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Sample records for equatorward phase propagation

  1. BABCOCK–LEIGHTON SOLAR DYNAMO: THE ROLE OF DOWNWARD PUMPING AND THE EQUATORWARD PROPAGATION OF ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Cameron, Robert, E-mail: bkarak@ucar.edu [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-11-20

    The key elements of the Babcock–Leighton dynamos are the generation of poloidal field through decay and the dispersal of tilted bipolar active regions and the generation of toroidal field through the observed differential rotation. These models are traditionally known as flux transport dynamo models as the equatorward propagations of the butterfly wings in these models are produced due to an equatorward flow at the bottom of the convection zone. Here we investigate the role of downward magnetic pumping near the surface using a kinematic Babcock–Leighton model. We find that the pumping causes the poloidal field to become predominately radial in the near-surface shear layer, which allows the negative radial shear to effectively act on the radial field to produce a toroidal field. We observe a clear equatorward migration of the toroidal field at low latitudes as a consequence of the dynamo wave even when there is no meridional flow in the deep convection zone. Both the dynamo wave and the flux transport type solutions are thus able to reproduce some of the observed features of the solar cycle including the 11-year periodicity. The main difference between the two types of solutions is the strength of the Babcock–Leighton source required to produce the dynamo action. A second consequence of the magnetic pumping is that it suppresses the diffusion of fields through the surface, which helps to allow an 11-year cycle at (moderately) larger values of magnetic diffusivity than have previously been used.

  2. BABCOCK–LEIGHTON SOLAR DYNAMO: THE ROLE OF DOWNWARD PUMPING AND THE EQUATORWARD PROPAGATION OF ACTIVITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Cameron, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The key elements of the Babcock–Leighton dynamos are the generation of poloidal field through decay and the dispersal of tilted bipolar active regions and the generation of toroidal field through the observed differential rotation. These models are traditionally known as flux transport dynamo models as the equatorward propagations of the butterfly wings in these models are produced due to an equatorward flow at the bottom of the convection zone. Here we investigate the role of downward magnetic pumping near the surface using a kinematic Babcock–Leighton model. We find that the pumping causes the poloidal field to become predominately radial in the near-surface shear layer, which allows the negative radial shear to effectively act on the radial field to produce a toroidal field. We observe a clear equatorward migration of the toroidal field at low latitudes as a consequence of the dynamo wave even when there is no meridional flow in the deep convection zone. Both the dynamo wave and the flux transport type solutions are thus able to reproduce some of the observed features of the solar cycle including the 11-year periodicity. The main difference between the two types of solutions is the strength of the Babcock–Leighton source required to produce the dynamo action. A second consequence of the magnetic pumping is that it suppresses the diffusion of fields through the surface, which helps to allow an 11-year cycle at (moderately) larger values of magnetic diffusivity than have previously been used.

  3. Reversed phase propagation for hyperbolic surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Repän, Taavi; Novitsky, Andrey; Willatzen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic properties can be used to control phase propagation in hyperbolic metamaterials. However, in the visible spectrum magnetic properties are difficult to obtain. We discuss hyperbolic surface waves allowing for a similar control over phase, achieved without magnetic properties....

  4. Propagation of coherent light pulses with PHASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrdt, J.; Flechsig, U.; Grizzoli, W.; Siewert, F.

    2014-09-01

    The current status of the software package PHASE for the propagation of coherent light pulses along a synchrotron radiation beamline is presented. PHASE is based on an asymptotic expansion of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral (stationary phase approximation) which is usually truncated at the 2nd order. The limits of this approximation as well as possible extensions to higher orders are discussed. The accuracy is benchmarked against a direct integration of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral. Long range slope errors of optical elements can be included by means of 8th order polynomials in the optical element coordinates w and l. Only recently, a method for the description of short range slope errors has been implemented. The accuracy of this method is evaluated and examples for realistic slope errors are given. PHASE can be run either from a built-in graphical user interface or from any script language. The latter method provides substantial flexibility. Optical elements including apertures can be combined. Complete wave packages can be propagated, as well. Fourier propagators are included in the package, thus, the user may choose between a variety of propagators. Several means to speed up the computation time were tested - among them are the parallelization in a multi core environment and the parallelization on a cluster.

  5. Quantum dynamics via a time propagator in Wigner's phase space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1995-01-01

    We derive an expression for a short-time phase space propagator. We use it in a new propagation scheme and demonstrate that it works for a Morse potential. The propagation scheme is used to propagate classical distributions which do not obey the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. It is shown that ...... as a part of the sampling function. ©1995 American Institute of Physics....

  6. DETECTION OF EQUATORWARD MERIDIONAL FLOW AND EVIDENCE OF DOUBLE-CELL MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION INSIDE THE SUN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Junwei; Bogart, R. S.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Hartlep, Thomas; Duvall, T. L. Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Meridional flow in the solar interior plays an important role in redistributing angular momentum and transporting magnetic flux inside the Sun. Although it has long been recognized that the meridional flow is predominantly poleward at the Sun's surface and in its shallow interior, the location of the equatorward return flow and the meridional flow profile in the deeper interior remain unclear. Using the first 2 yr of continuous helioseismology observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic Magnetic Imager, we analyze travel times of acoustic waves that propagate through different depths of the solar interior carrying information about the solar interior dynamics. After removing a systematic center-to-limb effect in the helioseismic measurements and performing inversions for flow speed, we find that the poleward meridional flow of a speed of 15 m s –1 extends in depth from the photosphere to about 0.91 R ☉ . An equatorward flow of a speed of 10 m s –1 is found between 0.82 and 0.91 R ☉ in the middle of the convection zone. Our analysis also shows evidence of that the meridional flow turns poleward again below 0.82 R ☉ , indicating an existence of a second meridional circulation cell below the shallower one. This double-cell meridional circulation profile with an equatorward flow shallower than previously thought suggests a rethinking of how magnetic field is generated and redistributed inside the Sun

  7. DETECTION OF EQUATORWARD MERIDIONAL FLOW AND EVIDENCE OF DOUBLE-CELL MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION INSIDE THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Junwei; Bogart, R. S.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Hartlep, Thomas [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Duvall, T. L. Jr. [Solar Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Meridional flow in the solar interior plays an important role in redistributing angular momentum and transporting magnetic flux inside the Sun. Although it has long been recognized that the meridional flow is predominantly poleward at the Sun's surface and in its shallow interior, the location of the equatorward return flow and the meridional flow profile in the deeper interior remain unclear. Using the first 2 yr of continuous helioseismology observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic Magnetic Imager, we analyze travel times of acoustic waves that propagate through different depths of the solar interior carrying information about the solar interior dynamics. After removing a systematic center-to-limb effect in the helioseismic measurements and performing inversions for flow speed, we find that the poleward meridional flow of a speed of 15 m s{sup -1} extends in depth from the photosphere to about 0.91 R{sub Sun }. An equatorward flow of a speed of 10 m s{sup -1} is found between 0.82 and 0.91 R{sub Sun} in the middle of the convection zone. Our analysis also shows evidence of that the meridional flow turns poleward again below 0.82 R{sub Sun }, indicating an existence of a second meridional circulation cell below the shallower one. This double-cell meridional circulation profile with an equatorward flow shallower than previously thought suggests a rethinking of how magnetic field is generated and redistributed inside the Sun.

  8. A phase space approach to wave propagation with dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Benjamin, Jonathan S; Cohen, Leon; Loughlin, Patrick J

    2015-08-01

    A phase space approximation method for linear dispersive wave propagation with arbitrary initial conditions is developed. The results expand on a previous approximation in terms of the Wigner distribution of a single mode. In contrast to this previously considered single-mode case, the approximation presented here is for the full wave and is obtained by a different approach. This solution requires one to obtain (i) the initial modal functions from the given initial wave, and (ii) the initial cross-Wigner distribution between different modal functions. The full wave is the sum of modal functions. The approximation is obtained for general linear wave equations by transforming the equations to phase space, and then solving in the new domain. It is shown that each modal function of the wave satisfies a Schrödinger-type equation where the equivalent "Hamiltonian" operator is the dispersion relation corresponding to the mode and where the wavenumber is replaced by the wavenumber operator. Application to the beam equation is considered to illustrate the approach.

  9. GRAND MINIMA AND EQUATORWARD PROPAGATION IN A CYCLING STELLAR CONVECTIVE DYNAMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustson, Kyle; Miesch, Mark [High Altitude Observatory, Center Green 1, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Brun, Allan Sacha [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM–CNRS–Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Toomre, Juri [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2015-08-20

    The 3D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic code, using slope-limited diffusion, is employed to capture convective and dynamo processes achieved in a global-scale stellar convection simulation for a model solar-mass star rotating at three times the solar rate. The dynamo-generated magnetic fields possesses many timescales, with a prominent polarity cycle occurring roughly every 6.2 years. The magnetic field forms large-scale toroidal wreaths, whose formation is tied to the low Rossby number of the convection in this simulation. The polarity reversals are linked to the weakened differential rotation and a resistive collapse of the large-scale magnetic field. An equatorial migration of the magnetic field is seen, which is due to the strong modulation of the differential rotation rather than a dynamo wave. A poleward migration of magnetic flux from the equator eventually leads to the reversal of the polarity of the high-latitude magnetic field. This simulation also enters an interval with reduced magnetic energy at low latitudes lasting roughly 16 years (about 2.5 polarity cycles), during which the polarity cycles are disrupted and after which the dynamo recovers its regular polarity cycles. An analysis of this grand minimum reveals that it likely arises through the interplay of symmetric and antisymmetric dynamo families. This intermittent dynamo state potentially results from the simulation’s relatively low magnetic Prandtl number. A mean-field-based analysis of this dynamo simulation demonstrates that it is of the α-Ω type. The timescales that appear to be relevant to the magnetic polarity reversal are also identified.

  10. Mathematic model analysis of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuzhen; Guo, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Tingfeng

    2011-09-12

    In order to research the statistical properties of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen for adaptive optics and laser communication application in the laboratory, we establish mathematic models of statistical quantities, which are based on the Rytov method and the thin phase screen model, involved in the propagation process. And the analytic results are developed for an arbitrary thickness phase screen based on the Kolmogorov power spectrum. The comparison between the arbitrary thickness phase screen and the thin phase screen shows that it is more suitable for our results to describe the generalized case, especially the scintillation index.

  11. Poleward propagating subinertial alongshore surface currents off the U.S. West Coast

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Sung Yong

    2013-12-01

    The network comprising 61 high-frequency radar systems along the U.S. West Coast (USWC) provides a unique, high resolution, and broad scale view of ocean surface circulation. Subinertial alongshore surface currents show poleward propagating signals with phase speeds of O(10) and O(100-300) km d -1 that are consistent with historical in situ observations off the USWC and that can be possibly interpreted as coastally trapped waves (CTWs). The propagating signals in the slow mode are partly observed in southern California, which may result from scattering and reflection of higher-mode CTWs due to curvature of shoreline and bathymetry near Point Conception, California. On the other hand, considering the order of the phase speed in the slow mode, the poleward propagating signals may be attributed to alongshore advection or pressure-driven flows. A statistical regression of coastal winds at National Data Buoy Center buoys on the observed surface currents partitions locally and remotely wind-forced components, isolates footprints of the equatorward propagating storm events in winter off the USWC, and shows the poleward propagating signals year round. Key Points A unique resource to examine synoptic-scale alongshore variability Isolation of equatorward wind events in winter using a statistical model Poleward propagating surface signals year-round © 2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  12. A Standard Law for the Equatorward Drift of the Sunspot Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2012-01-01

    The latitudinal location of the sunspot zones in each hemisphere is determined by calculating the centroid position of sunspot areas for each solar rotation from May 1874 to June 2012. When these centroid positions are plotted and analyzed as functions of time from each sunspot cycle maximum there appears to be systematic differences in the positions and equatorward drift rates as a function of sunspot cycle amplitude. If, instead, these centroid positions are plotted and analyzed as functions of time from each sunspot cycle minimum then most of the differences in the positions and equatorward drift rates disappear. The differences that remain disappear entirely if curve fitting is used to determine the starting times (which vary by as much as 8 months from the times of minima). The sunspot zone latitudes and equatorward drift measured relative to this starting time follow a standard path for all cycles with no dependence upon cycle strength or hemispheric dominance. Although Cycle 23 was peculiar in its length and the strength of the polar fields it produced, it too shows no significant variation from this standard. This standard law, and the lack of variation with sunspot cycle characteristics, is consistent with Dynamo Wave mechanisms but not consistent with current Flux Transport Dynamo models for the equatorward drift of the sunspot zones.

  13. Numerical method for two-phase flow discontinuity propagation calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.; Raymond, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we present a class of numerical shock-capturing schemes for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws modelling two-phase flow. First, we solve the Riemann problem for a two-phase flow with unequal velocities. Then, we construct two approximate Riemann solvers: an one intermediate-state Riemann solver and a generalized Roe's approximate Riemann solver. We give some numerical results for one-dimensional shock-tube problems and for a standard two-phase flow heat addition problem involving two-phase flow instabilities

  14. Crack propagation in touch ductile materials. Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, R.D.; Sinclair, A.N.; McCammond, D.

    1989-06-01

    The thrust of this work was to investigate published J material resistance and stress-strain data applicable to the understanding of crack propagation in tough ductile steels, particularly SA 106 Grade B pipe steel. This data has been assembled from PIFRAC, AECB report INFO-0254-1 and Ontario Hydro sources and has been uniformly formatted and presented to facilitate comparison and assessment. While the data is in many aspects incomplete it has enabled an evaluation of the influence of temperature, specimen thickness and specimen orientation to be made in the context of the experimental J-R curves so determined. Comparisons of the stress-strain data within the Ramburg-Osgood formulation are also considered. A further component of this report addresses the development of the required software to utilize what is referred to as the engineering approach to elasto-plastic analysis to investigate the load carrying capacity of selected cracked pipe geometries which are representative of applied crack propagation studies associated with piping systems in the nuclear industry. Three specific geometries and loading situations, identified as Condition A, B and C have been evaluated; the results are presented and illustrate the variation in applied load as a function of an initial and final crack extension leading to instability

  15. Light propagation with phase discontinuities: generalized laws of reflection and refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nanfang; Genevet, Patrice; Kats, Mikhail A; Aieta, Francesco; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Capasso, Federico; Gaburro, Zeno

    2011-10-21

    Conventional optical components rely on gradual phase shifts accumulated during light propagation to shape light beams. New degrees of freedom are attained by introducing abrupt phase changes over the scale of the wavelength. A two-dimensional array of optical resonators with spatially varying phase response and subwavelength separation can imprint such phase discontinuities on propagating light as it traverses the interface between two media. Anomalous reflection and refraction phenomena are observed in this regime in optically thin arrays of metallic antennas on silicon with a linear phase variation along the interface, which are in excellent agreement with generalized laws derived from Fermat's principle. Phase discontinuities provide great flexibility in the design of light beams, as illustrated by the generation of optical vortices through use of planar designer metallic interfaces.

  16. Three-dimensional propagation in near-field tomographic X-ray phase retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhlandt, Aike; Salditt, Tim

    2016-01-01

    An extension of phase retrieval algorithms for near-field X-ray (propagation) imaging to three dimensions is presented, enhancing the quality of the reconstruction by exploiting previously unused three-dimensional consistency constraints. This paper presents an extension of phase retrieval algorithms for near-field X-ray (propagation) imaging to three dimensions, enhancing the quality of the reconstruction by exploiting previously unused three-dimensional consistency constraints. The approach is based on a novel three-dimensional propagator and is derived for the case of optically weak objects. It can be easily implemented in current phase retrieval architectures, is computationally efficient and reduces the need for restrictive prior assumptions, resulting in superior reconstruction quality

  17. Two-phase flow instability and propagation of disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Various mechanisms of static and dynamic macroinstabilities, appearing in two-phase flows, have been considered. Types of instabilities, conditioned by the form of hydraulic characteristics of the channel and density waves are analyzed in detail. Problems of instabilities in nuclear reactor circuits, in particular problems of instabilities, conditioned by water and steam mixing and vapour condensation, and problems of steam generator operation instability are discussed

  18. Propagation of small disturbances in two phases, one component flow (1963); Propagation de petites perturbations dans un ecoulement double phase a un seul constituant (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boure, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    A small disturbance is, shown to give rise to two waves: a pressure (sonic) wave and a continuity wave. Their propagation velocities are calculated. These velocities are independent of the disturbance amplitude. The sonic velocity is primarily a function of that one corresponding to the same medium with no flow and of the liquid phase velocity. It is also a function of the physical properties of the phases on the saturation line, of the slip laws and of the void fraction. The continuity wave velocity is only a function of the slip laws, of the void fraction and of the velocity of either phase. It appears two kinds of critical flow rates which are calculated. The void fraction and the liquid and gas velocities variations are calculated. These results are extended to the case of a real loop and an approximative method is given for the treatment of this case. (author) [French] On montre qu'une petite perturbation donne naissance a deux ondes: une onde de pression (onde sonique) et une onde de continuite. On calcule leurs vitesses de propagation qui sont independantes de l'amplitude de la perturbation. La vitesse du son depend des proprietes physiques des phases le long de la courbe de saturation, des lois du glissement, de la fraction volumique de vapeur. Elle depend surtout de la vitesse qu'il aurait dans le milieu immobile de meme fraction volumique de vapeur, et de la vitesse de la phase liquide. La vitesse de l'onde de continuite depend des lois du glissement, de la fraction volumique de vapeur et de la vitesse d'une des phases. Il apparait deux types de debits critiques que l'on calcule. On calcule egalement les variations de la fraction volumique de vapeur et des vitesses des phases dans la perturbation. On generalise des resultats precedents dans le cas d'un circuit reel et on propose une methode approchee pour traiter le probleme dans ce cas. (auteur)

  19. Impact of phase errors at the conjugate step on the propagation of intensity and phase shaped laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors investigate the phase conjugating element of a two element Fourier transform beam shaping scheme and the impact this element has on the resulting propagation. It is shown that there are stricter limitations placed on the system when...

  20. Propagation based phase retrieval of simulated intensity measurements using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Z. D. C.

    2018-04-01

    Determining the phase of a wave from intensity measurements has many applications in fields such as electron microscopy, visible light optics, and medical imaging. Propagation based phase retrieval, where the phase is obtained from defocused images, has shown significant promise. There are, however, limitations in the accuracy of the retrieved phase arising from such methods. Sources of error include shot noise, image misalignment, and diffraction artifacts. We explore the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to improve the accuracy of propagation based phase retrieval algorithms applied to simulated intensity measurements. We employ a phase retrieval algorithm based on the transport-of-intensity equation to obtain the phase from simulated micrographs of procedurally generated specimens. We then train an ANN with pairs of retrieved and exact phases, and use the trained ANN to process a test set of retrieved phase maps. The total error in the phase is significantly reduced using this method. We also discuss a variety of potential extensions to this work.

  1. Propagation of Nd magnetic phases in Nd/Sm(001) superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soriano, S; Dufour, C; Dumesnil, K; Stunault, A

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of Nd long range magnetic order in the hexagonal and cubic sublattices has been investigated in double hexagonal compact Nd/Sm(001) superlattices by resonant x-ray magnetic scattering at the Nd L 2 absorption edge. For a superlattice with 3.7 nm thick Sm layers, the magnetic structure of the hexagonal sublattice propagates coherently through several bilayers, whereas the order in the cubic sublattice remains confined to single Nd blocks. For a superlattice with 1.4 nm thick Sm layers, the magnetic structures of both sublattices appear to propagate coherently through the superlattice. This is the first observation (i) of the long range coherent propagation of Nd order on the cubic sites between Nd blocks and (ii) of a different thickness dependence of the propagation of the Nd magnetic phases associated with the hexagonal and cubic sublattices. The propagation of the Nd magnetic order through Sm is interpreted in terms of generalized susceptibility of the Nd conduction electrons

  2. Propagation characteristics of pulverized coal and gas two-phase flow during an outburst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aitao; Wang, Kai; Fan, Lingpeng; Tao, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Coal and gas outbursts are dynamic failures that can involve the ejection of thousands tons of pulverized coal, as well as considerable volumes of gas, into a limited working space within a short period. The two-phase flow of gas and pulverized coal that occurs during an outburst can lead to fatalities and destroy underground equipment. This article examines the interaction mechanism between pulverized coal and gas flow. Based on the role of gas expansion energy in the development stage of outbursts, a numerical simulation method is proposed for investigating the propagation characteristics of the two-phase flow. This simulation method was verified by a shock tube experiment involving pulverized coal and gas flow. The experimental and simulated results both demonstrate that the instantaneous ejection of pulverized coal and gas flow can form outburst shock waves. These are attenuated along the propagation direction, and the volume fraction of pulverized coal in the two-phase flow has significant influence on attenuation of the outburst shock wave. As a whole, pulverized coal flow has a negative impact on gas flow, which makes a great loss of large amounts of initial energy, blocking the propagation of gas flow. According to comparison of numerical results for different roadway types, the attenuation effect of T-type roadways is best. In the propagation of shock wave, reflection and diffraction of shock wave interact through the complex roadway types.

  3. Blume-Capel ferromagnet driven by propagating and standing magnetic field wave: Dynamical modes and nonequilibrium phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharyya, Muktish, E-mail: muktish.physics@presiuniv.ac.in; Halder, Ajay, E-mail: ajay.rs@presiuniv.ac.in

    2017-03-15

    The dynamical responses of Blume-Capel (S=1) ferromagnet to the plane propagating (with fixed frequency and wavelength) and standing magnetic field waves are studied separately in two dimensions by extensive Monte Carlo simulation. Depending on the values of temperature, amplitude of the propagating magnetic field and the strength of anisotropy, two different dynamical phases are observed. For a fixed value of anisotropy and the amplitude of the propagating magnetic field, the system undergoes a dynamical phase transition from a driven spin wave propagating phase to a pinned or spin frozen state as the system is cooled down. The time averaged magnetisation over a full cycle of the propagating magnetic field plays the role of the dynamic order parameter. A comprehensive phase diagram is plotted in the plane formed by the amplitude of the propagating wave and the temperature of the system. It is found that the phase boundary shrinks inward as the anisotropy increases. The phase boundary, in the plane described by the strength of the anisotropy and temperature, is also drawn. This phase boundary was observed to shrink inward as the field amplitude increases. - Highlights: • The Blume-Capel ferromagnet in propagating and standing magnetic wave. • Monte Carlo single spin flip Metropolis algorithm is employed. • The dynamical modes are observed. • The nonequilibrium phase transitions are studied. • The phase boundaries are drawn.

  4. Phase fluctuations model for EM wave propagation through solar scintillation at superior solar conjunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guanjun; Song, Zhaohui

    2017-04-01

    Traveling solar wind disturbances have a significant influence on radio wave characteristics during the superior solar conjunction communication. This paper considers the impact of solar scintillation on phase fluctuations of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation during the superior solar conjunction. Based on the Geometric Optics approximation, the close-form approximation model for phase fluctuations is developed. Both effects of anisotropic temporal variations function of plasma irregularities and their power spectrum are presented and analyzed numerically. It is found that phase fluctuations rapidly decrease with increasing Sun-Earth-Probe angle and decrease with increasing frequency at the rate of 1/f2. Moreover, the role of various features of the solar wind irregularities and their influence on the EM wave characteristic parameters is studied and discussed. Finally, we study the phase fluctuations of typical cases in order to better understand the impact of phase fluctuations in future deep space communication scenarios during solar conjunction periods.

  5. Propagation of the Semidiurnal Internal Tide: Phase Velocity Versus Group Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2017-12-01

    The superposition of two waves of slightly different wavelengths has long been used to illustrate the distinction between phase velocity and group velocity. The first-mode M2 and S2 internal tides exemplify such a two-wave model in the natural ocean. The M2 and S2 tidal frequencies are 1.932 and 2 cycles per day, respectively, and their superposition forms a spring-neap cycle in the semidiurnal band. The spring-neap cycle acts like a wave, with its frequency, wave number, and phase being the differences of the M2 and S2 internal tides. The spring-neap cycle and energy of the semidiurnal internal tide propagate at the group velocity. Long-range propagation of M2 and S2 internal tides in the North Pacific is observed by satellite altimetry. Along a 3,400 km beam spanning 24°-54°N, the M2 and S2 travel times are 10.9 and 11.2 days, respectively. For comparison, it takes the spring-neap cycle 21.1 days to travel over this distance. Spatial maps of the M2 phase velocity, the S2 phase velocity, and the group velocity are determined from phase gradients of the corresponding satellite observed internal tide fields. The observed phase and group velocities agree with theoretical values estimated using the World Ocean Atlas 2013 annual-mean ocean stratification.

  6. Nonlinear propagation of phase-conjugate focused sound beams in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brysev, A. P.; Krutyansky, L. M.; Preobrazhensky, V. L.; Pyl'nov, Yu. V.; Cunningham, K. B.; Hamilton, M. F.

    2000-07-01

    Nonlinear propagation of phase-conjugate, focused, ultrasound beams is studied. Measurements are presented of harmonic amplitudes along the axis and in the focal plane of the conjugate beam, and of the waveform and spectrum at the focus. A maximum peak pressure of 3.9 MPa was recorded in the conjugate beam. The measurements are compared with simulations based on the KZK equation, and satisfactory agreement is obtained.

  7. DOA and Noncircular Phase Estimation of Noncircular Signal via an Improved Noncircular Rotational Invariance Propagator Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqiang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the computationally efficient direction-of-arrival (DOA and noncircular (NC phase estimation problem of noncircular signal for uniform linear array. The key idea is to apply the noncircular propagator method (NC-PM which does not require eigenvalue decomposition (EVD of the covariance matrix or singular value decomposition (SVD of the received data. Noncircular rotational invariance propagator method (NC-RI-PM avoids spectral peak searching in PM and can obtain the closed-form solution of DOA, so it has lower computational complexity. An improved NC-RI-PM algorithm of noncircular signal for uniform linear array is proposed to estimate the elevation angles and noncircular phases with automatic pairing. We reconstruct the extended array output by combining the array output and its conjugated counterpart. Our algorithm fully uses the extended array elements in the improved propagator matrix to estimate the elevation angles and noncircular phases by utilizing the rotational invariance property between subarrays. Compared with NC-RI-PM, the proposed algorithm has better angle estimation performance and much lower computational load. The computational complexity of the proposed algorithm is analyzed. We also derive the variance of estimation error and Cramer-Rao bound (CRB of noncircular signal for uniform linear array. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  8. Integrating uncertainty propagation in GNSS radio occultation retrieval: from excess phase to atmospheric bending angle profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schwarz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS radio occultation (RO observations are highly accurate, long-term stable data sets and are globally available as a continuous record from 2001. Essential climate variables for the thermodynamic state of the free atmosphere – such as pressure, temperature, and tropospheric water vapor profiles (involving background information – can be derived from these records, which therefore have the potential to serve as climate benchmark data. However, to exploit this potential, atmospheric profile retrievals need to be very accurate and the remaining uncertainties quantified and traced throughout the retrieval chain from raw observations to essential climate variables. The new Reference Occultation Processing System (rOPS at the Wegener Center aims to deliver such an accurate RO retrieval chain with integrated uncertainty propagation. Here we introduce and demonstrate the algorithms implemented in the rOPS for uncertainty propagation from excess phase to atmospheric bending angle profiles, for estimated systematic and random uncertainties, including vertical error correlations and resolution estimates. We estimated systematic uncertainty profiles with the same operators as used for the basic state profiles retrieval. The random uncertainty is traced through covariance propagation and validated using Monte Carlo ensemble methods. The algorithm performance is demonstrated using test day ensembles of simulated data as well as real RO event data from the satellite missions CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP; Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC; and Meteorological Operational Satellite A (MetOp. The results of the Monte Carlo validation show that our covariance propagation delivers correct uncertainty quantification from excess phase to bending angle profiles. The results from the real RO event ensembles demonstrate that the new uncertainty estimation chain performs

  9. Integrating uncertainty propagation in GNSS radio occultation retrieval: from excess phase to atmospheric bending angle profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jakob; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Schwaerz, Marc

    2018-05-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) observations are highly accurate, long-term stable data sets and are globally available as a continuous record from 2001. Essential climate variables for the thermodynamic state of the free atmosphere - such as pressure, temperature, and tropospheric water vapor profiles (involving background information) - can be derived from these records, which therefore have the potential to serve as climate benchmark data. However, to exploit this potential, atmospheric profile retrievals need to be very accurate and the remaining uncertainties quantified and traced throughout the retrieval chain from raw observations to essential climate variables. The new Reference Occultation Processing System (rOPS) at the Wegener Center aims to deliver such an accurate RO retrieval chain with integrated uncertainty propagation. Here we introduce and demonstrate the algorithms implemented in the rOPS for uncertainty propagation from excess phase to atmospheric bending angle profiles, for estimated systematic and random uncertainties, including vertical error correlations and resolution estimates. We estimated systematic uncertainty profiles with the same operators as used for the basic state profiles retrieval. The random uncertainty is traced through covariance propagation and validated using Monte Carlo ensemble methods. The algorithm performance is demonstrated using test day ensembles of simulated data as well as real RO event data from the satellite missions CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP); Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC); and Meteorological Operational Satellite A (MetOp). The results of the Monte Carlo validation show that our covariance propagation delivers correct uncertainty quantification from excess phase to bending angle profiles. The results from the real RO event ensembles demonstrate that the new uncertainty estimation chain performs robustly. Together

  10. Focal points and the phase of the semi-classical propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levit, S.; Moehring, K.; Smilansky, U.; Dreyfus, T.

    1977-01-01

    The relation between the phase of the semi-classical propagator and the number of times the classical trajectory is reflected from a caustic is discussed. It is shown that the accepted prescription based on Morse's focal point theorem is valid only for a restricted class of problems (coordinate representation and a positive definite mass tensor). A more general method to evaluate the phase is derived. It applies to all problems of physical interest involving the most general representations (mixed coordinate and momentum) and complicated Hamiltonian functions. The result is of particular relevance for the classical S-matrix. (author)

  11. Investigation of the propagation characteristics in turbulent dispersed two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sami, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    The propagation characteristics of turbulent dispersed two-phase flows have been studied experimentally using the Pitot tube associated with a conical hot-film anemometer. It is found that the mixture velocity increases with decreasing volumetric mixing ratio of the air and water. The void fraction distribution shows homogeneity across the test section in the special case of fully developed boundary layer two-phase flow. An expression is obtained which relates the local mixture velocity to the local void fraction, gas and liquid densities, and volumetric gas-liquid ratio

  12. The study of the structural stability of the spiral laser beams propagation through inhomogeneous phase medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchik, Alexander A.; Muzychenko, Yana B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper discusses theoretical and experimental results of the investigation of light beams that retain their intensity structure during propagation and focusing. Spiral laser beams are a family of laser beams that preserve the structural stability up to scale and rotation with the propagation. Properties of spiral beams are of practical interest for laser technology, medicine and biotechnology. Researchers use a spiral beams for movement and manipulation of microparticles. Functionality laser manipulators can be significantly enhanced by using spiral beams whose intensity remains invariable. It is well known, that these beams has non-zero orbital angular momentum. Spiral beams have a complicated phase distribution in cross section. In this paper we investigate the structural stability of the laser beams having a spiral phase structure by passing them through an inhomogeneous phase medium. Laser beam is passed through a medium is characterized by a random distribution of phase in the range 0..2π. The modeling was performed using VirtualLab 5.0 (manufacturer LightTrans GmbH). Compared the intensity distribution of the spiral and ordinary laser beam after the passage of the inhomogeneous medium. It is shown that the spiral beams exhibit a significantly better structural stability during the passage phase heterogeneous environments than conventional laser beams. The results obtained in the simulation are tested experimentally. Experimental results show good agreement with the theoretical results.

  13. Controllable soliton propagation based on phase-front curvature in asymmetrical nonlocal media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huafeng; Lü, Hua; Luo, Jianghua; Sun, Lihui

    2016-08-01

    The influence of phase-front curvature on the dynamical behavior of the fundamental mode soliton during its transmission in asymmetrical nonlocal media is studied in detail and the phase-front curvature can be imposed on the fundamental mode soliton by reshaping or phase imprinting technologies. By changing the phase-front curvature or its imposed position, controllable soliton propagation in asymmetrical nonlocal media can be achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11547007 and 11304024), the Innovation Personnel Training Plan for Excellent Youth of Guangdong University Project (Grant No. 2013LYM_0023), and the Yangtze Fund for Youth Teams of Science and Technology Innovation (Grant No. 2015cqt03).

  14. Kinematics and thermodynamics across a propagating non-stoichiometric oxidation phase front in spent fuel grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.; Kansa, E.J.; Wijesinghe, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    Spent fuel contains mixtures, alloy and compound, but are dominated by U and O except for some UO 2 fuels with burnable poisons (gadolinia in BWR rods), the other elements evolve during reactor operation from neutron reaction and fission + fission decay events. Due to decay, chemical composition and activity of spent fuel will continue to evolve after removal from reactors. During the time interval with significant radioactivity levels relevant for a geological repository, it is important to develop models for potential chemical responses in spent fuel and potential degradation of repository. One such potential impact is the oxidation of spent fuel, which results in initial phase change of UO 2 lattice to U 4 O 9 and the next phase change is probably to U 3 O 8 although it has not been observed yet below 200C. The U 4 O 9 lattice is nonstoichiometric with a O/U weight ratio at 2.4. Preliminary indications are that the UO 2 has a O/U of 2. 4 at the time just before it transforms into the U 4 O 9 phase. In the oxygen weight gain versus time response, a plateau appears as the O/U approaches 2.4. Part of this plateau is due to geometrical effects of a U 4 O 9 phase change front propagating into UO 2 grain volumes; however, this may indicate a metastable phase change delay kinetics or a diffusional related delay time until the oxygen density can satisfy stoichiometry and energy conditions for phase changes. Experimental data show a front of U 4 O 9 lattice structure propagating into grains of the UO 2 lattice. To describe this spatially inhomogenous oxidation phase transition, as well as the expected U 3 O 8 phase transition from the U 4 O 9 lattice, lattice models are developed and spatially discontinuous kinematic and energetic expressions are derived. 9 refs

  15. Noise propagation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E

    2014-01-01

    Three phase-retrieval algorithms, based on the transport-of-intensity equation and on the contrast transfer function for propagation-based imaging, and on the linearized geometrical optics approximation for analyser-based imaging, are investigated. The algorithms are compared in terms of their effect on propagation of noise from projection images to the corresponding phase-retrieved images and further to the computed tomography (CT) images/slices of a monomorphous object reconstructed using filtered backprojection algorithm. The comparison is carried out in terms of an integral noise characteristic, the variance, as well as in terms of a simple figure-of-merit, i.e. signal-to-noise ratio per unit dose. A gain factor is introduced that quantitatively characterizes the effect of phase retrieval on the variance of noise in the reconstructed projection images and in the axial slices of the object. Simple analytical expressions are derived for the gain factor and the signal-to-noise ratio, which indicate that the application of phase-retrieval algorithms can increase these parameters by up to two orders of magnitude compared to raw projection images and conventional CT, thus allowing significant improvement in the image quality and/or reduction of the x-ray dose delivered to the patient. (paper)

  16. Comparison of propagation-based phase-contrast tomography approaches for the evaluation of dentin microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyhle, Hans; Weitkamp, Timm; Lang, Sabrina; Schulz, Georg; Rack, Alexander; Zanette, Irene; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    The complex hierarchical structure of human tooth hard tissues, enamel and dentin, guarantees function for decades. On the micrometer level the dentin morphology is dominated by the tubules, micrometer-narrow channels extending from the dentin-enamel junction to the pulp chamber. Their structure has been extensively studied, mainly with two-dimensional approaches. Dentin tubules are formed during tooth growth and their orientation is linked to the morphology of the nanometer-sized components, which is of interest for example for the development of bio-inspired dental fillings. Therefore, a method has to be identified that can access the three-dimensional organization of the tubules, e.g. density and orientation. Tomographic setups with pixel sizes in the sub-micrometer range allow for the three-dimensional visualization of tooth dentin tubules both in phase and absorption contrast modes. We compare high-resolution tomographic scans reconstructed with propagation based phase retrieval algorithms as well as reconstructions without phase retrieval concerning spatial and density resolution as well as rendering of the dentin microstructure to determine the approach best suited for dentin tubule imaging. Reasonable results were obtained with a single-distance phase retrieval algorithm and a propagation distance of about 75% of the critical distance of d2/λ, where d is the size of the smallest objects identifiable in the specimen and λ is the X-ray wavelength.

  17. Propagation of a radial phased-locked Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guoquan

    2011-11-21

    A radial phased-locked (PL) Lorentz beam array provides an appropriate theoretical model to describe a coherent diode laser array, which is an efficient radiation source for high-power beaming use. The propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral and some mathematical techniques, analytical formulae for the average intensity and the effective beam size of a radial PL Lorentz beam array are derived in turbulent atmosphere. The average intensity distribution and the spreading properties of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are numerically calculated. The influences of the beam parameters and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are discussed in detail. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. Propagation of small disturbances in two phases, one component flow (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boure, J.

    1963-01-01

    A small disturbance is, shown to give rise to two waves: a pressure (sonic) wave and a continuity wave. Their propagation velocities are calculated. These velocities are independent of the disturbance amplitude. The sonic velocity is primarily a function of that one corresponding to the same medium with no flow and of the liquid phase velocity. It is also a function of the physical properties of the phases on the saturation line, of the slip laws and of the void fraction. The continuity wave velocity is only a function of the slip laws, of the void fraction and of the velocity of either phase. It appears two kinds of critical flow rates which are calculated. The void fraction and the liquid and gas velocities variations are calculated. These results are extended to the case of a real loop and an approximative method is given for the treatment of this case. (author) [fr

  19. Assessment of wave propagation on surfaces of crystalline lens with phase sensitive optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manapuram, R K; Larin, K V; Baranov, S A; Manne, V G R; Mashiatulla, M; Sudheendran, N; Aglyamov, S; Emelianov, S

    2011-01-01

    We propose a real-time technique based on phase-sensitive swept source optical coherence tomography (PhS-SSOCT) modality for noninvasive quantification of very small optical path length changes produced on the surface of a mouse crystalline lens. Propagation of submicron mechanical waves on the surface of the lens was induced by periodic mechanical stimulation. Obtained results demonstrate that the described method is capable of detecting minute damped vibrations with amplitudes as small as 30 nanometers on the lens surface and hence, PhS-SSOCT could be potentially used to assess biomechanical properties of a crystalline lens with high accuracy and sensitivity

  20. Photoacoustic wave propagating from normal into superconductive phases in Pb single crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Iwanaga, Masanobu

    2005-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) wave has been examined in a superconductor of the first kind, Pb single crystal. The PA wave is induced by optical excitation of electronic state and propagates from normal into superconductive phases below T$_{\\rm C}$. It is clearly shown by wavelet analysis that the measured PA wave includes two different components. The high-frequency component is MHz-ultrasonic and the relative low-frequency one is induced by thermal wave. The latter is observed in a similar manner irre...

  1. Phase-resolved pulse propagation through metallic photonic crystal slabs: plasmonic slow light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhardt, Anja; Nau, Dietmar; Bauer, Christina; Christ, André; Gräbeldinger, Hedi; Giessen, Harald

    2017-03-01

    We characterized the electromagnetic field of ultra-short laser pulses after propagation through metallic photonic crystal structures featuring photonic and plasmonic resonances. The complete pulse information, i.e. the envelope and phase of the electromagnetic field, was measured using the technique of cross-correlation frequency resolved optical gating. In good agreement, measurements and scattering matrix simulations show a dispersive behaviour of the spectral phase at the position of the resonances. Asymmetric Fano-type resonances go along with asymmetric phase characteristics. Furthermore, the spectral phase is used to calculate the dispersion of the sample and possible applications in dispersion compensation are investigated. Group refractive indices of 700 and 70 and group delay dispersion values of 90 000 fs2 and 5000 fs2 are achieved in transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarization, respectively. The behaviour of extinction and spectral phase can be understood from an intuitive model using the complex transmission amplitude. An associated depiction in the complex plane is a useful approach in this context. This method promises to be valuable also in photonic crystal and filter design, for example, with regards to the symmetrization of the resonances. This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  2. Transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced global propagation of transient phase resetting associated with directional information flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eKawasaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG phase synchronization analyses can reveal large-scale communication between distant brain areas. However, it is not possible to identify the directional information flow between distant areas using conventional phase synchronization analyses. In the present study, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to the occipital area in subjects who were resting with their eyes closed, and analyzed the spatial propagation of transient TMS-induced phase resetting by using the transfer entropy (TE, to quantify the causal and directional flow of information. The time-frequency EEG analysis indicated that the theta (5 Hz phase locking factor (PLF reached its highest value at the distant area (the motor area in this study, with a time lag that followed the peak of the transient PLF enhancements of the TMS-targeted area at the TMS onset. PPI (phase-preservation index analyses demonstrated significant phase resetting at the TMS-targeted area and distant area. Moreover, the TE from the TMS-targeted area to the distant area increased clearly during the delay that followed TMS onset. Interestingly, the time lags were almost coincident between the PLF and TE results (152 vs. 165 ms, which provides strong evidence that the emergence of the delayed PLF reflects the causal information flow. Such tendencies were observed only in the higher-intensity TMS condition, and not in the lower-intensity or sham TMS conditions. Thus, TMS may manipulate large-scale causal relationships between brain areas in an intensity-dependent manner. We demonstrated that single-pulse TMS modulated global phase dynamics and directional information flow among synchronized brain networks. Therefore, our results suggest that single-pulse TMS can manipulate both incoming and outgoing information in the TMS-targeted area associated with functional changes.

  3. Tropospheric Ozone Change from 1980 to 2010 Dominated by Equatorward Redistribution of Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqiang; Cooper, Owen R.; Gaudel, Audrey; Thompson, Anne M.; Nedelec, Philippe; Ogino, Shin-Ya; West, J. Jason

    2016-01-01

    Ozone is an important air pollutant at the surface, and the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in the troposphere. Since 1980, anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors methane, non-methane volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides (NOx) have shifted from developed to developing regions. Emissions have thereby been redistributed equatorwards, where they are expected to have a stronger effect on the tropospheric ozone burden due to greater convection, reaction rates and NOx sensitivity. Here we use a global chemical transport model to simulate changes in tropospheric ozone concentrations from 1980 to 2010, and to separate the influences of changes in the spatial distribution of global anthropogenic emissions of short-lived pollutants, the magnitude of these emissions, and the global atmospheric methane concentration. We estimate that the increase in ozone burden due to the spatial distribution change slightly exceeds the combined influences of the increased emission magnitude and global methane. Emission increases in Southeast, East and South Asia may be most important for the ozone change, supported by an analysis of statistically significant increases in observed ozone above these regions. The spatial distribution of emissions dominates global tropospheric ozone, suggesting that the future ozone burden will be determined mainly by emissions from low latitudes.

  4. Simultaneous X-ray imaging and diffraction study of shock propagation and phase transition in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtier, Eric

    2017-06-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging technique using a free electron laser have observed the propagation of laser-driven shock waves directly inside materials. While providing images with few hundred nanometers spatial resolution, access to more quantitative information like the material density and the various shock front speeds remain challenging due to imperfections in the images limiting the convergence in the reconstruction algorithm. Alternatively, pump-probe X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a robust technique to extract atomic crystalline structure of compressed matter, providing insight into the kinetics of phase transformation and material response to stress. However, XRD by itself is not sufficient to extract the equation of state of the material under study. Here we report on the use of the LCLS free electron laser as a source of a high-resolution X-ray microscopy enabling the direct imaging of shock waves and phase transitions in optically opaque silicon. In this configuration, no algorithm is necessary to extract the material density and the position of the shock fronts. Simultaneously, we probed the crystalline structure via XRD of the various phases in laser compressed silicon. E. Galtier, B. Nagler, H. J. Lee, S. Brown, E. Granados, A. Hashim, E. McBride, A. Mackinnon, I. Nam, J. Zimmerman (SLAC) A. Gleason (Stanford, LANL) A. Higginbotham (University of York) A. Schropp, F. Seiboth (DESY).

  5. Temporal analysis of laser beam propagation in the atmosphere using computer-generated long phase screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dios, Federico; Recolons, Jaume; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Batet, Oscar

    2008-02-04

    Temporal analysis of the irradiance at the detector plane is intended as the first step in the study of the mean fade time in a free optical communication system. In the present work this analysis has been performed for a Gaussian laser beam propagating in the atmospheric turbulence by means of computer simulation. To this end, we have adapted a previously known numerical method to the generation of long phase screens. The screens are displaced in a transverse direction as the wave is propagated, in order to simulate the wind effect. The amplitude of the temporal covariance and its power spectrum have been obtained at the optical axis, at the beam centroid and at a certain distance from these two points. Results have been worked out for weak, moderate and strong turbulence regimes and when possible they have been compared with theoretical models. These results show a significant contribution of beam wander to the temporal behaviour of the irradiance, even in the case of weak turbulence. We have also found that the spectral bandwidth of the covariance is hardly dependent on the Rytov variance.

  6. Impact of tropical cyclones on the intensity and phase propagation of fall Wyrtki jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivas, P.; Chowdary, J. S.; Gnanaseelan, C.

    2012-11-01

    Observations and model simulations are used to study the impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on the fall Wyrtki jets (WJ). These strong narrow equatorial currents peak during November and play a vital role in the energy and mass transport in the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO). Maximum number of TCs is observed over TIO during November with longer than normal life span (8-15 days). These TCs enhance equatorial westerly winds (surface) and amplify monthly mean WJs (both at surface and subsurface) by 0.4 ms-1 (anomalies exceed 0.7 ms-1 during TC), which is about half of the climatological amplitude. Intensified WJs increase the heat content of eastern TIO and modulate air-sea interaction. It is also shown that movement of TCs is mainly responsible for the westward phase propagation of WJs, a previously unexplored mechanism. These features are evident in ECCO2 simulations as well.

  7. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  8. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, Taiwan 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Imaging Research Center, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3440 S. Dearborn Street, E1-116, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  9. Simulating non-Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens based on equivalent structure constant and its influence on simulations of beam propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chen

    Full Text Available Gaussian distribution is used to describe the power law along the propagation path and phase screen of the non-Kolmogorov turbulence is proposed based on the equivalent refractive-index structure constants. Various simulations of Gaussian beam propagation in Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov turbulence are used for telling the difference between isotropic and anisotropic turbulence. The results imply that the non-Kolmogorov turbulence makes a great influence on the simulations via power law in spectrum and the number of phase screens. Furthermore, the influence is mainly reflected in light intensity and beam drift. Statistics suggest that when Gaussian beam propagate through single phase screen of non-Kolmogorov, maximum and uniformity of light intensity increase first and then decrease with power law, and beam drift firstly increases and then to stabilize. When Gaussian beam propagate through multiple phase screens, relative errors of beam drift decrease with the number of phase screens. And scintillation indices in non-Kolmogorov turbulence is larger than that in Kolmogorov turbulence when the number is small. When the number is big, the scintillation indices in non-Kolmogorov turbulence is smaller than that in Kolmogorov turbulence. The results shown in this paper demonstrate the effect of the non-Kolmogorov turbulence on laser atmospheric transmissions. Thus, this paper suggests a possible direction of the improvement of the laser transmission accuracy over a long distance through the atmosphere.

