site of final emplacement. Megacryst cores had a forsterite content 3.2 ± 1.5 mol% higher than their current composition and some were in equilibrium with the whole-rock composition of NWA 1068 (Fo 80 ± 1.5). NWA 1068 composition is thus close to a

  9. Strontium isotope fractionation during strontianite (SrCO3) dissolution, precipitation and at equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Harrison, Anna L.; Eisenhauer, Anton; Dietzel, Martin

    2017-12-01

    In this study we examine the behavior of stable Sr isotopes between strontianite [SrCO3] and reactive fluid during mineral dissolution, precipitation, and at chemical equilibrium. Experiments were performed in batch reactors at 25 °C in 0.01 M NaCl solutions wherein the pH was adjusted by bubbling of a water saturated gas phase of pure CO2 or atmospheric air. The equilibrium Sr isotope fractionation between strontianite and fluid after dissolution of the solid under 1 atm CO2 atmosphere was estimated as Δ88/86SrSrCO3-fluid = δ88/86Sr SrCO3 - δ88/86Srfluid = -0.05 ± 0.01‰. On the other hand, during strontianite precipitation, an enrichment of the fluid phase in 88Sr, the heavy isotopomer, was observed. The evolution of the δ88/86Srfluid during strontianite precipitation can be modeled using a Rayleigh distillation approach and the estimated, kinetically driven, fractionation factor αSrCO3-fluid between solid and fluid is calculated to be 0.99985 ± 0.00003 corresponding to Δ88/86SrSrCO3-fluid = -0.15‰. The obtained results further support that under chemical equilibrium conditions between solid and fluid a continuous exchange of isotopes occurs until the system approaches isotopic equilibrium. This isotopic exchange is not limited to the outer surface layer of the strontianite crystal, but extends to ∼7-8 unit cells below the crystal surface. The behavior of Sr isotopes in this study is in excellent agreement with the concept of dynamic equilibrium and it suggests that the time needed for achievement of chemical equilibrium is generally shorter compared to that for isotopic equilibrium. Thus it is suggested that in natural Sr-bearing carbonates an isotopic change may still occur close to thermodynamic equilibrium, despite no observable change in aqueous elemental concentrations. As such, a secondary and ongoing change of Sr isotope signals in carbonate minerals caused by isotopic re-equilibration with fluids has to be considered in order to use Sr

  10. Viscosity of SiO2-"FeO"-Al2O3 System in Equilibrium with Metallic Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao; Raghunath, Sreekanth; Zhao, Baojun

    2013-08-01

    The present study delivered the measurements of viscosities in SiO2-"FeO"-Al2O3 system in equilibrium with metallic Fe. The rotational spindle technique was used in the measurements at the temperature range of 1473 K to 1773 K (1200 °C to 1500 °C). Molybdenum crucibles and spindles were employed in all measurements. The Fe saturation condition was maintained by an iron plate placed at the bottom of the crucible. The equilibrium compositions of the slags were measured by EPMA after the viscosity measurements. The effect of up to 20 mol. pct Al2O3 on the viscosity of the SiO2-"FeO" slag was investigated. The "charge compensation effect" of the Al2O3 and FeO association has been discussed. The modified quasi-chemical viscosity model has been optimized in the SiO2-"FeO"-Al2O3 system in equilibrium with metallic Fe to describe the viscosity measurements of the present study.

  11. The temporal evolution of magnesium isotope fractionation during hydromagnesite dissolution, precipitation, and at equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Berninger, Ulf-Niklas; Pérez-Fernàndez, Andrea; Chmeleff, Jérôme; Mavromatis, Vasileios

    2018-04-01

    This study provides experimental evidence of the resetting of the magnesium (Mg) isotope signatures of hydromagnesite in the presence of an aqueous fluid during its congruent dissolution, precipitation, and at equilibrium at ambient temperatures over month-long timescales. All experiments were performed in batch reactors in aqueous sodium carbonate buffer solutions having a pH from 7.8 to 9.2. The fluid phase in all experiments attained bulk chemical equilibrium within analytical uncertainty with hydromagnesite within several days, but the experiments were allowed to continue for up to 575 days. During congruent hydromagnesite dissolution, the fluid first became enriched in isotopically light Mg compared to the dissolving hydromagnesite, but this Mg isotope composition became heavier after the fluid attained chemical equilibrium with the mineral. The δ26Mg composition of the fluid was up to ∼0.35‰ heavier than the initial dissolving hydromagnesite at the end of the dissolution experiments. Hydromagnesite precipitation was provoked during one experiment by increasing the reaction temperature from 4 to 50 °C. The δ26Mg composition of the fluid increased as hydromagnesite precipitated and continued to increase after the fluid attained bulk equilibrium with this phase. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that mineral-fluid equilibrium is dynamic (i.e. dissolution and precipitation occur at equal, non-zero rates at equilibrium). Moreover the results presented in this study confirm (1) that the transfer of material from the solid to the fluid phase may not be conservative during stoichiometric dissolution, and (2) that the isotopic compositions of carbonate minerals can evolve even when the mineral is in bulk chemical equilibrium with its coexisting fluid. This latter observation suggests that the preservation of isotopic signatures of carbonate minerals in the geological record may require a combination of the isolation of fluid-mineral system

  12. Equilibrium properties of dense hydrogen isotope gases based on the theory of simple fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; MacElroy, J M D

    2006-08-03

    We present a new method for the prediction of the equilibrium properties of dense gases containing hydrogen isotopes. The proposed approach combines the Feynman-Hibbs effective potential method and a deconvolution scheme introduced by Weeks et al. The resulting equations of state and the chemical potentials as functions of pressure for each of the hydrogen isotope gases depend on a single set of Lennard-Jones parameters. In addition to its simplicity, the proposed method with optimized Lennard-Jones potential parameters accurately describes the equilibrium properties of hydrogen isotope fluids in the regime of moderate temperatures and pressures. The present approach should find applications in the nonlocal density functional theory of inhomogeneous quantum fluids and should also be of particular relevance to hydrogen (clean energy) storage and to the separation of quantum isotopes by novel nanomaterials.

  13. Using the Wolfsberg--Schactschneider program to calculate equilibrium constants for isotopic acetylenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.K.K.; Pyper, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Equilibrium constants were calculated for the gas-phase isotopic exchange reactions C 2 H 2 + C 2 D 2 = 2C 2 HD and C 2 H 2 + D 2 O = C 2 D 2 + H 2 O at temperatures ranging from 40 to 2000 0 K. No corrections to the harmonic approximation were made. The results agree quite well with experimental measurements

  14. A study of chemical equilibrium of tri-component mixtures of hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, Ioana; Cristescu, I.; Peculea, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we present a model for computing the equilibrium constants for chemical reactions between hydrogen's isotopes as function of temperature. The equilibrium constants were expressed with the aid of Gibbs potential and the partition function of the mixture. We assessed the partition function for hydrogen's isotopes having in view that some nuclei are fermions and other bosons. As results we plotted the values of equilibrium constants as function of temperature. Knowing these values we determined the deuterium distribution on species (for mixture H 2 -HD-D 2 ) as function of total deuterium concentration and the tritium distribution on species (for mixtures D 2 -DT-T 2 and H 2 -HT-T 2 ) as function of total tritium concentration. (authors)

  15. Phase equilibrium of the Gd-Fe-Co system at 873 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jinli; Zhong Haichang; Xia Xiuwen; He Wei; Zhu Jinming; Deng Jianqiu; Zhuang Yinghong

    2009-01-01

    Phase equilibrium of the ternary Gd-Fe-Co system at 873 K was investigated by using X-ray diffraction technique, electron probe microanalysis, metallographic analysis and differential thermal analysis. The 873 K isothermal section of the phase diagram of the Gd-Fe-Co ternary system consists of 11 single-phase regions, 16 two-phase regions and 6 three-phase regions. Three pairs of corresponding compounds of Gd-Co and Gd-Fe, i.e., Gd 2 Co 17 and Gd 2 Fe 17 , GdCo 3 and GdFe 3 , GdCo 2 and GdFe 2 , form a continuous series of solid solution. The compound Gd 2 Co 7-x Fe x was found to have a broad solubility range from 0 to 31 at.% Fe. The maximum solubility of Co in Gd 6 Fe 23 is about 7 at.% Co. At 873 K, the maximum solubilities of Fe in Gd 3 Co and Gd 4 Co 3 are about 3 and 1 at.% Fe, respectively. No ternary compound was found in all ternary alloy samples

  16. Iron Isotopic Compositions of Troilite (FeS) Inclusions from Iron Meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David L.; Schönbächler, Maria, E-mail: david.cook@erdw.ethz.ch [Institut für Geochemie und Petrologie, ETH Zürich, Clausiusstrasse 25, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2017-10-01

    We report non-mass-dependent Fe isotopic data for troilite (FeS) inclusions from 10 iron meteorites, representing both non-magmatic (IAB) and magmatic groups (IIAB, IIIAB, IVA). No resolvable variations are present in the most neutron-rich isotope ({sup 58}Fe), but small deficits (≈−0.1 ε ) in {sup 56}Fe were observed in several inclusions. With the exception of several Ca–Al-rich inclusions in primitive meteorites, these are the first reported non-mass-dependent variations in Fe isotopes for material formed in the early solar system. Nucleosynthetic variations in Ni isotopes were previously reported in these same samples. The effects in Fe isotopes are not correlated with those in Ni, which suggests that the origins of the isotopic variations are decoupled from one another. The {sup 56}Fe deficits may represent incomplete mixing of the precursor dust in the protoplanetary disk. Alternatively, a parent body process (e.g., irradiation by galactic cosmic rays) may have modified the Fe isotopic compositions of some inclusions, which initially had homogeneous Fe isotopic compositions.

  17. Lithium isotope separation factors of some two-phase equilibrium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palko, A.A.; Drury, J.S.; Begun, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Isotope separation factors of seventeen two-phase equilibrium systems for lithium isotope enrichment have been determined. In all cases, lithium amalgam was used as one of the lithium-containing phases and was equilibrated with an aqueous or organic phase containing a lithium compound. In all systems examined, isotopic exchange was found to be extremely rapid, and 6 Li was concentrated in the amalgam phase. The isotopic separation factor for the LiOH(aqueous) vs Li(amalgam) system has been studied as a function of temperature from -2 to 80 degreeC. The values obtained have been compared with the ''electrolysis'' and exchange separation factors given in the literature. The two-phase systems, LiCl(ethylenediamine) vs Li(amalgam) and LiCl(propylenediamine) vs Li(amalgam), have been studied, and the isotopic separation factors have been determined as functions of the temperature. The factors for the two systems have been found to be substantially the same (within limits of the errors involved) over the temperature range studied (0 to 100 degreeC) as those for the aqueous system. The isotopic separation factors for the seventeen systems have been tabulated, and correlations have been drawn that show the salt and solvent effects upon the values obtained

  18. Determination of the equilibrium constant of FeZrCl6 formation from FeCl3 and ZrCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdonosov, S.S.; Kharisov, B.I.; Nikitin, M.I.

    1992-01-01

    Equilibrium pressures of chlorine formed in the course of reaction FeCl 3 +ZrCl 4 ↔ FeZrCl 6 +0.5 Cl 2 were determined at the temperatures of 250-325 deg C. The values of equilibrium constant K p of the reaction mentioned at the temperatures of 250, 275, 300 and 325 deg were calculated, taking into consideration the determined values of p Cl2 and literature data on equilibrium pressures of ZrCl 4 and FeCl 3 vapours

  19. Using Beads and Divided Containers to Study Kinetic and Equilibrium Isotope Effects in the Laboratory and in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Dean J.; Brewer, Emily R.; Martinez, Keri A.; Fitzjarrald, Tamara J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this laboratory experiment is to study fundamental concepts of kinetics and equilibria and the isotope effects associated with both of these concepts. The concepts of isotopes in introductory and general chemistry courses are typically used within the contexts of atomic weights and radioactivity. Kinetic and equilibrium isotope…

  20. Viscosity Measurements of SiO2-"FeO"-MgO System in Equilibrium with Metallic Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao; Raghunath, Sreekanth; Zhao, Baojun

    2014-01-01

    The present study delivers the measurements of viscosities in the SiO2-"FeO"-MgO system in equilibrium with metallic Fe. The rotational spindle technique was used for the measurements at the temperature range of 1523 K to 1773 K (1250 °C to 1500 °C). Molybdenum crucibles and spindles were employed in all measurements. The viscosity measurements were carried out at 31 to 47 mol pct SiO2 and up to 18.8 mol pct MgO. Analysis of the quenched sample by Electron probe X-ray microanalysis after the viscosity measurement enables the composition and microstructure of the slag to be directly linked with the viscosity. The replacement of "FeO" by MgO was found to increase viscosity and activation energy of the SiO2-"FeO"-MgO slags. The modified Quasi-chemical Viscosity Model was further optimized in this system based on the current viscosity measurements.

  1. Application of Fe Isotopes to the Search for Life and Habitable Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Clark M.; Beard, Brian L.; Nealson, Kenneth L.

    2001-01-01

    The relatively new field of Fe isotope geochemistry can make important contributions to tracing the geochemical cycling of Fe, which bears on issues such as metabolic processing of Fe, surface redox conditions, and development of planetary atmospheres and biospheres. It appears that Fe isotope fractionation in nature and the lab spans about 4 per mil (%) in Fe-56/Fe-54, and although this range is small, our new analytical methods produce a precision of +/- 0.05% on sample sizes as small as 100 ng (10(exp -7) g); this now provides us with a sufficient "signal-to-noise" ratio to make this isotope system useful. We review our work in three areas: 1) the terrestrial and lunar rock record, 2) experiments on inorganic fractionation, and 3) experiments involving biological processing of Fe. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. A Study of Interdiffusion in the Fe-C/Ti System Under Equilibrium and Nonequilibrium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanthi, T. N.; Sudha, C.; Saroja, S.

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, diffusion behavior under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions in a Fe-C/Ti system is studied in the temperature range of 773 K to 1073 K (500 °C to 800 °C). A defect-free weld joint between mild steel (MS) (Fe-0.14 pct C) and Ti Grade 2 obtained by friction welding is diffusion annealed for various durations to study the interdiffusion behavior under equilibrium conditions, while an explosive clad joint is used to study interdiffusion under nonequilibrium conditions. From the elemental concentration profiles obtained across the MS-Ti interface using electron-probe microanalysis and imaging of the interface, the formation of distinct diffusion zones as a function of temperature and time is established. Concentration and temperature dependence of the interdiffusion coefficients ( D( c)) and activation energies are determined. Under equilibrium conditions, the change in molar volume with concentration shows a close match with the ideal Vegard's law, whereas a negative deviation is observed for nonequilibrium conditions. This deviation can be attributed to the formation of secondary phases, which, in turn, alters the D( c) values of diffusing species. Calculations showed that the D 0 and activation energy for interdiffusion under equilibrium is on the order of 10-11 m2/s and 147 kJ/mol, whereas it is far lower in the nonequilibrium case (10-10 m2/s and 117 kJ/mol) in the compositional range of 40 to 50 wt pct Fe, which also manifests as accelerated growth kinetics of the different diffusion zones.

  3. Ice-vapor equilibrium fractionation factor of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellehøj, Mads Dam; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Johnsen, Sigfus Johann

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: The equilibrium fractionation factors govern the relative change in the isotopic composition during phase transitions of water. The commonly used results, which were published more than 40 years ago, are limited to a minimum temperature of -33 degrees C. This limits the reliability...... values, with a temperature dependency in accordance with theory for equilibrium fractionation. We obtain the following expressions for the temperature dependency of the fractionation coefficients: ln(alpha(delta 2H)) = 0.2133 - 203.10/T + 48888/T-2 ln(alpha(delta 18O)) = 0.0831 - 49.192/T + 8312.5/T2...... Compared with previous experimental work, a significantly larger for H-2 is obtained while, for O-18, is larger for temperatures below -20 degrees C and slightly lower for temperatures above this. CONCLUSIONS: Using the new values for alpha, a Rayleigh distillation model shows significant changes in both...

  4. Isotopic equilibrium between precipitation and water vapor: evidence from continental rains in central Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, K.; Gerlein, C.; Kemeny, P. C.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    An accurate understanding of the relationships between the isotopic composition of liquid water and that of water vapor in the environment can help describe hydrologic processes across many scales. One such relationship is the isotopic equilibrium between falling raindrops and the surrounding vapor. The degree of equilibration is used to model the isotopic composition of precipitation in isotope-enable general circulation models and land-atmosphere exchange models. Although this equilibrium has been a topic of isotope hydrology research for more than four decades, few studies have included vapor measurements to validate modeling efforts. Recent advances in laser technology have allowed for in situ vapor measurements at high temporal resolution (e.g., >1 Hz). Here we present concomitant rain and vapor measurements for a series of 17 rain events during the 'Continental' rainy season (June through August) at Mpala Research Center in central Kenya. Rain samples (n=218) were collected at intervals of 2 to 35 minutes (median of 3 minutes) depending on the rain rate (0.4 to 10.5 mm/hr). The volume-weighted mean rain values for δ18O, δ2H and D-excess (δ2H - 8* δ18O) were 0.1 ‰, 10.7 ‰, and 10.1 ‰. These values are more enriched than the annual weighted means reported for the area (-2.2 ‰, -7.6 ‰, and 11.0 ‰, respectively). Vapor was measured continuously at ~2Hz (DLT-100, Los Gatos Research), with an inverted funnel intake 4m above the ground surface. The mean vapor isotopic composition during the rain events was -10.0 +/- 1.2 ‰ (1 σ) for δ18O and -73.9 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. The difference between the rain sample isotopic composition and that of liquid in isotopic equilibrium with the corresponding vapor at the ambient temperature was 0.8 +/- 2.2 ‰ for δ18O and 6.2 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. This disequilibrium was found to correlate with the natural log of rain rate (R2 of 0.26 for δ18O and 0.46 for δ2H), with lower rain rates having larger

  5. Iron Isotope Fractionation during Fe(II) Oxidation Mediated by the Oxygen-Producing Marine Cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanner, E. D.; Bayer, T.; Wu, W.; Hao, L.; Obst, M.; Sundman, A.; Byrne, J. M.; Michel, F. M.; Kleinhanns, I. C.; Kappler, A.; Schoenberg, R.

    2017-04-11

    In this study, we couple iron isotope analysis to microscopic and mineralogical investigation of iron speciation during circumneutral Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) precipitation with photosynthetically produced oxygen. In the presence of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002, aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) is oxidized and precipitated as amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide minerals (iron precipitates, Feppt), with distinct isotopic fractionation (ε56Fe) values determined from fitting the δ56Fe(II)aq (1.79‰ and 2.15‰) and the δ56Feppt (2.44‰ and 2.98‰) data trends from two replicate experiments. Additional Fe(II) and Fe(III) phases were detected using microscopy and chemical extractions and likely represent Fe(II) and Fe(III) sorbed to minerals and cells. The iron desorbed with sodium acetate (FeNaAc) yielded heavier δ56Fe compositions than Fe(II)aq. Modeling of the fractionation during Fe(III) sorption to cells and Fe(II) sorption to Feppt, combined with equilibration of sorbed iron and with Fe(II)aq using published fractionation factors, is consistent with our resulting δ56FeNaAc. The δ56Feppt data trend is inconsistent with complete equilibrium exchange with Fe(II)aq. Because of this and our detection of microbially excreted organics (e.g., exopolysaccharides) coating Feppt in our microscopic analysis, we suggest that electron and atom exchange is partially suppressed in this system by biologically produced organics. These results indicate that cyanobacteria influence the fate and composition of iron in sunlit environments via their role in Fe(II) oxidation through O2 production, the capacity of their cell surfaces to sorb iron, and the interaction of secreted organics with Fe(III) minerals.

  6. Autoinduced catalysis and inverse equilibrium isotope effect in the frustrated Lewis pair catalyzed hydrogenation of imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussing, Sebastian; Greb, Lutz; Tamke, Sergej; Schirmer, Birgitta; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Luy, Burkhard; Paradies, Jan

    2015-05-26

    The frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)-catalyzed hydrogenation and deuteration of N-benzylidene-tert-butylamine (2) was kinetically investigated by using the three boranes B(C6F5)3 (1), B(2,4,6-F3-C6H2)3 (4), and B(2,6-F2-C6H3)3 (5) and the free activation energies for the H2 activation by FLP were determined. Reactions catalyzed by the weaker Lewis acids 4 and 5 displayed autoinductive catalysis arising from a higher free activation energy (2 kcal mol(-1)) for the H2 activation by the imine compared to the amine. Surprisingly, the imine reduction using D2 proceeded with higher rates. This phenomenon is unprecedented for FLP and resulted from a primary inverse equilibrium isotope effect. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Fe and Cu stable isotopes in archeological human bones and their relationship to sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Balter, Vincent; Herrscher, Estelle; Lamboux, Aline; Telouk, Philippe; Albarède, Francis

    2012-07-01

    Accurate sex assignment of ancient human remains usually relies on the availability of coxal bones or well-preserved DNA. Iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) stable isotope compositions ((56)Fe/(54)Fe and (65)Cu/(63)Cu, respectively) were recently measured in modern human blood, and an unexpected result was the discovery of a (56)Fe-depletion and a (65)Cu-enrichment in men's blood compared to women's blood. Bones, being pervasively irrigated by blood, are expected to retain the (56)Fe/(54)Fe and (65)Cu/(63)Cu signature of blood, which in turn is useful for determining the sex of ancient bones. Here, we report the (56)Fe/(54)Fe, (65)Cu/(63)Cu, and (66)Zn/(64)Zn ratios from a suite of well-preserved phalanxes (n = 43) belonging to individuals buried in the 17th and 18th centuries at the necropolis of Saint-Laurent de Grenoble, France, and for which the sex was independently estimated from pelvic bone morphology. The metals were purified from the bone matrix by liquid chromatography on ion exchange resin and the isotope compositions were measured by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results show that, as expected from literature data on blood, male bone iron is depleted in (56)Fe and enriched in (65)Cu relative to female. No sex difference is found in the (66)Zn/(64)Zn ratios of bone. The concentration and isotopic data show no evidence of soil contamination. Four samples of five (77%) can be assigned their correct sex, a result comparable to sex assignment using Fe and Cu isotopes in blood (81%). Isotopic analysis of metals may therefore represent a valid method of sex assignment applicable to incomplete human remains. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Characterization of Low-Symmetry Structures from Phase Equilibrium of Fe-Al System—Microstructures and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Matysik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fe-Al intermetallic alloys with aluminum content over 60 at% are in the area of the phase equilibrium diagram that is considerably less investigated in comparison to the high-symmetry Fe3Al and FeAl phases. Ambiguous crystallographic information and incoherent data referring to the phase equilibrium diagrams placed in a high-aluminum range have caused confusions and misinformation. Nowadays unequivocal material properties description of FeAl2, Fe2Al5 and FeAl3 intermetallic alloys is still incomplete. In this paper, the influence of aluminum content and processing parameters on phase composition is presented. The occurrence of low-symmetry FeAl2, Fe2Al5 and FeAl3 structures determined by chemical composition and phase transformations was defined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS examinations. These results served to verify diffraction investigations (XRD and to explain the mechanical properties of cast materials such as: hardness, Young’s modulus and fracture toughness evaluated using the nano-indentation technique.

  9. Adsorption of hydrogen isotopes by metals in non-equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livshits, A.I.; Notkin, M.E.; Pustovojt, Yu.M.

    1982-01-01

    To study the interaction of thermonuclear plasma and additions with metallic walls, nonequilibrium system of thermal atomary hydrogen - ''cold'' (300-1100 K) metal is experimentally investigated. Atomary hydrogen was feeded to samples of Ni and Pd in the shape of atomic beam, coming into vacuum from high-frequency gaseous discharge. It is shown that hydrogen solubility under nonequilibrium conditions increases with surface passivation (contamination); in this case it surpasses equilibrium solubility by value orders. Nickel and iron dissolve more hydrogen than palladium at a certain state of surface ( passivation) and gas (atomary hydrogen). The sign of the temperature dependence of hydrogen solubility in passivated N 1 and Fe changes when alterating molecular hydrogen by atomary hydrogen

  10. Fine print in isotope effects: the glucose anomeric equilibrium and binding of glucose to human brain hexokinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.E; Schramm, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    Binding isotope effects are a sensitive measure of changes in molecular vibrational character that occur during ligand-receptor binding. In this study, we have measured isotope effects on the binding of glucose to human brain hexokinase using the ultrafiltration method, with the following results: 0.991±0.001, 0.908±0.003, 1.010±0.001, 0.974±0.002, 1.022±0.002 for [ 14 C]-glucose mixed with [1- 3 H]-, [2- 3 H]-, [3- 3 H]-, [5- 3 H]-, [6,6- 3 H]-glucose, respectively. Comparing the observed data with isotope effects on the anomeric equilibrium in glucose reported previously proves the existence of binding isotope effects in this system. Preliminary computational results are presented to explain the observed binding isotope effects in terms of hydrogen bond patterns and molecular crowding found in the binary complex of sugar and enzyme. (author)

  11. Coronal emission-line polarization from the statistical equilibrium of magnetic sublevels. I. Fe XII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    A general formulation for the polarization of coronal emission lines is presented, and the physics is illustrated through application of the formulation to the lines of Fe XIII at 10747 and 10798 A. The goal is to present a foundation for the determination of the orientation of coronal magnetic fields from emission-line polarization measurements. The physics of emission-line polarization is discussed using the statistical equilibrium equations for the magnetic sublevels of a coronal ion. The formulation of these equations, which describe the polarization of the radiation field in terms of Stokes parameters, is presented; and the various rate parameters: both radiative and collisional: are considered. The emission Stokes vector is constructed from the solution of the equilibrium equations for a point in the corona where the magnetic field has an arbitrary orientation. On the basis of a model, a computer code for the calculation of emission-line polarization is briefly described and illustrated with a number of sample calculations for Fe XIII. Calculations are carried out for three-dimensional models that demonstrate the physics of the formation of emission-line polarization and illustrate how the degree of polarization and angle of polarization and their variations over the corona are related to the density and magnetic field structure. The models considered range from simple cases in which the density distribution with height is spherically symmetric and the field is radial or dipole to a complex case in which both the density and magnetic field distributions are derived from realistic three-dimensional distributions for the 1973 eclipse on the basis of K-coronameter measurements for the density and potential-field extrapolation of surface magnetic fields in the corona

  12. Application of stable isotopes and isotope pattern deconvolution-ICPMS to speciation of endogenous and exogenous Fe and Se in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Iglesias, H.; Fernandez-Sanchez, M.L.; Garcia Alonso, J.I.; Lopez Sastre, J.B.; Sanz-Medel, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Enriched stable isotopes are crucial to study essential trace element metabolism (e.g. Se, Fe) in biological systems. Measuring isotope ratios by ICPMS and using appropriate mathematical calculations, based on isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD) may provide quantitative data about endogenous and exogenous essential or toxic elements and their metabolism. In this work, IPD was applied to explore the feasibility of using two Se (or Fe) enriched stable isotopes, one as metabolic tracer and the other as quantitation tracer, to discriminate between the endogenous and supplemented Se (or Fe) species in rat fluids by collision cell ICPMS coupled to HPLC separation. (author)

  13. Searching for signatures of life on Mars: an Fe-isotope perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, M; Russell, S S; Blackhurst, R L; Grady, M M

    2006-10-29

    Recent spacecraft and lander missions to Mars have reinforced previous interpretations that Mars was a wet and warm planet in the geological past. The role of liquid water in shaping many of the surface features on Mars has long been recognized. Since the presence of liquid water is essential for survival of life, conditions on early Mars might have been more favourable for the emergence and evolution of life. Until a sample return mission to Mars, one of the ways of studying the past environmental conditions on Mars is through chemical and isotopic studies of Martian meteorites. Over 35 individual meteorite samples, believed to have originated on Mars, are now available for lab-based studies. Fe is a key element that is present in both primary and secondary minerals in the Martian meteorites. Fe-isotope ratios can be fractionated by low-temperature processes which includes biological activity. Experimental investigations of Fe reduction and oxidation by bacteria have produced large fractionation in Fe-isotope ratios. Hence, it is considered likely that if there is/were any form of life present on Mars then it might be possible to detect its signature by Fe-isotope studies of Martian meteorites. In the present study, we have analysed a number of Martian meteorites for their bulk-Fe-isotope composition. In addition, a set of terrestrial analogue material has also been analysed to compare the results and draw inferences. So far, our studies have not found any measurable Fe-isotopic fractionation in bulk Martian meteorites that can be ascribed to any low-temperature process operative on Mars.

  14. Geochronology and Hf–Fe isotopic geochemistry of the Phanerozoic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As the first magmatic phase, the ∼395 Ma intrusions were mainly derived from ..... Fe-mineralized pyroxenite. 0.03. 0.01. GST-3. Fe-mineralized pyroxenite. 0.17 ..... Damiao area record old Hf model ages of ∼1.5 Ga. ... for his help in the field.

  15. Isotope exchange between alkaline earth metal hydroxide and HTO water in the equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, H.; Gounome, J.; Kano, N.

    1997-01-01

    In order reveal to what extent tritium ( 3 H or T) can be incorporated into hydroxides, the isotope exchange reaction (OT-for-OH exchange reaction) between each alkaline earth metal hydroxide (M(OH) 2 ), where M means alkaline earth metal (M=Ca, Sr or Ba) and HTO water was observed homogeneously at 30 deg C under equilibrium after mixing. Consequently, the followings were obtained: a quantitative relation between the electronegativity of each M ion and the ability (of the M ion) incorporating OT - into the M hydroxide can be found and the ability is small when the temperature is high, the exchange rate for the OT-for-OH exchange reaction is small when the electronegativity of the M ion in the M hydroxide is great, as for the dissociation of HTO water, it seems that formula (HTO ↔ T + + OH - ) is more predominant than the formula (HTO ↔H + + OT - ) when the temperature is high and the method used in this work is useful to estimate the reactivity of a certain alkaline material. (author)

  16. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 59Ni and Fe isotopes at the Argonne superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.; Kutschera, W.; Myslek-Laurikainen, B.; Pardo, R.C.; Smither, R.K.; Yntema, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    We have obtained initial results in an attempt to use the Argonne tandem-linac system for accelerator mass spectrometry of medium-heavy nuclei. Nuclei of the radioisotope 59 Ni (T/sub 1/2 = 7.5 x 10 5 y) and of the stable isotope 58 Fe at low concentrations have been accelerated and clearly identified. The latter experiment is in preparation of a measurement of the half-life of 60 Fe

  17. Hot rotating fp shell Fe isotopes near proton drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2003-01-01

    F p shell 44-58 Fe nuclei have been investigated in highly excited state using the statistical theory of hot rotating nucleus. Effects of thermal and rotational excitation at drip line nuclei are studied

  18. Characterization of Low-Symmetry Structures from Phase Equilibrium of Fe-Al System-Microstructures and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysik, Piotr; Jóźwiak, Stanisław; Czujko, Tomasz

    2015-03-04

    Fe-Al intermetallic alloys with aluminum content over 60 at% are in the area of the phase equilibrium diagram that is considerably less investigated in comparison to the high-symmetry Fe₃Al and FeAl phases. Ambiguous crystallographic information and incoherent data referring to the phase equilibrium diagrams placed in a high-aluminum range have caused confusions and misinformation. Nowadays unequivocal material properties description of FeAl₂, Fe₂Al₅ and FeAl₃ intermetallic alloys is still incomplete. In this paper, the influence of aluminum content and processing parameters on phase composition is presented. The occurrence of low-symmetry FeAl₂, Fe₂Al₅ and FeAl₃ structures determined by chemical composition and phase transformations was defined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) examinations. These results served to verify diffraction investigations (XRD) and to explain the mechanical properties of cast materials such as: hardness, Young's modulus and fracture toughness evaluated using the nano-indentation technique.

  19. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: Neviniza-VA@nrcki.ru; Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu., E-mail: yuri.titarenko@itep.ru [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing {sup 233}U from {sup 232}Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  20. A new method for studying iodine metabolism; the isotopic equilibrium method - kinetic and quantitative aspects of measurements made on rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, C.

    1964-05-01

    The isotopic equilibrium method which has been developed in the case of the rat has made it possible to measure the absolute values of the principal parameters of iodine metabolism in this animal. The quantities and concentrations of iodine have been measured in the thyroid gland and in the plasma with a sensitivity of 0.001 μg of 127 I. This sensitivity has made it possible to measure pools as small as the iodide and the free iodotyrosines of the thyroid and to demonstrate the absence of free iodotyrosines in the plasma of the normal rat. In vivo, the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the iodine content of the thyroid gland and to calculate the intensity of this gland's secretion without removing it. By double labelling with 125 I and 131 I the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the flux, intensity of the intrathyroidal recycling as well as the turnover rates of all the iodine containing compounds of the thyroid gland. For this gland no precursor-product relationship has been found between The iodotyrosines (MIT and DIT) and the iodothyronines (T 4 and T 3 ). The absence of this relationship is due to the heterogeneity of the thyroglobulin turnover. It has been shown furthermore that there exists in the plasma an organic fraction of the iodine which is different to thyroglobulin and which is renewed more rapidly than the circulating hormones T 3 and T 4 . The isotopic equilibrium method is very useful for series measurements of iodine. It makes it possible furthermore to improve the biochemical fractionations by adding carriers without affecting the subsequent 127 I measurements. (author) [fr

  1. Effects of deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium in the atmospheres of F supergiants. I. Overionization of Fe I atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarchuk, A.A.; Lyubimkov, L.S.; Sakhibullin, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    For a number of class F supergiants and dwarfs, non-LTE calculations have been made of the Fe I-Fe II ionization balance. It is shown that deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium lead to a strong overionization of the Fe I atoms in the upper layers of the atmosphere. This confirms the conclusion obtained by Lyubimkov and Boyarchuk on the basis of an investigation of microturbulence in F supergiants. The reason for the overionization (compared with LTE) is the nonequality of the recombination and photoionization temperatures: To recombination processes there corresponds a local temperature T(/tau/), whereas the photoionization takes place under the influence of ultraviolet radiation from deeper and hotter layers of the atmosphere. The equivalent widths of some Fe I lines have been calculated. It is shown that neglect of the overionization in the analysis of sufficiently strong lines may lead to an underestimation of the iron abundance by an order of magnitude

  2. pH-dependent equilibrium isotope fractionation associated with the compound specific nitrogen and carbon isotope analysis of substituted anilines by SPME-GC/IRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarpeli-Liati, Marita; Turgeon, Aurora; Garr, Ashley N; Arnold, William A; Cramer, Christopher J; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2011-03-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) was used to elucidate the effects of N-atom protonation on the analysis of N and C isotope signatures of selected aromatic amines. Precise and accurate isotope ratios were measured using polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) as the SPME fiber material at solution pH-values that exceeded the pK(a) of the substituted aniline's conjugate acid by two pH-units. Deviations of δ(15)N and δ(13)C-values from reference measurements by elemental analyzer IRMS were small (IRMS. Under these conditions, the detection limits for accurate isotope ratio measurements were between 0.64 and 2.1 mg L(-1) for δ(15)N and between 0.13 and 0.54 mg L(-1) for δ(13)C, respectively. Substantial inverse N isotope fractionation was observed by SPME-GC/IRMS as the fraction of protonated species increased with decreasing pH leading to deviations of -20‰ while the corresponding δ(13)C-values were largely invariant. From isotope ratio analysis at different solution pHs and theoretical calculations by density functional theory, we derived equilibrium isotope effects, EIEs, pertinent to aromatic amine protonation of 0.980 and 1.001 for N and C, respectively, which were very similar for all compounds investigated. Our work shows that N-atom protonation can compromise accurate compound-specific N isotope analysis of aromatic amines.

  3. Carbon isotope fractionation of chlorinated ethenes during oxidation by Fe{sup 2+} activated persulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, Massimo, E-mail: m2marche@uwaterloo.ca [Departament de Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalunya 08028 (Spain); Earth and Environmental Department, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Aravena, Ramon [Earth and Environmental Department, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Sra, Kanwartej S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Golder Associates Inc, Toronto, Ontario, Canada L5N 5Z7 (Canada); Thomson, Neil R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalunya 08028 (Spain); Mancini, Silvia [Golder Associates Inc, Toronto, Ontario, Canada L5N 5Z7 (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    The increased use of persulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}) for in situ chemical oxidation to treat groundwater and soils contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds (CHCs) requires unbiased methods to assess treatment performance. Stable carbon isotope analysis offers a potential tool for assessing the in situ treatment performance of persulfate at sites contaminated with CHCs. This study investigated the extent of C isotope fractionation during oxidation of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) by persulfate activated by ferrous ion (Fe{sup 2+}). An average carbon isotope enrichment factor {epsilon}{sub bulk} of - 4.9 Per-Mille-Sign for PCE, - 3.6 Per-Mille-Sign for TCE and - 7.6 Per-Mille-Sign for cis-DCE were obtained in batch experiments. Variations in the initial S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}/Fe{sup 2+}/CHC molar ratios did not result in any significant differences in carbon isotope fractionation. The occurrence of carbon isotope fractionation during oxidation and the lack of dependence of enrichment factors upon the S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}/Fe{sup 2+}/CHC molar ratio demonstrate that carbon isotope analysis can potentially be used at contaminated sites as an additional technique to estimate treatment efficacy during oxidation of CHCs by Fe{sup 2+} activated persulfate. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The performance of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is still difficult to assess. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the potential of carbon isotope analysis as a new assessing tool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C isotope of PCE, TCE and DCE oxidized by persulfate activated by Fe{sup 2+} was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enrichment factors of - 4.9 Per-Mille-Sign for PCE, - 3.6 Per-Mille-Sign for TCE and - 7.6 Per-Mille-Sign for cisDCE were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon isotope can potentially be used to estimate the ISCO treatment efficacy.

  4. Stochastic Simulation of Isotopic Exchange Mechanisms for Fe(II)-Catalyzed Recrystallization of Goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarzycki, Piotr [Energy; Institute; Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest

    2017-06-15

    Understanding Fe(II)-catalyzed transformations of Fe(III)- (oxyhydr)oxides is critical for correctly interpreting stable isotopic distributions and for predicting the fate of metal ions in the environment. Recent Fe isotopic tracer experiments have shown that goethite undergoes rapid recrystallization without phase change when exposed to aqueous Fe(II). The proposed explanation is oxidation of sorbed Fe(II) and reductive Fe(II) release coupled 1:1 by electron conduction through crystallites. Given the availability of two tracer exchange data sets that explore pH and particle size effects (e.g., Handler et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2014, 48, 11302-11311; Joshi and Gorski Environ. Sci. Technol. 2016, 50, 7315-7324), we developed a stochastic simulation that exactly mimics these experiments, while imposing the 1:1 constraint. We find that all data can be represented by this model, and unifying mechanistic information emerges. At pH 7.5 a rapid initial exchange is followed by slower exchange, consistent with mixed surface- and diffusion-limited kinetics arising from prominent particle aggregation. At pH 5.0 where aggregation and net Fe(II) sorption are minimal, that exchange is quantitatively proportional to available particle surface area and the density of sorbed Fe(II) is more readily evident. Our analysis reveals a fundamental atom exchange rate of ~10-5 Fe nm-2 s-1, commensurate with some of the reported reductive dissolution rates of goethite, suggesting Fe(II) release is the rate-limiting step in the conduction mechanism during recrystallization.

  5. Constraining Thermal Histories by Monte Carlo Simulation of Mg-Fe Isotopic Profiles in Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sio, C. K. I.; Dauphas, N.

    2016-12-01

    In thermochronology, random time-temperature (t-T) paths are generated and used as inputs to model fission track data. This random search method is used to identify a range of acceptable thermal histories that can describe the data. We have extended this modeling approach to magmatic systems. This approach utilizes both the chemical and stable isotope profiles measured in crystals as model constraints. Specifically, the isotopic profiles are used to determine the relative contribution of crystal growth vs. diffusion in generating chemical profiles, and to detect changes in melt composition. With this information, tighter constraints can be placed on the thermal evolution of magmatic bodies. We use an olivine phenocryst from the Kilauea Iki lava lake, HI, to demonstrate proof of concept. We treat this sample as one with little geologic context, then compare our modeling results to the known thermal history experienced by that sample. To complete forward modeling, we use MELTS to estimate the boundary condition, initial and quench temperatures. We also assume a simple relationship between crystal growth and cooling rate. Another important parameter is the isotopic effect for diffusion (i.e., the relative diffusivity of the light vs. heavy isotope of an element). The isotopic effects for Mg and Fe diffusion in olivine have been estimated based on natural samples; experiments to better constrain these parameters are underway. We find that 40% of the random t-T paths can be used to fit the Mg-Fe chemical profiles. However, only a few can be used to simultaneously fit the Mg-Fe isotopic profiles. These few t-T paths are close to the independently determined t-T history of the sample. This modeling approach can be further extended other igneous and metamorphic systems where data exist for diffusion rates, crystal growth rates, and isotopic effects for diffusion.

  6. Properties of Fe, Ni and Zn isotope chains near the drip-line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, V.N.; Tarasov, D.V.; Kuprikov, V.I.; Gridnev, K.A.; Gridnev, D.K.; Gridnev, K.A.; Gridnev, D.K.; Kartavenko, V.G.; Greiner, W.; Kartavenko, V.G.

    2007-01-01

    The location of proton and neutron drip-lines and the characteristics of the neutron-deficient and the neutron-rich isotopes Fe, Ni and Zn on the basis of Hartree-Fock method with Skyrme forces (Ska, SkM * , Sly4) taking into account deformation was investigated. The calculations predict a big jump of deformation parameter up to β ∼ 0.4 for Ni isotopes in the neighborhood of N ∼ 62. The manifestation of magic numbers for isotopes 48 Ni, 56 Ni, 78 Ni and also for the stable isotope in the respect to neutron emission 110 Ni which is situated beyond the neutron drip-line is discussed

  7. Correlation between the nanocrystalline Sm(Fe,Mo){sub 12} and its out of equilibrium phase Sm(Fe,Mo){sub 10}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khazzan, S. [CMTR, ICMPE, UMR7182, CNRS - Université Paris Est, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, F-94320 Thiais (France); Laboratoire Matériaux Organisation et Propriétés, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Bessais, L., E-mail: bessais@glvt.cnrs.fr [CMTR, ICMPE, UMR7182, CNRS - Université Paris Est, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, F-94320 Thiais (France); Van Tendeloo, G. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Mliki, N. [Laboratoire Matériaux Organisation et Propriétés, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2014-08-01

    Nanostructured Sm–Fe–Mo semi-hard magnetic material exhibiting enhanced magnetic properties can be produced by ball milling followed by recrystallization. Milled samples were annealed for 30 min in a vacuum at different temperatures (T{sub A}) between 700 and 1190 °C. The effects of heat treatment and Mo content on structural and magnetic property changes have been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction using the Rietveld method, transmission electron microscopy and magnetic measurements. For samples annealed at T{sub A}>900°C the tetragonal ThMn{sub 12}-type structure is identified, while for 700equilibrium P6/mmm type structure was found as the major phase. This novel nanocrystalline phase has never been synthesized before. The correspondent stoichiometry is determined on the basis of the vacancy model. The Rietveld analysis gives a stoichiometry ratio equal to 1:10, for the out of equilibrium hexagonal phase, which is described with three crystallographic transition metal sites: 3g is fully occupied, 6l occupation is limited to hexagons surrounding the Fe dumbbell pairs 2e. We have performed a magnetic and structural study of nanocrystalline metastable P6/mmm Sm(Fe{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}){sub 10}, correlated with structural transformation towards its equilibrium derivative I4/mmm Sm(Fe{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}){sub 12}. A maximum of the coercive field H{sub C} (H{sub C}>5kOe) has been observed for the new hexagonal P6/mmm phase suggesting that nanocrystalline Sm(Fe,Mo){sub 10}, is a semi-hard material, and is potential candidate for magnetic recording. - Highlights: • A study of the structure and magnetic properties of SmFeMo compound. • A new out of equilibrium P6/mmm-type structure was found. • Correlation between the 1/12 phase and its out of equilibrium 1/10 phase.

  8. Erythrokinetics examination using 59Fe and 51Cr isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistrik, M.; Klinda, F.; Geso, L.; Lipsic, T.

    1987-01-01

    The results are discussed of 55 case studies of various hematological diseases in which 59 Fe was used as a tracer in studying iron kinetics, simultaneously with 51 Cr as a tracer in studying erythrocyte survival and the localization of erythrocyte destruction. The values of iron metabolism are graphically presented, while erythropoiesis data is tabulated. The method was especially beneficial in conditions that could not easily be diagnosed using laboratory techniques. They included osteomyelofibrosis, polycythemia vera, aplastic anemia, and the myelodysplastic syndrome. The method allows quantitative assessment of erythropoiesis, thus facilitating differential diagnosis in clinical practice. (L.O.). 3 figs., 1 tab., 22 refs

  9. Study of self-diffusion of Fe in nanocrystalline FeNZr alloys using nuclear resonance reflectivity from isotopic multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Ajay; Chakravarty, Sajoy; Gupta, Mukul; Horisberger, M.; Rueffer, Rudolf; Wille, Hans-Christian; Leupold, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    It is demonstrated that nuclear resonance reflectivity from isotopic multilayers can be used to do accurate measurements of self diffusion of iron in thin film samples. Diffusion lengths down to ∼ 1A 0 can be measured. The technique has been used to measure the self-diffusion of iron in FeNZr nanocrystalline alloys. The activation energy for self-diffusion of iron is found to be 0.8% ± 0.01 eV while the pre-exponential factor is 3.54 x 10 13 m 2 /s. (author)

  10. Isotopic equilibrium constants of the deuterium exchange between HDO and H2S, H2Se and H2Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, D.

    1959-11-01

    We have determined experimentally the equilibrium constant K of each of the following isotope exchanges: SH 2 + OHD ↔ SHD + OH 2 ; SeH 2 + OHD ↔ SeHD + OH 2 ; TeH 2 + OHD ↔ TeHD + OH 2 . In gaseous phase, statistical thermodynamics leads to the expression: K (Z OHD x Z RH 2 )/(Z OH 2 x Z RHD ) x e W/T (R being the elements S, Se or Te). Z, the partition functions, have been calculated and, through our experimental results, the constant W has been determined. Having obtained W, the equilibrium constant K has been calculated for a series of temperatures. (author) [fr

  11. Properties of Fe, Ni and Zn isotopes near the drip-lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, V.N.; Tarasaov, D.V.; Gridnev, K.A.; Gridnev, D.K.; Kartavenko, V.G.; Greiner, W.

    2008-01-01

    The position of the neutron and proton drip-lines as well as properties of the isotopes Fe, Ni and Zn with neutron excess and neutron deficit are studied within the Hartree–Fock approach with the Skyrme interaction (Ska, SkM*, Sly4). The pairing is taken into account on the basis of the BCS approach with the pairing constant G = (19.5/A)[1 ± 0.51(N-Z)/A]. Our calculations predict that for Ni isotopes around N = 62 there appears a sudden increase of the deformation parameter up to β = 0.4. The zone with such big deformation, where Ni isotopes are stable against one neutron emission stretches up to N = 78. The magic numbers effects for the isotopes 48 Ni, 56 Ni, 78 Ni, 110 Ni are discussed. The universality of the reasons standing behind the enhancement of stability of the isotopes 40 O and 110 Ni which are beyond the drip-line is demonstrated. Calculated values of the two-neutron separation energy, and proton and neutron root mean square radii for the chain of Ni isotopes show a good agreement with existing Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov calculations of these values. (author)

  12. Phase equilibrium of the system Ag-Fe-Nd, and Nd extraction from magnet scraps using molten silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, O.; Okabe, T.H.; Umetsu, Y.

    2004-01-01

    To develop a new recycling process, we examined the direct extraction of neodymium (Nd) metal from Nd-Fe-B magnet scraps using molten silver (Ag) as an extraction medium. Prior to the extraction experiment, the phase equilibrium of the system Ag-Fe-Nd was investigated to estimate the theoretical extraction limit. It was observed that the Fe/Nd 2 Fe 17 mixture equilibrates with the molten Ag-Nd alloy containing 50-52 mol% Nd (57-59 mass% Nd) at 1363 K. The experimental results were in good agreement with the thermodynamic calculation based on literature values. By reacting Nd-Fe-B magnet scraps with molten silver at 1273 K, more than 90% of the neodymium in the scrap was extracted, and an Ag-Nd alloy containing 40-50 mass% Nd was obtained. The neodymium in the Ag-Nd alloy was separated from silver as Nd 2 O 3 by oxidizing the obtained alloy in air. Although the wettability of Nd 2 O 3 with molten silver caused some difficulties in the separation of neodymium from silver, molten silver is shown to be an effective medium for neodymium extraction from magnet scrap

  13. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K K; Wielandt, D; Schiller, M; Bizzarro, M

    2016-04-22

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of these species can result in incomplete Cr recovery during chromatographic purification. Because of large mass-dependent inter-species isotope fractionation, incomplete recovery can affect the accuracy of high-precision Cr isotope analysis. Here, we demonstrate widely differing cation distribution coefficients of Cr(III)-species (Cr(3+), CrCl(2+) and CrCl2(+)) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ∼1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr(3+), intermediates in CrCl(2+) and the lightest in CrCl2(+)/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ∼25% Cr (in the form of Cr(3+)) through chromatographic purification, this translates into 185 ppm/amu offset in the stable Cr isotope ratio of the residual sample. Depending on the validity of the mass-bias correction during isotope analysis, this further results in artificial mass-independent effects in the mass-bias corrected (53)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(53)Cr* of 5.2 ppm) and (54)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(54)Cr* of 13.5 ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high and reproducible Cr recovery. This is achieved either through 1) effective promotion of Cr(3+) by >5 days exposure to HNO3H2O2 solutions at room temperature, resulting in >∼98% Cr recovery for most types of sample matrices tested using a cationic chromatographic retention strategy, or 2) formation of Cr(III)-Cl complexes through exposure to concentrated HCl at high temperature (>120 °C) for several hours, resulting in >97.5% Cr recovery using a

  14. Chemical and oxygen isotopic properties of ordinary chondrites (H5, L6) from Oman: Signs of isotopic equilibrium during thermal metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arshad; Nasir, Sobhi J.; Jabeen, Iffat; Al Rawas, Ahmed; Banerjee, Neil R.; Osinski, Gordon R.

    2017-10-01

    Mean bulk chemical data of recently found H5 and L6 ordinary chondrites from the deserts of Oman generally reflect isochemical features which are consistent with the progressive thermal metamorphism of a common, unequilibrated starting material. Relative differences in abundances range from 0.5-10% in REE (Eu = 14%), 6-13% in siderophile elements (Co = 48%), and >10% in lithophile elements (exceptions are Ba, Sr, Zr, Hf, U = >30%) between H5 and L6 groups. These differences may have accounted for variable temperature conditions during metamorphism on their parent bodies. The CI/Mg-normalized mean abundances of refractory lithophile elements (Al, Ca, Sm, Yb, Lu, V) show no resolvable differences between H5 and L6 suggesting that both groups have experienced the same fractionation. The REE diagram shows subtle enrichment in LREE with a flat HREE pattern. Furthermore, overall mean REE abundances are 0.6 × CI with enriched La abundance ( 0.9 × CI) in both groups. Precise oxygen isotope compositions demonstrate the attainment of isotopic equilibrium by progressive thermal metamorphism following a mass-dependent isotope fractionation trend. Both groups show a slope-1/2 line on a three-isotope plot with subtle negative deviation in Δ17O associated with δ18O enrichment relative to δ17O. These deviations are interpreted as the result of liberation of water from phyllosilicates and evaporation of a fraction of the water during thermal metamorphism. The resultant isotope fractionations caused by the water loss are analogous to those occurring between silicate melt and gas phase during CAI and chondrule formation in chondrites and are controlled by cooling rates and exchange efficiency.

  15. Measurement of beta decay periods for Fe-Ni neutrons rich isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, S.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal fission of 239 Pu was used to produce 68,69 Co and 68 Fe isotopes, the lightest ones ever observed in thermal fission, at the ILL high-flux reactor, in Grenoble. Separated with the Lohengrin recoil spectrometer, then identified by means of a Δ E-E ionization chamber, fragments were implanted in a set of Si-detectors, where β-particles were detected too. The fission yields were determined, and the beta-decay half-lives were extracted from delayed coincidence analysis between ion implantation and the subsequent beta detection: They were found to be 0.27±0.05s, 0.18±0.10s, and 0.10±0.06s respectively for 69 Co, 68 Co, and 68 Fe. This method was adapted to a new experimental configuration: 65 Fe isotopes were produced from 86 Kr projectile fragmentation at 500 MeV/u on a Be target. Selected ions were separated with the fragment separator FRS at GSI (Darmstadt), tuned in the monoenergetic mode. Fragments were identified by ΔE-ToF, slowed down, and then implanted in two rows of PIN-diodes that provided an additional range selection. The half-life were determined from the analysis of the decay chain Fe-Co-Ni: it was found 0.4±0.2s. Production rates obtained with the two methods are compared at the end of this work

  16. Recycling of Oceanic Lithosphere: Water, fO2 and Fe-isotope Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizmis, M.; Peslier, A. H.; McCammon, C. A.; Keshav, S.; Williams, H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Spinel peridotite and garnet pyroxenite xenoliths from Hawaii provide important clues about the composition of the oceanic lithosphere, and can be used to assess its contribution to mantle heterogeneity upon recycling. The peridotites have lower bulk H2O (approximately 70-114 ppm) than the MORB source, qualitatively consistent with melt depletion. The garnet pyroxenites (high pressure cumulates) have higher H2O (200-460 ppm, up to 550 ppm accounting for phlogopite) and low H2O/Ce ratios (less than 100). The peridotites have relatively light Fe-isotopes (delta Fe -57 = -0.34 to 0.13) that decrease with increasing depletion, while the pyroxenites are significantly heavier (delta Fe-57 up to 0.3). The observed xenolith, as well as MORB and OIB total Fe-isotope variability is larger that can be explained by existing melting models. The high H2O and low H2O/Ce ratios of pyroxenites are similar to estimates of EM-type OIB sources, while their heavy delta Fe-57 are similar to some Society and Cook-Austral basalts. Therefore, recycling of mineralogically enriched oceanic lithosphere (i.e. pyroxenites) may contribute to OIB sources and mantle heterogeneity. The Fe(3+)/Sigma? systematics of these xenoliths also suggest that there might be lateral redox gradients within the lithosphere, between juxtaposed oxidized spinel peridotites (deltaFMQ = -0.7 to 1.6, at 15 kb) and more reduced pyroxenites (deltaFMQ = -2 to -0.4, at 20-25kb). Such mineralogically and compositionally imposed fO2 gradients may generate local redox melting due to changes in fluid speciation (e.g. reduced fluids from pyroxenite encountering more oxidized peridotite). Formation of such incipient, small degree melts could further contribute to metasomatic features seen in peridotites, mantle heterogeneity, as well as the low velocity and high electrical conductivity structures near the base of the lithosphere and upper mantle.

  17. Measured static hyperfine magnetic fields following implantation of Pt into Fe interpreted as evidence for pre-equilibrium effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderssen, S.S.; Stuchberry, A.E.