  10. Propagation-invariant vectorial Bessel beams by use of sub wavelength quantized Pancharatnam-Berry phase optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niv, A.; Biener, G.; Kleiner, V.; Hasman, E.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text:Propagation-invariant scalar fields have been extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally, since they were proposed by Durnin et al. These fields were employed in applications such as optical tweezers and for transport and guiding of microspheres. Although there has recently been considerable theoretical interest in propagation-invariant vectorial beams, experimental studies of such beams have remained somewhat limited. One of the most interesting types of propagation-invariant vectorial beam is the linearly polarized axially symmetric beam (LPASB) [l]. Recently, we introduced and experimentally demonstrated propagation-invariant vectorial Bessel beams with linearly polarized axial symmetry based on quantized Pancharatnam-Berry phase optical elements (QPBOEs) [21 and an axicon. QP-BOEs utilize the geometric phase that accompanies space-variant polarization manipulations to achieve a desired phase modification [31. To test our approach we formed QPBOEs with different polarization orders as computer-generated space-variant sub wavelength gratings upon GaAs wafers for use with 10.6 micron laser radiation. The resultant beams were also transmitted through a polarizer that produced a unique propagation-invariant scalar beam. This beam has a propeller-shaped intensity pattern that can be rotated by simple rotation of the polarizer. We therefore have demonstrated the formation of a vectorial Bessel beam by using simple, lightweight thin elements and exploited that beam to perform a controlled rotation of a propeller-shaped intensity pattern that can be suitable for optical tweezers

  11. Optimisation of a propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast micro-CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterets, Yakov I.; Gureyev, Timur E.; Dimmock, Matthew R.

    2018-03-01

    Micro-CT scanners find applications in many areas ranging from biomedical research to material sciences. In order to provide spatial resolution on a micron scale, these scanners are usually equipped with micro-focus, low-power x-ray sources and hence require long scanning times to produce high resolution 3D images of the object with acceptable contrast-to-noise. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography (PB-PCT) has the potential to significantly improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) or, alternatively, reduce the image acquisition time while preserving the CNR and the spatial resolution. We propose a general approach for the optimisation of the PB-PCT imaging system. When applied to an imaging system with fixed parameters of the source and detector this approach requires optimisation of only two independent geometrical parameters of the imaging system, i.e. the source-to-object distance R 1 and geometrical magnification M, in order to produce the best spatial resolution and CNR. If, in addition to R 1 and M, the system parameter space also includes the source size and the anode potential this approach allows one to find a unique configuration of the imaging system that produces the required spatial resolution and the best CNR.

  12. Propagation of Shock on NREL Phase VI Wind Turbine Airfoil under Compressible Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on numeric analysis of compressible flow around National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL phase VI wind turbine blade airfoil S809. Although wind turbine airfoils are low Reynolds number airfoils, a reasonable investigation of compressible flow under extreme condition might be helpful. A subsonic flow (mach no. M=0.8 has been considered for this analysis and the impacts of this flow under seven different angles of attack have been determined. The results show that shock takes place just after the mid span at the top surface and just before the mid span at the bottom surface at zero angle of attack. Slowly the shock waves translate their positions as angle of attack increases. A relative translation of the shock waves in upper and lower face of the airfoil are presented. Variation of Turbulent viscosity ratio and surface Y+ have also been determined. A k-ω SST turbulent model is considered and the commercial CFD code ANSYS FLUENT is used to find the pressure coefficient (Cp as well as the lift (CL and drag coefficients (CD. A graphical comparison of shock propagation has been shown with different angle of attack. Flow separation and stream function are also determined.

  13. Phase mixing of transverse oscillations in the linear and nonlinear regimes for IFR relativistic electron beam propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokair, I.R.

    1991-01-01

    Phase mixing of transverse oscillations changes the nature of the ion hose instability from an absolute to a convective instability. The stronger the phase mixing, the faster an electron beam reaches equilibrium with the guiding ion channel. This is important for long distance propagation of relativistic electron beams where it is desired that transverse oscillations phase mix within a few betatron wavelengths of injection and subsequently an equilibrium is reached with no further beam emittance growth. In the linear regime phase mixing is well understood and results in asymptotic decay of transverse oscillations as 1/Z 2 for a Gaussian beam and channel system, Z being the axial distance measured in betatron wavelengths. In the nonlinear regime (which is likely mode of propagation for long pulse beams) results of the spread mass model indicate that phase mixing is considerably weaker than in the regime. In this paper we consider this problem of phase mixing in the nonlinear regime. Results of the spread mass model will be shown along with a simple analysis of phase mixing for multiple oscillator models. Particle simulations also indicate that phase mixing is weaker in nonlinear regime than in the linear regime. These results will also be shown. 3 refs., 4 figs

  14. Analysis of flow induced valve operation and pressure wave propagation for single and two-phase flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, H.

    1986-01-01

    The flow induced valve operation is calculated for single and two-phase flow conditions by the fluid dynamic computer code DYVRO and results are compared to experimental data. The analysis show that the operational behaviour of the valves is not only dependent on the condition of the induced flow, but also the pipe flow can cause a feedback as a result of the induced pressure waves. For the calculation of pressure wave propagation in pipes of which the operation of flow induced valves has a considerable influence it is therefore necessary to have a coupled analysis of the pressure wave propagation and the operational behaviour of the valves. The analyses of the fast transient transfer from steam to two-phase flow show a good agreement with experimental data. Hence even these very high loads on pipes resulting from such fluid dynamic transients can be calculated realistically. (orig.)

  15. Analytical evaluation of the signal and noise propagation in x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raupach, Rainer; Flohr, Thomas G

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the signal and noise propagation of differential phase-contrast computed tomography (PCT) compared with conventional attenuation-based computed tomography (CT) from a theoretical point of view. This work focuses on grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging. A mathematical framework is derived that is able to analytically predict the relative performance of both imaging techniques in the sense of the relative contrast-to-noise ratio for the contrast of any two materials. Two fundamentally different properties of PCT compared with CT are identified. First, the noise power spectra show qualitatively different characteristics implying a resolution-dependent performance ratio. The break-even point is derived analytically as a function of system parameters such as geometry and visibility. A superior performance of PCT compared with CT can only be achieved at a sufficiently high spatial resolution. Second, due to periodicity of phase information which is non-ambiguous only in a bounded interval statistical phase wrapping can occur. This effect causes a collapse of information propagation for low signals which limits the applicability of phase-contrast imaging at low dose.

  16. Nonlinear propagation analysis of few-optical-cycle pulses for subfemtosecond compression and carrier envelope phase effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuta, Yo; Nagasawa, Minoru; Ohtani, Morimasa; Yamashita, Mikio

    2005-01-01

    A numerical approach called Fourier direct method (FDM) is applied to nonlinear propagation of optical pulses with the central wavelength 800 nm, the width 2.67-12.00 fs, and the peak power 25-6870 kW in a fused-silica fiber. Bidirectional propagation, delayed Raman response, nonlinear dispersion (self-steepening, core dispersion), as well as correct linear dispersion are incorporated into 'bidirectional propagation equations' which are derived directly from Maxwell's equations. These equations are solved for forward and backward waves, instead of the electric-field envelope as in the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE). They are integrated as multidimensional simultaneous evolution equations evolved in space. We investigate, both theoretically and numerically, the validity and the limitation of assumptions and approximations used for deriving the NLSE. Also, the accuracy and the efficiency of the FDM are compared quantitatively with those of the finite-difference time-domain numerical approach. The time-domain size 500 fs and the number of grid points in time 2048 are chosen to investigate numerically intensity spectra, spectral phases, and temporal electric-field profiles up to the propagation distance 1.0 mm. On the intensity spectrum of a few-optical-cycle pulses, the self-steepening, core dispersion, and the delayed Raman response appear as dominant, middle, and slight effects, respectively. The delayed Raman response and the core dispersion reduce the effective nonlinearity. Correct linear dispersion is important since it affects the intensity spectrum sensitively. For the compression of femtosecond optical pulses by the complete phase compensation, the shortness and the pulse quality of compressed pulses are remarkably improved by the intense initial peak power rather than by the short initial pulse width or by the propagation distance longer than 0.1 mm. They will be compressed as short as 0.3 fs below the damage threshold of fused-silica fiber 6 MW. It

  17. Propagating Mixed Uncertainties in Cyber Attacker Payoffs: Exploration of Two-Phase Monte Carlo Sampling and Probability Bounds Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Samrat; Tipireddy, Ramakrishna; Oster, Matthew R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2016-09-16

    Securing cyber-systems on a continual basis against a multitude of adverse events is a challenging undertaking. Game-theoretic approaches, that model actions of strategic decision-makers, are increasingly being applied to address cybersecurity resource allocation challenges. Such game-based models account for multiple player actions and represent cyber attacker payoffs mostly as point utility estimates. Since a cyber-attacker’s payoff generation mechanism is largely unknown, appropriate representation and propagation of uncertainty is a critical task. In this paper we expand on prior work and focus on operationalizing the probabilistic uncertainty quantification framework, for a notional cyber system, through: 1) representation of uncertain attacker and system-related modeling variables as probability distributions and mathematical intervals, and 2) exploration of uncertainty propagation techniques including two-phase Monte Carlo sampling and probability bounds analysis.

  18. Quantification of signal detection performance degradation induced by phase-retrieval in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    In propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) imaging, the measured image contains a mixture of absorption- and phase-contrast. To obtain separate images of the projected absorption and phase (i.e., refractive) properties of a sample, phase retrieval methods can be employed. It has been suggested that phase-retrieval can always improve image quality in PB XPC imaging. However, when objective (task-based) measures of image quality are employed, this is not necessarily true and phase retrieval can be detrimental. In this work, signal detection theory is utilized to quantify the performance of a Hotelling observer (HO) for detecting a known signal in a known background. Two cases are considered. In the first case, the HO acts directly on the measured intensity data. In the second case, the HO acts on either the retrieved phase or absorption image. We demonstrate that the performance of the HO is superior when acting on the measured intensity data. The loss of task-specific information induced by phase-retrieval is quantified by computing the efficiency of the HO as the ratio of the test statistic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the two cases. The effect of the system geometry on this efficiency is systematically investigated. Our findings confirm that phase-retrieval can impair signal detection performance in XPC imaging.

  19. Vertical propagation of waves in the solar atmosphere. II. Phase delays in the quiet chromosphere and cell-network distinctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lites, B.W.; Chipman, E.G.; White, O.R.

    1982-01-01

    The differences in the phase of the velocity oscillations between a pair of chromospheric Ca II lines was measured using the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Sacramento Peak Observatory. The observed phase differences indicate that the acoustic modes are trapped or envanescent, rather than propagating in the chromosphere. We find systematic distinctions in the phase delays between quiet network and cell interior regions for both intensity and velocity oscillations in photospheric and chromospheric lines. The theory of linear perturbations in a isothermal atmosphere is invoked to interpret these differences. From this analysis we find that one or more of the following explanations is possible. (1) the radiative damping is more effective in the network than in the cell interior; (2) the network features exclude oscillations of large horizontal wavenumber; or (3) the scale height of the chromosphere is larger in the network than in the cell interior

  20. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James Chien-Chih [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of failing molten lithium or Li2BeF4 (Flibe) jets encircles the reactors central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel.

  1. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J. Chien-Chih

    1993-01-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of failing molten lithium or Li 2 BeF 4 (Flibe) jets encircles the reactors central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel

  2. The premixing and propagation phases of fuel-coolant interactions: a review of recent experimental studies and code developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, A.R.; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun-sun; Maruyama, Yu; Yang, Yanhua; Sugimoto, Jun

    1998-09-01

    A vapor explosion (or an energetic fuel-coolant interactions, FCIs) is a process in which hot liquid (fuel) transfers its internal energy to colder, more volatile liquid (coolant); thus the coolant vaporizes at high pressure and expands and does works on its surroundings. Traditionally, the energetic fuel-coolant interactions could be distinguished in subsequent stages: premixing (or coarse mixing), triggering, propagation and expansion. Realizing that better and realistic prediction of fuel-coolant interaction consequences will be available understanding the phenomenology in the premixing and propagation stages, many experimental and analytical studies have been performed during more than two decades. A lot of important achievements are obtained during the time. However, some fundamental aspects are still not clear enough; thus the works are directed to that direction. In conjunction, the model/code development is pursuit. This is aimed to provide a scaling tool to bridge the experimental results to the real geometries, e.g. reactor pressure vessel, reactor containment. The present review intends to collect the available information on the recent works performed to study the premixing and propagation phases. (author). 97 refs

  3. The premixing and propagation phases of fuel-coolant interactions: a review of recent experimental studies and code developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antariksawan, A.R. [Reactor Safety Technology Research Center of BATAN (Indonesia); Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun-sun; Maruyama, Yu; Yang, Yanhua; Sugimoto, Jun

    1998-09-01

    A vapor explosion (or an energetic fuel-coolant interactions, FCIs) is a process in which hot liquid (fuel) transfers its internal energy to colder, more volatile liquid (coolant); thus the coolant vaporizes at high pressure and expands and does works on its surroundings. Traditionally, the energetic fuel-coolant interactions could be distinguished in subsequent stages: premixing (or coarse mixing), triggering, propagation and expansion. Realizing that better and realistic prediction of fuel-coolant interaction consequences will be available understanding the phenomenology in the premixing and propagation stages, many experimental and analytical studies have been performed during more than two decades. A lot of important achievements are obtained during the time. However, some fundamental aspects are still not clear enough; thus the works are directed to that direction. In conjunction, the model/code development is pursuit. This is aimed to provide a scaling tool to bridge the experimental results to the real geometries, e.g. reactor pressure vessel, reactor containment. The present review intends to collect the available information on the recent works performed to study the premixing and propagation phases. (author). 97 refs.

  4. MESSENGER Spacecraft Phase Scintillation due to Plasma ductting effect on RF beam propagation at Superior Solar Conjunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavi, N.; Sequeira, H.; Copeland, D.; Menyuk, C.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of a radio frequency (RF) X-band signal as it propagates through the solar corona turbulence in superior solar conjunction at low Sun-Earth-Probe (SEP) angles.Data that was obtained during several MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENivornment, GEochmeisty, and Ranging) conjunctions reveal a short-term and long-term effect. Amplitude scintillation is evident on a short time scale. Phase scintillations are stronger, but occur over a longer time scale. We examine different possible phenomena in the solar plasma that could be the source of the different time scales of the amplitude and phase scintillations. We propose a theoretical model in which the amplitude scintillations are due to local fluctuations of the index of refraction that scatter the RF signal. These rapidly varying fluctuations randomly attenuate the signal without affecting its phase. By contrast, we propose a model in which phase fluctuations are due to long ducts in the solar plasma, streaming from the sun, that trap some parts of the RF signal. These ducts act as waveguides, changing the phase velocity of the RF beam as it travels a zigzag path inside a duct. When the radiated wave exits from a duct, its phase is changed with respect to the signal that did not pass through the duct, which can lead to destructive interference and carrier suppression. The trapping of the wave is random in nature and can be either a fast or slow process. The predictions of this model are consistent with observations.

  5. Comparison of Rigid and Adaptive Methods of Propagating Gross Tumor Volume Through Respiratory Phases of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Image Data Set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezhil, Muthuveni; Choi, Bum; Starkschall, George; Bucci, M. Kara; Vedam, Sastry; Balter, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare three different methods of propagating the gross tumor volume (GTV) through the respiratory phases that constitute a four-dimensional computed tomography image data set. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography data sets of 20 patients who had undergone definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy to the lung were acquired. The GTV regions of interest (ROIs) were manually delineated on each phase of the four-dimensional computed tomography data set. The ROI from the end-expiration phase was propagated to the remaining nine phases of respiration using the following three techniques: (1) rigid-image registration using in-house software, (2) rigid image registration using research software from a commercial radiotherapy planning system vendor, and (3) rigid-image registration followed by deformable adaptation originally intended for organ-at-risk delineation using the same software. The internal GTVs generated from the various propagation methods were compared with the manual internal GTV using the normalized Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) index. Results: The normalized DSC index of 1.01 ± 0.06 (SD) for rigid propagation using the in-house software program was identical to the normalized DSC index of 1.01 ± 0.06 for rigid propagation achieved with the vendor's research software. Adaptive propagation yielded poorer results, with a normalized DSC index of 0.89 ± 0.10 (paired t test, p <0.001). Conclusion: Propagation of the GTV ROIs through the respiratory phases using rigid- body registration is an acceptable method within a 1-mm margin of uncertainty. The adaptive organ-at-risk propagation method was not applicable to propagating GTV ROIs, resulting in an unacceptable reduction of the volume and distortion of the ROIs

  6. Multi-spacecraft observations of ICMEs propagating beyond Earth orbit during MSL/RAD flight and surface phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Forstner, J.; Guo, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Temmer, M.; Vrsnak, B.; Čalogović, J.; Dumbovic, M.; Lohf, H.; Appel, J. K.; Heber, B.; Steigies, C. T.; Zeitlin, C.; Ehresmann, B.; Jian, L. K.; Boehm, E.; Boettcher, S. I.; Burmeister, S.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Brinza, D. E.; Posner, A.; Reitz, G.; Matthiae, D.; Rafkin, S. C.; weigle, G., II; Cucinotta, F.

    2017-12-01

    The propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) between Earth's orbit (1 AU) and Mars ( 1.5 AU) has been studied with their propagation speed estimated from both measurements and simulations. The enhancement of the magnetic fields related to ICMEs and their shock fronts cause so-called Forbush decreases, which can be detected as a reduction of galactic cosmic rays measured on-ground or on a spacecraft. We have used galactic cosmic ray (GCR) data from in-situ measurements at Earth, from both STEREO A and B as well as the GCR measurement by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) instrument onboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) on the surface of Mars as well as during its flight to Mars in 2011-2012. A set of ICME events has been selected during the periods when Earth (or STEREO A or B) and MSL locations were nearly aligned on the same side of the Sun in the ecliptic plane (so-called opposition phase). Such lineups allow us to estimate the ICMEs' transit times between 1 AU and the MSL location by estimating the delay time of the corresponding Forbush decreases measured at each location. We investigate the evolution of their propagation speeds after passing Earth's orbit and find that the deceleration of ICMEs due to their interaction with the ambient solar wind continues beyond 1 AU. The results are compared to simulation data obtained from two CME propagation models, namely the Drag-Based Model (DBM) and the WSA-ENLIL plus cone model.

  7. A compressed sensing based reconstruction algorithm for synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melli, Seyed Ali, E-mail: sem649@mail.usask.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wahid, Khan A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Babyn, Paul [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Montgomery, James [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Snead, Elisabeth [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); El-Gayed, Ali [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Pettitt, Murray; Wolkowski, Bailey [College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wesolowski, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2016-01-11

    Synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is increasingly used in pre-clinical imaging. However, it typically requires a large number of projections, and subsequently a large radiation dose, to produce high quality images. To improve the applicability of this imaging technique, reconstruction algorithms that can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time without degrading image quality are needed. The proposed research focused on using a novel combination of Douglas–Rachford splitting and randomized Kaczmarz algorithms to solve large-scale total variation based optimization in a compressed sensing framework to reconstruct 2D images from a reduced number of projections. Visual assessment and quantitative performance evaluations of a synthetic abdomen phantom and real reconstructed image of an ex-vivo slice of canine prostate tissue demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive in reconstruction process compared with other well-known algorithms. An additional potential benefit of reducing the number of projections would be reduction of time for motion artifact to occur if the sample moves during image acquisition. Use of this reconstruction algorithm to reduce the required number of projections in synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is an effective form of dose reduction that may pave the way for imaging of in-vivo samples.

  8. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien-Chih Liu, James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of falling molten lithium or Li2BeF4 (Flibe) jets encircles the reactor`s central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel. X-rays from the fusion microexplosion will ablate a thin layer of blanket material from the surfaces which face toward the fusion site. This generates a highly energetic vapor, which mostly coalesces in the central cavity. The blast expansion from the central cavity generates a shock which propagates through the segmented blanket - a complex geometry, gas-continuous two-phase medium. The impulse that the blast gives to the liquid as it vents past, the gas shock on the chamber wall, and ultimately the liquid impact on the wall are all important quantities to the HYLIFE structural designers.

  9. The propagation of stochastic pixel noise into magnitude and phase values in the Fourier analysis of digital images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, J.E.; Halama, J.R.; Hasegawa, B.H.

    1986-01-01

    The use of Fourier analysis in nuclear medicine gated blood ventriculography provides a useful example of the application of Fourier methods to digital medical imaging. In particular, the nuclear medicine experience demonstrates that there is diagnostic significance not only in the pixel averages of temporal Fourier magnitude and phase computed in various image regions, but also in the distributions of the individual pixel values about those averages. However, a region containing pixels that are perfectly synchronous on average would still yield a finite distribution of calculated Fourier coefficients due to the propagation of stochastic pixel noise into the calculated values. The authors have studied this noise component of both the magnitude and phase distributions using phantom studies and computer simulation. In both approaches, several thousand one-pixel 'ventriculograms' were generated, all identical to each other except for stochastic noise. Fourier magnitudes and phases at several frequencies were calculated and histograms generated. A theoretical prediction of the distributions was developed and shown to fit the experimental results well. The authors' formalism can be used to estimate study count requirements or, for fixed study counts, to assess the stochastic noise contribution in the interpretation of measured phase and magnitude distributions. (author)

  10. Prion propagation and toxicity occur in vitro with two-phase kinetics specific to strain and neuronal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaoui, Samia; Maatouk, Layal; Privat, Nicolas; Levavasseur, Etienne; Faucheux, Baptiste A; Haïk, Stéphane

    2013-03-01

    Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that occur in humans and animals. The neuropathological hallmarks of TSEs are spongiosis, glial proliferation, and neuronal loss. The only known specific molecular marker of TSEs is the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C)), which accumulates in the brain of infected subjects and forms infectious prion particles. Although this transmissible agent lacks a specific nucleic acid component, several prion strains have been isolated. Prion strains are characterized by differences in disease outcome, PrP(Sc) distribution patterns, and brain lesion profiles at the terminal stage of the disease. The molecular factors and cellular mechanisms involved in strain-specific neuronal tropism and toxicity remain largely unknown. Currently, no cellular model exists to facilitate in vitro studies of these processes. A few cultured cell lines that maintain persistent scrapie infections have been developed, but only two of them have shown the cytotoxic effects associated with prion propagation. In this study, we have developed primary neuronal cultures to assess in vitro neuronal tropism and toxicity of different prion strains (scrapie strains 139A, ME7, and 22L). We have tested primary neuronal cultures enriched in cerebellar granular, striatal, or cortical neurons. Our results showed that (i) a strain-specific neuronal tropism operated in vitro; (ii) the cytotoxic effect varied among strains and neuronal cell types; (iii) prion propagation and toxicity occurred in two kinetic phases, a replicative phase followed by a toxic phase; and (iv) neurotoxicity peaked when abnormal PrP accumulation reached a plateau.

  11. Phase and group refractive index curves for electromagnet waves moving in an ionised medium (1962); Courbes des indices de phase et de groupe d'ondes electromagnetiques se propageant dans un milieu ionise (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consoli, T [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    The family of curves presented in this table give the phase and group refractive indexes of plane electromagnetic waves propagating along and across a static magnetic field in a plasma. (author) [French] Les courbes presentees sous formes de reseaux donnent les indices de phase et de groupe d'ondes electromagnetiques planes se propageant longitudinalement ou transversalement dans un plasma en presence d'un champ magnetique statique. (auteur)

  12. Numerical Simulation of Wave Propagation and Phase Transition of Tin under Shock-Wave Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai-Feng, Song; Hai-Feng, Liu; Guang-Cai, Zhang; Yan-Hong, Zhao

    2009-01-01

    We undertake a numerical simulation of shock experiments on tin reported in the literature, by using a multiphase equation of state (MEOS) and a multiphase Steinberg Guinan (MSG) constitutive model for tin in the β, γ and liquid phases. In the MSG model, the Bauschinger effect is considered to better describe the unloading behavior. The phase diagram and Hugoniot of tin are calculated by MEOS, and they agree well with the experimental data. Combined with the MEOS and MSG models, hydrodynamic computer simulations are successful in reproducing the measured velocity profile of the shock wave experiment. Moreover, by analyzing the mass fraction contour as well as stress and temperature profiles of each phase for tin, we further discuss the complex behavior of tin under shock-wave loading. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  13. The phase accumulation and antenna near field of microscopic propagating spin wave devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Crosby S.; Kostylev, Mikhail, E-mail: mikhail.kostylev@uwa.edu.au; Ivanov, Eugene [School of Physics M013, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Ding, Junjia; Adeyeye, Adekunle O. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-01-20

    We studied phase accumulation by the highly non-reciprocal magnetostatic surface spin waves in thin Permalloy microstripes excited and received by microscopic coplanar antennae. We find that the experimentally measured characteristic length of the near field of the antenna is smaller than the total width of the coplanar. This is confirmed by our numerical simulations. Consequently, the distance over which the spin wave accumulates its phase while travelling between the input and output antennae coincides with the distance between the antennae symmetry axes with good accuracy.

  14. The phase accumulation and antenna near field of microscopic propagating spin wave devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Crosby S.; Kostylev, Mikhail; Ivanov, Eugene; Ding, Junjia; Adeyeye, Adekunle O.

    2014-01-01

    We studied phase accumulation by the highly non-reciprocal magnetostatic surface spin waves in thin Permalloy microstripes excited and received by microscopic coplanar antennae. We find that the experimentally measured characteristic length of the near field of the antenna is smaller than the total width of the coplanar. This is confirmed by our numerical simulations. Consequently, the distance over which the spin wave accumulates its phase while travelling between the input and output antennae coincides with the distance between the antennae symmetry axes with good accuracy

  15. Propagation dynamics and X-pulse formation in phase-mismatched second-harmonic generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiulis, G.; Jukna, V.; Jedrkiewicz, O.; Clerici, M.; Rubino, E.; DiTrapani, P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concerns the theoretical, numerical, and experimental study of the second-harmonic-generation (SHG) process under conditions of phase and group-velocity mismatch and aims to demonstrate the dimensionality transition of the SHG process caused by the change of the fundamental wave diameter. We show that SHG from a narrow fundamental beam leads to the spontaneous self-phase-matching process with, in addition, the appearance of angular dispersion for the off-axis frequency components generated. The angular dispersion sustains the formation of the short X pulse in the second harmonic (SH) and is recognized as three-dimensional (3D) dynamics. On the contrary, the large-diameter fundamental beam reduces the number of the degrees of freedom, does not allow the generation of the angular dispersion, and maintains the so-called one-dimensional (1D) SHG dynamics, where the self-phase-matching appears just for axial components and is accompanied by the shrinking of the SH temporal bandwidth, and sustains a long SH pulse formation. The transition from long SH pulse generation typical of the 1D dynamics to the short 3D X pulse is illustrated numerically and experimentally by changing the conditions from the self-defocusing to the self-focusing regime by simply tuning the phase mismatch. The numerical and experimental verification of the analytical results are also presented.

  16. Switching of the direction of reflectionless light propagation at exceptional points in non-PT-symmetric structures using phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yin; Shen, Yuecheng; Min, Changjun; Veronis, Georgios

    2017-10-30

    We introduce a non-parity-time-symmetric three-layer structure, consisting of a gain medium layer sandwiched between two phase-change medium layers for switching of the direction of reflectionless light propagation. We show that for this structure unidirectional reflectionlessness in the forward direction can be switched to unidirectional reflectionlessness in the backward direction at the optical communication wavelength by switching the phase-change material Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 (GST) from its amorphous to its crystalline phase. We also show that it is the existence of exceptional points for this structure with GST in both its amorphous and crystalline phases which leads to unidirectional reflectionless propagation in the forward direction for GST in its amorphous phase, and in the backward direction for GST in its crystalline phase. Our results could be potentially important for developing a new generation of compact active free-space optical devices.

  17. Boundary-enhancement in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis improves depth position characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huifeng; Xu, Qiaofeng; Garson, Alfred B; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-04-21

    Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) tomosynthesis combines the concepts of tomosynthesis and XPC imaging to realize the advantages of both for biological imaging applications. Tomosynthesis permits reductions in acquisition times compared with full-view tomography, while XPC imaging provides the opportunity to resolve weakly absorbing structures. In this note, an investigation of the depth resolving properties of PB XPC tomosynthesis is conducted. The results demonstrate that in-plane structures display strong boundary-enhancement while out-of-plane structures do not. This effect can facilitate the identification of in-plane structures in PB XPC tomosynthesis that could normally not be distinguished from out-of-plane structures in absorption-based tomosynthesis.

  18. Boundary-enhancement in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis improves depth position characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Huifeng; Xu, Qiaofeng; Garson, Alfred B III; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) tomosynthesis combines the concepts of tomosynthesis and XPC imaging to realize the advantages of both for biological imaging applications. Tomosynthesis permits reductions in acquisition times compared with full-view tomography, while XPC imaging provides the opportunity to resolve weakly absorbing structures. In this note, an investigation of the depth resolving properties of PB XPC tomosynthesis is conducted. The results demonstrate that in-plane structures display strong boundary-enhancement while out-of-plane structures do not. This effect can facilitate the identification of in-plane structures in PB XPC tomosynthesis that could normally not be distinguished from out-of-plane structures in absorption-based tomosynthesis. (note)

  19. A volume-preserving sharpening approach for the propagation of sharp phase boundaries in multiphase lattice Boltzmann simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.; Dellar, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Lattice Boltzmann models that recover a macroscopic description of multiphase flow of immiscible liquids typically represent the boundaries between phases using a scalar function, the phase field, that varies smoothly over several grid points. Attempts to tune the model parameters to minimise the widths of these interfaces typically lead to the interfaces becoming fixed to the underlying grid instead of advecting with the fluid velocity. This phenomenon, known as lattice pinning, is strikingly similar to that associated with the numerical simulation of conservation laws coupled to stiff algebraic source terms. We present a lattice Boltzmann formulation of the model problem proposed by LeVeque and Yee (1990) [3] to study the latter phenomenon in the context of computational combustion, and offer a volume-conserving extension in multiple space dimensions. Inspired by the random projection method of Bao and Jin (2000) [1] we further generalise this formulation by introducing a uniformly distributed quasi-random variable into the term responsible for the sharpening of phase boundaries. This method is mass conserving, gives correct average propagation speeds over many timesteps, and is shown to significantly delay the onset of pinning as the interface width is reduced. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A volume-preserving sharpening approach for the propagation of sharp phase boundaries in multiphase lattice Boltzmann simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.

    2011-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann models that recover a macroscopic description of multiphase flow of immiscible liquids typically represent the boundaries between phases using a scalar function, the phase field, that varies smoothly over several grid points. Attempts to tune the model parameters to minimise the widths of these interfaces typically lead to the interfaces becoming fixed to the underlying grid instead of advecting with the fluid velocity. This phenomenon, known as lattice pinning, is strikingly similar to that associated with the numerical simulation of conservation laws coupled to stiff algebraic source terms. We present a lattice Boltzmann formulation of the model problem proposed by LeVeque and Yee (1990) [3] to study the latter phenomenon in the context of computational combustion, and offer a volume-conserving extension in multiple space dimensions. Inspired by the random projection method of Bao and Jin (2000) [1] we further generalise this formulation by introducing a uniformly distributed quasi-random variable into the term responsible for the sharpening of phase boundaries. This method is mass conserving, gives correct average propagation speeds over many timesteps, and is shown to significantly delay the onset of pinning as the interface width is reduced. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Remarks on nonlinear relation among phases and frequencies in modulational instabilities of parallel propagating Alfvén waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Nariyuki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear relations among frequencies and phases in modulational instability of circularly polarized Alfvén waves are discussed, within the context of one dimensional, dissipation-less, unforced fluid system. We show that generation of phase coherence is a natural consequence of the modulational instability of Alfvén waves. Furthermore, we quantitatively evaluate intensity of wave-wave interaction by using bi-coherence, and also by computing energy flow among wave modes, and demonstrate that the energy flow is directly related to the phase coherence generation. We first discuss the modulational instability within the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS equation, which is a subset of the Hall-MHD system including the right- and left-hand polarized, nearly degenerate quasi-parallel Alfvén waves. The dominant nonlinear process within this model is the four wave interaction, in which a quartet of waves in resonance can exchange energy. By numerically time integrating the DNLS equation with periodic boundary conditions, and by evaluating relative phase among the quartet of waves, we show that the phase coherence is generated when the waves exchange energy among the quartet of waves. As a result, coherent structures (solitons appear in the real space, while in the phase space of the wave frequency and the wave number, the wave power is seen to be distributed around a straight line. The slope of the line corresponds to the propagation speed of the coherent structures. Numerical time integration of the Hall-MHD system with periodic boundary conditions reveals that, wave power of transverse modes and that of longitudinal modes are aligned with a single straight line in the dispersion relation phase space, suggesting that efficient exchange of energy among transverse and longitudinal wave modes is realized in the Hall-MHD. Generation of the longitudinal wave modes violates the assumptions employed in deriving the DNLS such as the quasi

  2. Uncertainty propagation for flood forecasting in the Alps: different views and impacts from MAP D-PHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Rotach

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available D-PHASE was a Forecast Demonstration Project of the World Weather Research Programme (WWRP related to the Mesoscale Alpine Programme (MAP. Its goal was to demonstrate the reliability and quality of operational forecasting of orographically influenced (determined precipitation in the Alps and its consequences on the distribution of run-off characteristics. A special focus was, of course, on heavy-precipitation events.

    The D-PHASE Operations Period (DOP ran from June to November~2007, during which an end-to-end forecasting system was operated covering many individual catchments in the Alps, with their water authorities, civil protection organizations or other end users. The forecasting system's core piece was a Visualization Platform where precipitation and flood warnings from some 30 atmospheric and 7 hydrological models (both deterministic and probabilistic and corresponding model fields were displayed in uniform and comparable formats. Also, meteograms, nowcasting information and end user communication was made available to all the forecasters, users and end users. D-PHASE information was assessed and used by some 50 different groups ranging from atmospheric forecasters to civil protection authorities or water management bodies.

    In the present contribution, D-PHASE is briefly presented along with its outstanding scientific results and, in particular, the lessons learnt with respect to uncertainty propagation. A focus is thereby on the transfer of ensemble prediction information into the hydrological community and its use with respect to other aspects of societal impact. Objective verification of forecast quality is contrasted to subjective quality assessments during the project (end user workshops, questionnaires and some general conclusions concerning forecast demonstration projects are drawn.

  3. Determination better culture medium in the establishment phase for the in vitro propagation of banana (Musa paradisiaca L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancasi-Espejo Ruth Gabriela

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted at the Laboratory of Plant Biotechnology of the Department of Biological and Natural Sciences of the Amazonian University of Pando, in 2014. The aim of the study was to determine better culture medium in the establishment phase for propagation in vitro banana (Musa paradisiaca L., 20 were selected and characterized mother plants NTRCA (New Technology Research Center Amazonia. A completely random design (CRD with three different culture media was used. The culture media were M1 Murashige and Skoog (MS was supplemented with ascorbic acid 100 mg/L and L-cysteine 2 ml /L, M2 Murashige and Skoog (MS was supplemented charcoal 2 g/L, M3 Murashige and Skoog (MS supplement-ed with ascorbic acid 100 mg/L and cítrico100 mg/L acid. The variables evaluated were: The survival of the former Plantes, where contamination and oxidation was observed. The results showed that in the first phase of establishment, the best answer for the survival of the former Plantes banana (Musa paradisiaca, was with the culture medium 3, where a lower degree of oxidation (0.26 and pollution for all explants was obtained was 28%.

  4. Electromigration-Induced Surface Drift and Slit Propagation in Polycrystalline Interconnects: Insights from Phase-Field Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Ankit, Kumar; Selzer, Michael; Nestler, Britta

    2018-04-01

    We employ the phase-field method to assess electromigration (EM) damage in wide polycrystalline interconnects due to grain-boundary grooving. An interplay of surface and grain-boundary diffusion is shown to drastically influence the mode of progressive EM damage. Rapid atomic transport along the surface leads to shape-preserving surface drift reminiscent of Blech drift-velocity experiments. On the other hand, a comparatively faster grain-boundary transport localizes the damage, resulting in the proliferation of intergranular slits with a shape-preserving tip. At steady state, the two regimes exhibit exponents of 1 and 3 /2 , respectively, in Black's law. While surface drift obeys an inverse scaling with grain size, slits exhibit a direct relationship at small sizes, with the dependence becoming weaker at larger ones. Furthermore, we explain the influence of curvature- or EM-mediated healing fluxes running along the surface on groove replenishment. Insights derived from phase-field simulations of EM in bicrystals are extended to investigate the multiphysics of mixed-mode damage of a polycrystalline interconnect line that is characterized by a drift of small grain surfaces, slit propagation, and coarsening. The triple and quadruple junctions are identified as prominent sites of failure.

  5. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activities, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Tsap, Yuri T., E-mail: huangj@nao.cas.cn [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory of Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, 98409 Crimea, Nauchny (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  6. Sound propagation in dilute suspensions of spheres: Analytical comparison between coupled phase model and multiple scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valier-Brasier, Tony; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Coulouvrat, François; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2015-10-01

    Sound propagation in dilute suspensions of small spheres is studied using two models: a hydrodynamic model based on the coupled phase equations and an acoustic model based on the ECAH (ECAH: Epstein-Carhart-Allegra-Hawley) multiple scattering theory. The aim is to compare both models through the study of three fundamental kinds of particles: rigid particles, elastic spheres, and viscous droplets. The hydrodynamic model is based on a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation generalized to elastic spheres and viscous droplets. The hydrodynamic forces for elastic spheres are introduced by analogy with those of droplets. The ECAH theory is also modified in order to take into account the velocity of rigid particles. Analytical calculations performed for long wavelength, low dilution, and weak absorption in the ambient fluid show that both models are strictly equivalent for the three kinds of particles studied. The analytical calculations show that dilatational and translational mechanisms are modeled in the same way by both models. The effective parameters of dilute suspensions are also calculated.

  7. Application of Fourier-wavelet regularized deconvolution for improving image quality of free space propagation x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongxing; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Lixin

    2012-11-21

    New x-ray phase contrast imaging techniques without using synchrotron radiation confront a common problem from the negative effects of finite source size and limited spatial resolution. These negative effects swamp the fine phase contrast fringes and make them almost undetectable. In order to alleviate this problem, deconvolution procedures should be applied to the blurred x-ray phase contrast images. In this study, three different deconvolution techniques, including Wiener filtering, Tikhonov regularization and Fourier-wavelet regularized deconvolution (ForWaRD), were applied to the simulated and experimental free space propagation x-ray phase contrast images of simple geometric phantoms. These algorithms were evaluated in terms of phase contrast improvement and signal-to-noise ratio. The results demonstrate that the ForWaRD algorithm is most appropriate for phase contrast image restoration among above-mentioned methods; it can effectively restore the lost information of phase contrast fringes while reduce the amplified noise during Fourier regularization.

  8. Optical pulse coupling in a photorefractive crystal, propagation of encoded pulses in an optical fiber, and phase conjugate optical interconnections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, X.S.

    1992-01-01

    In Part I, the author presents a theory to describe the interaction between short optical pulses in a photorefractive crystal. This theory provides an analytical framework for pulse coherence length measurements using a photorefractive crystal. The theory also predicts how a pulse changes its temporal shape due to its coupling with another pulse in a photorefractive crystal. The author describes experiments to demonstrate how photorefractive coupling alters the temporal shape and the frequency spectrum of an optical pulse. The author describes a compact optical field correlator. Using this correlator, the author measured the field cross-correlation function of optical pulses using a photorefractive crystal. The author presents a more sophisticated theory to describe the photorefractive coupling of optical pulses that are too short for the previous theory to be valid. In Part II of this dissertation, the author analyzes how the group-velocity dispersion and the optical nonlinearity of an optical fiber ruin an fiberoptic code-division multiple-access (CDMA) communication system. The author treats the optical fiber's nonlinear response with a novel approach and derives the pulse propagation equation. Through analysis and numerically simulations, the author obtains the maximum and the maximum allowed peak pulse power, as well as the minimum and the maximum allowed pulse width for the communication system to function properly. The author simulates how the relative misalignment between the encoding and the decoding masks affects the system's performance. In Part III the author demonstrates a novel optical interconnection device based on a mutually pumped phase conjugator. This device automatically routes light from selected information-sending channels to selected information-receiving channels, and vice versa. The phase conjugator eliminates the need for critical alignment. It is shown that a large number of optical channels can be interconnected using this

  9. Latitudinally propagating on-off switching aurorae and associated geomagnetic pulsations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguti, T.; Kokubun, S.; Hayashi, K.; Tsuruda, K.; Machida, S.; Kitamura, T.; Saka, O.; Watanabe, T.

    1981-01-01

    Poleward propagating on-off switching aurorae and equatorward propagating aurorae, otherwise similar, were observed simultaneously at Rabbit Lake and La Ronge, respectively, for about 40 min before dawn of Feb 20, 1980. Rabbit Lake is a high auroral latitude site at the northern end of the Saskatchewan chain of stations for the Pulsating Aurora Campaign, whereas La Ronge, due south of Rabbit, is almost at the southern edge of the auroral zone. The repetition periods of the on-off switching aurorae are about 6 to 13 s. The poleward propagating aurorae had well defined fronts of light which extended a few hundred kilometres or more in the east-west direction. The light fronts of the equatorward propagating aurorae, though comparable in extent, were less well defined: they were thicker and fuzzier. The poleward propagating aurorae moved with a speed of approximately 10 km/s whereas the equatorward ones did so with a slightly greater velocity. Geomagnetic field fluctuations were concurrent with the aurorae at both sites. At Rabbit Lake, northward (southward) field changes were associated with upward (downward) changes, whereas the trend is reversed at La Ronge, viz., northward (southward) changes with downward (upward) changes. These trends are consistent with a model of a periodic occurrence of two line currents, westward and eastward, the former moving poleward north of Rabbit Lake and the latter approaching La Ronge from the north

  10. Beam propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The main part of this thesis consists of 15 published papers, in which the numerical Beam Propagating Method (BPM) is investigated, verified and used in a number of applications. In the introduction a derivation of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation is presented to connect the beginning of the soliton papers with Maxwell's equations including a nonlinear polarization. This thesis focuses on the wide use of the BPM for numerical simulations of propagating light and particle beams through different types of structures such as waveguides, fibers, tapers, Y-junctions, laser arrays and crystalline solids. We verify the BPM in the above listed problems against other numerical methods for example the Finite-element Method, perturbation methods and Runge-Kutta integration. Further, the BPM is shown to be a simple and effective way to numerically set up the Green's function in matrix form for periodic structures. The Green's function matrix can then be diagonalized with matrix methods yielding the eigensolutions of the structure. The BPM inherent transverse periodicity can be untied, if desired, by for example including an absorptive refractive index at the computational window edges. The interaction of two first-order soliton pulses is strongly dependent on the phase relationship between the individual solitons. When optical phase shift keying is used in coherent one-carrier wavelength communication, the fiber attenuation will suppress or delay the nonlinear instability. (orig.)

  11. Nonlinear acoustic effects in the propagation of surface acoustic waves in SrTiO3 near the structural phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balashova, E.V.; Lemanov, V.V.; Sherman, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Generation process of a surface acoustic wave with summarized frequency in collinear propagation of two surface acoustic waves in SrTiO 3 crystal near crystal-phase transition O n → D 4h (T c ≅ 105 K) is investigated. Anomalous increase of a nonlinear parameter Γ ∼ (T-T c ) -1 attributed to a fluctuation mechanism is observed. It is shown that the presence of a surface layer in SrTiO 3 having a higher, than in crystal volume, temperature of phase transition results in summarized frequency signal oscillation

  12. Equatorward dispersion of a high-latitude volcanic plume and its relation to the Asian summer monsoon: a case study of the Sarychev eruption in 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue; Griessbach, Sabine; Hoffmann, Lars

    2017-11-01

    Tropical volcanic eruptions have been widely studied for their significant contribution to stratospheric aerosol loading and global climate impacts, but the impact of high-latitude volcanic eruptions on the stratospheric aerosol layer is not clear and the pathway of transporting aerosol from high latitudes to the tropical stratosphere is not well understood. In this work, we focus on the high-latitude volcano Sarychev (48.1° N, 153.2° E), which erupted in June 2009, and the influence of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) on the equatorward dispersion of the volcanic plume. First, the sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission time series and plume height of the Sarychev eruption are estimated with SO2 observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and a backward trajectory approach using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model Massive-Parallel Trajectory Calculations (MPTRAC). Then, the transport and dispersion of the plume are simulated using the derived SO2 emission time series. The transport simulations are compared with SO2 observations from AIRS and validated with aerosol observations from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). The MPTRAC simulations show that about 4 % of the sulfur emissions were transported to the tropical stratosphere within 50 days after the beginning of the eruption, and the plume dispersed towards the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) through isentropic transport above the subtropical jet. The MPTRAC simulations and MIPAS aerosol data both show that between the potential temperature levels of 360 and 400 K, the equatorward transport was primarily driven by anticyclonic Rossby wave breaking enhanced by the ASM in boreal summer. The volcanic plume was entrained along the anticyclone flows and reached the TTL as it was transported southwestwards into the deep tropics downstream of the anticyclone. Further, the ASM anticyclone influenced the pathway of aerosols by isolating an aerosol hole inside of the ASM, which

  13. SABRE observations of structured ionospheric flows during substorm expansion phase onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Bradshaw

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available The irregularity velocity patterns observed by the SABRE coherent radar at substorm expansion phase onset, which is identified by magnetometer observations of Pi2 pulsations, are occasionally highly structured. In all the examples of structured velocity patterns examined, the SABRE viewing area is located at longitudes within the inferred substorm current wedge. Three types of structured velocity regime are apparent depending on the level of magnetic activity and the position of the radar viewing area relative to the substorm enhanced currents and the Pi2 pulsation generation region. Firstly, vortex-like velocity patterns are observed and these may be caused by the field-aligned currents associated with the substorm current wedge. Secondly, regions of equatorward velocity are also observed at times of substorm expansion phase onset moving longitudinally across the SABRE viewing area. The longitudinal movement is usually westward although an example of eastward motion has been observed. The phase velocity of these regions of equatorward flow is typically 1-3 km s-1. The observed equatorward velocities occur at the poleward edge or poleward of the background convection velocities observed by SABRE. These equatorward velocities may be related to the westward travelling surge and to the expansion (eastwards as well as westwards of the brightening arc region at substorm onset. Thirdly, the flow rotates equatorward within the field of view but does not then appear to move longitudinally. These equatorward velocities may relate to the earthward surge of plasma from the magnetotail at substorm onset.

  14. MANGO PROPAGATION

    OpenAIRE

    ALBERTO CARLOS DE QUEIROZ PINTO; VICTOR GALÁN SAÚCO; SISIR KUMAR MITRA; FRANCISCO RICARDO FERREIRA

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT This Chapter has the objectives to search, through the review of the available literature, important informations on the evolution of mango propagation regarding theoretical and practical aspects from cellular base of sexual propagation, nursery structures and organizations, substrate compositions and uses, importance of rootstock and scion selections, also it will be described the preparation and transport of the grafts (stem and bud) as well as the main asexual propagation methods...

  15. Field driven ferromagnetic phase nucleation and propagation from the domain boundaries in antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicular anisotropy films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauet, Thomas; Gunther, Christian M.; Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Hellwig, Olav

    2008-12-09

    We investigate the reversal process in antiferromagnetically coupled [Co/Pt]{sub X-1}/{l_brace}Co/Ru/[Co/Pt]{sub X-1}{r_brace}{sub 16} multilayer films by combining magnetometry and Magnetic soft X-ray Transmission Microscopy (MXTM). After out-of-plane demagnetization, a stable one dimensional ferromagnetic (FM) stripe domain phase (tiger-tail phase) for a thick stack sample (X=7 is obtained), while metastable sharp antiferromagnetic (AF) domain walls are observed in the remanent state for a thinner stack sample (X=6). When applying an external magnetic field the sharp domain walls of the thinner stack sample transform at a certain threshold field into the FM stripe domain wall phase. We present magnetic energy calculations that reveal the underlying energetics driving the overall reversal mechanisms.

  16. Simulation of 3-D radiation beam patterns propagated through a planar interface from ultrasonic phased array transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Kim, Chang-Hwan

    2002-05-01

    Phased array transducers are quite often mounted on solid wedges with specific angles in many practical ultrasonic inspections of thin plates phased array techniques with testing set-up, it is essential to have thorough understanding on the characteristics of radiation beam pattern produced in the interrogated medium. To address such a need, this paper proposes a systematic way to calculate full 3-D radiation beam patterns produced in the interrogated solid medium by phased array transducers mounted on a solid wedge. In order to investigate the characteristics of radiation beam patterns in steel, simulation is carried out for 7.5 MHz array transducers mounted on an acrylic wedge with the angle of 15.45 degrees with various of steering angles and/or focal planes.

  17. Semi-classical propagation of wavepackets for the phase space Schroedinger equation: interpretation in terms of the Feichtinger algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosson, Maurice A de

    2008-01-01

    The nearby orbit method is a powerful tool for constructing semi-classical solutions of Schroedinger's equation when the initial datum is a coherent state. In this paper, we first extend this method to arbitrary squeezed states and thereafter apply our results to the Schroedinger equation in phase space. This adaptation requires the phase-space Weyl calculus developed in previous work of ours. We also study the regularity of the semi-classical solutions from the point of view of the Feichtinger algebra familiar from the theory of modulation spaces

  18. Analyzing the propagation behavior of coherence and polarization degrees of a phase-locked partially coherent radial flat-topped array laser beam in underwater turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Fatemeh Dabbagh; Yousefi, Masoud

    2016-08-10

    In this research, based on an analytical expression for cross-spectral density (CSD) matrix elements, coherence and polarization properties of phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) radial array laser beams propagating through weak oceanic turbulence are analyzed. Spectral degrees of coherence and polarization are analytically calculated using CSD matrix elements. Also, the effective width of spatial degree of coherence (EWSDC) is calculated numerically. The simulation is done by considering the effects of source parameters (such as radius of the array setup's circle, effective width of the spectral degree of coherence, and wavelength) and turbulent ocean factors (such as the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid and relative strength of temperature and salinity fluctuations, Kolmogorov micro-scale, and rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature) in detail. Results indicate that any change in the amount of turbulence factors that increase the turbulence power reduces the EWSDC significantly and causes the reduction in the degree of polarization, and occurs at shorter propagation distances but with smaller magnitudes. In addition, being valid for all conditions, the degradation rate of the EWSDC of Gaussian array beams are more in comparison with the PCFT ones. The simulation and calculation results are shown by graphs.

  19. Influence of metallurgical phase transformation on crack propagation of 15-5PH stainless steel and 16MND5 low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of phase transformations on crack propagation. We want to understand the changes of fracture toughness during welding. In this work, fracture toughness is expressed by J-integral. There are many experimental methods to obtain the critical toughness JIC but they are impractical for our investigation during phase transformation. That is the reason why we have proposed a method coupling mechanical tests, digital image correlation and finite element simulation. The fracture tests are implemented on pre-cracked single edge notched plate sample which is easy for machining and heat conduct during phase transformation. The tests are conducted at different temperatures until rupture. Digital image correlation gives us the displacement information on every sample. Each test is then simulated by finite element where the fracture toughness is evaluated by the method G-Theta at the crack propagation starting moment found by potential drop method and digital image correlation technical. Two materials have been studied, 15Cr-5Ni martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel and 16MND5 ferritic low carbon steel. For these two materials, different test temperatures were chosen before, during and after phase transformation for testing and failure characterization of the mechanical behavior. Investigation result shows that metallurgical phase transformation has an influence on fracture toughness and further crack propagation. For 15-5PH, the result of J1C shows that the as received 15-5PH has higher fracture toughness than the one at 200 C. The toughness is also higher than the original material after one cycle heat treatment probably due to some residual austenite. Meanwhile, pure austenite 15-5PH at 200 C has higher fracture toughness than pure martensitic 15-5PH at 200 C. For 16MND5, the result also proves that the phase transformation affects fracture toughness. The as received material has bigger J1C than the situation where it was heated

  20. Concept of contrast transfer function for edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging and its comparison with the free-space propagation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemoz, Paul C; Vittoria, Fabio A; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-16

    Previous studies on edge illumination (EI) X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi) have investigated the nature and amplitude of the signal provided by this technique. However, the response of the imaging system to different object spatial frequencies was never explicitly considered and studied. This is required in order to predict the performance of a given EI setup for different classes of objects. To this scope, in the present work we derive analytical expressions for the contrast transfer function of an EI imaging system, using the approximation of near-field regime, and study its dependence upon the main experimental parameters. We then exploit these results to compare the frequency response of an EI system with respect of that of a free-space propagation XPCi one. The results achieved in this work can be useful for predicting the signals obtainable for different types of objects and also as a basis for new retrieval methods.

  1. MANGO PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBERTO CARLOS DE QUEIROZ PINTO

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This Chapter has the objectives to search, through the review of the available literature, important informations on the evolution of mango propagation regarding theoretical and practical aspects from cellular base of sexual propagation, nursery structures and organizations, substrate compositions and uses, importance of rootstock and scion selections, also it will be described the preparation and transport of the grafts (stem and bud as well as the main asexual propagation methods their uses and practices. Finally, pattern and quality of graft mangos and their commercialization aspects will be discussed in this Chapter.

  2. A general method for propagation of the phase space distribution, with application to the saw-tooth instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnock, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    The authors propose and illustrate a general numerical method to follow the probability distribution in phase space as a function of time. It applies to any multiparticle system governed by Liouville, Vlasov or Vlasov-Fokker-Planck dynamics. The technique, based on discretization of the local Perron-Frobenius operator, is simple in concept, easy to implement, and numerically stable in examples studied to date. The authors illustrate by treating longitudinal dynamics in electron storage rings with realistic wake field. Applied to the SLC damping rings, the method gives the observed current threshold for bunch lengthening, and several aspects of observed behavior above threshold, including the presence of a bursting or sawtooth mode. In contrast to previous particle-in-cell simulations, the authors have very low numerical noise and the ability to follow the motion over several damping times. The method has also been applied to the coherent beam-beam interaction. It appears likely that this approach will be of interest for some of the central problems of this workshop, for instance matching of space-charge dominated beams to a focusing channel, and coherent synchrotron radiation with self-consistent charge/current density

  3. Semiclassical propagator of the Wigner function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Thomas; Viviescas, Carlos; Sandoval, Luis

    2006-02-24

    Propagation of the Wigner function is studied on two levels of semiclassical propagation: one based on the Van Vleck propagator, the other on phase-space path integration. Leading quantum corrections to the classical Liouville propagator take the form of a time-dependent quantum spot. Its oscillatory structure depends on whether the underlying classical flow is elliptic or hyperbolic. It can be interpreted as the result of interference of a pair of classical trajectories, indicating how quantum coherences are to be propagated semiclassically in phase space. The phase-space path-integral approach allows for a finer resolution of the quantum spot in terms of Airy functions.

  4. Modeling of Cosmic-Ray Propagation and Galactic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission in Support of Current and Future NASA Missions, Phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, Igor

    This is a "Phase 3" successor proposal that is a continuation of work funded by the Astrophysics Research and Analysis (APRA) Program through the sub-topic "Particle Astrophysics": Considerable advances in astrophysics of cosmic rays in recent years have become possible due to superior instrumentation launched into space and to the top of the atmosphere. The ACE-CRIS, AMS-02, Fermi-LAT, HAWC, PAMELA, SuperTIGER, Voyager 1,2, WMAP, and many other missions made a lot of breakthroughs and more is expected in the following years. Other high-expectations missions are recently launched (CALET) or are awaiting for launch (ISS-CREAM). The claimed precision of the AMS- 02 data reaches 1-3%. Taking full advantage of the high quality data requires numerical models of comparable accuracy. The current state-of-the-art cosmic ray propagation model is GALPROP, which has become a standard analysis tool in astrophysics of cosmic rays, studies of the diffuse emissions, and related fields. It provides a unified framework for the interpretation of data collected by many different kinds of experiments and emphasizes the inter-relationship between different types of data. We are proposing considerable improvements of the GALPROP model and tool that include generalization of the description of the components of the Galactic interstellar medium to the full 3D and extensive application of the Bayesian tools in building such data-sets, development of a heliospheric propagation tool fully compatible with GALPROP, development of a reliable diffuse emission model in the keV-TeV energy range, generalization of the nuclear reaction network and cross section routines to include trans-iron nuclides, improvements in the description of the production of secondary particles in cosmic ray interactions, various speed and memory optimizations. We will continue to support a dedicated website which hosts GALPROP WebRun, a user-friendly interface for running the GALPROP code on a dedicated cluster

  5. Quantitative Assessment of Degenerative Cartilage and Subchondral Bony Lesions in a Preserved Cadaveric Knee: Propagation-Based Phase-Contrast CT Versus Conventional MRI and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Brun, Emmanuel; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Weber, Loriane; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Bravin, Alberto; Reiser, Maximilian; Coan, Paola; Horng, Annie

    2018-04-09

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone conditions in a fully preserved cadaveric human knee joint using high-resolution x-ray propagation-based phase-contrast imaging (PBI) CT and to compare the performance of the new technique with conventional CT and MRI. A cadaveric human knee was examined using an x-ray beam of 60 keV, a detector with a 90-mm 2 FOV, and a pixel size of 46 × 46 μm 2 . PBI CT images were reconstructed with both the filtered back projection algorithm and the equally sloped tomography method. Conventional 3-T MRI and CT were also performed. Measurements of cartilage thickness, cartilage lesions, International Cartilage Repair Society scoring, and detection of subchondral bone changes were evaluated. Visual inspection of the specimen akin to arthroscopy was conducted and served as a standard of reference for lesion detection. Loss of cartilage height was visible on PBI CT and MRI. Quantification of cartilage thickness showed a strong correlation between the two modalities. Cartilage lesions appeared darker than the adjacent cartilage on PBI CT. PBI CT showed similar agreement to MRI for depicting cartilage substance defects or lesions compared with the visual inspection. The assessment of subchondral bone cysts showed moderate to strong agreement between PBI CT and CT. In contrast to the standard clinical methods of MRI and CT, PBI CT is able to simultaneously depict cartilage and bony changes at high resolution. Though still an experimental technique, PBI CT is a promising high-resolution imaging method to evaluate comprehensive changes of osteoarthritic disease in a clinical setting.

  6. Semiclassical propagation of Wigner functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T; Gómez, E A; Pachón, L A

    2010-06-07

    We present a comprehensive study of semiclassical phase-space propagation in the Wigner representation, emphasizing numerical applications, in particular as an initial-value representation. Two semiclassical approximation schemes are discussed. The propagator of the Wigner function based on van Vleck's approximation replaces the Liouville propagator by a quantum spot with an oscillatory pattern reflecting the interference between pairs of classical trajectories. Employing phase-space path integration instead, caustics in the quantum spot are resolved in terms of Airy functions. We apply both to two benchmark models of nonlinear molecular potentials, the Morse oscillator and the quartic double well, to test them in standard tasks such as computing autocorrelation functions and propagating coherent states. The performance of semiclassical Wigner propagation is very good even in the presence of marked quantum effects, e.g., in coherent tunneling and in propagating Schrodinger cat states, and of classical chaos in four-dimensional phase space. We suggest options for an effective numerical implementation of our method and for integrating it in Monte-Carlo-Metropolis algorithms suitable for high-dimensional systems.

  7. Pulsating aurora and cosmic noise absorption associated with growth-phase arcs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. McKay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial stage of a magnetospheric substorm is the growth phase, which typically lasts 1–2 h. During the growth phase, an equatorward moving, east–west extended, optical auroral arc is observed. This is called a growth-phase arc. This work aims to characterize the optical emission and riometer absorption signatures associated with growth-phase arcs of isolated substorms. This is done using simultaneous all-sky camera and imaging riometer observations. The optical and riometric observations allow determination of the location of the precipitation within growth-phase arcs of low- (< 10  keV and high- (>  10 keV energy electrons, respectively. The observations indicate that growth-phase arcs have the following characteristics: 1. The peak of the cosmic noise absorption (CNA arc is equatorward of the optical emission arc. This CNA is contained within the region of diffuse aurora on the equatorward side.2. Optical pulsating aurora are seen in the border region between the diffuse emission region on the equatorward side and the bright growth-phase arc on the poleward side. CNA is detected in the same region. 3. There is no evidence of pulsations in the CNA. 4. Once the equatorward drift starts, it proceeds at constant speed, with uniform separation between the growth-phase arc and CNA of 40 ± 10 km. Optical pulsating aurora are known to be prominent in the post-onset phase of a substorm. The fact that pulsations are also seen in a fairly localized region during the growth phase shows that the substorm expansion-phase dynamics are not required to closely precede the pulsating aurora.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of two-phases turbulent combustion: application to study of propagation and structure of flames; Simulation numerique directe de la combustion turbulente diphasique: application a l'etude de la propagation et de la structure des flammes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canneviere, K.

    2003-12-15

    This work is devoted to the study of the propagation and the structure of two-phases turbulent flames. To this end, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are used. First, numerical systems for two-phases flow simulations is presented along with a specific chemical model. Then, a study of laminar spray flames is carried out. An analytical study related to the dynamics of evaporation of droplets is first proposed where the influence on the equivalence ratio of the ratio between the heating delay of the droplet and the evaporation delay is detailed. The simulation of a propagating flame through a cloud of droplets is carried out and a pulsating behavior is highlighted. A study of these flames according to the topology of liquid fuel enabled us to characterize a double flame structure composed of a premixed flame and a diffusion flame. Our last study is devoted to spray turbulent flames. Two-phase combustion of turbulent jets has been simulated. By varying the spray injection parameters (density, equivalence ratio), a database has been generated. This database allowed us to describe local and global flame regimes appearing in the combustion of sprays. They have been categorized in four main structures: open and closed external regime, group combustion and mixed combustion. Eventually, a combustion diagram has been developed. It involves the spray vaporization time, the mean inter-space between droplets or group of droplets and eventually the injected equivalence ratio. (author)

  9. Equivalence of Equilibrium Propagation and Recurrent Backpropagation

    OpenAIRE

    Scellier, Benjamin; Bengio, Yoshua

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent Backpropagation and Equilibrium Propagation are algorithms for fixed point recurrent neural networks which differ in their second phase. In the first phase, both algorithms converge to a fixed point which corresponds to the configuration where the prediction is made. In the second phase, Recurrent Backpropagation computes error derivatives whereas Equilibrium Propagation relaxes to another nearby fixed point. In this work we establish a close connection between these two algorithms....

  10. Fundamental aspects of excitation and propagation of on-line partial discharge signals in three-phase medium voltage cable systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielen, van der P.C.J.M.; Steennis, E.F.; Wouters, P.A.A.F.

    2003-01-01

    On-line partial discharge (PD) detection of three-phase belted medium voltage cable connections results in a number of interpretation differences as compared to off-line measurements where only one phase is energized. The induced currents and charges in the phase conductors and earth screen upon a

  11. Part two: Error propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Topics covered in this chapter include a discussion of exact results as related to nuclear materials management and accounting in nuclear facilities; propagation of error for a single measured value; propagation of error for several measured values; error propagation for materials balances; and an application of error propagation to an example of uranium hexafluoride conversion process

  12. Déphaseur large bande à phase indépendante de la fréquence à base de circuit actif à temps de propagation de groupe négatif

    OpenAIRE

    Ravelo , Blaise ,; Le Roy , Marc; Pérennec , André

    2009-01-01

    National audience; Un nouveau principe de déphaseur actif à phase constante est proposé. Ce déphaseur est obtenu par l'association de dispositifs à Temps de Propagation de Groupe (TPG) positif et négatif de même valeur absolue. Pour le concevoir, nous avons ainsi associé une ligne de transmission classique avec un circuit actif à TPG négatif développé récemment. Après réalisation d'un prototype en technologie planaire hybride, nous avons mesuré une phase constante (indépendante de la fréquenc...

  13. Compensation of nonlinearity in a fiber-optic transmission system using frequency-degenerate phase conjugation through counter-propagating dual pump FWM in a semiconductor optical amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchal, Abhishek; K, Pradeep Kumar; O'Duill, Sean; Anandarajah, Prince M.; Landais, Pascal

    2018-04-01

    We present a scheme of frequency-degenerate mid-span spectral inversion (MSSI) for nonlinearity compensation in fiber-optic transmission systems. The spectral inversion is obtained by using counter-propagating dual pump four-wave mixing in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Frequency-degeneracy between signal and conjugate is achieved by keeping two pump frequencies symmetrical about the signal frequency. We simulate the performance of MSSI for nonlinearity compensation by scrutinizing the improvement of the Q-factor of a 200 Gbps QPSK signal transmitted over a standard single mode fiber, as a function of launch power for different span lengths and number of spans. We demonstrate a 7.5 dB improvement in the input power dynamic range and an almost 83% increase in the transmission length for optimum MSSI parameters of -2 dBm pump power and 400 mA SOA current.

  14. Reduction of the harmonic propagation in three-phase systems using active compensation; Reduccion de la propagacion armonica en sistemas trifasicos empleando compensacion activa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras Ordaz, Marco Antonio

    2007-08-15

    With the development of semiconductor devices and the increase of non-linear loads based on static power converters, the power quality of transmission, distribution and consumption systems has been affected. The harmonics present in a distribution system are mainly result of the current harmonics generated by the non-linear loads and their effect on the impedance of the distribution system. There are several problems generated by the presence of current and voltage harmonics in a power distribution system. One of these problems is the harmonic propagation phenomenon, which has become important on the matter of power distribution systems. This phenomenon is manifested by the harmonic voltage amplification in distribution lines, generating levels of distortion that affect the electric facilities, and the life expectancy of equipment (CA motors, transformers, capacitor banks, etc.). There is also a reduction in the power transmission capacity of electric distribution lines. The harmonic propagation is mainly produced by the resonance between the line impedance and the power factor correction of capacitor banks installed along the distribution line and the consumers' equipment. The utilization of passive filters is not a sufficient solution, because the harmonic propagation exists even with no loads on the electric network, and the resonance frequencies do not correspond to the characteristic harmonics. This problem is solved by using active filters in radial distribution systems, mainly in low voltage. The objective of using an active filter is neither to compensate a particular load, nor a group of centralized loads; its objective is to reduce the voltage distortion and avoid the harmonic propagation by placing the filter in a branch of feeder of the electric system. This thesis presents a thorough study of the harmonic propagation phenomenon in ring networks and its damping with an active filter. An important point is to identify the location of the active

  15. Propagation calculation for reactor cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yanhua [School of Power and Energy Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China); Moriyama, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Hashimoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-11-01

    The propagation of steam explosion for real reactor geometry and conditions are investigated by using the computer code JASMINE-pro. The ex-vessel steam explosion is considered, which is described as follow: during the accident of reactor core meltdown, the molten core melts a hole at the bottom of reactor vessel and causes the higher temperature core fuel being leaked into the water pool below reactor vessel. During the melt-water mixing interaction process, the high temperature melt evaporates the cool water at an extreme high rate and might induce a steam explosion. A steam explosion could experience first the premixing phase and then the propagation explosion phase. For a propagation calculation, we should know the information about the initial fragmentation time, the total melt mass, premixing region size, initial void fraction and distribution of the melt volume fraction, and so on. All the initial conditions used in this calculation are based on analyses from some simple assumptions and the observation from the experiments. The results show that the most important parameter for the initial condition of this phase is the total mass and its initial distribution. This gives the requirement for a premixing calculation. On the other hand, for higher melt volume fraction case, the fragmentation is strong so that the local pressure can exceed over the EOS maximum pressure of the code, which lead to the incorrect calculation or divergence of the calculation. (Suetake, M.)

  16. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation

  17. Effect of metal-ion-to-fuel ratio on the phase formation of bioceramic phosphates synthesized by self-propagating combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swamiappan Sasikumar and Rajagopalan Vijayaraghavan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca10 (PO46 (OH2 is a well-known bioceramic material used in orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent biocompatibility and bone-bonding ability due to its structural and compositional similarity to human bone. Here we report, for the first time, the synthesis of HAP by combustion employing tartaric acid as a fuel. Calcium nitrate is used as the source of calcium and diammonium hydrogen phosphate serves as the source of phosphate ions. Reaction processing parameters such as the pH, fuel-oxidant ratio and autoignition temperature are controlled and monitored. The products were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, which revealed the formation of a hexagonal hydroxyapatite phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR spectra showed that the substitution of a carbonate ion occurs at the phosphate site. The morphology of the particles was imaged by scanning electron microscopy, which also revealed that the particles are of submicron size. Thermal analysis showed that the phase formation takes place at the time of combustion. Surface area and porosity analysis showed that the surface area is high and that the pores are of nanometer size. The mean grain size of the HAP powder, determined by the Debye–Scherrer formula, is in the range 20–30 nm. Chemical analyses to determine the Ca : P atomic ratio in synthesized ceramics were performed, and it was found to be 1 : 1.66.

  18. Biofilm imaging in porous media by laboratory X-Ray tomography: Combining a non-destructive contrast agent with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Maxence; Beltran, Mario A; Morales, Verónica L; Derlon, Nicolas; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Kaufmann, Rolf; Holzner, Markus

    2017-01-01

    X-ray tomography is a powerful tool giving access to the morphology of biofilms, in 3D porous media, at the mesoscale. Due to the high water content of biofilms, the attenuation coefficient of biofilms and water are very close, hindering the distinction between biofilms and water without the use of contrast agents. Until now, the use of contrast agents such as barium sulfate, silver-coated micro-particles or 1-chloronaphtalene added to the liquid phase allowed imaging the biofilm 3D morphology. However, these contrast agents are not passive and potentially interact with the biofilm when injected into the sample. Here, we use a natural inorganic compound, namely iron sulfate, as a contrast agent progressively bounded in dilute or colloidal form into the EPS matrix during biofilm growth. By combining a very long source-to-detector distance on a X-ray laboratory source with a Lorentzian filter implemented prior to tomographic reconstruction, we substantially increase the contrast between the biofilm and the surrounding liquid, which allows revealing the 3D biofilm morphology. A comparison of this new method with the method proposed by Davit et al (Davit et al., 2011), which uses barium sulfate as a contrast agent to mark the liquid phase was performed. Quantitative evaluations between the methods revealed substantial differences for the volumetric fractions obtained from both methods. Namely, contrast agent-biofilm interactions (e.g. biofilm detachment) occurring during barium sulfate injection caused a reduction of the biofilm volumetric fraction of more than 50% and displacement of biofilm patches elsewhere in the column. Two key advantages of the newly proposed method are that passive addition of iron sulfate maintains the integrity of the biofilm prior to imaging, and that the biofilm itself is marked by the contrast agent, rather than the liquid phase as in other available methods. The iron sulfate method presented can be applied to understand biofilm development

  19. Lamb wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers

    OpenAIRE

    Fromme, P.; Pizzolato, M.; Robyr, J-L; Masserey, B.

    2018-01-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. Guided ultrasonic waves offer the potential to efficiently detect micro-cracks in the thin wafers. Previous studies of ultrasonic wave propagation in silicon focused on effects of material anisotropy on bulk ultrasonic waves, but the dependence of the wave propagation characteristics on the material anisotropy is not well understood for Lamb waves. The phase slowness a...

  20. r.avaflow v1, an advanced open-source computational framework for the propagation and interaction of two-phase mass flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergili, Martin; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Krenn, Julia; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2017-02-01

    r.avaflow represents an innovative open-source computational tool for routing rapid mass flows, avalanches, or process chains from a defined release area down an arbitrary topography to a deposition area. In contrast to most existing computational tools, r.avaflow (i) employs a two-phase, interacting solid and fluid mixture model (Pudasaini, 2012); (ii) is suitable for modelling more or less complex process chains and interactions; (iii) explicitly considers both entrainment and stopping with deposition, i.e. the change of the basal topography; (iv) allows for the definition of multiple release masses, and/or hydrographs; and (v) serves with built-in functionalities for validation, parameter optimization, and sensitivity analysis. r.avaflow is freely available as a raster module of the GRASS GIS software, employing the programming languages Python and C along with the statistical software R. We exemplify the functionalities of r.avaflow by means of two sets of computational experiments: (1) generic process chains consisting in bulk mass and hydrograph release into a reservoir with entrainment of the dam and impact downstream; (2) the prehistoric Acheron rock avalanche, New Zealand. The simulation results are generally plausible for (1) and, after the optimization of two key parameters, reasonably in line with the corresponding observations for (2). However, we identify some potential to enhance the analytic and numerical concepts. Further, thorough parameter studies will be necessary in order to make r.avaflow fit for reliable forward simulations of possible future mass flow events.

  1. Experimental study on fatigue crack propagation rate of RC beam strengthened with carbon fiber laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peiyan; Liu, Guangwan; Guo, Xinyan; Huang, Man

    2008-11-01

    The experimental research on fatigue crack propagation rate of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon fiber laminate (CFL) is carried out by MTS system in this paper. The experimental results show that, the main crack propagation on strengthened beam can be summarized into three phases: 1) fast propagation phase; 2) steady propagation and rest phase; 3) unsteady propagation phase. The phase 2-i.e. steady propagation and rest stage makes up about 95% of fatigue life of the strengthened beam. The propagation rate of the main crack, da/dN, in phase 2 can be described by Paris formula, and the constant C and m can be confirmed by the fatigue crack propagation experiments of the RC beams strengthened with CFL under three-point bending loads.

  2. Modelling the gluon propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinweber, D.B.; Parrinello, C.; Skullerud, J.I.; Williams, A.G

    1999-03-01

    Scaling of the Landau gauge gluon propagator calculated at {beta} = 6.0 and at {beta} = 6.2 is demonstrated. A variety of functional forms for the gluon propagator calculated on a large (32{sup 3} x 64) lattice at {beta} = 6.0 are investigated.

  3. Sound propagation in cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.; Polinder, H.; Lohman, W.; Zhou, H.; Borst, H.

    2009-01-01

    A new engineering model for sound propagation in cities is presented. The model is based on numerical and experimental studies of sound propagation between street canyons. Multiple reflections in the source canyon and the receiver canyon are taken into account in an efficient way, while weak

  4. A representation independent propagator. Pt. 1. Compact Lie groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tome, W.A.

    1995-01-01

    Conventional path integral expressions for propagators are representation dependent. Rather than having to adapt each propagator to the representation in question, it is shown that for compact Lie groups it is possible to introduce a propagator that is representation independent. For a given set of kinematical variables this propagator is a single function independent of any particular choice of fiducial vector, which monetheless, correctly propagates each element of the coherent state representation associated with these kinematical variables. Although the configuration space is in general curved, nevertheless the lattice phase-space path integral for the representation independent propagator has the form appropriate to flat space. To illustrate the general theory a representation independent propagator is explicitly constructed for the Lie group SU(2). (orig.)

  5. Database for propagation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1991-07-01

    A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various database tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation database is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a database construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The database may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the database. Another way in which the database may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the database already. The following sections show a possible database construction, as well as properties of the database for the propagation research.

  6. Propagation of Porro "petal" beams through a turbulent atmosphere

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burger, L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available . Construct a series of pseudo–random phase screens from the basis. 3. Implement optical wavefront changes from the pseudo–random phase screens. 4. Propagate the resulting beam to the far field and measure …. Page 11 Phase screen construction 20 40 60 80... constant h is height asl k is the wave number Atmospheric propagation Kolmogorov Turbulence Model Page 10 Atmospheric propagation How to measure turbulence 1. Decompose the turbulence model into a series of orthogonal functions (basis set). 2...

  7. Against dogma: On superluminal propagation in classical electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherall, James Owen

    2014-11-01

    It is deeply entrenched dogma that relativity theory prohibits superluminal propagation. It is also experimentally well-established that under some circumstances, classical electromagnetic fields propagate through a dielectric medium with superluminal group velocities and superluminal phase velocities. But it is usually claimed that these superluminal velocities do not violate the relativistic prohibition. Here I analyze electromagnetic fields in a dielectric medium within a framework for understanding superluminal propagation recently developed by Geroch (1996, 2011) and elaborated by Earman (2014). I will argue that for some parameter values, electromagnetic fields do propagate superluminally in the Geroch-Earman sense.

  8. Propagation of waves

    CERN Document Server

    David, P

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of Waves focuses on the wave propagation around the earth, which is influenced by its curvature, surface irregularities, and by passage through atmospheric layers that may be refracting, absorbing, or ionized. This book begins by outlining the behavior of waves in the various media and at their interfaces, which simplifies the basic phenomena, such as absorption, refraction, reflection, and interference. Applications to the case of the terrestrial sphere are also discussed as a natural generalization. Following the deliberation on the diffraction of the "ground? wave around the ear

  9. Propagation of steel corrosion in concrete: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Otieno, M.; Stang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on experimental and numerical investigations of the propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion to determine anodic and cathodic Tafel constants and exchange current densities, from corrosion current density and corrosion potential measurements. The experimental program includ...

  10. A wave propagation matrix method in semiclassical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Takigawa, N.

    1977-05-01

    A wave propagation matrix method is used to derive the semiclassical formulae of the multiturning point problem. A phase shift matrix and a barrier transformation matrix are introduced to describe the processes of a particle travelling through a potential well and crossing a potential barrier respectively. The wave propagation matrix is given by the products of phase shift matrices and barrier transformation matrices. The method to study scattering by surface transparent potentials and the Bloch wave in solids is then applied

  11. Propagation environments [Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass F. Jacobs; Thomas D. Landis; Tara Luna

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of all factors influencing plant growth in a nursery environment is needed for the successful growth and production of high-quality container plants. Propagation structures modify the atmospheric conditions of temperature, light, and relative humidity. Native plant nurseries are different from typical horticultural nurseries because plants must be...

  12. Uncertainty Propagation in OMFIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sterling; Meneghini, Orso; Sung, Choongki

    2017-10-01

    A rigorous comparison of power balance fluxes and turbulent model fluxes requires the propagation of uncertainties in the kinetic profiles and their derivatives. Making extensive use of the python uncertainties package, the OMFIT framework has been used to propagate covariant uncertainties to provide an uncertainty in the power balance calculation from the ONETWO code, as well as through the turbulent fluxes calculated by the TGLF code. The covariant uncertainties arise from fitting 1D (constant on flux surface) density and temperature profiles and associated random errors with parameterized functions such as a modified tanh. The power balance and model fluxes can then be compared with quantification of the uncertainties. No effort is made at propagating systematic errors. A case study will be shown for the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations on the kinetic profiles and fluxes at the top of the pedestal. A separate attempt at modeling the random errors with Monte Carlo sampling will be compared to the method of propagating the fitting function parameter covariant uncertainties. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG2-95ER-54309, DE-SC 0012656.

  13. The Weinberg propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvoeglazov, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    An analog of the j = 1/2 Feynman-Dyson propagator is presented in the framework of the j = 1 Weinberg's theory. The basis for this construction is the concept of the Weinberg field as a system of four field functions differing by parity and by dual transformations. (orig.)

  14. UWB Propagation through Walls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schejbal, V.; Bezoušek, P.; Čermák, D.; NĚMEC, Z.; Fišer, Ondřej; Hájek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2006), s. 17-24 ISSN 1210-2512 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA2/030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Ultra wide band * UWB antennas * UWB propagation * multipath effects Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation

  15. Tropical Cyclone Propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, William

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the question of tropical cyclone propagation or why the average tropical cyclone moves 1-2 m/s faster and usually 10-20 deg to the left of its surrounding (or 5-7 deg radius) deep layer (850-300 mb) steering current...

  16. The effect of lower-hybrid waves on the propagation of hydromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamabata, Hiromitsu; Namikawa, Tomikazu; Mori, Kazuhiro

    1988-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of hydromagnetic waves in a magnetic plasma are investigated using the two-plasma fluid equations including the effect of lower-hybrid waves propagating perpendicularly to the magnetic field. The effect of lower-hybrid waves on the propagation of hydromagnetic waves is analysed in terms of phase speed, growth rate, refractive index, polarization and the amplitude relation between the density perturbation and the magnetic-field perturbation for the cases when hydromagnetic waves propagate in the plane whose normal is perpendicular to both the magnetic field and the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves and in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves. It is shown that hydromagnetic waves propagating at small angles to the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves can be excited by the effect of lower-hybrid waves and the energy of excited waves propagates nearly parallel to the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves. (author)

  17. Characteristic of laser diode beam propagation through a collimating lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Han, Yiping; Cui, Zhiwei

    2010-01-20

    A mathematical model of a laser diode beam propagating through a collimating lens is presented. Wave propagation beyond the paraxial approximation is studied. The phase delay of the laser diode wave in passing through the lens is analyzed in detail. The propagation optical field after the lens is obtained from the diffraction integral by the stationary phase method. The model is employed to predict the light intensity at various beam cross sections, and the computed intensity distributions are in a good agreement with the corresponding measurements.

  18. Propagator of stochastic electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalleri, G.

    1981-01-01

    The ''elementary propagator'' for the position of a free charged particle subject to the zero-point electromagnetic field with Lorentz-invariant spectral density proportionalω 3 is obtained. The nonstationary process for the position is solved by the stationary process for the acceleration. The dispersion of the position elementary propagator is compared with that of quantum electrodynamics. Finally, the evolution of the probability density is obtained starting from an initial distribution confined in a small volume and with a Gaussian distribution in the velocities. The resulting probability density for the position turns out to be equal, to within radiative corrections, to psipsi* where psi is the Kennard wave packet. If the radiative corrections are retained, the present result is new since the corresponding expression in quantum electrodynamics has not yet been found. Besides preceding quantum electrodynamics for this problem, no renormalization is required in stochastic electrodynamics

  19. Preventing Unofficial Information Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Zhengyi; Ouyang, Yi; Xu, Yurong; Ford, James; Makedon, Fillia

    Digital copies are susceptible to theft and vulnerable to leakage, copying, or manipulation. When someone (or some group), who has stolen, leaked, copied, or manipulated digital documents propagates the documents over the Internet and/or distributes those through physical distribution channels many challenges arise which document holders must overcome in order to mitigate the impact to their privacy or business. This paper focuses on the propagation problem of digital credentials, which may contain sensitive information about a credential holder. Existing work such as access control policies and the Platform for Privacy Preferences (P3P) assumes that qualified or certified credential viewers are honest and reliable. The proposed approach in this paper uses short-lived credentials based on reverse forward secure signatures to remove this assumption and mitigate the damage caused by a dishonest or honest but compromised viewer.

  20. Wave propagation in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, Jan

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids is of interest in many branches of the physical scienses and engineering. This book aims to present an account of the theory of wave propagation in elastic solids. The material is arranged to present an exposition of the basic concepts of mechanical wave propagation within a one-dimensional setting and a discussion of formal aspects of elastodynamic theory in three dimensions, followed by chapters expounding on typical wave propagation phenomena, such as radiation, reflection, refraction, propagation in waveguides, and diffraction. The treat

  1. Temporal scaling in information propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  2. Effects of laser beam propagation in a multilevel photoionization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izawa, Y.; Nomaru, K.; Chen, Y. W.

    1995-01-01

    When the intense laser pulse propagates in the atomic vapor over a long distance, the laser pulse shape, the carrier frequency and the propagating velocity are greatly modified during the propagation by the resonant and/or the near-resonant interactions with atoms. We have been investigating these effects on the laser beam propagation experimentally and analytically. The simulation code named CEALIS-P has been developed, which employs the coupled three- level Bloch-Maxwell equations to study the atomic excitation and laser beam propagation simultaneously. Several features of the resonant and near-resonant effects based on the the self-induced transparency, the self-phase modulation and the nonlinear group velocity dispersion are described and the influences of such effects on the photoionization efficiency are analyzed.

  3. Bolt beam propagation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokair, I. R.

    BOLT (Beam on Laser Technology) is a rocket experiment to demonstrate electron beam propagation on a laser ionized plasma channel across the geomagnetic field in the ion focused regime (IFR). The beam parameters for BOLT are: beam current I(sub b) = 100 Amps, beam energy of 1--1.5 MeV (gamma =3-4), and a Gaussian beam and channel of radii r(sub b) = r(sub c) = 1.5 cm. The N+1 ionization scheme is used to ionize atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere. This scheme utilizes 130 nm light plus three IR lasers to excite and then ionize atomic oxygen. The limiting factor for the channel strength is the energy of the 130 nm laser, which is assumed to be 1.6 mJ for BOLT. At a fixed laser energy and altitude (fixing the density of atomic oxygen), the range can be varied by adjusting the laser tuning, resulting in a neutralization fraction axial profile of the form: f(z) = f(sub 0) e(exp minus z)/R, where R is the range. In this paper we consider the propagation of the BOLT beam and calculate the range of the electron beam taking into account the fact that the erosion rates (magnetic and inductive) vary with beam length as the beam and channel dynamically respond to sausage and hose instabilities.

  4. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagating in one-dimensional layered system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y.; Miao, G.Q.; Zhang, P.; Huang, K.; Wei, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    The propagation of finite-amplitude plane sound in one-dimensional layered media is studied by the extended method of transfer matrix formalism. For the periodic layered system consisting of two alternate types of liquid, the energy distribution and the phase vectors of the interface vibration are computed and analyzed. It is found that in the pass-band, the second harmonic of sound wave can propagate with the characteristic modulation

  5. Five-component propagation model for steam explosion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, H.S.; Maruyama, Yu; Sugimoto, Jun

    1999-01-01

    A five-field simulation code JASMINE-pro has been developed at JAERI for the calculation of the propagation and explosion phase of steam explosions. The basic equations and the constitutive relationships specifically utilized in the propagation models in the code are introduced in this paper. Some calculations simulating the KROTOS 1D and 2D steam explosion experiments are also stated in the paper to show the present capability of the code. (author)

  6. Biomass plug development and propagation in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, T L; Fogler, H S

    2001-02-05

    Exopolymer-producing bacteria can be used to modify soil profiles for enhanced oil recovery or bioremediation. Understanding the mechanisms associated with biomass plug development and propagation is needed for successful application of this technology. These mechanisms were determined from packed-bed and micromodel experiments that simulate plugging in porous media. Leuconostoc mesenteroides was used, because production of dextran, a water-insoluble exopolymer, can be controlled by using different carbon sources. As dextran was produced, the pressure drop across the porous media increased and began to oscillate. Three pressure phases were identified under exopolymer-producing conditions: the exopolymer-induction phase, the plugging phase, and the plug-propagation phase. The exopolymer-induction phase extended from the time that exopolymer-producing conditions were induced until there was a measurable increase in pressure drop across the porous media. The plugging phase extended from the first increase in pressure drop until a maximum pressure drop was reached. Changes in pressure drop in these two phases were directly related to biomass distribution. Specifically, flow channels within the porous media filled with biomass creating a plugged region where convective flow occurred only in water channels within the biofilm. These water channels were more restrictive to flow causing the pressure drop to increase. At a maximum pressure drop across the porous media, the biomass yielded much like a Bingham plastic, and a flow channel was formed. This behavior marked the onset of the plug-propagation phase which was characterized by sequential development and breakthrough of biomass plugs. This development and breakthrough propagated the biomass plug in the direction of nutrient flow. The dominant mechanism associated with all three phases of plugging in porous media was exopolymer production; yield stress is an additional mechanism in the plug-propagation phase. Copyright

  7. Lamb wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Paul; Pizzolato, Marco; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Masserey, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. Guided ultrasonic waves offer the potential to efficiently detect micro-cracks in the thin wafers. Previous studies of ultrasonic wave propagation in silicon focused on effects of material anisotropy on bulk ultrasonic waves, but the dependence of the wave propagation characteristics on the material anisotropy is not well understood for Lamb waves. The phase slowness and beam skewing of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes A 0 and S 0 were investigated. Experimental measurements using contact wedge transducer excitation and laser measurement were conducted. Good agreement was found between the theoretically calculated angular dependency of the phase slowness and measurements for different propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation. Significant wave skew and beam widening was observed experimentally due to the anisotropy, especially for the S 0 mode. Explicit finite element simulations were conducted to visualize and quantify the guided wave beam skew. Good agreement was found for the A 0 mode, but a systematic discrepancy was observed for the S 0 mode. These effects need to be considered for the non-destructive testing of wafers using guided waves.

  8. Propagators and path integrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holten, J.W. van

    1995-08-22

    Path-integral expressions for one-particle propagators in scalar and fermionic field theories are derived, for arbitrary mass. This establishes a direct connection between field theory and specific classical point-particle models. The role of world-line reparametrization invariance of the classical action and the implementation of the corresponding BRST-symmetry in the quantum theory are discussed. The presence of classical world-line supersymmetry is shown to lead to an unwanted doubling of states for massive spin-1/2 particles. The origin of this phenomenon is traced to a `hidden` topological fermionic excitation. A different formulation of the pseudo-classical mechanics using a bosonic representation of {gamma}{sub 5} is shown to remove these extra states at the expense of losing manifest supersymmetry. (orig.).

  9. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  10. Atomistics of crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Dienes, G.J.; Paskin, A.; Massoumzadeh, B.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamic technique is used to investigate static and dynamic aspects of crack extension. The material chosen for this study was the 2D triangular solid with atoms interacting via the Johnson potential. The 2D Johnson solid was chosen for this study since a sharp crack in this material remains stable against dislocation emission up to the critical Griffith load. This behavior allows for a meaningful comparison between the simulation results and continuum energy theorems for crack extension by appropriately defining an effective modulus which accounts for sample size effects and the non-linear elastic behavior of the Johnson solid. Simulation results are presented for the stress fields of moving cracks and these dynamic results are discussed in terms of the dynamic crack propagation theories, of Mott, Eshelby, and Freund

  11. Broadband unidirectional ultrasound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2017-12-12

    A passive, linear arrangement of a sonic crystal-based apparatus and method including a 1D sonic crystal, a nonlinear medium, and an acoustic low-pass filter, for permitting unidirectional broadband ultrasound propagation as a collimated beam for underwater, air or other fluid communication, are described. The signal to be transmitted is first used to modulate a high-frequency ultrasonic carrier wave which is directed into the sonic crystal side of the apparatus. The apparatus processes the modulated signal, whereby the original low-frequency signal exits the apparatus as a collimated beam on the side of the apparatus opposite the sonic crystal. The sonic crystal provides a bandpass acoustic filter through which the modulated high-frequency ultrasonic signal passes, and the nonlinear medium demodulates the modulated signal and recovers the low-frequency sound beam. The low-pass filter removes remaining high-frequency components, and contributes to the unidirectional property of the apparatus.

  12. Propagation into an unstable state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dee, G.

    1985-01-01

    We describe propagating front solutions of the equations of motion of pattern-forming systems. We make a number of conjectures concerning the properties of such fronts in connection with pattern selection in these systems. We describe a calculation which can be used to calculate the velocity and state selected by certain types of propagating fronts. We investigate the propagating front solutions of the amplitude equation which provides a valid dynamical description of many pattern-forming systems near onset

  13. Unidirectional reflectionless light propagation at exceptional points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review of unidirectional reflectionless light propagation in photonic devices at exceptional points (EPs. EPs, which are branch point singularities of the spectrum, associated with the coalescence of both eigenvalues and corresponding eigenstates, lead to interesting phenomena, such as level repulsion and crossing, bifurcation, chaos, and phase transitions in open quantum systems described by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Recently, it was shown that judiciously designed photonic synthetic matters could mimic the complex non-Hermitian Hamiltonians in quantum mechanics and realize unidirectional reflection at optical EPs. Unidirectional reflectionlessness is of great interest for optical invisibility. Achieving unidirectional reflectionless light propagation could also be potentially important for developing optical devices, such as optical network analyzers. Here, we discuss unidirectional reflectionlessness at EPs in both parity-time (PT-symmetric and non-PT-symmetric optical systems. We also provide an outlook on possible future directions in this field.

  14. Harmonic surface wave propagation in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivarova, A.; Stoychev, T.

    1980-01-01

    Second order harmonic surface waves generated by one fundamental high-frequency surface wave are investigated experimentally in gas discharge plasma. Two types of harmonic waves of equal frequency, associated with the linear dispersion relation and the synchronism conditions relatively propagate. The experimental conditions and the different space damping rates of the waves ensure the existence of different spatial regions (consecutively arranged along the plasma column) of a dominant propagation of each one of these two waves. Experimental data are obtained both for the wavenumbers and the space damping rates by relatively precise methods for wave investigations such as the methods of time-space diagrams and of phase shift measurements. The results are explained by the theoretical model for nonlinear mixing of dispersive waves. (author)

  15. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  16. Propagating annular modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, A.; Plumb, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    The leading "annular mode", defined as the dominant EOF of surface pressure or of zonal mean zonal wind variability, appears as a dipolar structure straddling the mean midlatitude jet and thus seems to describe north-south wobbling of the jet latitude. However, extratropical zonal wind anomalies frequently tend to migrate poleward. This behavior can be described by the first two EOFs, the first (AM1) being the dipolar structure, and the second (AM2) having a tripolar structure centered on the mean jet. Taken in isolation, AM1 thus describes a north-south wobbling of the jet position, while AM2 describes a strengthening and narrowing of the jet. However, despite the fact that they are spatially orthogonal, and their corresponding time series temporally orthogonal, AM1 and AM2 are not independent, but show significant lag-correlations which reveal the propagation. The EOFs are not modes of the underlying dynamical system governing the zonal flow evolution. The true modes can be estimated using principal oscillation pattern (POP) analysis. In the troposphere, the leading POPs manifest themselves as a pair of complex conjugate structures with conjugate eigenvalues thus, in reality, constituting a single, complex, mode that describes propagating anomalies. Even though the principal components associated with the two leading EOFs decay at different rates, each decays faster than the true mode. These facts have implications for eddy feedback and the susceptibility of the mode to external perturbations. If one interprets the annular modes as the modes of the system, then simple theory predicts that the response to steady forcing will usually be dominated by AM1 (with the longest time scale). However, such arguments should really be applied to the true modes. Experiments with a simplified GCM show that climate response to perturbations do not necessarily have AM1 structures. Implications of these results for stratosphere-troposphere interactions are explored. The POP

  17. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  18. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Wireless communications has seen explosive growth in recent decades, in a realm that is both broad and rapidly expanding to include satellite services, navigational aids, remote sensing, telemetering, audio and video broadcasting, high-speed data communications, mobile radio systems and much more. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications deals with the basic principles of radiowaves propagation for frequency bands used in radio-communications, offering descriptions of new achievements and newly developed propagation models. The book bridges the gap between theoretical calculations and approaches, and applied procedures needed for advanced radio links design. The primary objective of this two-volume set is to demonstrate the fundamentals, and to introduce propagation phenomena and mechanisms that engineers are likely to encounter in the design and evaluation of radio links of a given type and operating frequency. Volume one covers basic principles, along with tropospheric and ionospheric propagation,...

  19. Transionospheric propagation predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klobucher, J. A.; Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Davies, K.; Donatelli, D. E.; Fremouw, E. J.; Goodman, J. M.; Hartmann, G. K.; Leitinger, R.

    1979-01-01

    The current status and future prospects of the capability to make transionospheric propagation predictions are addressed, highlighting the effects of the ionized media, which dominate for frequencies below 1 to 3 GHz, depending upon the state of the ionosphere and the elevation angle through the Earth-space path. The primary concerns are the predictions of time delay of signal modulation (group path delay) and of radio wave scintillation. Progress in these areas is strongly tied to knowledge of variable structures in the ionosphere ranging from the large scale (thousands of kilometers in horizontal extent) to the fine scale (kilometer size). Ionospheric variability and the relative importance of various mechanisms responsible for the time histories observed in total electron content (TEC), proportional to signal group delay, and in irregularity formation are discussed in terms of capability to make both short and long term predictions. The data base upon which predictions are made is examined for its adequacy, and the prospects for prediction improvements by more theoretical studies as well as by increasing the available statistical data base are examined.