    1994-06-01

    The static hyperfine magnetic field present at Pt nuclei implanted in ferromagnetic Fe has been measured using the ion-implantation perturbed angular correlation (IMPAC) technique following Coulomb excitation. The present measured precessions agree with earlier data, but more recent information on the transient field correction leads to an inferred static field strength that is ∼ 25% smaller than obtained previously. Comparisons are made between the static fields measured by various techniques for Pt and neighbouring ions in iron. From these comparisons, it is show that the IMPAC data are consistent with a scenario in which (i) the static field takes about 10 ps to reach its equilibrium value, following recovery from dynamic structural damage caused by the ion-implantation process, and (ii) following equilibration, a large fraction (∼ 90%) of the implanted ions have final positions on lattice sites of the Fe host. 50 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs

  18. Measured static hyperfine magnetic fields following implantation of Pt into Fe interpreted as evidence for pre-equilibrium effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderssen, S S; Stuchberry, A E

    1994-06-01

    The static hyperfine magnetic field present at Pt nuclei implanted in ferromagnetic Fe has been measured using the ion-implantation perturbed angular correlation (IMPAC) technique following Coulomb excitation. The present measured precessions agree with earlier data, but more recent information on the transient field correction leads to an inferred static field strength that is {approx} 25% smaller than obtained previously. Comparisons are made between the static fields measured by various techniques for Pt and neighbouring ions in iron. From these comparisons, it is show that the IMPAC data are consistent with a scenario in which (i) the static field takes about 10 ps to reach its equilibrium value, following recovery from dynamic structural damage caused by the ion-implantation process, and (ii) following equilibration, a large fraction ({approx} 90%) of the implanted ions have final positions on lattice sites of the Fe host. 50 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

  19. Non-equilibrium magnetic properties of melt-spun Nd60Fe30Al10 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato Turtelli, R.; Sinnecker, J.P.; Steiner, W.; Wiesinger, G.; Groessinger, R.; Triyono, D.

    2003-01-01

    The temperature, frequency and DC-field dependence of the AC-susceptibility has been investigated on melt-spun Nd 60 Fe 30 Al 10 . The temperature dependence of the AC-susceptibility shows an anomalous behavior, which depends strongly on the applied heat treatment and exhibits a cluster-like characteristic. Similar to the time dependence of the coercivity, a magnetic after-effect is present for temperatures higher than 50 K. 57 Fe Moessbauer spectra can be analyzed by two hyperfine field distributions pointing to two phases with quite different magnetic moments on the Fe sites

  20. Discerning crystal growth from diffusion profiles in zoned olivine by in situ Mg–Fe isotopic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sio, Corliss Kin I.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Chaussidon, Marc; Helz, Rosalind T.; Roskosz, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Mineral zoning is used in diffusion-based geospeedometry to determine magmatic timescales. Progress in this field has been hampered by the challenge to discern mineral zoning produced by diffusion from concentration gradients inherited from crystal growth. A zoned olivine phenocryst from Kilauea Iki lava lake (Hawaii) was selected for this study to evaluate the potential of Mg and Fe isotopes for distinguishing these two processes. Microdrilling of the phenocryst (∼300 μm drill holes) followed by MC-ICPMS analysis of the powders revealed negatively coupled Mg and Fe isotopic fractionations (δ26Mg from +0.1‰ to −0.2‰ and δ56Fe from −1.2‰ to −0.2‰ from core to rim), which can only be explained by Mg–Fe exchange between melt and olivine. The data can be explained with ratios of diffusivities of Mg and Fe isotopes in olivine scaling as D2/D1 = (m1/m2)β with βMg ∼0.16 and βFe ∼0.27. LA-MC-ICPMS and MC-SIMS Fe isotopic measurements are developed and are demonstrated to yield accurate δ56Fe measurements within precisions of ∼0.2‰ (1 SD) at spatial resolutions of ∼50 μm. δ56Fe and δ26Mg stay constant with Fo# in the rim (late-stage overgrowth), whereas in the core (original phenocryst) δ56Fe steeply trends toward lighter compositions and δ26Mg trends toward heavier compositions with higher Fo#. A plot of δ56Fe vs. Fo# immediately distinguishes growth-controlled from diffusion-controlled zoning in these two regions. The results are consistent with the idea that large isotopic fractionation accompanies chemical diffusion in crystals, whereas fractional crystallization induces little or no isotopic fractionation. The cooling timescale inferred from the chemical-isotope zoning profiles is consistent with the documented cooling history of the lava lake. In the absence of geologic context, in situ stable isotopic measurements may now be used to interpret the nature of mineral zoning. Stable isotope measurements by LA-MC-ICPMS and MC

  1. Fe-isotope fractionation in magmatic-hydrothermal mineral deposits: A case study from the Renison Sn-W deposit, Tasmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawryk, Christine M.; Foden, John D.

    2015-02-01

    We present 50 new iron isotopic analyses of source granite and mineral separates from the Renison tin deposit in western Tasmania. The aim of the study is to characterise the composition of minerals within a tin deposit associated with a reduced, S-type magma. We have analysed bulk samples of granite, and separates of pyrrhotite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, magnetite, chalcopyrite and siderite by multi-collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The isotopic compositions of mineral separates are consistent with theoretical predictions of equilibrium fractionation based on Mössbauer spectroscopy and other parametric calculations. Mineral-mineral pairs yield temperatures of formation that are in agreement with prior detailed fluid inclusion studies, but are spatially inconsistent with declining fluid temperatures with distance from the causative intrusion, limiting the use of Fe isotopes as a potential geothermometer, at least in this case. Comparison of our data with published data from other deposits clearly demonstrates that pyrite, magnetite and chalcopyrite from the hottest ore fluids (>300-400 °C) at Renison are isotopically heavier than minerals sampled from a deposit formed at similar temperatures, but associated with a more oxidised and less differentiated intrusion.

  2. Determination of tin equilibrium isotope fractionation factors from synchrotron radiation experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyakov, VB; Mineev, SD; Clayton, RN; Hu, G; Mineev, KS

    2005-01-01

    A method of determination of the reduced isotopic partition function ratio (beta-factor) from the partial density of state (PDOS) obtained by inelastic nuclear resonant X-ray scattering (INRXS) in synchrotron radiation experiments has been established. The method has been demonstrated by the example

  3. Specific equilibrium behavior of hydrogen isotopes adsorbed onto synthetic zeolite A-type governed by lithium cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Shoji; Kotoh, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Isotherms for H 2 and D 2 adsorbed onto SZ-LiA at 77.4 K are shown. • The adsorption isotherms exhibit specific deviation in the range lower than 10 Pa. • SZ-LiA indicates the power of several 100-times at 0.1 Pa, compared with SZ-NaA. • Experimental isotherms are described empirically by a dual-site Langmuir equation. • The isotope effect on adsorption isotherms appears in the Langmuir constants. -- Abstract: Since synthetic zeolites (SZs) are powerfully adsorptive for hydrogen isotopes at cryogenic temperatures such as liquefied nitrogen, adsorption processes using these have been considered applicable to such as recovery of tritium from the lithium blanket of DT fusion reactor system. Onto these zeolites the adsorptions isotherms for hydrogen isotopes onto SZ-NaA, SZ-CaA and SZ-NaX at 77.4 K were already clarified experimentally and analytically. These isotherms exhibit similar profiles of Langmuir type. In this work, adsorption isotherms were examined for H 2 and D 2 on SZ-LiA at 77.4 K. SZ-LiA was made from SZ-NaA by exchanging its sodium ions for lithium ones, provided by TOSOH Corp. The experimental results demonstrate the specific equilibrium behavior of hydrogen isotopes adsorbed on SZ-LiA, deviating from isothermal profiles on SZ-CaA and SZ-NaX. SZ-LiA show the isothermal profiles of adsorption for H 2 and D 2 similar to on the conventional zeolites in the range from around 1 kPa to the atmospheric pressure, but exhibit a plateau around 1 mol/kg between 0.1 Pa and 100 Pa, while other zeolites show linearly profiling isotherms. This deviation indicates the adsorptive power of SZ-LiA remarkably greater than that of the others

  4. Fe-O stable isotope pairs elucidate a high-temperature origin of Chilean iron oxide-apatite deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilenker, Laura D.; Simon, Adam C.; Reich, Martin; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Gajos, Norbert; Bindeman, Ilya; Barra, Fernando; Munizaga, Rodrigo

    2016-03-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) ore deposits occur globally and can host millions to billions of tons of Fe in addition to economic reserves of other metals such as rare earth elements, which are critical for the expected growth of technology and renewable energy resources. In this study, we pair the stable Fe and O isotope compositions of magnetite samples from several IOA deposits to constrain the source reservoir of these elements in IOAs. Since magnetite constitutes up to 90 modal% of many IOAs, identifying the source of Fe and O within the magnetite may elucidate high-temperature and/or lower-temperature processes responsible for their formation. Here, we focus on the world-class Los Colorados IOA in the Chilean iron belt (CIB), and present data for magnetite from other Fe oxide deposits in the CIB (El Laco, Mariela). We also report Fe and O isotopic values for other IOA deposits, including Mineville, New York (USA) and the type locale, Kiruna (Sweden). The ranges of Fe isotopic composition (δ56Fe, 56Fe/54Fe relative to IRMM-14) of magnetite from the Chilean deposits are: Los Colorados, δ56Fe (±2σ) = 0.08 ± 0.03‰ to 0.24 ± 0.08‰; El Laco, δ56Fe = 0.20 ± 0.03‰ to 0.53 ± 0.03‰; Mariela, δ56Fe = 0.13 ± 0.03‰. The O isotopic composition (δ18O, 18O/16O relative to VSMOW) of the same Chilean magnetite samples are: Los Colorados, δ18O (±2σ) = 1.92 ± 0.08‰ to 3.17 ± 0.03‰; El Laco, δ18O = 4.00 ± 0.10‰ to 4.34 ± 0.10‰; Mariela, δ18O = (1.48 ± 0.04‰). The δ18O and δ56Fe values for Kiruna magnetite yield an average of 1.76 ± 0.25‰ and 0.16 ± 0.07‰, respectively. The Fe and O isotope data from the Chilean IOAs fit unequivocally within the range of magnetite formed by high-temperature magmatic or magmatic-hydrothermal processes (i.e., δ56Fe 0.06-0.49‰ and δ18O = 1.0-4.5‰), consistent with a high-temperature origin for Chilean IOA deposits. Additionally, minimum formation temperatures calculated by using the measured Δ18O

  5. Extreme Hf and light Fe isotopes in Archean komatiites - a remnant of very early mantle depletion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, O.; Sossi, P.; Campbell, I. H.; Van Kranendonk, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hafnium isotope signatures in some Archean komatiites (ca. 3.5-3.0 billion years old) require a mantle source with a time-integrated Lu/Hf that exceeds average modern depleted mantle. Investigation of the timing and locus of parent-daughter fractionation in their mantle sources potentially constrains differentiation processes in the early Earth and their subsequent distribution and storage. In addition, they may help to constrain the Hf isotope evolution of the greater depleted mantle. In order to shed light on these processes, we discuss radiogenic Hf isotopes in conjunction with stable Fe isotope systematics in Archean komatiites from the Pilbara craton in Western Australia. Our findings indicate that, after careful evaluation of the effects of alteration, pristine samples are characterised by initial 176Hf/177Hf, which lie above the age-corrected depleted mantle, as a consequence of ancient melt extraction. Iron isotope systematics for these samples further point to a mantle source that is isotopically lighter than average modern depleted mantle, which is also consistent with melt-depletion. Taken together, these observations require a component of an old, super-depleted reservoir in the komatiite mantle source(s) that survived in the mantle for possibly hundreds of millions of years. The Lu/Hf of this refractory mantle appears to be complementary to, and therefore contemporaneous with, the first terrestrial crust, as preserved in Hadean (i.e., > 4 Ga) detrital zircon cores, which may indicate a causal relationship between them. We will discuss implications for very early mantle dynamics and the formation of very early mantle reservoirs.

  6. Sorption separation of Eu and As from single-component systems by Fe-modified biochar. Kinetic and equilibrium study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fristak, Vladimir; Soja, Gerhard; Michalekova-Richveisova, Barbora; Pipiska, Martin; Viglasova, Eva; Galambos, Michal; Duriska, Libor; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of carbonaceous materials in separation processes of radionuclides, heavy metals and metalloids represents a burning issue in environmental and waste management. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effect of chemical modification of corncob-derived biochar by Fe-impregnations on sorption efficiency of Eu and As as a model compounds of cationic lanthanides and anionic metalloids. The biochar sample produced in slow pyrolysis process at 500 C before (BC) and after (IBC) impregnation process was characterized by elemental, FTIR, SEM-EDX analysis to confirm the effectiveness of Fe-impregnation process. The basic physico-chemical properties showed differences in surface area and pH values of BC- and IBC-derived sorbents. Sorption processes of Eu and As by BC and IBC were characterized as a time- and initial concentration of sorbate-dependent processes. The sorption equilibrium was reached for both sorbates in 24 h of contact time. Batch equilibrium experiments revealed the increased maximum sorption capacities (Q max ) of IBC for As about more than 20 times (Q max BC 0.11 and Q max IBC 2.26 mg g -1 ). Our study confirmed negligible effect of Fe-impregnation on sorption capacity of biochar for Eu (Q max BC 0.89 and Q max IBC 0.98 mg g -1 ). The iron-impregnation of biochar-derived sorbents can be utilized as a valuable treatment method to produce stable and more effective sorption materials for various xenobiotics separation from liquid wastes and aqueous solutions.

  7. Sorption separation of Eu and As from single-component systems by Fe-modified biochar. Kinetic and equilibrium study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fristak, Vladimir; Soja, Gerhard [Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Tulln (Austria). Energy Dept. Environmental Resources and Technologies; Michalekova-Richveisova, Barbora; Pipiska, Martin [Trnava Univ. (Slovakia). Dept. of Chemistry; Viglasova, Eva; Galambos, Michal [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry; Duriska, Libor [Slovak Univ. of Technology in Bratislava, Trnava (Slovakia). Faculty of Materials Science and Technology; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Agricola y Bromatologia

    2017-03-15

    The utilization of carbonaceous materials in separation processes of radionuclides, heavy metals and metalloids represents a burning issue in environmental and waste management. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effect of chemical modification of corncob-derived biochar by Fe-impregnations on sorption efficiency of Eu and As as a model compounds of cationic lanthanides and anionic metalloids. The biochar sample produced in slow pyrolysis process at 500 C before (BC) and after (IBC) impregnation process was characterized by elemental, FTIR, SEM-EDX analysis to confirm the effectiveness of Fe-impregnation process. The basic physico-chemical properties showed differences in surface area and pH values of BC- and IBC-derived sorbents. Sorption processes of Eu and As by BC and IBC were characterized as a time- and initial concentration of sorbate-dependent processes. The sorption equilibrium was reached for both sorbates in 24 h of contact time. Batch equilibrium experiments revealed the increased maximum sorption capacities (Q{sub max}) of IBC for As about more than 20 times (Q{sub max} BC 0.11 and Q{sub max} IBC 2.26 mg g{sup -1}). Our study confirmed negligible effect of Fe-impregnation on sorption capacity of biochar for Eu (Q{sub max} BC 0.89 and Q{sub max} IBC 0.98 mg g{sup -1}). The iron-impregnation of biochar-derived sorbents can be utilized as a valuable treatment method to produce stable and more effective sorption materials for various xenobiotics separation from liquid wastes and aqueous solutions.

  8. Site-Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Propane: Mass spectrometric methods, equilibrium temperature dependence, and kinetics of exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Ponton, C.; Kitchen, N.; Lloyd, M. K.; Lawson, M.; Formolo, M. J.; Eiler, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Intramolecular isotope ordering can constrain temperatures of synthesis, mechanisms of formation, and/or source substrates of organic compounds. Here we explore site-specific hydrogen isotope variations of propane. Statistical thermodynamic models predict that at equilibrium methylene hydrogen (-CH2-) in propane will be 10's of per mil higher in D/H ratio than methyl hydrogen (-CH3) at geologically relevant temperatures, and that this difference is highly temperature dependent ( 0.5-1 ‰/°C). Chemical-kinetic controls on site-specific D/H in propane could constrain the mechanisms, conditions and extents of propane synthesis or destruction. We have developed a method for measuring the difference in D/H ratio between methylene and methyl hydrogen in propane by gas source mass spectrometry. The data were measured using the Thermo Fisher Double Focusing Sector high resolution mass spectrometer (DFS), and involve comparison of the D/H ratios of molecular ion (C3H8+) and the ethyl fragmental ion (C2H5+). We demonstrate the accuracy and precision of this method through analysis of D-labeled and independently analyzed propanes. In the exchange experiments, propane was heated (100-200 oC) either alone or in the presence of D-enriched water (δD=1,1419 ‰ SMOW), with or without one of several potentially catalytic substrates for hours to weeks. Propane was found to exchange hydrogen with water vigorously at 200 °C in the presence of metal catalysts. In the presence of Ni catalyst, methylene hydrogen exchanges 2.5 times faster than methyl hydrogen. Hydrogen exchange in the presence of Pd catalyst is more effective and can equilibrate hydrogen isotope distribution on propane on the order of 7 days. Isotopic exchange in the presence of natural materials have also been tested, but is only measurable in the methylene group at 200 °C. High catalytic activity of Pd permits attainment of a bracketed, time-invariant equilibrium state that we use to calibrate the site

  9. ICP-MS with hexapole collision cell for isotope ratio measurements of Ca, Fe, and Se.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S F; Becker, J S

    2001-07-01

    To avoid mass interferences on analyte ions caused by argon ions and argon molecular ions via reactions with collision gases, an rf hexapole filled with helium and hydrogen has been used in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and its performance has been studied. Up to tenfold improvement in sensitivity was observed for heavy elements (m > 100 u), because of better ion transmission through the hexapole ion guide. A reduction of argon ions Ar+ and the molecular ions of argon ArX+ (X = O, Ar) by up to three orders of magnitude was achieved in a hexapole collision cell of an ICP-MS ("Platform ICP", Micromass, Manchester, UK) as a result of gas-phase reactions with hydrogen when the hexapole bias (HB) was set to 0 V; at an HB of 1.6 V argon, and argon-based ions of masses 40 u, 56 u, and 80 u, were reduced by approximately four, two, and five orders of magnitude, respectively. The signal-to-noise ratio 80Se/ 40Ar2+ was improved by more than five orders of magnitude under optimized experimental conditions. Dependence of mass discrimination on collision-cell properties was studied in the mass range 10 u (boron) to 238 u (uranium). Isotopic analysis of the elements affected by mass-spectrometric interference, Ca, Fe, and Se, was performed using a Meinhard nebulizer and an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN). The measured isotope ratios were comparable with tabulated values from IUPAC. Precision of 0.26%, 0.19%, and 0.12%, respectively, and accuracy of 0.13% 0.25%, and 0.92%, respectively, was achieved for isotope ratios 44Ca/ 40Ca and 56Fe/57Fe in 10 microg L(-1) solution nebulized by means of a USN and for 78Se/80Se in 100 microg L(-1) solution nebulized by means of a Meinhard nebulizer.

  10. The importance of a Ni correction with ion counter in the double spike analysis of Fe isotope compositions using a 57Fe/58Fe double spike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, V. A.; Konter, J. G.; Ma, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new method capable of measuring iron isotope ratios of igneous materials to high precision by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) using a 57Fe-58Fe double spike. After sample purification, near-baseline signal levels of nickel are still present in the sample solution, acting as an isobaric interference on 58 amu. To correct for the interference, the minor 60Ni isotope is monitored and used to subtract a proportional 58Ni signal from the total 58 amu beam. The 60Ni signal is difficult to precisely measure on the Faraday detector due to Johnson noise occurring at similar magnitude. This noise-dominated signal is subtracted from the total 58 amu beam, and its error amplified during the double spike correction. Placing the 60Ni beam on an ion counter produces a more precise measurement, resulting in a near-threefold improvement in δ56Fe reproducibility, from ±0.145‰ when measured on Faraday to 0.052‰. Faraday detectors quantify the 60Ni signal poorly, and fail to discern the transient 20Ne40Ar interference visible on the ion counter, which is likely responsible for poor reproducibility. Another consideration is instrumental stability (defined herein as drift in peak center mass), which affects high-resolution analyses. Analyses experiencing large drift relative to bracketing standards often yield nonreplicating data. Based on this, we present a quantitative outlier detection method capable of detecting drift-affected data. After outlier rejection, long-term precision on individual runs of our secondary standard improves to ±0.046‰. Averaging 3-4 analyses further improves precision to 0.019‰, allowing distinction between ultramafic minerals.

  11. Equilibrium Sorption studies of Fe, Cu and Co ions in aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recinius Communis Linn a commonly found herbal plant was used to prepare activated carbon by physicochemical activation method. The sorption capacity of this bio-resource material to remove Fe(III), Cu(II) and Co(II) from aqueous solutions was determined by batch tests. The influences of important parameters such as ...

  12. Stable isotope geochemical study of Pamukkale travertines: New evidences of low-temperature non-equilibrium calcite-water fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kele, Sándor; Özkul, Mehmet; Fórizs, István; Gökgöz, Ali; Baykara, Mehmet Oruç; Alçiçek, Mehmet Cihat; Németh, Tibor

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present the first detailed geochemical study of the world-famous actively forming Pamukkale and Karahayit travertines (Denizli Basin, SW-Turkey) and associated thermal waters. Sampling was performed along downstream sections through different depositional environments (vent, artificial channel and lake, terrace-pools and cascades of proximal slope, marshy environment of distal slope). δ 13C travertine values show significant increase (from + 6.1‰ to + 11.7‰ PDB) with increasing distance from the spring orifice, whereas the δ 18O travertine values show only slight increase downstream (from - 10.7‰ to - 9.1‰ PDB). Mainly the CO 2 outgassing caused the positive downstream shift (~ 6‰) in the δ 13C travertine values. The high δ 13C values of Pamukkale travertines located closest to the spring orifice (not affected by secondary processes) suggest the contribution of CO 2 liberated by thermometamorphic decarbonation besides magmatic sources. Based on the gradual downstream increase of the concentration of the conservative Na +, K +, Cl -, evaporation was estimated to be 2-5%, which coincides with the moderate effect of evaporation on the water isotope composition. Stable isotopic compositions of the Pamukkale thermal water springs show of meteoric origin, and indicate a Local Meteoric Water Line of Denizli Basin to be between the Global Meteoric Water Line (Craig, 1961) and Western Anatolian Meteoric Water Line (Şimşek, 2003). Detailed evaluation of several major and trace element contents measured in the water and in the precipitated travertine along the Pamukkale MM section revealed which elements are precipitated in the carbonate or concentrated in the detrital minerals. Former studies on the Hungarian Egerszalók travertine (Kele et al., 2008a, b, 2009) had shown that the isotopic equilibrium is rarely maintained under natural conditions during calcite precipitation in the temperature range between 41 and 67 °C. In this paper

  13. Irradiation of Wrought FeCrAl Tubes in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign within the Nuclear Technology Research and Development program of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is seeking to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactors. Alumina-forming ferritic alloys (e.g., FeCrAl) are one of the leading candidate materials for fuel cladding to replace traditional zirconium alloys because of the superior oxidation resistance of FeCrAl. However, there are still some unresolved questions regarding irradiation effects on the microstructure and mechanical properties of FeCrAl at end-of-life dose levels. In particular, there are concerns related to irradiation-induced embrittlement of FeCrAl alloys due to secondary phase formation. To address this issue, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a new experimental design to irradiate shortened cladding tube specimens with representative 17×17 array pressurized water reactor diameter and thickness in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) under relevant temperatures (300–350°C). Post-irradiation examination will include studies of dimensional change, microstructural changes, and mechanical performance. This report briefly summarizes the capsule design concept and the irradiation test matrix for six rabbit capsules. Each rabbit contains two FeCrAl alloy tube specimens. The specimens include Generation I and Generation II FeCrAl alloys with varying processing conditions, Cr concentrations, and minor alloying elements. The rabbits were successfully assembled, welded, evaluated, and delivered to the HFIR along with a complete quality assurance fabrication package. Pictures of the rabbit assembly process and detailed dimensional inspection of select specimens are included in this report. The rabbits were inserted into HFIR starting in cycle 472 (May 2017).

  14. Equilibrium isotope exchange kinetics of native and site-specific mutant forms of E. coli aspartate transcarbamoylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedler, F.C.; Hsuanyu, Y.; Kantrowitz, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    Isotope exchange kinetics at equilibrium (EIEK) have been used to probe the kinetic and regulatory mechanisms of native aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from E. coli at pH 7.0, 30 0 . Substrate saturation patterns were most consistent with a preferred order random kinetic mechanism: C-P prior to L-Asp, C-Asp released before Pi, with the Asp ↔ C-Asp exchange rate 5X faster than C-P ↔ Pi. Computer simulations allow one to fit the EIEK experimental data and to arrive at the best set of kinetic constants for a given enzyme state. These approaches have been applied to modified ATCase. Bound CTP and ATP were observed, respectively, to inhibit and activate differentially Asp ↔ C-Asp, but not C-P ↔ Pi, indicating that these modifiers alter the association-dissociation rates of L-Asp and C-Asp but not of C-P or Pi. Low levels of PALA activated both exchange rates (due to shifting the T-R equilibrium), but higher [PALA] completely blocked both exchanges. The effects of a site-specific mutation of Tyr240 Phe have been similarly probed by EIEK methods. The Phe240 mutant enzyme exhibited kinetic properties markedly different from native ATCase: the data indicate that Phe240 ATCase is much closer to an R-state enzyme than is native enzyme

  15. The Isotopologue Record of Repeat Vital Effect Offenders: Tracking (Dis)equilibrium Effects in Sea Urchins and Nannofossil Using Clumped Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, C. M.; Davies, A.; Drury, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Vital effects vary between species and affect various isotopic systems in unequal proportion. The magnitude of the response of different isotopic systems might thus be key in understanding biologically-mediated disequilibrium, especially in groups that show a tendency to be "repeat offenders" with regards to vital effects. Here we present carbon, oxygen, and clumped isotope data from echinoderm calcite and nannofossil ooze, both of which exhibit strong vital effects in bulk isotopes. Our study is the first to investigate the clumped isotope (dis)equilibrium of echinoids. Results from two echinoids, three marine gastropods and a bivalve mollusk from modern beach deposits of Bali, Indonesia, highlight a significant offset in clumped isotopes of a regular echinoid test from expected values, interpreted as evidence of a similar "vital effect" as observed in surface corals. This is in contrast to the test of an irregular "sand dollar" echinoid, with clumped isotope values within error of expected sea surface temperature. Furthermore, data on the inter-skeletal variability in the clumped isotopic composition of two regular echinoid species shows that the spines of the echinoids are in equilibrium with seawater with respect to clumped isotopes, but the test is not. For the nannofossil material, no clumped isotope vital effects are observed, consistent with previously published studies but at odds with strong vital effects in carbon and oxygen isotopes, often correlated with cell-size. In addition, we reveal that the <63 micron fraction of deep-sea ooze could constitute useful material for clumped isotope studies. An intriguing result of our study is that vital effects are mostly absent in clumped isotopes, even in phylums known for important isotopic effects. It remains to be explained why some parts of the echinoids show clear vital effects, notably enrichment in clumped isotopes of urchin tests. Mechanisms that could explain this include pH effects during calcification

  16. The effect of the initial exciton numbers on 54,56Fe(p, xp) Pre-Equilibrium Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bölükdemir, M. H.; Tel, E.; Aydın, A.; Okuducu, S.; Kaplan, A.

    2011-01-01

    In pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions, the geometry-dependent hybrid model is applied with the use of the neutron and proton densities to investigate the effect of initial exciton numbers on the nucleon emission spectra. The initial exciton numbers calculated with the theoretical neutron and proton densities have been obtained within the Skryme-Hartree-Fock method with SKM* and SLy4 forces on target nuclei in the 54,56 Fe(p, xp) reaction at 61.5-MeV incident proton energy by using a new calculationmethod of Tel et al. Also, the differences between the initial exciton numbers for protons and neutrons as a function of nuclear radius, focusing on systematic discrepancies correlated to differences in the proton and neutron densities have been investigated.

  17. Study of kinetics, equilibrium and isotope exchange in ion exchange systems Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plicka, J.; Stamberg, K.; Cabicar, J.; Gosman, A.

    1986-01-01

    The description of kinetics of ion exchange in ternary system was based upon three Nernst-Planck equations, each of them describing the particle diffusion flux of a given counterion as an independent process. For experimental verification, the strongly acidic cation exchanger OSTION KS 08 the shallow-bed technique, and 0.2 mol x dm -3 aqueous nitrate solutions were chosen. The kinetics of ion exchange in the system of cations Na + - Mg 2+ - UO 2 2+ was studied. The values of diffusion coefficients obtained by evaluating of kinetics of isotope exchange and binary ion exchange were used for calculation. The comparison of calculated exchange rate curves with the experimental ones was made. It was found that the exchanging counterions were affected by each other. (author)

  18. Ion-exchange equilibrium of Fe3+-Cl- and UO22+-Cl- systems in a porous anion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kunihiko; Kawakami, Fumiaki; Sasaki, Mitsunaga

    1985-01-01

    The ion-exchange equilibrium behavior of complex ions was investigatided in the systems of UO 2 2+ - Cl - and Fe 3+ - Cl - using an anion exchanger. It was performed by examining the dependency of adsorption distribution and selectivity of complexes on the micro structure of ion-exchangers, and temperature-dependency of selectivity. Changes in micropore structure of the ion-exchanger were found to have a significant effect on selectivity; the coefficient of selectivity and the average valence of the adsorbed species increased as the discrete pore ratio used as the index for pore structure decreased. In this study, equilibrium reactions were regarded as a sort of addition reaction for a easier analysis. This analysis based on the concept of addition chemical potential suggested that decreases in the discrete pore ratio were advantageous for the adsorption of complex ion species with higher valence, and average valence of the adsorbed species within the exchanger was shifted to the higher side. For this reason, it is assumed that the coefficient of selectivity became larger with a decrease in the discrete pore ratio. There is also a marked change in the coefficient of selectivity with temperature, and this becomes greater the higher the temperature. The ΔH of the present system accompanying the complex forming reaction is estimated to be 7 to 8 kcal/mol, and this value suggests that the temperature effect of the complex forming reaction contributes greatly to the change in selectivity with temperature. (author)

  19. Molybdenum isotopes in modern marine hydrothermal Fe/Mn deposits: Implications for Archean and Paleoproterozoic Mo cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, K. T.; Hein, J. R.; Shimoda, G.; Aoki, S.; Ishikawa, A.; Suzuki, K.; Gordon, G. W.; Anbar, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    Molybdenum isotope (δ98/95Mo) variations recorded in Archean and Paleoproterozoic Fe/Mn-rich sediments have been used to constrain ocean redox conditions at the time of deposition (Canfield et al., 2013 PNAS; Planavsky et al., 2014 Nat. Geo.; Kurzweil et al., 2015 GCA). However, except for hydrogenous Fe-Mn crusts (Siebert et al., 2003), δ98/95Mo variation of modern Fe and Mn oxide deposits has been poorly investigated. Marine hydrothermal systems are thought to be the major source of Fe and Mn in Archean and Paleoproterozoic Fe- and Mn-rich sediments. Hence, to accurately interpret Mo isotope data of those ancient sedimentary rocks, it is important to evaluate the possible influence of hydrothermally derived Mo on δ98/95Mo of modern Fe- and Mn-rich sediments. In this study, we analyzed Mo isotopic compositions of one hydrothermal Fe oxide and 15 Mn oxides from five different hydrothermal systems in the modern ocean. The Fe oxide is composed mainly of goethite, and has a δ98/95Mo of 0.7‰, which is 1.4‰ lighter than that of present-day seawater. The observed offset is similar to isotope fractionation observed during adsorption experiments of Mo on goethite (Δ98/95Mogoethite-solution = -1.4 ± 0.5%; Goldberg et al., 2009 GCA). The 15 hydrothermal Mn oxides show large variations in δ98/95Mo ranging from -1.7 to 0.5‰. However, most of the values are similar to those of modern hydrogenous Fe-Mn crusts (Siebert et al., 2003 EPSL), and fall within the range of estimated δ98/95Mo of Mn oxides precipitated from present-day seawater using the isotope offset reported from adsorption experiments (Δ98/95Mo = -2.7 ± 0.3‰; Wasylenki et al., 2008 GCA). These findings indicate that seawater is the dominant source of Mo for modern hydrothermal Fe and Mn deposits. However, the observed large variation indicates that the contribution Mo from local hydrothermal systems is not negligible. The oceanic Mo inventory during the Archean and Paleoproterozoic is thought to be

  20. ICP-MS with hexapole collision cell for isotope ratio measurements of Ca, Fe, and Se

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk (Belarus); Becker, J.S. [Central Department for Analytical Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    To avoid mass interferences on analyte ions caused by argon ions and argon molecular ions via reactions with collision gases, an rf hexapole filled with helium and hydrogen has been used in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and its performance has been studied. Up to tenfold improvement in sensitivity was observed for heavy elements (m > 100 u), because of better ion transmission through the hexapole ion guide. A reduction of argon ions Ar{sup +} and the molecular ions of argon ArX{sup +} (X = O, Ar) by up to three orders of magnitude was achieved in a hexapole collision cell of an ICP-MS (''Platform ICP'', Micromass, Manchester, UK) as a result of gas-phase reactions with hydrogen when the hexapole bias (HB) was set to 0 V; at an HB of 1.6 V argon, and argon-based ions of masses 40 u, 56 u, and 80 u, were reduced by approximately four, two, and five orders of magnitude, respectively. The signal-to-noise ratio {sup 80}Se/ {sup 40}Ar{sub 2}{sup +} was improved by more than five orders of magnitude under optimized experimental conditions. Dependence of mass discrimination on collision-cell properties was studied in the mass range 10 u (boron) to 238 u (uranium). Isotopic analysis of the elements affected by mass-spectrometric interference, Ca, Fe, and Se, was performed using a Meinhard nebulizer and an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN). The measured isotope ratios were comparable with tabulated values from IUPAC. Precision of 0.26%, 0.19%, and 0.12%, respectively, and accuracy of 0.13% 0.25%, and 0.92%, respectively, was achieved for isotope ratios {sup 44}Ca/ {sup 40}Ca and {sup 56}Fe/{sup 57}Fe in 10 {mu}g L{sup -1} solution nebulized by means of a USN and for {sup 78}Se/{sup 80}Se in 100 {mu}g L{sup -1} solution nebulized by means of a Meinhard nebulizer. (orig.)

  1. Mass measurement and structure studies of neutron-rich isotopes of Zn, Ni, Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessagne, P.

    1982-01-01

    With the Orsay MP Tandem, the reaction ( 14 C, 16 O) on 58 - 60 - 62 - 64 Ni, 64 - 66 - 68 - 70 Zn, 74 - 76 Ge and 82 Se targets, and the reaction ( 14 C, 15 O) on 60 - 62 - 64 Ni, 68 - 70 Zn, 76 Ge targets, have been investigated at 72 MeV bombarding energy. The mass excess of neutron rich nuclei: 63 Fe (-55.19+-.06MeV), 69 Ni(-60.14+-.06 MeV), 75 Zn(.62.7+-08 MeV) have been measured for the first time, and those of 62 Fe, 68 Ni, 74 Zn, 80 Ge have been remeasured. A new equipment has been designed in order to perform measurements at zero degree. From the angular distribution around 0 0 for the 70 Zn( 14 C, 16 O) reaction, the first state of 68 Ni observed for the first time (1.77 MeV +- .04 MeV) has been shown to be a 0 + . This result establishes a new case of 2 1+ - 0 2+ inversion. The systematics of the ( 14 C, 16 O) measurements on the even Ni and Zn isotopes have shown a different behaviour with two series. For the Ni → Fe (g.s.) transitions, the ratio σsub(exp)/σsub(DWBA) increases by a factor of four when the neutron number varies from 30 to 36. Whereas for the Zn → Ni (gs) transitions this ratio remains constant for the first three isotopes and decrease by a factor of two when N=40. For the Ni → Fe transitions, axial and spherical symmetries have been used. In agreement with the shell model no change are found with the spherical symmetry. For the axial symmetry a variation is observed but strongly dapendant of the sub-shell. Hence no clear conclusion can be deduced for the cross section estimate. For the Zn → Ni transitions, the spherical symmetry has been used. One configuration prevails, leading to a qualitative agreement with the experimental results [fr

  2. Composition and thermochemistry of the equilibrium vapour of the systems NaI-FeI2 and NaI-PbI2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilpert, K.; Gerads, H.; Koberts, D.; Miller, M.

    1987-01-01

    The vaporization of NaI/FeI 2 and NaI/PbI 2 samples of equimolar composition was investigated was investigated in the temperature ranges between 574 to 683 K and 562 to 669 K, respectively, by using the mass spectrometric Knudsen effusion method. The gaseous species I, I 2 , NaI, (NaI) 2 , FeI 2 , (FeI 2 ) 2 , FeI 3 , NaFeI 3 , and Na 2 FeI 4 (NaI-FeI 2 system) as well as NaI, (NaI) 2 , PbI 2 , (PbI 2 ) 2 , and NaPbI 3 (NaI-PbI 2 system) are present in the equilibrium vapours. The equilibrium partial pressures of these species were determined with the exception of I, I 2 , and FeI 3 . Enthalpies and entropies of dissociation resulted for the reactions NaFeI 3 (g) ↔ NaI(g)+FeI 2 (g) (1), Na 2 FeI 4 (g) ↔ 2NaI(g)+FeI 2 (g) and (2) NaPbI 3 (g) ↔ NaI(g)+PbI 2 (g) (3) as Δ d H 298 0 (Eq. (1)) = 184±5 kJ mol -1 , Δ d S 298 0 (Eq. (1)) = 143±8 J mol -1 K -1 ; Δ d H 298 0 (Eq. (2)) = 333±9 kJ mol -1 , Δ d S 298 0 (Eq. (2)) = 274±14 J mol -1 K -1 ; and Δ d H 298 0 (Eq. (3)) = 168±5 kJ mol -1 , Δ d S 298 0 (Eq. (3)) = 151±9 J mol -1 K -1 . Equilibrium constants for these reactions are additionally given. The pressures of NaFeI 3 (g) and NaPbI 3 (g) as all as their enthalpies of dissociation are discussed with respect to their significance of semi empirical rules. (orig.)

  3. Generation of covariance files for the isotopes of Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Pb in ENDF/B-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetrick, D.M.; Larson, D.C.; Fu, C.Y.

    1991-02-01

    The considerations that governed the development of the uncertainty files for the isotopes of Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Pb in ENDF/B-VI are summarized. Four different approaches were used in providing the covariance information. Some examples are given which show the standard deviations as a function of incident energy and the corresponding correlation matrices. 11 refs., 5 tabs

  4. Geochemical and stable isotopic constraints on the generation and passive treatment of acidic, Fe-SO{sub 4} rich waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthies, Romy, E-mail: rmatthies@uwaterloo.ca [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Aplin, Andrew C., E-mail: andrew.aplin@ncl.ac.uk [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Boyce, Adrian J., E-mail: a.boyce@suerc.gla.ac.uk [Scottish Universities Environment Research Centre, East Kilbride, G75 0QF (United Kingdom); Jarvis, Adam P., E-mail: a.p.jarvis@ncl.ac.uk [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Reducing and Alkalinity Producing Systems (RAPS) remediate net-acidic metalliferous mine drainage by creating anoxic conditions in which bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) raises alkalinity and drives the precipitation of iron and other chalcophilic elements as sulfides. We report chemical and stable isotopic data from a study monitoring the biogeochemical processes involved in the generation of mine waters and their remediation by two RAPS. Sulfur isotopes show that sulfate in all mine waters has a common source (pyrite oxidation), whilst oxygen isotopes show that oxidation of pyritic sulfur is mediated by Fe(III){sub aq}. The isotopic composition of dissolved sulfide, combined with the sulfur and oxygen isotopic composition of sulfate in RAPS effluents, proves BSR and details its dual isotope systematics. The occurrence and isotopic composition of solid phase iron sulfides indicate the removal of reduced sulfur within the RAPS, with significant amounts of elemental sulfur indicating reoxidation steps. However, only 0 to 9% of solid phase iron occurs as Fe sulfides, with approximately 70% of the removed iron occurs as Fe(III) (hydr)oxides. Some of the (hydr)oxide is supplied to the wetland as solids and is simply filtered by the wetland substrate, playing no role in alkalinity generation or proton removal. However, the majority of iron is supplied as dissolved Fe(II), indicating that acid generating oxidation and hydrolysis reactions dominate iron removal. The overall contribution of BSR to the sulfur geochemistry in the RAPS is limited and sulfate retention is dominated by sulfate precipitation, comparable to aerobic treatment systems, and show that the proton acidity resulting from iron oxidation and hydrolysis must be subsequently neutralised by calcite dissolution and/or BSR deeper in the RAPS sediments. BSR is not as important as previously thought for metal removal in RAPS. The results have practical consequences for the design, treatment performance and long

  5. Redox history of the Three Gorges region during the Ediacaran and Early Cambrian as indicated by the Fe isotope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Sawaki

    2018-01-01

    To circumvent this deficiency, we drilled a fossiliferous Ediacaran to Early Cambrian sedimentary succession in the Three Gorges region, South China. We analyzed the iron isotope ratios (δ56/54Fe of pyrite grains in the drill cores using laser ablation multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results demonstrate large variations in δ56/54Fe, from −1.6 to 1.6‰, and positive iron isotope ratios are observed in many successions. The presence of positive δ56/54Fe in pyrite indicates that the ferrous iron in the seawater was partially oxidized, suggesting that seawater at Three Gorges was ferruginous during the Ediacaran and Early Cambrian periods. However, aggregated pyrite grains in organic carbon-rich black shales at Member 4 of the Doushantuo Formation and the base of the Shuijingtuo Formation yield near-zero δ56/54Fe values; this suggests that the ocean was transiently dominated by sulfidic conditions during these periods. Notably negative δ56/54Fe values, lower than −1‰, can be interpreted as a signature of DIR. The DIR also might contribute in part to the re-mineralization of organic matter during the largest negative carbon isotope anomaly in the Ediacaran.

  6. Experimental Phase Equilibria Studies of the Pb-Fe-O System in Air, in Equilibrium with Metallic Lead and at Intermediate Oxygen Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, M.; Jak, E.

    2017-12-01

    The phase equilibria information on the Pb-Fe-O system is of practical importance for the improvement of the existing thermodynamic database of lead-containing slag systems (Pb-Zn-Fe-Cu-Si-Ca-Al-Mg-O). Phase equilibria of the Pb-Fe-O system have been investigated: (a) in air at temperatures between 1053 K and 1373 K (780 °C and 1100 °C); (b) in equilibrium with metallic lead at temperatures between 1053 K and 1373 K (780 °C and 1100 °C); and (c) at intermediate oxidation conditions for the liquid slag in equilibrium with two solids (spinel + magnetoplumbite), at temperatures between 1093 K and 1373 K (820 °C and 1100 °C). The high-temperature equilibration/quenching/electron probe X-ray microanalysis technique has been used to accurately determine the compositions of the phases in equilibrium in the system. The Pb and Fe concentrations in the phases were determined directly; preliminary thermodynamic modeling with FactSage was used to estimate the ferrous-to-ferric ratios and to present the results in the ternary diagram.

  7. How did Marine Isotope Stage 3 and Last Glacial Maximum climates differ? – Perspectives from equilibrium simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Van Meerbeeck

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dansgaard-Oeschger events occurred frequently during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3, as opposed to the following MIS2 period, which included the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. Transient climate model simulations suggest that these abrupt warming events in Greenland and the North Atlantic region are associated with a resumption of the Thermohaline Circulation (THC from a weak state during stadials to a relatively strong state during interstadials. However, those models were run with LGM, rather than MIS3 boundary conditions. To quantify the influence of different boundary conditions on the climates of MIS3 and LGM, we perform two equilibrium climate simulations with the three-dimensional earth system model LOVECLIM, one for stadial, the other for interstadial conditions. We compare them to the LGM state simulated with the same model. Both climate states are globally 2°C warmer than LGM. A striking feature of our MIS3 simulations is the enhanced Northern Hemisphere seasonality, July surface air temperatures being 4°C warmer than in LGM. Also, despite some modification in the location of North Atlantic deep water formation, deep water export to the South Atlantic remains unaffected. To study specifically the effect of orbital forcing, we perform two additional sensitivity experiments spun up from our stadial simulation. The insolation difference between MIS3 and LGM causes half of the 30–60° N July temperature anomaly (+6°C. In a third simulation additional freshwater forcing halts the Atlantic THC, yielding a much colder North Atlantic region (−7°C. Comparing our simulation with proxy data, we find that the MIS3 climate with collapsed THC mimics stadials over the North Atlantic better than both control experiments, which might crudely estimate interstadial climate. These results suggest that freshwater forcing is necessary to return climate from warm interstadials to cold stadials during MIS3. This changes our perspective, making the stadial

  8. An experimental study on the effect of carbonic anhydrase on the oxygen isotope exchange kinetics and equilibrium in the carbonic acid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of marine biogenic carbonates are often depleted in 18O relative to the values expected for thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater. One possibility is that 18O-depletion in carbonates is kinetically controlled. The kinetic isotope effect associated with the hydration of CO2 results in 18O-depleted HCO3-. If the HCO3- is utilized before re-establishing equilibrium with ambient water under rapid calcification, the 18O-depletion will be recorded in carbonates. But one caveat in this kinetic model is the fact that many marine calcifiers posses carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bearing enzyme that catalyzes the CO2 hydration reaction. It is expected that this enzyme accelerates 18O-equilibration in the carbonic acid system by facilitating direct oxygen isotope exchange between HCO3- and H2O via CO2 hydration. Clearly this argues against the conceptual framework of the kinetic model. Yet the critical variable here is the effectiveness of the carbonic anhydrase, which is likely to depend on its concentration and the carbonate chemistry of the aqueous medium. It is also hitherto unknown whether the presence of carbonic anhydrase alters the equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations between dissolved carbonate species and water. We performed a series of quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments to examine the changes in the oxygen isotope equilibration time as a function of carbonic anhydrase concentrations. We conducted experiments at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are similar to the average surface ocean pH and the elevated pH levels observed within calcification microenvironments of certain corals and planktonic foraminifera. A summary of our new experimental results will be presented.

  9. Study of oxalic acid effect on equilibrium and kinetics of isotopic exchange between penta- and hexavalent neptunium in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Ionnikova, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometry at 25 deg C and ionic force μ=1.0 mol/l (KNO 3 +HNO 3 ) was used to show that at HNO 3 concentration 0.1-1.0 mol/l H 2 C 2 O 4 introduction to nitric acid solutions of Np 5+ in the presence of nitrite-ion resulted in the shift of equilibrium between Np 5+ and Np 6+ to the side of Np 6+ accumulation. The presence of H 2 C 2 O 4 at HNO 3 concentration > 1.0 mol/l doesn't affect the equilibrium position. The values of nominal equilibrium constant at different HNO 3 and H 2 C 2 O 4 concentrations were calculated. It was found that isotope exchange ( 239 Np/ 237 Np) between Np 5+ and Np 6+ in oxalate solutions proceeded more slowly than in oxalate absence. Rate constants of isotope exchange calculated at 9 deg C, μ=1.0 mol/l (KNO 3 ), H 2 C 2 O 4 concentration 0.01 mol/l and pH=2.2 and 3.5 are equal to 0.49x10 3 and 0.67x10 2 l/mol·min respectively. Mechanism of isotope exchange including electron transport between Np 5+ and Np 6+ oxalate complexes is suggested

  10. Structural isotopic effect of the α/β-phase transition in the vanadium hydride and its influence on the equilibrium coefficient of separation of hydrogen isotopes in the gas-solid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magomedbekov, Eh.P.; Bochkarev, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    Equilibrium coefficient of hydrogen isotope separation (α H-D ) in the system of vanadium hydride VH n (solid, n ∼ 0.7)-H 2 (g) is measured by the counterbalancing method in a circulation facility and by the method of laser desorption at 298, 373, and 437 K. It is shown that the combination of highly anharmonic potential in the lattice octahedral sites and in significant difference in the energy of hydrogen atom coordination for tetra- and octahedral sites is the reason for unusual behaviour of the hydrogen isotope separation coefficient and the difference in crystal structures of vanadium hydride and deuteride [ru

  11. A Fast Numerical Method for the Calculation of the Equilibrium Isotopic Composition of a Transmutation System in an Advanced Fuel Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Álvarez-Velarde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A fast numerical method for the calculation in a zero-dimensional approach of the equilibrium isotopic composition of an iteratively used transmutation system in an advanced fuel cycle, based on the Banach fixed point theorem, is described in this paper. The method divides the fuel cycle in successive stages: fuel fabrication, storage, irradiation inside the transmutation system, cooling, reprocessing, and incorporation of the external material into the new fresh fuel. The change of the fuel isotopic composition, represented by an isotope vector, is described in a matrix formulation. The resulting matrix equations are solved using direct methods with arbitrary precision arithmetic. The method has been successfully applied to a double-strata fuel cycle with light water reactors and accelerator-driven subcritical systems. After comparison to the results of the EVOLCODE 2.0 burn-up code, the observed differences are about a few percents in the mass estimations of the main actinides.

  12. Assimilation of carbonate country rock by the parent magma of the Panzhihua Fe-Ti-V deposit (SW China: Evidence from stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Ganino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Panzhihua intrusion in southwest China is part of the Emeishan Large Igneous Province and host of a large Fe-Ti-V ore deposit. During emplacement of the main intrusion, multiple generations of mafic dykes invaded carbonate wall rocks, producing a large contact aureole. We measured the oxygen-isotope composition of the intrusions, their constituent minerals, and samples of the country rock. Magnetite and plagioclase from Panzhihua intrusion have δ18O values that are consistent with magmatic equilibrium, and formed from magmas with δ18O values that were 1–2‰ higher than expected in a mantle-derived magma. The unmetamorphosed country rock has high δ18O values, ranging from 13.2‰ (sandstone to 24.6–28.6‰ (dolomite. The skarns and marbles from the aureole have lower δ18O and δ13C values than their protolith suggesting interaction with fluids that were in exchange equilibrium with the adjacent mafic magmas and especially the numerous mafic dykes that intruded the aureole. This would explain the alteration of δ18O of the dykes which have significantly higher values than expected for a mantle-derived magma. Depending on the exact δ18O values assumed for the magma and contaminant, the amount of assimilation required to produce the elevated δ18O value of the Panzhihua intrusion was between 8 and 13.7 wt.%, assuming simple mixing. The exact mechanism of contamination is unclear but may involve a combination of assimilation of bulk country rock, mixing with a melt of the country rock and exchange with CO2-rich fluid derived from decarbonation of the marls and dolomites. These mechanisms, particularly the latter, were probably involved in the formation of the Fe-Ti-V ores.

  13. Effects of different water storage procedures on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically contrasted waters from the Amazon River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Daniel S; Poitrasson, Franck; Boaventura, Geraldo R

    2015-11-15

    Although recent studies have investigated the Fe isotopic composition of dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases from continental and oceanic natural waters, few efforts have been made to evaluate whether water sample storage and the separation of different pore-size fractions through filtration can cause any change to the Fe isotopic compositions. The present study investigates the possible biases introduced by different water storage conditions on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically different waters. Water samples were collected from an organic-rich river and from mineral particulate-rich rivers. Filtered and unfiltered water samples were stored either at room temperature or frozen at -18°C in order to assess possible biases due to (i) different water storage temperature, and (ii) storage of bulk (unfiltered) vs filtered water. Iron isotope measurements were performed by Multicollector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry with a Thermo Electron Neptune instrument, after Fe purification using anion-exchange resins. Our data reveal that bulk water storage at room temperature without filtration produces minor changes in the dissolved Fe isotopic composition of mineral particulate-rich waters, but significant isotopic composition changes in organic-rich waters. In both cases, however, the impact of the different procedures on the Fe concentrations was strong. On the other hand, the bulk water stored frozen without filtration produced more limited changes in the dissolved Fe concentrations, and also on isotopic compositions, relative to the samples filtered in the field. The largest effect was again observed for the organic-rich waters. These findings suggest that a time lag between water collection and filtration may cause isotopic exchanges between the dissolved and particulate Fe fractions. When it is not possible to filter the samples in the field immediately after collection, the less detrimental approach is to

  14. Decay properties of 68,69,70Mn: Probing collectivity up to N=44 in Fe isotopic chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Benzoni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The β decays Mn68→Fe68, Mn69→Fe69 and Mn70→Fe70 have been measured at the RIBF facility at RIKEN using the EURICA γ spectrometer combined with an active stopper consisting of a stack of Si detectors. The nuclei were produced as fission fragments from a beam of 238U at a bombarding energy of 345 MeV/nucleon impinging on a Be target and selected using the BigRIPS separator. Half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission probabilities have been extracted for these decays, together with first experimental information on excited states populated in 69,70Fe. The data indicate a continuously increasing deformation for Fe isotopes up to A=70. This is interpreted, as for Cr isotopes, in terms of the interplay between the quadrupole correlations of the ν1d5/2 and ν0g9/2 orbitals and the monopole component of the π0f7/2–ν0f5/2 interaction.

  15. Equilibrium and generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, H.S.

    1994-01-01

    This work studies the behaviour of radionuclides when it produce a desintegration activity,decay and the isotopes stable creation. It gives definitions about the equilibrium between activity of parent and activity of the daughter, radioactive decay,isotope stable and transient equilibrium and maxim activity time. Some considerations had been given to generators that permit a disgregation of two radioisotopes in equilibrium and its good performance. Tabs

  16. Microbial production of isotopically light iron(II) in a modern chemically precipitated sediment and implications for isotopic variations in ancient rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangalos, G.E.; Beard, B.L.; Johnson, C.M.; Alpers, Charles N.; Shelobolina, E.S.; Xu, H.; Konishi, H.; Roden, E.E.

    2012-01-01

    The inventories and Fe isotope composition of aqueous Fe(II) and solid-phase Fe compounds were quantified in neutral-pH, chemically precipitated sediments downstream of the Iron Mountain acid mine drainage site in northern California, USA. The sediments contain high concentrations of amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxides [Fe(III)am] that allow dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) to predominate over Fe–S interactions in Fe redox transformation, as indicated by the very low abundance of Cr(II)-extractable reduced inorganic sulfur compared with dilute HCl-extractable Fe. δ56Fe values for bulk HCl- and HF-extractable Fe were ≈ 0. These near-zero bulk δ56Fe values, together with the very low abundance of dissolved Fe in the overlying water column, suggest that the pyrite Fe source had near-zero δ56Fe values, and that complete oxidation of Fe(II) took place prior to deposition of the Fe(III) oxide-rich sediment. Sediment core analyses and incubation experiments demonstrated the production of millimolar quantities of isotopically light (δ56Fe ≈ -1.5 to -0.5‰) aqueous Fe(II) coupled to partial reduction of Fe(III)am by DIR. Trends in the Fe isotope composition of solid-associated Fe(II) and residual Fe(III)am are consistent with experiments with synthetic Fe(III) oxides, and collectively suggest an equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III)am of approximately -2‰. These Fe(III) oxide-rich sediments provide a model for early diagenetic processes that are likely to have taken place in Archean and Paleoproterozoic marine sediments that served as precursors for banded iron formations. Our results suggest pathways whereby DIR could have led to the formation of large quantities of low-δ56Fe minerals during BIF genesis.