  20. Dressing the nucleon propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, S.; Gersten, A.

    1976-01-01

    The nucleon propagator in the ''nested bubbles'' approximation is analyzed. The approximation is built from the minimal set of diagrams which is needed to maintain the unitarity condition under two-pion production threshold in the two-nucleon Bethe--Salpeter equation. Recursive formulas for subsets of ''nested bubbles'' diagrams calculated in the framework of the pseudoscalar interaction are obtained by the use of dispersion relations. We prove that the sum of all the ''nested bubbles'' diverges. Moreover, the successive iterations are plagued with ghost poles. We prove that the first approximation--which is the so-called chain approximation--has ghost poles for any nonvanishing coupling constant. In an earlier paper we have shown that ghost poles lead to ghost cuts. These cuts are present in the ''nested bubbles.'' Ghost elimination procedures are discussed. Modifications of the ''nested bubbles'' approximation are introduced in order to obtain convergence and in order to eliminate the ghost poles and ghost cuts. In a similar way as in the Lee model, cutoff functions are introduced in order to eliminate the ghost poles. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the absence of ghost poles are formulated and analyzed. The spectral functions of the modified ''nested bubbles'' are analyzed and computed. Finally, we present a theorem, similar in its form to Levinson's theorem in scattering theory, which enables one to compute in a simple way the number of ghost poles

  1. Optical vortex beams: Generation, propagation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen

    An optical vortex (also known as a screw dislocation or phase singularity) is one type of optical singularity that has a spiral phase wave front around a singularity point where the phase is undefined. Optical vortex beams have a lot of applications in areas such as optical communications, LADAR (laser detection and ranging) system, optical tweezers, optical trapping and laser beam shaping. The concepts of optical vortex beams and methods of generation are briefly discussed. The properties of optical vortex beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence have been studied. A numerical modeling is developed and validated which has been applied to study the high order properties of optical vortex beams propagating though a turbulent atmosphere. The simulation results demonstrate the advantage that vectorial vortex beams may be more stable and maintain beam integrity better when they propagate through turbulent atmosphere. As one important application of optical vortex beams, the laser beam shaping is introduced and studied. We propose and demonstrate a method to generate a 2D flat-top beam profile using the second order full Poincare beams. Its applications in two-dimensional flat-top beam shaping with spatially variant polarization under low numerical aperture focusing have been studied both theoretically and experimentally. A novel compact flat-top beam shaper based on the proposed method has been designed, fabricated and tested. Experimental results show that high quality flat-top profile can be obtained with steep edge roll-off. The tolerance to different input beam sizes of the beam shaper is also verified in the experimental demonstration. The proposed and experimentally verified LC beam shaper has the potential to become a promising candidate for compact and low-cost flat-top beam shaping in areas such as laser processing/machining, lithography and medical treatment.

  2. On the propagation of a coupled saturation and pressure front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Using an asymptotic technique, valid for a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity, I derive an expression for the velocity of a propagating, coupled saturation and pressure front. Due to the nonlinearity of the governing equations, the velocity of the propagating front depends upon the magnitude of the saturation and pressure changes across the front in addition to the properties of the medium. Thus, the expression must be evaluated in conjunction with numerical reservoir simulation. The propagation of the two-phase front is governed by the background saturation distribution, the saturation-dependent component of the fluid mobility, the porosity, the permeability, the capillary pressure function, the medium compressibility, and the ratio of the slopes of the relative permeability curves. Numerical simulation of water injection into a porous layer saturated with a nonaqueous phase liquid indicates that two modes of propagation are important. The fastest mode of propagation is a pressure-dominated disturbance that travels through the saturated layer. This is followed, much later, by a coupled mode with a large saturation change. These two modes are also observed in a simulation using a heterogeneous porous layer. A comparison between the propagation times estimated from the results of the numerical simulation and predictions from the asymptotic expression indicates overall agreement.

  3. Target & Propagation Models for the FINDER Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Vaughn; Lux, James; Haque, Salmon

    2013-01-01

    Finding persons still alive in piles of rubble following an earthquake, a severe storm, or other disaster is a difficult problem. JPL is currently developing a victim detection radar called FINDER (Finding Individuals in Emergency and Response). The subject of this paper is directed toward development of propagation & target models needed for simulation & testing of such a system. These models are both physical (real rubble piles) and numerical. Early results from the numerical modeling phase show spatial and temporal spreading characteristics when signals are passed through a randomly mixed rubble pile.

  4. Laser beam propagation through random media

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Larry C

    2005-01-01

    Since publication of the first edition of this text in 1998, there have been several new, important developments in the theory of beam wave propagation through a random medium, which have been incorporated into this second edition. Also new to this edition are models for the scintillation index under moderate-to-strong irradiance fluctuations; models for aperture averaging based on ABCD ray matrices; beam wander and its effects on scintillation; theory of partial coherence of the source; models of rough targets for ladar applications; phase fluctuations; analysis of other beam shapes; plus exp

  5. Electromagnetic wave propagating along a space curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Meng-Yun; Wang, Yong-Long; Liang, Guo-Hua; Wang, Fan; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2018-03-01

    By using the thin-layer approach, we derive the effective equation for the electromagnetic wave propagating along a space curve. We find intrinsic spin-orbit, extrinsic spin-orbit, and extrinsic orbital angular-momentum and intrinsic orbital angular-momentum couplings induced by torsion, which can lead to geometric phase, spin, and orbital Hall effects. And we show the helicity inversion induced by curvature that can convert a right-handed circularly polarized electromagnetic wave into a left-handed polarized one, vice versa. Finally, we demonstrate that the gauge invariance of the effective dynamics is protected by the geometrically induced gauge potential.

  6. PROPAGATION OF NEW BLACKBERRY CULTIVARS FOR PRODUCING CERTIFIED PROPAGATION MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Isac

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study the behaviour of two new Romanian thorn blackberry cultivars DAR 24 and DAR 8 in process of micropropagation, compared with Darrow cultivar usually commercially micropropagated in our laboratory. Due to several drawbacks of the conventional propagation of Rubus, the efficiency of micropropagation was tested in order to obtain high quality planting material and to introduce rapidly these new cultivars in a certification program. Thorn blackberry cultivars DAR 8 and DAR 24 with resistance to winter colds was successfully micropropagated. Blackberry plants were found without virus infection after biological and ELISA tests. Axillary buds from the branches in full growth were used as the initial explants. After four weeks of growth, aseptic cultures was established on MS basal mineral salts, LS vitamins with 0.3 mg/l BAP, 0.1mg/l GA3 and 0.001mg/l NAA. The rate of successfully established cultures was on average 65.11%. Good proliferation of the regenerated shoots was obtained on the same medium composition used for initiation phase, whereas medium MS with mineral salts reduced to ½ and LS vitamins with 0.1 mg/l IBA and 0.1 mg/l GA3 was used in the rooting phase. Dar 24 and Dar 8 cultivars responded by good rates of micropropagation on medium culture B as compared to control Darrow cultivar, even if the obtained shoots length was lower than on medium A. The statistical analysis reveled that the highest MR (20.66 plantlets/explant was obtained for Dar 24. In this case the length of shoots was 1.92 cm. The highest rooting percentages (over 85% were obtained with shoots multiplied on medium B. High quality of rooted plants induced a high percentage of acclimatization of cultivar Dar 8, 86.36% under mist system in green house whereas the percentage of acclimatization of cultivar Dar 24 was lower, 51.85%.

  7. Mass transport in propagating patterns of convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E.; Steinberg, V.

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies of propagating waves in an oscillatory convection of binary mixtures arise questions about transport properties of this flow. Optical visualization of a field of refraction index due to a shadowgraph technique gives information on the temperature and concentration fields. However, experimental observation of rolls propagating along the cell as travelling waves (TW) does not necessarily imply that mass is transferred hydrodynamically by the convective motion along the cell. One of the possibilities discussed, e.g., is that TW observed is only a phase propagation. The traditional examples of such situations come from the domain of linear, superposition-oriented physics. Acoustic waves transfer momentum and energy, but do not cause the mass to make excursions for their equilibrium point that are larger than the oscillation amplitude. In the case of nonlinear physics we were aware that small amplitude surface waves cause only small oscillatory motion round the equilibrium point, while larger amplitudes can cause the mass to start moving in the direction of the TW. This paper discussed the different possibilities of mass transfer by TW. 27 refs., 20 figs

  8. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M and O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M and O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report

  9. Laser beam propagation generation and propagation of customized light

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ""The text is easy to read and is accompanied by beautiful illustrations. It is an excellent book for anyone working in laser beam propagation and an asset for any library.""-Optics & Photonics News, July 2014

  10. Shear wave propagation in piezoelectric-piezoelectric composite layered structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Mli Gaur

    Full Text Available The propagation behavior of shear wave in piezoelectric composite structure is investigated by two layer model presented in this approach. The composite structure comprises of piezoelectric layers of two different materials bonded alternatively. Dispersion equations are derived for propagation along the direction normal to the layering and in direction of layering. It has been revealed that thickness and elastic constants have significant influence on propagation behavior of shear wave. The phase velocity and wave number is numerically calculated for alternative layer of Polyvinylidene Difluoride (PVDF and Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT-5H in composite layered structure. The analysis carried out in this paper evaluates the effect of volume fraction on the phase velocity of shear wave.

  11. Methodologies of Uncertainty Propagation Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chojnacki, Eric

    2002-01-01

    After recalling the theoretical principle and the practical difficulties of the methodologies of uncertainty propagation calculation, the author discussed how to propagate input uncertainties. He said there were two kinds of input uncertainty: - variability: uncertainty due to heterogeneity, - lack of knowledge: uncertainty due to ignorance. It was therefore necessary to use two different propagation methods. He demonstrated this in a simple example which he generalised, treating the variability uncertainty by the probability theory and the lack of knowledge uncertainty by the fuzzy theory. He cautioned, however, against the systematic use of probability theory which may lead to unjustifiable and illegitimate precise answers. Mr Chojnacki's conclusions were that the importance of distinguishing variability and lack of knowledge increased as the problem was getting more and more complex in terms of number of parameters or time steps, and that it was necessary to develop uncertainty propagation methodologies combining probability theory and fuzzy theory

  12. Propagation engineering in wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the basic principles for understanding radio wave propagation for common frequency bands used in radio-communications. This includes achievements and developments in propagation models for wireless communication. This book is intended to bridge the gap between the theoretical calculations and approaches to the applied procedures needed for radio links design in a proper manner. The authors emphasize propagation engineering by giving fundamental information and explain the use of basic principles together with technical achievements. This new edition includes additional information on radio wave propagation in guided media and technical issues for fiber optics cable networks with several examples and problems. This book also includes a solution manual - with 90 solved examples distributed throughout the chapters - and 158 problems including practical values and assumptions.

  13. Wave propagation in electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Julian L

    1990-01-01

    This is the second work of a set of two volumes on the phenomena of wave propagation in nonreacting and reacting media. The first, entitled Wave Propagation in Solids and Fluids (published by Springer-Verlag in 1988), deals with wave phenomena in nonreacting media (solids and fluids). This book is concerned with wave propagation in reacting media-specifically, in electro­ magnetic materials. Since these volumes were designed to be relatively self­ contained, we have taken the liberty of adapting some of the pertinent material, especially in the theory of hyperbolic partial differential equations (concerned with electromagnetic wave propagation), variational methods, and Hamilton-Jacobi theory, to the phenomena of electromagnetic waves. The purpose of this volume is similar to that of the first, except that here we are dealing with electromagnetic waves. We attempt to present a clear and systematic account of the mathematical methods of wave phenomena in electromagnetic materials that will be readily accessi...

  14. Massive propagators in instanton fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.S.; Lee, C.

    1978-01-01

    Green's functions for massive spinor and vector particles propagating in a self-dual but otherwise arbitrary non-Abelian gauge field are shown to be completely determined by the corresponding Green's functions of massive scalar particles

  15. Propagation of dynamic measurement uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessling, J P

    2011-01-01

    The time-dependent measurement uncertainty has been evaluated in a number of recent publications, starting from a known uncertain dynamic model. This could be defined as the 'downward' propagation of uncertainty from the model to the targeted measurement. The propagation of uncertainty 'upward' from the calibration experiment to a dynamic model traditionally belongs to system identification. The use of different representations (time, frequency, etc) is ubiquitous in dynamic measurement analyses. An expression of uncertainty in dynamic measurements is formulated for the first time in this paper independent of representation, joining upward as well as downward propagation. For applications in metrology, the high quality of the characterization may be prohibitive for any reasonably large and robust model to pass the whiteness test. This test is therefore relaxed by not directly requiring small systematic model errors in comparison to the randomness of the characterization. Instead, the systematic error of the dynamic model is propagated to the uncertainty of the measurand, analogously but differently to how stochastic contributions are propagated. The pass criterion of the model is thereby transferred from the identification to acceptance of the total accumulated uncertainty of the measurand. This increases the relevance of the test of the model as it relates to its final use rather than the quality of the calibration. The propagation of uncertainty hence includes the propagation of systematic model errors. For illustration, the 'upward' propagation of uncertainty is applied to determine if an appliance box is damaged in an earthquake experiment. In this case, relaxation of the whiteness test was required to reach a conclusive result

  16. Photoelectric observations of propagating sunspot oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lites, B.W.; White, O.R.; Packman, D.

    1982-01-01

    The Sacramento Park Observatory Vacuum Tower Telescope and diode array were used to make repeated intensity and velocity images of a large, isolated sunspot in both a chromospheric (lambda8542 Ca II) and a photospheric (lambda5576 Fe I) line. The movie of the digital data for the chromospheric line shows clearly a relationship between the propagating umbral disturbances and the running penumbral waves. The velocities for transverse propagating of the umbral and penumbral disturbances are 60--70 km s -1 and 20--35 km s -1 , respectively. Power spectra of the oscillations show a sharp peak at a period of about 170 s in both the velocity and intensity signals. The rms velocity fluctuation of this power peak is 0.26 km s -1 . The oscillations at any given point in the sunspot are very regular, and the phase relationship between the velocity and intensity of the chromospheric oscillations is radically different than that for the quiet Sun. Our preliminary interpretation of the phase relationship involves acoustic waves with wave vector directed downwards along the magnetic field lines; however, this interpretation relies on assumptions involved in the data reduction scheme. The mechanical energy flux carried by the observed umbral disturbances does not appear to be a significant contributor to the overall energy budget of the sunspot or the surrounding active region

  17. Wave propagation downstream of a high power helicon in a dipolelike magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prager, James; Winglee, Robert; Roberson, B. Race; Ziemba, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    The wave propagating downstream of a high power helicon source in a diverging magnetic field was investigated experimentally. The magnetic field of the wave has been measured both axially and radially. The three-dimensional structure of the propagating wave is observed and its wavelength and phase velocity are determined. The measurements are compared to predictions from helicon theory and that of a freely propagating whistler wave. The implications of this work on the helicon as a thruster are also discussed.

  18. Investigations on the propagation of free surface boiling in a vertical superheated liquid column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, P.K.; Bhat, G.S.; Arakeri, V.H.

    1987-04-01

    Some experimental studies on boiling propagation in a suddenly depressurized superheated vertical liquid column are reported. The propagation velocity of this phase change has been measured using an optical method. This velocity is strongly dependent on liquid superheat, liquid purity and test section size. The measured velocities of less than 5 m s/sup -1/ are significantly lower than the sonic velocity. Present observations suggest that the dominant mechanism for boiling propagation is convection.

  19. Investigations on the propagation of free surface boiling in a vertical superheated liquid column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, P.K.; Bhat, G.S.; Arakeri, V.H.

    1987-01-01

    Some experimental studies on boiling propagation in a suddenly depressurized superheated vertical liquid column are reported. The propagation velocity of this phase change has been measured using an optical method. This velocity is strongly dependent on liquid superheat, liquid purity and test section size. The measured velocities of less than 5 m s -1 are significantly lower than the sonic velocity. Present observations suggest that the dominant mechanism for boiling propagation is convection. (author)

  20. Development and propagation of a pollution gradient in the marine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The development and propagation of a pollution gradient in the marine boundary layer over the Arabian Sea during the Intensive Field Phase of the Indian Ocean Experiment (1999) is investigated. A hypothesis for the generation of the pollution gradient is presented. Infrared satellite images show the formation of the ...

  1. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis and magnetic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ni–Zn ferrite powders were synthesized by self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) method. X-ray diffraction, TEM and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) were used to characterize the phase composition, microstructure and magnetic properties of the combustion products. The effect of the combustion ...

  2. Cluster Characteristics in a MIMO Indoor Propagation Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czink, Nicolai; Yin, Xuefeng; Ozcelik, Huseyin

    2007-01-01

    , strong (obstructed-)line-of-sight clusters show Rician fading, corresponding to few dominant propagation paths, whereas most clusters exhibit Rayleigh fading, corresponding to many paths with approximately equal powers and uncorrelated phases. Root-mean-square cluster azimuth spreads (CASs) were...

  3. Wideband satellite phase coherent beacon observations at auroral and equatorial latitudes - A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rino, C.L.; Livingston, R.C.; Cousins, M.D.; Fair, B.C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of some of the principal results from the first two years of operation of the Wideband satellite which transmits phase-coherent signals from S-band to VHF. The auroral zone data show narrow regions of enhanced scintillation well equatorward of the discrete aurora. Such enhancements can be explained as a purely geometrical effect if the irregularities within the major precipitation regions have a sheet-like structure. Evidence of a localized irregularity source at the poleward boundary of the plasma trough is also found. Model computations are discussed and applied to the interpretation of equatorial data

  4. Group symmetries and information propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draayer, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Spectroscopy concerns itself with the ways in which the Hamiltonian and other interesting operators defined in few-particle spaces are determined or determine properties of many-particle systems. But the action of the central limit theorem (CLT) filters the transmission of information between source and observed so whether propagating forward from a few-particle defining space, as is usual in theoretical studies, or projecting backward to it from measured things, each is only sensitive to averaged properties of the other. Our concern is with the propagation of spectroscopic information in the presence of good symmetries when filtering action of the CLT is effective. Specifically, we propose to address the question, What propagates and how. We begin with some examples, using both scalar and isospin geometries to illustrate simple propagation. Examples of matrix propagation are studied; contact with standard tensor algebra is established and an algorithm put forward for the expansion of any operator in terms of another set, complete or not; shell-model results for 20 Ne using a realistic interaction and two trace-equivalent forms are presented; and some further challenges are mentioned

  5. Role of Compressibility on Tsunami Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolali, Ali; Kirby, James T.

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, we aim to reduce the discrepancies between tsunami arrival times evaluated from tsunami models and real measurements considering the role of ocean compressibility. We perform qualitative studies to reveal the phase speed reduction rate via a modified version of the Mild Slope Equation for Weakly Compressible fluid (MSEWC) proposed by Sammarco et al. (2013). The model is validated against a 3-D computational model. Physical properties of surface gravity waves are studied and compared with those for waves evaluated from an incompressible flow solver over realistic geometry for 2011 Tohoku-oki event, revealing reduction in phase speed.Plain Language SummarySubmarine earthquakes and submarine mass failures (SMFs), can generate long gravitational waves (or tsunamis) that propagate at the free surface. Tsunami waves can travel long distances and are known for their dramatic effects on coastal areas. Nowadays, numerical models are used to reconstruct the tsunamigenic events for many scientific and socioeconomic aspects i.e. Tsunami Early Warning Systems, inundation mapping, risk and hazard analysis, etc. A number of typically neglected parameters in these models cause discrepancies between model outputs and observations. Most of the tsunami models predict tsunami arrival times at distant stations slightly early in comparison to observations. In this study, we show how ocean compressibility would affect the tsunami wave propagation speed. In this framework, an efficient two-dimensional model equation for the weakly compressible ocean has been developed, validated and tested for simplified and real cases against three dimensional and incompressible solvers. Taking the effect of compressibility, the phase speed of surface gravity waves is reduced compared to that of an incompressible fluid. Then, we used the model for the case of devastating Tohoku-Oki 2011 tsunami event, improving the model accuracy. This study sheds light for future model development

  6. Signal propagation along the axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Sylvain; Zbili, Mickaël; Debanne, Dominique

    2018-03-08

    Axons link distant brain regions and are usually considered as simple transmission cables in which reliable propagation occurs once an action potential has been generated. Safe propagation of action potentials relies on specific ion channel expression at strategic points of the axon such as nodes of Ranvier or axonal branch points. However, while action potentials are generally considered as the quantum of neuronal information, their signaling is not entirely digital. In fact, both their shape and their conduction speed have been shown to be modulated by activity, leading to regulations of synaptic latency and synaptic strength. We report here newly identified mechanisms of (1) safe spike propagation along the axon, (2) compartmentalization of action potential shape in the axon, (3) analog modulation of spike-evoked synaptic transmission and (4) alteration in conduction time after persistent regulation of axon morphology in central neurons. We discuss the contribution of these regulations in information processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Propagation of Sound in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, M.R.; Kurn, D.M.; Miesner, H.; Durfee, D.S.; Townsend, C.G.; Inouye, S.; Ketterle, W.

    1997-01-01

    Sound propagation has been studied in a magnetically trapped dilute Bose-Einstein condensate. Localized excitations were induced by suddenly modifying the trapping potential using the optical dipole force of a focused laser beam. The resulting propagation of sound was observed using a novel technique, rapid sequencing of nondestructive phase-contrast images. The speed of sound was determined as a function of density and found to be consistent with Bogoliubov theory. This method may generally be used to observe high-lying modes and perhaps second sound. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  8. Wave propagation in electromagnetic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is concerned with wave propagation in reacting media, specifically in electromagnetic materials. An account is presented of the mathematical methods of wave phenomena in electromagnetic materials. The author presents the theory of time-varying electromagnetic fields, which involves a discussion of Faraday's laws, Maxwell's equations and their application to electromagnetic wave propagation under a variety of conditions. The author gives a discussion of magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics. Chapters are included on quantum mechanics and the theory of relativity. The mathematical foundation of electromagnetic waves vis a vis partial differential equations is discussed

  9. Vegetative propagation of Bambusa vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Malfitano Braga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo is an important source of raw material of multiple uses. The development of simple techniques for its propagation is a practical way to enable its implementation in ownership of low technology. The present work had the objective of evaluating artisanal propagation methods for Bambusa vulgaris. Two types of propagules were tested, with buds budded or not, and three relative positions to the removal of vegetative material on the culm. The best propagule was with only one node, extracted from the lower thirds of the stem, presenting 72% of rooting. This result demonstrates its potential for seedling production of this species under low tech.

  10. Nonequilibrium theory of flame propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzhanov, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    The nonequilibrium theory of flame propagation is considered as applied to the following three processes of wave propagation: the combustion waves of the second kind, the combustion waves with broad reaction zones, and the combustion waves with chemical stages. Kinetic and combustion wave parameters are presented for different in composition mixtures of boron and transition metals, such as Zr, Hf, Ti, Nb, Ta, Mo, as well as for the Ta-N, Zr-C-H, Nb-B-O systems to illustrate specific features of the above-mentioned processes [ru

  11. Can Electron Propagator Methods Be Used To Improve Polarization Propagator Methods?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2008-01-01

    Calculations of Rydberg excitation energies with the second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) often produce results which are more in error than the random phase approximation (RPA), which formally is the first-order model. This is obviously because of cancellation of errors...... at the RPA level. On the other hand, valence excitation energies behave as expected, and they are systematically improved in SOPPA compared to RPA. Note that a Rydberg series is related to one of the ionization thresholds of the molecule, and it is thus obvious that a good description of the ionization...

  12. Earthquake wave propagation in immiscibly compressible porous soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, S.; Kurita, S.; Izumi, M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper utilizes the formalism of the theory of immiscible compressible mixtures to formulate the wave propagation equation for the soil where the soil has been assumed as a binary mixture consisting of one solid phase and one fluid phase. The method is developed to solve the one dimensional wave equation by the above theory. The relations between the wave attenuating characteristic value Q and the volume fraction, the relative motion of two phases have been shown. It is concluded that based on such theory we can solve more precisely the soil behaviors while considering the interaction of structure and soil of immiscible mixture. (author)

  13. Temperature dependency of external stress corrosion crack propagation of 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashibara, Hitoshi; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Mayuzumi, Masami; Tani, Jun-ichi

    2010-01-01

    Temperature dependency of external stress corrosion cracking (ESCC) of 304 stainless steel was examined with CT specimens. Maximum ESCC propagation rates appeared in the early phase of ESCC propagation. ESCC propagation rates generally became smaller as testing time advance. Temperature dependency of maximum ESCC propagation rate was analyzed with Arrhenius plot, and apparent activation energy was similar to that of SCC in chloride solutions. Temperature dependency of macroscopic ESCC incubation time was different from that of ESCC propagation rate. Anodic current density of 304 stainless steel was also examined by anodic polarization measurement. Temperature dependency of critical current density of active state in artificial sea water solution of pH=1.3 was similar to that of ESCC propagation rate. (author)

  14. Physics of Earthquake Rupture Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiqing; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Sagy, Amir; Doan, Mai-Linh

    2018-05-01

    A comprehensive understanding of earthquake rupture propagation requires the study of not only the sudden release of elastic strain energy during co-seismic slip, but also of other processes that operate at a variety of spatiotemporal scales. For example, the accumulation of the elastic strain energy usually takes decades to hundreds of years, and rupture propagation and termination modify the bulk properties of the surrounding medium that can influence the behavior of future earthquakes. To share recent findings in the multiscale investigation of earthquake rupture propagation, we held a session entitled "Physics of Earthquake Rupture Propagation" during the 2016 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco. The session included 46 poster and 32 oral presentations, reporting observations of natural earthquakes, numerical and experimental simulations of earthquake ruptures, and studies of earthquake fault friction. These presentations and discussions during and after the session suggested a need to document more formally the research findings, particularly new observations and views different from conventional ones, complexities in fault zone properties and loading conditions, the diversity of fault slip modes and their interactions, the evaluation of observational and model uncertainties, and comparison between empirical and physics-based models. Therefore, we organize this Special Issue (SI) of Tectonophysics under the same title as our AGU session, hoping to inspire future investigations. Eighteen articles (marked with "this issue") are included in this SI and grouped into the following six categories.

  15. Invisibility cloaking without superluminal propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perczel, Janos; Leonhardt, Ulf [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Tyc, Tomas, E-mail: jp394@st-andrews.ac.uk, E-mail: tomtyc@physics.muni.cz, E-mail: ulf@st-andrews.ac.uk [Faculty of Science, Kotlarska 2 and Faculty of Informatics, Botanicka 68a, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    Conventional cloaking based on Euclidean transformation optics requires that the speed of light should tend to infinity on the inner surface of the cloak. Non-Euclidean cloaking still needs media with superluminal propagation. Here we show by giving an example that this is no longer necessary.

  16. Propagating Class and Method Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    1999-01-01

    number of implicit combinations. For example, it is possible to specify separate aspects of a family of classes, and then combine several aspects into a full-fledged class family. The combination expressions would explicitly combine whole-family aspects, and by propagation implicitly combine the aspects...

  17. Bayesian Image Segmentations by Potts Prior and Loopy Belief Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Kataoka, Shun; Yasuda, Muneki; Waizumi, Yuji; Hsu, Chiou-Ting

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a Bayesian image segmentation model based on Potts prior and loopy belief propagation. The proposed Bayesian model involves several terms, including the pairwise interactions of Potts models, and the average vectors and covariant matrices of Gauss distributions in color image modeling. These terms are often referred to as hyperparameters in statistical machine learning theory. In order to determine these hyperparameters, we propose a new scheme for hyperparameter estimation based on conditional maximization of entropy in the Potts prior. The algorithm is given based on loopy belief propagation. In addition, we compare our conditional maximum entropy framework with the conventional maximum likelihood framework, and also clarify how the first order phase transitions in loopy belief propagations for Potts models influence our hyperparameter estimation procedures.

  18. Propagation properties of the chirped Airy beams through the gradient-index medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liyan; Zhang, Jianbin; Pang, Zihao; Wang, Linyi; Zhong, Tianfen; Yang, Xiangbo; Deng, Dongmei

    2017-11-01

    Through analytical derivation and numerical analysis, the propagation properties of the chirped Airy(CAi) beams in the gradient-index medium are investigated. The intensity and the phase distributions, the propagation trajectory and the Poynting vector of the CAi beams are demonstrated to investigate the propagation properties. Owing to the special and symmetrical refractive index profile of the gradient-index medium, the CAi beams propagate periodically. The effects of the distribution factor and the chirped parameter on the propagation of the CAi beams are analyzed. As the increasing of the distribution factor, the intensity distribution of the CAi beams is more scattering. However, with the chirped parameter increasing, the focusing property of the CAi beams strengthens. The variation of the chirped parameter can change the position of the peak intensity maximum, but it cannot alter the period of the peak intensity. The variations of the initial phase and the energy of the beams in the transverse plane expedite accordingly.

  19. Quark Loop Effects on Dressed Gluon Propagator in Framework of Global Color Symmetry Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; SUN Wei-Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the global color symmetry model (GCM), a method for obtaining the quark loop effects on the dressed gluon propagator in GCM is developed. In the chiral limit, it is found that the dressed gluon propagator containing the quark loop effects in the Nambu-Goldstone and Wigner phases are quite different. In solving the quark self-energy functions in the two different phases and subsequent study of bag constant one should use the above dressed gluon propagator as input. The above approach for obtaining the current quark mass effects on the dressed gluon propagator is quite general and can also be used to calculate the chemical potential dependence of the dressed gluon propagator.

  20. Propagation and diffraction of optical vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Pascal; Skelton, Susan E.; Leburn, Christopher G.; Streuber, Casey T.; Wright, Ewan M.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2008-01-01

    We explore the propagation and diffraction of optical vortices (Laguerre-Gaussian beams) of varying azimuthal index past a circular obstacle and Young's double slits. When the beam and obstacle centers are aligned the famous spot of Arago, which arises for zero azimuthal index, is replaced for non-zero azimuthal indices by a dark spot of Arago, a simple consequence of the conserved phase singularity at the beam center. We explore how for larger azimuthal indices, as the beam and obstacle centers are progressively misaligned, the central dark spot breaks up into several dark spots of Arago. Using Young's double slits we can easily measure the azimuthal index of the vortex beam, even for polychromatic vortices generated by broadband supercontinuum radiation

  1. Propagation of an ionizing surface electromagnetic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boev, A.G.; Prokopov, A.V.

    1976-11-01

    The propagation of an rf surface wave in a plasma which is ionized by the wave itself is analyzed. The exact solution of the nonlinear Maxwell equations is discussed for the case in which the density of plasma electrons is an exponential function of the square of the electric field. The range over which the surface wave exists and the frequency dependence of the phase velocity are found. A detailed analysis is given for the case of a plasma whose initial density exceeds the critical density at the wave frequency. An increase in the wave amplitude is shown to expand the frequency range over which the plasma is transparent; The energy flux in the plasma tends toward a certain finite value which is governed by the effective ionization field.

  2. The directional propagation characteristics of elastic wave in two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jihong; Yu, Dianlong; Wang Gang; Zhao Honggang; Liu Yaozong; Wen Xisen

    2007-01-01

    The directional propagation characteristics of elastic wave during pass bands in two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals are analyzed by using the lumped-mass method to yield the phase constant surface. The directions and regions of wave propagation in phononic crystals for certain frequencies during pass bands are predicted with the iso-frequency contour lines of the phase constant surface, which are then validated with the harmonic responses of a finite two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals with 16x16 unit cells. These results are useful for controlling the wave propagation in the pass bands of phononic crystals

  3. Realtime identification of the propagation direction of received echoes in long range ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Myoung Seon; Heo, Won Nyoung

    2013-01-01

    In long range ultrasonic testing, a phased array probe composed of multiple identical transducers with an uniform interval of one quarter wavelength is usually used for the transmission or reception directivity control. This paper shows that the propagation directions of individual echoes can be identified in real time by displaying the inputs of a process for summing the constitution reception signals after compensating the phase difference due to the transducer interval, together with the output of the process. A constructive interference of the constitution echoes indicates a forward direction echo propagating along an intended direction while a destructive interference implies a reverse direction echo propagating along the direction opposite to the intended one

  4. Nonlinear propagation of ultrashort laser pulses in transparent media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincotte, A.

    2006-10-01

    We present different aspects of the propagation of ultrashort laser pulses in transparent media. First, we derive the propagation equations starting from the Maxwell equations. We remind of the main physical phenomena undergone by ultrashort and powerful laser pulses. First self-focusing occurs, owing to the Kerr response of the medium. This self-focusing is stopped by plasma generation from the laser-induced ionization of the ambient atoms. The propagation of the wave generates a super-continuum through self-phase modulation. We recall the main results concerning the simple and multiple filamentation of an intense wave, induced by the beam inhomogeneities and which take place as soon as the beam power is above critical. In a second part, we investigate the influence of high-order nonlinearities on the propagation of the beam and especially on its filamentation pattern. To control the multi-filamentation process, we investigate in a third part the propagation of beams with special designs, namely; Gradient- and vortex-shaped beams. We justify the robustness of this latter kind of optical objects. Eventually, we investigate multi-filamentation patterns of femtosecond pulses in a fog tube and in cells of ethanol doped with coumarin, for different beam configurations. (author)

  5. Equilibrium Propagation: Bridging the Gap between Energy-Based Models and Backpropagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Scellier

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce Equilibrium Propagation, a learning framework for energy-based models. It involves only one kind of neural computation, performed in both the first phase (when the prediction is made and the second phase of training (after the target or prediction error is revealed. Although this algorithm computes the gradient of an objective function just like Backpropagation, it does not need a special computation or circuit for the second phase, where errors are implicitly propagated. Equilibrium Propagation shares similarities with Contrastive Hebbian Learning and Contrastive Divergence while solving the theoretical issues of both algorithms: our algorithm computes the gradient of a well-defined objective function. Because the objective function is defined in terms of local perturbations, the second phase of Equilibrium Propagation corresponds to only nudging the prediction (fixed point or stationary distribution toward a configuration that reduces prediction error. In the case of a recurrent multi-layer supervised network, the output units are slightly nudged toward their target in the second phase, and the perturbation introduced at the output layer propagates backward in the hidden layers. We show that the signal “back-propagated” during this second phase corresponds to the propagation of error derivatives and encodes the gradient of the objective function, when the synaptic update corresponds to a standard form of spike-timing dependent plasticity. This work makes it more plausible that a mechanism similar to Backpropagation could be implemented by brains, since leaky integrator neural computation performs both inference and error back-propagation in our model. The only local difference between the two phases is whether synaptic changes are allowed or not. We also show experimentally that multi-layer recurrently connected networks with 1, 2, and 3 hidden layers can be trained by Equilibrium Propagation on the permutation-invariant MNIST

  6. Low frequency piezoresonance defined dynamic control of terahertz wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Moumita; Betal, Soutik; Peralta, Xomalin G.; Bhalla, Amar S.; Guo, Ruyan

    2016-11-01

    Phase modulators are one of the key components of many applications in electromagnetic and opto-electric wave propagations. Phase-shifters play an integral role in communications, imaging and in coherent material excitations. In order to realize the terahertz (THz) electromagnetic spectrum as a fully-functional bandwidth, the development of a family of efficient THz phase modulators is needed. Although there have been quite a few attempts to implement THz phase modulators based on quantum-well structures, liquid crystals, or meta-materials, significantly improved sensitivity and dynamic control for phase modulation, as we believe can be enabled by piezoelectric-resonance devices, is yet to be investigated. In this article we provide an experimental demonstration of phase modulation of THz beam by operating a ferroelectric single crystal LiNbO3 film device at the piezo-resonance. The piezo-resonance, excited by an external a.c. electric field, develops a coupling between electromagnetic and lattice-wave and this coupling governs the wave propagation of the incident THz beam by modulating its phase transfer function. We report the understanding developed in this work can facilitate the design and fabrication of a family of resonance-defined highly sensitive and extremely low energy sub-millimeter wave sensors and modulators.

  7. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd [Institute for Composite Materials (IVW GmbH) Technical University of Kaiserslautern, 67633 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2016-05-18

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  8. Statistical estimation of ultrasonic propagation path parameters for aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, Robert C; Astheimer, Jeffrey P

    2005-05-01

    Parameters in a linear filter model for ultrasonic propagation are found using statistical estimation. The model uses an inhomogeneous-medium Green's function that is decomposed into a homogeneous-transmission term and a path-dependent aberration term. Power and cross-power spectra of random-medium scattering are estimated over the frequency band of the transmit-receive system by using closely situated scattering volumes. The frequency-domain magnitude of the aberration is obtained from a normalization of the power spectrum. The corresponding phase is reconstructed from cross-power spectra of subaperture signals at adjacent receive positions by a recursion. The subapertures constrain the receive sensitivity pattern to eliminate measurement system phase contributions. The recursion uses a Laplacian-based algorithm to obtain phase from phase differences. Pulse-echo waveforms were acquired from a point reflector and a tissue-like scattering phantom through a tissue-mimicking aberration path from neighboring volumes having essentially the same aberration path. Propagation path aberration parameters calculated from the measurements of random scattering through the aberration phantom agree with corresponding parameters calculated for the same aberrator and array position by using echoes from the point reflector. The results indicate the approach describes, in addition to time shifts, waveform amplitude and shape changes produced by propagation through distributed aberration under realistic conditions.

  9. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  10. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  11. The propagator of stochastic electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalleri, G.

    1981-01-01

    The "elementary propagator" for the position of a free charged particle subject to the zero-point electromagnetic field with Lorentz-invariant spectral density ~ω3 is obtained. The nonstationary process for the position is solved by the stationary process for the acceleration. The dispersion of the position elementary propagator is compared with that of quantum electrodynamics. Finally, the evolution of the probability density is obtained starting from an initial distribution confined in a small volume and with a Gaussian distribution in the velocities. The resulting probability density for the position turns out to be equal, to within radiative corrections, to ψψ* where ψ is the Kennard wave packet. If the radiative corrections are retained, the present result is new since the corresponding expression in quantum electrodynamics has not yet been found. Besides preceding quantum electrodynamics for this problem, no renormalization is required in stochastic electrodynamics.

  12. Interprocedural Analysis with Lazy Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon Holm; Møller, Anders; Thiemann, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We propose lazy propagation as a technique for flow- and context-sensitive interprocedural analysis of programs with objects and first-class functions where transfer functions may not be distributive. The technique is described formally as a systematic modification of a variant of the monotone fr...... framework and its theoretical properties are shown. It is implemented in a type analysis tool for JavaScript where it results in a significant improvement in performance....

  13. Crack propagation in dynamic thermoelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    We study the singular thermoelastic fields near the crack tip, in the linear strain assumption. The equations are coupled and non linear. The asymptotic expansions of the displacement and the temperature are given for the first and the second order. It is shown that the temperature is singular when the crack propagates. However, this field does not change the dominant singularity of the mechanical field which is the same as that obtained in the theory of isothermal elasticity [fr

  14. Information Propagation on Permissionless Blockchains

    OpenAIRE

    Ersoy, Oguzhan; Ren, Zhijie; Erkin, Zekeriya; Lagendijk, Reginald L.

    2017-01-01

    Blockchain technology, as a decentralized and non-hierarchical platform, has the potential to replace centralized systems. Yet, there are several challenges inherent in the blockchain structure. One of the deficiencies of the existing blockchains is a convenient information propagation technique enhancing incentive-compatibility and bandwidth efficiency. The transition from a centralized system into distributed one brings along game theoretical concerns. Especially for the permissionless bloc...

  15. Quantum noise and superluminal propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, Bilha; Milonni, Peter W.; Babb, James F.; Chiao, Raymond Y.

    2000-01-01

    Causal ''superluminal'' effects have recently been observed and discussed in various contexts. The question arises whether such effects could be observed with extremely weak pulses, and what would prevent the observation of an ''optical tachyon.'' Aharonov, Reznik, and Stern (ARS) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2190 (1998)] have argued that quantum noise will preclude the observation of a superluminal group velocity when the pulse consists of one or a few photons. In this paper we reconsider this question both in a general framework and in the specific example, suggested by Chiao, Kozhekin, and Kurizki (CKK) [Phys. Rev. 77, 1254 (1996)], of off-resonant, short-pulse propagation in an optical amplifier. We derive in the case of the amplifier a signal-to-noise ratio that is consistent with the general ARS conclusions when we impose their criteria for distinguishing between superluminal propagation and propagation at the speed c. However, results consistent with the semiclassical arguments of CKK are obtained if weaker criteria are imposed, in which case the signal can exceed the noise without being ''exponentially large.'' We show that the quantum fluctuations of the field considered by ARS are closely related to superfluorescence noise. More generally, we consider the implications of unitarity for superluminal propagation and quantum noise and study, in addition to the complete and truncated wave packets considered by ARS, the residual wave packet formed by their difference. This leads to the conclusion that the noise is mostly luminal and delayed with respect to the superluminal signal. In the limit of a very weak incident signal pulse, the superluminal signal will be dominated by the noise part, and the signal-to-noise ratio will therefore be very small. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  16. Propagation functions in pseudoparticle fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.S.; Carlitz, R.D.; Creamer, D.B.; Lee, C.

    1978-01-01

    The Green's functions for massless spinor and vector particles propagating in a self-dual but otherwise arbitrary non-Abelian gauge field are shown to be completely determined by the corrresponding Green's functions of scalar particles. Simple, explicit algebraic expressions are constructed for the scalar Green's functions of isospin-1/2 and isospin-1 particles in the self-dual field of a configuration of n pseudoparticles described by 5n arbitrary parameters

  17. Near-earth Thin Current Sheets and Birkeland Currents during Substorm Growth Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorin Zaharia; Cheng, C.Z.

    2003-01-01

    Two important phenomena observed during the magnetospheric substorm growth phase are modeled: the formation of a near-Earth (|X| ∼ 9 R E ) thin cross-tail current sheet, as well as the equatorward shift of the ionospheric Birkeland currents. Our study is performed by solving the 3-D force-balance equation with realistic boundary conditions and pressure distributions. The results show a cross-tail current sheet with large current (J φ ∼ 10 nA/m 2 ) and very high plasma β (β ∼ 40) between 7 and 10 R E . The obtained region-1 and region-2 Birkeland currents, formed on closed field lines due to pressure gradients, move equatorward and become more intense (J parallel max ∼ 3 (micro)A/m 2 ) compared to quiet times. Both results are in agreement with substorm growth phase observations. Our results also predict that the cross-tail current sheet maps into the ionosphere in the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents

  18. Uncertainty propagation in probabilistic safety analysis of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, P.V.

    1981-09-01

    The uncertainty propagation in probabilistic safety analysis of nuclear power plants, is done. The methodology of the minimal cut is implemented in the computer code SVALON and the results for several cases are compared with corresponding results obtained with the SAMPLE code, which employs the Monte Carlo method to propagate the uncertanties. The results have show that, for a relatively small number of dominant minimal cut sets (n approximately 25) and error factors (r approximately 5) the SVALON code yields results which are comparable to those obtained with SAMPLE. An analysis of the unavailability of the low pressure recirculation system of Angra 1 for both the short and long term recirculation phases, are presented. The results for the short term phase are in good agreement with the corresponding one given in WASH-1400. (E.G.) [pt

  19. Quasi-Airy beams along tunable propagation trajectories and directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yixian; Zhang, Site

    2016-05-02

    We present a theoretical and experimental exhibit that accelerates quasi-Airy beams propagating along arbitrarily appointed parabolic trajectories and directions in free space. We also demonstrate that such quasi-Airy beams can be generated by a tunable phase pattern, where two disturbance factors are introduced. The topological structures of quasi-Airy beams are readily manipulated with tunable phase patterns. Quasi-Airy beams still possess the characteristics of non-diffraction, self-healing to some extent, although they are not the solutions for paraxial wave equation. The experiments show the results are consistent with theoretical predictions. It is believed that the property of propagation along arbitrarily desired parabolic trajectories will provide a broad application in trapping atom and living cell manipulation.

  20. Propagating separable equalities in an MDD store

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadzic, Tarik; Hooker, John N.; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We present a propagator that achieves MDD consistency for a separable equality over an MDD (multivalued decision diagram) store in pseudo-polynomial time. We integrate the propagator into a constraint solver based on an MDD store introduced in [1]. Our experiments show that the new propagator pro...... provides substantial computational advantage over propagation of two inequality constraints, and that the advantage increases when the maximum width of the MDD store increases....

  1. Geometry of duskside equatorial current during magnetic storm main phase as deduced from magnetospheric and low-altitude observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dubyagin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a coordinated study of the moderate magnetic storm on 22 July 2009. The THEMIS and GOES observations of magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere were complemented by energetic particle observations at low altitude by the six NOAA POES satellites. Observations in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit revealed a relatively thin (half-thickness of less than 1 RE and intense current sheet in the dusk MLT sector during the main phase of the storm. The total westward current (integrated along the z-direction on the duskside at r ~ 6.6 RE was comparable to that in the midnight sector. Such a configuration cannot be adequately described by existing magnetic field models with predefined current systems (error in B > 60 nT. At the same time, low-altitude isotropic boundaries (IB of > 80 keV protons in the dusk sector were shifted ~ 4° equatorward relative to the IBs in the midnight sector. Both the equatorward IB shift and the current strength on the duskside correlate with the Sym-H* index. These findings imply a close relation between the current intensification and equatorward IB shift in the dusk sector. The analysis of IB dispersion revealed that high-energy IBs (E > 100 keV always exhibit normal dispersion (i.e., that for pitch angle scattering on curved field lines. Anomalous dispersion is sometimes observed in the low-energy channels (~ 30–100 keV. The maximum occurrence rate of anomalous dispersion was observed during the main phase of the storm in the dusk sector.

  2. Spatiotemporal Propagation of the Cortical Atrophy: Population and Individual Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Koval

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Repeated failures in clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD have raised a strong interest for the prodromal phase of the disease. A better understanding of the brain alterations during this early phase is crucial to diagnose patients sooner, to estimate an accurate disease stage, and to give a reliable prognosis. According to recent evidence, structural alterations in the brain are likely to be sensitive markers of the disease progression. Neuronal loss translates in specific spatiotemporal patterns of cortical atrophy, starting in the enthorinal cortex and spreading over other cortical regions according to specific propagation pathways. We developed a digital model of the cortical atrophy in the left hemisphere from prodromal to diseased phases, which is built on the temporal alignment and combination of several short-term observation data to reconstruct the long-term history of the disease. The model not only provides a description of the spatiotemporal patterns of cortical atrophy at the group level but also shows the variability of these patterns at the individual level in terms of difference in propagation pathways, speed of propagation, and age at propagation onset. Longitudinal MRI datasets of patients with mild cognitive impairments who converted to AD are used to reconstruct the cortical atrophy propagation across all disease stages. Each observation is considered as a signal spatially distributed on a network, such as the cortical mesh, each cortex location being associated to a node. We consider how the temporal profile of the signal varies across the network nodes. We introduce a statistical mixed-effect model to describe the evolution of the cortex alterations. To ensure a spatiotemporal smooth propagation of the alterations, we introduce a constrain on the propagation signal in the model such that neighboring nodes have similar profiles of the signal changes. Our generative model enables the reconstruction of personalized

  3. Fast Heat Pulse Propagation by Turbulence Spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Mantica, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of a cold pulse initiated by edge cooling in JET is compared to propagation of the heat wave originating from a modulation of the heating source roughly at mid radius. It is found that the propagation of the cold pulse is by far faster than what could be predicted on the basis of ...

  4. Tidal propagation off the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    . [Keywords: Tidal propagation, Mumbai high, Global tidal model, Shelf model, Central west coast of India] Introduction In coastal regions, tides play an important role in determining circulation and hydrography. Barotropic tides coming from the open... with increase in the width of the shelf. Materials and Methods Global tidal models Schwiderski5 used a hydrodynamic interpolation technique to determine the amplitude and phase of tidal constituents of global ocean. Since the availability of satellite...

  5. Schroedinger propagation of initial discontinuities leads to divergence of moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchewka, A.; Schuss, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We show that the large phase expansion of the Schroedinger propagation of an initially discontinuous wave function leads to the divergence of average energy, momentum, and displacement, rendering them unphysical states. If initially discontinuous wave functions are considered to be approximations to continuous ones, the determinant of the spreading rate of these averages is the maximal gradient of the initial wave function. Therefore a dilemma arises between the inclusion of discontinuous wave functions in quantum mechanics and the requirement of finite moments.

  6. Schroedinger propagation of initial discontinuities leads to divergence of moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchewka, A., E-mail: avi.marchewka@gmail.co [Ruppin Academic Center, Emek-Hefer 40250 (Israel); Schuss, Z., E-mail: schuss@post.tau.ac.i [Department of Mathematics, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv, 69978 Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2009-09-21

    We show that the large phase expansion of the Schroedinger propagation of an initially discontinuous wave function leads to the divergence of average energy, momentum, and displacement, rendering them unphysical states. If initially discontinuous wave functions are considered to be approximations to continuous ones, the determinant of the spreading rate of these averages is the maximal gradient of the initial wave function. Therefore a dilemma arises between the inclusion of discontinuous wave functions in quantum mechanics and the requirement of finite moments.

  7. Search for fourth sound propagation in supersolid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Y.; Kojima, H.; Lin, X.

    2008-01-01

    A systematic study is carried out to search for fourth sound propagation solid 4 He samples below 500 mK down to 40 mK between 25 and 56 bar using the techniques of heat pulse generator and titanium superconducting transition edge bolometer. If solid 4 He is endowed with superfluidity below 200 mK, as indicated by recent torsional oscillator experiments, theories predict fourth sound propagation in such a supersolid state. If found, fourth sound would provide convincing evidence for superfluidity and a new tool for studying the new phase. The search for a fourth sound-like mode is based on the response of the bolometers to heat pulses traveling through cylindrical samples of solids grown with different crystal qualities. Bolometers with increasing sensitivity are constructed. The heater generator amplitude is reduced to the sensitivity limit to search for any critical velocity effects. The fourth sound velocity is expected to vary as ∞ √ Ρ s /ρ. Searches for a signature in the bolometer response with such a characteristic temperature dependence are made. The measured response signal has not so far revealed any signature of a new propagating mode within a temperature excursion of 5 μK from the background signal shape. Possible reasons for this negative result are discussed. Prior to the fourth sound search, the temperature dependence of heat pulse propagation was studied as it transformed from 'second sound' in the normal solid 4 He to transverse ballistic phonon propagation. Our work extends the studies of [V. Narayanamurti and R. C. Dynes, Phys. Rev. B 12, 1731 (1975)] to higher pressures and to lower temperatures. The measured transverse ballistic phonon propagation velocity is found to remain constant (within the 0.3% scatter of the data) below 100 mK at all pressures and reveals no indication of an onset of supersolidity. The overall dynamic thermal response of solid to heat input is found to depend strongly on the sample preparation procedure

  8. The propagator of quantum gravity in minisuperspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louko, J.

    1985-04-01

    We study the quantum gravitational propagation amplitude between two spacelike three-surfaces in minisuperspaces where the supermomentum constraints are identically satisfied. We derive a well-defined path integral formula for the propagator and show that the propagator is an inverse of the canonical Hamiltonian operator. In an exactly solvable deSitter minisuperspace model the propagator is found to obey semi-classically correct boundary conditions. We discuss the implications for the full theory and suggest an approach to unravelling the physical meaning of the propagator. (orig.)

  9. Tropospheric radiowave propagation beyond the horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Du Castel, François

    1966-01-01

    Tropospheric Radiowave Propagation Beyond the Horizon deals with developments concerning the tropospheric propagation of ultra-short radio waves beyond the horizon, with emphasis on the relationship between the theoretical and the experimental. Topics covered include the general conditions of propagation in the troposphere; general characteristics of propagation beyond the horizon; and attenuation in propagation. This volume is comprised of six chapters and begins with a brief historical look at the various stages that have brought the technique of transhorizon links to its state of developmen

  10. Light propagation in linear optical media

    CERN Document Server

    Gillen, Glen D; Guha, Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    Light Propagation in Linear Optical Media describes light propagation in linear media by expanding on diffraction theories beyond what is available in classic optics books. In one volume, this book combines the treatment of light propagation through various media, interfaces, and apertures using scalar and vector diffraction theories. After covering the fundamentals of light and physical optics, the authors discuss light traveling within an anisotropic crystal and present mathematical models for light propagation across planar boundaries between different media. They describe the propagation o

  11. Lateral stress-induced propagation characteristics in photonic crystal fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Hong-Da; Yu Zhong-Yuan; Han Li-Hong; Liu Yu-Min

    2009-01-01

    Using the finite element method, this paper investigates lateral stress-induced propagation characteristics in a pho-tonic crystal fibre of hexagonal symmetry. The results of simulation show the strong stress dependence of effective index of the fundamental guided mode, phase modal birefringence and confinement loss. It also finds that the contribution of the geometrical effect that is related only to deformation of the photonic crystal fibre and the stress-related contribution to phase modal birefringence and confinement loss are entirely different. Furthermore, polarization-dependent stress sensitivity of confinement loss is proposed in this paper.

  12. Radio wave propagation and parabolic equation modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Apaydin, Gokhan

    2018-01-01

    A thorough understanding of electromagnetic wave propagation is fundamental to the development of sophisticated communication and detection technologies. The powerful numerical methods described in this book represent a major step forward in our ability to accurately model electromagnetic wave propagation in order to establish and maintain reliable communication links, to detect targets in radar systems, and to maintain robust mobile phone and broadcasting networks. The first new book on guided wave propagation modeling and simulation to appear in nearly two decades, Radio Wave Propagation and Parabolic Equation Modeling addresses the fundamentals of electromagnetic wave propagation generally, with a specific focus on radio wave propagation through various media. The authors explore an array of new applications, and detail various v rtual electromagnetic tools for solving several frequent electromagnetic propagation problems. All of the methods described are presented within the context of real-world scenari...

  13. Propagation phenomena in real world networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fay, Damien; Gabryś, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Propagation, which looks at spreading in complex networks, can be seen from many viewpoints; it is undesirable, or desirable, controllable, the mechanisms generating that propagation can be the topic of interest, but in the end all depends on the setting. This book covers leading research on a wide spectrum of propagation phenomenon and the techniques currently used in its modelling, prediction, analysis and control. Fourteen papers range over topics including epidemic models, models for trust inference, coverage strategies for networks, vehicle flow propagation, bio-inspired routing algorithms, P2P botnet attacks and defences, fault propagation in gene-cellular networks, malware propagation for mobile networks, information propagation in crisis situations, financial contagion in interbank networks, and finally how to maximize the spread of influence in social networks. The compendium will be of interest to researchers, those working in social networking, communications and finance and is aimed at providin...

  14. Wave Propagation in Bimodular Geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Maria; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    Observations and laboratory experiments show that fragmented or layered geomaterials have the mechanical response dependent on the sign of the load. The most adequate model accounting for this effect is the theory of bimodular (bilinear) elasticity - a hyperelastic model with different elastic moduli for tension and compression. For most of geo- and structural materials (cohesionless soils, rocks, concrete, etc.) the difference between elastic moduli is such that their modulus in compression is considerably higher than that in tension. This feature has a profound effect on oscillations [1]; however, its effect on wave propagation has not been comprehensively investigated. It is believed that incorporation of bilinear elastic constitutive equations within theory of wave dynamics will bring a deeper insight to the study of mechanical behaviour of many geomaterials. The aim of this paper is to construct a mathematical model and develop analytical methods and numerical algorithms for analysing wave propagation in bimodular materials. Geophysical and exploration applications and applications in structural engineering are envisaged. The FEM modelling of wave propagation in a 1D semi-infinite bimodular material has been performed with the use of Marlow potential [2]. In the case of the initial load expressed by a harmonic pulse loading strong dependence on the pulse sign is observed: when tension is applied before compression, the phenomenon of disappearance of negative (compressive) strains takes place. References 1. Dyskin, A., Pasternak, E., & Pelinovsky, E. (2012). Periodic motions and resonances of impact oscillators. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331(12), 2856-2873. 2. Marlow, R. S. (2008). A Second-Invariant Extension of the Marlow Model: Representing Tension and Compression Data Exactly. In ABAQUS Users' Conference.

  15. Multispecimen fatigue crack propagation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Bauer, R.E.; Chin, B.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chains of miniature center-cracked-tension specimens were tested on a conventional testing machine and on a prototypic in-reactor fatigue machine as part of the fusion reactor materials alloy development program. Annealed and 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were cycled under various conditions of temperature, frequency, stress ratio and chain length. Crack growth rates determined from multispecimen visual measurements and from an electrical potential technique were consistent with those obtained by conventional test methods. Results demonstrate that multispecimen chain testing is a valid method of obtaining fatigue crack propagation information for alloy development. 8 refs

  16. Radio Propagation into Modern Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Jørgensen, Niels T.K.

    2014-01-01

    Energy-efficient buildings are gaining momentum in order to comply with the new energy regulations. Especially in northern cold countries, thick reinforced walls and energy-efficient windows composed of several layers of glass plus metal coating are becoming the de facto elements in modern building...... constructions. These materials are used in favor of achieving a proper level of thermal isolation, but it has been noticed that they can impact heavily on radio signal propagation. This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of the outdoor-to-indoor attenuation experienced in several modern constructions...

  17. Fast imaging of streamer propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Baede, A.H.F.M.; Hayashi, D.; Rutgers, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    Recently measurement methods are becoming available to study the corona discharge in more detail. One of the most promising methods is laser-induced fluorescence to determine radical density. Recent improvements in CCD cameras makes it now possible to improve measurements of the discharge structure to a resolution of 1 ns in time and 10 μm in space. This paper shows the first results of the spontaneous emission of a point-to-plane corona discharge in air using such a camera. It clearly indicates that the 2-D approach for streamer propagation under these conditions is insufficient

  18. Fast imaging of streamer propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Baede, A.H.F.M.; Hayashi, D.; Rutgers, W.R. [Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Physics

    2001-07-01

    Recently measurement methods are becoming available to study the corona discharge in more detail. One of the most promising methods is laser-induced fluorescence to determine radical density. Recent improvements in CCD cameras makes it now possible to improve measurements of the discharge structure to a resolution of 1 ns in time and 10 {mu}m in space. This paper shows the first results of the spontaneous emission of a point-to-plane corona discharge in air using such a camera. It clearly indicates that the 2-D approach for streamer propagation under these conditions is insufficient.

  19. Modification Propagation in Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouronte, Mary Luz; Vargas, María Luisa; Moyano, Luis Gregorio; Algarra, Francisco Javier García; Del Pozo, Luis Salvador

    To keep up with rapidly changing conditions, business systems and their associated networks are growing increasingly intricate as never before. By doing this, network management and operation costs not only rise, but are difficult even to measure. This fact must be regarded as a major constraint to system optimization initiatives, as well as a setback to derived economic benefits. In this work we introduce a simple model in order to estimate the relative cost associated to modification propagation in complex architectures. Our model can be used to anticipate costs caused by network evolution, as well as for planning and evaluating future architecture development while providing benefit optimization.

  20. Mathematical modelling of ultrasound propagation in multi-phase flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simurda, Matej

    violates the repeatability of the measurements and thus impairs the device accuracy. Development of new flow meter designs for these conditions based on a purely experimental approach is expensive both in terms of time and economy. An attractive alternative is the employment of a mathematical model...

  1. Propagation of Regional Seismic Phases in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-08

    and Southeastern France recorded at short period stations of the LDG (Laboratoire de Detection Geophysique , France) and IGG (Istituto Geofisico di...here were provided by the L.D.G. (Laboratoire de Geophysique ). The french seismic network consists of 27 stations with the same features : the

  2. Propagation of Regional Phases in the Basin and Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-02

    complex miultiple rupture, Bull. Seusmol. Soc. Am., 57, 1017 W i23 K un.rT~I, "aind G. S. Stew art, Seismologica aspects of she Gutemala 1967...Fred K. Lamb Prof. William Menke University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory Department of Physics of Columbia

  3. Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph High Accuracy Optical Propagation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) project is considering several approaches to discovering planets orbiting stars far from earth and assessing their suitability to...

  4. Modeling the propagation of electromagnetic waves over the surface of the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendik, I. B.; Vendik, O. G.; Kirillov, V. V.; Pleskachev, V. V.; Tural'chuk, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    The results of modeling and an experimental study of electromagnetic (EM) waves in microwave range propagating along the surface of the human body have been presented. The parameters of wave propagation, such as the attenuation and phase velocity, have also been investigated. The calculation of the propagation of EM waves by the numerical method FDTD (finite difference time domain), as well as the use of the analytical model of the propagation of the EM wave along flat and curved surfaces has been fulfilled. An experimental study on a human body has been conducted. It has been shown that creeping waves are slow and exhibit a noticeable dispersion, while the surface waves are dispersionless and propagate at the speed of light in free space. A comparison of the results of numerical simulation, analytical calculation, and experimental investigations at a frequency of 2.55 GHz has been carried out.

  5. In propagation Gerbera jamessonii H. Bolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Machado Armas

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Gerbera is one of the horticultural crops of great demand on the Cuban local market, but its exploitation is limited because with the traditional multiplication methods established, it is not possible to comply with the demands of the “seeds”. This work was carried out at the biofactory of Las Flores de Servicios Comunales”, with the objective of establishing a methodology for the in vitro commercial propagation of Gerbera. Culture media and explant management in the different micropropagation phases were studied. The results obtained showed that with sodium hypochlorite at 0.5% during 10 minutes, a high disinfection of the shoot tips was achieved. With the combination of 6-bencilaminepurine (1.0 mg-l-1 and giberrelic acid (0.1 mg.l-1 in the culture medium, it was possible to increase the number of shoots per explant during establishment. In the multiplication phase, the best results were obtained with a combination of 6-BAP (2.0 mg.l-1 with AIA (0.65 and 1.3 mg.l-1 subculturing the explants greater than 1.0 cm individually in semisolid culture medium. A significant influence on the number of roots and growth of the explants was achieved adding indolacetic acid to the rooting medium and using for the subculture, explants greater than 3.0 cm. The quality of the explants influenced significantly in the acclimatization phase, demonstrating that the plants rooted in vitro should be 3.0 cm in height. Key words: explants, disinfection, shoot tip, culture medium

  6. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ying D.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Möstl, Christian; Bale, Stuart D.; Lin, Robert P.; Lugaz, Noé; Davies, Jackie A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts, and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast CMEs can be approximately formulated into three phases: an impulsive acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed propagation (or gradual deceleration); (2) the CMEs studied here are still accelerating even after the flare maximum, so energy must be continuously fed into the CME even after the time of the maximum heating and radiation has elapsed in the corona; (3) the rapid deceleration, presumably due to interactions with the ambient medium, mainly occurs over a relatively short timescale following the acceleration phase; and (4) CME-CME interactions seem a common phenomenon close to solar maximum. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations: (1) for the current cases, triangulation assuming a compact CME geometry is more reliable than triangulation assuming a spherical front attached to the Sun for distances below 50-70 solar radii from the Sun, but beyond about 100 solar radii we would trust the latter more; (2) a proper treatment of CME geometry must be performed in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, especially when the CME propagation direction is far away from the

  7. Quantum spacetime operationally based on propagators for extended test particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prugovecki, E.

    1981-01-01

    By taking into account the quantum aspects intrinsic to any operational definition of spatio-temporal relationships, a stochastic concept of spacetime emerges. In relation to its classical counterpart is realized as a stochastic mean around which quantum fluctuations become negligible only in the limit of macroscopic spacetime intervals. The test-particle propagators used in the proposed quantum concept of spacetime are derived by solving in a consistent manner the localizability problem for relativistic particles. This is achieved in the framework of the stochastic phase space formulation of quantum mechanics, which in the nonrelativistic context is shown to result from systems of imprimitivity related to phase space conserved probability currents derivable from bona fide convariant probability densities in stochastic phase spaces of one particle systems, which can be interpreted as due to measurements performed with extended rather than pointlike test particles. The associated particle propagators can be therefore consistently related to coordinate probability densities measurable by the exchange of photons in between test particles from a chosen standard. Quantum spacetime is defined as the family of propagators corresponding to all conceivable coherent flows of test particles. This family of free-fall propagators has to satisfy certain self-consistency conditions as well as consistent laws of motion which inplicitly determine the stochastic geometro-dynamics of quantum space-time. Field theory on quantum spacetime retains many of the formal features of conventional quantum field theory. On a fundamental epistemological level stochastic geometries emerge as essential prerequisites in the construction of spacetime models that would be operationally based and yet consistent with the relativity principle as well as with the uncertinty principle

  8. Observations of apparent superslow wave propagation in solar prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, J. O.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Baes, M.; Wright, A. N.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Phase mixing of standing continuum Alfvén waves and/or continuum slow waves in atmospheric magnetic structures such as coronal arcades can create the apparent effect of a wave propagating across the magnetic field. Aims: We observe a prominence with SDO/AIA on 2015 March 15 and find the presence of oscillatory motion. We aim to demonstrate that interpreting this motion as a magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) wave is faulty. We also connect the decrease of the apparent velocity over time with the phase mixing process, which depends on the curvature of the magnetic field lines. Methods: By measuring the displacement of the prominence at different heights to calculate the apparent velocity, we show that the propagation slows down over time, in accordance with the theoretical work of Kaneko et al. We also show that this propagation speed drops below what is to be expected for even slow MHD waves for those circumstances. We use a modified Kippenhahn-Schlüter prominence model to calculate the curvature of the magnetic field and fit our observations accordingly. Results: Measuring three of the apparent waves, we get apparent velocities of 14, 8, and 4 km s-1. Fitting a simple model for the magnetic field configuration, we obtain that the filament is located 103 Mm below the magnetic centre. We also obtain that the scale of the magnetic field strength in the vertical direction plays no role in the concept of apparent superslow waves and that the moment of excitation of the waves happened roughly one oscillation period before the end of the eruption that excited the oscillation. Conclusions: Some of the observed phase velocities are lower than expected for slow modes for the circumstances, showing that they rather fit with the concept of apparent superslow propagation. A fit with our magnetic field model allows for inferring the magnetic geometry of the prominence. The movie attached to Fig. 1 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Wave propagation in elastic medium with heterogeneous quadratic nonlinearity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Guangxin; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Qu Jianmin

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the one-dimensional wave propagation in an elastic medium with spatially non-uniform quadratic nonlinearity. Two problems are solved analytically. One is for a time-harmonic wave propagating in a half-space where the displacement is prescribed on the surface of the half-space. It is found that spatial non-uniformity of the material nonlinearity causes backscattering of the second order harmonic, which when combined with the forward propagating waves generates a standing wave in steady-state wave motion. The second problem solved is the reflection from and transmission through a layer of finite thickness embedded in an otherwise linearly elastic medium of infinite extent, where it is assumed that the layer has a spatially non-uniform quadratic nonlinearity. The results show that the transmission coefficient for the second order harmonic is proportional to the spatial average of the nonlinearity across the thickness of the layer, independent of the spatial distribution of the nonlinearity. On the other hand, the coefficient of reflection is proportional to a weighted average of the nonlinearity across the layer thickness. The weight function in this weighted average is related to the propagating phase, thus making the coefficient of reflection dependent on the spatial distribution of the nonlinearity. Finally, the paper concludes with some discussions on how to use the reflected and transmitted second harmonic waves to evaluate the variance and autocorrelation length of nonlinear parameter β when the nonlinearity distribution in the layer is a stochastic process.

  10. High frequency guided wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Marco; Masserey, Bernard; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Fromme, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. The cutting process can introduce micro-cracks in the thin wafers and lead to varying thickness. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves are considered for the structural monitoring of the wafers. The anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon leads to variations of the wave characteristics, depending on the propagation direction relative to the crystal orientation. Full three-dimensional Finite Element simulations of the guided wave propagation were conducted to visualize and quantify these effects for a line source. The phase velocity (slowness) and skew angle of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes (first anti-symmetric mode A0 and first symmetric mode S0) for varying propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation were measured experimentally. Selective mode excitation was achieved using a contact piezoelectric transducer with a custom-made wedge and holder to achieve a controlled contact pressure. The out-of-plane component of the guided wave propagation was measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Good agreement was found with the simulation results and theoretical predictions based on nominal material properties of the silicon wafer.

  11. Genetic conservation and paddlefish propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloss, Brian L.; Klumb, Robert A.; Heist, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    The conservation of genetic diversity of our natural resources is overwhelmingly one of the central foci of 21st century management practices. Three recommendations related to the conservation of paddlefish Polyodon spathula genetic diversity are to (1) identify genetic diversity at both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA loci using a suggested list of 20 sampling locations, (2) use genetic diversity estimates to develop genetic management units, and (3) identify broodstock sources to minimize effects of supplemental stocking on the genetic integrity of native paddlefish populations. We review previous genetic work on paddlefish and described key principles and concepts associated with maintaining genetic diversity within and among paddlefish populations and also present a genetic case study of current paddlefish propagation at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Gavins Point National Fish Hatchery. This study confirmed that three potential sources of broodfish were genetically indistinguishable at the loci examined, allowing the management agencies cooperating on this program flexibility in sampling gametes. This study also showed significant bias in the hatchery occurred in terms of male reproductive contribution, which resulted in a shift in the genetic diversity of progeny compared to the broodfish. This shift was shown to result from differential male contributions, partially attributed to the mode of egg fertilization. Genetic insights enable implementation of a paddlefish propagation program within an adaptive management strategy that conserves inherent genetic diversity while achieving demographic goals.

  12. Quantum propagation across cosmological singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Steffen; Turok, Neil

    2017-05-01

    The initial singularity is the most troubling feature of the standard cosmology, which quantum effects are hoped to resolve. In this paper, we study quantum cosmology with conformal (Weyl) invariant matter. We show that it is natural to extend the scale factor to negative values, allowing a large, collapsing universe to evolve across a quantum "bounce" into an expanding universe like ours. We compute the Feynman propagator for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds exactly, identifying curious pathologies in the case of curved (open or closed) universes. We then include anisotropies, fixing the operator ordering of the quantum Hamiltonian by imposing covariance under field redefinitions and again finding exact solutions. We show how complex classical solutions allow one to circumvent the singularity while maintaining the validity of the semiclassical approximation. The simplest isotropic universes sit on a critical boundary, beyond which there is qualitatively different behavior, with potential for instability. Additional scalars improve the theory's stability. Finally, we study the semiclassical propagation of inhomogeneous perturbations about the flat, isotropic case, at linear and nonlinear order, showing that, at least at this level, there is no particle production across the bounce. These results form the basis for a promising new approach to quantum cosmology and the resolution of the big bang singularity.

  13. Simplified propagation of standard uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shull, A.H.

    1997-01-01

    An essential part of any measurement control program is adequate knowledge of the uncertainties of the measurement system standards. Only with an estimate of the standards'' uncertainties can one determine if the standard is adequate for its intended use or can one calculate the total uncertainty of the measurement process. Purchased standards usually have estimates of uncertainty on their certificates. However, when standards are prepared and characterized by a laboratory, variance propagation is required to estimate the uncertainty of the standard. Traditional variance propagation typically involves tedious use of partial derivatives, unfriendly software and the availability of statistical expertise. As a result, the uncertainty of prepared standards is often not determined or determined incorrectly. For situations meeting stated assumptions, easier shortcut methods of estimation are now available which eliminate the need for partial derivatives and require only a spreadsheet or calculator. A system of simplifying the calculations by dividing into subgroups of absolute and relative uncertainties is utilized. These methods also incorporate the International Standards Organization (ISO) concepts for combining systematic and random uncertainties as published in their Guide to the Expression of Measurement Uncertainty. Details of the simplified methods and examples of their use are included in the paper

  14. Uncertainty propagation in nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommé, S.; Jerome, S.M.; Venchiarutti, C.

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty propagation formulae are presented for age dating in support of nuclear forensics. The age of radioactive material in this context refers to the time elapsed since a particular radionuclide was chemically separated from its decay product(s). The decay of the parent radionuclide and ingrowth of the daughter nuclide are governed by statistical decay laws. Mathematical equations allow calculation of the age of specific nuclear material through the atom ratio between parent and daughter nuclides, or through the activity ratio provided that the daughter nuclide is also unstable. The derivation of the uncertainty formulae of the age may present some difficulty to the user community and so the exact solutions, some approximations, a graphical representation and their interpretation are presented in this work. Typical nuclides of interest are actinides in the context of non-proliferation commitments. The uncertainty analysis is applied to a set of important parent–daughter pairs and the need for more precise half-life data is examined. - Highlights: • Uncertainty propagation formulae for age dating with nuclear chronometers. • Applied to parent–daughter pairs used in nuclear forensics. • Investigated need for better half-life data

  15. Propagation engineering; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 28-30, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeika, Norman S.; Miller, Walter B.

    The present conference on atmospheric propagation discusses the effect of the turbulence inner scale on atmospheric scintillation, experimental verification of the K-distribution family for scattering, the impact of atmospheric turbulence on FLIR target recognition, a phase-detection algorithm, refractive index structure parameter measurement by incoherent aperture scintillation techniques, an optical scintillometer/Doppler radar instrument for profiling turbulence, and the effects of ionospheric propagation disturbances on space-based SAR. Also discussed are phase structure function measurements with multiple apertures, fluctuations in MMW signals due to clear-air turbulence, multiwavelength transmittance through falling snow, the modeling of aerosols in the marine mixed layer, a unified low stratus cloud-subcloud microphysics model, alexandrite laser-propagation experiments, and vaporization and recondensation in propagation and imaging of laser beams.

  16. Propagation of optical pulses in a resonantly absorbing medium: Observation of negative velocity in Rb vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Hayami, K.; Furue, S.; Nakayama, K.; Niwa, H.; Kohmoto, T.; Kunitomo, M.; Fukuda, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Propagation of optical pulses in a resonantly absorbing medium is studied. Propagation time of nanosecond pulses was measured for the Rb D 1 transition. At the center of two absorption lines, delay of the pulse peak which is about ten times as large as the pulse width was observed, where zero delay is defined for the propagation with the light velocity in vacuum. On the other hand, at the peak of an absorption line, negative delay was observed for large absorption, where the advance time is as large as 25% of the pulse width. Simulation including the effect of absorption and phase shift reproduced well the experimental results

  17. Numerical studies on soliton propagation in the dielectric media by the nonlinear Lorentz computational model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, H.; Okuda, H.

    1994-06-01

    Soliton propagation in the dielectric media has been simulated by using the nonlinear Lorentz computational model, which was recently developed to study the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a linear and a nonlinear dielectric. The model is constructed by combining a microscopic model used in the semi-classical approximation for dielectric media and the particle model developed for the plasma simulations. The carrier wave frequency is retained in the simulation so that not only the envelope of the soliton but also its phase can be followed in time. It is shown that the model may be useful for studying pulse propagation in the dielectric media

  18. Propagation of electromagnetic radiation in a random field of gravitational waves and space radio interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braginsky, V.B.; Kardashev, N.S.; Polnarev, A.G.; Novikov, I.D.

    1989-12-01

    Propagation of an electromagnetic wave in the field of gravitational waves is considered. Attention is given to the principal difference between the electromagnetic wave propagation in the field of random gravitational waves and the electromagnetic wave propagation in a medium with a randomly-inhomogeneous refraction index. It is shown that in the case of the gravitation wave field the phase shift of an electromagnetic wave does not increase with distance. The capability of space radio interferometry to detect relic gravitational waves as well as gravitational wave bursts of non cosmological origin are analyzed. (author). 64 refs, 2 figs

  19. Generation of spirally polarized propagation-invariant beam using fiber microaxicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Geo M; Viswanathan, Nirmal K

    2011-10-01

    We present here a fiber microaxicon (MA)based method to generate spirally polarized propagation-invariant optical beam. MA chemically etched in the tip of a two-mode fiber efficiently converts the generic cylindrically polarized vortex fiber mode into a spirally polarized propagation-invariant (Bessel-type) beam via radial dependence of polarization rotation angle. The combined roles of helico-conical phase and nonparaxial propagation in the generation and characteristics of the output beam from the fiber MA are discussed. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  20. Modeling laser beam diffraction and propagation by the mode-expansion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, James J

    2007-08-01

    In the mode-expansion method for modeling propagation of a diffracted beam, the beam at the aperture can be expanded as a weighted set of orthogonal modes. The parameters of the expansion modes are chosen to maximize the weighting coefficient of the lowest-order mode. As the beam propagates, its field distribution can be reconstructed from the set of weighting coefficients and the Gouy phase of the lowest-order mode. We have developed a simple procedure to implement the mode-expansion method for propagation through an arbitrary ABCD matrix, and we have demonstrated that it is accurate in comparison with direct calculations of diffraction integrals and much faster.

  1. Propagation engineering in radio links design

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Propagation Engineering in Radio Link Design covers the basic principles of radiowaves propagation in a practical manner.  This fundamental understanding enables the readers to design radio links efficiently. This book elaborates on new achievements as well as recently developed propagation models.  This is in addition to a comprehensive overview of fundamentals of propagation in various scenarios. It examines theoretical calculations, approaches and applied procedures needed for radio links design. The authors study and analysis of the main propagation phenomena and its mechanisms based on the recommendations of International Telecommunications Union, (ITU). The book has been organized in 9 chapters and examines the role of antennas and passive reflectors in radio services, propagation mechanisms related to radar, satellite, short distance, broadcasting and trans-horizon radio links, with two chapters devoted to radio noise and main  parameters of radio link design. The book presents some 278 illustration...

  2. Acoustic energy propagation around railways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizkova, Petra

    2017-09-01

    The article deals with the issues of acoustic energy propagation around railways. The research subject was noise emission spreading into the surroundings during the passage of trains over a directly travelled steel bridge construction. Noise emissions were measured using direct measurements in the field. The measurements were performed in two measurement profiles. The noise exposures A LAE measured near the steel bridge construction were compared against the noise exposures A LAE captured on an open track. From the difference of these data, the noise level of the steel bridge structure was determined. Part of the research was to evaluate the effect of the reconstruction of the railway track superstructure on the acoustic situation in the given section of the railway track. The article describes the methodology of measurements, including the processing and evaluation of measured data. The article points out the noise levels of the steel bridge construction and assesses changes in the acoustic situation after the reconstruction.

  3. Pulse Propagation on close conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Dieckmann, A

    2001-01-01

    The propagation and reflection of arbitrarily shaped pulses on non-dispersive parallel conductors of finite length with user defined cross section is simulated employing the discretized telegraph equation. The geometry of the system of conductors and the presence of dielectric material determine the capacities and inductances that enter the calculation. The values of these parameters are found using an iterative Laplace equation solving procedure and confirmed for certain calculable geometries including the line charge inside a box. The evolving pulses and the resulting crosstalk can be plotted at any instant and - in the Mathematica notebook version of this report - be looked at in an animation. As an example a differential pair of microstrips as used in the ATLAS vertex detector is analysed.

  4. IBEX - annular beam propagation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.B.; Shope, S.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Ramirez, J.J.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Adler, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    IBEX is a 4-MV, 100-kA, 20-ns cylindrical isolated Blumlein accelerator. In the experiments reported here, the accelerator is fitted with a specially designed foilless diode which is completely immersed in a uniform magnetic field. Several diode geometries have been studied as a function of magnetic field strength. The beam propagates a distance of 50 cm (approx. 10 cyclotron wavelengths) in vacuum before either striking a beam stop or being extracted through a thin foil. The extracted beam was successfully transported 60 cm downstream into a drift pipe filled either with 80 or 640 torr air. The main objectives of this experiment were to establish the proper parameters for the most quiescent 4 MV, 20 to 40 kA annular beam, and to compare the results with available theory and numerical code simulations

  5. Front propagation in flipping processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antal, T; Ben-Avraham, D; Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2008-01-01

    We study a directed flipping process that underlies the performance of the random edge simplex algorithm. In this stochastic process, which takes place on a one-dimensional lattice whose sites may be either occupied or vacant, occupied sites become vacant at a constant rate and simultaneously cause all sites to the right to change their state. This random process exhibits rich phenomenology. First, there is a front, defined by the position of the leftmost occupied site, that propagates at a nontrivial velocity. Second, the front involves a depletion zone with an excess of vacant sites. The total excess Δ k increases logarithmically, Δ k ≅ ln k, with the distance k from the front. Third, the front exhibits ageing-young fronts are vigorous but old fronts are sluggish. We investigate these phenomena using a quasi-static approximation, direct solutions of small systems and numerical simulations

  6. Nonlinear operators and their propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, C.

    1997-01-01

    Mathematical physicists are familiar with a large set of tools designed for dealing with linear operators, which are so common in both the classical and quantum theories; but many of those tools are useless with nonlinear equations of motion. In this work a general algebra and calculus is developed for working with nonlinear operators: The basic new tool being the open-quotes slash product,close quotes defined by A(1+εB) =A+εA/B+O(ε 2 ). For a generic time development equation, the propagator is constructed and then there follows the formal version of time dependent perturbation theory, in remarkable similarity to the linear situation. A nonperturbative approximation scheme capable of producing high accuracy computations, previously developed for linear operators, is shown to be applicable as well in the nonlinear domain. A number of auxiliary mathematical properties and examples are given. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. Rapid Vegetative Propagation Method for Carob

    OpenAIRE

    Hamide GUBBUK; Esma GUNES; Tomas AYALA-SILVA; Sezai ERCISLI

    2011-01-01

    Most of fruit species are propagated by vegetative methods such as budding, grafting, cutting, suckering, layering etc. to avoid heterozygocity. Carob trees (Ceratonia siliqua L.) are of highly economical value and are among the most difficult to propagate fruit species. In the study, air-layering propagation method was investigated first time to compare wild and cultivated (�Sisam�) carob types. In the experiment, one year old carob limbs were air-layered on coco peat medium by wrapping with...

  8. Aspects of HF radio propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Saillant

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    radio systems. From the point of view Working Group 2 of the COST 296 Action, interest lies with effects associated

    with propagation via the ionosphere of signals within the HF band. Several aspects are covered in this paper:

    a The directions of arrival and times of flight of signals received over a path oriented along the trough have

    been examined and several types of propagation effects identified. Of particular note, combining the HF observations

    with satellite measurements has identified the presence of irregularities within the floor of the trough that

    result in propagation displaced from the great circle direction. An understanding of the propagation effects that

    result in deviations of the signal path from the great circle direction are of particular relevance to the operation

    of HF radiolocation systems.

    b Inclusion of the results from the above mentioned measurements into a propagation model of the northerly

    ionosphere (i.e. those regions of the ionosphere located poleward of, and including, the mid-latitude trough

    and the use of this model to predict the coverage expected from transmitters where the signals impinge on the

    northerly ionosphere

  9. Neural network construction via back-propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burwick, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    A method is presented that combines back-propagation with multi-layer neural network construction. Back-propagation is used not only to adjust the weights but also the signal functions. Going from one network to an equivalent one that has additional linear units, the non-linearity of these units and thus their effective presence is then introduced via back-propagation (weight-splitting). The back-propagated error causes the network to include new units in order to minimize the error function. We also show how this formalism allows to escape local minima

  10. Terrestrial propagation of long electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Galejs, Janis; Fock, V A

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial Propagation of Long Electromagnetic Waves deals with the propagation of long electromagnetic waves confined principally to the shell between the earth and the ionosphere, known as the terrestrial waveguide. The discussion is limited to steady-state solutions in a waveguide that is uniform in the direction of propagation. Wave propagation is characterized almost exclusively by mode theory. The mathematics are developed only for sources at the ground surface or within the waveguide, including artificial sources as well as lightning discharges. This volume is comprised of nine chapte

  11. ACTS Propagation Measurements in Maryland and Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Asoka; Lin, Kuan-Ting

    1996-01-01

    Rapid growth in new satellite services incorporating very small aperture terminals (VSAT) and ultra small aperture terminals (USAT) is expected in the coming years. Small size terminals allow for widespread use of satellite services in small business and domestic applications. Due to congestion of lower frequency bands such as C and Ku, most of these services will use Ka-band (2/20 GHz) frequencies. Propagation impairments produced by the troposphere is a limiting factor for the effective use of the 20/30 GHz band and the use of smaller Earth terminals makes it difficult to provide sufficient link margins for propagation related outages. In this context, reliable prediction of propagation impairments for low margin systems becomes important. Due to the complexity of propagation phenomena propagation modeling is mainly attempted on an empirical basis. As such, the availability of reliable measured data that extend to probability levels well in excess of the traditional limit of 1 percent is of great importance in the development, validation, and refinement of propagation models. The beacon payload on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) together with the propagation measurement terminals developed under the NASA ACTS propagation program provide an excellent opportunity to collect such data on a long-term basis. This paper presents the results of ACTS propagation measurements conducted in the Washington, DC metropolitan area by COMSAT Laboratories.

  12. Fatigue crack propagation behavior under creep conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohji, Kiyotsugu; Kubo, Shiro

    1991-01-01

    The crack propagation behavior of the SUS 304 stainless steel under creep-fatigue conditions was reviewed. Cracks propagated either in purely time-dependent mode or in purely cycle-dependent mode, depending on loading conditions. The time-dependent crack propagation rate was correlated with modified J-integral J * and the cycle-dependent crack propagation rate was correlated with J-integral range ΔJ f . Threshold was observed in the cycle-dependent crack propagation, and below this threshold the time-dependent crack propagation appeared. The crack propagation rates were uniquely characterized by taking the effective values of J * and ΔJ f , when crack closure was observed. Change in crack propagation mode occurred reversibly and was predicted by the competitive damage model. The threshold disappeared and the cycle-dependent crack propagation continued in a subthreshold region under variable amplitude conditions, where the threshold was interposed between the maximum and minimum ΔJ f . (orig.)

  13. The propagation of sound in tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai Ming; Iu, King Kwong

    2002-11-01

    The sound propagation in tunnels is addressed theoretically and experimentally. In many previous studies, the image source method is frequently used. However, these early theoretical models are somewhat inadequate because the effect of multiple reflections in long enclosures is often modeled by the incoherent summation of contributions from all image sources. Ignoring the phase effect, these numerical models are unlikely to be satisfactory for predicting the intricate interference patterns due to contributions from each image source. In the present paper, the interference effect is incorporated by summing the contributions from the image sources coherently. To develop a simple numerical model, tunnels are represented by long rectangular enclosures with either geometrically reflecting or impedance boundaries. Scale model experiments are conducted for the validation of the numerical model. In some of the scale model experiments, the enclosure walls are lined with a carpet for simulating the impedance boundary condition. Large-scale outdoor measurements have also been conducted in two tunnels designed originally for road traffic use. It has been shown that the proposed numerical model agrees reasonably well with experimental data. [Work supported by the Research Grants Council, The Industry Department, NAP Acoustics (Far East) Ltd., and The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

  14. Sustained propagation and control of topological excitations in polariton superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeon, Simon; Bramati, Alberto

    2017-09-01

    We present a simple method to compensate for losses in a polariton superfluid. Based on a weak support field, it allows for the extended propagation of a resonantly driven polariton superfluid with minimal energetic cost. Moreover, this setup is based on optical bistability and leads to the significant release of the phase constraint imposed by resonant driving. This release, together with macroscopic polariton propagation, offers a unique opportunity to study the hydrodynamics of the topological excitations of polariton superfluids such as quantized vortices and dark solitons. We numerically study how the coherent field supporting the superfluid flow interacts with the vortices and how it can be used to control them. Interestingly, we show that standard hydrodynamics does not apply for this driven-dissipative fluid and new types of behaviour are identified.

  15. The impact of PMSE and NLC particles on VLF propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nunn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available PMSE or Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes are a well-known phenomenon in the summer northern polar regions, in which anomalous VHF/UHF radar echoes are returned from heights ~85km. Noctilucent clouds and electron density biteouts are two phenomena that sometimes occur together with PMSE. Electron density biteouts are electron density depletion layers of up to 90%, which may be several kms thick. Using the NOSC Modefndr code based on Wait's modal theory for subionospheric propagation, we calculate the shifts in received VLF amplitude and phase that occur as a result of electron density biteouts. The code assumes a homogeneous background ionosphere and a homogeneous biteout layer along the Great Circle Path (GCP corridor, for transmitter receiver path lengths in the range of 500–6000km.

    For profiles during the 10h about midnight and under quiet geomagnetic conditions, where the electron density at 85km would normally be less than 500el/cc, it was found that received signal perturbations were significant, of the order of 1–4dB and 5–40° of phase. Perturbation amplitudes increase roughly as the square root of frequency. At short range perturbations are rather erratic, but more consistent at large ranges, readily interpretable in terms of the shifts in excitation factor, attenuation factor and v/c ratios for Wait's modes. Under these conditions such shifts should be detectable by a well constituted experiment involving multiple paths and multiple frequencies in the north polar region in summer. It is anticipated that VLF propagation could be a valuable diagnostic for biteout/PMSE when electron density at 85km is under 500el/cc, under which circumstances PMSE are not directly detectable by VHF/UHF radars.

    Key words. Electromagnetism (wave propagation – Ionosphere (polar ionosphere – Radioscience (ionospheric propagation

  16. APPARENT CROSS-FIELD SUPERSLOW PROPAGATION OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN SOLAR PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, T.; Yokoyama, T. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Goossens, M.; Doorsselaere, T. Van [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, Bus 2400, B-3001 Herverlee (Belgium); Soler, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Wright, A. N., E-mail: kaneko@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-20

    In this paper we show that the phase-mixing of continuum Alfvén waves and/or continuum slow waves in the magnetic structures of the solar atmosphere as, e.g., coronal arcades, can create the illusion of wave propagation across the magnetic field. This phenomenon could be erroneously interpreted as fast magnetosonic waves. The cross-field propagation due to the phase-mixing of continuum waves is apparent because there is no real propagation of energy across the magnetic surfaces. We investigate the continuous Alfvén and slow spectra in two-dimensional (2D) Cartesian equilibrium models with a purely poloidal magnetic field. We show that apparent superslow propagation across the magnetic surfaces in solar coronal structures is a consequence of the existence of continuum Alfvén waves and continuum slow waves that naturally live on those structures and phase-mix as time evolves. The apparent cross-field phase velocity is related to the spatial variation of the local Alfvén/slow frequency across the magnetic surfaces and is slower than the Alfvén/sound velocities for typical coronal conditions. Understanding the nature of the apparent cross-field propagation is important for the correct analysis of numerical simulations and the correct interpretation of observations.

  17. FEM Modeling of Crack Propagation in a Model Multiphase Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihe QIAN; Seishi NISHIDO; Hiroyuki TODA; Tosliro KOBAYASHI

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, several widely applied fracture criteria were first numerically examined and the crack-tip-region Jintegral criterion was confirmed to be more applicable to predict fracture angle in an elastic-plastic multiphase material. Then, the crack propagation in an idealized dendritic two-phase Al-7%Si alloy was modeled using an elastic-plastic finite element method. The variation of crack growth driving force with crack extension was also demonstrated. It is found that the crack path is significantly influenced by the presence of α-phase near the crack tip, and the crack growth driving force varies drastically from place to place. Lastly, the simulated fracture path in the two-phase model alloy was compared with the experimentally observed fracture path.

  18. Content Propagation in Online Social Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blenn, N.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents methods and techniques to analyze content propagation within online social networks (OSNs) using a graph theoretical approach. Important factors and different techniques to analyze and describe content propagation, starting from the smallest entity in a network, representing a

  19. Topology optimization of wave-propagation problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures.......Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures....

  20. Propagation of microwaves in pulsar magnetospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodo, G; Ferrari, A [Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica); Massaglia, S [Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale; Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Astronomy)

    1981-12-01

    We discuss the dispersion relation of linearly-polarized waves, propagating along a strong background magnetic field embedded in an electron-positron plasma. The results are then applied to the study of the propagation conditions of coherent curvature radio radiation inside neutron stars magnetospheres, as produced by electric discharges following current pulsar models.

  1. Wave propagation in thermoelastic saturated porous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the existence and propagation of four waves in the medium. Three of the waves are ... predicted infinite speed for propagation of ther- mal signals. Lord and ..... saturated reservoir rock (North-sea Sandstone) is chosen for the numerical model ...

  2. In vitro propagation of Irvingia gabonensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-16

    Apr 16, 2007 ... Full-grown plantlets were obtained and work is in progress on mass propagation. ... subsequent mass propagation to produce seedlings for farmers, and to improve food security and ... Shooting and rooting were observed, and full grown plantlets were obtained. ¼ MS +0.2 mg KIN. +0.1 mg NAA. Rooting ...

  3. Uncertainty Propagation in an Ecosystem Nutrient Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New aspects and advancements in classical uncertainty propagation methods were used to develop a nutrient budget with associated error for a northern Gulf of Mexico coastal embayment. Uncertainty was calculated for budget terms by propagating the standard error and degrees of fr...

  4. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    acoustic communications, acoustic navigation, or acoustic remote sensing of the ocean interior . RELATED PROJECTS The 2015 CANAPE pilot study was a...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE...ocean structure. Changes in sea ice and the water column affect both acoustic propagation and ambient noise. This implies that what was learned

  5. Propagation testing multi-cell batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orendorff, Christopher J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lamb, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steele, Leigh Anna Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spangler, Scott Wilmer [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Propagation of single point or single cell failures in multi-cell batteries is a significant concern as batteries increase in scale for a variety of civilian and military applications. This report describes the procedure for testing failure propagation along with some representative test results to highlight the potential outcomes for different battery types and designs.

  6. Diagnostics for the ATA beam propagation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Barletta, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a discussion of the diagnostics required for the beam propagation experiment to be done with the ATA accelerator. Included are a list of the diagnostics needed; a description of the ATA experimental environment; the status of beam diagnostics available at Livermore including recent developments, and a prioritized list of accelerator and propagation diagnostics under consideration or in various stages of development

  7. Unirradiated cladding rip-propagation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Hunter, C.W.

    1981-04-01

    The size of cladding rips which develop when a fuel pin fails can affect the subassembly cooling and determine how rapidly fuel escapes from the pin. The object of the Cladding Rip Propagation Test (CRPT) was to quantify the failure development of cladding so that a more realistic fuel pin failure modeling may be performed. The test results for unirradiated 20% CS 316 stainless steel cladding show significantly different rip propagation behavior at different temperatures. At room temperature, the rip growth is stable as the rip extension increases monotonically with the applied deformation. At 500 0 C, the rip propagation becomes unstable after a short period of stable rip propagation. The rapid propagation rate is approximately 200 m/s, and the critical rip length is 9 mm. At test temperatures above 850 0 C, the cladding exhibits very high failure resistances, and failure occurs by multiple cracking at high cladding deformation. 13 figures

  8. Propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Weiyan

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the SLF/ELF wave propagation, an important branch of electromagnetic theory. The SLF/ELF wave propagation theory is well applied in earthquake electromagnetic radiation, submarine communication, thunderstorm detection, and geophysical prospecting and diagnostics. The propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves is introduced in various media like the earth-ionospheric waveguide, ionospheric plasma, sea water, earth, and the boundary between two different media or the stratified media. Applications in the earthquake electromagnetic radiation and the submarine communications are also addressed. This book is intended for scientists and engineers in the fields of radio propagation and EM theory and applications. Prof. Pan is a professor at China Research Institute of Radiowave Propagation in Qingdao (China). Dr. Li is a professor at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou (China).