  17. Fe isotope composition of bulk chondrules from Murchison (CM2): Constraints for parent body alteration, nebula processes and chondrule-matrix complementarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezel, Dominik C.; Wilden, Johanna S.; Becker, Daniel; Steinbach, Sonja; Wombacher, Frank; Harak, Markus

    2018-05-01

    Chondrules are a major constituent of primitive meteorites. The formation of chondrules is one of the most elusive problems in cosmochemistry. We use Fe isotope compositions of chondrules and bulk chondrites to constrain the conditions of chondrule formation. Iron isotope compositions of bulk chondrules are so far only known from few studies on CV and some ordinary chondrites. We studied 37 chondrules from the CM chondrite Murchison. This is particularly challenging, as CM chondrites contain the smallest chondrules of all chondrite groups, except for CH chondrites. Bulk chondrules have δ56Fe between -0.62 and +0.24‰ relative to the IRMM-014 standard. Bulk Murchison has as all chondrites a δ56Fe of 0.00‰ within error. The δ56Fe distribution of the Murchison chondrule population is continuous and close to normal. The width of the δ56Fe distribution is narrower than that of the Allende chondrule population. Opaque modal abundances in Murchison chondrules is in about 67% of the chondrules close to 0 vol.%, and in 33% typically up to 6.5 vol.%. Chondrule Al/Mg and Fe/Mg ratios are sub-chondritic, while bulk Murchison has chondritic ratios. We suggest that the variable bulk chondrule Fe isotope compositions were established during evaporation and recondensation prior to accretion in the Murchison parent body. This range in isotope composition was likely reduced during aqueous alteration on the parent body. Murchison has a chondritic Fe isotope composition and a number of chondritic element ratios. Chondrules, however, have variable Fe isotope compositions and chondrules and matrix have complementary Al/Mg and Fe/Mg ratios. In combination, this supports the idea that chondrules and matrix formed from a single reservoir and were then accreted in the parent body. The formation in a single region also explains the compositional distribution of the chondrule population in Murchison.

  18. Spatial evolution of Zn-Fe-Pb isotopes of sphalerite within a single ore body: A case study from the Dongshengmiao ore deposit, Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhaofu; Zhu, Xiangkun; Sun, Jian; Luo, Zhaohua; Bao, Chuang; Tang, Chao; Ma, Jianxiong

    2018-01-01

    Analyses of sphalerite minerals from the characteristic brecciated Zn-Pb ores of the main ore body in the giant Dongshengmiao deposit have revealed variations in δ66Zn from 0.17 to 0.40‰ and in δ56Fe from -1.78 to -0.35‰. Further, the investigated pyrrhotite samples have iron that is isotopically similar to that of associated sphalerite minerals. The most distinctive pattern revealed by the zinc and iron isotope data is the lateral trend of increasing δ66Zn and δ56Fe values from southwest to northeast within the main ore body. The lead isotopic homogeneity of ore sulfides from the main ore body suggests that there is only one significant source for metal, thus precluding the mixing of multiple metal sources as the key factor controlling spatial variations of zinc and iron isotopes. The most likely control on spatial variations is Rayleigh fractionation during hydrothermal fluid flow, with lighter Zn and Fe isotopes preferentially incorporated into the earliest sulfides to precipitate from fluids. Precipitations of sphalerite and pyrrhotite have played vital roles in the Zn and Fe isotopic variations, respectively, of the ore-forming system. Accordingly, the larger isotopic variability for Fe than Zn within the same hydrothermal system perhaps resulted from a larger proportion of precipitation for pyrrhotite than for sphalerite. The lateral trend pattern revealed by the zinc and iron isotope data is consistent with the occurrence of a cystic-shaped breccia zone, which is characterized by marked elevation in Cu. The results further confirm that Zn and Fe isotopes can be used as a vectoring tool for mineral prospecting.

  19. Studies Regarding As(V Adsorption from Underground Water by Fe-XAD8-DEHPA Impregnated Resin. Equilibrium Sorption and Fixed-Bed Column Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Ciopec

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of arsenic adsorption onto Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin were studied on the laboratory scale using aqueous solutions and natural underground waters. Amberlite XAD8 resin was impregnated with di(2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (DEHPA via the dry method of impregnation. Fe(III ions were loaded onto the impregnated resin by exploiting the high affinity of arsenic towards iron. The studies were conducted by both in contact and continuous modes. Kinetics data revealed that the removal of arsenic by Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin is a pseudo-second-order reaction. The equilibrium data were modelled with Freundlich Langmuir and Dubinin Radushkevich (D-R isotherms and it was found that the Freundlich model give the poorest correlation coefficient. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from the Langmuir isotherm is 22.6 µg As(V/g of Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin. The mean free energy of adsorption was found in this study to be 7.2 kJ/mol and the ΔG° value negative (−9.2 kJ/mol. This indicates that the sorption process is exothermal, spontaneous and physical in nature. The studied Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin showed excellent arsenic removal performance by sorption, both from synthetic solution and the natural water sample, and could be regenerated simply by using aqueous NaOH or HCl solutions.

  20. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn; Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of ...

  1. Equilibrium and Kinetic Studies of Systems of Hydrogen Isotopes, Lithium Hydrides, Aluminum and LiAlO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper described measurements of (1) the distribution of tritium and helium throughout both phases of irradiated Li-Al alloy, (2) the migration rate of tritium during moderate heating, (3) equilibrium pressures as functions of temperature of H2, D2, or T2 in contact with lithium hydrides + aluminum, Li-Al alloy, or irradiated Li-Al alloy, (4) the equilibrium constant for the reaction as a function of temperature, and (5) extraction rates of tritium from irradiated LiAlO2 targets at elevated temperatures

  2. The Prestudy for Studying Inorganic Nutrient Metabolism in Humans : the Aplication of ICP-MS for Determination of Stable Isotope Ratio of Fe and Zn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukihati; Sumadjo

    2001-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of isotope ratio of Fe and Zn by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The mass spectrometer was operated in low resolution mode to provide maximal sensitivity. Typical conditions for operations were: plasma power 0.85 k W, reflected power 56 Fe/ 54 Fe, 57 Fe/ 54 Fe, 58 Fe/ 54 Fe, dan 64 Zn/ 67 Zn, 66 Zn/ 67 Zn, 68 Zn/ 67 Zn, 70 Zn/ 67 Zn measured by ICP-MS showed a good level of agreement with TIMS (thermal ionization mass spectrometry). This method was prepared for studying the absorption and/or metabolism of inorganic nutrients in humans. (author)

  3. Mass fractionation processes of transition metal isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X. K.; Guo, Y.; Williams, R. J. P.; O'Nions, R. K.; Matthews, A.; Belshaw, N. S.; Canters, G. W.; de Waal, E. C.; Weser, U.; Burgess, B. K.; Salvato, B.

    2002-06-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry make it possible to utilise isotope variations of transition metals to address some important issues in solar system and biological sciences. Realisation of the potential offered by these new isotope systems however requires an adequate understanding of the factors controlling their isotope fractionation. Here we show the results of a broadly based study on copper and iron isotope fractionation during various inorganic and biological processes. These results demonstrate that: (1) naturally occurring inorganic processes can fractionate Fe isotope to a detectable level even at temperature ˜1000°C, which challenges the previous view that Fe isotope variations in natural system are unique biosignatures; (2) multiple-step equilibrium processes at low temperatures may cause large mass fractionation of transition metal isotopes even when the fractionation per single step is small; (3) oxidation-reduction is an importation controlling factor of isotope fractionation of transition metal elements with multiple valences, which opens a wide range of applications of these new isotope systems, ranging from metal-silicate fractionation in the solar system to uptake pathways of these elements in biological systems; (4) organisms incorporate lighter isotopes of transition metals preferentially, and transition metal isotope fractionation occurs stepwise along their pathways within biological systems during their uptake.

  4. Non-equilibrium Modeling of the Fe XVII 3C/3D Line Ratio in an Intense X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Excited Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Li, Y.; Fogle, M.; Fontes, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent measurements using an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) and an Electron Beam Ion Trap at the Linac Coherent Light Source facility highlighted large discrepancies between the observed and theoretical values for the Fe xvii 3C/3D line intensity ratio. This result raised the question of whether the theoretical oscillator strengths may be significantly in error, due to insufficiencies in the atomic structure calculations. We present time-dependent spectral modeling of this experiment and show that non-equilibrium effects can dramatically reduce the predicted 3C/3D line intensity ratio, compared with that obtained by simply taking the ratio of oscillator strengths. Once these non-equilibrium effects are accounted for, the measured line intensity ratio can be used to determine a revised value for the 3C/3D oscillator strength ratio, giving a range from 3.0 to 3.5. We also provide a framework to narrow this range further, if more precise information about the pulse parameters can be determined. We discuss the implications of the new results for the use of Fe xvii spectral features as astrophysical diagnostics and investigate the importance of time-dependent effects in interpreting XFEL-excited plasmas.

  5. Deuterium isotope effects on the ring inversion equilibrium in cyclohexane: the A value of deuterium and its origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anet, F.A.L.; Kopelevich, M.

    1986-01-01

    It has been reported recently that the deuterium in cyclohexane-d 1 prefers the equatorial over the axial position by about 200 J/mol (i.e., ca. 50 cal/mol), as shown by three different kinds of NMR measurements. Such an isotope effect is unexpectedly large, and this has led the authors to reinvestigate the problem using Saunder's isotopic perturbation method. The authors thereby established that the free energy difference (the A value for deuterium) is 6.3 +/- 1.5 cal/mol, with deuterium more stable equatorial than axial. This value is supported by molecular mechanics calculations based in part on experimental vibrational frequencies. 17 references, 1 figure

  6. Out-of-equilibrium nanocrystalline R1-s(Fe,M)5+2s alloys (R=Sm,Pr; M=Co,Si,Ga)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessais, L.; Djega-Mariadassou, C.

    2005-01-01

    The out-of-equilibrium hexagonal P6/mmm R 1-s (Fe,M) 5+2s (R=Sm,Pr and M=Co, Si or Ga) intermetallics are obtained by controlled nanocrystallization. A model is presented to explain the structure of the hexagonal phases, which stoichiometry is consistent with Sm(Fe,M) 9 and R(Fe,Ti,Co) 10 . The Curie temperatures increase versus Ga, Si, Co content. The analysis of the Moessbauer spectra leads to monotonous variation of the hyperfine parameters. The refinement of the Moessbauer spectra was performed on the basis of the correlation between Wigner-Seitz cell volumes obtained from X-ray diffraction results and isomer shifts. The abundance of each magnetic site was calculated by the multinomial distribution law. For a given substituting Co, Si, Ga content, the sequence for the isomer shift in the hexagonal cell is 2e>3g>6l. With increasing M content, the isomer shift of the 3g site remains quasi-constant. Those approaches lead to the location of Si, Ga, Co in 3g site, Ti in 6l site. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Rotational spectra of rare isotopic species of fluoroiodomethane: determination of the equilibrium structure from rotational spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; López, Juan Carlos; Alonso, José Luis; Baldacci, Agostino; Baldan, Alessandro; Stopkowicz, Stella; Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-14

    Supported by accurate quantum-chemical calculations, the rotational spectra of the mono- and bi-deuterated species of fluoroiodomethane, CHDFI and CD(2)FI, as well as of the (13)C-containing species, (13)CH(2)FI, were recorded for the first time. Three different spectrometers were employed, a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, a millimeter/submillimter-wave spectrometer, and a THz spectrometer, thus allowing to record a huge portion of the rotational spectrum, from 5 GHz up to 1.05 THz, and to accurately determine the ground-state rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants. Sub-Doppler measurements allowed to resolve the hyperfine structure of the rotational spectrum and to determine the complete iodine quadrupole-coupling tensor as well as the diagonal elements of the iodine spin-rotation tensor. The present investigation of rare isotopic species of CH(2)FI together with the results previously obtained for the main isotopologue [C. Puzzarini, G. Cazzoli, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, S. Stopkowicz, L. Cheng, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 174312 (2011); G. Cazzoli, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, and C. Puzzarini, Mol. Phys. 109, 2245 (2011)] enabled us to derive a semi-experimental equilibrium structure for fluoroiodomethane by means of a least-squares fit procedure using the available experimental ground-state rotational constants together with computed vibrational corrections. Problems related to the missing isotopic substitution of fluorine and iodine were overcome thanks to the availability of an accurate theoretical equilibrium geometry (computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations).

  8. pH-Dependent isotope exchange and hydrogenation catalysed by water-soluble NiRu complexes as functional models for [NiFe]hydrogenases

    OpenAIRE

    Kure, Bunsho; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Koji; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Yagi, Tatsuhiko; Ogo, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    The pH-dependent hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between gaseous isotopes and medium isotopes and hydrogenation of the carbonyl compounds have been investigated with water-soluble bis(mu-thiolate)(mu-hydride)NiRu complexes, Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) {(mu-SR)(2) = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine}, as functional models for [NiFe]hydrogenases. In acidic media (at pH 4-6), the mu-H ligand of the Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) complexes has H(+) properties, and the c...

  9. Assessment of surface reactivity of thorium oxide in conditions close to chemical equilibrium by isotope exchange {sup 229}Th/{sup 232}Th method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki-Muresan, Tomo; Perrigaud, Katy; Vandenborre, Johan; Ribet, Solange; Grambow, Bernd [Nantes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). SUBATECH Unite Mixte de Recherche 6457; Takamasa, Inai [TOKAI Univ., Kanagawa (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    This work aims to assess the solubility and the surface reactivity of crystallized thorium at pH 3.0 in presence of three types of solids: synthesized powder at 1300 C, crushed kernel, and intact kernel. In this study, the kernel is composed by the core solid from high temperature reactors (HTR) sphere particles. The originality of this work consisted in following in a sequential order the kinetic of dissolution, the surface reactivity in presence of isotope tracer {sup 229}Th, and its desorption process. Long time experiments (634 days) allowed to get deeper understanding on the behavior of the surface reactivity in contact with the solution. Solubility values are ranging from 0.3 x 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1} to 3 x 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1} with a dissolution rate of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -4} g.m{sup -2} day{sup -1}. PHREEQC modeling showed that crystallized ThO{sub 2}(cr, 20 nm) phase controls the equilibrium in solution. Isotope exchange between {sup 229}Th and {sup 232}Th indicated that well-crystallized phase exist as an inert surface regarding to the absence of exchange between surface solid and solution.

  10. The End of Monterey Submarine Canyon Incision and Potential River Source Areas-Os, Nd, and Pb Isotope Constraints from Hydrogenetic Fe-Mn Crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, T. A.; Nielsen, S.; Ehrenbrink, B. P. E.; Blusztajn, J.; Hein, J. R.; Paytan, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Monterey Canyon off central California is the largest submarine canyon off North America and is comparable in scale to the Grand Canyon. The age and history of the Monterey Canyon are poorly constrained due to thick sediment cover and sediment disruption from turbidity currents. To address this deficit we analyzed isotopic proxies (Os, Pb, Nd) from hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts, which grow over millions of years on elevated rock surfaces by precipitation of metals from seawater. Fe-Mn crusts were studied from Davidson Seamount near the base of the Monterey submarine fan, the Taney Seamount Chain, and from Hoss Seamount, which serves as a regional control (Fig.). Fe-Mn crusts were dated using Os isotope ratios compared to those that define the Cenozoic Os isotope seawater curve. Four Fe-Mn crust samples from Davidson and Taney Seamounts deviate from the Os isotopic seawater curve towards radiogenic values after 4.5±1 Ma. Osmium is well mixed in the global ocean and is not subject to significant diffusive reequilibration in Fe-Mn crusts. We therefore attribute deviations from the Os isotope seawater curve to large-scale terrestrial input that ended about 4.5±1 Ma. The two Davidson samples also show more radiogenic Nd isotope values from about 4.5±1 Ma. Lead isotopes in one Davidson Seamount crust, measured by LA-ICPMS, deviate from regional values after 4.5±1 Ma for about 500 ka towards terrestrial sources. The Taney Seamount Fe-Mn crust does not deviate from regional Nd nor Pb isotope values due to its greater distance from Monterey Canyon and the shorter marine residence times of Nd and Pb. Isotope plots of our crust data and compiled data for potential source rocks indicate that the river that carved Monterey Canyon carried sediment with values closer to the Sierra Nevada than to a Colorado Plateau source, with cessation of major riverine input occurring approximately 4.5±1 Ma, an age that we interpret as the end of the Monterey Canyon

  11. pH-Dependent isotope exchange and hydrogenation catalysed by water-soluble NiRu complexes as functional models for [NiFe]hydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kure, Bunsho; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Koji; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Yagi, Tatsuhiko; Ogo, Seiji

    2008-09-21

    The pH-dependent hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between gaseous isotopes and medium isotopes and hydrogenation of the carbonyl compounds have been investigated with water-soluble bis(mu-thiolate)(mu-hydride)NiRu complexes, Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) {(mu-SR)(2) = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine}, as functional models for [NiFe]hydrogenases. In acidic media (at pH 4-6), the mu-H ligand of the Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) complexes has H(+) properties, and the complexes catalyse the hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between gaseous isotopes and medium isotopes. A mechanism of the hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between gaseous isotopes and medium isotopes through a low-valent Ni(I)(mu-SR)(2)Ru(I) complex is proposed. In contrast, in neutral-basic media (at pH 7-10), the mu-H ligand of the Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) complexes acts as H(-), and the complexes catalyse the hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds.

  12. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of systems of hydrogen isotopes, lithium hydrides, aluminum, and LiAlO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, J.H.; Randall, D.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium might be bred by the 6 Li(n,α)T reaction in a solid lithium alloy or compound in the blanket of a controlled thermonuclear reactor to avoid problems associated with molten lithium or lithium compounds. Li--Al and LiAlO 2 systems containing hydrogen, deuterium, or tritium were studied 10 to 15 years ago at the Savannah River Laboratory. This paper descibes measurements of (1) the distribution of tritium and helium throughout both α and β phases of irradiated Li--Al alloy, (2) the migration rate of tritium to the β phase during moderate heating, (3) equilibrium pressures as functions of temperature of H 2 , D 2 , or T 2 in contact with lithium hydrides + aluminum, Li--Al alloy, or irradiated Li--Al alloy, (4) the equilibrium constant for the reaction LiH + Al → LiAl + 1 / 2 H 2 as a function of temperature, and (5) extraction rates of tritium from irradiated LiAlO 2 targets at elevated temperatures

  13. Equilibrium phase of high-entropy FeCoNiCrCu0.5 alloy at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-M.; Tsai, H.-L.

    2010-01-01

    The phase transformations of FeCoNiCrCu 0.5 alloy with the as-cast structure and heat-treated structures were studied. The as-cast alloy specimens were first heated at 1050 o C with a holding time of 1 h. Serial heat-treatment processes at 350 o C, 500 o C, 650 o C, 800 o C, 950 o C, 1100 o C, 1250 o C and 1350 o C with a holding time of 24 h were then carried out to understand the phase evolution and the relationship between the microstructure and the hardness of the specimens. The microstructures were investigated and chemical analyses performed by optical microscopy (OM), scanning elector microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and transmission elector microscopy (TEM). The results show that FCC peaks were observed from the X-ray diffraction of the as-cast specimens and a precipitate phase was present in the specimens that had been heated to 950 o C. The hardness of the FeCoNiCrCu 0.5 alloy remained unchanged in the specimens that underwent various heat treatments that were applied in this study.

  14. Experimental Study of Liquidus of the "FeO"-SiO2-PbO Slags in Equilibrium with Air and with Metallic Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Maksym; Hidayat, Taufiq; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    Limited data are available on phase equilibria of the "FeO"-SiO2-PbO slag system at conditions used in the lead smelting due to difficulties from lead vaporization and interactions with metal and ceramic crucibles. Recently experimental procedures have been developed and successfully applied to complex industrial slag-metal-matte systems involving high temperature equilibration on a primary phase substrate and rapid quenching followed by the electron probe X-ray microanalysis. The liquidus isotherms and invariant lines in the "FeO"-SiO2-PbO slag system in equilibrium with air and with metallic lead have been constructed. Preliminary data compared to the FactSage package predictions demonstrate differences in some aspects, indicating the possibility for further improvement of the thermodynamic database. The present work is a part of the integrated experimental and thermodynamic modelling research program on multi-phase lead systems in support of the optimization and development of complex lead smelting, refining and recycling technologies.

  15. Neutron-proton ratios of collective quadrupole matrix elements in even Fe and Cr isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antalik, R.

    1989-01-01

    M n /M p ratios are investigated within the QRPA framework for the low-lying quadrupole states and for isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in 54,56,58 Fe and 50,52,54 Cr. Theoretical results for 2 l ? + states are in good agreement with empirical ones obtained from recent proton and pion inelastic scattering studies. 16 refs.; 3 tabs

  16. Decay of neutron-rich Mn nuclides and deformation of heavy Fe isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Hannawald, M; Wöhr, A; Walters, W B; Kratz, K L; Fedosseev, V; Mishin, V I; Böhmer, W; Pfeiffer, B; Sebastian, V; Jading, Y; Köster, U; Lettry, Jacques; Ravn, H L

    1999-01-01

    The use of chemically selective laser ionization combined with beta-delayed neutron counting at CERN/ISOLDE has permitted identification and half-life measurements for 623-ms Mn-61 up through 14-ms Mn-69. The measured half-lives are found to be significantly longer near N=40 than the values calculated with a QRPA shell model using ground-state deformations from the FRDM and ETFSI models. Gamma-ray singles and coincidence spectroscopy has been performed for Mn-64 and Mn-66 decays to levels of Fe-64 and Fe-66, revealing a significant drop in the energy of the first 2+ state in these nuclides that suggests an unanticipated increase in collectivity near N=40.

  17. Neutron Capture Reactions on Fe and Ni Isotopes for the Astrophysical s-process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederer, C., E-mail: claudia.lederer@ed.ac.uk [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universität, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Giubrone, G. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Massimi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bologna, and Sezione INFN di Bologna, 40100 Bologna (Italy); Žugec, P. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 70125 Bari (Italy); Domingo-Pardo, C. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Guerrero, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Gunsing, F. [Commissariat à l' Énergie Atomique (CEA) Saclay – Irfu, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Käppeler, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Nord, Institut für Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tain, J.L. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Altstadt, S. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universität, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Andrzejewski, J. [Uniwersytet Łódzki, 90131 Lodz (Poland); Audouin, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 – IPN, 91406 Orsay (France); Bécares, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bečvář, F. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-06-15

    Neutron capture cross sections in the keV neutron energy region are the key nuclear physics input to study the astrophysical slow neutron capture process. In the past years, a series of neutron capture cross section measurements has been performed at the neutron time-of-flight facility n{sub T}OF at CERN focussing on the Fe/Ni mass region. Recent results and future developments in the neutron time-of-flight technique are discussed.

  18. Cerenkov-ΔE-Cerenkov detector for high-energy cosmic-ray isotopes and an accelerator study of 40Ar and 56Fe fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis has two major parts. The first part of the thesis will describe a high energy cosmic ray detector - the High Energy Isotope Spectrometer Telescope (HEIST). HEIST is a large area (0.25 m 2 sr) balloon-borne isotope spectrometer designed to make high-resolution measurements of isotopes in the element range from neon to nickel (10 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28) at energies of about 2 GeV/nucleon. The instrument consists of a stack of 12 NaI(Tl) scintillators, two Cerenkov counters, and two plastic scintillators. The second part of this thesis presents an experimental measurement of the isotopic composition of the fragments from the breakup of high energy 40 Ar and 56 Fe nuclei. Cosmic ray composition studies rely heavily on semi-empirical estimates of the cross-sections for the nuclear fragmentation reactions which alter the composition during propagation through the interstellar medium. Experimentally measured yields of isotopes from the fragmentation of 40 Ar and 56 Fe are compared with calculated yields based on semi-empirical cross-section formulae

  19. ENDF/B-VI evaluations for isotopes of Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetrick, D.M.; Fu, C.Y.; Larson, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Evaluations have been done for each of the stable isotopes of chromium, iron, nickel, copper, and lead. They are based on analysis of experimental data and results of nuclear model calculations which reproduce the experimental data. Evaluated data are given for neutron induced reaction cross sections, angular and energy distributions, and gamma-ray production cross sections associated with the reactions. The new file 6 formats are used to represent energy-angle correlated data and recoil spectra for the first time in ENDF. This paper reviews the structure of the evaluations, notes the major pieces of experimental data utilized, gives a summary of the model codes used, and compares calculations to measured data

  20. β-decay half-lives of neutron-rich isotopes of Fe, Co, Ni involved in the beginning of the r-process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, S.; Bernas, M.; Brissot, R.

    1992-01-01

    The very neutron-rich Fe- to Ni-isotopes are of interest since they are located at the very beginning of the astrophysical r-process path. The β-decay half-lives of several isotopes, identified in thermal fission of 235 U or 239 Pu, have been measured at the ILL high-flux reactor using the Lohengrin spectrometer. Half-lives have been determined from time-correlations analysis between the fragment implantation and the detection of the subsequent β-particles in the same detector. With the fragment separator FRS , at GSI, the projectile fragments of 86 Kr have been separated. The β-decay half-life of 65 Fe has been measured. Received: (from VMMAIL[FRSAC11 for XIN[IAEA1 via NJE)

  1. 238U-234U-230Th chronometry of Fe-Mn crusts: Growth processes and recovery of thorium isotopic ratios of seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabaux, F.; Cohen, A.S.; O'Nions, R.K.; Hein, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Comparison of ( 234 U) excess /( 238 U) and ( 230 Th)/( 232 Th) activity ratios in oceanic Fe-Mn deposits provides a method for assessing the closed-system behaviour of 238 U- 234 U- 230 Th, as well as variations in the initial uranium and thorium isotopic ratios of the precipitated metal oxides. This approach is illustrated using a Fe-Mn crust from Lotab seamount (Marshall Islands, west equatorial Pacific). Here we report uranium and thorium isotopic compositions in five subsamples from the surface of one large 5 cm diameter botyroid of this crust, and from two depth profiles of the outermost rim of the same botyroid. The decrease of ( 234 U) excess /( 238 U) and ( 230 Th/ 232 Th) activity ratio with depth in the two profiles gives mean growth rates, for the last 150 ka, of 7.8 ± 2 mm/Ma and 6.6 ± 1 mm/Ma, respectively. All data points (surface and core samples) but one, define a linear correlation in the Ln ( 230 Th/ 232 Th) - Ln [( 234 U) excess ( 238 U)] diagram. This correlation indicates that for all points the U-Th system remained closed after the Fe-Mn layer precipitated, and that the different samples possessed the same initial Uranium and thorium isotope ratios. Furthermore, these results show that the preserved surface of this Fe-Mn crust may not be the present-day growth surface, and that the thorium and uranium isotopic ratios of seawater in west equatorial Pacific have not changed during the past 150 ka. The initial thorium activity ratio is estimated from the correlation obtained between Ln( 230 Th/ 232 Th) and Ln [( 234 U) excess /( 238 U)

  2. Contribution of local thyroxine monodeiodination to intracellular 3,5, 3'-triiodothyronine in several tissues of hyperthyroid rats at isotopic equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Doorn, J.; van der Heide, D.; Roelfsema, F.

    1984-01-01

    The local conversion of T4 as a source of intracellular T3 in several organs of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats has recently been recognized to be an important phenomenon. In the present study the source and quantity of T3 in various peripheral tissues of hyperthyroid rats were investigated. Athyreotic rats received a continuous iv infusion of T4 over a prolonged period in order to attain hyperthyroid conditions. At the same time, the animals also received a continuous iv infusion of [ 125 I]T4 and [ 131 I]T3 until isotopic equilibrium was achieved. After the animals were bled and perfused, the source and quantity of T3 in various tissue homogenates and subcellular preparations of liver, kidney, and the anterior pituitary gland were analyzed. In spite of the elevated plasma T3 and T4 levels, the concentration of T3 in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum was within the normal range. The contribution of T3 derived from local T4 to T3 conversion [Lc T3(T4)] was rather low in both parts of the brain when compared with values previously determined for euthyroid rats. Whereas previous studies revealed that Lc T3(T4) contributes significantly to the T3 in the pituitary glands of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats, this was not the case for the hyperthyroid animals; virtually all T3 was derived from plasma. It was found that the T3 in muscle was derived exclusively from plasma. Both the liver and kidney showed high concentrations of T3. Whereas Lc T3(T4) was the main source of T3 in the liver, it contributed only a minor fraction of the total T3 content in the kidney

  3. Contribution of local thyroxine monodeiodination to intracellular 3,5, 3'-triiodothyronine in several tissues of hyperthyroid rats at isotopic equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Doorn, J.; van der Heide, D.; Roelfsema, F.

    1984-07-01

    The local conversion of T4 as a source of intracellular T3 in several organs of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats has recently been recognized to be an important phenomenon. In the present study the source and quantity of T3 in various peripheral tissues of hyperthyroid rats were investigated. Athyreotic rats received a continuous iv infusion of T4 over a prolonged period in order to attain hyperthyroid conditions. At the same time, the animals also received a continuous iv infusion of (/sup 125/I)T4 and (/sup 131/I)T3 until isotopic equilibrium was achieved. After the animals were bled and perfused, the source and quantity of T3 in various tissue homogenates and subcellular preparations of liver, kidney, and the anterior pituitary gland were analyzed. In spite of the elevated plasma T3 and T4 levels, the concentration of T3 in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum was within the normal range. The contribution of T3 derived from local T4 to T3 conversion (Lc T3(T4)) was rather low in both parts of the brain when compared with values previously determined for euthyroid rats. Whereas previous studies revealed that Lc T3(T4) contributes significantly to the T3 in the pituitary glands of both hypothyroid and euthyroid rats, this was not the case for the hyperthyroid animals; virtually all T3 was derived from plasma. It was found that the T3 in muscle was derived exclusively from plasma. Both the liver and kidney showed high concentrations of T3. Whereas Lc T3(T4) was the main source of T3 in the liver, it contributed only a minor fraction of the total T3 content in the kidney.

  4. Isotopically exchangeable phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, N.O.

    1984-01-01

    A critique revision of isotope dilution is presented. The concepts and use of exchangeable phosphorus, the phosphate adsorption, the kinetics of isotopic exchange and the equilibrium time in soils are discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  5. Equilibrium constant and nitrogen activity and the parameters of interaction eN(N), rN(N,Cr), rN(N,Mn) in high nitrogen steels of Fe-Cr-Mn-N type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svyazhin, A.G.; Siwka, J.; Rashev, T.

    1999-01-01

    In the paper a description of a thermodynamic of liquid solutions of Fe-Cr-Mn-N type with using a concept of parameters of an interaction has been presented. A temperature relationship of the equilibrium constant K N(Fe) and values of self interaction parameters e N (N) , r N (N,Cr) , r N (N,Mn) and t N (N,Cr,Cr) has been determined for mean values of temperatures of liquid metal equal 1990 K and 2090 K. By application of a theory of regular solutions those values were recalculated for a temperature 1873 K. (orig.)

  6. Ion-microprobe measurements of Mg, Ca, Ti and Fe isotopic ratios and trace element abundance in hibonite-bearing inclusions in primitive meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahey, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis reports the isotopic abundances of Mg, Ca, and Ti and rare earth element (REE) abundances in 19 hibonite-bearing inclusions from primative meteorites. The isotopic ratios of Fe were measured in one of the samples, Lance HH-1. These measurements were made by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (CAMECA IMS-3f). The novel hardware and software developments that made this work possible are described in detail. The samples were studied in thin section in order to investigate the relationship between the inclusions and their mineralogical environments. Inclusions from a number of different meteorites, specifically, Mighei, Murray, Murchison, Lance, Efremovka, Vigarano, Qingzhen, Dhajala, and Semarkona, were studied. The isotopes of Ca and Ti show large and correlated abundance anomalies in their most neutron-rich isotopes, 48 Ca and 50 Ti. The largest anomalies among the samples studied here are in the Murray inclusion MY-F6, with a 4.6% deficit in 48 Ca and a 5.2% deficit in 50 Ti, and Lance HH-1, with 3.3% and 6.0% deficits in 48 Ca and 50 Ti respectively. Correlated excesses of 48 Ca and 50 Ti, up to 2.4% and 1.4% respectively, are found in some other samples studied here. The fact that there is a correlation of isotopic anomalies in two different elements is clear evidence for a nucleosynthetic origin of these effects. Various possibilities for the origin of these isotopic anomalies are discussed and it is shown that a Cosmic Chemical Memory-like model of the incomplete mixing of dust grains from one or several supernovae is sufficient to explain the data. Magnesium isotopes show excesses of 26 Mg, attributable to the in-situ decay of 26 Al, in 7 of these inclusions

  7. The Behaviour of Fe Stable Isotopes Accompanying Fluid Migration in Subducted Serpentinite from the Zermatt-Saas Ophiolite of the Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, E.; Bouilhol, P.; Burton, K. W.; Debret, B.; Millet, M. A.; Williams, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    During subduction the destabilisation of hydrous serpentine group phases can generate significant fluid fluxes between the subducting slab and the overlying mantle wedge. Despite our knowledge of this, the exact process and nature of the fluids released during serpentinite devolatilisation remain poorly understood. This study presents new field observations alongside petrographic and geochemical data for metamorphic veins and host serpentinite from the Zermatt-Saas ophiolite from the Swiss Alps, which underwent high-pressure metamorphism during the Alpine orogeny. Samples were collected from the serpentinised ultramafic section of the Zermatt-Saas ophiolite, which is mainly comprised of variably foliated and sheared antigorite serpentine. High-pressure metamorphic veins hosted within the antigorite serpentinite, are observed within the least deformed part of the massif, occurring as cm scale laterally continuous channels or mm scale interconnected anastomosing networks. Preliminary high-precision Fe isotope data for the host antigorite serpentine yield a mean δ56Fe value of -0.09‰ ± 0.04‰ (n=3), notably lighter than previously measured Alpine and abyssal serpentinites (Debret et al., 2016). In contrast, samples of cm scale olivine-bearing veins display a mean δ56Fe value of 0.07 ± 0.05‰ (n=3), resolvably heavier than that of the host serpentinite. These preliminary results suggest preferential mobility of isotopically heavy Fe within the vein forming fluids, but at this stage it is unclear if this fluid is related to local devolatilisation of the host serpentinite or input from an external source. Debret et al., 2016. Isotopic evidence for iron mobility during subduction. Geology, v. 44, no. 3, pp. 215 -218.

  8. A universal fluorogenic switch for Fe(ii) ion based on N-oxide chemistry permits the visualization of intracellular redox equilibrium shift towards labile iron in hypoxic tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Tasuku; Tsuboi, Hitomi; Niwa, Masato; Miki, Ayaji; Kadota, Satoki; Ikeshita, Yukie; Okuda, Kensuke; Nagasawa, Hideko

    2017-07-01

    Iron (Fe) species play a number of biologically and pathologically important roles. In particular, iron is a key element in oxygen sensing in living tissue where its metabolism is intimately linked with oxygen metabolism. Regulation of redox balance of labile iron species to prevent the generation of iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical to survival. However, studies on the redox homeostasis of iron species are challenging because of a lack of a redox-state-specific detection method for iron, in particular, labile Fe 2+ . In this study, a universal fluorogenic switching system is established, which is responsive to Fe 2+ ion based on a unique N-oxide chemistry in which dialkylarylamine N-oxide is selectively deoxygenized by Fe 2+ to generate various fluorescent probes of Fe 2+ -CoNox-1 (blue), FluNox-1 (green), and SiRhoNox-1 (red). All the probes exhibited fluorescence enhancement against Fe 2+ with high selectivity both in cuvette and in living cells. Among the probes, SiRhoNox-1 showed an excellent fluorescence response with respect to both reaction rate and off/on signal contrast. Imaging studies were performed showing the intracellular redox equilibrium shift towards labile iron in response to reduced oxygen tension in living cells and 3D tumor spheroids using SiRhoNox-1, and it was found that the hypoxia induction of labile Fe 2+ is independent of iron uptake, hypoxia-induced signaling, and hypoxia-activated enzymes. The present studies demonstrate the feasibility of developing sensitive and specific fluorescent probes for Fe 2+ with refined photophysical characteristics that enable their broad application in the study of iron in various physiological and pathological conditions.

  9. Effect of Silicon on the Activity Coefficient of Rhenium in Fe-Si Liquids: Implications for HSE and Os Isotopes in Planetary Mantles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Yang, S.; Humayun, M.

    2018-01-01

    Metallic cores contain light alloying elements that can be a combination of S, C, Si, and O, all of which have important chemical and physical influences. For Earth, Si may be the most abundant light element in the core. Si dissolved into Fe liquids can have a large effect on the magnitude of the activity coefficient of siderophile elements (SE), and thus the partitioning behavior of those elements between core and mantle. The effect of Si on the highly siderophile elements is only beginning to be studied and the effects on Au, Pd and Pt are significant. Here we report new experiments designed to quantify the effect of Si on the partitioning of Re between metal and silicate melt. A solid understanding of Re partitioning is required for a complete understanding of the Re-Os isotopic systems. The results will be applied to understanding the HSEs and Os isotopic data for planetary mantles, and especially Earth.

  10. Isotopic tailoring with 59Ni to study the effect of helium on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L.; Greenwood, L.R.; Stubbins, J.F.; Oliver, B.M.

    1992-03-01

    Tensile testing on three model Fe-Cr-Ni alloys removed from four discharges of the 59 Ni isotopic doping experiment in FFTF-MOTA indicates that helium/dpa ratios typical of fusion reactors do not produce changes in the yield strength or elongation that are significantly different from those at much lower helium generation rates. It also appears that tensile properties approach a saturation level that is dependent only on the final irradiation temperature, but not prior temperature history or thermomechanical starting condition. The saturation in mechanical properties reflects a similar saturation in microstructure that is independent of starting condition. The successful conduct of an isotopic doping experiment was found to require post-irradiation measurement of the helium levels in order to compensate for uncertainties in the cross sections for burn-out and burn-in of 59 Ni and for uncertainties in neutron flux and spectra in the vicinity of the edge of the core

  11. Kinetic control on Zn isotope signatures recorded in marine diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbberich, Michael; Vance, Derek

    2017-08-01

    Marine diatoms dominate the oceanic cycle of the essential micronutrient zinc (Zn). The stable isotopes of zinc and other metals are increasingly used to understand trace metal micronutrient cycling in the oceans. One clear feature of the early isotope data is the heavy Zn isotope signature of the average oceanic dissolved pool relative to the inputs, potentially driven by uptake of light isotopes into phytoplankton cells and export to sediments. However, despite the fact that diatoms strip Zn from surface waters across the Antarctic polar front in the Southern Ocean, the local upper ocean is not isotopically heavy. Here we use culturing experiments to quantify the extent of Zn isotope fractionation by diatoms and to elucidate the mechanisms driving it. We have cultured two different open-ocean diatom species (T. oceanica and Chaetoceros sp.) in a series of experiments at constant medium Zn concentration but at bioavailable medium Fe ranging from limiting to replete. We find that T. oceanica can maintain high growth rates and Zn uptake rates over the full range of bioavailable iron (Fe) investigated, and that the Zn taken up has a δ66Zn that is unfractionated relative to that of the bioavailable free Zn in the medium. The studied representative of the genus Chaetoceros, on the other hand, shows more significantly reduced Zn uptake rates at low Fe and records more variable biomass δ66Zn signatures, of up to 0.85‰ heavier than the medium. We interpret the preferential uptake of heavy isotopes at extremely low Zn uptake rates as potentially due to either of the following two mechanisms. First, the release of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), at low Fe levels, may preferentially scavenge heavy Zn isotopes. Second, the Zn uptake rate may be slow enough to establish pseudo-equilibrium conditions at the transporter site, with heavy Zn isotopes forming more stable surface complexes. Thus we find that, in our experiments, Fe-limitation exerts a key control that

  12. Origin of the volcanic-hosted Yamansu Fe deposit, Eastern Tianshan, NW China: constraints from pyrite Re-Os isotopes, stable isotopes, and in situ magnetite trace elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Wen; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Beaudoin, Georges; Gao, Jian-Feng; Qi, Liang; Lyu, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    The Yamansu Fe deposit (32 Mt at 51% Fe) in the Eastern Tianshan Orogenic Belt of NW China is hosted in early Carboniferous volcano-sedimentary rocks and spatially associated with skarn. The paragenetic sequence includes garnet-diopside (I), magnetite (II), hydrous silicate-sulfide (III), and calcite-quartz (IV) stages. Pyrite associated with magnetite has a Re-Os isochron age of 322 ± 7 Ma, which represents the timing of pyrite and, by inference, magnetite mineralization. Pyrite has δ 34SVCDT values of - 2.2 to + 2.9‰, yielding δ 34SH2S values of - 3.1 to 2‰, indicating the derivation of sulfur from a magmatic source. Calcite from stages II and IV has δ 13CVPDB values from - 2.5 to - 1.2‰, and - 1.1 to 1.1‰, and δ 18OVSMOW values from 11.8 to 12.0‰ and - 7.7 to - 5.2‰, respectively. Calculated δ 13C values of fluid CO2 and water δ 18O values indicate that stage II hydrothermal fluids were derived from magmatic rocks and that meteoric water mixed with the hydrothermal fluids in stage IV. Some ores contain magnetite with obvious chemical zoning composed of dark and light domains in BSE images. Dark domains have higher Mg, Al, Ca, Mn, and Ti but lower Fe and Cr contents than light domains. The chemical zoning resulted from a fluctuating fluid composition and/or physicochemical conditions (oscillatory zoning), or dissolution-precipitation (irregular zoning) via infiltration of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids diluted by late meteoric water. Iron was mainly derived from fluids similar to that in skarn deposits.

  13. Effect of Sulfur on Liquidus Temperatures in the ZnO-"FeO"-Al2O3-CaO-SiO2-S System in Equilibrium with Metallic Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baojun; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2011-10-01

    The phase equilibria in the ZnO-"FeO"-Al2O3-CaO-SiO2-S system have been determined experimentally in equilibrium with metallic iron. A pseudoternary section of the form ZnO-"FeO"-(Al2O3+CaO+SiO2) for CaO/SiO2 = 0.71 (weight), (CaO+SiO2)/Al2O3 = 5.0 (weight), and fixed 2.0 wt pct S concentration has been constructed. It was found that the addition of 2.0 wt pct S to the liquid extends the spinel primary phase field significantly and decreases the size of the wustite primary phase field. The liquidus temperature in the wustite primary phase field is decreased by approximately 80 K and the liquidus temperature in the spinel primary phase field is decreased by approximately 10 K with addition of 2.0 wt pct S in the composition range investigated. It was also found that iron-zinc sulfides are present in some samples in the spinel primary phase field, which are matte appearing at low zinc concentrations and sphalerite (Zn,Fe)S at higher zinc concentrations. The presence of sulfur in the slag has a minor effect on the partitioning of ZnO between the wustite and liquid phases but no effect on the partitioning of ZnO between the spinel and liquid phases.

  14. Prediction of the equilibrium structures and photomagnetic properties of the Prussian blue analogue RbMn[Fe(CN)(6)] by density functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luzon, Javier; Castro, Miguel; Vertelman, Esther J.M.; Gengler, Régis Y.N.; van Koningsbruggen, Petra J.; Molodtsova, Olga; Knupfer, Martin; Rudolf, Petra; Loosdrecht, Paul H.M. van; Broer, Ria

    2008-01-01

    A periodic density functional theory method using the B3LYP hybrid exchange-correlation potential is applied to the Prussian blue analogue RbMn[Fe(CN)(6)] to evaluate the suitability of the method for studying, and predicting, the photomagnetic behavior of Prussian blue analogues and related

  15. Adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 and Congo Red dye from aqueous solution by amino-functionalized Fe3O4 particles: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ting-guo; Wang, Li-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic adsorbent was synthesized by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modification of Fe(3)O(4) particles using a two-step process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and vibration sample magnetometry were used to characterize the obtained magnetic adsorbent. EDS and XPS showed that APTES polymer was successfully introduced onto the as-prepared Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particle surfaces. The saturation magnetization of the magnetic adsorbent was around 65 emu g(-1), which indicated that the dye can be removed fast and efficiently from aqueous solution with an external magnetic field. The maximum adsorption capacities of Fe(3)O(4)/APTES for C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) were 51.4 and 118.8 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) on Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particles corresponded well to the Langmuir model and the Freundlich model, respectively. The adsorption processes for RR 228 and CR followed the pseudo-second-order model. The Boyd's film-diffusion model showed that film diffusion also played a major role in the studied adsorption processes for both dyes. Thermodynamic study indicated that both of the adsorption processes of the two dyes are spontaneous exothermic.

  16. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations. Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, David [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wankel, Scott David [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States); Buchwald, Carolyn [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States); Hansel, Colleen [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States)

    2015-09-16

    Redox reactions involving nitrogen and iron have been shown to have important implications for mobilization of priority contaminants. Thus, an understanding of the linkages between their biogeochemical cycling is critical for predicting subsurface mobilization of radionuclides such as uranium. Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or ‘chemodenitrification,’ and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (~8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  17. Analysis of trace metals (Cu, Cd, Pb, and Fe) in seawater using single batch nitrilotriacetate resin extraction and isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong-Mi [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Boyle, Edward A., E-mail: eaboyle@mit.edu [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Echegoyen-Sanz, Yolanda; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zhang Ruifeng [State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Kayser, Richard A. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-02-07

    A simple and accurate low-blank method has been developed for the analysis of total dissolved copper, cadmium, lead, and iron in a small volume (1.3-1.5 mL per element) of seawater. Pre-concentration and salt-separation of a stable isotope spiked sample are achieved by single batch extraction onto nitrilotriacetate (NTA)-type Superflow chelating resin beads (100-2400 beads depending on the element). Metals are released into 0.1-0.5 M HNO{sub 3}, and trace metal isotope ratios are determined by ICPMS. The benefit of this method compared to our previous Mg(OH){sub 2} coprecipitation method is that the final matrix is very dilute so cone-clogging and matrix sensitivity suppression are minimal, while still retaining the high accuracy of the isotope dilution technique. Recovery efficiencies are sensitive to sample pH, number of resin beads added, and the length of time allowed for sample-resin binding and elution; these factors are optimized for each element to yield the highest recovery. The method has a low procedural blank and high sensitivity sufficient for the analysis of pM-nM open-ocean trace metal concentrations. Application of this method to samples from the Bermuda Atlantic Time-Series Study station provides oceanographically consistent Cu, Cd, Pb, and Fe profiles that are in good agreement with other reliable data for this site. In addition, the method can potentially be modified for the simultaneous analysis of multiple elements, which will be beneficial for the analysis of large number of samples.

  18. Analysis of trace metals (Cu, Cd, Pb, and Fe) in seawater using single batch nitrilotriacetate resin extraction and isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong-Mi; Boyle, Edward A.; Echegoyen-Sanz, Yolanda; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Zhang Ruifeng; Kayser, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    A simple and accurate low-blank method has been developed for the analysis of total dissolved copper, cadmium, lead, and iron in a small volume (1.3-1.5 mL per element) of seawater. Pre-concentration and salt-separation of a stable isotope spiked sample are achieved by single batch extraction onto nitrilotriacetate (NTA)-type Superflow chelating resin beads (100-2400 beads depending on the element). Metals are released into 0.1-0.5 M HNO 3 , and trace metal isotope ratios are determined by ICPMS. The benefit of this method compared to our previous Mg(OH) 2 coprecipitation method is that the final matrix is very dilute so cone-clogging and matrix sensitivity suppression are minimal, while still retaining the high accuracy of the isotope dilution technique. Recovery efficiencies are sensitive to sample pH, number of resin beads added, and the length of time allowed for sample-resin binding and elution; these factors are optimized for each element to yield the highest recovery. The method has a low procedural blank and high sensitivity sufficient for the analysis of pM-nM open-ocean trace metal concentrations. Application of this method to samples from the Bermuda Atlantic Time-Series Study station provides oceanographically consistent Cu, Cd, Pb, and Fe profiles that are in good agreement with other reliable data for this site. In addition, the method can potentially be modified for the simultaneous analysis of multiple elements, which will be beneficial for the analysis of large number of samples.

  19. Non-traditional stable isotope behaviors in immiscible silica-melts in a mafic magma chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Bao, Huiming; Liu, Yun

    2015-12-01

    Non-traditional stable isotopes have increasingly been applied to studies of igneous processes including planetary differentiation. Equilibrium isotope fractionation of these elements in silicates is expected to be negligible at magmatic temperatures (δ(57)Fe difference often less than 0.2 per mil). However, an increasing number of data has revealed a puzzling observation, e.g., the δ(57)Fe for silicic magmas ranges from 0‰ up to 0.6‰, with the most positive δ(57)Fe almost exclusively found in A-type granitoids. Several interpretations have been proposed by different research groups, but these have so far failed to explain some aspects of the observations. Here we propose a dynamic, diffusion-induced isotope fractionation model that assumes Si-melts are growing and ascending immiscibly in a Fe-rich bulk magma chamber. Our model offers predictions on the behavior of non-traditional stable isotope such as Fe, Mg, Si, and Li that are consistent with observations from many A-type granitoids, especially those associated with layered intrusions. Diffusion-induced isotope fractionation may be more commonly preserved in magmatic rocks than was originally predicted.

  20. A new model and gas sensitivity of non-equilibrium xSnO2-(1-x)alpha-Fe2O3 nanopowders prepared by mechanical alloying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, W.; Tan, O.K.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    1998-01-01

    )alpha-Fe2O3 materials. This model can explain non only the lattice expansion of the milled samples, but also takes into account the charge balance by adding oxygen dangling bonds at the particle surfaces, which can be visualized in the nano-sized powders. The thich film gas sensors made by such mechanically......Nano-sized xSnO2-(1-x)alpha-Fe2O3 materials have been prepared using the high energy ball milling technique and their structural and gas sensing properties have been characterized. Based on experimental results, we propose a new structure model, xxx, forthese non-equilibrium, nano-sized xSnO2-(1-x...... alloyed materials have high ethanol gas sensitivity values of 289 in air and 1016 in nitrogen at 1000 p.p.m. and very good gas selectivity to ethanol over CO and H2 gases. It is believed that the high ethanol gas sensitivity of these materials is related to the enormous defects such as O- and O2- dangling...

  1. Local equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-12-15

    From 3-6 September the First International Workshop on Local Equilibrium in Strong Interaction Physics took place in Bad-Honnef at the Physics Centre of the German Physical Society. A number of talks covered the experimental and theoretical investigation of the 'hotspots' effect, both in high energy particle physics and in intermediate energy nuclear physics.

  2. Equilibrium Dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    context of antimicrobial therapy in malnutrition. Dialysis has in the past presented technical problems, being complicated and time-consuming. A new dialysis system based on the equilibrium technique has now become available, and it is the principles and practical application of this apparatus (Kontron Diapack; Kontron.

  3. Strategic Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.

    2000-01-01

    An outcome in a noncooperative game is said to be self-enforcing, or a strategic equilibrium, if, whenever it is recommended to the players, no player has an incentive to deviate from it.This paper gives an overview of the concepts that have been proposed as formalizations of this requirement and of

  4. Maximin equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new concept which extends von Neumann and Morgenstern's maximin strategy solution by incorporating `individual rationality' of the players. Maximin equilibrium, extending Nash's value approach, is based on the evaluation of the strategic uncertainty of the whole game. We show that

  5. Minimal Influence of [NiFe] Hydrogenase on Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in H2-Oxidizing Cupriavidus necator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Campbell

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids produced by H2-metabolizing bacteria are sometimes observed to be more D-depleted than those of photoautotrophic organisms, a trait that has been suggested as diagnostic for chemoautotrophic bacteria. The biochemical reasons for such a depletion are not known, but are often assumed to involve the strong D-depletion of H2. Here, we cultivated the bacterium Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly Ralstonia eutropha H16 under aerobic, H2-consuming, chemoautotrophic conditions and measured the isotopic compositions of its fatty acids. In parallel with the wild type, two mutants of this strain, each lacking one of two key hydrogenase enzymes, were also grown and measured. In all three strains, fractionations between fatty acids and water ranged from -173‰ to -235‰, and averaged -217‰, -196‰, and -226‰, respectively, for the wild type, SH- mutant, and MBH- mutant. There was a modest increase in δD as a result of loss of the soluble hydrogenase enzyme. Fractionation curves for all three strains were constructed by growing parallel cultures in waters with δDwater values of approximately -25‰, 520‰, and 1100‰. These curves indicate that at least 90% of the hydrogen in fatty acids is derived from water, not H2. Published details of the biochemistry of the soluble and membrane-bound hydrogenases confirm that these enzymes transfer electrons rather than intact hydride (H- ions, providing no direct mechanism to connect the isotopic composition of H2 to that of lipids. Multiple lines of evidence thus agree that in this organism, and presumably others like it, environmental H2 plays little or no direct role in controlling lipid δD values. The observed fractionations must instead result from isotope effects in the reduction of NAD(PH by reductases with flavin prosthetic groups, which transfer two electrons and acquire H+ (or D+ from solution. Parallels to NADPH reduction in photosynthesis may explain why D/H fractionations in C. necator

  6. The effect of carbonic anhydrase on the kinetics and equilibrium of the oxygen isotope exchange in the CO2-H2O system: Implications for δ18O vital effects in biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2012-10-01

    Interpretations of the primary paleoceanographic information recorded in stable oxygen isotope values (δ18O) of biogenic CaCO3 can be obscured by disequilibrium effects. CaCO3 is often depleted in 18O relative to the δ18O values expected for precipitation in thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater as a result of vital effects. Vital effects in δ18O have been explained in terms of the influence of fluid pH on the overall δ18O of the sum of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species (often referred to as "pH model") and in terms of 18O depletion as a result of the kinetic effects associated with CO2 hydration (CO2 + H2O ↔ H2CO3 ↔ HCO3- + H+) and CO2 hydroxylation (CO2 + OH- ↔ HCO3-) in the calcification sites (so-called "kinetic model"). This study addresses the potential role of an enzyme, carbonic anhydrase (CA), that catalyzes inter-conversion of CO2 and HCO3- in relation to the underlying mechanism of vital effects. We performed quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments in order to examine the changes in 18O equilibration rate as a function of CA concentration. Experiments were performed at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are comparable to the average surface ocean pH and elevated pH levels observed in the calcification sites of some coral and foraminiferal species, respectively. The rate of uncatalyzed 18O exchange in the CO2-H2O system is governed by the pH-dependent DIC speciation and the kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydration and hydroxylation, which can be summarized by a simple mathematical expression. The results from control experiments (no CA addition) are in agreement with this expression. The results from control experiments also suggest that the most recently published kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydroxylation has been overestimated. When CA is present, the 18O equilibration process is greatly enhanced at both pH levels due to the catalysis of CO2 hydration by the enzyme. For example, the time required for 18O

  7. Sweatshop equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Nancy H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a capability-augmented model of on the job search, in which sweatshop conditions stifle the capability of the working poor to search for a job while on the job. The augmented setting unveils a sweatshop equilibrium in an otherwise archetypal Burdett-Mortensen economy, and reconciles a number of oft noted yet perplexing features of sweatshop economies. We demonstrate existence of multiple rational expectation equilibria, graduation pathways out of sweatshops in complete abs...

  8. Thallium isotope variations in seawater and hydrogenetic, diagenetic, and hydrothermal ferromanganese deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehkamper, M.; Frank, M.; Hein, J.R.; Porcelli, D.; Halliday, A.; Ingri, J.; Liebetrau, V.

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented for the first in-depth investigation of TI isotope variations in marine materials. The TI isotopic measurements were conducted by multiple collector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for a comprehensive suite of hydrogenetic ferromanganese crusts, diagenetic Fe-Mn nodules, hydrothermal manganese deposits and seawater samples. The natural variability of TI isotope compositions in these samples exceeds the analytical reproducibility (?? 0.05???) by more than a factor of 40. Hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts have ??205TI of + 10 to + 14, whereas seawater is characterized by values as low as -8 (??205TI represents the deviation of the 205TI/203TI ratio of a sample from the NIST SRM 997 TI isotope standard in parts per 104). This ~ 2??? difference in isotope composition is thought to result from the isotope fractionation that accompanies the adsorption of TI onto ferromanganese particles. An equilibrium fractionation factor of ?? ~ 1.0021 is calculated for this process. Ferromanganese nodules and hydrothermal manganese deposits have variable TI isotope compositions that range between the values obtained for seawater and hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts. The variability in ??205TI in diagenetic nodules appears to be caused by the adsorption of TI from pore fluids, which act as a closed-system reservoir with a TI isotope composition that is inferred to be similar to seawater. Nodules with ??205TI values similar to seawater are found if the scavenging of TI is nearly quantitative. Hydrothermal manganese deposits display a positive correlation between ??205TI and Mn/Fe. This trend is thought to be due to the derivation of TI from distinct hydrothermal sources. Deposits with low Mn/Fe ratios and low ??205TI are produced by the adsorption of TI from fluids that are sampled close to hydrothermal sources. Such fluids have low Mn/Fe ratios and relatively high temperatures, such that only minor isotope fractionation occurs during adsorption. Hydrothermal

  9. Mass measurements of neutron rich isotopes in the Fe region and electron capture processes in neutron star crusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrade, Alfredo; Matos, M.; Schatz, Hendrik; Amthor, A.M.; Beard, Mary; Brown, Edward; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Gupta, Sanjib; Hix, William Raphael; Lau, Rita; Moeller, Peter; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A.M.; Shapira, Dan; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.; Wiescher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Experimental knowledge of nuclear masses of exotic nuclei is important for understanding nuclear structure far from the valley of stability, and as a direct input into astrophysical models. Electron capture processes in the crust of accreting neutron stars have been proposed as a heat source that can affect the thermal structure of the star. Nuclear masses of very neutron-rich nuclides are necessary inputs to model the electron capture process. The time-of-flight (TOF) mass measurement technique allows measurements on very short-lived nuclei. It has been effectively applied using the fast fragment beams produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab (NSCL) to reach masses very far from stability. Measurements were performed for neutron-rich isotopes in the region of the N=32 and N=40 subshells, which coincides with the mass range of carbon superburst ashes. We discuss reaction network calculations performed to investigate the impact of our new measurements and to compare the effect of using different global mass models in the calculations. It is observed that the process is sensitive to the differences in the odd-even mass staggering predicted by the mass models, and our new result for 66Mn has a significant impact on the distribution of heat sources in the crust.

  10. Phase Equilibrium Experiments on Potential Lunar Core Compositions: Extension of Current Knowledge to Multi-Component (Fe-Ni-Si-S-C) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous geophysical and geochemical studies have suggested the existence of a small metallic lunar core, but the composition of that core is not known. Knowledge of the composition can have a large impact on the thermal evolution of the core, its possible early dynamo creation, and its overall size and fraction of solid and liquid. Thermal models predict that the current temperature at the core-mantle boundary of the Moon is near 1650 K. Re-evaluation of Apollo seismic data has highlighted the need for new data in a broader range of bulk core compositions in the PT range of the lunar core. Geochemical measurements have suggested a more volatile-rich Moon than previously thought. And GRAIL mission data may allow much better constraints on the physical nature of the lunar core. All of these factors have led us to determine new phase equilibria experimental studies in the Fe-Ni-S-C-Si system in the relevant PT range of the lunar core that will help constrain the composition of Moon's core.

  11. Binary and tertiary reaction cross-sections of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ta, W, Pt and their isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, S.B.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron induced binary and tertiary reaction cross-sections have been evaluated for V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ta, W, Pt and their isotopes in the 'energy range 0.5 MeV to 20 MeV using the nuclear statistical empirical model. The reactions considered are (n,n'), (n,2n), (n,3n), (n,p), (n,d), (n,t), (n, 3 He), (n,α), (n,np), (n,nd), (n,nt), (n,n 3 He), (n,nα), (n,pn), (n,2p), (n,ν), (n,αp), (n,dn) and (n,pα). Most of the above mentioned elements are used as structural materials in nuclear reactors and the measured cross-section data for the above listed reactions are seldom available for the radiation damage and safety analysis. With a view to providing these data, this nuclear model based evaluation has been undertaken. The associated uncertainties in the cross-sections and their fission averages have also been evaluated. (author)

  12. Study of the oxidation-reduction kinetics involved in the Np(V) + Fe(II) in equilibrium Np(IV) + Fe(III) system in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jao, Y.

    1975-08-01

    Ferrous nitrate-hydrazine is one of the more attractive alternate reactants to the currently used reagent, ferrous sulfamate, for partitioning plutonium from neptunium and uranium. An understanding of the kinetics of the reduction of Np(VI) to Np(IV) by ferrous nitrate-hydrazine is needed before a satisfactory evaluation of the feasibility of this reductant in actinide element separations can be made. The purpose of this work was to study the kinetics and mechanisms of the reduction of Np(V) by Fe(II) and the oxidation of Np(IV) by Fe(III) in 1-2 M nitric acid solutions. The acid concentration range was chosen to include that typically used in the separation of plutonium from neptunium and uranium by solvent extraction with tributylphosphate. The forward and reverse rate constants, hydrogen ion dependence, temperature dependence, ionic strength effects and nitrate ion influence were determined. The proposed reaction mechanisms involve protonation of the NpO 2 + ions and hydroxyoxygenation of Np 4 + ions. (LK)

  13. Equilibrium Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Anderlini; Daniele Terlizzese

    2009-01-01

    We build a simple model of trust as an equilibrium phenomenon, departing from standard "selfish" preferences in a minimal way. Agents who are on the receiving end of an other to transact can choose whether to cheat and take away the entire surplus, taking into account a "cost of cheating." The latter has an idiosyncratic component (an agent's type), and a socially determined one. The smaller the mass of agents who cheat, the larger the cost of cheating suffered by those who cheat. Depending o...

  14. Uses of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Damian

    1998-01-01

    The most important fields of stable isotope use with examples are presented. These are: 1. Isotope dilution analysis: trace analysis, measurements of volumes and masses; 2. Stable isotopes as tracers: transport phenomena, environmental studies, agricultural research, authentication of products and objects, archaeometry, studies of reaction mechanisms, structure and function determination of complex biological entities, studies of metabolism, breath test for diagnostic; 3. Isotope equilibrium effects: measurement of equilibrium effects, investigation of equilibrium conditions, mechanism of drug action, study of natural processes, water cycle, temperature measurements; 4. Stable isotope for advanced nuclear reactors: uranium nitride with 15 N as nuclear fuel, 157 Gd for reactor control. In spite of some difficulties of stable isotope use, particularly related to the analytical techniques, which are slow and expensive, the number of papers reporting on this subject is steadily growing as well as the number of scientific meetings organized by International Isotope Section and IAEA, Gordon Conferences, and regional meeting in Germany, France, etc. Stable isotope application development on large scale is determined by improving their production technologies as well as those of labeled compound and the analytical techniques. (author)

  15. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Mário J

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions. These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This new edit...

  16. Experimental evidence for Mo isotope fractionation between metal and silicate liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hin, Remco C.; Burkhardt, Christoph; Schmidt, Max W.; Bourdon, Bernard; Kleine, Thorsten

    2013-10-01

    Stable isotope fractionation of siderophile elements may inform on the conditions and chemical consequences of core-mantle differentiation in planetary objects. The extent to which Mo isotopes fractionate during such metal-silicate segregation, however, is so far unexplored. We have therefore investigated equilibrium fractionation of Mo isotopes between liquid metal and liquid silicate to evaluate the potential of Mo isotopes as a new tool to study core formation. We have performed experiments at 1400 and 1600 °C in a centrifuging piston cylinder. Tin was used to lower the melting temperature of the Fe-based metal alloys to double spike technique. In experiments performed at 1400 °C, the 98Mo/95Mo ratio of silicate is 0.19±0.03‰ (95% confidence interval) heavier than that of metal. This fractionation is not significantly affected by the presence or absence of carbon. Molybdenum isotope fractionation is furthermore independent of oxygen fugacity in the range IW -1.79 to IW +0.47, which are plausible values for core formation. Experiments at 1600 °C show that, at equilibrium, the 98Mo/95Mo ratio of silicate is 0.12±0.02‰ heavier than that of metal and that the presence or absence of Sn does not affect this fractionation. Equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation between liquid metal and liquid silicate as a function of temperature can therefore be described as ΔMoMetal-Silicate98/95=-4.70(±0.59)×105/T2. Our experiments show that Mo isotope fractionation may be resolvable up to metal-silicate equilibration temperatures of about 2500 °C, rendering Mo isotopes a novel tool to investigate the conditions of core formation in objects ranging from planetesimals to Earth sized bodies.

  17. Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-10-01

    The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

  18. A counter-intuitive approach to calculating non-exchangeable 2H isotopic composition of hair: treating the molar exchange fraction fE as a process-related rather than compound-specific variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landwehr, J.M.; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Kemp, H.F.

    2011-01-01

    Hair is a keratinous tissue that incorporates hydrogen from material that an animal consumes but it is metabolically inert following synthesis. The stable hydrogen isotope composition of hair has been used in ecological studies to track migrations of mammals as well as for forensic and archaeological purposes to determine the provenance of human remains or the recent geographic life trajectory of living people. Measurement of the total hydrogen isotopic composition of a hair sample yields a composite value comprised of both metabolically informative, non-exchangeable hydrogen and exchangeable hydrogen, with the latter reflecting ambient or sample preparation conditions. Neither of these attributes is directly measurable, and the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition is obtained by estimation using a commonly applied mathematical expression incorporating sample measurements obtained from two distinct equilibration procedures. This commonly used approach treats the fraction of exchangeable hydrogen as a mixing ratio, with a minimal procedural fractionation factor assumed to be close or equal to 1. Instead, we propose to use full molar ratios to derive an expression for the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition explicitly as a function of both the procedural fractionation factor α and the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE. We apply these derivations in a longitudinal study of a hair sample and demonstrate that the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE should, like the procedural fractionation factor α, be treated as a process-dependent parameter, i.e. a reaction-specific constant. This is a counter-intuitive notion given that maximum theoretical values for the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE can be calculated that are arguably protein-type specific and, as such, fE could be regarded as a compound-specific constant. We also make some additional suggestions for future approaches to determine the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition of hair and the use of

  19. Isotope effects on nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    This review concentrates upon empirical trends and practical uses of mostly secondary isotope effects, both of the intrinsic and equilibrium types. The text and the tables are arranged in the following fashion. The most 'popular' isotope effect is treated first, deuterium isotope effects on 13 C nuclear shielding, followed by deuterium on 1 H nuclear shieldings, etc. Focus is thus on the isotopes producing the effect rather than on the nuclei suffering the effect. After a brief treatment of each type of isotope effect, general trends are dealt with. Basic trends of intrinsic isotope effects such as additivity, solvent effects, temperature effects, steric effects, substituent effects and hyperconjugation are discussed. Uses of isotope effects for assignment purposes, in stereochemical studies, in hydrogen bonding and in isotopic tracer studies are dealt with. Kinetic studies, especially of phosphates, are frequently performed by utilizing isotope effects. In addition, equilibrium isotope effects are treated in great detail as these are felt to be new and very important and may lead to new uses of isotope effects. Techniques used to obtain isotope effects are briefly surveyed at the end of the chapter. (author)

  20. Thermodynamical properties of 56Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavukcu, E.; Becker, J. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; Garrett, P. E.; Younes, W.; Guttormsen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Mitchell, G. E.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2003-01-01

    Average nuclear level densities close to the nuclear binding energy in 56Fe and 57Fe are extracted from primary γ-ray spectra. A step structure is observed in the level density for both isotopes, and is interpreted as breaking of Cooper pairs. Thermal properties of 56Fe are studied within the statistical canonical ensemble. The experimental heat capacity in 56Fe is compared with the theoretical heat capacity calculated within the shell model Monte Carlo approach

  1. Isotope effects on chemical equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golding, P.D.

    1974-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium constants of three deuterated substituted acetic acids are reported. The calculation of secondary isotope effects of the second kind for the three isotopic acid pairs has been accomplished by the appropriate comparison of thermodynamic equilibrium constants, and by the comparison of isotopic slopes. The effect of substituent variation on the isotope effects reported here disqualifies the simple inductive model as a legitimate description of secondary isotope effects of the second kind. The correlation of diminishing isotope effect per deuterium atom with increasing acidity is also invalidated by the present results. The syntheses of 9-thia-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene-9-oxide and thioxanthene-10-oxide are described. These compounds have been partially deuterated at their respective methylene positions. Spectral evidence indicates stereoselectivity of the methylene protons in the exchange reactions of both compounds. (author)

  2. Gallium isotope fractionation during Ga adsorption on calcite and goethite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Chen, JiuBin; Vetuschi Zuccolini, Marino; Birck, Jean-Louis; Liu, Yujie; Schott, Jacques

    2018-02-01

    Gallium (Ga) isotopic fractionation during its adsorption on calcite and goethite was investigated at 20 °C as a function of the solution pH, Ga aqueous concentration and speciation, and the solid to solution ratio. In all experiments Ga was found to be enriched in light isotopes at the solid surface with isotope fractionation △71Gasolid-solution up to -1.27‰ and -0.89‰ for calcite and goethite, respectively. Comparison of Ga isotopic data of this study with predictions for 'closed system' equilibrium and 'Rayleigh fractionation' models indicates that the experimental data are consistent with a 'closed system' equilibrium exchange between the fluid and the solid. The results of this study can be interpreted based on Ga aqueous speciation and the structure of Ga complexes formed at the solid surfaces. For calcite, Ga isotope fractionation is mainly triggered by increased Ga coordination and Ga-O bond length, which vary respectively from 4 and 1.84 Å in Ga(OH)4- to 6 and 1.94 Å in the >Ca-O-GaOH(OH2)4+ surface complex. For goethite, despite the formation of Ga hexa-coordinated >FeOGa(OH)20 surface complexes (Ga-O distances of 1.96-1.98 Å) both at acid and alkaline pH, a similar extent of isotope fractionation was found at acid and alkaline pH, suggesting that Ga(OH)4- is preferentially adsorbed on goethite for all investigated pH conditions. In addition, the observed decrease of Ga isotope fractionation magnitude observed with increasing Ga surface coverage for both calcite and goethite is likely related to the formation of Ga surface polymers and/or hydroxides with reduced Ga-O distances. This first study of Ga isotope fractionation during solid-fluid interactions suggests that the adsorption of Ga by oxides, carbonates or clay minerals could yield significant Ga isotope fractionation between secondary minerals and surficial fluids including seawater. Ga isotopes thus should help to better characterize the surficial biogeochemical cycles of gallium and its

  3. Isotope effect and isotope separation. A chemist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Takanobu

    2002-01-01

    What causes the isotope effects (IE)? This presentation will be centered around the equilibrium isotope effects due to the differences in the nuclear masses. The occurrence of the equilibrium constant, K, of isotope exchange reactions which differ from the values predicted by the classical theory of statistical mechanics, K cl , is explored. The non-classical K corresponds to the unit-stage separation factor, α, that is different from unity and forms a basis of an isotope separation process involving the chemical exchange reaction. Here, the word 'chemical exchange' includes not only the isotope exchange chemical reactions between two or more chemical species but also the isotope exchanges involving the equilibria between liquid and vapor phases and liquid-gas, liquid solution-gas, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid phases. In Section I, origins of the isotope effect phenomena will be explored and, in the process, various quantities used in discussions of isotope effect that have often caused confusions will be unambiguously defined. This Section will also correlate equilibrium constant with separation factor. In Section II, various forms of temperature-dependence of IE and separation factor will be discussed. (author)

  4. Association equilibrium constants and populations of clusters (H2O)n(g) and (D2O)n(g): differences between isotopomers and a possible relation to isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slanina, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Equilibrium constants of H 2 O(g) and D 2 O(g) associations to clusters (H 2 O) n (g) and (D 2 O) n (g) were calculated on the basis of the ab initio SCF CI MCY-B water-water pair potential. Populations of the components of equilibrium cluster mixtures were evaluated at various temperatures and pressures for both isotopomeric series. Differences between the H and D steam are pointed out and possible consequences are discussed. (author)

  5. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  6. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available for distribution within the United States for nondestructive research use from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Material Research Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  7. Experimental determination of the Mo isotope fractionation factor between metal and silicate liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hin, R. C.; Burkhardt, C.; Schmidt, M. W.; Bourdon, B.

    2011-12-01

    The conditions and chemical consequences of core formation have mainly been reconstructed from experimentally determined element partition coefficients between metal and silicate liquids. However, first order questions such as the mode of core formation or the nature of the light element(s) in the Earth's core are still debated [1]. In addition, the geocentric design of most experimental studies leaves the conditions of core formation on other terrestrial planets and asteroids even more uncertain than for Earth. Through mass spectrometry, records of mass-dependent stable isotope fractionation during high-temperature processes such as metal-silicate segregation are detectable. Stable isotope fractionation may thus yield additional constrains on core formation conditions and its consequences for the chemical evolution of planetary objects. Experimental investigations of equilibrium mass-dependent stable isotope fractionation have shown that Si isotopes fractionate between metal and silicate liquids at temperatures of 1800°C and pressures of 1 GPa, while Fe isotopes leave no resolvable traces of core formation processes [2,3]. Molybdenum is a refractory and siderophile trace element in the Earth, and thus much less prone to complications arising from mass balancing core and mantle and from potential volatile behaviour than other elements. To determine equilibrium mass-dependent Mo isotope fractionation during metal-silicate segregation, we have designed piston cylinder experiments with a basaltic silicate composition and an iron based metal with ~8 wt% Mo, using both graphite and MgO capsules. Metal and silicate phases are completely segregated by the use of a centrifuging piston cylinder at ETH Zurich, thus preventing analysis of mixed metal and silicate signatures. Molybdenum isotope compositions were measured using a Nu Instruments 1700 MC-ICP-MS at ETH Zurich. To ensure an accurate correction of analytical mass fractionation a 100Mo-97Mo double spike was admixed

  8. Methane clumped isotopes: Progress and potential for a new isotopic tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, Peter M. J.; Stolper, Daniel A.; Eiler, John M.; Sessions, Alex L.; Lawson, Michael; Shuai, Yanhua; Bishop, Andrew; Podlaha, Olaf G.; Ferreira, Alexandre A.; Santos Neto, Eugenio V.; Niemann, Martin; Steen, Arne S.; Huang, Ling; Chimiak, Laura; Valentine, David L.; Fiebig, Jens; Luhmann, Andrew J.; Seyfried, William E.; Etiope, Giuseppe; Schoell, Martin; Inskeep, William P.; Moran, James J.; Kitchen, Nami

    2017-11-01

    The isotopic composition of methane is of longstanding geochemical interest, with important implications for understanding hydrocarbon systems, atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, the global carbon cycle, and life in extreme environments. Recent analytical developments focusing on multiply substituted isotopologues (‘clumped isotopes’) are opening a potentially valuable new window into methane geochemistry. When methane forms in internal isotopic equilibrium, clumped isotopes can provide a direct record of formation temperature, making this property particularly valuable for identifying different methane origins. However, it has also become clear that in certain settings methane clumped isotope measurements record kinetic rather than equilibrium isotope effects. Here we present a substantially expanded dataset of methane clumped isotope analyses, and provide a synthesis of the current interpretive framework for this parameter. We review different processes affecting methane clumped isotope compositions, describe the relationships between conventional isotope and clumped isotope data, and summarize the types of information that this measurement can provide in different Earth and planetary environments.

  9. Importance of reduced sulfur for the equilibrium chemistry and kinetics of Fe(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) supplemented to semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors fed with stillage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakeri Yekta, Sepehr; Lindmark, Amanda; Skyllberg, Ulf; Danielsson, Åsa; Svensson, Bo H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics and kinetics of Fe, Co and Ni added to biogas reactors were studied. • Formation of Fe-sulfide and Fe-thiol aqueous complexes controlled the Fe solubility. • Cobalt solubility was controlled by processes independent of Co-sulfide interaction. • Iron added to the biogas reactors effected the Ni speciation and solubility. - Abstract: The objective of the present study was to assess major chemical reactions and chemical forms contributing to solubility and speciation of Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) during anaerobic digestion of sulfur (S)-rich stillage in semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors (SCSTR). These metals are essential supplements for efficient and stable performance of stillage-fed SCSTR. In particular, the influence of reduced inorganic and organic S species on kinetics and thermodynamics of the metals and their partitioning between aqueous and solid phases were investigated. Solid phase S speciation was determined by use of S K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Results demonstrated that the solubility and speciation of supplemented Fe were controlled by precipitation of FeS(s) and formation of the aqueous complexes of Fe-sulfide and Fe-thiol. The relatively high solubility of Co (∼20% of total Co content) was attributed to the formation of compounds other than Co-sulfide and Co-thiol, presumably of microbial origin. Nickel had lower solubility than Co and its speciation was regulated by interactions with FeS(s) (e.g. co-precipitation, adsorption, and ion substitution) in addition to precipitation/dissolution of discrete NiS(s) phase and formation of aqueous Ni-sulfide complexes

  10. Importance of reduced sulfur for the equilibrium chemistry and kinetics of Fe(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) supplemented to semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors fed with stillage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakeri Yekta, Sepehr, E-mail: sepehr.shakeri.yekta@liu.se [Department of Thematic Studies – Water and Environmental Studies, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Lindmark, Amanda [Department of Thematic Studies – Water and Environmental Studies, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Skyllberg, Ulf [Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå (Sweden); Danielsson, Åsa; Svensson, Bo H. [Department of Thematic Studies – Water and Environmental Studies, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics and kinetics of Fe, Co and Ni added to biogas reactors were studied. • Formation of Fe-sulfide and Fe-thiol aqueous complexes controlled the Fe solubility. • Cobalt solubility was controlled by processes independent of Co-sulfide interaction. • Iron added to the biogas reactors effected the Ni speciation and solubility. - Abstract: The objective of the present study was to assess major chemical reactions and chemical forms contributing to solubility and speciation of Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) during anaerobic digestion of sulfur (S)-rich stillage in semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors (SCSTR). These metals are essential supplements for efficient and stable performance of stillage-fed SCSTR. In particular, the influence of reduced inorganic and organic S species on kinetics and thermodynamics of the metals and their partitioning between aqueous and solid phases were investigated. Solid phase S speciation was determined by use of S K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Results demonstrated that the solubility and speciation of supplemented Fe were controlled by precipitation of FeS(s) and formation of the aqueous complexes of Fe-sulfide and Fe-thiol. The relatively high solubility of Co (∼20% of total Co content) was attributed to the formation of compounds other than Co-sulfide and Co-thiol, presumably of microbial origin. Nickel had lower solubility than Co and its speciation was regulated by interactions with FeS(s) (e.g. co-precipitation, adsorption, and ion substitution) in addition to precipitation/dissolution of discrete NiS(s) phase and formation of aqueous Ni-sulfide complexes.

  11. Equilibrium Droplets on Deformable Substrates: Equilibrium Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koursari, Nektaria; Ahmed, Gulraiz; Starov, Victor M

    2018-05-15

    Equilibrium conditions of droplets on deformable substrates are investigated, and it is proven using Jacobi's sufficient condition that the obtained solutions really provide equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformed support. At the equilibrium, the excess free energy of the system should have a minimum value, which means that both necessary and sufficient conditions of the minimum should be fulfilled. Only in this case, the obtained profiles provide the minimum of the excess free energy. The necessary condition of the equilibrium means that the first variation of the excess free energy should vanish, and the second variation should be positive. Unfortunately, the mentioned two conditions are not the proof that the obtained profiles correspond to the minimum of the excess free energy and they could not be. It is necessary to check whether the sufficient condition of the equilibrium (Jacobi's condition) is satisfied. To the best of our knowledge Jacobi's condition has never been verified for any already published equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate. A simple model of the equilibrium droplet on the deformable substrate is considered, and it is shown that the deduced profiles of the equilibrium droplet and deformable substrate satisfy the Jacobi's condition, that is, really provide the minimum to the excess free energy of the system. To simplify calculations, a simplified linear disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm is adopted for the calculations. It is shown that both necessary and sufficient conditions for equilibrium are satisfied. For the first time, validity of the Jacobi's condition is verified. The latter proves that the developed model really provides (i) the minimum of the excess free energy of the system droplet/deformable substrate and (ii) equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate.

  12. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF/sub 3/ gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF/sub 3/. Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF/sub 3/ solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references.

  13. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF 3 gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF 3 . Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF 3 solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references

  14. Fe atom exchange between aqueous Fe2+ and magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Christopher A; Handler, Robert M; Beard, Brian L; Pasakarnis, Timothy; Johnson, Clark M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-11-20

    The reaction between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+) has been extensively studied due to its role in contaminant reduction, trace-metal sequestration, and microbial respiration. Previous work has demonstrated that the reaction of Fe(2+) with magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) results in the structural incorporation of Fe(2+) and an increase in the bulk Fe(2+) content of magnetite. It is unclear, however, whether significant Fe atom exchange occurs between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+), as has been observed for other Fe oxides. Here, we measured the extent of Fe atom exchange between aqueous Fe(2+) and magnetite by reacting isotopically "normal" magnetite with (57)Fe-enriched aqueous Fe(2+). The extent of Fe atom exchange between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+) was significant (54-71%), and went well beyond the amount of Fe atoms found at the near surface. Mössbauer spectroscopy of magnetite reacted with (56)Fe(2+) indicate that no preferential exchange of octahedral or tetrahedral sites occurred. Exchange experiments conducted with Co-ferrite (Co(2+)Fe(2)(3+)O(4)) showed little impact of Co substitution on the rate or extent of atom exchange. Bulk electron conduction, as previously invoked to explain Fe atom exchange in goethite, is a possible mechanism, but if it is occurring, conduction does not appear to be the rate-limiting step. The lack of significant impact of Co substitution on the kinetics of Fe atom exchange, and the relatively high diffusion coefficients reported for magnetite suggest that for magnetite, unlike goethite, Fe atom diffusion is a plausible mechanism to explain the rapid rates of Fe atom exchange in magnetite.

  15. C, Cl and H compound-specific isotope analysis to assess natural versus Fe(0) barrier-induced degradation of chlorinated ethenes at a contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audí-Miró, Carme, E-mail: carmeaudi@ub.edu [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), Martí Franquès s/n, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Cretnik, Stefan [Institute of Groundwater Ecology, Helmholtz Zentrum München-National Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Torrentó, Clara; Rosell, Mònica [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), Martí Franquès s/n, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Shouakar-Stash, Orfan [Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, 200 University Ave. W, N2L 3G1 Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Otero, Neus [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), Martí Franquès s/n, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Palau, Jordi [Université de Neuchâtel, CHYN - Centre d' Hydrogéologie, Rue Emile-Argand 11, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); and others

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • {sup 13}C to evaluate natural chlorinated ethenes biodegradation. • {sup 13}C to evaluate the efficiency of a zero-valent iron-permeable reactive barrier. • {sup 13}C-{sup 37}Cl to discriminate biotic from abiotic degradation of cis-dichloroethene. • {sup 13}C-{sup 37}Cl-{sup 2}H of cis-DCE and TCE to elucidate different contaminant sources. - Abstract: Compound-specific isotopic analysis of multiple elements (C, Cl, H) was tested to better assess the effect of a zero-valent iron-permeable reactive barrier (ZVI-PRB) installation at a site contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). The focus was on (1) using {sup 13}C to evaluate natural chlorinated ethene biodegradation and the ZVI-PRB efficiency; (2) using dual element {sup 13}C-{sup 37}Cl isotopic analysis to distinguish biotic from abiotic degradation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE); and (3) using {sup 13}C-{sup 37}Cl-{sup 2}H isotopic analysis of cis-DCE and TCE to elucidate different contaminant sources. Both biodegradation and degradation by ZVI-PRB were indicated by the metabolites that were detected and the {sup 13}C data, with a quantitative estimate of the ZVI-PRB efficiency of less than 10% for PCE. Dual element {sup 13}C-{sup 37}Cl isotopic plots confirmed that biodegradation was the main process at the site including the ZVI-PRB area. Based on the carbon isotope data, approximately 45% and 71% of PCE and TCE, respectively, were estimated to be removed by biodegradation. {sup 2}H combined with {sup 13}C and {sup 37}Cl seems to have identified two discrete sources contributing to the contaminant plume, indicating the potential of δ{sup 2}H to discriminate whether a compound is of industrial origin, or whether a compound is formed as a daughter product during degradation.

  16. C, Cl and H compound-specific isotope analysis to assess natural versus Fe(0) barrier-induced degradation of chlorinated ethenes at a contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audí-Miró, Carme; Cretnik, Stefan; Torrentó, Clara; Rosell, Mònica; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Otero, Neus; Palau, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 13 C to evaluate natural chlorinated ethenes biodegradation. • 13 C to evaluate the efficiency of a zero-valent iron-permeable reactive barrier. • 13 C- 37 Cl to discriminate biotic from abiotic degradation of cis-dichloroethene. • 13 C- 37 Cl- 2 H of cis-DCE and TCE to elucidate different contaminant sources. - Abstract: Compound-specific isotopic analysis of multiple elements (C, Cl, H) was tested to better assess the effect of a zero-valent iron-permeable reactive barrier (ZVI-PRB) installation at a site contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). The focus was on (1) using 13 C to evaluate natural chlorinated ethene biodegradation and the ZVI-PRB efficiency; (2) using dual element 13 C- 37 Cl isotopic analysis to distinguish biotic from abiotic degradation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE); and (3) using 13 C- 37 Cl- 2 H isotopic analysis of cis-DCE and TCE to elucidate different contaminant sources. Both biodegradation and degradation by ZVI-PRB were indicated by the metabolites that were detected and the 13 C data, with a quantitative estimate of the ZVI-PRB efficiency of less than 10% for PCE. Dual element 13 C- 37 Cl isotopic plots confirmed that biodegradation was the main process at the site including the ZVI-PRB area. Based on the carbon isotope data, approximately 45% and 71% of PCE and TCE, respectively, were estimated to be removed by biodegradation. 2 H combined with 13 C and 37 Cl seems to have identified two discrete sources contributing to the contaminant plume, indicating the potential of δ 2 H to discriminate whether a compound is of industrial origin, or whether a compound is formed as a daughter product during degradation.

  17. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  18. Importance of reduced sulfur for the equilibrium chemistry and kinetics of Fe(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) supplemented to semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors fed with stillage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri Yekta, Sepehr; Lindmark, Amanda; Skyllberg, Ulf; Danielsson, Asa; Svensson, Bo H

    2014-03-30

    The objective of the present study was to assess major chemical reactions and chemical forms contributing to solubility and speciation of Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) during anaerobic digestion of sulfur (S)-rich stillage in semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors (SCSTR). These metals are essential supplements for efficient and stable performance of stillage-fed SCSTR. In particular, the influence of reduced inorganic and organic S species on kinetics and thermodynamics of the metals and their partitioning between aqueous and solid phases were investigated. Solid phase S speciation was determined by use of S K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Results demonstrated that the solubility and speciation of supplemented Fe were controlled by precipitation of FeS(s) and formation of the aqueous complexes of Fe-sulfide and Fe-thiol. The relatively high solubility of Co (∼ 20% of total Co content) was attributed to the formation of compounds other than Co-sulfide and Co-thiol, presumably of microbial origin. Nickel had lower solubility than Co and its speciation was regulated by interactions with FeS(s) (e.g. co-precipitation, adsorption, and ion substitution) in addition to precipitation/dissolution of discrete NiS(s) phase and formation of aqueous Ni-sulfide complexes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantity Constrained General Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babenko, R.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In a standard general equilibrium model it is assumed that there are no price restrictions and that prices adjust infinitely fast to their equilibrium values.In case of price restrictions a general equilibrium may not exist and rationing on net demands or supplies is needed to clear the markets.In

  20. Isotopic echange of .sup.18./sup.O as a tool in studies of N2O decomposition over Fe-zeolites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Jana; Sobalík, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 6, - (2007), s. 55-68 ISSN 0972-4508 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400400413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : N2O decomposition * 18O2 * Fe-zeolites Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  1. The empirical equilibrium structure of diacetylene

    OpenAIRE

    Thorwirth, S.; Harding, M. E.; Muders, D.; Gauss, J.

    2008-01-01

    High-level quantum-chemical calculations are reported at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory for the equilibrium structure and the harmonic and anharmonic force fields of diacetylene, HCCCCH. The calculations were performed employing Dunning's hierarchy of correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ, cc-pCVXZ, and cc-pwCVXZ, as well as the ANO2 basis set of Almloef and Taylor. An empirical equilibrium structure based on experimental rotational constants for thirteen isotopic species of diacety...

  2. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  3. Comparison of threshold reaction cross sections for the Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn isotopes from evaluated data libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blokhin, A I; Manokhin, V N; Nasyrova, S M [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1998-09-01

    Evaluated excitation functions for various threshold reactions on Ti, V, Cr, Ge, Ni, Cu and Zn isotopes are compared to reveal discrepancies between different nuclear data libraries. The recommended excitation functions for (n,p), (n,np), (N,{alpha}) and (n,2n) reactions, evaluated on the basis of empirical systematics are given for comparison to facilitate selection of a more reliable data. The available experimental data are also plotted. (author) 10 refs, 70 figs

  4. Modeling of Reactive Blue 19 azo dye removal from colored textile wastewater using L-arginine-functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles: Optimization, reusability, kinetic and equilibrium studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalvand, Arash; Nabizadeh, Ramin [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reza Ganjali, Mohammad [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Molecular-Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoobi, Mehdi [Medical Biomaterials Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14176 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nazmara, Shahrokh [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hossein Mahvi, Amir, E-mail: ahmahvi@yahoo.com [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center for Solid Waste Research, Institute for Environmental Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); National Institute of Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    This study aimed to investigate the removal of Reactive Blue 19 from colored wastewater using Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles modified with L-arginine (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine). In order to investigate the effect of independent variables on dye removal and determining the optimum condition, the Box–Behnken Design (BBD) under Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was employed. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. Applying Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine nanoparticles for dye removal showed that; by increasing adsorbent dose and decreasing pH, dye concentration, and ionic strength dye removal has been increased. In the optimum condition, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine nanoparticles were able to remove dye as high as 96.34% at an initial dye concentration of 50 mg/L, adsorbent dose of 0.74 g/L, and pH 3. The findings indicated that dye removal followed pseudo-second-order kinetic (R{sup 2}=0.999) and Freundlich isotherm (R{sup 2}=0.989). Based on the obtained results, as an efficient and reusable adsorbent, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine nanoparticles can be successfully applied for dye removal from colored wastewater. - Highlights: • The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@L-arginine removed RB 19 azo dye from wastewater efficiently. • BBD under RSM was used to analyze and optimize the adsorption process. • pH was the most influential parameter in dye removal.

  5. Density functional theory study of small X-doped Mg(n) (X = Fe, Co, Ni, n = 1-9) bimetallic clusters: equilibrium structures, stabilities, electronic and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanjie; Hu, Yanfei

    2014-03-01

    The geometries, stabilities, and electronic and magnetic properties of Mg(n) X (X = Fe, Co, Ni, n = 1-9) clusters were investigated systematically within the framework of the gradient-corrected density functional theory. The results show that the Mg(n)Fe, Mg(n)Co, and Mg(n)Ni clusters have similar geometric structures and that the X atom in Mg(n)X clusters prefers to be endohedrally doped. The average atomic binding energies, fragmentation energies, second-order differences in energy, and HOMO-LUMO gaps show that Mg₄X (X = Fe, Co, Ni) clusters possess relatively high stability. Natural population analysis was performed and the results showed that the 3s and 4s electrons always transfer to the 3d and 4p orbitals in the bonding atoms, and that electrons also transfer from the Mg atoms to the doped atoms (Fe, Co, Ni). In addition, the spin magnetic moments were analyzed and compared. Several clusters, such as Mg₁,₂,₃,₄,₅,₆,₈,₉Fe, Mg₁,₂,₄,₅,₆,₈,₉Co, and Mg₁,₂,₅,₆,₇,₉Ni, present high magnetic moments (4 μ(B), 3 μ(B), and 2 μ(B), respectively).

  6. Comparison of 18O Isotopic Exchange After and During the Interaction of N2O, NO and NO2 with Fe Ions in Ferrierites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Jana; Sobalík, Zdeněk

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 89, 3/4 (2003), s. 243-247 ISSN 1011-372X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS4040016; GA MŠk OC D15.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : Fe-ferrierite * N oxides * 18O2 exchange Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.581, year: 2003

  7. Abiotic oxidation of pyrite by Fe(III) in acidic media and its implications for sulfur isotope measurements of lattice-bound sulfate in sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumdar, A.; Goldberg, T.; Strauss, H.

    (OH) 3 (Perez-Lopez et al., 2007) and hydrated iron sulfate (Lefticariu et al., 2006) havealsobeen reported. Someflaky material deposited in some of the reaction pits (Fig. 5C) in our experiment probably resembles ferric oxide/hydroxide (Perez-Lopez et al...–160. Perez-Lopez, R., Cama, J., Nieto, J.M., Ayora, C., 2007. The iron-coating role on the oxidation kinetics of a pyritic sludge doped with flyash. Geochim Cosmochim Acta. 71, 1921–1934. Piper, D.Z., Kolodny, Y.,1987. The stable isotopic composition of a...

  8. Studies on the separation of hydrogen isotopes and spin isomers by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushpa, K.K.; Annaji Rao, K.

    2000-08-01

    Separation and analysis of mixture of hydrogen isotopes has gained considerable importance because of various applications needing different isotopes in lasers, nuclear reactions and tracer or labelled compounds. In the literature gas chromatographic methods are reported using columns packed with partly dehydrated or thoroughly dehydrated alumina/molecular sieve stationary phase at 77 deg K with helium, neon and even hydrogen or deuterium as carrier gas. In the present study an attempt is made to compare the chromatographic behaviour of these two stationary phases using virgin and Fe doped form in partly dehydrated and thoroughly dehydrated state, using helium, neon, hydrogen and deuterium as carrier gas. The results of this study show that helium or neon carrier gas behave similarly broad peaks with some tailing. Sharp symmetric peaks are obtained with hydrogen or deuterium carrier gas. This is attributed to large hold up capacity for H 2 or D 2 at 77 deg K in these materials as compared to helium or neon. Spin isomers of H 2 or D 2 are separated on Fe free stationary phases, though ortho H 2 and HD are not resolved. Using a combination of Fe doped short column and plain alumina column, both maintained in dehydrated form, the effect of Fe doping on thermal equilibrium of ortho/para forms at 77 deg K is clearly demonstrated. (author)

  9. A new method for studying iodine metabolism; the isotopic equilibrium method - kinetic and quantitative aspects of measurements made on rats; Une nouvelle methode d'etude du metabolisme de l'iode: la methode d'equilibre isotopique - aspects cinetiques et quantitatifs obtenus chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-05-15

    The isotopic equilibrium method which has been developed in the case of the rat has made it possible to measure the absolute values of the principal parameters of iodine metabolism in this animal. The quantities and concentrations of iodine have been measured in the thyroid gland and in the plasma with a sensitivity of 0.001 {mu}g of {sup 127}I. This sensitivity has made it possible to measure pools as small as the iodide and the free iodotyrosines of the thyroid and to demonstrate the absence of free iodotyrosines in the plasma of the normal rat. In vivo, the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the iodine content of the thyroid gland and to calculate the intensity of this gland's secretion without removing it. By double labelling with {sup 125}I and {sup 131}I the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the flux, intensity of the intrathyroidal recycling as well as the turnover rates of all the iodine containing compounds of the thyroid gland. For this gland no precursor-product relationship has been found between The iodotyrosines (MIT and DIT) and the iodothyronines (T{sub 4} and T{sub 3}). The absence of this relationship is due to the heterogeneity of the thyroglobulin turnover. It has been shown furthermore that there exists in the plasma an organic fraction of the iodine which is different to thyroglobulin and which is renewed more rapidly than the circulating hormones T{sub 3} and T{sub 4}. The isotopic equilibrium method is very useful for series measurements of iodine. It makes it possible furthermore to improve the biochemical fractionations by adding carriers without affecting the subsequent {sup 127}I measurements. (author) [French] La methode d'equilibre isotopique, mise au point chez le rat, a permis de mesurer en valeur absolue les principaux parametres du metabolisme de l'iode chez cet animal. Les quantites ou les concentrations d'iode ont ete mesurees pour la thyroide et pour le

  10. A new method for studying iodine metabolism; the isotopic equilibrium method - kinetic and quantitative aspects of measurements made on rats; Une nouvelle methode d'etude du metabolisme de l'iode: la methode d'equilibre isotopique - aspects cinetiques et quantitatifs obtenus chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-05-15

    The isotopic equilibrium method which has been developed in the case of the rat has made it possible to measure the absolute values of the principal parameters of iodine metabolism in this animal. The quantities and concentrations of iodine have been measured in the thyroid gland and in the plasma with a sensitivity of 0.001 {mu}g of {sup 127}I. This sensitivity has made it possible to measure pools as small as the iodide and the free iodotyrosines of the thyroid and to demonstrate the absence of free iodotyrosines in the plasma of the normal rat. In vivo, the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the iodine content of the thyroid gland and to calculate the intensity of this gland's secretion without removing it. By double labelling with {sup 125}I and {sup 131}I the isotopic equilibrium method has made it possible to measure the flux, intensity of the intrathyroidal recycling as well as the turnover rates of all the iodine containing compounds of the thyroid gland. For this gland no precursor-product relationship has been found between The iodotyrosines (MIT and DIT) and the iodothyronines (T{sub 4} and T{sub 3}). The absence of this relationship is due to the heterogeneity of the thyroglobulin turnover. It has been shown furthermore that there exists in the plasma an organic fraction of the iodine which is different to thyroglobulin and which is renewed more rapidly than the circulating hormones T{sub 3} and T{sub 4}. The isotopic equilibrium method is very useful for series measurements of iodine. It makes it possible furthermore to improve the biochemical fractionations by adding carriers without affecting the subsequent {sup 127}I measurements. (author) [French] La methode d'equilibre isotopique, mise au point chez le rat, a permis de mesurer en valeur absolue les principaux parametres du metabolisme de l'iode chez cet animal. Les quantites ou les concentrations d'iode ont ete mesurees pour la thyroide et pour le plasma avec une

  11. Phase equilibrium engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brignole, Esteban Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the teaching of phase equilibria emphasizes the relationships between the thermodynamic variables of each phase in equilibrium rather than its engineering applications. This book changes the focus from the use of thermodynamics relationships to compute phase equilibria to the design and control of the phase conditions that a process needs. Phase Equilibrium Engineering presents a systematic study and application of phase equilibrium tools to the development of chemical processes. The thermodynamic modeling of mixtures for process development, synthesis, simulation, design and

  12. Thermal equilibrium in strongly damped collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaddar, S.K.; De, J.N.; Krishan, K.

    1985-01-01

    Energy division between colliding nuclei in damped collisions is studied in the statistical nucleon exchange model. The reactions 56 Fe+ 165 Ho and 56 Fe+ 238 U at incident energy of 465 MeV are considered for this purpose. It is found that the excitation energy is approximately equally shared between the nuclei for the peripheral collisions and the systems slowly approach equilibrium for more central collisions. This is in conformity with the recent experimental observations. The calculated variances of the charge distributions are found to depend appreciably on the temperature and are in very good agreement with the experimental data

  13. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  14. Atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe in clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anke; Wu, Lingling; Li, Weiqiang; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M; Rosso, Kevin M; Frierdich, Andrew J; Scherer, Michelle M

    2015-03-03

    Due to their stability toward reductive dissolution, Fe-bearing clay minerals are viewed as a renewable source of Fe redox activity in diverse environments. Recent findings of interfacial electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe in clay minerals and electron conduction in octahedral sheets of nontronite, however, raise the question whether Fe interaction with clay minerals is more dynamic than previously thought. Here, we use an enriched isotope tracer approach to simultaneously trace Fe atom movement from the aqueous phase to the solid ((57)Fe) and from the solid into the aqueous phase ((56)Fe). Over 6 months, we observed a significant decrease in aqueous (57)Fe isotope fraction, with a fast initial decrease which slowed after 3 days and stabilized after about 50 days. For the aqueous (56)Fe isotope fraction, we observed a similar but opposite trend, indicating that Fe atom movement had occurred in both directions: from the aqueous phase into the solid and from the solid into aqueous phase. We calculated that 5-20% of structural Fe in clay minerals NAu-1, NAu-2, and SWa-1 exchanged with aqueous Fe(II), which significantly exceeds the Fe atom layer exposed directly to solution. Calculations based on electron-hopping rates in nontronite suggest that the bulk conduction mechanism previously demonstrated for hematite1 and suggested as an explanation for the significant Fe atom exchange observed in goethite2 may be a plausible mechanism for Fe atom exchange in Fe-bearing clay minerals. Our finding of 5-20% Fe atom exchange in clay minerals indicates that we need to rethink how Fe mobility affects the macroscopic properties of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates and its role in Fe biogeochemical cycling, as well as its use in a variety of engineered applications, such as landfill liners and nuclear repositories.

  15. Fall Back Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleppe, J.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hendrickx, R.L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Fall back equilibrium is a refinement of the Nash equilibrium concept. In the underly- ing thought experiment each player faces the possibility that, after all players decided on their action, his chosen action turns out to be blocked. Therefore, each player has to decide beforehand on a back-up

  16. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabicar, J.; Stamberg, K.; Katzer, J.

    1983-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes by the method of controlled distribution is claimed. A first phase is either a solution of isotopic components and a ligand (from 10 - 6 M to a saturated solution), or a gaseous mixture of isotopic components, or a gaseous mixture of isotopic components and an inert gas. The isotopes are in the starting mixture in molar ratio from 1:10 5 to 1:10 - 5 . The second phase is a solid sorbent such as styrene-divinylbenzene ion exchangers, or bio-sorbents on the basis of mycelium of lower fungi and sorbents on the basis of cellulose, or an extraction agent such as tributyl phosphate and trioctyl amine, if need be, kept by a carrier such as teflon, silica gel and cellulose. The two-phase system exhibits non-linear equilibrium isotherm for sorption and/or desorption or for extraction and/or re-extraction. After bringing both phases into contact the rate of transport of isotopic components from one phase into another is not equal. Retardation of isotopic exchange takes place by complexation of isotopes with ligands such as cabonate, sulphate, citrate, chloride and ethylenediamine tetraacetate ions, or by using sorbents and extraction agents with chelating functional groups such as carboxyl and hyroxyl groups, groups on the basis of phosphorus, nitrogen and sulphur and/or by operating in darkness, or in the light having wave length between 2.5x10 2 and 10 9 nm. The contact time is between 10 - 2 and 10 6 s, temperature between 10 2 and 10 3 K, the number of stirrer revolutions between 10 - 2 and 10 4 revolutions per s, flow rate at column arrangement between 10 - 6 and 10 - 1 m/s and the size of particles of sorbent between 10 - 6 and 10 - 2 m

  17. Inverse isotope effect in iron-based superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirage, Parasharam M.; Kihou, Kunihiro; Miyazawa, Kiichi; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kito, Hijiri; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasumoto; Iyo, Akira

    2010-01-01

    We have found that (Ba, K)Fe 2 As 2 superconductor (a transition temperature, T c ∼ 38 K) shows an inverse Iron isotope effect (α Fe = -0.18 ± 0.03, where T c ∼ M -αFe and M is the iron isotope mass), i.e. the sample containing the larger iron mass depicts higher T c . Systematic studies using three types of Fe-isotopes ( 54 Fe, natural Fe and 57 Fe) reveal a clear inverse shift on T c by measurements of temperature dependent magnetization and resistivity. The inverse isotope effect that is the first case in high-T c superconductors strongly suggests that superconducting mechanism of the iron-based system is not explained by conventional BCS theory mediated by phonons.

  18. Asymmetric interfaces in Fe/Ag and Ag/Fe bilayers prepared by molecular beam evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunyogi, A. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)]. E-mail: tunyogi@rmki.kfki.hu; Paszti, F. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Osvath, Z. [MTA Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Tancziko, F. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Major, M. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Szilagyi, E. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2006-08-15

    Single layers of Fe and Ag, as well as Fe/Ag (iron deposited first) and Ag/Fe bilayers were prepared by molecular beam evaporation onto Si. The samples were investigated with backscattering spectrometry (BS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). BS spectra of Fe/Ag and Ag/Fe indicate a significant difference at the interface. In the case of Fe/Ag the Ag peak has a long tail at the interface, while for Ag/Fe the interface is abrupt. The tail in the Fe/Ag spectrum is too large to be caused by double or plural scattering. According to AFM, the effect of surface roughness is also negligible. In spite of the fact that Fe and Ag are completely immiscible in equilibrium, this tail, however, suggests that some Ag is located in the Fe layer. After annealing, both samples show mixing between the two layers; this is much larger again for Fe/Ag.

  19. Inverse break-through investigation on uranium isotope separation in the system Fe(III) water-glycerine solution-U(IV) cathionic resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murgulescu, Sanda; Calusaru, A.

    1977-01-01

    When a solution containing ferric ions passes on cationic resin in U(IV) form, the substitution of uranium by iron is preceded by oxydation of U(IV) to U(VI). During the contact of U(VI) in solution with U(IV) in resin, an exchange reaction occurs, in which 235 U is slightly concentrated in solution and 238 U in resin phase. Since increase of temperature accelerates the exchange reaction, the apparent thermodynamic values of the exchange reaction were calculated, by taking into account the variation of the apparent equilibrium constant as a function of the reciprocal value of the temperature. The corresponding thermodynamic values in both pure aqueous and water-glycerine solution are: ΔH 0 =6.45 cal.mol -1 and ΔS 0 =21.6x10 -3 cal. 0 K -1 . The use of glycerine containing solutions offers the important advantage to increase the stability versus hydrolysis of the ferric ions even at higher temperature

  20. Equilibrium and non equilibrium in fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorso, C.O.; Chernomoretz, A.; Lopez, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In this communication we present recent results regarding the interplay of equilibrium and non equilibrium in the process of fragmentation of excited finite Lennard Jones drops. Because the general features of such a potential resemble the ones of the nuclear interaction (fact that is reinforced by the similarity between the EOS of both systems) these studies are not only relevant from a fundamental point of view but also shed light on the problem of nuclear multifragmentation. We focus on the microscopic analysis of the state of the fragmenting system at fragmentation time. We show that the Caloric Curve (i e. the functional relationship between the temperature of the system and the excitation energy) is of the type rise plateau with no vapor branch. The usual rise plateau rise pattern is only recovered when equilibrium is artificially imposed. This result puts a serious question on the validity of the freeze out hypothesis. This feature is independent of the dimensionality or excitation mechanism. Moreover we explore the behavior of magnitudes which can help us determine the degree of the assumed phase transition. It is found that no clear cut criteria is presently available. (Author)

  1. Chelating agents related to ethylenediamine bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid (EDDHA): synthesis, characterization, and equilibrium studies of the free ligands and their Mg2+, Ca2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunta, Felipe; García-Marco, Sonia; Lucena, Juan J; Gómez-Gallego, Mar; Alcázar, Roberto; Sierra, Miguel A

    2003-08-25

    Iron chelates such as ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid (EDDHA) and their analogues are the most efficient soil fertilizers to treat iron chlorosis in plants growing in calcareous soils. EDDHA, EDDH4MA (ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-4-methylphenyl)acetic acid), and EDDCHA (ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-5-carboxyphenyl)acetic acid) are allowed by the European directive, but also EDDHSA (ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-5-sulfonylphenyl)acetic acid) and EDDH5MA (ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)acetic acid) are present in several commercial iron chelates. In this study, these chelating agents as well as p,p-EDDHA (ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid) and EDDMtxA (ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(2-metoxyphenyl)acetic acid) have been obtained following a new synthetic pathway. Their chemical behavior has been studied to predict the effect of the substituents in the benzene ring on their efficacy as iron fertilizers for soils above pH 7. The purity of the chelating agents has been determined using a novel methodology through spectrophotometric titration at 480 nm with Fe(3+) as titrant to evaluate the inorganic impurities. The protonation constants were determined by both spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods, and Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) stability constants were determined from potentiometric titrations. To establish the Fe(3+) and Cu(2+) stability constants, a new spectrophotometric method has been developed, and the results were compared with those reported in the literature for EDDHA and EDDHMA and their meso- and rac-isomers. pM values have been also determined to provide a comparable basis to establish the relative chelating ability of these ligands. The purity obtained for the ligands is higher than 87% in all cases and is comparable with that obtained by (1)H NMR. No significant differences have been found among ligands when their protonation and stability constants were compared. As expected, no Fe(3

  2. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  3. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in arcs and torches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A general treatment of non-equilibrium plasma aspects is obtained by relating transport fluxes to equilibrium restoring processes in so-called disturbed Bilateral Relations. The (non) equilibrium stage of a small microwave induced plasma serves as case study.

  4. Quantification of the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde products of 2-deoxyribose oxidation in DNA and cells by isotope-dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry: differential effects of gamma-radiation and Fe2+-EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wan; Chen, Bingzi; Wang, Lianrong; Taghizadeh, Koli; Demott, Michael S; Dedon, Peter C

    2010-05-05

    The oxidation of 2-deoxyribose in DNA has emerged as a critical determinant of the cellular toxicity of oxidative damage to DNA, with oxidation of each carbon producing a unique spectrum of electrophilic products. We have developed and validated an isotope-dilution gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the rigorous quantification of two major 2-deoxyribose oxidation products: the 2-deoxyribonolactone abasic site of 1'-oxidation and the nucleoside 5'-aldehyde of 5'-oxidation chemistry. The method entails elimination of these products as 5-methylene-2(5H)-furanone (5MF) and furfural, respectively, followed by derivatization with pentafluorophenylhydrazine (PFPH), addition of isotopically labeled PFPH derivatives as internal standards, extraction of the derivatives, and quantification by GC-MS analysis. The precision and accuracy of the method were validated with oligodeoxynucleotides containing the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde lesions. Further, the well-defined 2-deoxyribose oxidation chemistry of the enediyne antibiotics, neocarzinostatin and calicheamicin gamma(1)(I), was exploited in control studies, with neocarzinostatin producing 10 2-deoxyribonolactone and 300 nucleoside 5'-aldehyde per 10(6) nt per microM in accord with its established minor 1'- and major 5'-oxidation chemistry. Calicheamicin unexpectedly caused 1'-oxidation at a low level of 10 2-deoxyribonolactone per 10(6) nt per microM in addition to the expected predominance of 5'-oxidation at 560 nucleoside 5'-aldehyde per 10(6) nt per microM. The two hydroxyl radical-mediated DNA oxidants, gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA, produced nucleoside 5'-aldehyde at a frequency of 57 per 10(6) nt per Gy (G-value 74 nmol/J) and 3.5 per 10(6) nt per microM, respectively, which amounted to 40% and 35%, respectively, of total 2-deoxyribose oxidation as measured by a plasmid nicking assay. However, gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA produced different proportions of 2

  5. Thermodynamic model for solution behavior and solid-liquid equilibrium in Na-Al(III)-Fe(III)-Cr(III)-Cl-H2O system at 25°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Laurent; Christov, Christomir; Lassin, Arnault; Azaroual, Mohamed

    2018-03-01

    The knowledge of the thermodynamic behavior of multicomponent aqueous electrolyte systems is of main interest in geo-, and environmental-sciences. The main objective of this study is the development of a high accuracy thermodynamic model for solution behavior, and highly soluble M(III)Cl3(s) (M= Al, Fe, Cr) minerals solubility in Na-Al(III)-Cr(III)-Fe(III)-Cl-H2O system at 25°C. Comprehensive thermodynamic models that accurately predict aluminium, chromium and iron aqueous chemistry and M(III) mineral solubilities as a function of pH, solution composition and concentration are critical for understanding many important geochemical and environmental processes involving these metals (e.g., mineral dissolution/alteration, rock formation, changes in rock permeability and fluid flow, soil formation, mass transport, toxic M(III) remediation). Such a model would also have many industrial applications (e.g., aluminium, chromium and iron production, and their corrosion, solve scaling problems in geothermal energy and oil production). Comparisons of solubility and activity calculations with the experimental data in binary and ternary systems indicate that model predictions are within the uncertainty of the data. Limitations of the model due to data insufficiencies are discussed. The solubility modeling approach, implemented to the Pitzer specific interaction equations is employed. The resulting parameterization was developed for the geochemical Pitzer formalism based PHREEQC database.