  9. In vitro propagation of jojoba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Berta E; Apóstolo, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis (Link) Schn.) is a nontraditional crop in arid and semi-arid areas. Vegetative propagation can be achieved by layering, grafting, or rooting semi-hardwood cuttings, but the highest number of possible propagules is limited by the size of the plants and time of the year. Micropropagation is highly recommended strategy for obtaining jojoba elite clones. For culture initiation, single-node explants are cultivated on Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) supplemented with Gamborg's vitamins (B5), 11.1 μM BA (N(6)-benzyl-adenine), 0.5 μM IBA (indole-3-butyric acid), and 1.4 μM GA(3) (gibberellic acid). Internodal and apical cuttings proliferate on MS medium containing B5 vitamins and 4.4 μM BA. Rooting is achieved on MS medium (half strength mineral salt) amended with B5 vitamins and 14.7 μM IBA during 7 days and transferred to develop in auxin-free rooting medium. Plantlets are acclimatized using a graduated humidity regime on soil: peat: perlite (5:1:1) substrate. This micropagation protocol produces large numbers of uniform plants from selected genotypes of jojoba.

  10. Ultrasound propagation in dense aerogels filled with liquid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, K; Ohmori, K; Abe, S; Kanamori, K; Nakanishi, K

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal ultrasound propagation was studied in dense aerogels filled with liquid 4 He. Sound velocity and attenuation were measured at the frequency of 6 MHz in both normal and superfluid phases. Pressure dependence of velocity and attenuation were also studied. Studied aerogels had porosities about 85%. They had two different types of structure, tangled strand structure and aggregated particles structure. The pore size distributions were narrow. Reduction of superfluid transition temperature mainly depended on not porosity but mean pore size. The structure of gel played an important role in sound velocity and attenuation.

  11. Nonlinear Theory of Nonparaxial Laser Pulse Propagation in Plasma Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shadwick, B. A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Leemans, W. P.

    2000-01-01

    Nonparaxial propagation of ultrashort, high-power laser pulses in plasma channels is examined. In the adiabatic limit, pulse energy conservation, nonlinear group velocity, damped betatron oscillations, self-steepening, self-phase modulation, and shock formation are analyzed. In the nonadiabatic limit, the coupling of forward Raman scattering (FRS) and the self-modulation instability (SMI) is analyzed and growth rates are derived, including regimes of reduced growth. The SMI is found to dominate FRS in most regimes of interest. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  12. Transient Aspects of Wave Propagation Connected with Spatial Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzat G. Bakhoum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents transient aspects of light wave propagation connected with spatial coherence. It is shown that reflection and refraction phenomena involve spatial patterns which are created within a certain transient time interval. After this transient time interval, these patterns act like a memory, determining the wave vector for subsequent sets of reflected/refracted waves. The validity of this model is based on intuitive aspects regarding phase conservation of energy for waves reflected/refracted by multiple centers in a certain material medium.

  13. Modelling the average velocity of propagation of the flame front in a gasoline engine with hydrogen additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolenskaya, N. M.; Smolenskii, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents models for calculating the average velocity of propagation of the flame front, obtained from the results of experimental studies. Experimental studies were carried out on a single-cylinder gasoline engine UIT-85 with hydrogen additives up to 6% of the mass of fuel. The article shows the influence of hydrogen addition on the average velocity propagation of the flame front in the main combustion phase. The dependences of the turbulent propagation velocity of the flame front in the second combustion phase on the composition of the mixture and operating modes. The article shows the influence of the normal combustion rate on the average flame propagation velocity in the third combustion phase.

  14. Integral propagator solvers for Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoso, J M; Rio, E del

    2007-01-01

    We briefly discuss the use of short-time integral propagators on solving the so-called Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation for the dynamics of a distribution function. For this equation, the diffusion tensor is singular and the usual Gaussian representation of the short-time propagator is no longer valid. However, we prove that the path-integral approach on solving the equation is, in fact, reliable by means of our generalized propagator, which is obtained through the construction of an auxiliary solvable Fokker-Planck equation. The new representation of the grid-free advancing scheme describes the inherent cross- and self-diffusion processes, in both velocity and configuration spaces, in a natural manner, although these processes are not explicitly depicted in the differential equation. We also show that some splitting methods, as well as some finite-difference schemes, could fail in describing the aforementioned diffusion processes, governed in the whole phase space only by the velocity diffusion tensor. The short-time transition probability offers a stable and robust numerical algorithm that preserves the distribution positiveness and its norm, ensuring the smoothness of the evolving solution at any time step. (fast track communication)

  15. Modeling broadband poroelastic propagation using an asymptotic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, Donald W.

    2009-05-01

    An asymptotic method, valid in the presence of smoothly-varying heterogeneity, is used to derive a semi-analytic solution to the equations for fluid and solid displacements in a poroelastic medium. The solution is defined along trajectories through the porous medium model, in the manner of ray theory. The lowest order expression in the asymptotic expansion provides an eikonal equation for the phase. There are three modes of propagation, two modes of longitudinal displacement and a single mode of transverse displacement. The two longitudinal modes define the Biot fast and slow waves which have very different propagation characteristics. In the limit of low frequency, the Biot slow wave propagates as a diffusive disturbance, in essence a transient pressure pulse. Conversely, at low frequencies the Biot fast wave and the transverse mode are modified elastic waves. At intermediate frequencies the wave characteristics of the longitudinal modes are mixed. A comparison of the asymptotic solution with analytic and numerical solutions shows reasonably good agreement for both homogeneous and heterogeneous Earth models.

  16. Experimental studies on the plasma bullet propagation and its inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Laroussi, Mounir

    2010-01-01

    Plasma bullets generated by atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets have recently been an active research topic due to their unique properties and their enhanced plasma chemistry. In this paper, experimental insights into the plasma bullet lifetime and its velocity are reported. Data obtained from intensified charge-coupled device camera and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) elucidated the existence of a weakly ionized channel between the plasma bullet and its source (such as the plasma pencil). Factors responsible for the inhibition of the propagation of the bullet, such as low helium mole fraction, the magnitude of the applied voltage, and the secondary discharge ignition time, are also revealed. A new technique is discussed to accurately measure the plasma bullet velocity, using time-resolved OES. This new technique shows that during its lifetime the plasma bullet goes through launching, propagation, and ending phases. In addition, it is noted that the plasma bullet exhibits an unstable behavior at the early beginning and late ending of the propagation.

  17. In vitro propagation of Hylocereus monacanthus (Lem. Britton and Rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Belem Montiel-Frausto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of tissue culture contributes to the rapid and massive propagation of economically important species and serves as a basic platform for production strategies. The objective of this work was to establish the in vitro propagation of Hylocereus monacanthus (Lem. Britton and Rose. The seeds were in vitro germinated and then the apical segments containing the apex and areoles were taken and placed in culture medium MS with BAP (1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg l-1 and IAA (0.5 mg l-1 separately and combined for the multiplication phase. For rooting an MS culture medium with different  concentrations of inorganic salts (50, 75 and 100% and IBA (0.1 mg l-1 was used. In vitro plants obtained were planted in greenhouse for their acclimatization. The percentage of seeds germination was 70% with 6% of microbial contamination. With 1 mg l-1 BAP, the best results were obtained for the in vitro multiplication of H. monacanthus. In all treatments 100% of rooted shoots were obtained and only a significant difference was observed for root length with the addition of 0.1 mg l-1 IBA. The average survival of plants transferred to substrate was 97.1%. The results of this work offer an alternative of propagation for H. monacanthus, which will contribute to the establishment of commercial plantations and other studies at the laboratory level.   Keywords: pitahaya, shoot tip, cacti

  18. Subluminal and superluminal pulse propagation in inhomogeneous media of nonspherical particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yu; Gao Lei

    2006-01-01

    We study the pulse propagation through a metal/dielectric composites of nonspherical particles enclosed by two gold mirrors. To account for the shape effect, we first adopt Maxwell-Garnett type approximation to obtain the effective dielectric function of composites. Based on the group index, phase time and pulse shape calculations, we find that the particles' shape (characterized by the depolarization factor) plays an important role in determining the subluminal and superluminal pulse propagations through the system. When the inclusions' shape is not spherical, it is possible to observe significant superluminal behavior of the pulse propagation, although the volume fraction is the same. The shape-dependent critical volume fraction is predicted, above which superluminal propagation appears. Furthermore, the Hartman effect in such a system is also investigated

  19. The accuracy of dynamic attitude propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, E.; Chu, D.; Woodard, M.

    1990-01-01

    Propagating attitude by integrating Euler's equation for rigid body motion has long been suggested for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) but until now has not been implemented. Because of limited Sun visibility, propagation is necessary for yaw determination. With the deterioration of the gyros, dynamic propagation has become more attractive. Angular rates are derived from integrating Euler's equation with a stepsize of 1 second, using torques computed from telemetered control system data. The environmental torque model was quite basic. It included gravity gradient and unshadowed aerodynamic torques. Knowledge of control torques is critical to the accuracy of dynamic modeling. Due to their coarseness and sparsity, control actuator telemetry were smoothed before integration. The dynamic model was incorporated into existing ERBS attitude determination software. Modeled rates were then used for attitude propagation in the standard ERBS fine-attitude algorithm. In spite of the simplicity of the approach, the dynamically propagated attitude matched the attitude propagated with good gyros well for roll and yaw but diverged up to 3 degrees for pitch because of the very low resolution in pitch momentum wheel telemetry. When control anomalies significantly perturb the nominal attitude, the effect of telemetry granularity is reduced and the dynamically propagated attitudes are accurate on all three axes.

  20. Failure propagation tests and analysis at PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, H.; Miyake, O.; Daigo, Y.; Sato, M.

    1984-01-01

    Failure propagation tests have been conducted using the Large Leak Sodium Water Reaction Test Rig (SWAT-1) and the Steam Generator Safety Test Facility (SWAT-3) at PNC in order to establish the safety design of the LMFBR prototype Monju steam generators. Test objectives are to provide data for selecting a design basis leak (DBL), data on the time history of failure propagations, data on the mechanism of the failures, and data on re-use of tubes in the steam generators that have suffered leaks. Eighteen fundamental tests have been performed in an intermediate leak region using the SWAT-1 test rig, and ten failure propagation tests have been conducted in the region from a small leak to a large leak using the SWAT-3 test facility. From the test results it was concluded that a dominant mechanism was tube wastage, and it took more than one minute until each failure propagation occurred. Also, the total leak rate in full sequence simulation tests including a water dump was far less than that of one double-ended-guillotine (DEG) failure. Using such experimental data, a computer code, LEAP (Leak Enlargement and Propagation), has been developed for the purpose of estimating the possible maximum leak rate due to failure propagation. This paper describes the results of the failure propagation tests and the model structure and validation studies of the LEAP code. (author)

  1. Compressive performance and crack propagation in Al alloy/Ti{sub 2}AlC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanaor, D.A.H., E-mail: dorian.hanaor@sydney.edu.au [School of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hu, L. [Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kan, W.H.; Proust, G. [School of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Foley, M. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Karaman, I.; Radovic, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Composite materials comprising a porous Ti{sub 2}AlC matrix and Al 6061 alloy were fabricated by a current-activated pressure assisted melt infiltration process. Coarse, medium and fine meso-structures were prepared with Al alloy filled pores of differing sizes. Materials were subjected to uniaxial compressive loading up to stresses of 668 MPa, leading to the failure of specimens through crack propagation in both phases. As-fabricated and post-failure specimens were analysed by X-ray microscopy and electron microscopy. Quasi-static mechanical testing results revealed that compressive strength was the highest in the fine structured composite materials. While the coarse structured specimens exhibited a compressive strength of 80% relative to this. Reconstructed micro-scale X-ray tomography data revealed different crack propagation mechanisms. Large planar shear cracks propagated throughout the fine structured materials while the coarser specimens exhibited networks of branching cracks propagating preferentially along Al alloy-Ti{sub 2}AlC phase interfaces and through shrinkage pores in the Al alloy phase. Results suggest that control of porosity, compensation for Al alloy shrinkage and enhancement of the Al alloy-Ti{sub 2}AlC phase interfaces are key considerations in the design of high performance metal/Ti{sub 2}AlC phase composites.

  2. Network propagation in the cytoscape cyberinfrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Daniel E; Demchak, Barry; Pratt, Dexter; Sage, Eric; Ideker, Trey

    2017-10-01

    Network propagation is an important and widely used algorithm in systems biology, with applications in protein function prediction, disease gene prioritization, and patient stratification. However, up to this point it has required significant expertise to run. Here we extend the popular network analysis program Cytoscape to perform network propagation as an integrated function. Such integration greatly increases the access to network propagation by putting it in the hands of biologists and linking it to the many other types of network analysis and visualization available through Cytoscape. We demonstrate the power and utility of the algorithm by identifying mutations conferring resistance to Vemurafenib.

  3. Pole solutions for flame front propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Kupervasser, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with solving mathematically the unsteady flame propagation equations. New original mathematical methods for solving complex non-linear equations and investigating their properties are presented. Pole solutions for flame front propagation are developed. Premixed flames and filtration combustion have remarkable properties: the complex nonlinear integro-differential equations for these problems have exact analytical solutions described by the motion of poles in a complex plane. Instead of complex equations, a finite set of ordinary differential equations is applied. These solutions help to investigate analytically and numerically properties of the flame front propagation equations.

  4. Inward propagating chemical waves in Taylor vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Barnaby W; Novak, Jan; Wilson, Mark C T; Britton, Melanie M; Taylor, Annette F

    2010-04-01

    Advection-reaction-diffusion (ARD) waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in steady Taylor-Couette vortices have been visualized using magnetic-resonance imaging and simulated using an adapted Oregonator model. We show how propagating wave behavior depends on the ratio of advective, chemical and diffusive time scales. In simulations, inward propagating spiral flamelets are observed at high Damköhler number (Da). At low Da, the reaction distributes itself over several vortices and then propagates inwards as contracting ring pulses--also observed experimentally.

  5. Propagation considerations in land mobile satellite transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, W. J.; Smith, E. K.

    1985-01-01

    It appears likely that the Land Mobile Satellite Services (LMSS) will be authorized by the FCC for operation in the 800 to 900 MHz (UHF) and possibly near 1500 MHz (L-band). Propagation problems are clearly an important factor in the effectiveness of this service, but useful measurements are few, and produced contradictory interpretations. A first order overview of existing measurements is presented with particular attention to the first two NASA balloon to mobile vehicle propagation experiments. Some physical insight into the interpretation of propagation effects in LMSS transmissions is provided.

  6. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos H. Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FDandE SAE Keyhole Specimen Test Load Histories by finite element analysis. To understand the crack propagation processes under variable amplitude loading, retardation effects are observed

  7. Network propagation in the cytoscape cyberinfrastructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Carlin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Network propagation is an important and widely used algorithm in systems biology, with applications in protein function prediction, disease gene prioritization, and patient stratification. However, up to this point it has required significant expertise to run. Here we extend the popular network analysis program Cytoscape to perform network propagation as an integrated function. Such integration greatly increases the access to network propagation by putting it in the hands of biologists and linking it to the many other types of network analysis and visualization available through Cytoscape. We demonstrate the power and utility of the algorithm by identifying mutations conferring resistance to Vemurafenib.

  8. Wave propagation of spectral energy content in a granular chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shrivastava, Rohit Kumar; Luding, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    A mechanical wave is propagation of vibration with transfer of energy and momentum. Understanding the spectral energy characteristics of a propagating wave through disordered granular media can assist in understanding the overall properties of wave propagation through inhomogeneous materials like

  9. Composite optical vortices in noncollinear Laguerre–Gaussian beams and their propagation in free space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ke; Liu Pusheng; Lü Baida

    2008-01-01

    Taking two Laguerre—Gaussian beams with topological charge l = ± 1 as an example, this paper studies the composite optical vortices formed by two noncollinear Laguerre—Gaussian beams with different phases, amplitudes, waist widths, off-axis distances, and their propagation in free space. It is shown by detailed numerical illustrative examples that the number and location of composite vortices at the waist plane are variable by varying the relative phase β, amplitude ratio η, waist width ratio ζ, or off-axis distance ratio μ. The net topological charge l net is not always equal to the sum l sum of charges of the two component beams. The motion, creation and annihilation of composite vortices take place in the free-space propagation, and the net charge during the propagation remains unchanged and equals to the net charge at the waist plane

  10. Wave fields in real media wave propagation in anisotropic, anelastic, porous and electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Carcione, José M

    2007-01-01

    This book examines the differences between an ideal and a real description of wave propagation, where ideal means an elastic (lossless), isotropic and single-phase medium, and real means an anelastic, anisotropic and multi-phase medium. The analysis starts by introducing the relevant stress-strain relation. This relation and the equations of momentum conservation are combined to give the equation of motion. The differential formulation is written in terms of memory variables, and Biot's theory is used to describe wave propagation in porous media. For each rheology, a plane-wave analysis is performed in order to understand the physics of wave propagation. The book contains a review of the main direct numerical methods for solving the equation of motion in the time and space domains. The emphasis is on geophysical applications for seismic exploration, but researchers in the fields of earthquake seismology, rock acoustics, and material science - including many branches of acoustics of fluids and solids - may als...

  11. Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation is studied theoretically and experimentally. This coupling arises because of the electrochemical double layer, which exists along the solid-grain/fluid-electrolyte boundaries of porous media. Within the double layer, charge is redistributed,

  12. A solid state lightning propagation speed sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Rust, W. David

    1989-01-01

    A device to measure the propagation speeds of cloud-to-ground lightning has been developed. The lightning propagation speed (LPS) device consists of eight solid state silicon photodetectors mounted behind precision horizontal slits in the focal plane of a 50-mm lens on a 35-mm camera. Although the LPS device produces results similar to those obtained from a streaking camera, the LPS device has the advantages of smaller size, lower cost, mobile use, and easier data collection and analysis. The maximum accuracy for the LPS is 0.2 microsec, compared with about 0.8 microsecs for the streaking camera. It is found that the return stroke propagation speed for triggered lightning is different than that for natural lightning if measurements are taken over channel segments less than 500 m. It is suggested that there are no significant differences between the propagation speeds of positive and negative flashes. Also, differences between natural and triggered dart leaders are discussed.

  13. Universal self-similarity of propagating populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores the universal self-similarity of propagating populations. The following general propagation model is considered: particles are randomly emitted from the origin of a d-dimensional Euclidean space and propagate randomly and independently of each other in space; all particles share a statistically common--yet arbitrary--motion pattern; each particle has its own random propagation parameters--emission epoch, motion frequency, and motion amplitude. The universally self-similar statistics of the particles' displacements and first passage times (FPTs) are analyzed: statistics which are invariant with respect to the details of the displacement and FPT measurements and with respect to the particles' underlying motion pattern. Analysis concludes that the universally self-similar statistics are governed by Poisson processes with power-law intensities and by the Fréchet and Weibull extreme-value laws.

  14. Universal self-similarity of propagating populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores the universal self-similarity of propagating populations. The following general propagation model is considered: particles are randomly emitted from the origin of a d -dimensional Euclidean space and propagate randomly and independently of each other in space; all particles share a statistically common—yet arbitrary—motion pattern; each particle has its own random propagation parameters—emission epoch, motion frequency, and motion amplitude. The universally self-similar statistics of the particles’ displacements and first passage times (FPTs) are analyzed: statistics which are invariant with respect to the details of the displacement and FPT measurements and with respect to the particles’ underlying motion pattern. Analysis concludes that the universally self-similar statistics are governed by Poisson processes with power-law intensities and by the Fréchet and Weibull extreme-value laws.

  15. Propagating semantic information in biochemical network models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To enable automatic searches, alignments, and model combination, the elements of systems biology models need to be compared and matched across models. Elements can be identified by machine-readable biological annotations, but assigning such annotations and matching non-annotated elements is tedious work and calls for automation. Results A new method called "semantic propagation" allows the comparison of model elements based not only on their own annotations, but also on annotations of surrounding elements in the network. One may either propagate feature vectors, describing the annotations of individual elements, or quantitative similarities between elements from different models. Based on semantic propagation, we align partially annotated models and find annotations for non-annotated model elements. Conclusions Semantic propagation and model alignment are included in the open-source library semanticSBML, available on sourceforge. Online services for model alignment and for annotation prediction can be used at http://www.semanticsbml.org.

  16. In vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Songjun; Huang, Weichang; Wu, Kunlin; Zhang, Jianxia; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Duan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Paphiopedilum is one of the most popular and rare orchid genera. Members of the genus are sold and exhibited as pot plants and cut flowers. Wild populations of Paphiopedilum are under the threat of extinction due to over-collection and loss of suitable habitats. A reduction in their commercial value through large-scale propagation in vitro is an option to reduce pressure from illegal collection, to attempt to meet commercial needs and to re-establish threatened species back into the wild. Although they are commercially propagated via asymbiotic seed germination, Paphiopedilum are considered to be difficult to propagate in vitro, especially by plant regeneration from tissue culture. This review aims to cover the most important aspects and to provide an up-to-date research progress on in vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum and to emphasize the importance of further improving tissue culture protocols for ex vitro-derived explants.

  17. Constrained bidirectional propagation and stroke segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, S; Gillespie, W; Suen, C Y

    1983-03-01

    A new method for decomposing a complex figure into its constituent strokes is described. This method, based on constrained bidirectional propagation, is suitable for parallel processing. Examples of its application to the segmentation of Chinese characters are presented. 9 references.

  18. The ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2011-01-01

    We present results for a numerical study of the ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge whereby lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used as input to solving the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation. We show that in order to solve completely, the ghost equation must be supplemented by a boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum) which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until 'forced' to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The boundary condition can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity; we also demonstrate that this is not connected to the renormalization. Further, the connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is discussed.

  19. Propagation of synchrotron radiation through nanocapillary structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjeoumikhov, A.; Bjeoumikhova, S.; Riesemeier, H.; Radtke, M.; Wedell, R.

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of synchrotron radiation through nanocapillary structures with channel sizes of 200 nm and periods in the micrometer size has been studied experimentally. It was shown that the propagation through individual capillary channels has a mode formation character. Furthermore it was shown that during the propagation through capillary channels the coherence of synchrotron radiation is partially conserved. Interference of beams propagating through different capillary channels is observed which leads to a periodically modulated distribution of the radiation intensity in a plane far from the exit of the structure. These investigations are of high relevance for the understanding of X-ray transmission through nanocapillaries and the appearance of wave properties at this size scale

  20. Radio Propagation in Open-pit Mines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika; Caldwell, George; Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of an extensive measurement campaign performed at two large iron ore mining centers in Brazil at the 2.6 GHz band. Although several studies focusing on radio propagation in underground mines have been published, measurement data and careful analyses for open......-pit mines are still scarce. Our results aim at filling this gap in the literature. The research is motivated by the ongoing mine automation initiatives, where connectivity becomes critical. This paper presents the first set of results comprising measurements under a gamut of propagation conditions. A second...... paper detailing sub-GHz propagation is also in preparation. The results indicate that conventional wisdom is wrong, in other words, radio-frequency (RF) propagation in surface mines can be far more elaborate than plain free-space line-of-sight conditions. Additionally, the old mining adage “no two mines...

  1. SDEM modelling of fault-propagation folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, O.R.; Egholm, D.L.; Poulsen, Jane Bang

    2009-01-01

    and variations in Mohr-Coulomb parameters including internal friction. Using SDEM modelling, we have mapped the propagation of the tip-line of the fault, as well as the evolution of the fold geometry across sedimentary layers of contrasting rheological parameters, as a function of the increased offset......Understanding the dynamics and kinematics of fault-propagation-folding is important for evaluating the associated hydrocarbon play, for accomplishing reliable section balancing (structural reconstruction), and for assessing seismic hazards. Accordingly, the deformation style of fault-propagation...... a precise indication of when faults develop and hence also the sequential evolution of secondary faults. Here we focus on the generation of a fault -propagated fold with a reverse sense of motion at the master fault, and varying only the dip of the master fault and the mechanical behaviour of the deformed...

  2. ADVANCES IN THE PROPAGATION OF RAMBUTAN TREE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENATA APARECIDA DE ANDRADE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The reality of Brazilian fruit farming is demonstrating increasing demand for sustainable information about native and exotic fruit, which can diversify and elevate the efficiency of fruit exploitation. Research on propagation of fruits tree is very important so that it can provide a protocol for suitable multiplication of this fruitful. Due to the great genetic diversity of rambutan plants, it is recommended the use of vegetative propagated plants. This research aimed to evaluate the propagation of rambutan by cuttings, layering and grafting, as well as seed germination and viability without storage. The results of this research indicate that this species can be successfully propagated by layering, grafting and seeds. We also observed that the germination percentage of seeds kept inside the fruits for six days were not influenced by the different substrates used in this experiment.

  3. ADVANCES IN PEACH, NECTARINE AND PLUM PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEWTON ALEX MAYER

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nursery trees of stone fruits (Prunus spp. are traditionally produced by union of two distinct genotypes - the rootstock and the scion - which, by grafting, form a composite plant that will be maintained throughout of all plant life. In Brazil, the rootstocks are predominantly seed propagated and therefore usually results in heterogeneous trees for vigor and edaphic adaptation. However, with advances in rootstock breeding programs that released cultivars and certification in several countries (notably in Europe, the system will come gradually evolving for vegetative propagation (cuttings and tissue culture and use of seeds of selected rootstocks with specific characteristics and potted nursery trees production. For scion cultivar propagation, the budding system (with its many variations has predominantly been adopted in major producing countries. This review had as objective to comment main propagation methods adopted for rootstocks and scion in peach, nectarine and plum, and recent technical progress obtained as well as the needs of improvement for nursery tree production.

  4. On the Coulomb gauge quark propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloker, M.; Alkofer, R.; Krassnigg, A.; Krenn, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A solution of the quark Dyson-Schwinger equation including transverse gluons is presented. The corresponding retardation effects in the quark propagator are discussed. Especially, their effects on confinement properties and dynamical mass generation are described. (author)

  5. Front Propagation in Stochastic Neural Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Webber, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic multiplicative noise on front propagation in a scalar neural field with excitatory connections. Using a separation of time scales, we represent the fluctuating front in terms of a diffusive-like displacement

  6. Strong seismic ground motion propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seale, S.; Archuleta, R.; Pecker, A.; Bouchon, M.; Mohammadioun, G.; Murphy, A.; Mohammadioun, B.

    1988-10-01

    At the McGee Creek, California, site, 3-component strong-motion accelerometers are located at depths of 166 m, 35 m and 0 m. The surface material is glacial moraine, to a depth of 30.5 m, overlying homfels. Accelerations were recorded from two California earthquakes: Round Valley, M L 5.8, November 23, 1984, 18:08 UTC and Chalfant Valley, M L 6.4, July 21, 1986, 14:42 UTC. By separating out the SH components of acceleration, we were able to determine the orientations of the downhole instruments. By separating out the SV component of acceleration, we were able to determine the approximate angle of incidence of the signal at 166 m. A constant phase velocity Haskell-Thomson model was applied to generate synthetic SH seismograms at the surface using the accelerations recorded at 166 m. In the frequency band 0.0 - 10.0 Hz, we compared the filtered synthetic records to the filtered surface data. The onset of the SH pulse is clearly seen, as are the reflections from the interface at 30.5 m. The synthetic record closely matches the data in amplitude and phase. The fit between the synthetic accelerogram and the data shows that the seismic amplification at the surface is a result of the contrast of the impedances (shear stiffnesses) of the near surface materials

  7. Spark channel propagation in a microbubble liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panov, V. A.; Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru; Vetchinin, S. P.; Pecherkin, V. Ya.; Son, E. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Experimental study on the development of the spark channel from the anode needle under pulsed electrical breakdown of isopropyl alcohol solution in water with air microbubbles has been performed. The presence of the microbubbles increases the velocity of the spark channel propagation and increases the current in the discharge gap circuit. The observed rate of spark channel propagation in microbubble liquid ranges from 4 to 12 m/s, indicating the thermal mechanism of the spark channel development in a microbubble liquid.

  8. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Parrinello, C. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Soni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16{sup 3}{times}40 lattice at {beta}=6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others.

  9. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics); Parrinello, C. (New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Soni, A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16[sup 3][times]40 lattice at [beta]=6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others.

  10. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. (Dept. of Physics, Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)); Parrinello, C. (Physics Dept., New York Univ., NY (United States) Physics Dept., Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Soni, A. (Physics Dept., Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16[sup 3] x 40 lattice at [beta] = 6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others. (orig.)

  11. The structure of the gluon propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinweber, D.B.; Parrinello, C.; Skullerud, J.I.; Williams, A.G

    1999-03-01

    The gluon propagator has been calculated for quenched QCD in the Landau gauge at {beta} = 6.0 for volumes 16{sup 3} x 48 and 32{sup 3} x 64, and at {beta} 6.2 for volume 24{sup 3} x 48. The large volume and different lattice spacings allow us to identify and minimise finite volume and finite lattice spacing artefacts. We also study the tensor structure of the gluon propagator, confirming that it obeys the lattice Landau gauge condition.

  12. Propagation of sound waves in ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described.......Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described....

  13. The quark propagator in a covariant gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, F.D.R.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Zanotti, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The quark propagator is one of the fundamental building blocks of QCD. Results strongly depend on the ansatz for the propagator. Direct simulations of QCD on a space time lattice can provide guidance and constraints on the analytic structure of the quark propagator. On the lattice the infrared and asymptotic behaviour of the quark propagator is of particular interest since it is a reflection of the accuracy of the discretised quark action. In the deep infrared region, artefacts associated with the finite size of the lattice spacing become small. This is the most interesting region as nonperturbative physics lies here. However, the ultraviolet behaviour at large momentum of the propagator will in general strongly deviate from the correct continuum behaviour. This behaviour will be action dependent. Some interesting progress has been made in improving the ultraviolet behaviour of the propagator. A method, recently developed and referred to as tree-level correction, consists of using the knowledge of the tree-level behaviour to eliminate the obvious lattice artefacts. Tree-level correction represents a crucial step in extracting meaningful results for the mass function and the renormalisation function outside of the deep infrared region. The mass function is particularly interesting as it provides insights into the constituent quark mass as a measure of the nonperturbative physics. In this poster I will present results from the analytic structure of the propagator in recent lattice studies for a variety of fermion actions in lattice QCD. I will also present the new ratio method used to tree-level correct these quark propagators

  14. Propagation Environment Assessment Using UAV Electromagnetic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    losses can be taken into account when calculating propagation losses. To correlate the data correctly, the measured received signal power must be...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) In this thesis, we attempt to build a picture of local propagation conditions by measuring ...operators to choose the optimal settings for the maximum detection range of their radar and radio systems. We also investigate the measurement system

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  16. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, C.; Soni, A.

    1992-01-01

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16 3 x40 lattice at β=6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others

  17. Radio propagation measurement and channel modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Salous, Sana

    2013-01-01

    While there are numerous books describing modern wireless communication systems that contain overviews of radio propagation and radio channel modelling, there are none that contain detailed information on the design, implementation and calibration of radio channel measurement equipment, the planning of experiments and the in depth analysis of measured data. The book would begin with an explanation of the fundamentals of radio wave propagation and progress through a series of topics, including the measurement of radio channel characteristics, radio channel sounders, measurement strategies

  18. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    H. Ricardo, Luiz Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FD&E SAE Keyh...

  19. Radial propagation of turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Laurent, L.; Samain, A.

    1993-12-01

    It is shown in this paper that a turbulence propagation can be due to toroidal or non linear mode coupling. An analytical analysis indicates that the toroidal coupling acts through a convection while the non linear effects induce a diffusion. Numerical simulations suggest that the toroidal propagation is usually the fastest process, except perhaps in some highly turbulent regimes. The consequence is the possibility of non local effects on the fluctuation level and the associated transport. (authors). 7 figs., 19 refs

  20. Relationships between GPS-signal propagation errors and EISCAT observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jakowski

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available When travelling through the ionosphere the signals of space-based radio navigation systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS are subject to modifications in amplitude, phase and polarization. In particular, phase changes due to refraction lead to propagation errors of up to 50 m for single-frequency GPS users. If both the L1 and the L2 frequencies transmitted by the GPS satellites are measured, first-order range error contributions of the ionosphere can be determined and removed by difference methods. The ionospheric contribution is proportional to the total electron content (TEC along the ray path between satellite and receiver. Using about ten European GPS receiving stations of the International GPS Service for Geodynamics (IGS, the TEC over Europe is estimated within the geographic ranges -20°≤ λ ≤40°E and 32.5°≤ Φ ≤70°N in longitude and latitude, respectively. The derived TEC maps over Europe contribute to the study of horizontal coupling and transport proces- ses during significant ionospheric events. Due to their comprehensive information about the high-latitude ionosphere, EISCAT observations may help to study the influence of ionospheric phenomena upon propagation errors in GPS navigation systems. Since there are still some accuracy limiting problems to be solved in TEC determination using GPS, data comparison of TEC with vertical electron density profiles derived from EISCAT observations is valuable to enhance the accuracy of propagation-error estimations. This is evident both for absolute TEC calibration as well as for the conversion of ray-path-related observations to vertical TEC. The combination of EISCAT data and GPS-derived TEC data enables a better understanding of large-scale ionospheric processes.

  1. Plasma simulation with the Differential Algebraic Cubic Interpolated Propagation scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, Takayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    A computer code based on the Differential Algebraic Cubic Interpolated Propagation scheme has been developed for the numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation for a one-dimensional plasma with immobile ions. The scheme advects the distribution function and its first derivatives in the phase space for one time step by using a numerical integration method for ordinary differential equations, and reconstructs the profile in phase space by using a cubic polynomial within a grid cell. The method gives stable and accurate results, and is efficient. It is successfully applied to a number of equations; the Vlasov equation, the Boltzmann equation with the Fokker-Planck or the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collision term and the relativistic Vlasov equation. The method can be generalized in a straightforward way to treat cases such as problems with nonperiodic boundary conditions and higher dimensional problems. (author)

  2. Anisotropic ultrasound propagation in a smectic-C liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Umrigar, C.J.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    The results of longitudinal ultrasound propagation in a magnetically aligned smectic-C liquid crystal (p-p' Heptyloxyazoxy benzene) are reported. In the smectic-C phase the plane normals can lie anywhere on a cone with the axis along the magnetic field direction in which the sample was cooled. The effects of the layer normal direction and the molecular orientation within the planes on the velocity anisotropy were separated by cooling the sample into the smectic-C phase at particular orientations of the magnetic field and subsequently rotating the magnetic field. The results were analyzed on the basis of a multidomain model where the azimuthal angle of the plane normal around the field direction was averaged over

  3. Nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, M.

    1985-01-01

    We study the linear and the nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave energy in an inhomogeneous plasma. The drift mode excited in such a plasma is dispersive in nature. The drift wave energy spreads out symmetrically along the direction of inhomogeneity with a finite group velocity. To study the effect of the nonlinear coupling on the propagation of energy in a collision free plasma, we solve the Hasegawa-Mima equation as a mixed initial boundary-value problem. The solutions of the linearized equation are used to check the reliability of our numerical calculations. Additional checks are also performed on the invariants of the system. Our results reveal that a pulse gets distorted as it propagates through the medium. The peak of the pulse propagates with a finite velocity that depends on the amplitude of the initial pulse. The polarity of propagation depends on the initial parameters of the pulse. We have also studied drift wave propagation in a resistive plasma. The Hasegawa-Wakatani equations are used to investigate this problem

  4. Soluble Aβ aggregates can inhibit prion propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarell, Claire J; Quarterman, Emma; Yip, Daniel C-M; Terry, Cassandra; Nicoll, Andrew J; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Farrow, Mark A; Walsh, Dominic M; Collinge, John

    2017-11-01

    Mammalian prions cause lethal neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and consist of multi-chain assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrP C ). Ligands that bind to PrP C can inhibit prion propagation and neurotoxicity. Extensive prior work established that certain soluble assemblies of the Alzheimer's disease (AD)-associated amyloid β-protein (Aβ) can tightly bind to PrP C , and that this interaction may be relevant to their toxicity in AD. Here, we investigated whether such soluble Aβ assemblies might, conversely, have an inhibitory effect on prion propagation. Using cellular models of prion infection and propagation and distinct Aβ preparations, we found that the form of Aβ assemblies which most avidly bound to PrP in vitro also inhibited prion infection and propagation. By contrast, forms of Aβ which exhibit little or no binding to PrP were unable to attenuate prion propagation. These data suggest that soluble aggregates of Aβ can compete with prions for binding to PrP C and emphasize the bidirectional nature of the interplay between Aβ and PrP C in Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Such inhibitory effects of Aβ on prion propagation may contribute to the apparent fall-off in the incidence of sporadic CJD at advanced age where cerebral Aβ deposition is common. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. Propagation of dust-acoustic waves in weakly ionized plasmas with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    63, No. 5. — journal of. November 2004 physics pp. 1021–1030. Propagation of dust-acoustic waves in weakly ionized plasmas with dust-charge fluctuation∗. K K MONDAL. Department of Physics ... has essentially to be considered because inertia is provided by the mass of the dust particles. Moreover, the phase velocity ...

  6. Influence of yielding base and rigid base on propagation of Rayleigh ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study aims to study the propagation of Rayleigh-type wave in a layer, composed of isotropic viscoelastic material of Voigt type, with the effect of yielding base and rigid base in two distinct cases.With the aid of an analytical treatment, closed-form expressions of phase velocity and damped velocity for both the ...

  7. Theoretical Studies of TE-Wave Propagation as a Diagnostic for Electron Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penn, Gregory E.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    The propagation of TE waves is sensitive to the presence of an electron cloud primarily through phase shifts generated by the altered dielectric function, but can also lead to polarization changes and other effects, especially in the presence of magnetic fields. These effects are studied theoretically and also through simulations using WARP. Examples are shown related to CesrTA parameters, and used to observe different regimes of operation as well as to validate estimates of the phase shift.

  8. CLIC Drive Beam Phase Stabilisation

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schulte, Daniel

    The thesis presents phase stability studies for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and focuses in particular on CLIC Drive Beam longitudinal phase stabilisation. This topic constitutes one of the main feasibility challenges for CLIC construction and is an essential component of the current CLIC stabilisation campaign. The studies are divided into two large interrelated sections: the simulation studies for the CLIC Drive Beam stability, and measurements, data analysis and simulations of the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) Drive Beam phase errors. A dedicated software tool has been developed for a step-by-step analysis of the error propagation through the CLIC Drive Beam. It uses realistic RF potential and beam loading amplitude functions for the Drive and Main Beam accelerating structures, complete models of the recombination scheme and compressor chicane as well as of further CLIC Drive Beam modules. The tool has been tested extensively and its functionality has been verified. The phase error propagation at CLIC h...

  9. Argan tree (Argania spinosa L. skeels vegetative propagation by cutting and grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Metougui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The argan tree (Argania spinosa L. skeels is an endemic species of Morocco that plays an important socioeconomic role through the value of its oil. Despite the importance of the species, the main propagation method is still by seeds, which presents several disadvantages, including a long juvenile phase and high genetic variability between plants. The aim of this work is to study from one side the genotype and source of calcium (CaCl2 and Ca(NO32 effects on the cutting yield, and from the other side the effect of the rootstock and the graft genotype on the grafting method’s success and finally compare between the both methods for argan massive propagation. The results exhibited an important genotype effect on the cutting; in fact, each of the four propagated genotypes reacted differently to this propagation method. The calcium treatment did not improve the cutting rooting, whereas its disinfectant effect depended on the genotype. From the other side, the grafting success depended mainly on the graft/rootstock compatibility, but little on the graft genotype and not at all on the rootstock genotype. The comparison between the two propagation methods showed that grafting is more suitable for argan tree propagation. The highest success rate reached through the cutting was 66.7 % with the best genotype, whereas by grafting the best rate was off 95.8% attended by two of twelve graft/rootstock combinations tested.

  10. NLO error propagation exercise: statistical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pack, D.J.; Downing, D.J.

    1985-09-01

    Error propagation is the extrapolation and cumulation of uncertainty (variance) above total amounts of special nuclear material, for example, uranium or 235 U, that are present in a defined location at a given time. The uncertainty results from the inevitable inexactness of individual measurements of weight, uranium concentration, 235 U enrichment, etc. The extrapolated and cumulated uncertainty leads directly to quantified limits of error on inventory differences (LEIDs) for such material. The NLO error propagation exercise was planned as a field demonstration of the utilization of statistical error propagation methodology at the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio from April 1 to July 1, 1983 in a single material balance area formed specially for the exercise. Major elements of the error propagation methodology were: variance approximation by Taylor Series expansion; variance cumulation by uncorrelated primary error sources as suggested by Jaech; random effects ANOVA model estimation of variance effects (systematic error); provision for inclusion of process variance in addition to measurement variance; and exclusion of static material. The methodology was applied to material balance area transactions from the indicated time period through a FORTRAN computer code developed specifically for this purpose on the NLO HP-3000 computer. This paper contains a complete description of the error propagation methodology and a full summary of the numerical results of applying the methodlogy in the field demonstration. The error propagation LEIDs did encompass the actual uranium and 235 U inventory differences. Further, one can see that error propagation actually provides guidance for reducing inventory differences and LEIDs in future time periods

  11. Some problems in generalized electromagnetic thermoelasticity and wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, S.E.S.

    2012-01-01

    Fourier transform techniques are used to derive the solution using the variation of parameters method. The inverse transforms are obtained by using the inversion formula of the exponential Fourier transform together with a numerical method to invert the Laplace transform. Numerical results are computed and represented graphically. In chapter five, we study the propagation of Rayleigh surface waves in a thermoelastic half space permeated by a uniform magnetic field. Numerical results are computed for attenuation coefficient, phase velocity, amplitude of temperature, displacement, stress, induced magnetic field and the induced electric field. Numerical results are represented graphically.

  12. Choriocapillary blood propagation in normal volunteers and in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Hideki; Young-Devall, Josephine; Peyman, Gholam A; Yoneya, Shin

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate early choroidal vascular dye-filling and dye propagation patterns in normal subjects and in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) using indocyanine green (ICG) angiography. Seventeen healthy volunteers (21-81 years old) and six patients with CSC were included. ICG angiography was performed using a modified Topcon ICG video-camera system. Subtracted images were made using the early ICG frames at a time interval of 0.12 s. Ninety frames of time-sequential images for 3 s starting from the initial dye appearance in the choroid were prepared to construct an animated video. The animated video demonstrated dye-filling and propagation patterns at the level of the choroid-choriocapillaris. In normal young volunteers, the initial phase of dye filling appeared as a uniform patchy fluorescence in the sub-foveal area, and then spread evenly in a centrifugal manner in all directions in a wave-like, pulsed fashion towards the equator. In normal older volunteers, the initial phase was similar to that in young volunteers, but centrifugal flow propagation of fluorescence towards the periphery showed an uneven progression and border. In patients with CSC, the initial dye showed a multiple patchy dye appearance with a significant time delay and loss of the centrifugal extension pattern. Using this new approach, various choroidal dye propagation patterns were observed in normal volunteers and in patients with CSC. A video of subtracted images allowed evaluation of the dynamics of dye propagation in the choroid-choriocapillaris.

  13. Characteristics of Electromagnetic Pulse Propagation in Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Nath, S.; Fulton, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the solution of the diffusion equation for an electromagnetic field with a time harmonic term, e(sup iwt), is in the form of a traveling wave whose amplitude attenuates over distance into a conducting medium. As the attenuation is an increasing function of frequency, the high frequency components attenuate more rapidly than those of low ones upon entering a well conducting object. At the same time, the phase velocity of an individual component is also an increasing function of frequency causing a broadening of the pulse traveling inside a conductor. In the results of our previous study of numerical simulations, the problem of using a gaussian input pulse was immediately clear. First, having the dominant frequency components distributed around zero, the movement of the peak was not well defined. Second, with the amplitude of fourier components varying slowly over a wide range, the dispersion-induced blurring of the peak position was seen to be severe. For the present study, we have used a gaussian modulated single frequency sinusoidal wave, i. e., the carrier, as an input pulse in an effort to improve the issues related to the unclear movement of peak and dispersion as described above. This was based on the following two anticipated advantages: First, the packet moves in a conductor at the group velocity calculated at the carrier frequency, which means it is well controllable. Second, the amplitude of frequency components other than that of the carrier can be almost negligible, such that the effect of dispersion can be significantly reduced. A series of experiments of transmitting electromagnetic pulses through aluminum plates of various thickness was performed to test the validity of the above points. The results of numerical simulation based on wave propagation are discussed with respect to the experimental results. Finally, a simple simulation was performed based on diffusion of a continuous sine wave input and the results are compared with

  14. ALVIN investigation of an active propagating rift system, Galapagos 95.5° W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, R.N.; Sinton, J.M.; Kleinrock, M.C.; Yonover, R.N.; MacDonald, K.C.; Miller, S.P.; Searle, R.C.; Christie, D.M.; Atwater, T.M.; Sleep, Norman H.; Johnson, H. Paul; Neal, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    ALVIN investigations have defined the fine-scale structural and volcanic patterns produced by active rift and spreading center propagation and failure near 95.5° W on the Galapagos spreading center. Behind the initial lithospheric rifting, which is propagating nearly due west at about 50 km m.y.−1, a triangular block of preexisting lithosphere is being stretched and fractured, with some recent volcanism along curving fissures. A well-organized seafloor spreading center, an extensively faulted and fissured volcanic ridge, develops ~ 10 km (~ 200,000 years) behind the tectonic rift tip. Regional variations in the chemical compositions of the youngest lavas collected during this program contrast with those encompassing the entire 3 m.y. of propagation history for this region. A maximum in degree of magmatic differentiation occurs about 9 km behind the propagating rift tip, in a region of diffuse rifting. The propagating spreading center shows a gentle gradient in magmatic differentiation culminating at the SW-curving spreading center tip. Except for the doomed rift, which is in a constructional phase, tectonic activity also dominates over volcanic activity along the failing spreading system. In contrast to the propagating rift, failing rift lavas show a highly restricted range of compositions consistent with derivation from a declining upwelling zone accompanying rift failure. The lithosphere transferred from the Cocos to the Nazca plate by this propagator is extensively faulted and characterized by ubiquitous talus in one of the most tectonically disrupted areas of seafloor known. The pseudofault scarps, where the preexisting lithosphere was rifted apart, appear to include both normal and propagator lavas and are thus more lithologically complex than previously thought. Biological communities, probably vestimentiferan tubeworms, occur near the top of the outer pseudofault scarp, although no hydrothermal venting was observed.

  15. Markov transitions and the propagation of chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, A.

    1998-01-01

    The propagation of chaos is a central concept of kinetic theory that serves to relate the equations of Boltzmann and Vlasov to the dynamics of many-particle systems. Propagation of chaos means that molecular chaos, i.e., the stochastic independence of two random particles in a many-particle system, persists in time, as the number of particles tends to infinity. We establish a necessary and sufficient condition for a family of general n-particle Markov processes to propagate chaos. This condition is expressed in terms of the Markov transition functions associated to the n-particle processes, and it amounts to saying that chaos of random initial states propagates if it propagates for pure initial states. Our proof of this result relies on the weak convergence approach to the study of chaos due to Sztitman and Tanaka. We assume that the space in which the particles live is homomorphic to a complete and separable metric space so that we may invoke Prohorov's theorem in our proof. We also show that, if the particles can be in only finitely many states, then molecular chaos implies that the specific entropies in the n-particle distributions converge to the entropy of the limiting single-particle distribution

  16. Thermal propagation and stability in superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, K.E.; Kampwirth, R.T.; Zasadzinski, J.F.; Ducharme, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal propagation and stable hot spots (normal domains) are studied in various high Tsub(c) superconducting films (Nb 3 Sn, Nb, NbN and Nb 3 Ge). A new energy balance is shown to give reasonable quantitative agreement of the dependence of the propagation velocity on the length of short normal domains. The steady state (zero velocity) measurements indicate the existence of two distinct situations for films on high thermal conductivity (sapphire) substrates. For low power per unit area the film and substrate have the same temperature, and the thermal properties of the substrate dominate. However, for higher power densities in short hot spots, the coupling is relatively weak and the thermal properties of the film alone are important. Here a connection is made between the critical current stability of superconducting films and a critical hot spot size for thermal propagation. As a result efficient heat removal is shown to dominate the stabilisation of superconducting films. The strong and weak coupling situations also lead to modifications of the models for propagation velocities on sapphire substrates. Self-healing of hot spots and other phenomena in superconducting film are explained. The potential use of the thermal propagation model in applications of superconductors, especially switches is discussed. (author)

  17. Blackmail propagation on small-world networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Jian-Ping Sang; Zou, Xian-Wu; Tan, Zhi-Jie; Jin, Zhun-Zhi

    2005-06-01

    The dynamics of the blackmail propagation model based on small-world networks is investigated. It is found that for a given transmitting probability λ the dynamical behavior of blackmail propagation transits from linear growth type to logistical growth one with the network randomness p increases. The transition takes place at the critical network randomness pc=1/N, where N is the total number of nodes in the network. For a given network randomness p the dynamical behavior of blackmail propagation transits from exponential decrease type to logistical growth one with the transmitting probability λ increases. The transition occurs at the critical transmitting probability λc=1/, where is the average number of the nearest neighbors. The present work will be useful for understanding computer virus epidemics and other spreading phenomena on communication and social networks.

  18. Adaptive numerical modeling of dynamic crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adouani, H.; Tie, B.; Berdin, C.; Aubry, D.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an adaptive numerical strategy that aims at developing reliable and efficient numerical tools to model dynamic crack propagation and crack arrest. We use the cohesive zone theory as behavior of interface-type elements to model crack. Since the crack path is generally unknown beforehand, adaptive meshing is proposed to model the dynamic crack propagation. The dynamic study requires the development of specific solvers for time integration. As both geometry and finite element mesh of the studied structure evolve in time during transient analysis, the stability behavior of dynamic solver becomes a major concern. For this purpose, we use the space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method, well-known to provide a natural framework to manage meshes that evolve in time. As an important result, we prove that the space-time discontinuous Galerkin solver is unconditionally stable, when the dynamic crack propagation is modeled by the cohesive zone theory, which is highly non-linear. (authors)

  19. Semiclassical propagation: Hilbert space vs. Wigner representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Ivanov, Sergei D.

    2018-03-01

    A unified viewpoint on the van Vleck and Herman-Kluk propagators in Hilbert space and their recently developed counterparts in Wigner representation is presented. Based on this viewpoint, the Wigner Herman-Kluk propagator is conceptually the most general one. Nonetheless, the respective semiclassical expressions for expectation values in terms of the density matrix and the Wigner function are mathematically proven here to coincide. The only remaining difference is a mere technical flexibility of the Wigner version in choosing the Gaussians' width for the underlying coherent states beyond minimal uncertainty. This flexibility is investigated numerically on prototypical potentials and it turns out to provide neither qualitative nor quantitative improvements. Given the aforementioned generality, utilizing the Wigner representation for semiclassical propagation thus leads to the same performance as employing the respective most-developed (Hilbert-space) methods for the density matrix.

  20. Error propagation analysis for a sensor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeater, M.L.; Hockenbury, R.W.; Hawkins, J.; Wilkinson, J.

    1976-01-01

    As part of a program to develop reliability methods for operational use with reactor sensors and protective systems, error propagation analyses are being made for each model. An example is a sensor system computer simulation model, in which the sensor system signature is convoluted with a reactor signature to show the effect of each in revealing or obscuring information contained in the other. The error propagation analysis models the system and signature uncertainties and sensitivities, whereas the simulation models the signatures and by extensive repetitions reveals the effect of errors in various reactor input or sensor response data. In the approach for the example presented, the errors accumulated by the signature (set of ''noise'' frequencies) are successively calculated as it is propagated stepwise through a system comprised of sensor and signal processing components. Additional modeling steps include a Fourier transform calculation to produce the usual power spectral density representation of the product signature, and some form of pattern recognition algorithm

  1. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Hill, K.W.; Izzo, R.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Monticello, D.A.; McGuire, K.; Bell, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Large scale propagation intermittency in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, Ali

    2000-11-01

    Long-term (several minutes to hours) amplitude variations observed in outdoor sound propagation experiments at Disneyland, California, in February 1998 are explained in terms of a time varying index of refraction. The experimentally propagated acoustic signals were received and recorded at several locations ranging from 300 meters to 2,800 meters. Meteorological data was taken as a function of altitude simultaneously with the received signal levels. There were many barriers along the path of acoustic propagation that affected the received signal levels, especially at short ranges. In a downward refraction situation, there could be a random change of amplitude in the predicted signals. A computer model based on the Fast Field Program (FFP) was used to compute the signal loss at the different receiving locations and to verify that the variations in the received signal levels can be predicted numerically. The calculations agree with experimental data with the same trend variations in average amplitude.

  3. Propagating Characteristics of Pulsed Laser in Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the performance of laser ranging system under the rain weather condition, we need to know the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain. In this paper, the absorption and attenuation coefficients were calculated based on the scattering theories in discrete stochastic media, and the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain were simulated and analyzed using Monte-Carlo method. Some simulation results were verified by experiments, and the simulation results are well matched with the experimental data, with the maximal deviation not less than 7.5%. The results indicated that the propagating laser beam would be attenuated and distorted due to the scattering and absorption of raindrops, and the energy attenuation and pulse shape distortion strongly depended on the laser pulse widths.

  4. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  5. Determination and demarcation of fatigue crack initiation phase in rotating bending condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasha, R.A.; Rehman, K.; Shah, M.

    2012-01-01

    In engineering applications, components often experience cyclic loading and therefore, have crack initiation propagation phase. In this research work experimental demarcation of fatigue crack initiation has been investigated. Initiation phase of fatigue life of Aluminium was determined by using single and two step fatigue loading test on four point rotating bending fatigue testing machine. Experimental data is used to determine the distinction between the initiation and propagation phase. Initiation phase is determined at different stress levels. The obtained results demonstrate the effect of stress level on initiation phase and propagation phase. (author)

  6. Field test and theoretical analysis of electromagnetic pulse propagation velocity on crossbonded cable systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Flytkjær; Bak, Claus Leth; Gudmundsdottir, Unnur Stella

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the electromagnetic pulse propagation velocity on a three-phase cable system, consisting of three single core (SC) cables in flat formation with an earth continuity conductor is under study. The propagation velocity is an important parameter for most travelling wave off- and online...... fault location methods and needs to be exactly known for optimal performance of these algorithm types. Field measurements are carried out on a 6.9 km and a 31.4 km 245 kV crossbonded cable system, and the results are analysed using the modal decomposition theory. Several ways for determining...

  7. A comparison on the propagation characteristics of focused Gaussian beam and fundamental Gaussian beam in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shixiong; Guo Hong; Liu Mingwei; Wu Guohua

    2004-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of focused Gaussian beam (FoGB) and fundamental Gaussian beam (FuGB) propagating in vacuum are investigated. Based on the Fourier transform and the angular spectral analysis, the transverse component and the second-order approximate longitudinal component of the electric field are obtained in the paraxial approximation. The electric field components, the phase velocity and the group velocity of FoGB are compared with those of FuGB. The spot size of FoGB is also discussed

  8. Propagation and generation of Josephson radiation in superconductor/insulator superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvil, P.R.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The wave propagation and generation characteristics of a metal-insulator superlattice are calculated in a low-field Landau--Ginzburg model, including Josephson coupling through the insulating layers. It is shown that a significant increase in the phase velocity of the electromagnetic waves propagating in the superlattice occurs when the thickness of the superconducting layers becomes much less than the London penetration depth, suggesting that increased output of Josephson radiation may be achieved from such structures. Wave generation via the ac Josephson effect (in the presence of applied dc electric and magnetic fields) is studied for both parallel and series driven multilayer structures

  9. Laser beam propagation in nematic liquid crystals at the temperature close to the nematicisotropic critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Lin, Yu-Sung; Jiang, I-Min; Tsai, Ming-Shan

    2008-03-17

    This study investigates the optical nonlinearity of beam propagation in homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells at a temperature close to the nematic-isotropic temperature (TNI). The undulate propagation mode with convergent and divergent loops appearing alternately is reported and the thermally enhanced optical reorientation nonlinearity at the focus is described. The optically induced phase transition exists along the pump beam direction. With the application of the conscopic technique, the arrangements of LC at the focus are proposed in this study. Results of this study demonstrate that the evolution of the LC configuration was affected by the pump beam based on the analysis of conoscopic patterns.

  10. Second-Order Statistics for Wave Propagation through Complex Optical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yura, H.T.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    1989-01-01

    Closed-form expressions are derived for various statistical functions that arise in optical propagation through arbitrary optical systems that can be characterized by a complex ABCD matrix in the presence of distributed random inhomogeneities along the optical path. Specifically, within the second......-order Rytov approximation, explicit general expressions are presented for the mutual coherence function, the log-amplitude and phase correlation functions, and the mean-square irradiance that are obtained in propagation through an arbitrary paraxial ABCD optical system containing Gaussian-shaped limiting...

  11. Propagation Velocity of Solid Earth Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, S.

    2017-12-01

    One of the significant considerations in most of the geodetic investigations is to take into account the outcome of Solid Earth tides on the location and its consequent impact on the time series of coordinates. In this research work, the propagation velocity resulting from the Solid Earth tides between the Indian stations is computed. Mean daily coordinates for the stations have been computed by applying static precise point positioning technique for a day. The computed coordinates are used as an input for computing the tidal displacements at the stations by Gravity method along three directions at 1-minute interval for 24 hours. Further the baseline distances are computed between four Indian stations. Computation of the propagation velocity for Solid Earth tides can be done by the virtue of study of the concurrent effect of it in-between the stations of identified baseline distance along with the time consumed by the tides for reaching from one station to another. The propagation velocity helps in distinguishing the impact at any station if the consequence at a known station for a specific time-period is known. Thus, with the knowledge of propagation velocity, the spatial and temporal effects of solid earth tides can be estimated with respect to a known station. As theoretically explained, the tides generated are due to the position of celestial bodies rotating about Earth. So the need of study is to observe the correlation of propagation velocity with the rotation speed of the Earth. The propagation velocity of Solid Earth tides comes out to be in the range of 440-470 m/s. This velocity comes out to be in a good agreement with the Earth's rotation speed.

  12. A formalism for cosmic ray propagation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, R.L.; Badhwar, G.D.; Stephens, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    The continuity equation for cosmic ray propagation is used to derive a set of linear equations interrelating the fluxes of multiply charged nuclei as observed at any particular part of the galaxy. The derivation leads to model indepent definitions for cosmic ray storage time, mean density of target nuclei and effective mass traversed. The set of equations form a common framework for comparisons of theories and observations. As an illustration, it is shown that there exists a large class of propagation models which give the same result as the exponential path length model. (orig./BJ) [de

  13. Underwater Sound Propagation from Marine Pile Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyff, James A

    2016-01-01

    Pile driving occurs in a variety of nearshore environments that typically have very shallow-water depths. The propagation of pile-driving sound in water is complex, where sound is directly radiated from the pile as well as through the ground substrate. Piles driven in the ground near water bodies can produce considerable underwater sound energy. This paper presents examples of sound propagation through shallow-water environments. Some of these examples illustrate the substantial variation in sound amplitude over time that can be critical to understand when computing an acoustic-based safety zone for aquatic species.

  14. Enhancement of in vitro Guayule propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastoor, M. N.; Schubert, W. W.; Petersen, G. R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method for stimulating in vitro propagation of Guayule from a nutrient medium containing Guayule tissue by adding a substituted trialkyl amine bioinducing agent to the nutrient medium is described. Selective or differentiated propagation of shoots or callus is obtained by varying the amounts of substituted trialky amine present in the nutrient medium. The luxuriant growth provided may be processed for its poly isoprene content or may be transferred to a rooting medium for production of whole plants as identical clones of the original tissue. The method also provides for the production of large numbers of Guayule plants having identical desirable properties such as high polyisoprene levels.

  15. Heat and density pulse propagation in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, L.; Riedl, K.; Stroth, U.; Eberhagen, A.; Gruber, O.; Mertens, V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the electron thermal conductivity, derived from the radial propagation of the heat pulse generated by a sawtooth crash, have consistently yielded larger values than those obtained by power balance. It has been proposed that this discrepancy could be the result of the coupling of density and temperature perturbations. Numerical modelling of heat and density pulse propagation on ASDEX has been used to address this question. In addition, measurements at various electron densities and in hydrogen and deuterium were undertaken, with the aim of providing a broad base of experimental measurements for testing the various transport models proposed. (author) 9 refs., 1 fig

  16. Heat and density pulse propagation in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, L.; Riedel, K.; Stroth, U.; Eberhagen, A.; Gruber, O.; Mertens, V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the electron thermal conductivity, derived from the radial propagation of the heat pulse generated by a sawtooth crash, have consistently yielded larger values than those obtained by power balance. It has been proposed that this discrepancy could be the result of the coupling of density and temperature perturbations. Numerical modelling of heat and density pulse propagation on ASDEX has been used to address this question. In addition, measurements at various electron densities and in hydrogen and deuterium were undertaken, with the aim of providing a broad base of experimental measurements for testing the various transport models proposed. (orig.)

  17. Wave propagation and scattering in random media

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimaru, Akira

    1978-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Scattering in Random Media, Volume 2, presents the fundamental formulations of wave propagation and scattering in random media in a unified and systematic manner. The topics covered in this book may be grouped into three categories: waves in random scatterers, waves in random continua, and rough surface scattering. Random scatterers are random distributions of many particles. Examples are rain, fog, smog, hail, ocean particles, red blood cells, polymers, and other particles in a state of Brownian motion. Random continua are the media whose characteristics vary randomly an

  18. Photon Propagation through Linearly Active Dimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Delfino Huerta Morales

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We provide an analytic propagator for non-Hermitian dimers showing linear gain or losses in the quantum regime. In particular, we focus on experimentally feasible realizations of the PT -symmetric dimer and provide their mean photon number and second order two-point correlation. We study the propagation of vacuum, single photon spatially-separable, and two-photon spatially-entangled states. We show that each configuration produces a particular signature that might signal their possible uses as photon switches, semi-classical intensity-tunable sources, or spatially entangled sources to mention a few possible applications.

  19. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals

  20. Propagation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)], E-mail: stanev@bartol.udel.edu

    2009-06-15

    We briefly describe the energy loss processes of ultrahigh-energy protons, heavier nuclei and {gamma}-rays in interactions with the universal photon fields of the Universe. We then discuss the modification of the accelerated cosmic-ray energy spectrum in propagation by the energy loss processes and the charged cosmic-ray scattering in the extragalactic magnetic fields. The energy lost by the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays goes into {gamma}-rays and neutrinos that carry additional information about the sources of highest energy particles. The new experimental results of the HiRes and the Auger collaborations are discussed in view of the predictions from propagation calculations.

  1. Light propagation and interaction observed with electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Word, Robert C.; Fitzgerald, J.P.S.; Könenkamp, R., E-mail: rkoe@pdx.edu

    2016-01-15

    We discuss possibilities for a microscopic optical characterization of thin films and surfaces based on photoemission electron microscopy. We show that propagating light with wavelengths across the visible range can readily be visualized, and linear and non-linear materials properties can be evaluated non-invasively with nanometer spatial resolution. While femtosecond temporal resolution can be achieved in pump-probe-type experiments, the interferometric approach presented here has typical image frame times of ~200 fs. - Highlights: • Non-linear photoemission electron micrographs are analyzed. • Optical properties of transparent and metallic thin films are determined. • Light propagation, surface plasmon resonances and energy transfer are discussed.

  2. Optimization of directional elastic energy propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Chang, Hannah R.; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how topology optimization can be used to design a periodically perforated plate, in order to obtain a tailored anisotropic group velocity profile. The main method is demonstrated on both low and high frequency bending wave propagation in an aluminum plate......, but is general in the sense that it could be used to design periodic structures with frequency dependent group velocity profiles for any kind of elastic wave propagation. With the proposed method the resulting design is manufacturable. Measurements on an optimized design compare excellently with the numerical...

  3. Sound Propagation An impedance Based Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    2010-01-01

    In Sound Propagation: An Impedance Based Approach , Professor Yang-Hann Kim introduces acoustics and sound fields by using the concept of impedance. Kim starts with vibrations and waves, demonstrating how vibration can be envisaged as a kind of wave, mathematically and physically. One-dimensional waves are used to convey the fundamental concepts. Readers can then understand wave propagation in terms of characteristic and driving point impedance. The essential measures for acoustic waves, such as dB scale, octave scale, acoustic pressure, energy, and intensity, are explained. These measures are

  4. Information and influence propagation in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei; Lakshmanan, Laks V S

    2013-01-01

    Research on social networks has exploded over the last decade. To a large extent, this has been fueled by the spectacular growth of social media and online social networking sites, which continue growing at a very fast pace, as well as by the increasing availability of very large social network datasets for purposes of research. A rich body of this research has been devoted to the analysis of the propagation of information, influence, innovations, infections, practices and customs through networks. Can we build models to explain the way these propagations occur? How can we validate our models

  5. In vitro propagation of Morus alba L. in semisolid culture medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Salas Barbosa

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Apical buds as explants were used with the objective to propagate in vitro mulberry plants in semisolid MS culture medium suplemented with 6-BAP and KIN in their establishment and, with different combinations of 6-BAP with ANA in the multiplication phase. In vitro plants were evaluated during the acclimatization phase. It is necessary to supplement the basal MS culture media with 0.5 mg.l-1 of 6-BAP to induce the sprouting and, 0.5 mg.l-1 of 6-BAP and 0.5 mg.l-1 of ANA to multiply the mulberry by nodal segments. In the acclimatization phase a 95% of survival, 30.2 cm of height, 9.8 leaves and 2.02 g.plant-1 of dry mass was observed. In vitro propagation of mulberry was achieved as an alternative for plants production. Key words: acclimatization, apical buds, establishment, explant, shooting

  6. Wave Propagation in a coaxial waveguide with a periodic slot array

    CERN Document Server

    Alesini, D; Garganese, C; Migliorati, M; Palumbo, L

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present the numerical and experimental study of the electromagnetic elds that propagate in a coaxial waveguide having periodic slots in the inner conductor. The aim of the work is to estimate the e ects of the holes on the phase velocity of the eld propagating in structures like the LHC liner, and to which extent these elds can be considered synchronous with the generating beam. To this end we have performed a numerical analysis by using the MAFIA simulation code, and have obtained, for a given geometry, the ampli- tude of the slowing down of the phase velocity due to the presence of the slot array. We have then performed a set of measurements of this e ect on a simple coaxial resonator, measuring the shift of the resonance frequencies produced by the slots. This shift, related to the phase velocity, has been compared with the results obtained with the simulations.

  7. Demonstration of slow light propagation in an optical fiber under dual pump light with co-propagation and counter-propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Liu, Jianjun; Wang, Yuda; Yang, Yujing; Gao, Yuan; Lv, Pin; Jiang, Qiuli

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a general theory of coherent population oscillation effect in an Er3+ -doped fiber under the dual-frequency pumping laser with counter-propagation and co-propagation at room temperature is presented. Using the numerical simulation, in case of dual frequency light waves (1480 nm and 980 nm) with co-propagation and counter-propagation, we analyze the effect of the pump optical power ratio (M) on the group speed of light. The group velocity of light can be varied with the change of M. We research the time delay and fractional delay in an Er3+-doped fiber under the dual-frequency pumping laser with counter-propagation and co-propagation. Compared to the methods of the single pumping, the larger time delay can be got by using the technique of dual-frequency laser pumped fiber with co-propagation and counter-propagation.

  8. Propagation of low frequency geomagnetic field fluctuations in Antarctica: comparison between two polar cap stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Santarelli

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We conduct a statistical analysis of the coherence and phase difference of low frequency geomagnetic fluctuations between two Antarctic stations, Mario Zucchelli Station (geographic coordinates: 74.7° S, 164.1° E; corrected geomagnetic coordinates: 80.0° S, 307.7° E and Scott Base (geographic coordinates: 77.8° S 166.8° E; corrected geomagnetic coordinates: 80.0° S 326.5° E, both located in the polar cap. Due to the relative position of the stations, whose displacement is essentially along a geomagnetic parallel, the phase difference analysis allows to determine the direction of azimuthal propagation of geomagnetic fluctuations. The results show that coherent fluctuations are essentially detectable around local geomagnetic midnight and, in a minor extent, around noon; moreover, the phase difference reverses in the night time hours, indicating a propagation direction away from midnight, and also around local geomagnetic noon, indicating a propagation direction away from the subsolar point. The nigh time phase reversal is more clear for southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions, suggesting a relation with substorm activity.

    The introduction, in this analysis, of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field conditions, gave interesting results, indicating a relation with substorm activity during nighttime hours.

    We also conducted a study of three individual pulsation events in order to find a correspondence with the statistical behaviour. In particular, a peculiar event, characterized by quiet magnetospheric and northward interplanetary magnetic field conditions, shows a clear example of waves propagating away from the local geomagnetic noon; two more events, occurring during southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions, in one case even during a moderate storm, show waves propagating away from the local geomagnetic midnight.

  9. Propagation of low frequency geomagnetic field fluctuations in Antarctica: comparison between two polar cap stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Santarelli

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We conduct a statistical analysis of the coherence and phase difference of low frequency geomagnetic fluctuations between two Antarctic stations, Mario Zucchelli Station (geographic coordinates: 74.7° S, 164.1° E; corrected geomagnetic coordinates: 80.0° S, 307.7° E and Scott Base (geographic coordinates: 77.8° S 166.8° E; corrected geomagnetic coordinates: 80.0° S 326.5° E, both located in the polar cap. Due to the relative position of the stations, whose displacement is essentially along a geomagnetic parallel, the phase difference analysis allows to determine the direction of azimuthal propagation of geomagnetic fluctuations. The results show that coherent fluctuations are essentially detectable around local geomagnetic midnight and, in a minor extent, around noon; moreover, the phase difference reverses in the night time hours, indicating a propagation direction away from midnight, and also around local geomagnetic noon, indicating a propagation direction away from the subsolar point. The nigh time phase reversal is more clear for southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions, suggesting a relation with substorm activity. The introduction, in this analysis, of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field conditions, gave interesting results, indicating a relation with substorm activity during nighttime hours. We also conducted a study of three individual pulsation events in order to find a correspondence with the statistical behaviour. In particular, a peculiar event, characterized by quiet magnetospheric and northward interplanetary magnetic field conditions, shows a clear example of waves propagating away from the local geomagnetic noon; two more events, occurring during southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions, in one case even during a moderate storm, show waves propagating away from the local geomagnetic midnight.

  10. Designing for sustained adoption: A model of developing educational innovations for successful propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Raina; Henderson, Charles; Cole, Renée; Froyd, Jeffrey E.; Friedrichsen, Debra; Stanford, Courtney

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] The physics education research community has produced a wealth of knowledge about effective teaching and learning of college level physics. Based on this knowledge, many research-proven instructional strategies and teaching materials have been developed and are currently available to instructors. Unfortunately, these intensive research and development activities have failed to influence the teaching practices of many physics instructors. This paper describes interim results of a larger study to develop a model of designing materials for successful propagation. The larger study includes three phases, the first two of which are reported here. The goal of the first phase was to characterize typical propagation practices of education developers, using data from a survey of 1284 National Science Foundation (NSF) principal investigators and focus group data from eight disciplinary groups of NSF program directors. The goal of the second phase was to develop an understanding of successful practice by studying three instructional strategies that have been well propagated. The result of the first two phases is a tentative model of designing for successful propagation, which will be further validated in the third phase through purposeful sampling of additional well-propagated instructional strategies along with typical education development projects. We found that interaction with potential adopters was one of the key missing ingredients in typical education development activities. Education developers often develop a polished product before getting feedback, rely on mass-market communication channels for dissemination, and do not plan for supporting adopters during implementation. The tentative model resulting from this study identifies three key propagation activities: interactive development, interactive dissemination, and support of adopters. Interactive development

  11. Vortex instability in turbulent free-space propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Martin P. J.

    2018-04-01

    The spatial structuring of optical fields is integral within many next generation optical metrology and communication techniques. A verifiable physical model of the propagation of these optical fields in a turbulent environment is important for developing effective mitigation techniques for the modal degradation that occurs in a free-space link. We present a method to simulate this modal degradation that agrees with recently reported experimental findings. A 1.5 km free-space link is emulated by decomposing the optical turbulence that accumulates over a long distance link, into many, weakly perturbing steps of 10 m. This simulation shows that the high-order vortex at the centre of the helical phase profiles in modes that carry orbital angular momentum of | {\\ell }| ≥slant 2{\\hslash } are unstable and fracture into many vortices when they propagate over the link. This splitting presents issues for the application of turbulence mitigation techniques. The usefulness of pre-correction, post-correction, and complex field conjugation techniques are discussed.

  12. Spatial-temporal dynamics of broadband terahertz Bessel beam propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenova, V A; Kulya, M S; Bespalov, V G

    2016-01-01

    The unique properties of narrowband and broadband terahertz Bessel beams have led to a number of their applications in different fields, for example, for the depth of focusing and resolution enhancement in terahertz imaging. However, broadband terahertz Bessel beams can probably be also used for the diffraction minimization in the short-range broadband terahertz communications. For this purpose, the study of spatial-temporal dynamics of the broadband terahertz Bessel beams is needed. Here we present a simulation-based study of the propagating in non-dispersive medium broadband Bessel beams generated by a conical axicon lens. The algorithm based on scalar diffraction theory was used to obtain the spatial amplitude and phase distributions of the Bessel beam in the frequency range from 0.1 to 3 THz at the distances 10-200 mm from the axicon. Bessel beam field is studied for the different spectral components of the initial pulse. The simulation results show that for the given parameters of the axicon lens one can obtain the Gauss-Bessel beam generation in the spectral range from 0.1 to 3 THz. The length of non-diffraction propagation for a different spectral components was measured, and it was shown that for all spectral components of the initial pulse this length is about 130 mm. (paper)

  13. Uncertainty propagation in a multiscale model of nanocrystalline plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koslowski, M.; Strachan, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    We characterize how uncertainties propagate across spatial and temporal scales in a physics-based model of nanocrystalline plasticity of fcc metals. Our model combines molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize atomic-level processes that govern dislocation-based-plastic deformation with a phase field approach to dislocation dynamics (PFDD) that describes how an ensemble of dislocations evolve and interact to determine the mechanical response of the material. We apply this approach to a nanocrystalline Ni specimen of interest in micro-electromechanical (MEMS) switches. Our approach enables us to quantify how internal stresses that result from the fabrication process affect the properties of dislocations (using MD) and how these properties, in turn, affect the yield stress of the metallic membrane (using the PFMM model). Our predictions show that, for a nanocrystalline sample with small grain size (4 nm), a variation in residual stress of 20 MPa (typical in today's microfabrication techniques) would result in a variation on the critical resolved shear yield stress of approximately 15 MPa, a very small fraction of the nominal value of approximately 9 GPa. - Highlights: → Quantify how fabrication uncertainties affect yield stress in a microswitch component. → Propagate uncertainties in a multiscale model of single crystal plasticity. → Molecular dynamics quantifies how fabrication variations affect dislocations. → Dislocation dynamics relate variations in dislocation properties to yield stress.

  14. Obliquely propagating large amplitude solitary waves in charge neutral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Verheest

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals in a consistent way with the implications, for the existence of large amplitude stationary structures in general plasmas, of assuming strict charge neutrality between electrons and ions. With the limit of pair plasmas in mind, electron inertia is retained. Combining in a fluid dynamic treatment the conservation of mass, momentum and energy with strict charge neutrality has indicated that nonlinear solitary waves (as e.g. oscillitons cannot exist in electron-ion plasmas, at no angle of propagation with respect to the static magnetic field. Specifically for oblique propagation, the proof has turned out to be more involved than for parallel or perpendicular modes. The only exception is pair plasmas that are able to support large charge neutral solitons, owing to the high degree of symmetry naturally inherent in such plasmas. The nonexistence, in particular, of oscillitons is attributed to the breakdown of the plasma approximation in dealing with Poisson's law, rather than to relativistic effects. It is hoped that future space observations will allow to discriminate between oscillitons and large wave packets, by focusing on the time variability (or not of the phase, since the amplitude or envelope graphs look very similar.

  15. Electrical stimulation induces propagated colonic contractions in an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aellen, S; Wiesel, P H; Gardaz, J-P; Schlageter, V; Bertschi, M; Virag, N; Givel, J-C

    2009-02-01

    Direct colonic electrical stimulation may prove to be a treatment option for specific motility disorders such as chronic constipation. The aim of this study was to provoke colonic contractions using electrical stimulation delivered from a battery-operated device. Electrodes were inserted into the caecal seromuscular layer of eight anaesthetized pigs. Contractions were induced by a neurostimulator (Medtronic 3625). Caecal motility was measured simultaneously by video image analysis, manometry and a technique assessing colonic transit. Caecal contractions were generated using 8-10 V amplitude, 1000 micros pulse width, 120 Hz frequency for 10-30 s, with an intensity of 7-15 mA. The maximal contraction strength was observed after 20-25 s. Electrical stimulation was followed by a relaxation phase of 1.5-2 min during which contractions propagated orally and aborally over at least 10 cm. Spontaneous and stimulated caecal motility values were significantly different for both intraluminal pressure (mean(s.d.) 332(124) and 463(187) mmHg respectively; P < 0.001, 42 experiments) and movement of contents (1.6(0.9) and 3.9(2.8) mm; P < 0.001, 40 experiments). Electrical stimulation modulated caecal motility, and provoked localized and propagated colonic contractions.

  16. Propagating Disturbances in Coronal Loops: A Detailed Analysis of Propagation Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiddie, G.; De Moortel, I.; Del Zanna, G.; McIntosh, S. W.; Whittaker, I.

    2012-08-01

    Quasi-periodic disturbances have been observed in the outer solar atmosphere for many years. Although first interpreted as upflows (Schrijver et al., Solar Phys. 187, 261, 1999), they have been widely regarded as slow magneto-acoustic waves, due to their observed velocities and periods. However, recent observations have questioned this interpretation, as periodic disturbances in Doppler velocity, line width, and profile asymmetry were found to be in phase with the intensity oscillations (De Pontieu and McIntosh, Astrophys. J. 722, 1013, 2010; Tian, McIntosh, and De Pontieu, Astrophys. J. Lett. 727, L37, 2011), suggesting that the disturbances could be quasi-periodic upflows. Here we conduct a detailed analysis of the velocities of these disturbances across several wavelengths using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We analysed 41 examples, including both sunspot and non-sunspot regions of the Sun. We found that the velocities of propagating disturbances (PDs) located at sunspots are more likely to be temperature dependent, whereas the velocities of PDs at non-sunspot locations do not show a clear temperature dependence. This suggests an interpretation in terms of slow magneto-acoustic waves in sunspots but the nature of PDs in non-sunspot (plage) regions remains unclear. We also considered on what scale the underlying driver is affecting the properties of the PDs. Finally, we found that removing the contribution due to the cooler ions in the 193 Å wavelength suggests that a substantial part of the 193 Å emission of sunspot PDs can be attributed to the cool component of 193 Å.

  17. IMPROVING PROPAGATION SUCCESS OF D. MELANOXYLON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    ABSTRACT. Dalbergia melanoxylon is a plant with valuable wood in the world and therefore is over harvested for timber while its regeneration is very low. The propagation efforts by techniques such as tissue culture or mycorrhiza have not been investigated which instigated conduction of this study. Soil and cuttings were ...

  18. Observing mode propagation inside a laser cavity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available components, to study the forward and backward propagating waves everywhere inside a laser cavity. We verify the previous theoretical-only prediction that the two fields may differ substantially in their amplitude profile, even for stable resonator systems, a...

  19. Interstellar propagation of low energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarsky, C.J.

    1975-01-01

    Wave particles interactions prevent low energy cosmic rays from propagating at velocities much faster than the Alfven velocity, reducing their range by a factor of order 50. Therefore, supernovae remnants cannot fill the neutral portions of the interstellar medium with 2 MeV cosmic rays [fr

  20. Wave propagation in non-linear media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, L.J.F.

    1965-01-01

    The problem of the propagation of electromagnetic waves through solids is essentially one of interaction between light quanta and matter. The most fundamental and general treatment of this subject is therefore undoubtedly based on the quantummechanical theory of this interaction. Nevertheless, a

  1. Prestress mediates force propagation into the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shaohua; Chen Jianxin; Butler, James P.; Wang Ning

    2005-01-01

    Several reports show that the nucleus is 10 times stiffer than the cytoplasm. Hence, it is not clear if intra-nuclear structures can be directly deformed by a load of physiologic magnitudes. If a physiologic load could not directly deform intra-nuclear structures, then signaling inside the nucleus would occur only via the mechanisms of diffusion or translocation. Using a synchronous detection approach, we quantified displacements of nucleolar structures in cultured airway smooth muscle cells in response to a localized physiologic load (∼0.4 μm surface deformation) via integrin receptors. The nucleolus exhibited significant displacements. Nucleolar structures also exhibited significant deformation, with the dominant strain being the bulk strain. Increasing the pre-existing tensile stress (prestress) in the cytoskeleton significantly increased the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus (defined as nucleolus displacement per surface deformation) whereas decreasing the prestress significantly lowered the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus. Abolishing the stress fibers/actin bundles by plating the cells on poly-L-lysine-coated dishes dramatically inhibited stress propagation to the nucleolus. These results demonstrate that the prestress in the cytoskeleton is crucial in mediating stress propagation to the nucleolus, with implications for direct mechanical regulation of nuclear activities and functions

  2. Wave propagation retrieval method for chiral metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the wave propagation method for the retrieving of effective properties of media with circularly polarized eigenwaves, in particularly for chiral metamaterials. The method is applied for thick slabs and provides bulk effective parameters. Its strong sides are the absence...

  3. Nonlinear propagation in fusion laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, E.S.; Glass, A.J.; Glaze, J.A.

    1977-11-01

    This report was assembled to provide a brief review of the historical development of the study of self-focusing and nonlinear light propagation and its impact on the design of large, Nd-glass lasers for fusion research. No claim to completeness is made, but we feel that the enclosed summary does not miss many of the major developments in the field

  4. A new exact quantum mechanical propagator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegel, F.W.; van Andel, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors derive a closed-form expression for the time-dependent propagator for a quantum mechanical particle which is subject to an external force which is the sum of (i) a reflecting half-plane barrier with a straight edge, and (ii) a harmonic force pointing towards a point of the edge. This new

  5. Generation and propagation of synchro - Cherenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintzmann, H.; Novello, M.; Schruefer, E.

    1981-01-01

    Particles moving along the magnetic field lines emit under favorable conditions Cherenkov radiation in a cold, rarefied plasma. A peculiar phenomenon occurs for curved magnetic fields: in for example a toroidal magnetic field the radiation spirals inward and approaches a resonance. Both the generation and the study of the propagation of these Cherenkov modes appear to be within reach of present technology. (Author) [pt

  6. Variation principle for nonlinear wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.; Lee, Y.C.; Nishikawa, Kyoji; Hojo, H.; Yoshida, Y.

    1976-01-01

    Variation principle is derived which determines stationary nonlinear propagation of electrostatic waves in the self-consistent density profile. Example is given for lower-hybrid waves and the relation to the variation principle for the Lagrangian density of electromagnetic fluids is discussed

  7. Measuring propagation speed of Coulomb fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangro, R. de; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Pizzella, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    The problem of gravity propagation has been subject of discussion for quite a long time: Newton, Laplace and, in relatively more modern times, Eddington pointed out that, if gravity propagated with finite velocity, planet motion around the sun would become unstable due to a torque originating from time lag of the gravitational interactions. Such an odd behavior can be found also in electromagnetism, when one computes the propagation of the electric fields generated by a set of uniformly moving charges. As a matter of fact the Lienard-Weichert retarded potential leads to the same formula as the one obtained assuming that the electric field propagate with infinite velocity. The Feynman explanation for this apparent paradox was based on the fact that uniform motions last indefinitely. To verify such an explanation, we performed an experiment to measure the time/space evolution of the electric field generated by an uniformly moving electron beam. The results we obtain, on a finite lifetime kinematical state, are compatible with an electric field rigidly carried by the beam itself. (orig.)

  8. An Immunization Strategy Based on Propagation Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the ubiquity of smart phones, wearable equipment, and wireless sensors, the topologies of networks composed by them change along with time. The immunization strategies in which network immune nodes are chosen by analyzing the static aggregation network topologies have been challenged. The studies about interaction propagations between two pathogens show that the interaction can change propagation threshold and the final epidemic size of each other, which provides a new thinking of immunization method. The eradication or inhibition of the virus can be achieved through the spread of its opposite party. Here, we put forward an immunization strategy whose implementation does not depend on the analysis of network topology. The immunization agents are randomly placed on a few of individuals of network and spread out from these individuals on network in a propagation method. The immunization agents prevent virus infecting their habitat nodes with certain immune success rate. The analysis and simulation of evolution equation of the model show that immune propagation has a significant impact on the spread threshold and steady-state density of virus on a finite size of BA networks. Simulations on some real-world networks also suggest that the immunization strategy is feasible and effective.

  9. Satellite-to-ground radiowave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Allnutt, JE

    2011-01-01

    This book is a follow up to the award winning first edition and is written as a comprehensive guide for those who need to obtain a working knowledge of radiowave propagation on satellite-to-ground links at frequencies above 1 GHz, and as a reference book for experts in the field.

  10. Slow light pulse propagation in dispersive media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    broadening or break-up of the pulse may be observed. The transition from linear to nonlinear pulse propagation is quantified in terms of the spectral width of the pulse. To cite this article: T.R. Nielsen et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009). (C) 2009 Academie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All...... rights reserved....

  11. Propagation by Cuttings, Layering and Division

    OpenAIRE

    Relf, Diane; Ball, Elizabeth Carter

    2009-01-01

    The major methods of asexual propagation are cuttings, layering, division, and budding/grafting. Cuttings involve rooting a severed piece of the parent plant; layering involves rooting a part of the parent and then severing it; and budding and grafting are joining two plant parts from different varieties.

  12. Wave propagation in complex structures with LEGO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancellotti, V.; Hon, de B.P.; Tijhuis, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    We present the extension of the linear embedding via Green's operators (LEGO) scheme to problems that involve elementary sources localized inside complex structures made of different dielectric media with inclusions. We show how this new feature allows solving problems of wave propagation within,

  13. Vertical laser beam propagation through the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minott, P. O.; Bufton, J. L.; Schaefer, W. H.; Grolemund, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the earth's atmosphere and its effects upon laser beams was investigated in a series of balloon borne, optical propagation experiments. These experiments were designed to simulate the space to ground laser link. An experiment to determine the amplitude fluctuation, commonly called scintillation, caused by the atmosphere was described.

  14. Strategies for Seed Propagation of Native Forbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan E. Meyer

    2006-01-01

    Native forbs are an increasingly important component of container production for many public and private nurseries. Propagators are often called upon to grow species with unknown requirements. A systematic approach is required to obtain plants from seeds of these species, beginning with determining what is a propagule and evaluating seed quality. Next, seed dormancy...

  15. Accelerating Generalized Polygon Beams and Their Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yun-Tian; Zhang Zhi-Gang; Cheng Teng; Zhang Qing-Chuan; Wu Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Accelerating beams with intensity cusps and exotic topological properties are drawing increasing attention as they have extensive uses in many intriguing fields. We investigate the structural features of accelerating polygon beams, show their generalized mathematical form theoretically, and discuss the even-numbered polygon beams. Furthermore, we also carry out the experiment and observe the intensity evolution during their propagation

  16. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Random Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of a narrow frequency band beam of electromagnetic waves in a medium with randomly varying index of refraction is considered. A novel formulation of the governing equation is proposed. An equation for the average Green function (or transition probability) can then be derived...

  17. On propagation of radiation in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzek, V.; Grigorijev, V.I.

    1984-11-01

    The description of the propagation of the photons in the crystal is given in the framework of a quantum field-theoretical model that can be solved exactly. Besides this, the quantum version of the Ewald-Oseen extinction theorem is proved. (author)

  18. Modeling of ultrasound propagation through contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootens, J.J.F.A.H.; Mischi, M.; Böhmer, M.; Korsten, H.; Aarts, R.M.; Vander Sloten, Jos; Verdonck, Pascal; Nyssen, Marc

    2008-01-01

    In the past years many advances have been made in the detection of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) by exploiting their nonlinear behavior. However, little attention has been paid to the nonlinear distortion of ultrasound (US) waves propagating through contrast media. The aim of this study is to

  19. Simulation of action potential propagation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, Vladimir; Nerush, Vladimir; Orlova, Lyubov; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2011-12-21

    Action potential is considered to be one of the primary responses of a plant to action of various environmental factors. Understanding plant action potential propagation mechanisms requires experimental investigation and simulation; however, a detailed mathematical model of plant electrical signal transmission is absent. Here, the mathematical model of action potential propagation in plants has been worked out. The model is a two-dimensional system of excitable cells; each of them is electrically coupled with four neighboring ones. Ion diffusion between excitable cell apoplast areas is also taken into account. The action potential generation in a single cell has been described on the basis of our previous model. The model simulates active and passive signal transmission well enough. It has been used to analyze theoretically the influence of cell to cell electrical conductivity and H(+)-ATPase activity on the signal transmission in plants. An increase in cell to cell electrical conductivity has been shown to stimulate an increase in the length constant, the action potential propagation velocity and the temperature threshold, while the membrane potential threshold being weakly changed. The growth of H(+)-ATPase activity has been found to induce the increase of temperature and membrane potential thresholds and the reduction of the length constant and the action potential propagation velocity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fatigue-propagation du melange polymere polystyrene/polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Martin N.

    The interrelations between the morphology of PS/HDPE and PS/SEBS/HDPE immiscible polymer blends and their mechanical behavior, namely in monotonic loading and in cyclic loading, were studied. As predicted by theory, high shear rates encountered during extrusion blending led to efficient minor phase emulsification in PS/HDPE blends for which the viscosity ratio approaches unity. Consequently, the emulsifying effect of an SEBS triblock copolymer employed as a compatibilizer was found to be negligible. In subsequent molding process, disintegration, shape relaxation and coarsening of the minor phase domains were responsible for the morphological evolution of the blends. In the compression molding process, morphological observations showed that the rate of minor phase coarsening followed the predictions of the Ostwald ripening theory, in agreement with the rheological analysis. In the injection molding process, minor phase coarsening was attributed to shear coalescence. The fatigue crack propagation behavior of injection-molded specimens of pure PS as well as of 95/5, 85/15 and 70/30 PS/HDPE blends and of 95/(0.5/4.5), 85/(1.5/13.5) and 70/(3/27) PS/(SEBS/HDPE) blends was then studied. The fatigue fracture surface features of specimens of pure PS as well as of PS/HDPE and PS/SEBS/HDPE blends were analyzed in detail in order to interpret their fatigue crack propagation behavior. In pure PS specimens, discontinuous growth bands, associated with the fracture of crazes in the plastic zone, formed at low fatigue crack growth rates, large dimple-like features at intermediate fatigue crack growth rates and fatigue striations at high fatigue crack growth rates. The fracture toughness of injection-molded specimens of pure PS as well as of 95/5, 85/15 and 70/30 PS/HDPE blends and of 95/(0.5/4.5) PS/(SEBS/HDPE), 85/(1.5/13.5) and 70/(3/27) PS/(SEBS/HDPE) was finally studied. The results showed that the addition of HDPE to PS led to a reduction of the fracture toughness KQ

  1. Proceedings of the Twentieth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX XX) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Nassar (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Meeting and associated Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop convene yearly to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom)industry, academia, and government with an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation have peer discussion of work in progress, disseminate propagation results, and interact with the satcom industry. NAPEX XX, in Fairbanks, Alaska, June 4-5, 1996, had three sessions: (1) "ACTS Propagation Study: Background, Objectives, and Outcomes," covered results from thirteen station-years of Ka-band experiments; (2) "Propagation Studies for Mobile and Personal Satellite Applications," provided the latest developments in measurement, modeling, and dissemination of propagation phenomena of interest to the mobile, personal, and aeronautical satcom industry; and (3)"Propagation Research Topics," covered a range of topics including space/ground optical propagation experiments, propagation databases, the NASA Propagation Web Site, and revision plans for the NASA propagation effects handbooks. The ACTS Miniworkshop, June 6, 1996, covered ACTS status, engineering support for ACTS propagation terminals, and the ACTS Propagation Data Center. A plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  2. Reinforcement against crack propagation of PWR absorbers by development of boron-carbon-hafnium composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provot, B.; Herter, P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to improve the mechanical behaviour of materials used as neutron absorbers in nuclear reactors, we have developed CERCER or CERMET composites with boron and hafnium. Thus a new composite B 4 C/HfB 2 has been especially studied. We have identified three kinds of degradation under irradiation (thermal gradient, swelling due to fission products and accidental corrosion) that induce imposed deformations cracking phenomena. Mechanical behaviour and crack propagation resistance have been studied by ball-on-three-balls and double torsion tests. A special device was developed to enable crack propagation and associated stress intensity factor measurements. Effects of structure and of a second phase are underline. First results show that these materials present crack initiation and propagation resistance much higher than pure boron carbide or hafnium diboride. We observe R-Curves effects, crack bridging or branching, crack arrests, and toughness increases that we can relate respectively to the composite structures. (author)

  3. Propagation of edge waves in a thinly layered laminated medium with stress couples under initial stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pijush Pal Roy

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of edge waves in a thinly layered laminated medium with stress couples under initial stresses is examined. Based upon an approximate representation of a laminated medium by an equivalent anisotropic continuum with average initial and couple stresses, an explicit form of frequency equation is obtained to derive the phase velocity of edge waves. Edge waves exist under certain conditions. The inclusion of couple stresses increases the velocity of wave propagation. For a specific compression, the presence of couple stresses increases the velocity of wave propagation with the increase of wave number, whereas the reverse is the case when there is no couple stress. Numerical computation is performed with graphical representations. Several special cases are also examined.

  4. Polyakov loop and QCD thermodynamics from the gluon and ghost propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Kashiwa, Kouji

    2013-01-01

    We investigate quark deconfinement by calculating the effective potential of the Polyakov loop using the non-perturbative propagators in the Landau gauge measured in the finite-temperature lattice simulation. With the leading term in the 2-particle-irreducible formalism the resultant effective potential exhibits a first-order phase transitions for the pure SU(3) Yang–Mills theory at the critical temperature consistent with the empirical value. We also estimate the thermodynamic quantities to confirm qualitative agreement with the lattice data near the critical temperature. We then apply our effective potential to the chiral model-study and calculate the order parameters and the thermodynamic quantities. Unlike the case in the pure Yang–Mills theory the thermodynamic quantities are sensitive to the temperature dependence of the non-perturbative propagators, while the behavior of the order parameters is less sensitive, which implies the importance of the precise determination of the temperature-dependent propagators

  5. Light-Cone and Diffusive Propagation of Correlations in a Many-Body Dissipative System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Jean-Sébastien; Tan, Ryan; Bonnes, Lars; Guo, Chu; Poletti, Dario; Kollath, Corinna

    2018-01-12

    We analyze the propagation of correlations after a sudden interaction change in a strongly interacting quantum system in contact with an environment. In particular, we consider an interaction quench in the Bose-Hubbard model, deep within the Mott-insulating phase, under the effect of dephasing. We observe that dissipation effectively speeds up the propagation of single-particle correlations while reducing their coherence. In contrast, for two-point density correlations, the initial ballistic propagation regime gives way to diffusion at intermediate times. Numerical simulations, based on a time-dependent matrix product state algorithm, are supplemented by a quantitatively accurate fermionic quasiparticle approach providing an intuitive description of the initial dynamics in terms of holon and doublon excitations.

  6. Space-time picture of relativistic propagation of medium energy hadrons through nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleszynski, M.; Jaroszewicz, T.