  6. Thermodynamic model for solution behavior and solid-liquid equilibrium in Na-Al(III-Fe(III-Cr(III-Cl-H2O system at 25°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Laurent

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the thermodynamic behavior of multicomponent aqueous electrolyte systems is of main interest in geo-, and environmental-sciences. The main objective of this study is the development of a high accuracy thermodynamic model for solution behavior, and highly soluble M(IIICl3(s (M= Al, Fe, Cr minerals solubility in Na-Al(III-Cr(III-Fe(III-Cl-H2O system at 25°C. Comprehensive thermodynamic models that accurately predict aluminium, chromium and iron aqueous chemistry and M(III mineral solubilities as a function of pH, solution composition and concentration are critical for understanding many important geochemical and environmental processes involving these metals (e.g., mineral dissolution/alteration, rock formation, changes in rock permeability and fluid flow, soil formation, mass transport, toxic M(III remediation. Such a model would also have many industrial applications (e.g., aluminium, chromium and iron production, and their corrosion, solve scaling problems in geothermal energy and oil production. Comparisons of solubility and activity calculations with the experimental data in binary and ternary systems indicate that model predictions are within the uncertainty of the data. Limitations of the model due to data insufficiencies are discussed. The solubility modeling approach, implemented to the Pitzer specific interaction equations is employed. The resulting parameterization was developed for the geochemical Pitzer formalism based PHREEQC database.

  7. Iron isotopic systematics of oceanic basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Dauphas, Nicolas; Huang, Shichun; Marty, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    The iron isotopic compositions of 93 well-characterized basalts from geochemically and geologically diverse mid-ocean ridge segments, oceanic islands and back arc basins were measured. Forty-three MORBs have homogeneous Fe isotopic composition, with δ56Fe ranging from +0.07‰ to +0.14‰ and an average of +0.105 ± 0.006‰ (2SD/√n, n = 43, MSWD = 1.9). Three back arc basin basalts have similar δ56Fe to MORBs. By contrast, OIBs are slightly heterogeneous with δ56Fe ranging from +0.05‰ to +0.14‰ in samples from Koolau and Loihi, Hawaii, and from +0.09‰ to +0.18‰ in samples from the Society Islands and Cook-Austral chain, French Polynesia. Overall, oceanic basalts are isotopically heavier than mantle peridotite and pyroxenite xenoliths, reflecting Fe isotope fractionation during partial melting of the mantle. Iron isotopic variations in OIBs mainly reflect Fe isotope fractionation during fractional crystallization of olivine and pyroxene, enhanced by source heterogeneity in Koolau samples.

  8. The fractioning factor and the number of theorical plates in isotopic enrichment columns determined simultaneously

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducatti, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    Using an analytical approach and an analytical graphical method, it was determined simultaneously the fractioning factor and the number of theoretical plates in isotopic enrichment columns during the conditions of dinamical isotopic equilibrium. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Non-equilibrium Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Martinás

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A microeconomic, agent based framework to dynamic economics is formulated in a materialist approach. An axiomatic foundation of a non-equilibrium microeconomics is outlined. Economic activity is modelled as transformation and transport of commodities (materials owned by the agents. Rate of transformations (production intensity, and the rate of transport (trade are defined by the agents. Economic decision rules are derived from the observed economic behaviour. The non-linear equations are solved numerically for a model economy. Numerical solutions for simple model economies suggest that the some of the results of general equilibrium economics are consequences only of the equilibrium hypothesis. We show that perfect competition of selfish agents does not guarantee the stability of economic equilibrium, but cooperativity is needed, too.

  10. DIAGNOSIS OF FINANCIAL EQUILIBRIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUCIU GHEORGHE

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis based on the balance sheet tries to identify the state of equilibrium (disequilibrium that exists in a company. The easiest way to determine the state of equilibrium is by looking at the balance sheet and at the information it offers. Because in the balance sheet there are elements that do not reflect their real value, the one established on the market, they must be readjusted, and those elements which are not related to the ordinary operating activities must be eliminated. The diagnosis of financial equilibrium takes into account 2 components: financing sources (ownership equity, loaned, temporarily attracted. An efficient financial equilibrium must respect 2 fundamental requirements: permanent sources represented by ownership equity and loans for more than 1 year should finance permanent needs, and temporary resources should finance the operating cycle.

  11. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, J E

    1968-01-01

    The International Encyclopedia of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Volume 1: Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics covers the fundamental principles and the development of theoretical aspects of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Statistical mechanical is the study of the connection between the macroscopic behavior of bulk matter and the microscopic properties of its constituent atoms and molecules. This book contains eight chapters, and begins with a presentation of the master equation used for the calculation of the fundamental thermodynamic functions. The succeeding chapters highlight t

  12. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  13. Hydrogeochemical evolution and C isotope study of groundwaters from 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Salamanca, Spain): implications for processes in radwaste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, L. Perez del; Garralon, A.; Delgado, A.; Reyes, E.; Cozar, J.S.; Gomez, P.; Nunez, R.; Sanchez, L.; Raya, J.

    2005-01-01

    Within the framework of the ENRESA natural analogue programme, the U ore deposit of 'Mina Fe', western Spain, has been studied as a natural analogue of radioactive spent fuel behaviour after burial, in spite of being an extremely perturbed geological environment due to mining activities. The main objectives of this project are to determine the hydrogeochemical evolution of the system and identify the main water/rock interaction processes that control the physicochemical variables (pH and Eh) of groundwaters, including the role-played by the organic matter.The hydrogeochemical results from 3 consecutive groundwater sampling campaigns, separated by a phase of restoration works, indicate that the groundwater of the site shows an evolutionary trend from Ca-SO42- acid oxidising waters towards alkaline-reducing waters, though their evolution with respect to the alkaline and alkaline-earth elements is not clear. The SO42--acid waters are the result of the oxidation processes affecting the primary sulphide-rich U mineralisation, while the alkaline-reducing waters result from the buffer capacity of carbonates from fracture filling materials, as the δ 13 C values of DIC demonstrate. The reducing character of these waters mainly results from the microbiologically mediated partial oxidation of the abundant organic matter existing in the clayey walls of the major faults at the site, since other dissolved inorganic redox pairs are insufficient to explain the in situ measured redox potential. Thus, the high content in DOC of these waters is also explained, since the soil at the site is poorly developed. DOC, DIC or both can be responsible for the high U concentration measured in these groundwaters, in spite of its reducing character.The restoration works performed in the exploitation quarry have also restored the aforementioned evolutionary trend, which was the normal evolution of groundwater in the site before mining. Finally, the results are discussed in terms of the

  14. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraedts, J.M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF 6 ) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  15. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  16. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method of isotope separation is described which involves the use of a laser photon beam to selectively induce energy level transitions of an isotope molecule containing the isotope to be separated. The use of the technique for 235 U enrichment is demonstrated. (UK)

  17. Isotopic equilibrium constants of the deuterium exchange between HDO and H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}Se and H{sub 2}Te; Etude des constantes des equilibres isotopiques du deuterium entre l'eau et les hydrures des metalloides de la deuxieme famille

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-11-15

    We have determined experimentally the equilibrium constant K of each of the following isotope exchanges: SH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SHD + OH{sub 2}; SeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SeHD + OH{sub 2}; TeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} TeHD + OH{sub 2}. In gaseous phase, statistical thermodynamics leads to the expression: K (Z{sub OHD} x Z{sub RH{sub 2}})/(Z{sub OH{sub 2}} x Z{sub RHD}) x e{sup W/T} (R being the elements S, Se or Te). Z, the partition functions, have been calculated and, through our experimental results, the constant W has been determined. Having obtained W, the equilibrium constant K has been calculated for a series of temperatures. (author) [French] Nous avons determine experimentalement la constante K de chacun des equilibres isotopiques suivants: SH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SHD + OH{sub 2}; SeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} SeHD + OH{sub 2}; TeH{sub 2} + OHD {r_reversible} TeHD + OH{sub 2}. En phase gazeuse, la thermodynamique donne l'expression: K = (Z{sub OHD} x Z{sub RH{sub 2}})/(Z{sub OH{sub 2}} x Z{sub RHD}) x e{sup W/T} (R representant un atome de soufre, selenium ou tellure). Les fonctions de partition Z de chacune des molecules ont ete calculees et, grace a nos resultats experimentaux, nous avons determine la constante W. Connaissant W, la constante d'equilibre K a pu etre tabulee en fonction de la temperature. (auteur)

  18. Presence of 60Fe in eucrite Piplia Kalan: A new perspective to the initial 60Fe/ 56Fe in the early solar system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rudraswami, N.G.; Sahijpal, S.; Bhandari, N.

    Fe-Ni isotope measurements of ferrous pyroxenes of the Piplia Kalan eucrite using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer revealed the presence of sup (60) Ni excess corresponding to the initial 60Fe/56Fe of (5.2 + or - 2.4) × 10 sup(-9). Combining...

  19. Theory of chemical equilibrium in a lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, K.; Dufour, M.; Balazs, N.L.

    1989-01-01

    The chemical equilibrium is studied for the reaction A+B↔C, assuming that, initially, the particles B form a lattice and the particles A are statistically distributed on interstices. A mass action law is derived which defines the numbers n A , n B , n C of particles A, B, C in the chemical equilibrium assuming the initial distribution to be known. It predicts a considerably larger number n C of fused particles C compared to the mass action law for the gaseous phase. The result holds for an ordinary as well as for a nuclear lattice. Its possible relevance for the production of proton-rich isotopes in the universe is discussed. (orig.)

  20. Immunity by equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  1. Decontamination of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despotovic, R.; Music, S.; Subotic, B.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of radioactive isotopes under controlled conditions is determined by a number of physical and chemical properties considered radiocontaminating and by the characteristics of the contaminated object. Determination of quantitative and qualitative factors for equilibrium in a contamination-decontamination system provides the basis for rational and successful decontamination. The decontamination of various ''solid/liquid'' systems is interesting from the scientific and technological point of view. These systems are of great importance in radiation protection (decontamination of various surfaces, liquids, drinking water, fixation or collection of radiocontaminants). Different types of decontamination systems are discussed. The dependence of rate and efficiency of the preparation conditions and on the ageing of the scavenger is described. The influence of coagulating electrolyte on radioactive isotope fixation efficiency was also determined. The fixation of fission radionuclide on oxide scavengers has been studied. The connection between fundamental investigations and practical decontamination of the ''solid/liquid'' systems is discussed. (author)

  2. Equilibrium shoreface profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Hughes, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale coastal behaviour models use the shoreface profile of equilibrium as a fundamental morphological unit that is translated in space to simulate coastal response to, for example, sea level oscillations and variability in sediment supply. Despite a longstanding focus on the shoreface...... profile and its relevance to predicting coastal response to changing environmental conditions, the processes and dynamics involved in shoreface equilibrium are still not fully understood. Here, we apply a process-based empirical sediment transport model, combined with morphodynamic principles to provide......; there is no tuning or calibration and computation times are short. It is therefore easily implemented with repeated iterations to manage uncertainty....

  3. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  4. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure , particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  5. Combined iron and magnesium isotope geochemistry of pyroxenite xenoliths from Hannuoba, North China Craton: implications for mantle metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin Miao; Cao, Hui Hui; Mi, Xue; Evans, Noreen J.; Qi, Yu Han; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Hong Fu

    2017-06-01

    We present high-precision iron and magnesium isotopic data for diverse mantle pyroxenite xenoliths collected from Hannuoba, North China Craton and provide the first combined iron and magnesium isotopic study of such rocks. Compositionally, these xenoliths range from Cr-diopside pyroxenites and Al-augite pyroxenites to garnet-bearing pyroxenites and are taken as physical evidence for different episodes of melt injection. Our results show that both Cr-diopside pyroxenites and Al-augite pyroxenites of cumulate origin display narrow ranges in iron and magnesium isotopic compositions (δ57Fe = -0.01 to 0.09 with an average of 0.03 ± 0.08 (2SD, n = 6); δ26Mg = - 0.28 to -0.25 with an average of -0.26 ± 0.03 (2SD, n = 3), respectively). These values are identical to those in the normal upper mantle and show equilibrium inter-mineral iron and magnesium isotope fractionation between coexisting mantle minerals. In contrast, the garnet-bearing pyroxenites, which are products of reactions between peridotites and silicate melts from an ancient subducted oceanic slab, exhibit larger iron isotopic variations, with δ57Fe ranging from 0.12 to 0.30. The δ57Fe values of minerals in these garnet-bearing pyroxenites also vary widely (-0.25 to 0.08 in olivines, -0.04 to 0.25 in orthopyroxenes, -0.07 to 0.31 in clinopyroxenes, 0.07 to 0.48 in spinels and 0.31-0.42 in garnets). In addition, the garnet-bearing pyroxenite shows light δ26Mg (-0.43) relative to the mantle. The δ26Mg of minerals in the garnet-bearing pyroxenite range from -0.35 for olivine and orthopyroxene, to -0.34 for clinopyroxene, 0.04 for spinel and -0.68 for garnet. These measured values stand in marked contrast to calculated equilibrium iron and magnesium isotope fractionation between coexisting mantle minerals at mantle temperatures derived from theory, indicating disequilibrium isotope fractionation. Notably, one phlogopite clinopyroxenite with an apparent later metasomatic overprint has the heaviest δ57Fe

  6. Microeconomics : Equilibrium and Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Raa, T.

    2013-01-01

    Microeconomics: Equilibrium and Efficiency teaches how to apply microeconomic theory in an innovative, intuitive and concise way. Using real-world, empirical examples, this book not only covers the building blocks of the subject, but helps gain a broad understanding of microeconomic theory and

  7. Differential Equation of Equilibrium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. Analysis of underground circular cylindrical shell is carried out in this work. The forth order differential equation of equilibrium, comparable to that of beam on elastic foundation, was derived from static principles on the assumptions of P. L Pasternak. Laplace transformation was used to solve the governing ...

  8. Comments on equilibrium, transient equilibrium, and secular equilibrium in serial radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Equations describing serial radioactive decay are reviewed along with published descriptions or transient and secular equilibrium. It is shown that terms describing equilibrium are not used in the same way by various authors. Specific definitions are proposed; they suggest that secular equilibrium is a subset of transient equilibrium

  9. Isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbuny, M.

    1979-01-01

    The invention discloses a method for deriving, from a starting material including an element having a plurality of isotopes, derived material enriched in one isotope of the element. The starting material is deposited on a substrate at less than a critical submonatomic surface density, typically less than 10 16 atoms per square centimeter. The deposit is then selectively irradiated by a laser (maser or electronic oscillator) beam with monochromatic coherent radiation resonant with the one isotope causing the material including the one istope to escape from the substrate. The escaping enriched material is then collected. Where the element has two isotopes, one of which is to be collected, the deposit may be irradiated with radiation resonant with the other isotope and the residual material enriched in the one isotope may be evaporated from the substrate and collected

  10. Physical conditions in CaFe interstellar clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Gnacinski, P.; Krogulec, M.

    2007-01-01

    Interstellar clouds that exhibit strong Ca I and Fe I lines were called CaFe clouds. The ionisation equilibrium equations were used to model the column densities of Ca II, Ca I, K I, Na I, Fe I and Ti II in CaFe clouds. The chemical composition of CaFe clouds is that of the Solar System and no depletion of elements onto dust grains is seen. The CaFe clouds have high electron densities n=1 cm^-3 that leads to high column densities of neutral Ca and Fe.

  11. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazier, J.L.; Guinamant, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    According to the progress which has been realised in the technology of separating and measuring isotopes, the stable isotopes are used as preferable 'labelling elements' for big number of applications. The isotopic composition of natural products shows significant variations as a result of different reasons like the climate, the seasons, or their geographic origins. So, it was proved that the same product has a different isotopic composition of alimentary and agriculture products. It is also important in detecting the pharmacological and medical chemicals. This review article deals with the technology, like chromatography and spectrophotometry, adapted to this aim, and some important applications. 17 refs. 6 figs

  12. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, R.J.; Morrey, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated

  13. Iron and oxygen isotope signatures of the Pea Ridge and Pilot Knob magnetite-apatite deposits, southeast Missouri, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Tristan; Simon, Adam C.; Day, Warren C.; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Bindeman, Ilya N.

    2016-01-01

    New O and Fe stable isotope ratios are reported for magnetite samples from high-grade massive magnetite of the Mesoproterozoic Pea Ridge and Pilot Knob magnetite-apatite ore deposits and these results are compared with data for other iron oxide-apatite deposits to shed light on the origin of the southeast Missouri deposits. The δ18O values of magnetite from Pea Ridge (n = 12) and Pilot Knob (n = 3) range from 1.0 to 7.0 and 3.3 to 6.7‰, respectively. The δ56Fe values of magnetite from Pea Ridge (n = 10) and Pilot Knob (n = 6) are 0.03 to 0.35 and 0.06 to 0.27‰, respectively. These δ18O and the δ56Fe values suggest that magnetite crystallized from a silicate melt (typical igneous δ56Fe ranges 0.06–0.49‰) and grew in equilibrium with a magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluid. We propose that the δ18O and δ56Fe data for the Pea Ridge and Pilot Knob magnetite-apatite deposits are consistent with the flotation model recently proposed by Knipping et al. (2015a), which invokes flotation of a magmatic magnetite-fluid suspension and offers a plausible explanation for the igneous (i.e., up to ~15.9 wt % TiO2 in magnetite) and hydrothermal features of the deposits.

  14. Equilibrium and pre-equilibrium emissions in proton-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    necessary for the domain of fission-reactor technology for the calculation of nuclear transmutation ... tions occur in three stages: INC, pre-equilibrium and equilibrium (or compound. 344. Pramana ... In the evaporation phase of the reaction, the.

  15. Gated equilibrium bloodpool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinders Folmer, S.C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis deals with the clinical applications of gated equilibrium bloodpool scintigraphy, performed with either a gamma camera or a portable detector system, the nuclear stethoscope. The main goal has been to define the value and limitations of noninvasive measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction as a parameter of cardiac performance in various disease states, both for diagnostic purposes as well as during follow-up after medical or surgical intervention. Secondly, it was attempted to extend the use of the equilibrium bloodpool techniques beyond the calculation of ejection fraction alone by considering the feasibility to determine ventricular volumes and by including the possibility of quantifying valvular regurgitation. In both cases, it has been tried to broaden the perspective of the observations by comparing them with results of other, invasive and non-invasive, procedures, in particular cardiac catheterization, M-mode echocardiography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. (Auth.)

  16. Problems in equilibrium theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aliprantis, Charalambos D

    1996-01-01

    In studying General Equilibrium Theory the student must master first the theory and then apply it to solve problems. At the graduate level there is no book devoted exclusively to teaching problem solving. This book teaches for the first time the basic methods of proof and problem solving in General Equilibrium Theory. The problems cover the entire spectrum of difficulty; some are routine, some require a good grasp of the material involved, and some are exceptionally challenging. The book presents complete solutions to two hundred problems. In searching for the basic required techniques, the student will find a wealth of new material incorporated into the solutions. The student is challenged to produce solutions which are different from the ones presented in the book.

  17. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, E Atlee

    2000-01-01

    Ideal as an elementary introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics, this volume covers both classical and quantum methodology for open and closed systems. Introductory chapters familiarize readers with probability and microscopic models of systems, while additional chapters describe the general derivation of the fundamental statistical mechanics relationships. The final chapter contains 16 sections, each dealing with a different application, ordered according to complexity, from classical through degenerate quantum statistical mechanics. Key features include an elementary introduction t

  18. Volatility in Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Sizova, Natalia; Tauchen, George

    Stock market volatility clusters in time, carries a risk premium, is fractionally inte- grated, and exhibits asymmetric leverage effects relative to returns. This paper develops a first internally consistent equilibrium based explanation for these longstanding empirical facts. The model is cast i......, and the dynamic cross-correlations of the volatility measures with the returns calculated from actual high-frequency intra-day data on the S&P 500 aggregate market and VIX volatility indexes....

  19. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, C.M.; Huebner, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated. 18 refs

  20. Absolute isotopic abundances of Ti in meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederer, F.R.; Papanastassiou, D.A.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute isotope abundance of Ti has been determined in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites and in samples of whole meteorites. The absolute Ti isotope abundances differ by a significant mass dependent isotope fractionation transformation from the previously reported abundances, which were normalized for fractionation using 46 Ti/ 48 Ti. Therefore, the absolute compositions define distinct nucleosynthetic components from those previously identified or reflect the existence of significant mass dependent isotope fractionation in nature. We provide a general formalism for determining the possible isotope compositions of the exotic Ti from the measured composition, for different values of isotope fractionation in nature and for different mixing ratios of the exotic and normal components. The absolute Ti and Ca isotopic compositions still support the correlation of 50 Ti and 48 Ca effects in the FUN inclusions and imply contributions from neutron-rich equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium nucleosynthesis. The present identification of endemic effects at 46 Ti, for the absolute composition, implies a shortfall of an explosive-oxygen component or reflects significant isotope fractionation. Additional nucleosynthetic components are required by 47 Ti and 49 Ti effects. Components are also defined in which 48 Ti is enhanced. Results are given and discussed. (author)

  1. Equilibrium calculations, ch. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deursen, A.P.J. van

    1976-01-01

    A calculation is presented of dimer intensities obtained in supersonic expansions. There are two possible limiting considerations; the dimers observed are already present in the source, in thermodynamic equilibrium, and are accelerated in the expansion. Destruction during acceleration is neglected, as are processes leading to newly formed dimers. On the other hand one can apply a kinetic approach, where formation and destruction processes are followed throughout the expansion. The difficulty of this approach stems from the fact that the density, temperature and rate constants have to be known at all distances from the nozzle. The simple point of view has been adopted and the measured dimer intensities are compared with the equilibrium concentration in the source. The comparison is performed under the assumption that the detection efficiency for dimers is twice the detection efficiency for monomers. The experimental evidence against the simple point of view that the dimers of the onset region are formed in the source already, under equilibrium conditions, is discussed. (Auth.)

  2. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to molecular and atomic isotope separation and is particularly applicable to the separation of 235 U from other uranium isotopes including 238 U. In the method described a desired isotope is separated mechanically from an atomic or molecular beam formed from an isotope mixture utilising the isotropic recoil momenta resulting from selective excitation of the desired isotope species by radiation, followed by ionization or dissociation by radiation or electron attachment. By forming a matrix of UF 6 molecules in HBr molecules so as to collapse the V 3 vibrational mode of the UF 6 molecule the 235 UF 6 molecules are selectively excited to promote reduction of UF 6 molecules containing 235 U and facilitate separation. (UK)

  3. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Isotopic species in an isotopic mixture including a first species having a first isotope and a second species having a second isotope are separated by selectively exciting the first species in preference to the second species and then reacting the selectively excited first species with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product having a mass different from the original species and separating the product from the balance of the mixture in a centrifugal separating device such as centrifuge or aerodynamic nozzle. In the centrifuge the isotopic mixture is passed into a rotor where it is irradiated through a window. Heavier and lighter components can be withdrawn. The irradiated mixture experiences a large centrifugal force and is separated in a deflection area into lighter and heavier components. (UK)

  4. Isotope resolution of the iron peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henke, R.P.; Benton, E.V.

    1977-01-01

    A stack of Lexan detectors from the Apollo 17 mission has been analyzed to obtain Z measurements of sufficient accuracy to resolve the iron peak into its isotopic components. Within this distribution several peaks are present. With the centrally located, most populated peak assumed to be 56 Fe, the measurements imply that the abundances of 54 Fe and 58 Fe are appreciable fractions of the 56 Fe abundance. This result is in agreement with those of Webber et al. and Siegman et al. but in disagreement with the predictions of Tsao et al. (Auth.)

  5. Noncompact Equilibrium Points and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Al-Rumaih

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove an equilibrium existence result for vector functions defined on noncompact domain and we give some applications in optimization and Nash equilibrium in noncooperative game.

  6. Equilibrium thermodynamics - Callen's postulational approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongschaap, R.J.J.; Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2001-01-01

    In order to provide the background for nonequilibrium thermodynamics, we outline the fundamentals of equilibrium thermodynamics. Equilibrium thermodynamics must not only be obtained as a special case of any acceptable nonequilibrium generalization but, through its shining example, it also elucidates

  7. MHD equilibrium with toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.

    1987-03-01

    The present work attempts to formulate the equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma with purely toroidal flow within ideal MHD theory. In general, the inertial term Rho(v.Del)v caused by plasma flow is so complicated that the equilibrium equation is completely different from the Grad-Shafranov equation. However, in the case of purely toroidal flow the equilibrium equation can be simplified so that it resembles the Grad-Shafranov equation. Generally one arbitrary two-variable functions and two arbitrary single variable functions, instead of only four single-variable functions, are allowed in the new equilibrium equations. Also, the boundary conditions of the rotating (with purely toroidal fluid flow, static - without any fluid flow) equilibrium are the same as those of the static equilibrium. So numerically one can calculate the rotating equilibrium as a static equilibrium. (author)

  8. Isotope effects in gas-phase chemical reactions and photodissociation processes: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The origins of isotope effects in equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemical processes are reviewed. In non-equilibrium processes, attention is given to isotope effects in simple bimolecular reactions, symmetry-related reactions, and photodissociation processes. Recent examples of isotope effects in these areas are reviewed. Some indication of other scientific areas for which measurements and/or calculations of isotope effects are used is also given. Examples presented focus on neutral molecule chemistry and in many cases complement examples considered in greater detail in the other chapters of this volume

  9. Thermodynamics of the Mo-Fe-C and W-Fe-C systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleykamp, H.

    1978-01-01

    A study on the reaction behaviour of the components of the Mo 2 C-Fe and WC-Fe systems is presented. Both systems are stable if the mono-phase carbides are in equilibrium with the Fe-C solid solution within fixed carbon concentrations, the limits of which are calculated in this paper. Gibbs energies of formation at 1273 K of the intermetallic phases, of the binary and of the ternary carbides in the Mo-Fe-C and W-Fe-C systems were determined. The Fe corner in the phase diagrams of both systems and the calculated C boundaries in the two-phase field γ-Fe(Mo,C)-Mo 2 C and the γ-Fe(W,C)-WC, respectively, based on this study, are shown in figures. (GSC) [de

  10. Isotope angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepinska, J.; Ruzyllo, W.; Konieczny, W.

    1979-01-01

    Method of technetium isotope 99 m pass through the heart recording with the aid of radioisotope scanner connected with seriograph and computer is being presented. Preliminary tests were carried out in 26 patients with coronary disease without or with previous myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy, ventricular septal defect and in patients with artificial mitral and aortic valves. The obtained scans were evaluated qualitatively and compared with performed later contrast X-rays of the heart. Size of the right ventricle, volume and rate of left atrial evacuation, size and contractability of left ventricle were evaluated. Similarity of direct and isotope angiocardiographs, non-invasional character and repeatability of isotope angiocardiography advocate its usefulness. (author)

  11. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Groot, Sybren Ruurds

    1984-01-01

    The study of thermodynamics is especially timely today, as its concepts are being applied to problems in biology, biochemistry, electrochemistry, and engineering. This book treats irreversible processes and phenomena - non-equilibrium thermodynamics.S. R. de Groot and P. Mazur, Professors of Theoretical Physics, present a comprehensive and insightful survey of the foundations of the field, providing the only complete discussion of the fluctuating linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics. The application covers a wide range of topics: the theory of diffusion and heat conduction, fluid dyn

  12. Chemical exchange equilibria in isotope separation. Part I : Evaluation of separation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of chemical exchange equilibria as applied to the isotope separation processes and the isotope effects on equilibrium constants of different exchange reactions has come a long way since its inception by Urey and Rittenberg. An attempt has been made to bring relevant information together and present a unified approach to isotopic chemical exchange equilibrium constant evaluation and its implications to separation processes. (auth.)

  13. Leatherback Isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  14. Isotope Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this training modules is to examine the process of using gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identification; apply pattern recognition to gamma spectra; identify methods of verifying energy calibration; and discuss potential causes of isotope misidentification.

  15. Isotope laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report from the Dutch Ministry of Health is an advisory document concerned with isotope laboratories in hospitals, in connection with the Dutch laws for hospitals. It discusses which hospitals should have isotope laboratories and concludes that as many hospitals as possible should have small laboratories so that emergency cases can be dealt with. It divides the Netherlands into regions and suggests which hospitals should have these facilities. The questions of how big each lab. is to be, what equipment each has, how each lab. is organised, what therapeutic and diagnostic work should be carried out by each, etc. are discussed. The answers are provided by reports from working groups for in vivo diagnostics, in vitro diagnostics, therapy, and safety and their results form the criteria for the licences of isotope labs. The results of a questionnaire for isotope labs. already in the Netherlands are presented, and their activities outlined. (C.F.)

  16. Assessment of Stable Isotope Distribution in Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y.; Cao, X.; Wang, J.; Bao, H.

    2017-12-01

    Biomolecules in living organisms have the potential to approach chemical steady state and even apparent isotope equilibrium because enzymatic reactions are intrinsically reversible. If an apparent local equilibrium can be identified, enzymatic reversibility and its controlling factors may be quantified, which helps to understand complex biochemical processes. Earlier research on isotope fractionation tends to focus on specific process and compare mostly two different chemical species. Using linear regression, "Thermodynamic order", which refers to correlated δ13C and 13β values, has been proposed to be present among many biomolecules by Galimov et al. However, the concept "thermodynamic order" they proposed and the approach they used has been questioned. Here, we propose that the deviation of a complex system from its equilibrium state can be rigorously described as a graph problem as is applied in discrete mathematics. The deviation of isotope distribution from equilibrium state and apparent local isotope equilibrium among a subset of biomolecules can be assessed using an apparent fractionation difference matrix (|Δα|). Applying the |Δα| matrix analysis to earlier published data of amino acids, we show the existence of apparent local equilibrium among different amino acids in potato and a kind of green alga. The existence of apparent local equilibrium is in turn consistent with the notion that enzymatic reactions can be reversible even in living systems. The result also implies that previous emphasis on external carbon source intake may be misplaced when studying isotope distribution in physiology. In addition to the identification of local equilibrium among biomolecules, the difference matrix approach has the potential to explore chemical or isotope equilibrium state in extraterrestrial bodies, to distinguish living from non-living systems, and to classify living species. This approach will benefit from large numbers of systematic data and advanced pattern

  17. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Isomeric island in the vicinity of 66Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugas, J. M.; Belier, G.; Girod, M.; Goutte, H.; Meot, V.; Perru, O.; Roig, O.; Sauvestre, J. E.; Sawicka, M.; Pfuetzner, M.; Zylicz, J.; Matea, I.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grawe, H.; Becker, F.; Mayet, P.; Grzywacz, R.; Achouri, N. L.; Angelique, J. C.; Baiborodin, D.

    2006-01-01

    An island of isomers have recently been observed on both sides of the N=40 shell below the Ni isotopes. Isomeric states in the 65Fe and 67Fe allow the knowledge of the single particle structure around the νg9/2 shell. Moreover, the excitation energy of the first 2+ and 4+ states in the 68Fe have been established by β-γ correlation. The evolution of the structure of the Fe isotopes going far away from the valley of stability is, for the first time, given for N>40

  19. Isotopic chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, H.G. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  20. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for separating isotopes in which photo-excitation of selected isotope species is used together with the reaction of the excited species with postive ions of predetermined ionization energy, other excited species, or free electrons to produce ions or ion fragments of the selected species. Ions and electrons are produced by an electrical discharge, and separation is achieved through radial ambipolar diffusion, electrostatic techniques, or magnetohydrodynamic methods

  1. Isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydtin, H-J.; Wilden, R.J.; Severin, P.J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The isotope enrichment method described is based on the recognition that, owing to mass diffusion and thermal diffusion in the conversion of substances at a heated substrate while depositing an element or compound onto the substrate, enrichment of the element, or a compound of the element, with a lighter isotope will occur. The cycle is repeated for as many times as is necessary to obtain the degree of enrichment required

  2. Pathways of coupled arsenic and iron cycling in high arsenic groundwater of the Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia, China: an iron isotope approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huaming; Liu, Chen; Lu, Hai; Wanty, Richard B.; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Yinzhu

    2013-01-01

    High As groundwater is widely distributed all over the world, which has posed a significant health impact on millions of people. Iron isotopes have recently been used to characterize Fe cycling in aqueous environments, but there is no information on Fe isotope characteristics in the groundwater. Since groundwater As behavior is closely associated with Fe cycling in the aquifers, Fe isotope signatures may help to characterize geochemical processes controlling As concentrations of shallow groundwaters. This study provides the first observation of Fe isotope fractionation in high As groundwater and evaluation of Fe cycling and As behaviors in shallow aquifers in terms of Fe isotope signatures. Thirty groundwater samples were taken for chemical and isotopic analysis in the Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia. Thirty-two sediments were sampled as well from shallow aquifers for Fe isotope analysis. Results showed that groundwater was normally enriched in isotopically light Fe with δ56Fe values between −3.40‰ and 0.58‰ and median of −1.14‰, while heavier δ56Fe values were observed in the sediments (between −1.10‰ and 0.75‰, median +0.36‰). In reducing conditions, groundwaters generally had higher δ56Fe values, in comparison with oxic conditions. High As groundwaters, generally occurring in reducing conditions, had high δ56Fe values, while low As groundwaters normally had low δ56Fe values. Although sediment δ56Fe values were generally independent of lithological conditions, a large variation in sediment δ56Fe values was observed in the oxidation–reduction transition zone. Three pathways were identified for Fe cycling in shallow groundwater, including dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) oxides, re-adsorption of Fe(II), and precipitation of pyrite and siderite. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) oxides resulted in light δ56Fe values (around −1.0‰) and high As concentration (>50 μg/L) in groundwater in anoxic conditions. Re-adsorption of isotopically

  3. Geochemical and iron isotopic insights into hydrothermal iron oxyhydroxide deposit formation at Loihi Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, Olivier; Toner, Brandy; Germain, Yoan; Glazer, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal vents, such as those encountered at Loihi Seamount, harbor abundant microbial communities and provide ideal systems to test hypotheses on biotic versus abiotic formation of hydrous ferric oxide (FeOx) deposits at the seafloor. Hydrothermal activity at Loihi Seamount produces abundant microbial mats associated with rust-colored FeOx deposits and variably encrusted with Mn-oxyhydroxides. Here, we applied Fe isotope systematics together with major and trace element geochemistry to study the formation mechanisms and preservation of such mineralized microbial mats. Iron isotope composition of warm (oxidation of Fe(II) during mixing of the hydrothermal fluid with seawater. By comparing the results with experimentally determined Fe isotope fractionation factors, we determined that less than 20% of Fe(II) is oxidized within active microbial mats, although this number may reach 80% in aged or less active deposits. These results are consistent with Fe(II) oxidation mediated by microbial processes considering the expected slow kinetics of abiotic Fe oxidation in low oxygen bottom water at Loihi Seamount. In contrast, FeOx deposits recovered at extinct sites have distinctly negative Fe-isotope values down to -1.77‰ together with significant enrichment in Mn and occurrence of negative Ce anomalies. These results are best explained by the near-complete oxidation of an isotopically light Fe(II) source produced during the waning stage of hydrothermal activity under more oxidizing conditions. Light Fe isotope values of FeOx are therefore generated by subsurface precipitation of isotopically heavy Fe-oxides rather than by the activity of dissimilatory Fe reduction in the subsurface. Overall, Fe-isotope compositions of microbial mats at Loihi Seamount display a remarkable range between -1.2‰ and +1.6‰ which indicate that Fe isotope compositions of hydrothermal Fe-oxide precipitates are particularly sensitive to local environmental conditions where

  4. Application of constrained equilibrium thermodynamics to irradiated alloy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, James Paul; Stubbins, James F.

    1984-05-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamics are applied to systems with an excess of point defects to calculate the relative stability of phases. It is possible to model systems with supersaturation levels of vacancies and interstitials, such as those found under irradiation. The calculations reveal the extent to which phase compositional boundaries could shift when one phase or both in a two phase system contain an excess of point defects. Phase boundary shifts in the Ni-Si, Fe-Ni, Ni-Cr, and Fe-Cr systems are examined as a function of the number of excess defects in each phase. It is also found that the critical temperature of the sigma phase in the Fe-Cr system and the fcc-bcc transition in the Fe-Ni are sensitive to excess defect concentrations. These results may apply to local irradiation-induced phase transformations in the presence of solute segregation.

  5. Iron isotope biogeochemistry of Neoproterozoic marine shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Marcus; Gibson, Timothy M.; Halverson, Galen P.; Hodgskiss, Malcolm S. W.; Bui, Thi Hao; Carozza, David A.; Sperling, Erik A.; Poirier, André; Cox, Grant M.; Wing, Boswell A.

    2017-07-01

    Iron isotopes have been widely applied to investigate the redox evolution of Earth's surface environments. However, it is still unclear whether iron cycling in the water column or during diagenesis represents the major control on the iron isotope composition of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Interpretation of isotopic data in terms of oceanic redox conditions is only possible if water column processes dominate the isotopic composition, whereas redox interpretations are less straightforward if diagenetic iron cycling controls the isotopic composition. In the latter scenario, iron isotope data is more directly related to microbial processes such as dissimilatory iron reduction. Here we present bulk rock iron isotope data from late Proterozoic marine shales from Svalbard, northwestern Canada, and Siberia, to better understand the controls on iron isotope fractionation in late Proterozoic marine environments. Bulk shales span a δ 56Fe range from -0.45 ‰ to +1.04 ‰ . Although δ 56Fe values show significant variation within individual stratigraphic units, their mean value is closer to that of bulk crust and hydrothermal iron in samples post-dating the ca. 717-660 Ma Sturtian glaciation compared to older samples. After correcting for the highly reactive iron content in our samples based on iron speciation data, more than 90% of the calculated δ 56Fe compositions of highly reactive iron falls in the range from ca. -0.8 ‰ to +3 ‰ . An isotope mass-balance model indicates that diagenetic iron cycling can only change the isotopic composition of highly reactive iron by control the isotopic composition of highly reactive iron. Considering a long-term decrease in the isotopic composition of the iron source to the dissolved seawater Fe(II) reservoir to be unlikely, we offer two possible explanations for the Neoproterozoic δ 56Fe trend. First, a decreasing supply of Fe(II) to the ferrous seawater iron reservoir could have caused the reservoir to decrease in size

  6. Multiple stable isotope fronts during non-isothermal fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Stable isotope signatures of oxygen, hydrogen and other elements in minerals from hydrothermal veins and metasomatized host rocks are widely used to investigate fluid sources and paths. Previous theoretical studies mostly focused on analyzing stable isotope fronts developing during single-phase, isothermal fluid flow. In this study, numerical simulations were performed to assess how temperature changes, transport phenomena, kinetic vs. equilibrium isotope exchange, and isotopic source signals determine mineral oxygen isotopic compositions during fluid-rock interaction. The simulations focus on one-dimensional scenarios, with non-isothermal single- and two-phase fluid flow, and include the effects of quartz precipitation and dissolution. If isotope exchange between fluid and mineral is fast, a previously unrecognized, significant enrichment in heavy oxygen isotopes of fluids and minerals occurs at the thermal front. The maximum enrichment depends on the initial isotopic composition of fluid and mineral, the fluid-rock ratio and the maximum change in temperature, but is independent of the isotopic composition of the incoming fluid. This thermally induced isotope front propagates faster than the signal related to the initial isotopic composition of the incoming fluid, which forms a trailing front behind the zone of transient heavy oxygen isotope enrichment. Temperature-dependent kinetic rates of isotope exchange between fluid and rock strongly influence the degree of enrichment at the thermal front. In systems where initial isotope values of fluids and rocks are far from equilibrium and isotope fractionation is controlled by kinetics, the temperature increase accelerates the approach of the fluid to equilibrium conditions with the host rock. Consequently, the increase at the thermal front can be less dominant and can even generate fluid values below the initial isotopic composition of the input fluid. As kinetics limit the degree of isotope exchange, a third front may

  7. INTRAMOLECULAR ISOTOPE EFFECTS IN HYDROCARBON MASS SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, D. P.; Schachtschneider, J. H.

    1963-07-15

    Approximate calculations based on the quasi-equilibrium rate theory of the origin of mass spectra are shown to lead to an approximately correct magnitude for the intramolecular ( pi /sup -/) isotope effect on C--H bond dissociation probabilities of various deuterohydrocarbons. (auth)

  8. Elemental and isotopic (C, O, Sr, Nd) compositions of Late Paleozoic carbonated eclogite and marble from the SW Tianshan UHP belt, NW China: Implications for deep carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianjiang; Zhang, Lifei; Lü, Zeng; Bader, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Subduction zones are important for understanding of the global carbon cycle from the surface to deep part of the mantle. The processes involved the metamorphism of carbonate-bearing rocks largely control the fate of carbon and contribute to local carbon isotopic heterogeneities of the mantle. In this study, we present petrological and geochemical results for marbles and carbonated eclogites in the Southwestern Tianshan UHP belt, NW China. Marbles are interlayered with coesite-bearing pelitic schists, and have Sr-Nd isotopic values (εNd (T=320Ma) = -3.7 to -8.9, 87Sr/86Sr (i) = 0.7084-0.7089), typical of marine carbonates. The marbles have dispersed low δ18OVSMOW values (ranging from 14 to 29‰) and unaffected carbon isotope (δ13CVPDB = -0.2-3.6‰), possibly due to infiltration of external H2O-rich fluids. Recycling of these marbles into mantle may play a key role in the carbon budget and contributed to the mantle carbon isotope heterogeneity. The carbonated eclogites have high Sr isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr (i) = 0.7077-0.7082) and positive εNd (T = 320 Ma) values (from 7.6 to 8.2), indicative of strong seafloor alteration of their protolith. The carbonates in the carbonated eclogites are mainly dolomite (Fe# = 12-43, Fe# = Fe2+/(Fe2+ + Mg)) that were added into oceanic basalts during seafloor alteration and experienced calcite - dolomite - magnesite transformation during the subduction metamorphic process. The uniformly low δ18O values (∼11.44‰) of carbonates in the carbontaed eclogites can be explained by closed-system equilibrium between carbonate and silicate minerals. The low δ13C values (from -3.3 to -7.7‰) of the carbonated eclogites most likely reflect contribution from organic carbon. Recycling of these carbonated eclogites with C isotope similar to typical mantle reservoirs into mantle may have little effect on the mantle carbon isotope heterogeneity.

  9. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high-abundance, naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56. All requests for the loan of samples should be submitted with a summary of the purpose of the loan to: Iotope Distribution Office, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Requests from non-DOE contractors and from foreign institutions require DOE approval

  10. Equilibrium models and variational inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Konnov, Igor

    2007-01-01

    The concept of equilibrium plays a central role in various applied sciences, such as physics (especially, mechanics), economics, engineering, transportation, sociology, chemistry, biology and other fields. If one can formulate the equilibrium problem in the form of a mathematical model, solutions of the corresponding problem can be used for forecasting the future behavior of very complex systems and, also, for correcting the the current state of the system under control. This book presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts in economics, including several models from related sciences.- Presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts and also the present state of investigations in this field- Describes static and dynamic input-output models, Walras, Cassel-Wald, spatial price, auction market, oligopolistic equilibrium models, transportation and migration equilibrium models- Covers the basics of theory and solution methods both for the complementarity and variational inequality probl...

  11. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  12. Mental Equilibrium and Rational Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Eyal Winter; Ignacio Garcia-Jurado; Jose Mendez-Naya; Luciano Mendez-Naya

    2009-01-01

    We introduce emotions into an equilibrium notion. In a mental equilibrium each player "selects" an emotional state which determines the player's preferences over the outcomes of the game. These preferences typically differ from the players' material preferences. The emotional states interact to play a Nash equilibrium and in addition each player's emotional state must be a best response (with respect to material preferences) to the emotional states of the others. We discuss the concept behind...

  13. Para-equilibrium phase diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Koukkari, Pertti; Pajarre, Risto; Eriksson, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A rapidly cooled system may attain a state of para-equilibrium. • In this state rapidly diffusing elements reach equilibrium but others are immobile. • Application of the Phase Rule to para-equilibrium phase diagrams is discussed. • A general algorithm to calculate para-equilibrium phase diagrams is described. - Abstract: If an initially homogeneous system at high temperature is rapidly cooled, a temporary para-equilibrium state may result in which rapidly diffusing elements have reached equilibrium but more slowly diffusing elements have remained essentially immobile. The best known example occurs when homogeneous austenite is quenched. A para-equilibrium phase assemblage may be calculated thermodynamically by Gibbs free energy minimization under the constraint that the ratios of the slowly diffusing elements are the same in all phases. Several examples of calculated para-equilibrium phase diagram sections are presented and the application of the Phase Rule is discussed. Although the rules governing the geometry of these diagrams may appear at first to be somewhat different from those for full equilibrium phase diagrams, it is shown that in fact they obey exactly the same rules with the following provision. Since the molar ratios of non-diffusing elements are the same in all phases at para-equilibrium, these ratios act, as far as the geometry of the diagram is concerned, like “potential” variables (such as T, pressure or chemical potentials) rather than like “normal” composition variables which need not be the same in all phases. A general algorithm to calculate para-equilibrium phase diagrams is presented. In the limit, if a para-equilibrium calculation is performed under the constraint that no elements diffuse, then the resultant phase diagram shows the single phase with the minimum Gibbs free energy at any point on the diagram; such calculations are of interest in physical vapor deposition when deposition is so rapid that phase

  14. Iron isotope systematics of the Skaergaard intrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesher, Charles; Lundstrom, C.C.; Barfod, Gry

    crystallization on non-traditional stable isotope systems, particularly iron. FeTi oxide minerals (titanomagnetite and ilmenite) appear after ~60% of the magma had solidified. This was a significant event affecting the liquid line of descent and potentially accompanied by iron isotope fractionation. Here we...... report the results of a broad study of the iron isotope compositions of gabbros within the layered and upper border series of the Skaergaard intrusion, pegmatite and granophyre associated with these gabbroic rocks, and the sandwich horizon thought to represent the product of extreme differentiation and...

  15. Isotopes Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dairiki, J.M.; Browne, E.; Firestone, R.B.; Lederer, C.M.; Shirley, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    The Isotopes Project compiles and evaluates nuclear structure and decay data and disseminates these data to the scientific community. From 1940-1978 the Project had as its main objective the production of the Table of Isotopes. Since publication of the seventh (and last) edition in 1978, the group now coordinates its nuclear data evaluation efforts with those of other data centers via national and international nuclear data networks. The group is currently responsible for the evaluation of mass chains A = 167-194. All evaluated data are entered into the International Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and are published in Nuclear Data Sheets. In addition to the evaluation effort, the Isotopes Project is responsible for production of the Radioactivity Handbook

  16. Isotope production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Dewi M.

    1995-07-15

    Some 2 0% of patients using radiopharmaceuticals receive injections of materials produced by cyclotrons. There are over 200 cyclotrons worldwide; around 35 are operated by commercial companies solely for the production of radio-pharmaceuticals with another 25 accelerators producing medically useful isotopes. These neutron-deficient isotopes are usually produced by proton bombardment. All commonly used medical isotopes can be generated by 'compact' cyclotrons with energies up to 40 MeV and beam intensities in the range 50 to 400 microamps. Specially designed target systems contain gram-quantities of highly enriched stable isotopes as starting materials. The targets can accommodate the high power densities of the proton beams and are designed for automated remote handling. The complete manufacturing cycle includes large-scale target production, isotope generation by cyclotron beam bombardment, radio-chemical extraction, pharmaceutical dispensing, raw material recovery, and labelling/packaging prior to the rapid delivery of these short-lived products. All these manufacturing steps adhere to the pharmaceutical industry standards of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). Unlike research accelerators, commercial cyclotrons are customized 'compact' machines usually supplied by specialist companies such as IBA (Belgium), EBCO (Canada) or Scanditronix (Sweden). The design criteria for these commercial cyclotrons are - small magnet dimensions, power-efficient operation of magnet and radiofrequency systems, high intensity extracted proton beams, well defined beam size and automated computer control. Performance requirements include rapid startup and shutdown, high reliability to support the daily production of short-lived isotopes and low maintenance to minimize the radiation dose to personnel. In 1987 a major step forward in meeting these exacting industrial requirements came when IBA, together with the University of Louvain-La-Neuve in Belgium, developed the Cyclone-30

  17. The empirical equilibrium structure of diacetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorwirth, Sven; Harding, Michael E.; Muders, Dirk; Gauss, Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    High-level quantum-chemical calculations are reported at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory for the equilibrium structure and the harmonic and anharmonic force fields of diacetylene, H sbnd C tbnd C sbnd C tbnd C sbnd H. The calculations were performed employing Dunning's hierarchy of correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pV XZ, cc-pCV XZ, and cc-pwCV XZ, as well as the ANO2 basis set of Almlöf and Taylor. An empirical equilibrium structure based on experimental rotational constants for 13 isotopic species of diacetylene and computed zero-point vibrational corrections is determined (reemp:r=1.0615 Å,r=1.2085 Å,r=1.3727 Å) and in good agreement with the best theoretical structure (CCSD(T)/cc-pCV5Z: r=1.0617 Å, r=1.2083 Å, r=1.3737 Å). In addition, the computed fundamental vibrational frequencies are compared with the available experimental data and found in satisfactory agreement.

  18. Study on adsorption of 99Tc on Fe, Fe2O3 and Fe3O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dejun; Fan Xianhua; Zhang Yingjie; Yao Jun; Zhou Duo; Wang Yong

    2004-01-01

    The absorption behavior of 99 Tc on Fe, Fe 2 O 3 and Fe 3 O 4 powders from aqueous 99 TcO 4 - solutions is studied by batch method in atmospheric conditions. After the adsorption reaches equilibrium, the valence state of 99 Tc in the aqueous solution is examined by extraction with tetraphenylarsonium chloride. The experimental results show that the adsorption ratio of 99 Tc on iron powders decreases with the increase of pH (in the range of 5-8) and of CO 3 2- concentration (in the range of 1 x 10 -8 -1 x 10 -2 mol/L). In opposite, the two factors have no significant influence on the absorption of 99 Tc on both Fe 2 O 3 and Fe 3 O 4 powders. The adsorption isotherms of 99 TcO 4 - on Fe, Fe 2 O 3 and Fe 3 O 4 powders can be well described by the Freundlich's equation. The major valence state of 99 Tc is deduced to be Tc(IV) when iron powders is used as the absorbent. In the case of Fe 2 O 3 or Fe 3 O 4 as an absorbent, the 99 Tc remains as the TcO 4 - form

  19. Thermodynamic chemical energy transfer mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2015-01-01

    Chemical energy transfer mechanisms at finite temperature are explored by a chemical energy transfer theory which is capable of investigating various chemical mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium. Gibbs energy fluxes are obtained as a function of chemical potential, time, and displacement. Diffusion, convection, internal convection, and internal equilibrium chemical energy fluxes are demonstrated. The theory reveals that there are chemical energy flux gaps and broken discrete symmetries at the activation chemical potential, time, and displacement. The statistical, thermodynamic theory is the unification of diffusion and internal convection chemical reactions which reduces to the non-equilibrium generalization beyond the quasi-equilibrium theories of migration and diffusion processes. The relationship between kinetic theories of chemical and electrochemical reactions is also explored. The theory is applied to explore non-equilibrium chemical reactions as an illustration. Three variable separation constants indicate particle number constants and play key roles in describing the distinct chemical reaction mechanisms. The kinetics of chemical energy transfer accounts for the four control mechanisms of chemical reactions such as activation, concentration, transition, and film chemical reactions. - Highlights: • Chemical energy transfer theory is proposed for non-, quasi-, and equilibrium. • Gibbs energy fluxes are expressed by chemical potential, time, and displacement. • Relationship between chemical and electrochemical reactions is discussed. • Theory is applied to explore nonequilibrium energy transfer in chemical reactions. • Kinetics of non-equilibrium chemical reactions shows the four control mechanisms

  20. Chemistry and Ni-isotope composition of ureilites and their components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, A. D.; Quitté, G.; Pack, A.

    2008-09-01

    Ureilites are olivine-pigeonite bearing achondrites with interstitial carbonaceous material and metal. The latter is present as balance calculations assuming a chondritic parent body yield a metal core with 7 to 11 wt% Ni and 0.3 to 0.55 wt% Co. Thermodynamic calculations of Fe-Ni and Fe-Co exchange between olivine and vein metal show that vein metal cannot be in equilibrium with the olivine at any temperature. We conclude that the vein metal is genetically not linked to the ureilite olivine and may have been injected into the parent body by an impactor. Recently published data show a deficit in 60Ni of - 0.24+/-0.02 ɛ-units for various achondrites including ureilites [1]. This has been interpreted as evidence for a late injection of 60Fe after formation of these achondrites. However, our chemical data for vein metal, which is the dominant Ni host in ureilites, demonstrate that bulk Ni isotope data have little meaning with respect to the formation of ureilite silicates. In this work we present Ni isotope data for bulk samples but also vein material and the silicate phase of 4 ureilites (ALHA77257, EET87157, EET96041, Kenna). Bulk ureilites have a ɛ60 between -0.05+/-0.12 and 0.08+/-0.12; the vein metal gives ɛ60 = -0.05+/-0.13 to 0.11+/-0.16. No resolvable deficit in ɛ60 was found, in disagreement with results reported in Bizzarro et al. (2007). The vein material and the bulk samples have, within uncertainty, the same isotopic composition, confirming that the global Ni budget is controlled by the vein material. In ureilite silicates ɛ60 varies from -0.77+/-0.31 to -0.12+/-0.21. Due to the high Fe/Ni ratio of silicates, clear excesses of 60Ni (at least several ɛ-units) are expected if they formed early in the solar system. This is not observed. There is thus no evidence for life 60Fe in ureilites, which may be interpreted in different ways: either 60Fe was injected at a later time into the protoplanetary disk as suggested by [1] (but this is difficult to

  1. Isotopically modified compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter the nomenclature of isotopically modified compounds in Slovak language is described. This chapter consists of following parts: (1) Isotopically substituted compounds; (2) Specifically isotopically labelled compounds; (3) Selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (4) Non-selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (5) Isotopically deficient compounds.

  2. Fundamental functions in equilibrium thermodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, H.J. ter

    In the standard presentations of the principles of Gibbsian equilibrium thermodynamics one can find several gaps in the logic. For a subject that is as widely used as equilibrium thermodynamics, it is of interest to clear up such questions of mathematical rigor. In this paper it is shown that using

  3. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium controls on the abundances of clumped isotopologues of methane during thermogenic formation in laboratory experiments: Implications for the chemistry of pyrolysis and the origins of natural gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yanhua; Douglas, Peter M.J.; Zhang, Shuichang; Stolper, Daniel A.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lawson, Michael; Lewan, Michael; Formolo, Michael; Mi, Jingkui; He, Kun; Hu, Guoyi; Eiler, John M.

    2018-01-01

    Multiply isotopically substituted molecules (‘clumped’ isotopologues) can be used as geothermometers because their proportions at isotopic equilibrium relative to a random distribution of isotopes amongst all isotopologues are functions of temperature. This has allowed measurements of clumped-isotope abundances to be used to constrain formation temperatures of several natural materials. However, kinetic processes during generation, modification, or transport of natural materials can also affect their clumped-isotope compositions. Herein, we show that methane generated experimentally by closed-system hydrous pyrolysis of shale or nonhydrous pyrolysis of coal yields clumped-isotope compositions consistent with an equilibrium distribution of isotopologues under some experimental conditions (temperature–time conditions corresponding to ‘low,’ ‘mature,’ and ‘over-mature’ stages of catagenesis), but can have non-equilibrium (i.e., kinetically controlled) distributions under other experimental conditions (‘high’ to ‘over-mature’ stages), particularly for pyrolysis of coal. Non-equilibrium compositions, when present, lead the measured proportions of clumped species to be lower than expected for equilibrium at the experimental temperature, and in some cases to be lower than a random distribution of isotopes (i.e., negative Δ18 values). We propose that the consistency with equilibrium for methane formed by relatively low temperature pyrolysis reflects local reversibility of isotope exchange reactions involving a reactant or transition state species during demethylation of one or more components of kerogen. Non-equilibrium clumped-isotope compositions occur under conditions where ‘secondary’ cracking of retained oil in shale or wet gas hydrocarbons (C2-5, especially ethane) in coal is prominent. We suggest these non-equilibrium isotopic compositions are the result of the expression of kinetic isotope effects during the irreversible generation

  4. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium controls on the abundances of clumped isotopologues of methane during thermogenic formation in laboratory experiments: Implications for the chemistry of pyrolysis and the origins of natural gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yanhua; Douglas, Peter M. J.; Zhang, Shuichang; Stolper, Daniel A.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lawson, Michael; Lewan, Michael D.; Formolo, Michael; Mi, Jingkui; He, Kun; Hu, Guoyi; Eiler, John M.

    2018-02-01

    Multiply isotopically substituted molecules ('clumped' isotopologues) can be used as geothermometers because their proportions at isotopic equilibrium relative to a random distribution of isotopes amongst all isotopologues are functions of temperature. This has allowed measurements of clumped-isotope abundances to be used to constrain formation temperatures of several natural materials. However, kinetic processes during generation, modification, or transport of natural materials can also affect their clumped-isotope compositions. Herein, we show that methane generated experimentally by closed-system hydrous pyrolysis of shale or nonhydrous pyrolysis of coal yields clumped-isotope compositions consistent with an equilibrium distribution of isotopologues under some experimental conditions (temperature-time conditions corresponding to 'low,' 'mature,' and 'over-mature' stages of catagenesis), but can have non-equilibrium (i.e., kinetically controlled) distributions under other experimental conditions ('high' to 'over-mature' stages), particularly for pyrolysis of coal. Non-equilibrium compositions, when present, lead the measured proportions of clumped species to be lower than expected for equilibrium at the experimental temperature, and in some cases to be lower than a random distribution of isotopes (i.e., negative Δ18 values). We propose that the consistency with equilibrium for methane formed by relatively low temperature pyrolysis reflects local reversibility of isotope exchange reactions involving a reactant or transition state species during demethylation of one or more components of kerogen. Non-equilibrium clumped-isotope compositions occur under conditions where 'secondary' cracking of retained oil in shale or wet gas hydrocarbons (C2-5, especially ethane) in coal is prominent. We suggest these non-equilibrium isotopic compositions are the result of the expression of kinetic isotope effects during the irreversible generation of methane from an alkyl

  5. Isotope generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The patent describes an isotope generator incorporating the possibility of stopping elution before the elution vessel is completely full. Sterile ventilation of the whole system can then occur, including of both generator reservoir and elution vessel. A sterile, and therefore pharmaceutically acceptable, elution fluid is thus obtained and the interior of the generator is not polluted with non-sterile air. (T.P.)

  6. A Multiperiod Equilibrium Pricing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsuk Kwak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an equilibrium pricing model in a dynamic multiperiod stochastic framework with uncertain income. There are one tradable risky asset (stock/commodity, one nontradable underlying (temperature, and also a contingent claim (weather derivative written on the tradable risky asset and the nontradable underlying in the market. The price of the contingent claim is priced in equilibrium by optimal strategies of representative agent and market clearing condition. The risk preferences are of exponential type with a stochastic coefficient of risk aversion. Both subgame perfect strategy and naive strategy are considered and the corresponding equilibrium prices are derived. From the numerical result we examine how the equilibrium prices vary in response to changes in model parameters and highlight the importance of our equilibrium pricing principle.

  7. Non-equilibrium phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Henkel, Malte; Lübeck, Sven

    2009-01-01

    This book describes two main classes of non-equilibrium phase-transitions: (a) static and dynamics of transitions into an absorbing state, and (b) dynamical scaling in far-from-equilibrium relaxation behaviour and ageing. The first volume begins with an introductory chapter which recalls the main concepts of phase-transitions, set for the convenience of the reader in an equilibrium context. The extension to non-equilibrium systems is made by using directed percolation as the main paradigm of absorbing phase transitions and in view of the richness of the known results an entire chapter is devoted to it, including a discussion of recent experimental results. Scaling theories and a large set of both numerical and analytical methods for the study of non-equilibrium phase transitions are thoroughly discussed. The techniques used for directed percolation are then extended to other universality classes and many important results on model parameters are provided for easy reference.

  8. Experimental and thermodynamic assessments of substitutions in the AlFeSi, FeMnSi, FeSiZr and AlCaFeSi systems (65 wt % Si) - solidification simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueneau, C.; Ansara, I.

    1994-01-01

    The substitutions of Al Si, Fe Mn and Fe Zr in some intermetallic compounds of the Al-Fe-Si, Fe-Mn-Si and Fe-Si-Zr systems are modelled in the Si-rich corner using a two sublattice model. The solidification paths of the studied alloys are determined at equilibrium. The ascalculated phase volume fractions of the alloys are compared to the experimental ones. Finally, a solidification simulation using the Gulliver-Scheil's model is performed in order to explain the formation of some precipitates experimentally observed. (authors). 14 figs., 19 refs

  9. The equilibrium crystal shape of nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meltzman, Hila; Chatain, Dominique; Avizemer, Dan; Besmann, Theodore M.; Kaplan, Wayne D.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The ECS of pure Ni is completely facetted with both dense and high-index planes. → The partial pressure of oxygen has a significant effect on the surface anisotropy. → The addition of Fe decreased the anisotropy and de-stabilized high-index planes. → During solid dewetting nucleation barriers prevent equilibration of the top facet. - Abstract: The crystal shape of Ni particles, dewetted in the solid state on sapphire substrates, was examined as a function of the partial pressure of oxygen (P(O 2 )) and iron content using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the surface was characterized by atom-probe tomography. Unlike other face-centered cubic (fcc) equilibrium crystal shapes, the Ni crystals containing little or no impurities exhibited a faceted shape, indicating large surface anisotropy. In addition to the {1 1 1}, {1 0 0} and {1 1 0} facets, which are usually present in the equilibrium crystal shape of fcc metals, high-index facets were identified such as {1 3 5} and {1 3 8} at low P(O 2 ), and {0 1 2} and {0 1 3} at higher P(O 2 ). The presence of iron altered the crystal shape into a truncated sphere with only facets parallel to denser planes. The issue of particle equilibration is discussed specifically for the case of solid-state dewetting.

  10. Moessbauer-spectroscopic study of structure and magnetism of the exchange-coupled layer systems Fe/FeSn{sub 2}, and Fe/FeSi/Si and the ion-implanted diluted magnetic semiconductor SiC(Fe); Moessbauerspektroskopische Untersuchung von Struktur und Magnetismus der austauschgekoppelten Schichtsysteme Fe/FeSn{sub 2} und Fe/FeSi/Si und des ionenimplantierten verduennten magnetischen Halbleiters SiC(Fe)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stromberg, Frank

    2009-07-07

    In line with this work the structural and magnetic properties of the exchange coupled layered systems Fe/FeSn{sub 2} and Fe/FeSi/Si and of the Fe ion implanted diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) SiC(Fe) were investigated. The main measuring method was the isotope selective {sup 57}Fe conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS), mostly in connection with the {sup 57}Fe tracer layer technique, in a temperature range from 4.2 K to 340 K. Further measurement techniques were X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron diffraction (LEED, RHEED), SQUID magnetometry and FMR (Ferromagnetic Resonance). In the first part of this work the properties of thin AF FeSn{sub 2}(001) films and of the exchange-bias system Fe/FeSn{sub 2}(001) on InSb(001) were investigated. With the application of {sup 57}Fe-tracer layers and CEMS both the Fe-spin structure and the temperature dependence of the magnetic hyperfine field (B{sub hf}) of FeSn{sub 2} could be examined. The evaporation of Fe films on the FeSn{sub 2} films produced in the latter ones a high perpendicular spin component at the Fe/FeSn{sub 2} interface. In some distance from the interface the Fe spins rotate back into the sample plane. Furthermore {sup 57}Fe-CEMS provided a correlation between the absolute value of the exchange field vertical stroke He vertical stroke and the amount of magnetic defects within the FeSn{sub 2}. Temperature dependent CEMS-measurements yielded informations about the spin dynamics within the AF. The transition temperatures T{sub B}{sup *}, which were interpreted as superparamagnetic blocking temperatures, obtain higher values compared to the temperatures T{sub B} of the exchange-bias effect, obtained with magnetometry measurements. The second part of this work deals with the indirect exchange coupling within Fe/FeSi/Si/FeSi/Fe multilayers and FeSi diffusion barriers. The goal was to achieve Fe free Si interlayers. The CEMS results show that starting from a thickness of t{sub FeSi}=10-12 A of the

  11. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-09-18

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  12. Spontaneity and Equilibrium: Why "?G Equilibrium" Are Incorrect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental criteria for chemical reactions to be spontaneous in a given direction are generally incorrectly stated as ?G equilibrium are also misstated as being ?G = 0 or ?A = 0. Following a brief review of the…

  13. Iron Isotope Fractionation in Microbial and Non-Biological Precipitates, and the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Boettcher, M. E.; Hofmann, B.; Walczyk, T.

    2001-12-01

    We have investigated biotic and abiotic stable iron isotope fractionation pathways in experiments, the low-T natural environment, and the human body. Fe samples were analysed using a Nu Plasma Multicollector ICP-MS. All measured samples plot on the theoretically predicted exponential fractionation line in the Delta57Fe versus Delta56Fe space, demonstrating absence of ArN or ArO interferences. An experimental calibration of Fe isotope fractionation during abiotic formation of iron (III) oxyhydroxide and iron(II) minerals from aqueous solution resulted in significant differences: (a) During fast precipitation of FeOOH during alkalization of a Fe(III)Cl3 solution at room temperature the solid is only slightly enriched by about 0.1permil in 57Fe compared to the solution. (b) Slow precipitation of akaganeite (beta-FeOOH) from aqueous Fe(III)Cl3 solution leads to a depletion of 57Fe by about -2.2permil in the solid phase without a significant influence of temperature. (c) Precipitation of FeOOH during oxidation of aqueous Fe(II) solutions by oxygen yields an enrichment of up to 4.8permil in 57Fe in the solid phase. (d) Iron(II) carbonate precipitation between 20 and 60C leads to an almost negligible depletion in 57Fe compared to aqueous ferrous ions. Interpretation: Large enrichment of the heavy isotope is observed where Fe is oxidised, whereas small to interme-diate depletions of heavy Fe isotopes occur upon forma-tion of Fe-minerals without change in redox state. Addi-tionally, kinetic effects, the speciation of the aqueous solution, or the effect of crystal structures may have to be considered. Biotic isotope fractionation by microorganisms was investigated at two field sites. In a Fe mine (Gonzen, Switzerland), Fe-precipitating microbes (Gallionella ferrugina and Leptohrix ochtraceae) have formed Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides that are ca. 0.6permil heavier in Delta57Fe than the Fe-rich parent solutions. At Cady Mts, California, filamentous fabrics of goethite, thought to

  14. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift

  15. Isotope hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drost, W.

    1978-01-01

    The International Symposium on Isotope Hydrology was jointly organized by the IAEA and UNESCO, in co-operation with the National Committee of the Federal Republic of Germany for the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) and the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH (GSF). Upon the invitation of the Federal Republic of Germany the Symposium was held from 19-23 June 1978 in Neuherberg on the GSF campus. The Symposium was officially opened by Mr. S. Eklund, Director General of the IAEA. The symposium - the fifth meeting held on isotope hydrology - was attended by over 160 participants from 44 countries and four international organizations and by about 30 observers from the Federal Republic of Germany. Due to the absence of scientists from the USSR five papers were cancelled and therefore only 46 papers of the original programme were presented in ten sessions

  16. Tracing alteration of mantle peridotite in the Samail ophiolite using Mg isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Obeso, J. C.; Kelemen, P. B.; Higgins, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Magnesium is one of the main constituents of mantle peridotite ( 22.8 wt%), which has a homogeneous Mg isotopic composition (d26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.04 ‰ (2 sd) DSM3, Teng et al 2010 GCA). Mg isotopes are used as tracers of continental and oceanic weathering as they exhibit variable degrees of fractionation during alteration depending on the lithology. Here we report some of the first Mg isotopic compositions of the mantle section of the Samail ophiolite in Oman and its alteration products. The mantle section of the ophiolite is composed mainly of depleted harzburgites and dunites with mantle-like d26Mg (-0.25, -0.21 ‰). Mantle peridotite is far from equilibrium in near surface conditions leading to rapid, extensive serpentinization, carbonation and oxidation, as well as other geochemical changes. Our analyzed samples encompass most of the alteration of peridotite products observed in Oman including listvenites (completely carbonated peridotite) near the basal thrust of the ophiolite, massive magnesite veins within peridotite outcrops, and heavily altered harzburgites. Magnesite listvenites have d26Mg slightly below mantle values (-0.33, -0.33‰) while dolomite listvenites are significantly lighter (-1.46, -0.89‰). This suggests that heavy Mg isotopes were removed from the listvenites during ophiolite emplacement. Heavily altered peridotite from Wadi Fins exhibit alteration halos with drastic changes in composition. The most oxidized areas are enriched in Fe and depleted in Mg compared to the cores of the samples. These variations in Mg concentrations are complemented by a shift to heavy Mg isotopic compositions (0.74, 0.86‰), among the heaviest d26Mg values that have been reported in altered peridotite. Potential sinks for light isotopes removed from such alteration zones are massive magnesite veins with very light compositions (-3.39, -3.14‰). The fractionation of Mg isotopes observed in the mantle section of the ophiolite spans more than 50% of the known

  17. Stable isotopes and heavy metal distribution in Dreissena polymorpha (Zebra Mussels) from western basin of Lake Erie, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Aasm, I.S.; Clarke, J.D.; Fryer, B.J. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1998-02-01

    Dreissena polymorpha is an exotic freshwater bivalve species which was introduced into the Great Lakes system in the fall of 1985 through the release of ballast water from European freighters. Utilizing individual growth rings of the shells, the stable isotope distribution ({delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C) was determined for the life history of selected samples which were collected from the western basin of Lake Erie. These bivalves deposit their shell in near equilibrium with the ambient water and thus reflect any annual variation of the system in the isotopic records held within their shells. Observed values for {delta}{sup 18}O range from -6.64 to -9.46 permille with an average value of -7.69 permille PDB, while carbon values ranged from -0.80 to -4.67 permille with an average value of -1.76 permille PDB. Dreissena polymorpha shells incorporate metals into their shells during growth. Individual shell growth increments were analyzed for Pb, Fe, Mg, Mn, Cd, Cu, and V concentrations. The shells show increased uptake of certain metals during periods of isotopic enrichment which correspond with warmer water temperatures. Since metals are incorporated into the shells, the organism may be useful as a biomonitor of metal pollution within aquatic environments. (orig.)

  18. Structural transformation in mechanosynthesized bcc Fe-Al-Si(Ge) solid solutions during heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubalova, L.M.; Sviridov, I.A.; Vasilyeva, O.Ya.; Fadeeva, V.I.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffractometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy study of Fe 50 Al 25 Si 25 and Fe 50 Al 25 Ge 25 alloys obtained by mechanical alloying (MA) of elementary powders was carried out. Phase transformation during heating of synthesized products was studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). After 2.5 h of MA monophase alloys containing bcc Fe(Al, Ge) solid solutions Fe(Al, Si) are formed. Fe(Al, Si) is partially ordered B2 type and Fe(Al, Ge) is completely disordered. DSC curves of synthesized alloys displayed the presence of exothermal peaks caused by phase transformation. The metastable Fe(Al, Si) solid solution transformed into FeAl 1-x Si x (B2) and FeSi 1-x Al x (B20) equilibrium phases. The Fe(Al, Ge) solid solution transformed into equilibrium phases through intermediate stage of Fe 6 Ge 3 Al 2 metastable phase formation. The Fe 6 Ge 3 Al 2 phase dissociated into three equilibrium phases: FeAl 1-x Ge x (B2), χ-Fe 6 Ge 5 and η-Fe 13 (Ge, Al) 8 (B8 2 ). The structure of Fe 6 Ge 3 Al 2 was calculated by Rietveld method, the distribution of Al and Ge in the elementary cell and its parameters were calculated. Moessbauer study showed that Fe(Al, Si) and Fe(Al, Ge) solid solutions are paramagnetic. In the equilibrium state the alloy containing Si is also paramagnetic while the alloy with Ge showed ferromagnetic properties

  19. Numerical Verification Of Equilibrium Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piro, Markus; Lewis, Brent; Thompson, William T.; Simunovic, Srdjan; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical tool is in an advanced state of development to compute the equilibrium compositions of phases and their proportions in multi-component systems of importance to the nuclear industry. The resulting software is being conceived for direct integration into large multi-physics fuel performance codes, particularly for providing boundary conditions in heat and mass transport modules. However, any numerical errors produced in equilibrium chemistry computations will be propagated in subsequent heat and mass transport calculations, thus falsely predicting nuclear fuel behaviour. The necessity for a reliable method to numerically verify chemical equilibrium computations is emphasized by the requirement to handle the very large number of elements necessary to capture the entire fission product inventory. A simple, reliable and comprehensive numerical verification method is presented which can be invoked by any equilibrium chemistry solver for quality assurance purposes.

  20. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative

  1. On the local equilibrium condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessling, H.

    1994-11-01

    A physical system is in local equilibrium if it cannot be distinguished from a global equilibrium by ''infinitesimally localized measurements''. This should be a natural characterization of local equilibrium, but the problem is to give a precise meaning to the qualitative phrase ''infinitesimally localized measurements''. A solution is suggested in form of a Local Equilibrium Condition (LEC), which can be applied to linear relativistic quantum field theories but not directly to selfinteracting quantum fields. The concept of local temperature resulting from LEC is compared to an old approach to local temperature based on the principle of maximal entropy. It is shown that the principle of maximal entropy does not always lead to physical states if it is applied to relativistic quantum field theories. (orig.)

  2. A Strategic-Equilibrium Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel J. Turbay

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The strategic equilibrium of an N-person cooperative game with transferable utility is a system composed of a cover collection of subsets of N and a set of extended imputations attainable through such equilibrium cover. The system describes a state of coalitional bargaining stability where every player has a bargaining alternative against any other player to support his corresponding equilibrium claim. Any coalition in the sable system may form and divide the characteristic value function of the coalition as prescribed by the equilibrium payoffs. If syndicates are allowed to form, a formed coalition may become a syndicate using the equilibrium payoffs as disagreement values in bargaining for a part of the complementary coalition incremental value to the grand coalition when formed. The emergent well known-constant sum derived game in partition function is described in terms of parameters that result from incumbent binding agreements. The strategic-equilibrium corresponding to the derived game gives an equal value claim to all players.  This surprising result is alternatively explained in terms of strategic-equilibrium based possible outcomes by a sequence of bargaining stages that when the binding agreements are in the right sequential order, von Neumann and Morgenstern (vN-M non-discriminatory solutions emerge. In these solutions a preferred branch by a sufficient number of players is identified: the weaker players syndicate against the stronger player. This condition is referred to as the stronger player paradox.  A strategic alternative available to the stronger players to overcome the anticipated not desirable results is to voluntarily lower his bargaining equilibrium claim. In doing the original strategic equilibrium is modified and vN-M discriminatory solutions may occur, but also a different stronger player may emerge that has eventually will have to lower his equilibrium claim. A sequence of such measures converges to the equal

  3. Thermodynamic evolution far from equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khantuleva, Tatiana A.

    2018-05-01

    The presented model of thermodynamic evolution of an open system far from equilibrium is based on the modern results of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, the nonlocal theory of nonequilibrium transport developed by the author and the Speed Gradient principle introduced in the theory of adaptive control. Transition to a description of the system internal structure evolution at the mesoscopic level allows a new insight at the stability problem of non-equilibrium processes. The new model is used in a number of specific tasks.

  4. Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as−25 per mil can be written as−25 mUr (or−2.5 cUr or−0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg ‘units’ are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  5. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central 40 Ca + 40 Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80≤t≤300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables

  6. Mechanical alloying of the FeNi-Ag system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, G.; Ibarra, D.; Ochoa, J.; Villalba, R.; Sagarzazu, A.

    2007-01-01

    The Fe-Ni-Ag system is of particular interest for its potential applications as soft magnetic granular material with small magnetic grains embedded in a non-magnetic metal matrix. Under equilibrium conditions: Fe-Ag and Ni-Ag are immiscible and Fe-Ni shows complete solubility. These materials are particularly important for magnetoresistivity properties. The properties of these alloys are closely related to their microstructure; therefore, a detailed study of the transformations occurring during milling was undertaken using pre-alloyed Fe x Ni 100-x (x = 30, 50 and 70) further milled with different Ag content to give the following alloys compositions (Fe x -Ni 100-x ) 100-y Ag y (y = 5, 20, 60). Consolidation of the mechanically alloyed powders by sintering at 950 o C was performed. Morphological and structural characterization of the sintered powders was carried out by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Fe 30 Ni 70 and Fe 50 Ni 50 formed ordered FeNi 3 compound. Fe 70 Ni 30 showed the formation of a mixture of γ-(Fe,Ni) and α-Fe(Ni) solid solutions. The mixture of these systems with Ag showed the metal solid solutions surrounded by Ag islands of Fe x Ni y -Ag, There was also evidence of Ag diffusing into the γ-(Fe,Ni). High Ag content (60%) shows formation of islands of FeNi surrounded by Ag. Sintering is always improved with the Ag content

  7. Nd-Sr isotopic geochemistry and U-Pb geochronology of the Fe granitic gneiss and Lajedo Granodiorite: implications for paleoproterozoic evolution of the Mineiro Belt, southern Sao Francisco craton, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Wilson [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Centro de Pesquisas Geocronologicas]. E-mail: wteixeir@usp.br; Avila, Ciro Alexandre [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Museu Nacional. Dept. de Geologia e Paleontologia]. E-mail: avila@mn.ufrj.br; Nunes, Luciana Cabral [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias]. E-mail: luciana@igc.usp.br

    2008-07-01

    The Fe granitic gneiss and Lajedo granodiorite belong to a voluminous felsic-mafic plutonism, tectonically linked to Paleoproterozoic magmatic evolution of the Mineiro Belt, southern portion of the Sao Francisco Craton, central-eastern Brazil. The Fe pluton is located north of the Lenheiros shear zone and is intrusive with respect to the Rio das Mortes greenstone belt and pyroxenite - gabbroic bodies, as indicated by xenoliths of gneiss and amphibolite, in the first case, and pyroxenite in the latter. The Lajedo granodiorite is located south of the Lenheiros shear zone and cuts the metamafic rocks of the Forro peridotite - pyroxenite and mafic and intermediate rocks of the Nazareno greenstone belt, as evidenced by xenoliths from the latter unit. The modal composition of the Fe granitic gneiss lies within the ranges of monzogranite and syenogranite. It is peraluminous and shows a large variation in K{sub 2}O content, which implies a middle-K calc-alkaline to high-K calc-alkaline tendency. The Lajedo modal composition is consistent with granodioritic and tonalitic compositions. It indicates a predominantly peraluminous composition and calc-alkaline character. The U-Pb zircon crystallization age of the Fe granitic gneiss is 2191 {+-} 9 Ma, whereas the Lajedo granodiorite yields 2208 {+-} 26 Ma. The Nd/Sr characteristics of the Fe and Lajedo plutons are consistent with mixtures of enriched mantle (EMI-type), DMM and crustal components during magma genesis in a plutonic arc setting, while the low {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sri ratios point to contribution of mafic rock protoliths during magma genesis. This is also in accordance with the characteristic xenoliths observed within the investigated plutons from the Nazareno and Rio das Mortes greenstone belts. The Fe granitic gneiss and Lajedo granodiorite show tectonic characteristics which are comparable to those of nearby coeval plutons: Brito quartz-diorite (2221 +- 2 Ma), Brumado de Cima granodiorite (2219 {+-} 2 Ma), Brumado

  8. Nd-Sr isotopic geochemistry and U-Pb geochronology of the Fe granitic gneiss and Lajedo Granodiorite: implications for paleoproterozoic evolution of the Mineiro Belt, southern Sao Francisco craton, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Wilson; Avila, Ciro Alexandre; Nunes, Luciana Cabral

    2008-01-01

    The Fe granitic gneiss and Lajedo granodiorite belong to a voluminous felsic-mafic plutonism, tectonically linked to Paleoproterozoic magmatic evolution of the Mineiro Belt, southern portion of the Sao Francisco Craton, central-eastern Brazil. The Fe pluton is located north of the Lenheiros shear zone and is intrusive with respect to the Rio das Mortes greenstone belt and pyroxenite - gabbroic bodies, as indicated by xenoliths of gneiss and amphibolite, in the first case, and pyroxenite in the latter. The Lajedo granodiorite is located south of the Lenheiros shear zone and cuts the metamafic rocks of the Forro peridotite - pyroxenite and mafic and intermediate rocks of the Nazareno greenstone belt, as evidenced by xenoliths from the latter unit. The modal composition of the Fe granitic gneiss lies within the ranges of monzogranite and syenogranite. It is peraluminous and shows a large variation in K 2 O content, which implies a middle-K calc-alkaline to high-K calc-alkaline tendency. The Lajedo modal composition is consistent with granodioritic and tonalitic compositions. It indicates a predominantly peraluminous composition and calc-alkaline character. The U-Pb zircon crystallization age of the Fe granitic gneiss is 2191 ± 9 Ma, whereas the Lajedo granodiorite yields 2208 ± 26 Ma. The Nd/Sr characteristics of the Fe and Lajedo plutons are consistent with mixtures of enriched mantle (EMI-type), DMM and crustal components during magma genesis in a plutonic arc setting, while the low 87 Sr/ 86 Sri ratios point to contribution of mafic rock protoliths during magma genesis. This is also in accordance with the characteristic xenoliths observed within the investigated plutons from the Nazareno and Rio das Mortes greenstone belts. The Fe granitic gneiss and Lajedo granodiorite show tectonic characteristics which are comparable to those of nearby coeval plutons: Brito quartz-diorite (2221 +- 2 Ma), Brumado de Cima granodiorite (2219 ± 2 Ma), Brumado de Baixo

  9. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  10. Stability of the high pressure phase Fe3S2 up to Earth's core pressures in the Fe-S-O and the Fe-S-Si systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Davis, A.; Brauser, N.; Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's core is comprised of an iron-nickel alloy that contains 5-15% of a light element component. The abundance and alloying capability of sulfur, silicon and oxygen in the bulk Earth make them important core alloy candidates; therefore, the high-pressure phase equilibria of the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems are relevant for understanding the possible chemistry of Earth's core. Previously, a Fe3S2 phase was recognized as a low-pressure intermediate phase in the Fe-FeS system that is stable from 14-21 GPa, but the structure of this phase has not been resolved. We report in-situ XRD and chemical analysis of recovered samples to further examine the stability and structure of Fe3S2 as it coexists with other phases in the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems. In situ high P-T synchrotron XRD experiments were conducted in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell to determine the equilibrium phases in Fe75S7O18 and Fe80S5Si15 compositions between 30 and 174 GPa and up to 3000 K. In the S,O-rich samples, an orthorhombic Fe3S2 phase coexists with hcp-Fe, Fe3S and FeO and undergoes two monoclinic distortions between 60 and 174 GPa. In the S,Si-rich samples, the orthorhombic Fe3S2 phase was observed up to 115 GPa. With increasing pressure, the Fe3S2 phase becomes stable to higher temperatures in both compositions, suggesting possible Fe3(S,O)2 or Fe3(S,Si)2 solid solutions. SEM analysis of a laser heated Fe75S7O18 sample recovered from 40 GPa and 1450 K confirms a Fe3(S,O)2 phase with O dissolved into the structure. Based on the current melting data in the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems, the Fe3(S,O)2 stability field intersects the solidus in the outer core and could be a possible liquidus phase in Fe,S,O-rich planetary cores, whereas Fe3S is the stable sulfide at outer core pressures in Fe,S,Si-rich systems.

  11. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significant...

  12. Isotopic enrichment of 15N by ionic exchange cromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelin, P.C.O.; Matsui, E.; Salati, E.

    1979-01-01

    The ionic exchange chromatographic method in columns of resin which is employed in the study of isotopic enrichment of 15 N is presented. Determinations are made of the isotopic separation constant for the exchange of isotopes 15 N and 14 N in the equilibrium involving ammonium hidroxide in the solution phase and ions NH 4 + adsorbed in cationic resins: Dowex 50W-X8 and X12, 100-200 mesh. Experiments are also conducted for determination of height of theoretical plates for situations of equilibrium of the NH 4 + band in two systems of resin's columns aimed at estimating the experimental conditions used. The isotopic analyses of nitrogen are carried out by mass spectrometry [pt

  13. Tritium isotope fractionation in biological systems and in analytical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.A.; Baumgaertner, Franz

    1989-01-01

    The organically bound tritium (OBT) is evaluated in biological systems by determining the tritium distribution ratio (R-value), i.e. tritium concentrations in organic substance to cell water. The determination of the R-value always involves isotope fractionation is applied analytical procedures and hence the evaluation of the true OBT -value in a given biological system appears more complicated than hitherto known in the literature. The present work concentrates on the tritium isotope fractionation in the cell water separation and on the resulting effects on the R-value. The analytical procedures examined are vacuum freeze drying under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions and azeotropic distillation. The vaporization isotope effects are determined separately in the phase transition of solid or liquid to gas in pure tritium water systems as well as in real biological systems, e.g. corn plant. The results are systematically analyzed and the influence of isotope effects on the R-value is rigorously quantified

  14. Prediction of isotope effects for anticipated intermediate structures in the course of bacterial denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, M.A.; Schowen, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    Vibrational-analysis methods have been used to estimate the equilibrium 14 N/ 15 N isotope effects to be expected for conversion of nitrite anion to thirteen possible intermediate-state and product-state structures [HONO, NO + , NO, NO - , FeNO, ON * NO 2 , O * NNO 2 , O 2 NNO 2 , ONO * N, O * NON, ONNO, * NNO, N * NO] in the reduction of nitrite ion to nitrous oxide denitrifying bacteria. The results, taken in combination with previous experimental isotope-effect and tracer studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri and related systems, are consistent with a suggestion that a second nitrite anion enters the enzyme-catalytic cycle at the stage of a nitrosyl-ion intermediate but re-emerges after entry of the reducing electrons; the product nitrous oxide is then formed by disproportionation of enzymically generated hyponitrous acid. The calculations are consistent with contributions, under different experimental conditions, of several different transition states to limiting the rate of the enzymic reaction. These transition states (and the corresponding experimental conditions) are the transition states for N-O fission in the generation of a mononitrogen electrophilic species from nitrite anion (high reductant, high nitrite concentrations), for attack of nitrite on this electrophile (high reductant, low nitrite concentrations) and for electron transfer to a dinitrogen-trioxide-like species (low reductant concentration). (orig.)

  15. Donnan membrane speciation of Al, Fe, trace metals and REEs in coastal lowland acid sulfate soil-impacted drainage waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Adele M.; Xue, Youjia [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Kinsela, Andrew S. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Institute for Environmental Research (IER), Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Wilcken, Klaus M. [Institute for Environmental Research (IER), Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Collins, Richard N., E-mail: richard.collins@unsw.edu.au [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Donnan dialysis has been applied to forty filtered drainage waters collected from five coastal lowland acid sulfate soil (CLASS) catchments across north-eastern NSW, Australia. Despite having average pH values < 3.9, 78 and 58% of Al and total Fe, respectively, were present as neutral or negatively-charged species. Complementary isotope dilution experiments with {sup 55}Fe and {sup 26}Al demonstrated that only soluble (i.e. no colloidal) species were present. Trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) were also mainly present (> 70%) as negatively-charged complexes. In contrast, the speciation of the divalent trace metals Co, Mn, Ni and Zn was dominated by positively-charged complexes and was strongly correlated with the alkaline earth metals Ca and Mg. Thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations indicated that natural organic matter (NOM) complexes dominated Fe(III) speciation in agreement with that obtained by Donnan dialysis. In the case of Fe(II), however, the free cation was predicted to dominate under thermodynamic equilibrium, whilst our results indicated that Fe(II) was mainly present as neutral or negatively-charged complexes (most likely with sulfate). For all other divalent metals thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations agreed well with the Donnan dialysis results. The proportion of Al and REEs predicted to be negatively-charged was also grossly underestimated, relative to the experimental results, highlighting possible inaccuracies in the stability constants developed for these trivalent Me(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup −} and/or Me–NOM complexes and difficulties in modeling complex environmental samples. These results will help improve metal mobility and toxicity models developed for CLASS-affected environments, and also demonstrate that Australian CLASS environments can discharge REEs at concentrations an order of magnitude greater than previously reported. - Highlights: • CLASS discharge large amounts of metals and their speciation is poorly

  16. Local Equilibrium and Retardation Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott K; Vesselinov, Velimir V

    2018-01-01

    In modeling solute transport with mobile-immobile mass transfer (MIMT), it is common to use an advection-dispersion equation (ADE) with a retardation factor, or retarded ADE. This is commonly referred to as making the local equilibrium assumption (LEA). Assuming local equilibrium, Eulerian textbook treatments derive the retarded ADE, ostensibly exactly. However, other authors have presented rigorous mathematical derivations of the dispersive effect of MIMT, applicable even in the case of arbitrarily fast mass transfer. We resolve the apparent contradiction between these seemingly exact derivations by adopting a Lagrangian point of view. We show that local equilibrium constrains the expected time immobile, whereas the retarded ADE actually embeds a stronger, nonphysical, constraint: that all particles spend the same amount of every time increment immobile. Eulerian derivations of the retarded ADE thus silently commit the gambler's fallacy, leading them to ignore dispersion due to mass transfer that is correctly modeled by other approaches. We then present a particle tracking simulation illustrating how poor an approximation the retarded ADE may be, even when mobile and immobile plumes are continually near local equilibrium. We note that classic "LEA" (actually, retarded ADE validity) criteria test for insignificance of MIMT-driven dispersion relative to hydrodynamic dispersion, rather than for local equilibrium. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Equilibrium leach testing of Magnox swarf and sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A.; Angus, M.J.; Kirkham, I.A.; Tyson, A.

    1988-10-01

    A static equilibrium leach test has been developed to simulate repository conditions after ground water has penetrated the near field barrier. The repository components - waste, matrix and backfill - have been equilibrated with water for up to one year. Leachates were analysed for U, Pu, Np 237 , Am 241 , Cs 137 , Sr 90 , Tc 99 , I 129 and C 14 . Results are presented for leaching from Magnox fuel cladding wastes using a combination of matrices, backfills and atmospheric conditions. The equilibrium concentrations were generally very low and have been compared with the concentration of each isotope in drinking water that would give an adult an annual effective dose equivalent of 0.1mSv. (author)

  18. Equilibrium leach testing of Magnox swarf and sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A.; Angus, M.J.; Kirkham, I.A.; Tyson, A.

    1987-10-01

    A static equilibrium leach test has been developed to simulate repository conditions after ground water has penetrated the near field barrier. The repository components - waste, matrix and backfill - have been equilibrated with water for up to one year. Leachates were analysed for U, Pu, Np 237 , Am 241 , Cs 137 , Sr 90 , Tc 99 , I 129 and C 14 . Results are presented for leaching from Magnox fuel cladding wastes using a combination of matrices, backfills and atmospheric conditions. The equilibrium concentrations were generally very low and have been compared with the concentration of each isotope in drinking water that would give an adult an annual effective dose equivalent of 0.1mSv. (author)

  19. Isotopic evidences of past upwelling intensity in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    and understand the history of upwelling as it is recorded in deep-sea sediments. The southwest (SW) monsoon strongly influences the climatic conditions in South and Southeast Asia and biological productivity in the Arabian Sea. ability at the ODP Site 728... climatic change and ocean history (McCrea, 1950; Epstein et al., 1953; Emiliani, 1955). The isotopic role of planktic forami- nifera expanded, it was recognized that foraminifera did not secret their shells in isotopic equilibrium with ambient water (Be...

  20. Cross sections for production of 70 discrete-energy gamma rays created by neutron interactions with 56Fe for En to 40 MeV: Tabulated data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; Todd, J.H.; Larson, D.C.

    1990-09-01

    Inelastic and nonelastic neutron interactions with 56 Fe have been studied for incident neutron energies between 0.8 and 41 MeV. An iron sample isotopically enriched in the mass 56 isotope was used. Gamma rays representing 70 transitions among levels in residual nuclei were identified, and production cross sections were deduced. The reactions studied were 56 Fe(n,n') 56 Fe, 56 Fe(n,p) 56 Mn, 56 Fe(n,2n) 55 Fe, 56 Fe(n,d + n,np) 55 Mn, 56 Fe(n,t + n,nd + n,2np) 54 Mn, 56 Fe(n,α) 53 Cr, 56 Fe(n,nα) 52 Cr, and 56 Fe(n,3n) 54 Fe. Values obtained for production cross sections as functions of incident neutron energy are presented in tabular form. 38 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs

  1. Equilibrium Temperature Profiles within Fission Product Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Michael D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    We studied waste form strategies for advanced fuel cycle schemes. Several options were considered for three waste streams with the following fission products: cesium and strontium, transition metals, and lanthanides. These three waste streams may be combined or disposed separately. The decay of several isotopes will generate heat that must be accommodated by the waste form, and this heat will affect the waste loadings. To help make an informed decision on the best option, we present computational data on the equilibrium temperature of glass waste forms containing a combination of these three streams.

  2. Imaging the equilibrium state and magnetization dynamics of partially built hard disk write heads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valkass, R. A. J., E-mail: rajv202@ex.ac.uk; Yu, W.; Shelford, L. R.; Keatley, P. S.; Loughran, T. H. J.; Hicken, R. J. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Cavill, S. A. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Laan, G. van der; Dhesi, S. S. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Bashir, M. A.; Gubbins, M. A. [Research and Development, Seagate Technology, 1 Disc Drive, Springtown Industrial Estate, Derry BT48 0BF (United Kingdom); Czoschke, P. J.; Lopusnik, R. [Recording Heads Operation, Seagate Technology, 7801 Computer Avenue South, Bloomington, Minnesota 55435 (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Four different designs of partially built hard disk write heads with a yoke comprising four repeats of NiFe (1 nm)/CoFe (50 nm) were studied by both x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) and time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM). These techniques were used to investigate the static equilibrium domain configuration and the magnetodynamic response across the entire structure, respectively. Simulations and previous TRSKM studies have made proposals for the equilibrium domain configuration of similar structures, but no direct observation of the equilibrium state of the writers has yet been made. In this study, static XPEEM images of the equilibrium state of writer structures were acquired using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism as the contrast mechanism. These images suggest that the crystalline anisotropy dominates the equilibrium state domain configuration, but competition with shape anisotropy ultimately determines the stability of the equilibrium state. Dynamic TRSKM images were acquired from nominally identical devices. These images suggest that a longer confluence region may hinder flux conduction from the yoke into the pole tip: the shorter confluence region exhibits clear flux beaming along the symmetry axis, whereas the longer confluence region causes flux to conduct along one edge of the writer. The observed variations in dynamic response agree well with the differences in the equilibrium magnetization configuration visible in the XPEEM images, confirming that minor variations in the geometric design of the writer structure can have significant effects on the process of flux beaming.

  3. Equilibrium Arrival Times to Queues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Jesper; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    We consider a non-cooperative queueing environment where a finite number of customers independently choose when to arrive at a queueing system that opens at a given point in time and serves customers on a last-come first-serve preemptive-resume (LCFS-PR) basis. Each customer has a service time...... requirement which is identically and independently distributed according to some general probability distribution, and they want to complete service as early as possible while minimizing the time spent in the queue. In this setting, we establish the existence of an arrival time strategy that constitutes...... a symmetric (mixed) Nash equilibrium, and show that there is at most one symmetric equilibrium. We provide a numerical method to compute this equilibrium and demonstrate by a numerical example that the social effciency can be lower than the effciency induced by a similar queueing system that serves customers...

  4. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  5. Spontaneity and Equilibrium: Why "?G Equilibrium" Are Incorrect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental criteria for chemical reactions to be spontaneous in a given direction are generally incorrectly stated as ?G chemistry textbooks and even in some more advanced texts. Similarly, the criteria for equilibrium are also misstated as being ?G = 0 or ?A = 0. Following a brief review of the…

  6. Phosphorus release from anaerobic peat soil during convective discharge – effect of soil Fe:P molar ratio and preferential flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    soils (TOC from 5 to 39%) with a gradient in Fe:P molar ratio (molar ratio between bicarbonate dithionite extractable Fe and P (FeBD:PBD) from 3 to 112) and degree of non-equilibrium (preferential) flow. Short-term batch incubation experiments (21 days) indicated that concurrent Fe and P release...

  7. Equilibrium problems for Raney densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Peter J.; Liu, Dang-Zheng; Zinn-Justin, Paul

    2015-07-01

    The Raney numbers are a class of combinatorial numbers generalising the Fuss-Catalan numbers. They are indexed by a pair of positive real numbers (p, r) with p > 1 and 0 0 and similarly use both methods to identify the equilibrium problem for (p, r) = (θ/q + 1, 1/q), θ > 0 and q \\in Z+ . The Wiener-Hopf method is used to extend the latter to parameters (p, r) = (θ/q + 1, m + 1/q) for m a non-negative integer, and also to identify the equilibrium problem for a family of densities with moments given by certain binomial coefficients.

  8. Equilibrium in a Production Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarolla, Maria B., E-mail: maria.chiarolla@uniroma1.it [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Metodi e Modelli per l' Economia, il Territorio e la Finanza, Facolta di Economia (Italy); Haussmann, Ulrich G., E-mail: uhaus@math.ubc.ca [University of British Columbia, Department of Mathematics (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Consider a closed production-consumption economy with multiple agents and multiple resources. The resources are used to produce the consumption good. The agents derive utility from holding resources as well as consuming the good produced. They aim to maximize their utility while the manager of the production facility aims to maximize profits. With the aid of a representative agent (who has a multivariable utility function) it is shown that an Arrow-Debreu equilibrium exists. In so doing we establish technical results that will be used to solve the stochastic dynamic problem (a case with infinite dimensional commodity space so the General Equilibrium Theory does not apply) elsewhere.

  9. Incentives in Supply Function Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vetter, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The author analyses delegation in homogenous duopoly under the assumption that the firm-managers compete in supply functions. In supply function equilibrium, managers’ decisions are strategic complements. This reverses earlier findings in that the author finds that owners give managers incentives...... to act in an accommodating way. As a result, optimal delegation reduces per-firm output and increases profits to above-Cournot profits. Moreover, in supply function equilibrium the mode of competition is endogenous. This means that the author avoids results that are sensitive with respect to assuming...

  10. Equilibrium in a Production Economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarolla, Maria B.; Haussmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-01-01

    Consider a closed production-consumption economy with multiple agents and multiple resources. The resources are used to produce the consumption good. The agents derive utility from holding resources as well as consuming the good produced. They aim to maximize their utility while the manager of the production facility aims to maximize profits. With the aid of a representative agent (who has a multivariable utility function) it is shown that an Arrow-Debreu equilibrium exists. In so doing we establish technical results that will be used to solve the stochastic dynamic problem (a case with infinite dimensional commodity space so the General Equilibrium Theory does not apply) elsewhere.

  11. The Equilibrium Rule--A Personal Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Examples of equilibrium are evident everywhere and the equilibrium rule provides a reasoned way to view all things, whether in static (balancing rocks, steel beams in building construction) or dynamic (airplanes, bowling balls) equilibrium. Interestingly, the equilibrium rule applies not just to objects at rest but whenever any object or system of…

  12. Non equilibrium atomic processes and plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takako

    2003-01-01

    Along with the technical progress in plasma spectroscopy, non equilibrium ionization processes have been recently observed. We study non local thermodynamic equilibrium and non ionization equilibrium for various kinds of plasmas. Specifically we discuss non equilibrium atomic processes in magnetically confined plasmas, solar flares and laser produced plasmas using a collisional radiative model based on plasma spectroscopic data. (author)

  13. Ferromagnetic resonance study of sputtered NiFe/V/NiFe heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alayo, W., E-mail: willian.rodriguez@ufpel.edu.br [Departamento de Física – IFM, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, 96010-900 Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Pelegrini, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, 74001-970 (Brazil); Baggio-Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    The Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}/V/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} heterostructures has been produced by magnetron sputtering and analyzed by ferromagnetic resonance. Two systems were investigated: the non symmetrical NiFe(50 Å)/V(t)/NiFe(30 Å) trilayers and the symmetrical NiFe(80 Å)/V(t)/NiFe(80 Å) trilayers, with variable ultrathin V thickness t. Ferromagnetic exchange coupling was evidenced for t below 10 Å by the excitation of the optic mode, in the case of the non symmetrical samples, and by the observation of a single resonance mode for the symmetrical trilayers. For larger V thickness, all samples exhibited two modes, which were attributed to the resonance of the individual NiFe layers with different effective magnetizations. The analysis with the equilibrium and resonance conditions provided the exchange coupling constants and effective magnetizations. - Highlights: • We present a study of symmetrical and non symmetrical NiFe/V/NiFe trilayers deposited on Si single crystals by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) at room temperature. • For the non symmetrical trilayers, the FMR spectra show the optic and acoustic modes for samples with very thin V layer thicknesses, evidencing ferromagnetic exchange coupling, whereas, for larger V thickness, the spectra exhibited two well resolved modes associated to each independent NiFe layer. For the symmetrical trilayers, strong ferromagnetic exchange coupling is evidenced by the observation of a single resonance mode. • The analysis with the equilibrium condition and dispersion relation provides the exchange coupling constants and effective magnetizations.

  14. Pyroxene Homogenization and the Isotopic Systematics of Eucrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.

    1996-01-01

    The original Mg-Fe zoning of eucritic pyroxenes has in nearly all cases been partly homogenized, an observation that has been combined with other petrographic and compositional criteria to establish a scale of thermal "metamorphism" for eucrites. To evaluate hypotheses explaining development of conditions on the HED parent body (Vesta?) leading to pyroxene homogenization against their chronological implications, it is necessary to know whether pyroxene metamorphism was recorded in the isotopic systems. However, identifying the effects of the thermal metamorphism with specific effects in the isotopic systems has been difficult, due in part to a lack of correlated isotopic and mineralogical studies of the same eucrites. Furthermore, isotopic studies often place high demands on analytical capabilities, resulting in slow growth of the isotopic database. Additionally, some isotopic systems would not respond in a direct and sensitive way to pyroxene homogenization. Nevertheless, sufficient data exist to generalize some observations, and to identify directions of potentially fruitful investigations.

  15. Natural isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    14 C dates between 600 and 900 AD were obtained for early Iron Age sites in Natal, and from 1300 to 1450 AD for rock engraving sites in Bushmanland. Palaeoenvironmental data derived from the dating of samples related to sedimentary and geomorphic features in the central and northern Namib Desert enabled the production of a tentative graph for the changes in humidity in the region over the past 40000 years. These results suggest that relatively humid conditions came to an end in the Namib at ±25000 BP (before present). The increased precision of the SIRA mass spectrometer enabled the remeasurement of 13 C and 18 O in the Cango stalagmite. This data confirmed that the environmental temperatures in the Southern Cape remained constant to within ±1 o C during the past 5500 years. Techniques and applications for environmental isotopes in hydrology were developed to determine the origin and movement of ground water. Isotopic fractionation effects in light elements in nature were investigated. The 15 N/ 14 N ratio in bones of animals and humans increases in proportion to the aridity of the environment. This suggests that 15 N in bone from dated archaeological sites could be used to detect changes in past climatic conditions as naturally formed nitrate minerals are higly soluble and are only preserved in special, very dry environments. The sources and sinks of CO 2 on the South African subcontinent were also determined. The 13 C/ 12 C ratios of air CO 2 obtained suggest that the vegetation provides the major proportion of respired CO 2 . 9 refs., 1 fig

  16. 58Fe AND 54Cr IN EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM MATERIALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kun; Moynier, Frederic; Podosek, Frank; Foriel, Julien

    2011-01-01

    Stepwise dissolution of primitive meteorites exhibits large 54 Cr anomalies but no collateral effects on 58 Fe and 48 Ca, two other neutron-rich nuclides from the iron peak. These results suggest that 54 Cr must have been produced in particular zones of the rare Type Ia supernovae or that 48 Ca and/or 58 Fe were produced together in Type II supernovae and were chemically separated into some mineral phase that favors Cr over Ca and Fe, and it is the dissolution properties of that phase that is driving the isotopic effect in leaching. The recent findings of nanometer-size oxide grains with very large 54 Cr excesses favored the latter scenario for the origin of the mono-isotopic Cr isotopic effect. In addition, the absence of isotopic variations in the 58 Fe/ 54 Fe ratio at the mineral scale confirms that the short-lived nuclide 60 Fe (T 1/2 = 2.62 Myr) was homogeneously distributed to a less than 15% dispersion in the early solar nebula.

  17. 58Fe and 54Cr in Early Solar System Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Moynier, Frederic; Podosek, Frank; Foriel, Julien

    2011-10-01

    Stepwise dissolution of primitive meteorites exhibits large 54Cr anomalies but no collateral effects on 58Fe and 48Ca, two other neutron-rich nuclides from the iron peak. These results suggest that 54Cr must have been produced in particular zones of the rare Type Ia supernovae or that 48Ca and/or 58Fe were produced together in Type II supernovae and were chemically separated into some mineral phase that favors Cr over Ca and Fe, and it is the dissolution properties of that phase that is driving the isotopic effect in leaching. The recent findings of nanometer-size oxide grains with very large 54Cr excesses favored the latter scenario for the origin of the mono-isotopic Cr isotopic effect. In addition, the absence of isotopic variations in the 58Fe/54Fe ratio at the mineral scale confirms that the short-lived nuclide 60Fe (T 1/2 = 2.62 Myr) was homogeneously distributed to a less than 15% dispersion in the early solar nebula.

  18. Gluconeogenesis from labeled carbon: estimating isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    To estimate the rate of gluconeogenesis from steady-state incorporation of labeled 3-carbon precursors into glucose, isotope dilution must be considered so that the rate of labeling of glucose can be quantitatively converted to the rate of gluconeogenesis. An expression for the value of this isotope dilution can be derived using mathematical techniques and a model of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The present investigation employs a more complex model than that used in previous studies. This model includes the following pathways that may affect the correction for isotope dilution: 1) flux of 3-carbon precursor to the oxaloacetate pool via acetyl-CoA and the TCA cycle; 2) flux of 4- or 5-carbon compounds into the TCA cycle; 3) reversible flux between oxaloacetate (OAA) and pyruvate and between OAA and fumarate; 4) incomplete equilibrium between OAA pools; and 5) isotope dilution of 3-carbon tracers between the experimentally measured pool and the precursor for the TCA-cycle OAA pool. Experimental tests are outlined which investigators can use to determine whether these pathways are significant in a specific steady-state system. The study indicated that flux through these five pathways can significantly affect the correction for isotope dilution. To correct for the effects of these pathways an alternative method for calculating isotope dilution is proposed using citrate to relate the specific activities of acetyl-CoA and OAA

  19. Isotopic composition of precipitations in Brazil: isothermic models and the influence of evapotranspiration in the Amazonic Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dall'Olio, Attilio.

    1976-11-01

    The simplest theoretical models of the isotopic fractionation of water during equilibrium isothermical processes are analized in detail. The theoretical results are applied to the interpretation of the stable isotope concentrations in the precipitations of 11 Brazilian cities that belong to the international network of IAEA/WMO. The analysis shows that the experimental data are fairly consistent with such equilibrium models; no non-equilibrium processes need to be assumed. The study of the stable isotope content of precipitations in the Amazonic Basin suggests some modifications to the models in order that the evapotranspiration contribution to the vapour balance be taken into account [pt

  20. Deviations from thermal equilibrium in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burm, K.T.A.L.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma system in local thermal equilibrium can usually be described with only two parameters. To describe deviations from equilibrium two extra parameters are needed. However, it will be shown that deviations from temperature equilibrium and deviations from Saha equilibrium depend on one another. As a result, non-equilibrium plasmas can be described with three parameters. This reduction in parameter space will ease the plasma describing effort enormously

  1. Non-equilibrium fluctuation-induced interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, David S

    2012-01-01

    We discuss non-equilibrium aspects of fluctuation-induced interactions. While the equilibrium behavior of such interactions has been extensively studied and is relatively well understood, the study of these interactions out of equilibrium is relatively new. We discuss recent results on the non-equilibrium behavior of systems whose dynamics is of the dissipative stochastic type and identify a number of outstanding problems concerning non-equilibrium fluctuation-induced interactions.

  2. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  3. Thermodynamic theory of equilibrium fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The postulational basis of classical thermodynamics has been expanded to incorporate equilibrium fluctuations. The main additional elements of the proposed thermodynamic theory are the concept of quasi-equilibrium states, a definition of non-equilibrium entropy, a fundamental equation of state in the entropy representation, and a fluctuation postulate describing the probability distribution of macroscopic parameters of an isolated system. Although these elements introduce a statistical component that does not exist in classical thermodynamics, the logical structure of the theory is different from that of statistical mechanics and represents an expanded version of thermodynamics. Based on this theory, we present a regular procedure for calculations of equilibrium fluctuations of extensive parameters, intensive parameters and densities in systems with any number of fluctuating parameters. The proposed fluctuation formalism is demonstrated by four applications: (1) derivation of the complete set of fluctuation relations for a simple fluid in three different ensembles; (2) fluctuations in finite-reservoir systems interpolating between the canonical and micro-canonical ensembles; (3) derivation of fluctuation relations for excess properties of grain boundaries in binary solid solutions, and (4) derivation of the grain boundary width distribution for pre-melted grain boundaries in alloys. The last two applications offer an efficient fluctuation-based approach to calculations of interface excess properties and extraction of the disjoining potential in pre-melted grain boundaries. Possible future extensions of the theory are outlined.

  4. Equilibrium theory : A salient approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, S.

    1999-01-01

    Whereas the neoclassical models in General Equilibrium Theory focus on the existence of separate commodities, this thesis regards 'bundles of trade' as the unit objects of exchange. Apart from commodities and commodity bundles in the neoclassical sense, the term `bundle of trade' includes, for

  5. Essays in general equilibrium theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konovalov, A.

    2001-01-01

    The thesis focuses on various issues of general equilibrium theory and can approximately be divided into three parts. The first part of the thesis studies generalized equilibria in the Arrow-Debreu model in the situation where the strong survival assumption is not satisfied. Chapter four deals with

  6. Financial equilibrium with career concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amil Dasgupta

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available What are the equilibrium features of a financial market where a sizeable proportion of traders face reputational concerns? This question is central to our understanding of financial markets, which are increasingly dominated by institutional investors. We construct a model of delegated portfolio management that captures key features of the US mutual fund industry and embed it in an asset pricing framework. We thus provide a formal model of financial equilibrium with career concerned agents. Fund managers differ in their ability to understand market fundamentals, and in every period investors choose a fund. In equilibrium, the presence of career concerns induces uninformed fund managers to churn, i.e., to engage in trading even when they face a negative expected return. Churners act as noise traders and enhance the level of trading volume. The equilibrium relationship between fund return and net fund flows displays a skewed shape that is consistent with stylized facts. The robustness of our core results is probed from several angles.

  7. Equilibrium with arbitrary market structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Birgit; Vind, Karl

    2005-01-01

    . The complete market predicted by this theory is clearly unrealistic, and Radner [10] formulated and proved existence of equilibrium in a multiperiod model with incomplete markets. In this paper the Radner result is extended. Radner assumed a specific structure of markets, independence of preferences...

  8. Nash equilibrium with lower probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes, Ebbe; Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen; Sloth, Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    We generalize the concept of Nash equilibrium in mixed strategies for strategic form games to allow for ambiguity in the players' expectations. In contrast to other contributions, we model ambiguity by means of so-called lower probability measures or belief functions, which makes it possible...

  9. The asymmetric rotator model applied to odd-mass iridium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepenbring, R.

    1980-04-01

    The method of inversion of the eigenvalue problem previously developed for nuclei with axial symmetry is extended to asymmetric equilibrium shapes. This new approach of the asymmetric rotator model is applied to the odd-mass iridium isotopes. A satisfactory and coherent description of the observed energy spectra is obtained, especially for the lighter isotopes

  10. Isotope pattern deconvolution as a tool to study iron metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castrillón, José Angel; Moldovan, Mariella; García Alonso, J Ignacio; Lucena, Juan José; García-Tomé, Maria Luisa; Hernández-Apaolaza, Lourdes

    2008-01-01

    Isotope pattern deconvolution is a mathematical technique for isolating distinct isotope signatures from mixtures of natural abundance and enriched tracers. In iron metabolism studies measurement of all four isotopes of the element by high-resolution multicollector or collision cell ICP-MS allows the determination of the tracer/tracee ratio with simultaneous internal mass bias correction and lower uncertainties. This technique was applied here for the first time to study iron uptake by cucumber plants using 57Fe-enriched iron chelates of the o,o and o,p isomers of ethylenediaminedi(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid (EDDHA) and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Samples of root, stem, leaves, and xylem sap, after exposure of the cucumber plants to the mentioned 57Fe chelates, were collected, dried, and digested using nitric acid. The isotopic composition of iron in the samples was measured by ICP-MS using a high-resolution multicollector instrument. Mass bias correction was computed using both a natural abundance iron standard and by internal correction using isotope pattern deconvolution. It was observed that, for plants with low 57Fe enrichment, isotope pattern deconvolution provided lower tracer/tracee ratio uncertainties than the traditional method applying external mass bias correction. The total amount of the element in the plants was determined by isotope dilution analysis, using a collision cell quadrupole ICP-MS instrument, after addition of 57Fe or natural abundance Fe in a known amount which depended on the isotopic composition of the sample.

  11. Isotope pattern deconvolution as a tool to study iron metabolism in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Castrillon, Jose A.; Moldovan, Mariella; Garcia Alonso, J.I. [University of Oviedo, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Oviedo (Spain); Lucena, Juan J.; Garcia-Tome, Maria L.; Hernandez-Apaolaza, Lourdes [Autonoma University of Madrid, Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-01-15

    Isotope pattern deconvolution is a mathematical technique for isolating distinct isotope signatures from mixtures of natural abundance and enriched tracers. In iron metabolism studies measurement of all four isotopes of the element by high-resolution multicollector or collision cell ICP-MS allows the determination of the tracer/tracee ratio with simultaneous internal mass bias correction and lower uncertainties. This technique was applied here for the first time to study iron uptake by cucumber plants using {sup 57}Fe-enriched iron chelates of the o,o and o,p isomers of ethylenediaminedi(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid (EDDHA) and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Samples of root, stem, leaves, and xylem sap, after exposure of the cucumber plants to the mentioned {sup 57}Fe chelates, were collected, dried, and digested using nitric acid. The isotopic composition of iron in the samples was measured by ICP-MS using a high-resolution multicollector instrument. Mass bias correction was computed using both a natural abundance iron standard and by internal correction using isotope pattern deconvolution. It was observed that, for plants with low {sup 57}Fe enrichment, isotope pattern deconvolution provided lower tracer/tracee ratio uncertainties than the traditional method applying external mass bias correction. The total amount of the element in the plants was determined by isotope dilution analysis, using a collision cell quadrupole ICP-MS instrument, after addition of {sup 57}Fe or natural abundance Fe in a known amount which depended on the isotopic composition of the sample. (orig.)

  12. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  13. Method for separating isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-01-01

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether

  14. Low temperature isotope effects of hydrogen diffusion in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.; Kronmueller, H.

    1989-01-01

    Snoek-like relaxation peaks of Hydrogen and Deuterium in amorphous Fe 80 B 20 , Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 and Fe 91 Zr 9 are detected. At low H, D concentrations the peaks are near 200 K and show small isotope effects of the average activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.6 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≤ 10 meV). For higher H, D-contents the peaks shift to lower temperatures around to 120 K and show distinct isotope effects in the activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.3 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≅ 30 meV) and in the amplitude of the low temperature tails of the relaxation peaks. This points to isotope mass dependent deviations from the Arrhenius law due to nonthermal tunneling processes. (orig.)

  15. Reactions of laser-ablated iron atoms and cations with carbon monoxide: Infrared spectra of FeCO+, Fe(CO)2+, Fe(CO)x, and Fe(CO)x- (x=1-4) in solid neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mingfei; Andrews, Lester

    1999-06-01

    Laser-ablated iron atoms, cations, and electrons have been reacted with CO molecules during condensation in excess neon. The FeCO molecule is observed at 1933.7 cm-1 in solid neon. Based on isotopic shifts and density functional calculations, the FeCO molecule has the same 3Σ- ground state in solid neon that has been observed at 1946.5 cm-1 in a recent high resolution gas phase investigation [Tanaka et al., J. Chem. Phys. 106, 2118 (1997)]. The C-O stretching vibration of the Fe(CO)2 molecule is observed at 1917.1 cm-1 in solid neon, which is in excellent agreement with the 1928.2 cm-1 gas phase value for the linear molecule. Anions and cations are also produced and trapped, absorptions at 1782.0, 1732.9, 1794.5, and 1859.7 cm-1 are assigned to the linear FeCO-, Fe(CO)2-, trigonal planar Fe(CO)3-, and C3v Fe(CO)4- anions, respectively, and 2123.0, 2134.0 cm-1 absorptions to the linear FeCO+ and Fe(CO)2+ cations. Doping these experiments with CCl4 virtually eliminates the anion absorptions and markedly increases the cation absorptions, which confirms the charge identifications. Higher iron carbonyl Fe(CO)3, Fe(CO)4, and Fe(CO)5 absorptions are produced on photolysis.

  16. Proton-rich nuclear statistical equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitenzahl, I.R.; Timmes, F.X.; Marin-Lafleche, A.; Brown, E.; Magkotsios, G.; Truran, J.

    2008-01-01

    Proton-rich material in a state of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) is one of the least studied regimes of nucleosynthesis. One reason for this is that after hydrogen burning, stellar evolution proceeds at conditions of an equal number of neutrons and protons or at a slight degree of neutron-richness. Proton-rich nucleosynthesis in stars tends to occur only when hydrogen-rich material that accretes onto a white dwarf or a neutron star explodes, or when neutrino interactions in the winds from a nascent proto-neutron star or collapsar disk drive the matter proton-rich prior to or during the nucleosynthesis. In this Letter we solve the NSE equations for a range of proton-rich thermodynamic conditions. We show that cold proton-rich NSE is qualitatively different from neutron-rich NSE. Instead of being dominated by the Fe-peak nuclei with the largest binding energy per nucleon that have a proton-to-nucleon ratio close to the prescribed electron fraction, NSE for proton-rich material near freezeout temperature is mainly composed of 56Ni and free protons. Previous results of nuclear reaction network calculations rely on this nonintuitive high-proton abundance, which this Letter explains. We show how the differences and especially the large fraction of free protons arises from the minimization of the free energy as a result of a delicate competition between the entropy and nuclear binding energy.

  17. Method for separating isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepson, B.E.

    1976-01-01

    The invention comprises a method for separating different isotopes of elements from each other by contacting a feed solution containing the different isotopes with a macrocyclic polyether to preferentially form a macrocyclic polyether complex with the lighter of the different isotopes. The macrocyclic polyether complex is then separated from the lighter isotope depleted feed solution. A chemical separation of isotopes is carried out in which a constant refluxing system permits a continuous countercurrent liquid-liquid extraction. (LL)

  18. Method for separating isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlenker, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    A vortex tube for separating isotopes is described. A gas mixture containing the isotopic molecules enters the vortex tube under pressure and is separated into a hot discharge flow stream and a cold discharge flow stream. The hot discharge is enriched in lighter isotopic molecules whereas the cold discharge flow stream is enriched in the heavier isotopic molecules. The vortex tube can be used in a single stage or multistage isotope separation apparatus

  19. Magnetic Properties and Microstructure of FeOx/Fe/FePt and FeOx/FePt Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai-Lin Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fe(6 nm/FePt film with perpendicular magnetization was deposited on the glass substrate. To study the oxygen diffusion effect on the coupling of Fe/FePt bilayer, the plasma oxidation with 0.5~7% oxygen flow ratio was performed during sputtered part of Fe layer and formed the FeOx(3 nm/Fe(3 nm/FePt trilayer. Two-step magnetic hysteresis loops were found in trilayer with oxygen flow ratio above 1%. The magnetization in FeOx and Fe/FePt layers was decoupled. The moments in FeOx layer were first reversed and followed by coupled Fe/FePt bilayer. The trilayer was annealed again at 500°C and 800°C for 3 minutes. When the FeOx(3 nm/Fe(3 nm/FePt trilayer was annealed at 500°C, the layers structure was changed to FeOx(6 nm/FePt bilayer due to oxygen diffusion. The hard-magnetic FeOx(6 nm/FePt film was coupled with single switching field. The FeOx/(disordered FePt layer structure was observed with further annealing at 800°C and presented soft-magnetic loop. In summary, the coupling between soft-magnetic Fe, FeOx layer, and hard-magnetic L10 FePt layer can be controlled by the oxygen diffusion behavior, and the oxidation of Fe layer was tuned by the annealing temperature. The ordered L10 FePt layer was deteriorated by oxygen and became disordered FePt when the annealed temperature was up to 800°C.

  20. Paleogene Seawater Osmium Isotope Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolewicz, Z.; Thomas, D. J.; Marcantonio, F.

    2012-12-01

    Paleoceanographic reconstructions of the Late Cretaceous and early Cenozoic require enhanced geographic coverage, particularly in the Pacific, in order to better constrain meridional variations in environmental conditions. The challenge with the existing inventory of Pacific deep-sea cores is that they consist almost exclusively of pelagic clay with little existing age control. Pelagic clay sequences are useful for reconstructions of dust accumulation and water mass composition, but accurate correlation of these records to other sites requires improved age control. Recent work indicates that seawater Os isotope analyses provide useful age control for red clay sequences. The residence time of Os in seawater is relatively long compared to oceanic mixing, therefore the global seawater 187Os/188Os composition is practically homogeneous. A growing body of Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic data has constrained the evolution of the seawater Os isotopic composition and this curve is now a viable stratigraphic tool, employed in dating layers of Fe-Mn crusts (e.g., Klemm et al., 2005). Ravizza (2007) also demonstrated that the seawater Os isotopic composition can be extracted reliably from pelagic red clay sediments by analyzing the leached oxide minerals. The drawback to using seawater Os isotope stratigraphy to date Paleogene age sediments is that the compilation of existing data has some significant temporal gaps, notably between ~38 and 55 Ma. To improve the temporal resolution of the seawater Os isotope curve, we present new data from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 865 in the equatorial Pacific. Site 865 has excellent biostratigraphic age control over the interval ~38-55Ma. Preliminary data indicate an increase in the seawater composition from 0.427 at 53.4 Ma to 0.499 by 43 Ma, consistent with the apparent trend in the few existing data points. We also analyzed the Os isotopic composition recorded by oxide minerals at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1370

  1. Kinetics of FeII-polyaminocarboxylate oxidation by molecular oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jessica M.; Farley, Kevin J.; Carbonaro, Richard F.

    2018-03-01

    Complexation of iron by naturally-occurring and synthetic organic ligands has a large effect on iron oxidation and reduction rates which in turn affect the aqueous geochemistry of many other chemical constituents. In this study, the kinetics of FeII oxidation in the presence of the polyaminocarboxylate synthetic chelating agents ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and trimethylenediamine-N,N,N‧,N‧-tetraacetic acid (TMDTA) was investigated over the pH range 5.50-8.53. Batch oxidation experiments in the presence of molecular oxygen were conducted using a 2:1 M concentration ratio of polyaminocarboxylate (ligand, L) to FeII. The experimental data resembled first order kinetics for the oxidation of FeII-L to FeIII-L and observed rate constants at pH 6.0 were comparable to rate constants for the oxidation of inorganic FeII. Similar to other structurally-similar FeII-polyaminocarboxylate complexes, oxidation rates of FeII-EGTA and FeII-TMDTA decrease with increasing pH, which is the opposite trend for the oxidation of FeII complexed with inorganic ligands. However, the oxidation rates of FeII complexed with EGTA and TMDTA were considerably lower (4-5 orders of magnitude) than FeII complexed to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The distinguishing feature of the slower-reacting complexes is that they have a longer backbone between diamine functional groups. An analytical equilibrium model was developed to determine the contributions of the species FeIIL2- and FeII(H)L- to the overall oxidation rate of FeII-L. Application of this model indicated that the protonated FeII(H)L species are more than three orders of magnitude more reactive than FeIIL2-. These rate constants were used in a coupled kinetic equilibrium numerical model where the ligand to iron ratio (TOTL:TOTFe) and pH were varied to evaluate the effect on the FeII oxidation rate. Overall, increasing TOTL:TOTFe for EGTA and TMDTA enhances FeII oxidation rates at lower pH and inhibits FeII oxidation

  2. On generalized operator quasi-equilibrium problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Sangho; Kim, Won Kyu

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we will introduce the generalized operator equilibrium problem and generalized operator quasi-equilibrium problem which generalize the operator equilibrium problem due to Kazmi and Raouf [K.R. Kazmi, A. Raouf, A class of operator equilibrium problems, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 308 (2005) 554-564] into multi-valued and quasi-equilibrium problems. Using a Fan-Browder type fixed point theorem in [S. Park, Foundations of the KKM theory via coincidences of composites of upper semicontinuous maps, J. Korean Math. Soc. 31 (1994) 493-519] and an existence theorem of equilibrium for 1-person game in [X.-P. Ding, W.K. Kim, K.-K. Tan, Equilibria of non-compact generalized games with L*-majorized preferences, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 164 (1992) 508-517] as basic tools, we prove new existence theorems on generalized operator equilibrium problem and generalized operator quasi-equilibrium problem which includes operator equilibrium problems.

  3. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  4. Extrinsic labelling of staple food crops with isotopic iron does not consistently result in full equilibration: Revisiting the methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrinsic isotopic labeling of food Fe has been used for over 50 years to measure Fe absorption. This method is based on the assumption that complete equilibration occurs between the extrinsic and the intrinsic Fe prior to intestinal absorption. The present study tested this assumption via use of in...

  5. First principles calculations of the magnetic and hyperfine properties of Fe/N/Fe and Fe/O/Fe multilayers in the ground state of cohesive energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, A. V.; Samudio Pérez, C. A.; Muenchen, D.; Anibele, T. P.

    2015-01-01

    The ground state properties of Fe/N/Fe and Fe/O/Fe multilayers were investigated using the first principles calculations. The calculations were performed using the Linearized Augmented Plane Wave (LAPW) method implemented in the Wien2k code. A supercell consisting of one layer of nitride (or oxide) between two layers of Fe in the bcc structure was used to model the structure of the multilayer. The research in new materials also stimulated theoretical and experimental studies of iron-based nitrides due to their variety of structural and magnetic properties for the potential applications as in high strength steels and for high corrosion resistance. It is obvious from many reports that magnetic iron nitrides such as γ-Fe4N and α-Fe16N2 have interesting magnetic properties, among these a high magnetisation saturation and a high density crimp. However, although Fe-N films and multilayers have many potential applications, they can be produced in many ways and are being extensively studied from the theoretical point of view there is no detailed knowledge of their electronic structure. Clearly, efforts to understand the influence of the nitrogen atoms on the entire electronic structure are needed as to correctly interpret the observed changes in the magnetic properties when going from Fe-N bulk compounds to multilayer structures. Nevertheless, the N atoms are not solely responsible for electronics alterations in solid compounds. Theoretical results showed that Fe4X bulk compounds, where X is a variable atom with increasing atomic number (Z), the nature of bonding between X and adjacent Fe atoms changes from more covalent to more ionic and the magnetic moments of Fe also increase for Z=7, i.e. N. This is an indicative that atoms with a Z number higher than 7, i.e., O, can produce several new alterations in the entire magnetic properties of Fe multilayers. This paper presents the first results of an ab-initio electronic structure calculations, performed for Fe-N and Fe

  6. Fractionation of boron isotopes in Icelandic hydrothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    Boron isotope ratios have been determined in a variety of different geothermal waters from hydrothermal systems across Iceland. Isotope ratios from the high temperature meteoric water recharged systems reflect the isotope ratio of the host rocks without any apparent fractionation. Seawater recharged geothermal systems exhibit more positive δ 1 1B values than the meteoric water recharged geothermal systems. Water/rock ratios can be assessed from boron isotope ratios in the saline hydrothermal systems. Low temperature hydrothermal systems also exhibit more positive δ 1 1B than the high temperature systems, indicating fractionation of boron due to absorption of the lighter isotope onto secondary minerals. Fractionation of boron in carbonate deposits may indicate the level of equilibrium attained within the systems. (author). 14 refs., 2 figs

  7. Diffusion-driven magnesium and iron isotope fractionation in Hawaiian olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, F.-Z.; Dauphas, N.; Helz, R.T.; Gao, S.; Huang, S.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion plays an important role in Earth sciences to estimate the timescales of geological processes such as erosion, sediment burial, and magma cooling. In igneous systems, these diffusive processes are recorded in the form of crystal zoning. However, meaningful interpretation of these signatures is often hampered by the fact that they cannot be unambiguously ascribed to a single process (e.g., magmatic fractionation, diffusion limited transport in the crystal or in the liquid). Here we show that Mg and Fe isotope fractionations in olivine crystals can be used to trace diffusive processes in magmatic systems. Over sixty olivine fragments from Hawaiian basalts show isotopically fractionated Mg and Fe relative to basalts worldwide, with up to 0.4??? variation in 26Mg/24Mg ratios and 1.6??? variation in 56Fe/54Fe ratios. The linearly and negatively correlated Mg and Fe isotopic compositions [i.e., ??56Fe=(??3.3??0.3)????26Mg], co-variations of Mg and Fe isotopic compositions with Fe/Mg ratios of olivine fragments, and modeling results based on Mg and Fe elemental profiles demonstrate the coupled Mg and Fe isotope fractionation to be a manifestation of Mg-Fe inter-diffusion in zoned olivines during magmatic differentiation. This characteristic can be used to constrain the nature of mineral zoning in igneous and metamorphic rocks, and hence determine the residence times of crystals in magmas, the composition of primary melts, and the duration of metamorphic events. With improvements in methodology, in situ isotope mapping will become an essential tool of petrology to identify diffusion in crystals. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Equilibrium studies of helical axis stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.; Harris, J.H.; Rome, J.A.; Cantrell, J.L.; Lynch, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    The equilibrium properties of helical axis stellarators are studied with a 3-D equilibrium code and with an average method (2-D). The helical axis ATF is shown to have a toroidally dominated equilibrium shift and good equilibria up to at least 10% peak beta. Low aspect ratio heliacs, with relatively large toroidal shifts, are shown to have low equilibrium beta limits (approx. 5%). Increasing the aspect ratio and number of field periods proportionally is found to improve the equilibrium beta limit. Alternatively, increasing the number of field periods at fixed aspect ratio which raises and lowers the toroidal shift improves the equilibrium beta limit

  9. Students’ misconceptions on solubility equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiowati, H.; Utomo, S. B.; Ashadi

    2018-05-01

    This study investigated the students’ misconceptions of the solubility equilibrium. The participants of the study consisted of 164 students who were in the science class of second year high school. Instrument used is two-tier diagnostic test consisting of 15 items. Responses were marked and coded into four categories: understanding, misconception, understand little without misconception, and not understanding. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 45 students according to their written responses which reflected different perspectives, to obtain a more elaborated source of data. Data collected from multiple methods were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on the data analysis showed that the students misconceptions in all areas in solubility equilibrium. They had more misconceptions such as in the relation of solubility and solubility product, common-ion effect and pH in solubility, and precipitation concept.

  10. A NON-LOCAL THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM ANALYSIS OF BORON ABUNDANCES IN METAL-POOR STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Kefeng; Shi Jianrong; Zhao Gang

    2010-01-01

    The non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation of neutral boron in the atmospheres of cool stars are investigated. Our results confirm that NLTE effects for the B I resonance lines, which are due to a combination of overionization and optical pumping effects, are most important for hot, metal-poor, and low-gravity stars; however, the amplitude of departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) found by this work is smaller than that of previous studies. In addition, our calculation shows that the line formation of B I will get closer to LTE if the strength of collisions with neutral hydrogen increases, which is contrary to the result of previous studies. The NLTE line formation results are applied to the determination of boron abundances for a sample of 16 metal-poor stars with the method of spectrum synthesis of the B I 2497 A resonance lines using the archived HST/GHRS spectra. Beryllium and oxygen abundances are also determined for these stars with the published equivalent widths of the Be II 3131 A resonance and O I 7774 A triplet lines, respectively. The abundances of the nine stars which are not depleted in Be or B show that, no matter what the strength of collisions with neutral hydrogen may be, both Be and B increase with O quasilinearly in the logarithmic plane, which confirms the conclusions that Be and B are mainly produced by the primary process in the early Galaxy. The most noteworthy result of this work is that B increases with Fe or O at a very similar speed as, or a bit faster than, Be does, which is in accord with the theoretical models. The B/Be ratios remain almost constant over the metallicity range investigated here. Our average B/Be ratio falls in the interval [13 ± 4, 17 ± 4], which is consistent with the predictions of the spallation process. The contribution of B from the ν-process may be required if the 11 B/ 10 B isotopic ratios in metal-poor stars are the same as the meteoric value. An accurate measurement of the

  11. An introduction to equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Morrill, Bernard; Hartnett, James P; Hughes, William F

    1973-01-01

    An Introduction to Equilibrium Thermodynamics discusses classical thermodynamics and irreversible thermodynamics. It introduces the laws of thermodynamics and the connection between statistical concepts and observable macroscopic properties of a thermodynamic system. Chapter 1 discusses the first law of thermodynamics while Chapters 2 through 4 deal with statistical concepts. The succeeding chapters describe the link between entropy and the reversible heat process concept of entropy; the second law of thermodynamics; Legendre transformations and Jacobian algebra. Finally, Chapter 10 provides a

  12. Money Inventories in Search Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Aleksander

    1998-01-01

    The paper relaxes the one unit storage capacity imposed in the basic search-theoretic model of fiat money with indivisible real commodities and indivisible money. Agents can accumulate as much money as they want. It characterizes the stationary distributions of money and shows that for reasonable parameter values (e.g. production cost, discounting, degree of specialization) a monetary equilibrium exists. There are multiple stationary distributions of a given amount of money, which differ in t...

  13. Hydrogen isotopic fractionation during crystallization of the terrestrial magma ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, K.; Karato, S. I.

    2016-12-01

    Models of the Moon-forming giant impact extensively melt and partially vaporize the silicate Earth and deliver a substantial mass of metal to the Earth's core. The subsequent evolution of the terrestrial magma ocean and overlying vapor atmosphere over the ensuing 105-6 years has been largely constrained by theoretical models with remnant signatures from this epoch proving somewhat elusive. We have calculated equilibrium hydrogen isotopic fractionation between the magma ocean and overlying steam atmosphere to determine the extent to which H isotopes trace the evolution during this epoch. By analogy with the modern silicate Earth, the magma ocean-steam atmosphere system is often assumed to be chemically oxidized (log fO2 QFM) with the dominant atmospheric vapor species taken to be water vapor. However, the terrestrial magma ocean - having held metallic droplets in suspension - may also exhibit a much more reducing character (log fO2 IW) such that equilibration with the overlying atmosphere renders molecular hydrogen the dominant H-bearing vapor species. This variable - the redox state of the magma ocean - has not been explicitly included in prior models of the coupled evolution of the magma ocean-steam atmosphere system. We find that the redox state of the magma ocean influences not only the vapor speciation and liquid-vapor partitioning of hydrogen but also the equilibrium isotopic fractionation during the crystallization epoch. The liquid-vapor isotopic fractionation of H is substantial under reducing conditions and can generate measurable D/H signatures in the crystallization products but is largely muted in an oxidizing magma ocean and steam atmosphere. We couple equilibrium isotopic fractionation with magma ocean crystallization calculations to forward model the behavior of hydrogen isotopes during this epoch and find that the distribution of H isotopes in the silicate Earth immediately following crystallization represents an oxybarometer for the terrestrial

  14. Local equilibrium in bird flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an example of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with respect to analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. This non-equilibrium characteristic has been studied theoretically, but its impact on actual animal groups remains to be fully explored experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accommodates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment occurs on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  15. Non-traditional Stable Isotope Systematics of Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, O. J.

    2009-05-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridges is one of the fundamental processes controlling the chemistry of the oceans and the altered oceanic crust. Past studies have demonstrated the complexity and diversity of seafloor hydrothermal systems and have highlighted the importance of subsurface environments in controlling the composition of hydrothermal fluids and mineralization types. Traditionally, the behavior of metals in seafloor hydrothermal systems have been investigated by integrating results from laboratory studies, theoretical models, mineralogy and fluid and mineral chemistry. Isotope ratios of various metals and metalloids, such as Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd and Sb have recently provided new approaches for the study of seafloor hydrothermal systems. Despite these initial investigations, the cause of the isotopic variability of these elements remains poorly constrained. We have little understanding of the isotope variations between vent types (black or white smokers) as well as the influence of source rock composition (basalt, felsic or ultrabasic rocks) and alteration types. Here, I will review and present new results of metal isotope systematics of seafloor hydrothermal systems, in particular: (1) determination of empirical isotope fractionation factors for Zn, Fe and Cu-isotopes through isotopic analysis of mono-mineralic sulfide grains lining the internal chimney wall in contact with hydrothermal fluid; (2) comparison of Fe- and Cu-isotope signatures of vent fluids from mid- oceanic and back-arc hydrothermal fields, spanning wide ranges of pH, temperature, metal concentrations and contributions of magmatic fluids enriched in SO2. Ultimately, the use of complementary non-traditional stable isotope systems may help identify and constrain the complex interactions between fluids,minerals, and organisms in seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  16. Study of the ZrO2-FeO-Fe2O3 system by thermogravimetry in partial pressure of oxygen and temperatures up to 15000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, R.H.; Kiminami, A.

    1987-01-01

    The dissociation of iron oxide in the ZrO 2 -FeO-Fe 2 O 3 system was investigated in function of the temperature and the constant partial pressure of oxygen by thermal gravimetric analysis. The equilibrium diagram was constructed where the equilibrium relation between the solid phase of zirconium oxide, hematite and magnetite in 1437 0 C and PO 2 = 0.21 atm/m, as well as the equilibrium relation between the solid phase of zirconium oxide and hematite in lower temperatures than 1437 0 C were determined [pt

  17. Biological fractionation of oxygen and carbon isotopes by recent benthic foraminifera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, F.; Douglas, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Recent deep-sea benthic foraminifera from five East Pacific Rise box core tops have been analyzed for oxygen and carbon isotopic composition. The five equatorial stations, with water depths of between 3200 and 4600 m, yielded fourteen specific and generic taxonomic groups. Of the taxa analyzed, Uvigerina spp. most closely approaches oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient sea water. Pyrgo spp. was next closest to isotopic equilibrium, being on the average 0.59 per thousand depleted in 18 O relative to Uvigerina spp. Oridorsalis umbonatus also has relatively high delta 18 O values. Most other taxa were depleted in 18 O by large amounts. In no taxa was the carbon in the CaCO 3 secreted in carbon isotopic equilibrium with the dissolved HCO 3 - of ambient sea water. (Auth.)

  18. Stable isotope compositions (O-C) of reef fish otoliths from the Taiaro lagoon (Tuamotu, French Polynesia): isotopic and biologic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blamart, D.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Ouahdi, R.; Escoubeyrou, K.; Lecomte-Finiger, R.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclei (larval stage) and outer parts (adult stage) of fish otoliths from the Taiaro closed lagoon (French Polynesia) and adjacent ocean have been analysed for the C-O isotopic compositions. δ 18 O values of the nuclei of both populations indicate that isotopic equilibrium is reached. This implies that the lagoonal fish population has done its complete biological cycle in the lagoon and represents an adaptation in a closed system. δ 18 O values of the outer parts show a slight isotopic disequilibrium ( 13 C values exhibit a strong isotopic disequilibrium related to metabolic activity. (authors)

  19. Double differential cross sections for (p,n) reactions of 18 and 25 MeV protons with isotopes of Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Y, Zr, Mo, Pd and Tb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scobel, W.; Blann, M.; Komoto, T.; Trabandt, M.; Grimes, S.M.; Hansen, L.F.; Pohl, B.A.; Wong, C.

    1984-06-01

    Cross sections for the inclusive production of neutrons from reactions of 25 MeV protons with 50 52 53 Cr, 54 56 58 Fe, 59 Co, 60 Ni, 63 Cu, 89 Y, 90 91 92 94 Zr, 92 94 95 96 97 98 100 Mo, 110 Pd and 159 Tb and of 18 MeV protons with 90 91 92 94 Zr have been measured with time-of-flight techniques for 16 angles between 3.5 0 less than or equal to theta/sub lab/ less than or equal to 159.0 0 . After a short presentation of the motivations for these measurements, the experimental set up is discussed with emphasis on the systematic and statistical error sources pertinent to this work, in particular the question of background correction in the continuous parts of the spectra. The main purpose of this report is to make the experimental results of this work (angle integrated spectra, angular distributions) available for distribution, reducing thereby the data required in publication of the results of these experiments. 20 references

  20. Quantum dynamical semigroups and approach to equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigerio, A.

    1977-01-01

    For a quantum dynamical semigroup possessing a faithful normal stationary state, some conditions are discussed, which ensure the uniqueness of the equilibrium state and/or the approach to equilibrium for arbitrary initial condition. (Auth.)

  1. Isotope puzzle in sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liping

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms affecting multicomponent material sputtering are complex. Isotope sputtering is the simplest in the multicomponent materials sputtering. Although only mass effect plays a dominant role in the isotope sputtering, there is still an isotope puzzle in sputtering by ion bombardment. The major arguments are as follows: (1) At the zero fluence, is the isotope enrichment ejection-angle-independent or ejection-angle-dependent? (2) Is the isotope angular effect the primary or the secondary sputter effect? (3) How to understand the action of momentum asymmetry in collision cascade on the isotope sputtering?

  2. The behavior of iron and zinc stable isotopes accompanying the subduction of mafic oceanic crust: A case study from Western Alpine ophiolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Edward C.; Debret, Baptiste; Burton, Kevin W.; Millet, Marc-Alban; Pons, Marie-Laure; Dale, Christopher W.; Bouilhol, Pierre; Cooper, Matthew; Nowell, Geoff M.; McCoy-West, Alex J.; Williams, Helen M.

    2017-07-01

    Arc lavas display elevated Fe3+/ΣFe ratios relative to MORB. One mechanism to explain this is the mobilization and transfer of oxidized or oxidizing components from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge. Here we use iron and zinc isotopes, which are fractionated upon complexation by sulfide, chloride, and carbonate ligands, to remark on the chemistry and oxidation state of fluids released during prograde metamorphism of subducted oceanic crust. We present data for metagabbros and metabasalts from the Chenaillet massif, Queyras complex, and the Zermatt-Saas ophiolite (Western European Alps), which have been metamorphosed at typical subduction zone P-T conditions and preserve their prograde metamorphic history. There is no systematic, detectable fractionation of either Fe or Zn isotopes across metamorphic facies, rather the isotope composition of the eclogites overlaps with published data for MORB. The lack of resolvable Fe isotope fractionation with increasing prograde metamorphism likely reflects the mass balance of the system, and in this scenario Fe mobility is not traceable with Fe isotopes. Given that Zn isotopes are fractionated by S-bearing and C-bearing fluids, this suggests that relatively small amounts of Zn are mobilized from the mafic lithologies in within these types of dehydration fluids. Conversely, metagabbros from the Queyras that are in proximity to metasediments display a significant Fe isotope fractionation. The covariation of δ56Fe of these samples with selected fluid mobile elements suggests the infiltration of sediment derived fluids with an isotopically light signature during subduction.

  3. Stable Isotope Systematics of Martian Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Farley, K. A.; Archer, D., Jr.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairen, A.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Sutter, B.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine isotopic compositions in HCl released during evolved gas analysis (EGA) runs have been detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity rover ranging from approximately -9‰ to -50‰ δ37Cl, with two spatially and isotopically separated groups of samples averaging -15‰ and -45‰. These extremely low values are the first such detection of any known natural material; common terrestrial values very rarely exceed ±5‰, and the most extreme isotopic signature yet detected elsewhere in the solar system are values of around +24‰ on the Moon. The only other known location in the solar system with large negative chlorine isotopes is the Atacama Desert, where perchlorate with -14‰ δ37Cl has been detected. The Atacama perchlorate has unusual Δ17O signatures associated with it, indicating a formation mechanism involving O3, which suggests an atmospheric origin of the perchlorate and associated large isotopic anomalies. Identification of non-zero positive Δ17O signatures in the O2 released during EGA runs would allow definitive evidence for a similar process having occurred on Mars. Perchlorate is thought to be the most likely source of HCl in EGA runs due to the simultaneous onset of O2 release. If perchlorate is indeed the HCl source, atmospheric chemistry could be responsible for the observed isotopic anomalies, with variable extents of perchlorate production producing the isotopic variability. However, chloride salts have also been observed to release HCl upon heating; if the timing of O2 release is merely coincidental, observed HCl could be coming from chlorides. At thermodynamic equilibrium, the fractionation factor of perchlorate reduction is 0.93, meaning that differing amounts of post-deposition reduction of isotopically normal perchlorate to chloride could account for the highly variable Cl isotopes. Additionally, post-deposition reduction could account for the difference between the two Cl isotopic groups if perchlorate

  4. The geometry of finite equilibrium sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...... of equilibrium datasets is pathconnected when the equilibrium condition does impose restrictions on datasets, as for example when total resources are widely noncollinear....

  5. Accelerating Multiagent Reinforcement Learning by Equilibrium Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yujing; Gao, Yang; An, Bo

    2015-07-01

    An important approach in multiagent reinforcement learning (MARL) is equilibrium-based MARL, which adopts equilibrium solution concepts in game theory and requires agents to play equilibrium strategies at each state. However, most existing equilibrium-based MARL algorithms cannot scale due to a large number of computationally expensive equilibrium computations (e.g., computing Nash equilibria is PPAD-hard) during learning. For the first time, this paper finds that during the learning process of equilibrium-based MARL, the one-shot games corresponding to each state's successive visits often have the same or similar equilibria (for some states more than 90% of games corresponding to successive visits have similar equilibria). Inspired by this observation, this paper proposes to use equilibrium transfer to accelerate equilibrium-based MARL. The key idea of equilibrium transfer is to reuse previously computed equilibria when each agent has a small incentive to deviate. By introducing transfer loss and transfer condition, a novel framework called equilibrium transfer-based MARL is proposed. We prove that although equilibrium transfer brings transfer loss, equilibrium-based MARL algorithms can still converge to an equilibrium policy under certain assumptions. Experimental results in widely used benchmarks (e.g., grid world game, soccer game, and wall game) show that the proposed framework: 1) not only significantly accelerates equilibrium-based MARL (up to 96.7% reduction in learning time), but also achieves higher average rewards than algorithms without equilibrium transfer and 2) scales significantly better than algorithms without equilibrium transfer when the state/action space grows and the number of agents increases.

  6. The Geometry of Finite Equilibrium Datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...... of equilibrium datasets is pathconnected when the equilibrium condition does impose restrictions on datasets, as for example when total resources are widely non collinear....

  7. CO-Bridged H-Cluster Intermediates in the Catalytic Mechanism of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase CaI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzloff, Michael W; Artz, Jacob H; Mulder, David W; Collins, Reuben T; Furtak, Thomas E; King, Paul W

    2018-06-20

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenases ([FeFe] H 2 ases) catalyze reversible H 2 activation at the H-cluster, which is composed of a [4Fe-4S] H subsite linked by a cysteine thiolate to a bridged, organometallic [2Fe-2S] ([2Fe] H ) subsite. Profoundly different geometric models of the H-cluster redox states that orchestrate the electron/proton transfer steps of H 2 bond activation have been proposed. We have examined this question in the [FeFe] H 2 ase I from Clostridium acetobutylicum (CaI) by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with temperature annealing and H/D isotope exchange to identify the relevant redox states and define catalytic transitions. One-electron reduction of H ox led to formation of H red H + ([4Fe-4S] H 2+ -Fe I -Fe I ) and H red ' ([4Fe-4S] H 1+ -Fe II -Fe I ), with both states characterized by low frequency μ-CO IR modes consistent with a fully bridged [2Fe] H . Similar μ-CO IR modes were also identified for H red H + of the [FeFe] H 2 ase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrHydA1). The CaI proton-transfer variant C298S showed enrichment of an H/D isotope-sensitive μ-CO mode, a component of the hydride bound H-cluster IR signal, H hyd . Equilibrating CaI with increasing amounts of NaDT, and probed at cryogenic temperatures, showed H red H + was converted to H hyd . Over an increasing temperature range from 10 to 260 K catalytic turnover led to loss of H hyd and appearance of H ox , consistent with enzymatic turnover and H 2 formation. The results show for CaI that the μ-CO of [2Fe] H remains bridging for all of the "H red " states and that H red H + is on pathway to H hyd and H 2 evolution in the catalytic mechanism. These results provide a blueprint for designing small molecule catalytic analogs.

  8. Investigation of equilibrium core by recycling MA and LLFP in fast reactor cycle. 2. Investigation of LLFP confined in Equilibrium Core with element separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Akihiko; Shono, Akira; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2000-02-01

    A feasibility study has been performed on a self-consistent fuel cycle system in the nuclear fuel recycle system with fast reactors. In this system, the self-generated MAs (Minor Actinides) and LLFPs (Long-Lived Fission Products) are confined and incinerated in the fast reactor, which is called the 'Equilibrium Core' concept. However, as the isotope separations for selected LLFPs have been assumed in this cycle system, it seems that this assumption is far from realistic one from the viewpoint of economy with respect to the fuel cycle system. In this study, the possibility for realization of the 'Equilibrium Core' concept is evaluated for three fuel types such as oxide, nitride and metallic fuels, provided that the isotopic separation of LLFPs is changed to the element one. This study provides, that is to say, how many LLFP elements can be confined in the 'Equilibrium Core' with element separation. This report examines the nuclear properties of the Equilibrium Core' for various combinations of LLFP incineration schemes from the viewpoints of the risk of geological disposal and the limit in confinable quantity of LLFPs. From the viewpoint of the risk of geological disposal estimated by the retardation factor, it is possible to confine with element separation for Tc, I and Se even in the oxide fueled core. From the standpoint of the limit of confinable amounts of LLFPs, on the other hand, Tc, I, Se, Sn and Cs can be confined with element separate only in case that the nitride fuel is chosen. (author)

  9. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-01-01

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions

  10. The concept of equilibrium in organization theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, H.W.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many organization theories consist of an interpretation frame and an idea about the ideal equilibrium state. This article explains how the equilibrium concept is used in four organization theories: the theories of Fayol, Mintzberg, Morgan, and Volberda. Equilibrium can be defined as balance, fit or

  11. The concept of equilibrium in organization theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, Henk W.M.

    1997-01-01

    Many organization theories consist of an interpretation frame and an idea about the ideal equilibrium state. This article explains how the equilibrium concept is used in four organization theories: the theories of Fayol, Mintzberg, Morgan, and Volberda. Equilibrium can be defined as balance, fit or

  12. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-3Fe alloy processed by equal channel angular extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuxiao, Yu; Fang, Liu; Dazhi, Zhao; Toth, Laszlo S

    2014-01-01

    Al-Fe alloys are attractive for applications at temperatures beyond those normally associated with the conventional aluminum alloys. Under proper solidification condition, a full eutectic microstructure can be generated in Al-Fe alloys at Fe concentration well in excess of the eutectic composition of 1.8 wt.% Fe. The microstructure in this case is characterized by the metastable regular eutectic Al-Al 6 Fe fibers of nano-scale in diameter, instead of the equilibrium eutectic Al-Al 3 Fe phase. In this study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the Al-3Fe alloy with metastable Al 6 Fe particles deformed by equal channel angular extrusion were investigated. Severe plastic deformation results in a microstructure consisting of submicron equiaxed Al grains with a uniform distribution of submicron Al 6 Fe particles on the grain boundaries. The room temperature tensile properties of the alloy with this microstructure will be presented

  14. Colorimetric Determination of the Iron(III)-Thiocyanate Reaction Equilibrium Constant with Calibration and Equilibrium Solutions Prepared in a Cuvette by Sequential Additions of One Reagent to the Other

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasulu, Frazier; Barlag, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The well-known colorimetric determination of the equilibrium constant of the iron(III-thiocyanate complex is simplified by preparing solutions in a cuvette. For the calibration plot, 0.10 mL increments of 0.00100 M KSCN are added to 4.00 mL of 0.200 M Fe(NO[subscript 3])[subscript 3], and for the equilibrium solutions, 0.50 mL increments of…

  15. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO 2 ) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO 2 system, ZrO 2 precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO 2 phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO 2 is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO 2 precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed [111] Au/ZrO 2 interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent or semi-coherent. This paper reports that this indicates that there may be a relatively strong bond between MgO and Au

  16. Calcium isotopic composition of mantle peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Kang, J.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Ca isotopes are useful to decipher mantle evolution and the genetic relationship between the Earth and chondrites. It has been observed that Ca isotopes can be fractionated at high temperature [1-2]. However, Ca isotopic composition of the mantle peridotites and fractionation mechanism are still poorly constrained. Here, we report Ca isotope composition of 12 co-existing pyroxene pairs in 10 lherzolites, 1 harzburgite, and 1 wehrlite xenoliths collected from Hainan Island (South Eastern China). Ca isotope data were measured on a Triton-TIMS using the double spike method at the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS. The long-term external error is 0.12‰ (2SD) based on repeated analyses of NIST SRM 915a and geostandards. δ44Ca of clinopyroxenes except that from the wehrlite ranges from 0.85‰ to 1.14‰, while opx yields a wide range from 0.98‰ up to 2.16‰. Co-existing pyroxene pairs show large Δ44Caopx-cpx (defined as δ44Caopx-δ44Cacpx) ranging from 0 to 1.23‰, reflecting equilibrium fractionation controlled by variable Ca contents in the opx. Notably, clinopyroxene of wehrlite shows extremely high δ44Ca (3.22‰). δ44Ca of the bulk lherzolites and harzburgites range from 0.86‰ to 1.14‰. This can be explained by extracting melts with slightly light Ca isotopic compositions. Finally, the high δ44Ca of the wehrlite (3.22‰) may reflect metasomatism by melt which has preferentially lost light Ca isotopes due to chemical diffusion during upwelling through the melt channel. [1] Amini et al (2009) GGR 33; [2] Huang et al (2010) EPSL 292.

  17. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C. [BRGM av. Claude Guillemin BP6009 45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Vinsot, A. [ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground research Laboratory (URL), RD 960, 55290 Bure (France); Made, B.; Altmann, S. [ANDRA - Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  18. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C.; Vinsot, A.; Made, B.; Altmann, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  19. Optical isotope shifts for unstable samarium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.A.; Walker, P.M.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Evans, D.E.; Grant, I.S.; England, J.G.; Fawcett, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using a tunable dye laser beam intersecting a thermal atomic beam, optical isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings have been measured for the four unstable samarium isotopes between 144 Sm and 154 Sm, covering the well known transition region from spherical to deformed shapes. (orig.)

  20. Thermal equilibrium in Einstein's elevator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rey, Bernardo; Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Dagdug, Leonardo; Cubero, David

    2013-05-01

    We report fully relativistic molecular-dynamics simulations that verify the appearance of thermal equilibrium of a classical gas inside a uniformly accelerated container. The numerical experiments confirm that the local momentum distribution in this system is very well approximated by the Jüttner function-originally derived for a flat spacetime-via the Tolman-Ehrenfest effect. Moreover, it is shown that when the acceleration or the container size is large enough, the global momentum distribution can be described by the so-called modified Jüttner function, which was initially proposed as an alternative to the Jüttner function.

  1. Inclusive spectra of reactions 56Fe(P, XP), (P, X α) measured at Ep=29,9 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duisebayev, A.; Duisebayev, B.; Zholdybaev, T.; Ismailov, K.; Sadykov, B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The inclusive spectra of protons and α-particles emitted from proton induced reactions on 56 Fe isotopes at E p =29.9 ± 0.1MeV in angular range 30-135 o with the step 15 o have been measured on isochronous cyclotron U-150M of Institute of Nuclear Physics. Typically, intensities between 40 and 180 nA have been utilized with a beam energy resolution of 0.3%. The self-supporting isotopic enriched (95%) foil of 56 Fe with thickness of 2.7 mg/cm 2 in these experiments has been used. The two-detector telescope system (Δ E-E) registration of α-particles has been used. The thicknesses of silicon detectors are ΔE-30 microns and E-2000 microns. Solid angle subtended by a telescope of detectors was equal to Ω =2.72 * 10 -5 sr ± 1%. For registration and identification of protons in the whole energy range the same two-detector telescope (Δ E-E) system has been used. It was consisted of silicon surface-barrier ORTEC detector (100 micron) and a scintillation detector with a total absorption of CsI (Tl) (25 mm). The solid angle subtended by a telescope of detectors is equal to Ω =2.59 * 10 -5 sr. Basing on exciton model of pre-equilibrium decay have been calculated spectra of multi-step direct (MSD) and compound (MSC) processes for (p,xp), (p,x α) reaction on 56 Fe. From comparison of experimental and calculated integral spectra it follows that main contribution in experimental cross section is due to MSD reaction mechanism. It is shown also that evaporated part of cross-section is underestimated in framework of used version of exciton model. It can be explained by the following fact that used master equation approach gives only pre-equilibrium part of MSC process, so the emission from complex equilibrium configuration of composite system are not considered

  2. Kinetic isotope effect in the thermolysis of methylenecyclobutane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chickos, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    The intramolecular kinetic isotope effect for the thermolysis of equilibrated methylenecyclobutane-d 2 was investigated at 515 0 C as a function of pressure. A high-pressure value of k/sub H/k/sub D/ (ethylene/ethylene-d 2 ) = 0.9 was obtained at 13 cm of N 2 pressure. This value decreased to 0.86 at 70 μm total pressure. No intermolecular kinetic isotope effect was measured for the formation of ethylene from labeled and unlabeled methylenecyclobutane. The pressure and temperature dependence of the intramolecular kinetic isotope effect was used as evidence in establishing the inverse nature of the effect. The isotope effect observed was explained in terms of competing equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects in which the equilibrium isotope effects dominate. It was concluded on the bases of these results that an acyclic intermediate is involved in the fragmentation of methylenecyclobutane to ethylene and allene. The results also support the notion that deuterium prefers to accumulate at the methylene group with the greatest p character in the carbon--hydrogen bond. 1 figure, 4 tables

  3. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  4. Approach to transverse equilibrium in axial channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearick, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical treatments of channeling rely on the assumption of equilibrium on the transverse energy shell. The approach to equilibrium, and the nature of the equilibrium achieved, is examined using solutions of the equations of motion in the continuum multi-string model. The results show that the motion is chaotic in the absence of dissipative processes, and a complicated structure develops in phase space which prevent the development of the simple equilibrium usually assumed. The role of multiple scattering in smoothing out the equilibrium distribution is investigated

  5. Application of iron and zinc isotopes to track the sources and mechanisms of metal loading in a mountain watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrok, David M., E-mail: dborrok@utep.edu [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Wanty, Richard B.; Ian Ridley, W.; Lamothe, Paul J. [US Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Kimball, Briant A. [US Geological Survey, 2329 W. Orton Cir., Salt Lake City, UT 84119 (United States); Verplanck, Philip L.; Runkel, Robert L. [US Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Here the hydrogeochemical constraints of a tracer dilution study are combined with Fe and Zn isotopic measurements to pinpoint metal loading sources and attenuation mechanisms in an alpine watershed impacted by acid mine drainage. In the tested mountain catchment, {delta}{sup 56}Fe and {delta}{sup 66}Zn isotopic signatures of filtered stream water samples varied by {approx}3.5 per mille and 0.4 per mille, respectively. The inherent differences in the aqueous geochemistry of Fe and Zn provided complimentary isotopic information. For example, variations in {delta}{sup 56}Fe were linked to redox and precipitation reactions occurring in the stream, while changes in {delta}{sup 66}Zn were indicative of conservative mixing of different Zn sources. Fen environments contributed distinctively light dissolved Fe (<-2.0 per mille) and isotopically heavy suspended Fe precipitates to the watershed, while Zn from the fen was isotopically heavy (>+0.4 per mille). Acidic drainage from mine wastes contributed heavier dissolved Fe ({approx}+0.5 per mille) and lighter Zn ({approx}+0.2 per mille) isotopes relative to the fen. Upwelling of Fe-rich groundwater near the mouth of the catchment was the major source of Fe ({delta}{sup 56}Fe {approx} 0 per mille) leaving the watershed in surface flow, while runoff from mining wastes was the major source of Zn. The results suggest that given a strong framework for interpretation, Fe and Zn isotopes are useful tools for identifying and tracking metal sources and attenuation mechanisms in mountain watersheds.

  6. Pre-equilibrium plasma dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, U.

    1986-01-01

    Approaches towards understanding and describing the pre-equilibrium stage of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. Focus is on a kinetic theory approach to non-equilibrium dynamics, its extension to include the dynamics of color degrees of freedom when applied to the quark-gluon plasma, its quantum field theoretical foundations, and its relationship to both the particle formation stage at the very beginning of the nuclear collision and the hydrodynamic stage at late collision times. The usefulness of this approach to obtain the transport coefficients in the quark-gluon plasma and to derive the collective mode spectrum and damping rates in this phase are discussed. Comments are made on the general difficulty to find appropriated initial conditions to get the kinetic theory started, and a specific model is given that demonstrates that, once given such initial conditions, the system can be followed all the way through into the hydrodynamical regime. 39 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  7. Non-equilibrium phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, E.; Cooper, F.M.; Bishop, A.R.; Habib, S.; Kluger, Y.; Jensen, N.G.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Non-equilibrium phase transitions play a central role in a very broad range of scientific areas, ranging from nuclear, particle, and astrophysics to condensed matter physics and the material and biological sciences. The aim of this project was to explore the path to a deeper and more fundamental understanding of the common physical principles underlying the complex real time dynamics of phase transitions. The main emphasis was on the development of general theoretical tools to deal with non-equilibrium processes, and of numerical methods robust enough to capture the time-evolving structures that occur in actual experimental situations. Specific applications to Laboratory multidivisional efforts in relativistic heavy-ion physics (transition to a new phase of nuclear matter consisting of a quark-gluon plasma) and layered high-temperature superconductors (critical currents and flux flow at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory) were undertaken

  8. Pre-equilibrium plasma dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, U.

    1986-01-01

    Approaches towards understanding and describing the pre-equilibrium stage of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. Focus is on a kinetic theory approach to non-equilibrium dynamics, its extension to include the dynamics of color degrees of freedom when applied to the quark-gluon plasma, its quantum field theoretical foundations, and its relationship to both the particle formation stage at the very beginning of the nuclear collision and the hydrodynamic stage at late collision times. The usefulness of this approach to obtain the transport coefficients in the quark-gluon plasma and to derive the collective mode spectrum and damping rates in this phase are discussed. Comments are made on the general difficulty to find appropriated initial conditions to get the kinetic theory started, and a specific model is given that demonstrates that, once given such initial conditions, the system can be followed all the way through into the hydrodynamical regime. 39 refs., 7 figs

  9. Equilibrium: two-dimensional configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    In Chapter 6, the problem of toroidal force balance is addressed in the simplest, nontrivial two-dimensional geometry, that of an axisymmetric torus. A derivation is presented of the Grad-Shafranov equation, the basic equation describing axisymmetric toroidal equilibrium. The solutions to equations provide a complete description of ideal MHD equilibria: radial pressure balance, toroidal force balance, equilibrium Beta limits, rotational transform, shear, magnetic wall, etc. A wide number of configurations are accurately modeled by the Grad-Shafranov equation. Among them are all types of tokamaks, the spheromak, the reversed field pinch, and toroidal multipoles. An important aspect of the analysis is the use of asymptotic expansions, with an inverse aspect ratio serving as the expansion parameter. In addition, an equation similar to the Grad-Shafranov equation, but for helically symmetric equilibria, is presented. This equation represents the leading-order description low-Beta and high-Beta stellarators, heliacs, and the Elmo bumpy torus. The solutions all correspond to infinitely long straight helices. Bending such a configuration into a torus requires a full three-dimensional calculation and is discussed in Chapter 7

  10. Nickel distribution and isotopic fractionation in a Brazilian lateritic regolith: Coupling Ni isotopes and Ni K-edge XANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratié, G.; Garnier, J.; Calmels, D.; Vantelon, D.; Guimarães, E.; Monvoisin, G.; Nouet, J.; Ponzevera, E.; Quantin, C.

    2018-06-01

    Ultramafic (UM) rocks are known to be nickel (Ni) rich and to weather quickly, which makes them a good candidate to look at the Ni isotope systematics during weathering processes at the Earth's surface. The present study aims at identifying the Ni solid speciation and discussing the weathering processes that produce Ni isotope fractionation in two deep laterite profiles under tropical conditions (Barro Alto, Goiás State, Brazil). While phyllosilicates and to a lower extent goethite are the main Ni-bearing phases in the saprolitic part of the profile, iron (Fe) oxides dominate the Ni budget in the lateritic unit. Nickel isotopic composition (δ60Ni values) has been measured in each unit of the regolith, i.e., rock, saprock, saprolite and laterite (n = 52). δ60Ni varies widely within the two laterite profiles, from -0.10 ± 0.05‰ to 1.43 ± 0.05‰, showing that significant Ni isotope fractionation occurs during the weathering of UM rocks. Overall, our results show that during weathering, the solid phase is depleted in heavy Ni isotopes due to the preferential sorption and incorporation of light Ni isotopes into Fe oxides; the same mechanisms likely apply to the incorporation of Ni into phyllosilicates (type 2:1). However, an isotopically heavy Ni pool is observed in the solid phase at the bottom of the saprolitic unit. This feature can be explained by two hypotheses that are not mutually exclusive: (i) a depletion in light Ni isotopes during the first stage of weathering due to the preferential dissolution of light Ni-containing minerals, and (ii) the sorption or incorporation of isotopically heavy Ni carried by percolating waters (groundwater samples have δ60Ni of 2.20 and 2.27‰), that were enriched in heavy Ni isotopes due to successive weathering processes in the overlying soil and laterite units.

  11. Electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) in clays. Role in U and Hg(II) transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Michelle [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    During this project, we investigated Fe electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. We used selective chemical extractions, enriched Fe isotope tracer experiments, computational molecular modeling, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our findings indicate that structural Fe(III) in clay minerals is reduced by aqueous Fe(II) and that electron transfer occurs when Fe(II) is sorbed to either basal planes and edge OH-groups of clay mineral. Findings from highly enriched isotope experiments suggest that up to 30 % of the Fe atoms in the structure of some clay minerals exhanges with aqueous Fe(II). First principles calculations using a small polaron hopping approach suggest surprisingly fast electron mobility at room temperature in a nontronite clay mineral and are consistent with temperature dependent Mössbauer data Fast electron mobility suggests that electrons may be able to conduct through the mineral fast enough to enable exchange of Fe between the aqueous phase and clay mineral structure. over the time periods we observed. Our findings suggest that Fe in clay minerals is not as stable as previously thought.

  12. The transport of oxygen isotopes in hydrothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibbin, R.; Absar, A.; Blattner, P.

    1986-01-01

    As groundwater passes through porous rocks, exchange of oxygen between the fluid and the solid matrix causes a change in the oxygen isotope concentrations in both water and rock. If the rate at which the exchange takes place can be estimated (as a function of the isotope concentrations and temperature) then the time taken for a rock/water system to come to equilibrium with respect to isotope concentration might be calculated. In this paper, the equation for isotope transport is derived using conservation laws, and a simple equation to describe the rate of isotope exchange is proposed. These are combined with the equations for fluid flow in a porous medium, to produce a general set of equations describing isotope transport in a hydrothermal system. These equations are solved numerically, using typical parameters, for the one-dimensional case. Oxygen isotope data from the basement rocks underlying Kawerau geothermal field are modelled. The results indicate that the time taken for exchange of 18 O to present-day values is less than the postulated age of hydrothermal alteration in that field. This suggests that, although controlled by similar parameters, oxygen isotope exchange, in felsic rocks at least, is much faster than hydrothermal alteration. This conclusion is consistent with the petrographic observations from the Kawerau system as well as other geothermal fields

  13. Efficacy of Fe(o,o-EDDHA) and Fe(o,p-EDDHA) isomers in supplying Fe to strategy I plants differs in nutrient solution and calcareous soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Carmen L; Romera, Francisco J; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael; Sariego, Cristina; Garcaí-Alonso, J Ignacio; Boned, Javier; Marti, Gabriel

    2008-11-26

    The FeEDDHA [iron(3+) ethylenediamine di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid] is one of the most efficient iron chelates employed in the correction of iron clorosis in calcareous soils. FeEDDHA presents different positional isomers: the ortho-ortho (o,o), the ortho-para (o,p), and the para-para (p,p). Of these isomers, the p,p cannot chelate Fe in soil solution in a wide range of pH values, while both o,o and o,p can. The objective of this work was to compare the efficiency of both isomers (o,o and o,p) to provide Fe to two Strategy I plants (tomato and peach) in nutrient solution (pH approximately 6.0), as well as in calcareous soil (pH approximately 8.4; CALCIXEREPT). For this, chelates of both o,o-EDDHA and o,p-EDDHA with 57Fe (a nonradioactive isotope of Fe) were used, where the 57Fe acts as a tracer. The results obtained showed that the o,o isomer is capable of providing sufficient Fe to plants in both nutrient solution and calcareous soil. However, the o,p isomer is capable of providing sufficient Fe to plants in nutrient solution but not in calcareous soil.

  14. Isotope and multiband effects in layered superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Keller, Hugo

    2012-06-13

    In this review we consider three classes of superconductors, namely cuprate superconductors, MgB(2) and the new Fe based superconductors. All of these three systems are layered materials and multiband compounds. Their pairing mechanisms are under discussion with the exception of MgB(2), which is widely accepted to be a 'conventional' electron-phonon interaction mediated superconductor, but extending the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory to account for multiband effects. Cuprates and Fe based superconductors have higher superconducting transition temperatures and more complex structures. Superconductivity is doping dependent in these material classes unlike in MgB(2) which, as a pure compound, has the highest values of T(c) and a rapid suppression of superconductivity with doping takes place. In all three material classes isotope effects have been observed, including exotic ones in the cuprates, and controversial ones in the Fe based materials. Before the area of high-temperature superconductivity, isotope effects on T(c) were the signature for phonon mediated superconductivity-even when deviations from the BCS value to smaller values were observed. Since the discovery of high T(c) materials this is no longer evident since competing mechanisms might exist and other mediating pairing interactions are discussed which are of purely electronic origin. In this work we will compare the three different material classes and especially discuss the experimentally observed isotope effects of all three systems and present a rather general analysis of them. Furthermore, we will concentrate on multiband signatures which are not generally accepted in cuprates even though they are manifest in various experiments, the evidence for those in MgB(2), and indications for them in the Fe based compounds. Mostly we will consider experimental data, but when possible also discuss theoretical models which are suited to explain the data.

  15. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  16. Geochemistry of silicon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Tiping; Li, Yanhe; Gao, Jianfei; Hu, Bin [Chinese Academy of Geological Science, Beijing (China). Inst. of Mineral Resources; Jiang, Shaoyong [China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China).

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant elements in the Earth and silicon isotope geochemistry is important in identifying the silicon source for various geological bodies and in studying the behavior of silicon in different geological processes. This book starts with an introduction on the development of silicon isotope geochemistry. Various analytical methods are described and compared with each other in detail. The mechanisms of silicon isotope fractionation are discussed, and silicon isotope distributions in various extraterrestrial and terrestrial reservoirs are updated. Besides, the applications of silicon isotopes in several important fields are presented.

  17. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  18. Discovering a Change in Equilibrium Constant with Change in Ionic Strength: An Empirical Laboratory Experiment for General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzberg, Richard J.

    1999-05-01

    Students are challenged to investigate the hypothesis that an equilibrium constant, Kc, measured as a product and quotient of molar concentrations, is constant at constant temperature. Spectrophotometric measurements of absorbance of a solution of Fe3+(aq) and SCN-(aq) treated with different amounts of KNO3 are made to determine Kc for the formation of FeSCN2+(aq). Students observe a regular decrease in the value of Kc as the concentration of added KNO3 is increased.

  19. Fractionation of oxygen isotopes between mammalian bone-phosphate and environmental drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, B.; Kolodny, V.; Horowitz, M.

    1984-01-01

    The delta 18 O of mammalian bone-phosphate varies linearly with delta 18 O of environmental water, but is not in isotopic equilibrium with that water. This situation is explained by a model of delta 18 O in body water in which the important fluxes of exchangeable oxygen through the body are taken into account. Fractionation of oxygen isotopes between body and environmental drinking water is dependent on the rates of drinking and respiration. Isotopic fractionation can be estimated from physiological data and the estimates correlate very well with observed fractionation. Species whose water consumption is large relative to its energy expenditure is sensitive to isotopic ratio changes in environmental water. (author)

  20. Theorical and experimental analysis of nitrogen-15 isotope enrichment by nitrogen monoxide and nitric acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducatti, C.

    1985-01-01

    Nitrogen-15 isotope enrichment by chemical exchange in NO/HNO 3 system was studied using two different theories. The isotope fractionation factors obtained by the countercurrent theory was compared to those estimated by the isotope equipartition theory were confronted through a model. A column in countercurrent was built at laboratory scale and parameters such as: number of theoretical plates, height equivalent to a theoretical plate, type of packing, total height of column, production of H 15 NO 3 /week, obtained under isotope dynamic equilibrium conditions, were studied in comparison to those in the literature. (Author) [pt

  1. Equilibrium arsenic adsorption onto metallic oxides : Isotherm models, error analysis and removal mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simsek, Esra Bilgin [Yalova University, Yalova (Turkmenistan); Beker, Ulker [Yldz Technical University, Istanbul (Turkmenistan)

    2014-11-15

    Arsenic adsorption properties of mono- (Fe or Al) and binary (Fe-Al) metal oxides supported on natural zeolite were investigated at three levels of temperature (298, 318 and 338 K). All data obtained from equilibrium experiments were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Sips, Toth and Redlich-Peterson isotherms, and error functions were used to predict the best fitting model. The error analysis demonstrated that the As(Ⅴ) adsorption processes were best described by the Dubinin-Raduskevich model with the lowest sum of normalized error values. According to results, the presence of iron and aluminum oxides in the zeolite network improved the As(Ⅴ) adsorption capacity of the raw zeolite (ZNa). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of ZNa-Fe and ZNa-AlFe samples suggested that the redox reactions are the postulated mechanisms for the adsorption onto them while the adsorption process is followed by surface complexation reactions for ZNa-Al.

  2. Preparation and biodistribution of {sup 59}Fe-radiolabelled iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisilova, Martina, E-mail: martinapospisilova@gmail.com; Zapotocky, Vojtech; Nesporova, Kristina [Contipro a.s (Czech Republic); Laznicek, Milan; Laznickova, Alice [Charles University, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové (Czech Republic); Zidek, Ondrej; Cepa, Martin; Vagnerova, Hana; Velebny, Vladimir [Contipro a.s (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-15

    We report on the {sup 59}Fe radiolabelling of iron oxide nanoparticle cores through post-synthetic isotope exchange ({sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub ex}) and precursor labelling ({sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub pre}). Scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements showed no impact of radiolabelling on nanoparticle size or morphology. While incorporation efficiencies of these methods are comparable—83 and 90% for precursor labelling and post-synthetic isotope exchange, respectively—{sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub pre} exhibited much higher radiochemical stability in citrated human plasma. Quantitative ex vivo biodistribution study of {sup 59}Fe-IONP{sub pre} coated with triethylene glycol was performed in Wistar rats. Following the intravenous administration, high {sup 59}Fe concentration was observed in the lung and the organs of the reticuloendothelial system such as the liver, the spleen and the femur.

  3. Microstructure and thermal stability of Fe, Ti and Ag implanted Yttria-stabilized zirconia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hassel, B.A.; van Hassel, B.A.; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was implanted with 15 keV Fe or Ti ions up to a dose of 8×1016 at cm−2. The resulting “dopant” concentrations exceeded the concentrations corresponding to the equilibrium solid solubility of Fe2O3 or TiO2 in YSZ. During oxidation in air at 400° C, the Fe and Ti

  4. Calcium Isotope Geochemistry: Research Horizons and Nanoscale Fractionation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, J. M.; Depaolo, D. J.; Richter, F. M.; Fantle, M. S.; Simon, J. I.; Ryerson, F. J.; Ewing, S. A.; Turchyn, A. V.; Yang, W.; Owens, T. L.

    2008-12-01

    Interest in studies of calcium isotope variations in nature continues to increase. Investigations span human biology, plants and soils, oceanography and paleoclimate, early solar system processes, aqueous geochemistry, and silicate liquid structure. Variations in the 44Ca/40Ca ratio are generally small, about 5 ‰, but gradual small improvements in analytical capability now yield 0.05 to 0.1 ‰ resolution. The field is still plagued by a lack of universal standards for isotope ratios and data representation, but these are secondary issues. Traditional isotopic systems have been based in equilibrium thermodynamics, which can explain the magnitude and sign of observed mass-dependent fractionation behavior. For Ca isotopes this is not the case. There is still no reliable way to estimate the equilibrium free energy associated with isotopic exchange between most phases of interest. Experiments are difficult to interpret because it is almost impossible to precipitate minerals from aqueous solution at equilibrium at low temperature. Some studies suggest that, for example, there is no equilibrium isotopic fractionation between calcite and dissolved aqueous Ca. There is good evidence that most Ca isotopic fractionation is caused by kinetic effects. The details of the controlling processes are still missing, and without this mechanistic understanding it is difficult to fully understand the implications of natural isotopic variations. Recent work on dissolved Ca, calcite, and sulfates in both laboratory and natural settings is shedding light on where the fractionation may arise. There is emerging evidence for mass dependent fractionation associated with aqueous diffusion, but probably the primary source of the effects is in the details of precipitation of minerals from solution. This makes the fractionation potentially dependent on a number of factors, including solution composition and mineral growth rate. The next challenge is to develop appropriate experimental tests and

  5. Study on bioavailability of dietary iron of women by using activable isotopic tracer and neutron activation analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yangmei; Ni Bangfa; Tian Weizhi; Wang Pingsheng; Cao Lei

    2002-01-01

    The bioavailability of diet iron of 10 healthy young women in Beijing area is studied by using two enriched isotopes 54 Fe and 58 Fe, and neutron activation analysis techniques. The abundance of 54 Fe and 58 Fe is 61.4% and 23.4%, respectively. In additional, the atomic absorption spectrometry is employed to measure total iron in fecal samples. Dysprosium, rarely absorbed by human body, is used to monitor the residence time of tracer isotopes in order to collect the fecal samples completely. The results show that the bioavailability of dietary iron in young women is (14.9 +- 3.9)%

  6. Lithium isotope effect accompanying electrochemical intercalation of lithium into graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Yanase, S; Oi, T

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has been electrochemically intercalated from a 1:2 (v/v) mixed solution of ethylene carbonate (EC) and methylethyl carbonate (MEC) containing 1 M LiClO sub 4 into graphite, and the lithium isotope fractionation accompanying the intercalation was observed. The lighter isotope was preferentially fractionated into graphite. The single-stage lithium isotope separation factor ranged from 1.007 to 1.025 at 25 C and depended little on the mole ratio of lithium to carbon of the lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (Li-GIC) formed. The separation factor increased with the relative content of lithium. This dependence seems consistent with the existence of an equilibrium isotope effect between the solvated lithium ion in the EC/MEC electrolyte solution and the lithium in graphite, and with the formation of a solid electrolyte interfaces on graphite at the early stage of intercalation. (orig.)

  7. Equilibrium calculations and mode analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrnegger, F.

    1987-01-01

    The STEP asymptotic stellarator expansion procedure was used to study the MHD equilibrium and stability properties of stellarator configurations without longitudinal net-current, which also apply to advanced stellarators. The effects of toroidal curvature and magnetic well, and the Shafranov shift were investigated. A classification of unstable modes in toroidal stellarators is given. For WVII-A coil-field configurations having a β value of 1% and a parabolic pressure profile, no free-boundary modes are found. This agrees with the experimental fact that unstable behavior of the plasma column is not observed for this parameter range. So a theoretical β-limit for stability against ideal MHD modes can be estimated by mode analysis for the WVII-A device

  8. Stellar Equilibrium in Semiclassical Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Rubio, Raúl

    2018-02-09

    The phenomenon of quantum vacuum polarization in the presence of a gravitational field is well understood and is expected to have a physical reality, but studies of its backreaction on the dynamics of spacetime are practically nonexistent outside of the specific context of homogeneous cosmologies. Building on previous results of quantum field theory in curved spacetimes, in this Letter we first derive the semiclassical equations of stellar equilibrium in the s-wave Polyakov approximation. It is highlighted that incorporating the polarization of the quantum vacuum leads to a generalization of the classical Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation. Despite the complexity of the resulting field equations, it is possible to find exact solutions. Aside from being the first known exact solutions that describe relativistic stars including the nonperturbative backreaction of semiclassical effects, these are identified as a nontrivial combination of the black star and gravastar proposals.

  9. Risk premia in general equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posch, Olaf

    This paper shows that non-linearities can generate time-varying and asymmetric risk premia over the business cycle. These (empirical) key features become relevant and asset market implications improve substantially when we allow for non-normalities in the form of rare disasters. We employ explici......'s effective risk aversion.......This paper shows that non-linearities can generate time-varying and asymmetric risk premia over the business cycle. These (empirical) key features become relevant and asset market implications improve substantially when we allow for non-normalities in the form of rare disasters. We employ explicit...... solutions of dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models, including a novel solution with endogenous labor supply, to obtain closed-form expressions for the risk premium in production economies. We find that the curvature of the policy functions affects the risk premium through controlling the individual...

  10. Neoclassical equilibrium in gyrokinetic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nguyen, C.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, Ph.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a set of model collision operators, which reproduce the neoclassical equilibrium and comply with the constraints of a full-f global gyrokinetic code. The assessment of these operators is based on an entropy variational principle, which allows one to perform a fast calculation of the neoclassical diffusivity and poloidal velocity. It is shown that the force balance equation is recovered at lowest order in the expansion parameter, the normalized gyroradius, hence allowing one to calculate correctly the radial electric field. Also, the conventional neoclassical transport and the poloidal velocity are reproduced in the plateau and banana regimes. The advantages and drawbacks of the various model operators are discussed in view of the requirements for neoclassical and turbulent transport.

  11. QUIL: a chemical equilibrium code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunsford, J.L.

    1977-02-01

    A chemical equilibrium code QUIL is described, along with two support codes FENG and SURF. QUIL is designed to allow calculations on a wide range of chemical environments, which may include surface phases. QUIL was written specifically to calculate distributions associated with complex equilibria involving fission products in the primary coolant loop of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. QUIL depends upon an energy-data library called ELIB. This library is maintained by FENG and SURF. FENG enters into the library all reactions having standard free energies of reaction that are independent of concentration. SURF enters all surface reactions into ELIB. All three codes are interactive codes written to be used from a remote terminal, with paging control provided. Plotted output is also available

  12. Pre-equilibrium gamma emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sudip

    1993-01-01

    Together with the direct reaction and the compound nuclear emissions the pre-equilibrium (PEQ) or pre-compound processes give a fairly complete picture of nuclear reactions induced by light ions at energies of some tens of MeV. PEQ particle emissions covering the higher energy continuum spectra have been investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. In contrast, very little work has been done on PEQ γ- emissions. The reason is that in spite of extensive work done on PEQ particle emissions, the mechanism is not yet fully understood. Also, the PEQ γ-emission cross-sections (∼ micro barns) are very small compared to the PEQ particle emission cross-sections (∼ milli barns). Yet apart from the academic interest the understanding of PEQ γ-emissions is important for applied fusion research etc. In this paper the PEQ γ-emissions is discussed and the work done in this field is reviewed. (author). 14 refs

  13. Equilibrium Analysis in Cake Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branzei, Simina; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2013-01-01

    Cake cutting is a fundamental model in fair division; it represents the problem of fairly allocating a heterogeneous divisible good among agents with different preferences. The central criteria of fairness are proportionality and envy-freeness, and many of the existing protocols are designed...... to guarantee proportional or envy-free allocations, when the participating agents follow the protocol. However, typically, all agents following the protocol is not guaranteed to result in a Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we initiate the study of equilibria of classical cake cutting protocols. We consider one...... of the simplest and most elegant continuous algorithms -- the Dubins-Spanier procedure, which guarantees a proportional allocation of the cake -- and study its equilibria when the agents use simple threshold strategies. We show that given a cake cutting instance with strictly positive value density functions...

  14. Uranium isotopes in El hamraween harbour sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahel Din, K.

    2009-01-01

    Isotopes of uranium in marine sediments collected from El Hamraween harbour and Ras El-Bhar areas on the Egyptian coast of the Red Sea have been studied using radiochemical separation procedures and alpha-particle spectrometry. Activity concentrations of 238 U, 235 U, 234 U were calculated. The activities observed indicating the enhancement of radioactivity level in El Hamraween harbor area due to the activities of phosphate shipment operation. Secular equilibrium between 234 U and 238 U was found in the analyzed samples. The average activity ratio of 235 U/ 238 U was close to the value 0.046 for uranium in nature

  15. Equilibrium Solubility of CO2 in Alkanolamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium solubility of CO2 were measured in aqueous solutions of Monoethanolamine (MEA) and N,N-diethylethanolamine(DEEA). Equilibrium cells are generally used for these measurements. In this study, the equilibrium data were measured from the calorimetry. For this purpose a reaction calorimeter...... (model CPA 122 from ChemiSens AB, Sweden) was used. The advantage of this method is being the measurement of both heats of absorption and equilibrium solubility data of CO2 at the same time. The measurements were performed for 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA solutions as a function of CO2 loading at three...... different temperatures 40, 80 and 120 ºC. The measured 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA data were compared with the literature data obtained from different equilibrium cells which validated the use of calorimeters for equilibrium solubility measurements....

  16. Geochemistry of the stable isotopes of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douthitt, C B [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (USA). Div. of Geological and Planetary Sciences

    1982-08-01

    One hundred thirty two new measurements of the relative abundances of the stable isotopes of silicon in terrestrial materials are presented. The total variation of delta/sup 30/Si found is 6.2 parts per thousand, centered on the mean of terrestrial mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks, delta/sup 30/Si = -0.4 parts per thousand. Igneous rocks show limited variation; coexisting minerals exhibit small, systematic silicon isotopic fractionations that are roughly 1/3 the magnitude of concomitant oxygen isotopic fractionations at 1150/sup 0/C. In both igneous minerals and rocks, delta/sup 30/Si shows a positive correlation with silicon content, as does delta/sup 18/O. Opal from both sponge spicules and sinters is light, with delta/sup 30/Si = -2.3 and -1.4 parts per thousand respectively. Large delta/sup 30/Si values of both positive and negative sign are reported for the first time from clay minerals, opaline phytoliths, and authigenic quartz. All highly fractionated samples were precipitated from solution at low temperatures; however, aqueous silicon is not measurably fractionated relative to quartz at equilibrium. A kinetic isotope fractionation of approximately 3.5 parts per thousand is postulated to occur during the low temperature precipitation of opal and, possibly, poorly ordered phyllosilicates, with the silicate phase being enriched in /sup 28/Si. This fractionation, coupled with a Rayleigh precipitation model, is capable of explaining most non-magmatic delta/sup 30/Si variations.

  17. 450 {sup o}C isothermal section of the Fe-Zn-Si ternary phase diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Xuping [Inst. of Materials Research, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xiangtan Univ., Xiangtan, Hunan (China); Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tang, Nai-Yong [Cominco Ltd., Product Technology Centre, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Toguri, J.M. [Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The 450 {sup o}C isothermal section of the Fe-Zn-Si ternary phase diagram has been determined experimentally using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry. The focus of the work has been concentrated on the Zn-rich corner which is relevant to general galvanizing. The present study has confirmed the existence of the equilibrium state between the liquid, the {zeta} phase and the FeSi phase. This three phase equilibrium state prevents the equilibrium between the liquid and the {delta} phase suggested by some researchers. Experimental results indicate that Si solubility in all four binary Zn-Fe compounds is limited. The Fe solubility in molten Zn was found to decrease with increasing Si content in the melt. The liquid phase boundary was determined using a model based phenomenological approach. (author)

  18. Thermodynamics of calcium-isotope-exchange reactions. 1. Exchange between isotopic calcium carbonates and aqueous calcium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.S.; Nash, C.P.; Rock, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the authors results for the direct experimental determination of the equilibrium constant for the calcium-isotope-exchange reaction 40 CaCO 3 (s) + 44 CaCl 2 (aq) reversible 44 CaCO 2 (s) + 40 CaCl 2 (aq). The reaction was studied in electrochemical double cells without liquid junction of the type shown in eq 2. The experimental value of the equilibrium constant at 295 +/- 2 K is K = 1.08 +/- 0.02. The experimental value for K is compared with the values of K calculated for various model reactions according to the statistical thermodynamic theory of isotope effects. The isotopic solid carbonates were modeled according to both the Debye and Kieffer theories. No structured models of solvated isotopic aqueous calcium ions yield calculated equilibrium constants in agreement with their experimental results. This conclusion is in agreement with published molecular dynamics calculations which show that the aqueous solvation of Ca 2 =(aq) is essentially unstructured

  19. Protonation/reduction dynamics at the [4Fe-4S] cluster of the hydrogen-forming cofactor in [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Moritz; Mebs, Stefan; Duan, Jifu; Shulenina, Olga; Laun, Konstantin; Kertess, Leonie; Wittkamp, Florian; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Happe, Thomas; Winkler, Martin; Haumann, Michael; Stripp, Sven T

    2018-01-31

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenases of bacteria and algae are the most efficient hydrogen conversion catalysts in nature. Their active-site cofactor (H-cluster) comprises a [4Fe-4S] cluster linked to a unique diiron site that binds three carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN - ) ligands. Understanding microbial hydrogen conversion requires elucidation of the interplay of proton and electron transfer events at the H-cluster. We performed real-time spectroscopy on [FeFe]-hydrogenase protein films under controlled variation of atmospheric gas composition, sample pH, and reductant concentration. Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor shifts of the CO/CN - vibrational bands in response to redox and protonation changes. Three different [FeFe]-hydrogenases and several protein and cofactor variants were compared, including element and isotopic exchange studies. A protonated equivalent (HoxH) of the oxidized state (Hox) was found, which preferentially accumulated at acidic pH and under reducing conditions. We show that the one-electron reduced state Hred' represents an intrinsically protonated species. Interestingly, the formation of HoxH and Hred' was independent of the established proton pathway to the diiron site. Quantum chemical calculations of the respective CO/CN - infrared band patterns favored a cysteine ligand of the [4Fe-4S] cluster as the protonation site in HoxH and Hred'. We propose that proton-coupled electron transfer facilitates reduction of the [4Fe-4S] cluster and prevents premature formation of a hydride at the catalytic diiron site. Our findings imply that protonation events both at the [4Fe-4S] cluster and at the diiron site of the H-cluster are important in the hydrogen conversion reaction of [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

  20. Mathematical models and equilibrium in irreversible microeconomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly M. Tsirlin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A set of equilibrium states in a system consisting of economic agents, economic reservoirs, and firms is considered. Methods of irreversible microeconomics are used. We show that direct sale/purchase leads to an equilibrium state which depends upon the coefficients of supply/demand functions. To reach the unique equilibrium state it is necessary to add either monetary exchange or an intermediate firm.

  1. Collapse and equilibrium of rotating, adiabatic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical hydrodynamics computer code has been used to follow the collapse and establishment of equilibrium of adiabatic gas clouds restricted to axial symmetry. The clouds are initially uniform in density and rotation, with adiabatic exponents γ=5/3 and 7/5. The numerical technique allows, for the first time, a direct comparison to be made between the dynamic collapse and approach to equilibrium of unconstrained clouds on the one hand, and the results for incompressible, uniformly rotating equilibrium clouds, and the equilibrium structures of differentially rotating polytropes, on the other hand

  2. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  3. Static Equilibrium Configurations of Charged Metallic Bodies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Static equilibrium, charged metallic body, potential energy, projected gradient method. ... television, radio, internet, microwave ovens, mobile telephones, satellite communication systems, radar systems, electrical motors, electrical.

  4. Iron isotope fractionation during pyrite formation in a sulfidic Precambrian ocean analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolison, John M.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Middag, Rob; Gault-Ringold, Melanie; George, Ejin; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.

    2018-04-01

    The chemical response of the Precambrian oceans to rising atmospheric O2 levels remains controversial. The iron isotope signature of sedimentary pyrite is widely used to trace the microbial and redox states of the ocean, yet the iron isotope fractionation accompanying pyrite formation in nature is difficult to constrain due to the complexity of the pyrite formation process, difficulties in translating the iron isotope systematics of experimental studies to natural settings, and insufficient iron isotope datasets for natural euxinic (i.e. anoxic and sulfidic) marine basins where pyrite formation occurs. Herein we demonstrate, that a large, permil-level shift in the isotope composition of dissolved iron occurs in the Black Sea euxinic water column during syngenetic pyrite formation. Specifically, iron removal to syngenetic pyrite gives rise to an iron isotope fractionation factor between Fe(II) and FeS2 of 2.75 permil (‰), the largest yet reported for reactions under natural conditions that do not involve iron redox chemistry. These iron isotope systematics offer the potential to generate permil-level shifts in the sedimentary pyrite iron isotope record due to partial drawdown of the oceanic iron inventory. The implication is that the iron stable isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrites may record fundamental regime shifts between pyrite formation under sulfur-limited conditions and pyrite formation under iron-limited conditions. To this end, the iron isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrite may best represent the extent of euxinia in the past global ocean, rather than its oxygenation state. On this basis, the reinterpreted sedimentary pyrite Fe isotope record suggests a fundamental shift towards more sulfidic oceanic conditions coincident with the 'Great Oxidation Event' around 2.3 billion years ago. Importantly, this does not require the chemical state of the ocean to shift from mainly de-oxygenated to predominantly oxygenated in parallel with the permanent rise

  5. Process for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emile, B.F.M.

    1983-11-01

    A process is claimed for isotopic separation applied to isotopes of elements that can be placed in at least a physicochemical form in which the isotopic atoms or the molecules containing these atoms can be easily displaced and for which there are selective radiations preferentially absorbed by the isotopes of a certain type or by the molecules containing them, said absorption substantially increasing the probability of ionization of said atoms or molecules relative to the atoms or molecules that did not absorb the radiation. The process consists of placing the isotopic mixture in such a form, subjecting it in a separation zone to selective radiations and to an electrical field that produces migration of positive ions toward the negative electrodes and negative ions toward the positive electrodes, and withdrawing from certain such zones the fractions thus enriched in certain isotopes

  6. Adsorption of As(V) from water using Mg-Fe-based hydrotalcite (FeHT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuerk, T. [Mineral Processing Division, Department of Mining Engineering, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Alp, I., E-mail: ialp@ktu.edu.tr [Mineral Processing Division, Department of Mining Engineering, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Deveci, H. [Mineral Processing Division, Department of Mining Engineering, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2009-11-15

    This paper describes a study of the sorptive removal of arsenate (As(V)) from aqueous solutions by synthetically prepared Mg-Fe-based hydrotalcites (FeHT) as layered double hydroxide (LDH) adsorbents. The synthesis of Fe{sup 3+}-substituted hydrotalcites (FeHT) with the chemical formula [Mg(II){sub 6}Fe(III){sub 2}(OH){sub 16}]{sup 2+}[CO{sub 3} x yH{sub 2}O]{sup 2-} was achieved by a co-precipitation method. The reaction products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction analysis. The influences of solution pH, initial arsenate (As(V)) concentration, and sorbent concentration were investigated in multiple kinetic runs. The adsorption rates and isotherms were investigated in batch experiments. The pseudo-first-order and second-order kinetic models were tested and the latter was found to fit better to the experimental data. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used to describe the adsorption data from equilibrium experiments. The results have shown that FeHT has a high arsenate removal efficiency, with the ability to reduce the concentration of arsenate in the aqueous solution from an initial value of 330 {mu}g/l to <10 {mu}g/l (i.e. below the limit value specified by WHO).

  7. Accumulating the hydride state in the catalytic cycle of [FeFe]-hydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Martin; Senger, Moritz; Duan, Jifu; Esselborn, Julian; Wittkamp, Florian; Hofmann, Eckhard; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Stripp, Sven Timo; Happe, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    H2 turnover at the [FeFe]-hydrogenase cofactor (H-cluster) is assumed to follow a reversible heterolytic mechanism, first yielding a proton and a hydrido-species which again is double-oxidized to release another proton. Three of the four presumed catalytic intermediates (Hox, Hred/Hred and Hsred) were characterized, using various spectroscopic techniques. However, in catalytically active enzyme, the state containing the hydrido-species, which is eponymous for the proposed heterolytic mechanism, has yet only been speculated about. We use different strategies to trap and spectroscopically characterize this transient hydride state (Hhyd) for three wild-type [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Applying a novel set-up for real-time attenuated total-reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, we monitor compositional changes in the state-specific infrared signatures of [FeFe]-hydrogenases, varying buffer pH and gas composition. We selectively enrich the equilibrium concentration of Hhyd, applying Le Chatelier's principle by simultaneously increasing substrate and product concentrations (H2/H+). Site-directed manipulation, targeting either the proton-transfer pathway or the adt ligand, significantly enhances Hhyd accumulation independent of pH.

  8. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the 13 C content of soil CO 2 , CaCO 3 , precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The 13 C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing 13 C content with depth decreasing 13 C with altitude and reduced 13 C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO 2 loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids

  9. Simulation of startup period of hydrogen isotope separation distillation column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazonov, A.B.; Kagramanov, Z.G.; Magomedbekov, Eh.P.

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic procedure for the mathematical simulation of start-up regime of rectification columns for molecular hydrogen isotope separation was developed. Nonstationary state (start-up period) of separating column for rectification of multi-component mixture was calculated. Full information on equilibrium and kinetic physicochemical properties of components in separating mixtures was used for the calculations. Profile of concentration of components by height of column in task moment of time was calculated by means of differential equilibriums of nonstationary mass transfer. Calculated results of nonstationary state of column by the 2 m height, 30 mm diameter during separation of the mixture: 5 % protium, 70 % deuterium, 25 % tritium were illustrated [ru

  10. MOX - equilibrium core design and trial irradiation in KAPS - 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, A.S.; Ray, Sherly; Kumar, A.N.; Parikh, M.V.

    2006-01-01

    Option of usage of MOX fuel bundles in the equilibrium core of Indian 220 MWe PHWRs on a regular basis has been studied. The design of the MOX bundle considered is MOX -7 with inner 7 elements with uranium and plutonium oxide MOX fuel and outer 12 elements with natural uranium fuel. The composition of the plutonium isotopes corresponds to that at about 6500 MWD/TeU burnup. Burnup optimization has been done such that operation at design rated power is possible while achieving the maximum average discharge burnup. Operation with the optimized burnup pattern will result in substantial saving of natural uranium bundles. To obtain feedback on the performance of MOX bundles prior to its large scale use about 50 MOX-7 bundles have been loaded in KAPS - 1 equilibrium core. Locations have been selected such that reactor should be operating at rated power without violating any constraints on channel bundle powers and also meeting the safety requirements. Burnup of interest also should be achieved in minimum period of time. The fissile plutonium content in the 50 MOX fuel bundles loaded is about 75.6 wt % . About 38 bundles out of the 50 bundles loaded have been already discharged and remaining bundles are still in the core. The maximum discharge burnup of the MOX bundles is about 12000 MWD/TeU. The performance of the MOX bundles were excellent and as per prediction. No MOX bundle is reported to be failed. (author)

  11. Controls on the stable isotope compositions of travertine from hyperalkaline springs in Oman: Insights from clumped isotope measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, E. S.; Guo, W.; Paukert, A. N.; Matter, J. M.; Mervine, E. M.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2016-11-01

    Carbonate formation at hyperalkaline springs is typical of serpentinization in peridotite massifs worldwide. These travertines have long been known to exhibit large variations in their carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, extending from apparent equilibrium values to highly depleted values. However, the exact causes of these variations are not well constrained. We analyzed a suite of well-characterized fresh carbonate precipitates and travertines associated with hyperalkaline springs in the peridotite section of the Samail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman, and found their clumped isotope compositions vary systematically with formation environments. Based on these findings, we identified four main processes controlling the stable isotope compositions of these carbonates. These include hydroxylation of CO2, partial isotope equilibration of dissolved inorganic carbon, mixing between isotopically distinct carbonate end-members, and post-depositional recrystallization. Most notably, in fresh crystalline films on the surface of hyperalkaline springs and in some fresh carbonate precipitates from the bottom of hyperalkaline pools, we observed large enrichments in Δ47 (up to ∼0.2‰ above expected equilibrium values) which accompany depletions in δ18O and δ13C, yielding about 0.01‰ increase in Δ47 and 1.1‰ decrease in δ13C for every 1‰ decrease in δ18O, relative to expected equilibrium values. This disequilibrium trend, also reflected in preserved travertines ranging in age from modern to ∼40,000 years old, is interpreted to arise mainly from the isotope effects associated with the hydroxylation of CO2 in high-pH fluids and agrees with our first-order theoretical estimation. In addition, in some fresh carbonate precipitates from the bottom of hyperalkaline pools and in subsamples of one preserved travertine terrace, we observed additional enrichments in Δ47 at intermediate δ13C and δ18O, consistent with mixing between isotopically distinct carbonate end

  12. Effect of NaFeEDTA-fortified soy sauce on zinc absorption in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wu, Jinghuan; Ren, Tongxiang; Wang, Rui; Li, Weidong; Piao, Jianhua; Wang, Jun; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2015-03-01

    NaFeEDTA has been applied in many foods as an iron fortificant and is used to prevent iron deficiency in Fe-depleted populations. In China, soy sauce is fortified with NaFeEDTA to control iron deficiency. However, it is unclear whether Fe-fortified soy sauce affects zinc absorption. To investigate whether NaFeEDTA-fortified soy sauce affects zinc absorption in children, sixty children were enrolled in this study and randomly assigned to three groups (10 male children and 10 female children in each group). All children received daily 3 mg of (67)Zn and 1.2 mg of dysprosium orally, while the children in the three groups were supplemented with NaFeEDTA-fortified soy sauce (6 mg Fe, NaFeEDTA group), FeSO₄-fortified soy sauce (6 mg Fe, FeSO₄ group), and no iron-fortified soy sauce (control group), respectively. Fecal samples were collected during the experimental period and analyzed for the Zn content, (67)Zn isotope ratio and dysprosium content. The Fe intake from NaFeEDTA-fortified and FeSO₄-fortified groups was significantly higher than that in the control group (P sauce does not affect Zn bioavailability in children.

  13. Isotope Fractionation of Water During Evaporation Without Condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappa, Christopher D.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Smith, Jared D.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2005-01-01

    The microscopic events engendering liquid water evaporation have received much attention over the last century, but remain incompletely understood. We present measurements of isotope fractionation occurring during free molecular evaporation from liquid microjets and show that the isotope ratios of evaporating molecules exhibit dramatic differences from equilibrium vapor values, strong variations with the solution deuterium mole fraction, and a clear temperature dependence. These results indicate the existence of an energetic barrier to evaporation and that the evaporation coefficient of water is less than unity. These new insights into water evaporation promise to advance our understanding of the processes that control the formation and lifetime of clouds in the atmosphere.

  14. New method for simultaneous determination of 55Fe and 59Fe in blood serum samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saukkonen, H.; Uhlenius, R.

    1978-01-01

    Routine methods for the measurement of 55 Fe and 59 Fe activities in biological samples are frequently required in metabolic studies of iron. A new simple method for the simultaneous determination of 59 Fe and 55 Fe concentration in 5 cm 3 samples of blood is described and carefully evaluated. Before the measurement of the activity, organic matter was eliminated by HNO 3 -HClO 4 wet ashing and iron was electroplated onto a copper plate. The accuracy of results was studied by assessing samples, which contained known amounts of radioactivity and determining the counts per nanocurie in each case. The accuracy of the results of 59 Fe and 55 Fe determinations was found to be about 5%. The method has been routinely used to determine iron resorption in patients using the double isotope method. The determination proved to be satisfactory and not too laborious. When performing the yield determination there is a way of detecting and correcting mistakes or incompleteness in different stages of the measurement, thus leading to a high degree of reliability. (T.G.)

  15. Precise measurement of the neutron capture reaction 54Fe(n,γ)55Fe via AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, A; Buczak, K; Forstner, O; Golser, R; Kutschera, W; Lederer, C; Priller, A; Steier, P; Belgya, T; Szentmiklosi, L; Bichler, M; Coquard, L; Dillmann, I; Kaeppeler, F; Mengoni, A; Reifarth, R

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of cross sections relevant to nuclear astrophysics has become one main research topic at the VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) facility. The technique applied, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), offers excellent sensitivity for the detection of long-lived radionuclides through ultra-low isotope ratio measurements. We discuss the potential and preliminary results of ongoing precision measurements of neutron-capture cross sections of 54 Fe. Such measurements might help to clarify the recently found discrepancy of s-process nucleosynthesis at lower-mass nuclei (A 55 Fe (t 1/2 = 2.72 yr) was analyzed using AMS. At VERA, detection of 55 Fe was developed with a reproducibility of about 1%, which makes the 54 Fe(n,γ) 55 Fe reaction a precise and unique laboratory measurement, which can serve as a reference to complementary techniques. In this regard a new 55 Fe standard for AMS measurements was produced. The final cross-section data are expected to be accurate to better than 3%. We report a preliminary, however, already significantly improved thermal neutron cross section value of (2.32 ± 0.10) barn, and a value of (6.3 ± 0.6) mbarn for E n = (520 ± 50) keV.

  16. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Geobactermetallireducens during reduction of solubleFe(III)-NTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Garcia-Martin, Hector; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The tracer experiments showed that G. metallireducens containedcomplete biosynthesis pathways for essential metabolism, and this strainmight also have an unusual isoleucine biosynthesis route (usingacetyl-CoA and pyruvate as the precursors). The model indicated that over90 percent of the acetate was completely oxidized to CO2 via a completetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle while reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylaseand phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present under theseconditions, but enzymes in the glyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme wereabsent. Gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway were mainlyemployed for biosynthesis and accounted for less than 3 percent of totalcarbon consumption. The model also indicated surprisingly highreversibility in the reaction between oxoglutarate and succinate. Thisstep operates close to the thermodynamic equilibrium possibly becausesuccinate is synthesized via a transferase reaction, and the conversionof oxoglutarate to succinate is a rate limiting step for carbonmetabolism. These findings enable a better understanding of therelationship between genome annotation and extant metabolic pathways inG. metallireducens.

  17. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z., E-mail: d.pugliese.physics@gmail.com, E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz [Institute of Physics and Research Centre of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezručovo náměstí 13, CZ-74601 Opava (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  18. Isotopic marking and tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, F.

    1997-01-01

    The use of radioactive isotopes as tracers in biology has been developed thanks to the economic generation of the required isotopes in accelerators and nuclear reactors, and to the multiple applications of tracers in the life domain; the most usual isotopes employed in biology are carbon, hydrogen, phosphorus and sulfur isotopes, because these elements are present in most of organic molecules. Most of the life science knowledge appears to be dependent to the extensive use of nuclear tools and radioactive tracers; the example of the utilization of radioactive phosphorus marked ATP to study the multiple reactions with proteins, nucleic acids, etc., is given

  19. Isotopes in oxidation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of isotopes in the study of organic oxidation mechanisms is discussed. The help provided by tracer studies to demonstrate the two-equivalent path - hydride transfer, is illustrated by the examples of carbonium oxidants and the Wacker reaction. The role of kinetic isotope effects in the study of the scission of carbon-hydrogen bonds is illustrated by hydride abstraction, hydrogen atom abstraction, proton abstraction and quantum mechanical tunnelling. Isotopic studies on the oxidation of alcohols, carbonyl compounds, amines and hydrocarbons are discussed. The role of isotopes in the study of biochemical oxidation is illustrated with a discussion on nicotinamide and flavin coenzymes. (B.R.H.)

  20. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    The instant invention relates to a process for separating a material into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same material in said material. In one embodiment, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption followed by selective dissociation of said excited molecules by the absorption of a single photon of visible or ultraviolet light. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium. 11 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures

  1. Non-equilibrium spin and charge transport in superconducting heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalmann, Marcel; Rudolf, Marcel; Braun, Julian; Pietsch, Torsten; Scheer, Elke [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 78464 Konstanz (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Ferromagnet Superconductance (F/S) junctions are rich in exciting quantum-physical-phenomena, which are still poorly understood but may provide bright prospects for new applications. In contrast to conventional normal-metal proximity systems, Andreev reflection is suppressed for singlet cooper pairs in F/S heterostructures. However, long-range triplet pairing may be observed in S/F systems with non-collinear magnetization or spin-active interfaces. Herein, we investigate non-equilibrium transport properties of lateral S/F heterojunctions, defined via electron beam lithography. In particular we focus microwave- and magneto-transport spectroscopy on conventional type-I (Al, Pb, Zn) and type-II (Nb) superconductors in combination with strong transition metal ferromagnets (Ni, Co, Fe). A cryogenic HF readout platform and advanced electronic filtering is developed and results on Al-based heterojunctions are shown.

  2. Measurement of heavy particle and isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Masaru; Kohno, Takeshi; Imai, Takashi; Munakata, Kazuoki

    1987-01-01

    The report describes some achievements made so far in developing heavy particle and isotope measuring equipment that is planned to be mounted on the No.6 technical test satelite of the National Space Development Agency, ETS VI. Some ideas are proposed for such heavy particle and isotope measuring equipment that uses Astromag. The structure of SSD is shown which is planned to be incorporated in the sensor for the equipment. The planned charged particle detector consists of position sensitive detectors, PIN diodes and Si(Li) plates. Tests are made for the basic characteristics of such a detector. The characteristics of a PSD are also investigated. The PSD has a resolution of about 1 mm for 14 MeV He. Tests of a 0.3 mm PIN diode and 1.2 mm Si(Li) is carried out with 234 MeV-nucl Fe beams to determine their pulse height distribution. The PIN diode and Si(Li) are found to have a resolution of 6.79 and 17.6 MeV for energy loss of 158 and 710 MeV, respectively. If developed, a stripe-type Si PIN diode will serve for analysis of isotopes. A conceptual diagram of such a stripe device is proposed. The mechanism of measurement by a heavy particle and isotope detecting system incorporating Astromag is also illustrated. (Nogami, K.)

  3. Thermal transport across solid-solid interfaces enhanced by pre-interface isotope-phonon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eungkyu; Luo, Tengfei

    2018-01-01

    Thermal transport across solid interfaces can play critical roles in the thermal management of electronics. In this letter, we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the isotope effect on the thermal transport across SiC/GaN interfaces. It is found that engineered isotopes (e.g., 10% 15N or 71Ga) in the GaN layer can increase the interfacial thermal conductance compared to the isotopically pure case by as much as 23%. Different isotope doping features, such as the isotope concentration, skin depth of the isotope region, and its distance from the interface, are investigated, and all of them lead to increases in thermal conductance. Studies of spectral temperatures of phonon modes indicate that interfacial thermal transport due to low-frequency phonons (transport. This work may provide insights into interfacial thermal transport and useful guidance to practical material design.

  4. Salt effects on isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Fortier, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Essential to the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers and geothermometers is the knowledge of equilibrium isotope partitioning between different phases and species, which is usually a function of temperature only. The one exception known to date is oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation between liquid water and other phases (steam, gases, minerals), which changes upon the addition of salts to water, i.e., the isotope salt salt effect. Our knowledge of this effect, the difference between activity and composition (a-X) of isotopic water molecules in salt solutions, is very limited and controversial, especially at elevated temperatures. For the last several years, we have been conducting a detailed, systematic experimental study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the isotope salt effects from room temperature to elevated temperatures (currently to 500 degree C). From this effort, a simple, coherent picture of the isotope salt effect is emerging, that differs markedly from the complex results reported in the literature. In this communication, we present an overview on the isotope salt effect, obtained chiefly from our study. Observed isotope salt effects in salt solutions are significant even at elevated temperatures. The importance and implications of the isotope salt effect for isotopic studies of brine-dominated systems are also discussed in general terms

  5. Equilibrium figures in geodesy and geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, H.

    There is an enormous literature on geodetic equilibrium figures, but the various works have not always been interrelated, also for linguistic reasons (English, French, German, Italian, Russian). The author attempts to systematize the various approaches and to use the standard second-order theory for a study of the deviation of the actual earth and of the equipotential reference ellipsoid from an equilibrium figure.

  6. Equilibrium theory of island biogeography: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angela D. Yu; Simon A. Lei

    2001-01-01

    The topography, climatic pattern, location, and origin of islands generate unique patterns of species distribution. The equilibrium theory of island biogeography creates a general framework in which the study of taxon distribution and broad island trends may be conducted. Critical components of the equilibrium theory include the species-area relationship, island-...

  7. Gibbs equilibrium averages and Bogolyubov measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankovich, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Application of the functional integration methods in equilibrium statistical mechanics of quantum Bose-systems is considered. We show that Gibbs equilibrium averages of Bose-operators can be represented as path integrals over a special Gauss measure defined in the corresponding space of continuous functions. We consider some problems related to integration with respect to this measure

  8. Do intertidal flats ever reach equilibrium?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, D.C.; van Prooijen, B.C.; Wang, Z.B.; de Vriend, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have identified a strong relation between the hydrodynamic forces and the equilibrium profile for intertidal flats. A thorough understanding of the interplay between the hydrodynamic forces and the morphology, however, concerns more than the equilibrium state alone. We study the

  9. Vertical field and equilibrium calculation in ETE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, Antonio; Shibata, Carlos Shinya.

    1996-01-01

    The free-boundary MHD equilibrium code HEQ is used to study the plasma behaviour in the tokamak ETE, with optimized compensations coils and vertical field coils. The changes on the equilibrium parameters for different plasma current values are also investigated. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Statistical thermodynamics of equilibrium polymers at interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gucht, van der J.; Besseling, N.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of a solution of equilibrium polymers (or living polymers) at an interface is studied, using a Bethe-Guggenheim lattice model for molecules with orientation dependent interactions. The density profile of polymers and the chain length distribution are calculated. For equilibrium polymers

  11. Non-equilibrium modelling of distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, JA; Darton, R

    1997-01-01

    There are nasty conceptual problems in the classical way of describing distillation columns via equilibrium stages, and efficiencies or HETP's. We can nowadays avoid these problems by simulating the behaviour of a complete column in one go using a non-equilibrium model. Such a model has phase

  12. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  13. On the definition of equilibrium and non-equilibrium states in dynamical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Akimoto, Takuma

    2008-01-01

    We propose a definition of equilibrium and non-equilibrium states in dynamical systems on the basis of the time average. We show numerically that there exists a non-equilibrium non-stationary state in the coupled modified Bernoulli map lattice.

  14. Copper adsorption on magnetite-loaded chitosan microspheres: A kinetic and equilibrium study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podzus, P.E., E-mail: ppodzus@gmail.com [Grupo de Aplicaciones de Materiales Biocompatibles, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina); Debandi, M.V. [Grupo de Aplicaciones de Materiales Biocompatibles, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina); Daraio, M.E., E-mail: medit@fi.uba.ar [Grupo de Aplicaciones de Materiales Biocompatibles, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    A composite of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and the biopolymer chitosan, chemically crosslinked, was prepared as microspheres and used to adsorb copper ions, which were chosen as a model of contaminant metal in water. The adsorption of copper on the magnetic microspheres was studied in a batch process, with different aqueous solutions of Cu (II) at concentrations ranging from 40 to 1100 ppm. Kinetic and equilibrium aspects of the adsorption process were studied. The time-dependent Cu (II) adsorption data were well described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. It was found that the equilibrium data follow the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum adsorption capacity of around 500 mg Cu/g chitosan. The used microspheres were removed and after desorption the material was able to be reused as an adsorbent. The prepared microspheres proved efficient in the removal of copper ions through an adsorption process whose kinetic and equilibrium characteristics were analyzed.

  15. Copper adsorption on magnetite-loaded chitosan microspheres: A kinetic and equilibrium study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podzus, P.E.; Debandi, M.V.; Daraio, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    A composite of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and the biopolymer chitosan, chemically crosslinked, was prepared as microspheres and used to adsorb copper ions, which were chosen as a model of contaminant metal in water. The adsorption of copper on the magnetic microspheres was studied in a batch process, with different aqueous solutions of Cu (II) at concentrations ranging from 40 to 1100 ppm. Kinetic and equilibrium aspects of the adsorption process were studied. The time-dependent Cu (II) adsorption data were well described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. It was found that the equilibrium data follow the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum adsorption capacity of around 500 mg Cu/g chitosan. The used microspheres were removed and after desorption the material was able to be reused as an adsorbent. The prepared microspheres proved efficient in the removal of copper ions through an adsorption process whose kinetic and equilibrium characteristics were analyzed.

  16. Characterization of RFX-mod passive conducting structures to optimize plasma start up and equilibrium control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchiori, G.; Grando, L.; Cavinato, M.

    2007-01-01

    The load assembly of RFX-mod consists of three toroidal conducting structures whose eddy currents affect the plasma equilibrium magnetic configuration. The high number of electromagnetic probes mounted on the components of the load assembly allowed to analyse the response of each structure to a variation of the magnetic field vertical component. The capability of evaluating the axisymmetric toroidal currents in the passive structures and therefore their contribution to the equilibrium configuration by a 2D FE MHD equilibrium code was validated. The design and implementation of a feedback control system of the magnetic field vertical component before the gas ionization allowed meeting the requirement of an accurate control of this quantity in view of operation at higher plasma current and independently of the magnetizing winding programming

  17. Pre-equilibrium assumptions and statistical model parameters effects on reaction cross-section calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1992-02-01

    A systematic study on effects of statistical model parameters and semi-classical pre-equilibrium emission models has been carried out for the (n,p) reactions on the 56 Fe and 60 Co target nuclei. The results obtained by using various assumptions within a given pre-equilibrium emission model differ among them more than the ones of different models used under similar conditions. The necessity of using realistic level density formulas is emphasized especially in connection with pre-equilibrium emission models (i.e. with the exciton state density expression), while a basic support could be found only by replacement of the Williams exciton state density formula with a realistic one. (author). 46 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  18. Insights into iron sources and pathways in the Amazon River provided by isotopic and spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Daniel Santos; Poitrasson, Franck; Boaventura, Geraldo Resende; Allard, Thierry; Vieira, Lucieth Cruz; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Mancini, Luiz; Seyler, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the weathering and transport mechanisms of Fe in the Amazon River. A particular emphasis was placed on Fe partitioning, speciation, and isotopic fractionation in the contrasting waters of the Solimões and Negro rivers and their mixing zone at the beginning of the Amazon River. Samples collected in the end-member rivers and thirteen sites distributed throughout the mixing zone were processed through frontal vacuum filtration and tangential-flow ultrafiltration to separate the different suspended solid fractions, i.e., particulate (P > 0.45 μm and P > 0.22 μm), colloidal (0.22 μm > C > 5 kDa) and truly dissolved elements (TD particulate fractions yielded light isotopic compositions of -0.344‰ for P > 0.22 μm and -0.104‰ for P > 0.45 μm fractions). The mineral particulate-rich waters of the Solimões River had dissolved and colloidal fractions with light isotopic composition (-0.532‰ and -0.176‰, respectively), whereas the particulate fractions yielded δ57Fe values close to those of the continental crust (i.e., -0.029‰ for P > 0.22 μm and 0.028‰ for P > 0.45 μm). Ten kilometers downstream from the Negro and Solimões junction, the concentrations of colloidal and dissolved Fe species deviate markedly from conservative mixing. A maximum Fe loss of 43 μg/L (i.e., 50% of the dissolved and colloidal Fe) is observed 110 km downstream from the rivers junction. The contrasting Negro and Solimões Rivers isotopic compositions along the pore-sized water fractions is attributable to the biogeochemical processes involving different types of upland soils and parental materials. For instance, the isotopic composition of colloidal and dissolved Fe from the Negro River are consistent with Fe oxidation and complexation mechanisms at the interface between waterlogged podzols and river networks, as supported by strong organo-Fe complexes signals observed by EPR. Conversely, the particulate and colloidal fractions from the Solim

  19. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-03-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  20. Disturbances in equilibrium function after major earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Endo, Nobutaka; Osada, Yoshihisa; Kim, Yoshiharu; Kuriyama, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Major earthquakes were followed by a large number of aftershocks and significant outbreaks of dizziness occurred over a large area. However it is unclear why major earthquake causes dizziness. We conducted an intergroup trial on equilibrium dysfunction and psychological states associated with equilibrium dysfunction in individuals exposed to repetitive aftershocks versus those who were rarely exposed. Greater equilibrium dysfunction was observed in the aftershock-exposed group under conditions without visual compensation. Equilibrium dysfunction in the aftershock-exposed group appears to have arisen from disturbance of the inner ear, as well as individual vulnerability to state anxiety enhanced by repetitive exposure to aftershocks. We indicate potential effects of autonomic stress on equilibrium function after major earthquake. Our findings may contribute to risk management of psychological and physical health after major earthquakes with aftershocks, and allow development of a new empirical approach to disaster care after such events.