    1985-01-01

    Relativistic virtual pair creation effects in hadron-nucleus scattering at medium energies are discussed. A close analogy is found between these effects (particle propagation backwards in time) and some of noneikonal correlations to the Glauber theory, arising from particle propagation backwards in space. In multiple scattering both effects appear only for configurations involving overlapping scatterers and lead to the non-additivity of phase shifts. The proper-time path-integral formalism is found to provide an intuitive geometrical picture of these phenomena. The relativistic corrections are estimated to be of the order k/(aE/sup 2/), k being the particle momentum, E its energy, and a the target size. At medium energies they are comparable to noneikonal corrections, of order 1/(ak). Both effects vanish at high energy, when particle propagation in space-time can be described by means of geometrical optics

  7. Influence of superthermal electrons on obliquely propagating ion-acoustic solitons in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadijani, M Nouri; Abbasi, H; Pajouh, H Hakimi

    2011-01-01

    The effect of superthermal electrons, modeled by a Lorentzian velocity distribution function, on the oblique propagation characteristics of linear and nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in an electron-ion plasma in the presence of a uniform external magnetic field is investigated. First, the linear dispersion relations of the fast and slow modes are obtained. It is shown that the superthermal electrons make both modes propagate with smaller phase velocities. Then, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the propagation of nonlinear slow and fast ion-acoustic waves is derived. It is shown that the presence of superthermal electrons has a significant influence on the nature of magnetized ion-acoustic solitons. That is, for a larger population of the superthermal electrons, the soliton velocity of both modes in the laboratory frame significantly decreases and the soliton are slimmer, and on approaching the Maxwellian limit, the width becomes maximum.

  8. Manipulations of Wavefront Propagation: Useful Methods and Applications for Interferometric Measurements and Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avi Karsenty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase measurements obtained by high-coherence interferometry are restricted by the 2π ambiguity, to height differences smaller than λ/2. A further restriction in most interferometric systems is for focusing the system on the measured object. We present two methods that overcome these restrictions. In the first method, different segments of a measured wavefront are digitally propagated and focused locally after measurement. The divergent distances, by which the diverse segments of the wavefront are propagated in order to achieve a focused image, provide enough information so as to resolve the 2π ambiguity. The second method employs an interferogram obtained by a spectrum constituting a small number of wavelengths. The magnitude of the interferogram’s modulations is utilized to resolve the 2π ambiguity. Such methods of wavefront propagation enable several applications such as focusing and resolving the 2π ambiguity, as described in the article.

  9. Propagation stability of self-reconstructing Bessel beams enables contrast-enhanced imaging in thick media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrbach, Florian O; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2012-01-17

    Laser beams that can self-reconstruct their initial beam profile even in the presence of massive phase perturbations are able to propagate deeper into inhomogeneous media. This ability has crucial advantages for light sheet-based microscopy in thick media, such as cell clusters, embryos, skin or brain tissue or plants, as well as scattering synthetic materials. A ring system around the central intensity maximum of a Bessel beam enables its self-reconstruction, but at the same time illuminates out-of-focus regions and deteriorates image contrast. Here we present a detection method that minimizes the negative effect of the ring system. The beam's propagation stability along one straight line enables the use of a confocal line principle, resulting in a significant increase in image contrast. The axial resolution could be improved by nearly 100% relative to the standard light-sheet techniques using scanned Gaussian beams, while demonstrating self-reconstruction also for high propagation depths.

  10. Digital holography for coherent fiber beam combining with a co-propagative scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antier, Marie; Larat, Christian; Lallier, Eric; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Primot, Jérôme; Brignon, Arnaud

    2014-09-22

    We present a technique for passive coherent fiber beam combining based on digital holography. In this method, the phase errors between the fibers are compensated by the diffracted phase-conjugated -1 order of a digital hologram. Unlike previous digital holography technique, the probe beams measuring the phase errors between the fibers are co-propagating with the phase-locked signal beams. This architecture is compatible with the use of multi-stage isolated amplifying fibers. It does not require any phase calculation algorithm and its correction is collective. This concept is experimentally demonstrated with three fibers at 1.55 μm. A residual phase error of λ/20 is measured.

  11. Modeling of SCC initiation and propagation mechanisms in BWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, Hans, E-mail: Hans.Hoffmeister@hsu-hh.de [Institute for Failure Analysis and Failure Prevention ISSV e.V., c/o Helmut Schmidt University of the Federal Armed Forces, D-22039 Hamburg (Germany); Klein, Oliver [Institute for Failure Analysis and Failure Prevention ISSV e.V., c/o Helmut Schmidt University of the Federal Armed Forces, D-22039 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that SSC in BWR environments includes anodic crack propagation and hydrogen assisted cracking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen cracking is triggered by crack tip acidification following local impurity accumulations and subsequent phase precipitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We calculate effects of pH, chlorides, potentials and stress on crack SCC growth rates at 288 Degree-Sign C. - Abstract: During operation of mainly BWRs' (Boiling Water Reactors) excursions from recommended water chemistries may provide favorite conditions for stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Maximum levels for chloride and sulfate ion contents for avoiding local corrosion are therefore given in respective water specifications. In a previously published deterministic 288 Degree-Sign C - corrosion model for Nickel as a main alloying element of BWR components it was demonstrated that, as a theoretically worst case, bulk water chloride levels as low as 30 ppb provide local chloride ion accumulation, dissolution of passivating nickel oxide and precipitation of nickel chlorides followed by subsequent local acidification. In an extension of the above model to SCC the following work shows that, in a first step, local anodic path corrosion with subsequent oxide breakdown, chloride salt formation and acidification at 288 Degree-Sign C would establish local cathodic reduction of accumulated hydrogen ions inside the crack tip fluid. In a second step, local hydrogen reduction charges and increasing local crack tip strains from increasing crack lengths at given global stresses are time stepwise calculated and related to experimentally determined crack critical cathodic hydrogen charges and fracture strains taken from small scale SSRT tensile tests pieces. As a result, at local hydrogen equilibrium potentials higher than those of nickel in the crack tip solution, hydrogen ion reduction initiates hydrogen crack propagation that is enhanced with

  12. NASA Lunar Base Wireless System Propagation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Upanavage, Matthew; Sham, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    There have been many radio wave propagation studies using both experimental and theoretical techniques over the recent years. However, most of studies have been in support of commercial cellular phone wireless applications. The signal frequencies are mostly at the commercial cellular and Personal Communications Service bands. The antenna configurations are mostly one on a high tower and one near the ground to simulate communications between a cellular base station and a mobile unit. There are great interests in wireless communication and sensor systems for NASA lunar missions because of the emerging importance of establishing permanent lunar human exploration bases. Because of the specific lunar terrain geometries and RF frequencies of interest to the NASA missions, much of the published literature for the commercial cellular and PCS bands of 900 and 1800 MHz may not be directly applicable to the lunar base wireless system and environment. There are various communication and sensor configurations required to support all elements of a lunar base. For example, the communications between astronauts, between astronauts and the lunar vehicles, between lunar vehicles and satellites on the lunar orbits. There are also various wireless sensor systems among scientific, experimental sensors and data collection ground stations. This presentation illustrates the propagation analysis of the lunar wireless communication and sensor systems taking into account the three dimensional terrain multipath effects. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of the lunar terrain. The obtained results indicate the lunar surface material, terrain geometry and antenna location are the important factors affecting the propagation characteristics of the lunar wireless systems. The path loss can be much more severe than the free space propagation and is greatly affected by the antenna height, surface material and operating frequency. The

  13. Preparation for propagation and absorption experiments in MTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, J.A.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Hooper, E.B.; Meassick, S.; Rognlien, T.D.; Smith, G.R.; Stallard, B.W.

    1989-04-01

    Preparatory calculations of microwave transmission through the MTX access duct, propagation of the waves through the plasma and the resulting power deposition profile on a calorimeter located on the tokamak inside wall have been performed. The microwave transmission calculations include the relative phase slippage of waveguide modes in the duct to determine the spatial structure of the wavefront at the duct exist. Ray-tracing calculations show substantial spreading of the beam in the poloidal direction at densities above 1.5 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/3/, well within the range of the experiments. Initial experiments with low or high toroidal field (cyclotron resonance outside the plasma) will investigate both diffraction and refraction effects, without absorption. Estimates of the fractional absorption of the beam in the initial experiments with the cyclotron resonance at the plasma axis have also been made. 4 refs., 3 figs

  14. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  15. Radial response of a 2-MHz MWD propagation resistivity sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, W.C.; Meyer, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensors have become common in MWD logging applications. These tools are unique among resistivity sensors in that the depth of investigation of the phase shift and attenuation resistivity measurements varies dramatically with the formation resistivity, measuring deeper into the formation in higher resistivity environments. The fact that the depth of investigation can vary be more than a factor of two across a normal range of formation resistivities requires the log analyst to have an understanding of this phenomenon when performing both qualitative and quantitative interpretations of these logs. Other measurement characteristics such as regions of negative or sharply-rising radial response can produce log responses which may seem peculiar when compared to traditional induction logs or laterlogs

  16. Front propagation in Rayleigh-Taylor systems with reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scagliarini, A; Biferale, L; Sbragaglia, M; Mantovani, F; Pivanti, M; Schifano, S F; Tripiccione, R; Pozzati, F; Toschi, F

    2011-01-01

    A special feature of Rayleigh-Taylor systems with chemical reactions is the competition between turbulent mixing and the 'burning processes', which leads to a highly non-trivial dynamics. We studied the problem performing high resolution numerical simulations of a 2d system, using a thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model. We spanned the various regimes emerging at changing the relative chemical/turbulent time scales, from slow to fast reaction; in the former case we found numerical evidence of an enhancement of the front propagation speed (with respect to the laminar case), providing a phenomenological argument to explain the observed behaviour. When the reaction is very fast, instead, the formation of sharp fronts separating patches of pure phases, leads to an increase of intermittency in the small scale statistics of the temperature field.

  17. Autaptic pacemaker mediated propagation of weak rhythmic activity across small-world neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ergin; Baysal, Veli; Ozer, Mahmut; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-02-01

    We study the effects of an autapse, which is mathematically described as a self-feedback loop, on the propagation of weak, localized pacemaker activity across a Newman-Watts small-world network consisting of stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. We consider that only the pacemaker neuron, which is stimulated by a subthreshold periodic signal, has an electrical autapse that is characterized by a coupling strength and a delay time. We focus on the impact of the coupling strength, the network structure, the properties of the weak periodic stimulus, and the properties of the autapse on the transmission of localized pacemaker activity. Obtained results indicate the existence of optimal channel noise intensity for the propagation of the localized rhythm. Under optimal conditions, the autapse can significantly improve the propagation of pacemaker activity, but only for a specific range of the autaptic coupling strength. Moreover, the autaptic delay time has to be equal to the intrinsic oscillation period of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron or its integer multiples. We analyze the inter-spike interval histogram and show that the autapse enhances or suppresses the propagation of the localized rhythm by increasing or decreasing the phase locking between the spiking of the pacemaker neuron and the weak periodic signal. In particular, when the autaptic delay time is equal to the intrinsic period of oscillations an optimal phase locking takes place, resulting in a dominant time scale of the spiking activity. We also investigate the effects of the network structure and the coupling strength on the propagation of pacemaker activity. We find that there exist an optimal coupling strength and an optimal network structure that together warrant an optimal propagation of the localized rhythm.

  18. Meteor radar observations of vertically propagating low-frequency inertia-gravity waves near the southern polar mesopause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, I.-S.; Lee, C.; Kim, J.-H.; Jee, G.; Kim, Y.-H.; Choi, H.-J.; Chun, H.-Y.; Kim, Y. H.

    2017-04-01

    Vertically propagating low-frequency inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) are retrieved from meteor radar winds observed at King Sejong Station (KSS: 62.22°S, 58.78°W), Antarctica. IGW horizontal winds extracted from temporal band-pass filtering in regular time-height bins show the frequent occurrence of IGWs with the downward phase progression and the counterclockwise rotation of their horizontal wind vectors with time (i.e., upward energy propagation) near the mesopause region throughout the whole year of 2014. The vertical wavelengths of the observed IGWs roughly range from 14 km to more than 20 km, which is consistent with previous observational studies on the mesospheric IGWs over Antarctica. Stokes parameters and rotary spectra computed from the hodographs of the IGW horizontal wind components reveal that the intrinsic frequencies of the upward propagating IGWs are |f|-3|f| with seasonal variations of the relative predominance between |f|-2|f| and 2|f|-3|f|, where f is the Coriolis parameter at KSS. The hodograph analysis also indicates that the N-S propagation is dominant in austral summer, while the NE-SW propagation is pronounced in austral winter. The propagation direction is discussed in relation to the generation of IGWs due to dynamical imbalances occurring in the tropospheric and stratospheric jet flow systems. Ray tracing results indicate that the N-S propagation in summer may be due to the jet flow systems roughly north of KSS and the NE-SW propagation in winter may be either the SW propagation from the jet flow systems northeast of KSS or the NE propagation (around the South Pole) from the south of Australia and Southern Indian and Pacific Oceans.

  19. Propagative selection of tilted array patterns in directional solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Younggil; Akamatsu, Silvère; Bottin-Rousseau, Sabine; Karma, Alain

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of tilted cellular/dendritic array patterns that form during directional solidification of a binary alloy when a preferred-growth crystal axis is misoriented with respect to the temperature gradient. In situ experimental observations and phase-field simulations in thin samples reveal the existence of a propagative source-sink mechanism of array spacing selection that operates on larger space and time scales than the competitive growth at play during the initial solidification transient. For tilted arrays, tertiary branching at the diverging edge of the sample acts as a source of new cells with a spacing that can be significantly larger than the initial average spacing. A spatial domain of large spacing then invades the sample propagatively. It thus yields a uniform spacing everywhere, selected independently of the initial conditions, except in a small region near the converging edge of the sample, which acts as a sink of cells. We propose a discrete geometrical model that describes the large-scale evolution of the spatial spacing profile based on the local dependence of the cell drift velocity on the spacing. We also derive a nonlinear advection equation that predicts the invasion velocity of the large-spacing domain, and sheds light on the fundamental nature of this process. The models also account for more complex spacing modulations produced by an irregular dynamics at the source, in good quantitative agreement with both phase-field simulations and experiments. This basic knowledge provides a theoretical basis to improve the processing of single crystals or textured polycrystals for advanced materials.

  20. THE BIOLOGY OF THE PROPAGATION OF SPECIES SCHISANDRA CHINENSIS (TURCZ. BAILL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CIORCHINĂ NINA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents aspects regarding the possibilities for the propagation of species Schisandra chinensis (Turz. Baill, as well as its reaction in the pedo-climatic conditions of the Republic of Moldova. Situated in the Lianarium of the Botanical Garden (Institute AŞM since 1975, Schisandra chinensis (Turcz. Baill. grows, develops and fructifies abundantly every year. It is propagated vegetatively and generatively with some difficulty. In the case of generative propagation, in order to obtain a high germination percentage, the seeds are stratified in three phases, at different temperatures and are sown in spring. Germination percentages of 80-90% were obtained. Schisandra chinensis is also propagated by greenwood cuttings, semi-hardwood or hardwood cuttings, by layering or by division. The best results were obtained by using semi-hardwood and hardwood cuttings taken in summer, in June-July, from younger plants. The potential for in vitro propagation of this species was also tested. The explants consisting of apical meristems inoculated on MS medium + 0.5 mg/l BAP evolved the best.

  1. Action potential propagation: ion current or intramembrane electric field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Albert; Pérez, Juan J; Madrenas, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    The established action potential propagation mechanisms do not satisfactorily explain propagation on myelinated axons given the current knowledge of biological channels and membranes. The flow across ion channels presents two possible effects: the electric potential variations across the lipid bilayers (action potential) and the propagation of an electric field through the membrane inner part. The proposed mechanism is based on intra-membrane electric field propagation, this propagation can explain the action potential saltatory propagation and its constant delay independent of distance between Ranvier nodes in myelinated axons.

  2. Source reconstruction using phase space beam summation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graubart, Gideon.

    1990-10-01

    In this work, the phase-space beam summation technique (PSBS), is applied to back propagation and inverse source problems. The PSBS expresses the field as a superposition of shifted and tilted beams. This phase space spectrum of beams is matched to the source distribution via an amplitude function which expresses the local spectrum of the source function in terms of a local Fourier transform. In this work, the emphasis is on the phase space processing of the data, on the information content of this data and on the back propagation scheme. More work is still required to combine this back propagation approach in a full, multi experiment inverse scattering scheme. It is shown that the phase space distribution of the data, computed via the local spectrum transform, is localized along lines that define the local arrival direction of the wave data. We explore how the choice of the beam width affects the compactification of this distribution, and derive criteria for choosing a window that optimizes this distribution. It should be emphasized that compact distribution implies fewer beams in the back propagation scheme and therefore higher numerical efficiency and better physical insight. Furthermore it is shown how the local information property of the phase space representation can be used to improve the performance of this simple back propagation problem, in particular with regard to axial resolution; the distance to the source can be determined by back propagating only the large angle phase space beams that focus on the source. The information concerning transverse distribution of the source, on the other hand, is contained in the axial phase space region and can therefore be determined by the corresponding back propagating beams. Because of the global nature of the plane waves propagators the conventional plane wave back propagation scheme does not have the same 'focusing' property, and therefore suffers from lack of information localization and axial resolution. The

  3. Experimental studies of the propagation of electrostatic ion perturbations by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachet, G.; Skiff, F.; Doveil, F.; Stern, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Effects induced by the propagation of several kinds of electrostatic perturbation in a low-density collisionless argon plasma are observed with space, time, and velocity-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The propagation of strong self-organized ion structures is observed and the associated electric field is determined. Snap shots of the ion phase space with a time resolution of 2 μs can be reconstructed from the experimental data. All the terms of the kinetic equation can also be determined from the data. A one-dimensional (1D) numerical simulation reproduces qualitatively the experimentally observed ion phase space behavior

  4. Propagation speed of gamma radiation in brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, Jose T.P.D.; Silva, Paulo R.J.; Saitovich, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    The propagation speed (PS) of visible light -represented by a short frequency range in the large frame of electromagnetic radiations (ER) frequencies- in air was measured during the last century, using a great deal of different methods, with high precision results being achieved. Presently, a well accepted value, with very small uncertainty, is c= 299,792.458 Km/s) (c reporting to the Latin word celeritas: 'speed swiftness'). When propagating in denser material media (MM), such value is always lower when compared to the air value, with the propagating MM density playing an important role. Until present, such studies focusing propagation speeds, refractive indexes, dispersions were specially related to visible light, or to ER in wavelengths ranges dose to it, and with a transparent MM. A first incursion in this subject dealing with γ-rays was performed using an electronic coincidence counting system, when the value of it's PS was measured in air, C γ(air) 298,300.15 Km/s; a method that went on with later electronic improvements. always in air. To perform such measurements the availability of a γ-radiation source in which two γ-rays are emitted simultaneously in opposite directions -as already used as well as applied in the present case- turns out to be essential to the feasibility of the experiment, as far as no reflection techniques could be used. Such a suitable source was the positron emitter 22 Na placed in a thin wall metal container in which the positrons are stopped and annihilated when reacting with the medium electrons, in such way originating -as it is very well established from momentum/energy conservation laws - two gamma-rays, energy 511 KeV each, both emitted simultaneously in opposite directions. In all the previous experiments were used photomultiplier detectors coupled to NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators, which have a good energy resolution but a deficient time resolution for such purposes. Presently, as an innovative improvement, were used BaF 2

  5. Efficient Geometric Sound Propagation Using Visibility Culling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandak, Anish

    2011-07-01

    Simulating propagation of sound can improve the sense of realism in interactive applications such as video games and can lead to better designs in engineering applications such as architectural acoustics. In this thesis, we present geometric sound propagation techniques which are faster than prior methods and map well to upcoming parallel multi-core CPUs. We model specular reflections by using the image-source method and model finite-edge diffraction by using the well-known Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin (BTM) model. We accelerate the computation of specular reflections by applying novel visibility algorithms, FastV and AD-Frustum, which compute visibility from a point. We accelerate finite-edge diffraction modeling by applying a novel visibility algorithm which computes visibility from a region. Our visibility algorithms are based on frustum tracing and exploit recent advances in fast ray-hierarchy intersections, data-parallel computations, and scalable, multi-core algorithms. The AD-Frustum algorithm adapts its computation to the scene complexity and allows small errors in computing specular reflection paths for higher computational efficiency. FastV and our visibility algorithm from a region are general, object-space, conservative visibility algorithms that together significantly reduce the number of image sources compared to other techniques while preserving the same accuracy. Our geometric propagation algorithms are an order of magnitude faster than prior approaches for modeling specular reflections and two to ten times faster for modeling finite-edge diffraction. Our algorithms are interactive, scale almost linearly on multi-core CPUs, and can handle large, complex, and dynamic scenes. We also compare the accuracy of our sound propagation algorithms with other methods. Once sound propagation is performed, it is desirable to listen to the propagated sound in interactive and engineering applications. We can generate smooth, artifact-free output audio signals by applying

  6. Propagation dynamics of off-axis symmetrical and asymmetrical vortices embedded in flat-topped beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, propagation dynamics of off-axis symmetrical and asymmetrical optical vortices(OVs) embedded in flat-topped beams have been explored numerically based on rigorous scalar diffraction theory. The distribution properties of phase and intensity play an important role in driving the propagation dynamics of OVs. Numerical results show that the single off-axis vortex moves in a straight line. The displacement of the single off-axis vortex becomes smaller, when either the order of flatness N and the beam size ω0are increased or the off-axis displacement d is decreased. In addition, the phase singularities of high order vortex beams can be split after propagating a certain distance. It is also demonstrated that the movement of OVs are closely related with the spatial symmetrical or asymmetrical distribution of vortex singularities field. Multiple symmetrical and asymmetrical optical vortices(OVs) embedded in flat-topped beams can interact and rotate. The investment of the propagation dynamics of OVs may have many applications in optical micro-manipulation and optical tweezers.

  7. A theoretical analysis of the weak shock waves propagating through a bubbly flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Gu Sik; Kim, Heuy Dong; Baek, Seung Cheol

    2004-01-01

    Two-phase flow of liquid and gas through pipe lines are frequently encountered in nuclear power plant or industrial facility. Pressure waves which can be generated by a valve operation or any other cause in pipe lines propagate through the two-phase flow, often leading to severe noise and vibration problems or fatigue failure of pipe line system. It is of practical importance to predict the propagation characteristics of the pressure waves for the safety design for the pipe line. In the present study, a theoretical analysis is performed to understand the propagation characteristics of a weak shock wave in a bubbly flow. A wave equation is developed using a small perturbation method to analyze the weak shock wave through a bubbly flow with comparably low void fractions. It is known that the elasticity of pipe and void fraction significantly affect the propagation speed of shock wave, but the frequency of relaxation oscillation which is generated behind the shock wave is not strongly influenced by the elasticity of pipe. The present analytical results are in close agreement with existing experimental data

  8. Wigner distribution, partial coherence, and phase-space optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    The Wigner distribution is presented as a perfect means to treat partially coherent optical signals and their propagation through first-order optical systems from a radiometric and phase-space optical perspective

  9. International Conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The planning meeting for a conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation was held at M.LT. in February 1971 and attended by research workers from several industrial, governmental and academic organizations. It was felt that a more specialized meeting would provide a better opportunity for both U.S. and foreign researchers to exchange their ideas and views on dynamic fracture, a subject which is seldom emphasized in national or international fracture conferences. Dynamic crack propagation has been a concern to specialists in many fields: continuum mechanics, metallurgy, geology, polymer chemistry, orthopedics, applied mathematics, as well as structural design and testing. It impinges on a wide variety of problems such as rock breaking and earthquakes, pressure vessels and line pipes, comminution and the per­ formance of armament and ordnance, etc. Advances have been numerous, covering theories and experiments from both the microscopic and macro­ scopic points of view. Hence, the need for comparing the theoretical ...

  10. Submillimeter wave propagation in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.H.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Staats, P.A.; Vander Sluis, K.L.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Johnson, L.C.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of submillimeter-waves (smm) in tokamak plasmas has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally to ensure successful measurements of electron density and plasma current distributions in tokamak devices. Theoretical analyses have been carried out to study the polarization of the smm waves in TFTR and ISX-B tokamaks. A multichord smm wave interferometer/polarimeter system has been employed to simultaneously measure the line electron density and poloidal field-induced Faraday rotation in the ISX-B tokamak. The experimental study on TFTR is under way. Computer codes have been developed and have been used to study the wave propagation and to reconstruct the distributions of plasma current and density from the measured data. The results are compared with other measurements

  11. Cavitation propagation in water under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblin, Xavier; Yip Cheung Sang, Yann; Pellegrin, Mathieu; Materials and Complex Fluids Team

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation appears when pressure decreases below vapor pressure, generating vapor bubbles. It can be obtain in dynamical ways (acoustic, hydraulic) but also in quasi-static conditions. This later case is often observed in nature, in trees, or during the ejection of ferns spores. We study the cavitation bubbles nucleation dynamics and its propagation in a confined microfabricated media. This later is an ordered array of microcavities made in hydrogel filled with water. When the system is put into dry air, it dehydrates, water leaves the cavities and tension (negative pressure) builds in the cavities. This can be sustained up to a critical pressure (of order -20 MPa), then cavitation bubbles appear. We follow the dynamics using ultra high speed imaging. Events with several bubbles cavitating in a few microseconds could be observed along neighboring cells, showing a propagation phenomenon that we discuss. ANR CAVISOFT 2010-JCJC-0407 01.

  12. Radial propagation of microturbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Laurent, L.; Roubin, J.P.; Samain, A.

    1992-01-01

    Energy confinement time in tokamaks exhibits a clear dependence on global plasma parameters. This is not the case for transport coefficients; their dependence on local plasma parameters cannot be precisely established. The aim of the present paper is to give a possible explanation of this behaviour; turbulence propagates radially because of departure from cylindrical geometry. This implies that the turbulence level at a given point and hence transport coefficients are not only functions of local plasma parameters. A quantitative estimate of the propagation velocity is derived from a Lagrangian formalism. Two cases are considered: the effect of toroidicity and the effect of non linear mode-mode coupling. The consequences of this model are discussed. This process does not depend on the type of instability. For the sake of simplicity only electrostatic perturbations are considered

  13. Isobar propagation in nuclei and collective effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moniz, E.J.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1979-01-01

    Pion-nucleus and photonuclear reactions at intermediate energy provide a means for studying the dynamics of Δ propagation in the nuclear medium. Our discussion will be limited to (π,π), (γ,π) and (γ,γ) reactions leaving the nucleus in the ground state. Following a comment on the collectivity of the Δ-hole doorway states, a brief summary of what we have learned about Δ-nucleus dynamics from such reactions will be given. Emphasis will be placed on the connection of different aspects of the dynamics to specific inclusive reactions. Finally, the importance of multistep reaction mechanisms and of the interplay between Δ propagation and nuclear degrees of freedom will be discussed. (KBE) 891 KBE/KBE 892 ARA

  14. Submillimeter wave propagation in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.H.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Staats, P.A.; Vander Sluis, K.L.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Johnson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    Propagation of submillimeter waves (smm) in tokamak plasma was investigated both theoretically and experimentally to ensure successful measurements of electron density and plasma current distributions in tokamak devices. Theoretical analyses were carried out to study the polarization of the smm waves in TFTR and ISX-B tokamaks. A multichord smm wave interferometer/polarimeter system was employed to simultaneously measure the line electron density and poloidal field-induced Faraday rotation in the ISX-B tokamak. The experimental study on TFTR is under way. Computer codes were developed and have been used to study the wave propagation and to reconstruct the distributions of plasma current and density from the measured data. The results are compared with other measurements. 5 references, 2 figures

  15. Belief Propagation Algorithm for Portfolio Optimization Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi; Yasuda, Muneki

    2015-01-01

    The typical behavior of optimal solutions to portfolio optimization problems with absolute deviation and expected shortfall models using replica analysis was pioneeringly estimated by S. Ciliberti et al. [Eur. Phys. B. 57, 175 (2007)]; however, they have not yet developed an approximate derivation method for finding the optimal portfolio with respect to a given return set. In this study, an approximation algorithm based on belief propagation for the portfolio optimization problem is presented using the Bethe free energy formalism, and the consistency of the numerical experimental results of the proposed algorithm with those of replica analysis is confirmed. Furthermore, the conjecture of H. Konno and H. Yamazaki, that the optimal solutions with the absolute deviation model and with the mean-variance model have the same typical behavior, is verified using replica analysis and the belief propagation algorithm.

  16. Alternative model of thrust-fault propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstadt, Gloria; de Paor, Declan G.

    1987-07-01

    A widely accepted explanation for the geometry of thrust faults is that initial failures occur on deeply buried planes of weak rock and that thrust faults propagate toward the surface along a staircase trajectory. We propose an alternative model that applies Gretener's beam-failure mechanism to a multilayered sequence. Invoking compatibility conditions, which demand that a thrust propagate both upsection and downsection, we suggest that ramps form first, at shallow levels, and are subsequently connected by flat faults. This hypothesis also explains the formation of many minor structures associated with thrusts, such as backthrusts, wedge structures, pop-ups, and duplexes, and provides a unified conceptual framework in which to evaluate field observations.

  17. Quench propagation in the SSC dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.; Snitchler, G.

    1990-09-01

    The effects of quench propagation are modeled in 40mm and 50mm diameter collider dipole magnet designs. A comparative study of the cold diode (passive) and quench heater (active) protection schemes will be presented. The SSCQ modeling program accurately simulates the axial quench velocity and uses phenomenological time delays for turn-to-turn transverse propagation. The axial quench velocity is field dependent and consequently, each conductor's quench profile is tracked separately. No symmetry constraints are employed and the distribution of the temperatures along the conductor differs from the adiabatic approximation. A single magnet has a wide margin of self protection which suggests that passive protection schemes must be considered. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Design Against Propagating Shear Failure in Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, B. N.; Gray, J. Malcolm

    Propagating shear failure can occur in gas and certain hazardous liquid transmission pipelines, potentially leading to a large long-burning fire and/or widespread pollution, depending on the transported product. Such consequences require that the design of the pipeline and specification of the steel effectively preclude the chance of propagating shear failure. Because the phenomenology of such failures is complex, design against such occurrences historically has relied on full-scale demonstration experiments coupled with empirically calibrated analytical models. However, as economic drivers have pushed toward larger diameter higher pressure pipelines made of tough higher-strength grades, the design basis to ensure arrest has been severely compromised. Accordingly, for applications where the design basis becomes less certain, as has occurred increasing as steel grade and toughness has increased, it has become necessary to place greater reliance on the use and role of full-scale testing.

  19. Obliquely propagating dust-density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piel, A.; Arp, O.; Klindworth, M.; Melzer, A.

    2008-01-01

    Self-excited dust-density waves are experimentally studied in a dusty plasma under microgravity. Two types of waves are observed: a mode inside the dust volume propagating in the direction of the ion flow and another mode propagating obliquely at the boundary between the dusty plasma and the space charge sheath. The dominance of oblique modes can be described in the frame of a fluid model. It is shown that the results fom the fluid model agree remarkably well with a kinetic electrostatic model of Rosenberg [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996)]. In the experiment, the instability is quenched by increasing the gas pressure or decreasing the dust density. The critical pressure and dust density are well described by the models

  20. Sound propagation in elongated superfluid fermionic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capuzzi, P.; Vignolo, P.; Federici, F.; Tosi, M. P.

    2006-01-01

    We use hydrodynamic equations to study sound propagation in a superfluid Fermi gas at zero temperature inside a strongly elongated cigar-shaped trap, with main attention to the transition from the BCS to the unitary regime. First, we treat the role of the radial density profile in the limit of a cylindrical geometry and then evaluate numerically the effect of the axial confinement in a configuration in which a hole is present in the gas density at the center of the trap. We find that in a strongly elongated trap the speed of sound in both the BCS and the unitary regime differs by a factor √(3/5) from that in a homogeneous three-dimensional superfluid. The predictions of the theory could be tested by measurements of sound-wave propagation in a setup such as that exploited by Andrews et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 553 (1997)] for an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate

  1. Mechanically driven interface propagation in biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranft, Jonas; Joanny, Jean-François; Aliee, Maryam; Jülicher, Frank; Prost, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Many biological tissues consist of more than one cell type. We study the dynamics of an interface between two different cell populations as it occurs during the growth of a tumor in a healthy host tissue. Recent work suggests that the rates of cell division and cell death are under mechanical control, characterized by a homeostatic pressure. The difference in the homeostatic pressures of two cell types drives the propagation of the interface, corresponding to the invasion of one cell type into the other. We derive a front propagation equation that takes into account the coupling between cell number balance and tissue mechanics. We show that in addition to pulled fronts, pushed-front solutions occur as a result of convection driven by mechanics. (paper)

  2. M2 qualify laser beam propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelhalim, Bencheikh; Mohamed, Bouafia

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important properties of a laser resonator is the highly collimated or spatially coherent nature of the laser output beam. Laser beam diameter and quality factor M 2 are significant parameters in a wide range of laser applications. This is because the spatial beam quality determines how closely the beam can be focused or how well the beam propagates over long distances without significant dispersion. In the present paper we have used three different methods to qualify the spatial structure of a laser beam propagating in free space, the results are obtained and discussed, and we have found that the Wigner distribution function is a powerful tool which allows a global characterization of any kind of beam

  3. Coherent field propagation between tilted planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Johannes; Worku, Norman Girma; Gross, Herbert

    2017-10-01

    Propagating electromagnetic light fields between nonparallel planes is of special importance, e.g., within the design of novel computer-generated holograms or the simulation of optical systems. In contrast to the extensively discussed evaluation between parallel planes, the diffraction-based propagation of light onto a tilted plane is more burdensome, since discrete fast Fourier transforms cannot be applied directly. In this work, we propose a quasi-fast algorithm (O(N 3  log N)) that deals with this problem. Based on a proper decomposition into three rotations, the vectorial field distribution is calculated on a tilted plane using the spectrum of plane waves. The algorithm works on equidistant grids, so neither nonuniform Fourier transforms nor an explicit complex interpolation is necessary. The proposed algorithm is discussed in detail and applied to several examples of practical interest.

  4. Belief Propagation Algorithm for Portfolio Optimization Problems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Shinzato

    Full Text Available The typical behavior of optimal solutions to portfolio optimization problems with absolute deviation and expected shortfall models using replica analysis was pioneeringly estimated by S. Ciliberti et al. [Eur. Phys. B. 57, 175 (2007]; however, they have not yet developed an approximate derivation method for finding the optimal portfolio with respect to a given return set. In this study, an approximation algorithm based on belief propagation for the portfolio optimization problem is presented using the Bethe free energy formalism, and the consistency of the numerical experimental results of the proposed algorithm with those of replica analysis is confirmed. Furthermore, the conjecture of H. Konno and H. Yamazaki, that the optimal solutions with the absolute deviation model and with the mean-variance model have the same typical behavior, is verified using replica analysis and the belief propagation algorithm.

  5. Manifold Adaptive Label Propagation for Face Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaobing; Lyu, Zehua; Chen, Changqing; Chen, Chuanbo

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel label propagation (LP) method is presented, called the manifold adaptive label propagation (MALP) method, which is to extend original LP by integrating sparse representation constraint into regularization framework of LP method. Similar to most LP, first of all, MALP also finds graph edges from given data and gives weights to the graph edges. Our goal is to find graph weights matrix adaptively. The key advantage of our approach is that MALP simultaneously finds graph weights matrix and predicts the label of unlabeled data. This paper also derives efficient algorithm to solve the proposed problem. Extensions of our MALP in kernel space and robust version are presented. The proposed method has been applied to the problem of semi-supervised face clustering using the well-known ORL, Yale, extended YaleB, and PIE datasets. Our experimental evaluations show the effectiveness of our method.

  6. Uncertainty and its propagation in dynamics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devooght, J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to bring together some characteristics due to uncertainty when we deal with dynamic models and therefore to propagation of uncertainty. The respective role of uncertainty and inaccuracy is examined. A mathematical formalism based on Chapman-Kolmogorov equation allows to define a open-quotes subdynamicsclose quotes where the evolution equation takes the uncertainty into account. The problem of choosing or combining models is examined through a loss function associated to a decision

  7. Swell propagation across a wide continental shelf

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrickson, Eric J.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of wave refraction and damping on swell propagation across a wide continental shelf were examined with data from a transect of bottom pressure recorders extending from the beach to the shelf break near Duck, North Carolina. The observations generally show weak variations in swell energy across the shelf during benign conditions, in qualitative agreement with predictions of a spectral refraction model. Although the predicted ray trajectories are quite sensitive to the irregular she...

  8. Propagation and excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jeppesen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the propagation of graphene plasmon polaritons in graphene nanoribbon waveguides and experimentally observe the excitation of the graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer. We show that graphene nanoribbon bends do not induce any additional loss...... and nanofocusing occurs in a tapered graphene nanoriboon, and we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritonss in a continuous graphene monolayer assisted by a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating....

  9. Radiation and propagation of electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tyras, George; Declaris, Nicholas

    1969-01-01

    Radiation and Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves serves as a text in electrical engineering or electrophysics. The book discusses the electromagnetic theory; plane electromagnetic waves in homogenous isotropic and anisotropic media; and plane electromagnetic waves in inhomogenous stratified media. The text also describes the spectral representation of elementary electromagnetic sources; the field of a dipole in a stratified medium; and radiation in anisotropic plasma. The properties and the procedures of Green's function method of solution, axial currents, as well as cylindrical boundaries a

  10. Tsunami Propagation Models Based on First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    geodesic lines from the epicenter shown in the figure are great circles with a longitudinal separation of 90o, which define a ‘ lune ’ that covers one...past which the waves begin to converge according to Model C. A tsunami propagating in this lune does not encounter any continental landmass until...2011 Japan tsunami in a lune of angle 90o with wavefronts at intervals of 5,000 km The 2011 Japan tsunami was felt throughout the Pacific Ocean

  11. Propagation and Purification of Baculovirus oryctes Huger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susamto Somowiyarjo

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available An isolate of Baculovirus oryctes, a possible biological control agent for coconut beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros Huger from East Java was propagated and purified. The virus could be transmitted by feeding the imago with 10% sucrose containing virus from homogenate of infected beetles. Effectivity of virus to 9 healthy females by sexual copulation. Virus be succesfully purified by a method of Payne. Key words: Baculovirus oryctes, transmission, purification

  12. Feynman propagator in curved space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candelas, P.; Raine, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    The Wick rotation is generalized in a covariant manner so as to apply to curved manifolds in a way that is independent of the analytic properties of the manifold. This enables us to show that various methods for defining a Feynman propagator to be found in the literature are equivalent where they are applicable. We are also able to discuss the relation between certain regularization methods that have been employed

  13. Vegetative Propagation and the Genetic Improvement of North American Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. E. Farmer

    1973-01-01

    Progress and problems in vegetative propagation of important North American hardwoods are reviewed with emphasis on rooting cuttings and the application of propagation techniques in breeding research. Some problems in rooting physiology are discussed.

  14. Crack propagation at stresses below the fatigue limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, F. C.; Hyler, W. S.; Marschall, C. W.

    1967-01-01

    Crack propagation for stainless steel and Ti alloy at stresses below fatigue limit, noting of alternating stress cycles crack propagation for stainless steel and Ti alloy at stresses below fatigue limit, noting role of alternating stress cycles

  15. On the propagation of truncated localized waves in dispersive silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2010-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica and free space are numerically analyzed. It is shown that those characteristics are affected by the changes in the relation between the transverse spatial

  16. Quantum Graphical Models and Belief Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leifer, M.S.; Poulin, D.

    2008-01-01

    Belief Propagation algorithms acting on Graphical Models of classical probability distributions, such as Markov Networks, Factor Graphs and Bayesian Networks, are amongst the most powerful known methods for deriving probabilistic inferences amongst large numbers of random variables. This paper presents a generalization of these concepts and methods to the quantum case, based on the idea that quantum theory can be thought of as a noncommutative, operator-valued, generalization of classical probability theory. Some novel characterizations of quantum conditional independence are derived, and definitions of Quantum n-Bifactor Networks, Markov Networks, Factor Graphs and Bayesian Networks are proposed. The structure of Quantum Markov Networks is investigated and some partial characterization results are obtained, along the lines of the Hammersley-Clifford theorem. A Quantum Belief Propagation algorithm is presented and is shown to converge on 1-Bifactor Networks and Markov Networks when the underlying graph is a tree. The use of Quantum Belief Propagation as a heuristic algorithm in cases where it is not known to converge is discussed. Applications to decoding quantum error correcting codes and to the simulation of many-body quantum systems are described

  17. Cosmic ray propagation with CRPropa 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, R Alves; Evoli, C; Sigl, G; Van Vliet, A; Erdmann, M; Kuempel, D; Mueller, G; Walz, D; Kampert, K-H; Winchen, T

    2015-01-01

    Solving the question of the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) requires the development of detailed simulation tools in order to interpret the experimental data and draw conclusions on the UHECR universe. CRPropa is a public Monte Carlo code for the galactic and extragalactic propagation of cosmic ray nuclei above ∼ 10 17 eV, as well as their photon and neutrino secondaries. In this contribution the new algorithms and features of CRPropa 3, the next major release, are presented. CRPropa 3 introduces time-dependent scenarios to include cosmic evolution in the presence of cosmic ray deflections in magnetic fields. The usage of high resolution magnetic fields is facilitated by shared memory parallelism, modulated fields and fields with heterogeneous resolution. Galactic propagation is enabled through the implementation of galactic magnetic field models, as well as an efficient forward propagation technique through transformation matrices. To make use of the large Python ecosystem in astrophysics CRPropa 3 can be steered and extended in Python. (paper)

  18. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  19. Wave propagation in the magnetosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed for identifying the spatial regimes of various modes of wave propagation in the Jupiter magnetosphere that may be encountered by flyby missions. The Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis (CMA) diagram of plasma physics is utilized to identify the frequency regimes in which different modes of propagation occur in the magnetoplasma. The Gledhill model and the Ioannidis and Brice model of the magnetoplasma are summarized, and configuration-space CMA diagrams are constructed for each model for frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 MHz. The distinctive propagation features, the radio noise regimes, and the wave-particle interactions are discussed. It is concluded that the concentration of plasma in the equatorial plane makes this region of vital importance for radio observations with flyby missions. Local radio noise around the electron cyclotron frequency will probably differ appreciably from its terrestrial counterpart due to the lack of field-line guidance. Hydromagnetic wave properties at frequencies near the ion cyclotron frequency and below will probably be similar to the terrestrial case.

  20. Wave propagation in spatially modulated tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziepke, A., E-mail: ziepke@itp.tu-berlin.de; Martens, S.; Engel, H. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Hardenbergstraße 36, EW 7-1, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-09-07

    We investigate wave propagation in rotationally symmetric tubes with a periodic spatial modulation of cross section. Using an asymptotic perturbation analysis, the governing quasi-two-dimensional reaction-diffusion equation can be reduced into a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-advection equation. Assuming a weak perturbation by the advection term and using projection method, in a second step, an equation of motion for traveling waves within such tubes can be derived. Both methods predict properly the nonlinear dependence of the propagation velocity on the ratio of the modulation period of the geometry to the intrinsic width of the front, or pulse. As a main feature, we observe finite intervals of propagation failure of waves induced by the tube’s modulation and derive an analytically tractable condition for their occurrence. For the highly diffusive limit, using the Fick-Jacobs approach, we show that wave velocities within modulated tubes are governed by an effective diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of a single bottleneck on the period of pulse trains. We observe period changes by integer fractions dependent on the bottleneck width and the period of the entering pulse train.

  1. Intense relativistic electron beam: generation and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, K.C.; Mondal, J.

    2010-01-01

    A general review of relativistic electron beam extracted from explosive field emission diode has been presented here. The beam current in the diode gap taking into account cathode and anode plasma expansion velocity and excluding the self magnetic field effect is directly proportional to gap voltage V 3/2 and inversely proportional to the square of the effective diode gap (d-vt). In the limit of high current, self magnetic field focusing effect comes into play and results in a critical current at which pinching will take place. When the diode current exceeds the critical current, the electron flow is in the para-potential regime. Different diode geometries such as planner, coaxial, rod-pinched, reflex triode are discussed qualitatively. When the beam is injected into a vacuum drift tube the propagation of the beam is only possible in presence of a strong axial magnetic field which prevents the beam expansion in the radial direction. If the beam is injected in the drift tube filled with dense plasma, then the redistribution of the plasma electrons effectively neutralizes the beam space charge, resulting subsequent propagation of the beam along the drift tube. The beam propagation through neutral gas is similar to the plasma filled drift tube. In this case both the neutral gas pressure and the beam current regulate the transmission of the REB. (author)

  2. Pulsed positive corona streamer propagation and branching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Rutgers, W.R.

    2002-01-01

    The propagation and branching of pulsed positive corona streamers in a short gap is observed with high resolution in space and time. The appearance of the pre-breakdown phenomena can be controlled by the electrode configuration, the gas composition and the impedance of the pulsed power circuit. In a point-wire gap the positive corona shows much more branching than in the parallel plane gap with a protrusion. In air, the branching is more pronounced than in argon. The pulsed power circuit appears to operate in two modes, either as an inductive circuit creating a lower number of thick streamers or as a resistive circuit giving a higher number of thin streamers. A possible cause for branching is electrostatic repulsion of two parts of the streamer head. The electric field at the streamer head is limited, the maximum values found are ∼170 kV cm -1 in air and ∼100 kV cm -1 in argon. At these maximum field strengths, the electrons have 5-10 eV energy, so the ionization is dominated by two-step processes. Differences between argon and ambient air in the field strength at which streamers propagate are ascribed to the difference in de-excitation processes in noble and molecular gases. The fact that the pulsed power circuit can control the streamer structure is important for applications, but this effect must also be taken into account in fundamental studies of streamer propagation and branching. (author)

  3. Pulsed positive corona streamer propagation and branching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhuizen, E.M. van [Department of Physics, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands)]. E-mail: e.m.v.veldhuizen@tue.nl; Rutgers, W.R. [Department of Physics, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2002-09-07

    The propagation and branching of pulsed positive corona streamers in a short gap is observed with high resolution in space and time. The appearance of the pre-breakdown phenomena can be controlled by the electrode configuration, the gas composition and the impedance of the pulsed power circuit. In a point-wire gap the positive corona shows much more branching than in the parallel plane gap with a protrusion. In air, the branching is more pronounced than in argon. The pulsed power circuit appears to operate in two modes, either as an inductive circuit creating a lower number of thick streamers or as a resistive circuit giving a higher number of thin streamers. A possible cause for branching is electrostatic repulsion of two parts of the streamer head. The electric field at the streamer head is limited, the maximum values found are {approx}170 kV cm{sup -1} in air and {approx}100 kV cm{sup -1} in argon. At these maximum field strengths, the electrons have 5-10 eV energy, so the ionization is dominated by two-step processes. Differences between argon and ambient air in the field strength at which streamers propagate are ascribed to the difference in de-excitation processes in noble and molecular gases. The fact that the pulsed power circuit can control the streamer structure is important for applications, but this effect must also be taken into account in fundamental studies of streamer propagation and branching. (author)

  4. Crack propagation on spherical pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebey, J.; Roche, R.

    1975-01-01

    The risk presented by a crack on a pressure vessel built with a ductile steel cannot be well evaluated by simple application of the rules of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, which only apply to brittle materials. Tests were carried out on spherical vessels of three different scales built with the same steel. Cracks of different length were machined through the vessel wall. From the results obtained, crack initiation stress (beginning of stable propagation) and instable propagation stress may be plotted against the lengths of these cracks. For small and medium size, subject to ductile fracture, the resulting curves are identical, and may be used for ductile fracture prediction. Brittle rupture was observed on larger vessels and crack propagation occurred at lower stress level. Preceedings curves are not usable for fracture analysis. Ultimate pressure can be computed with a good accuracy by using equivalent energy toughness, Ksub(1cd), characteristic of the metal plates. Satisfactory measurements have been obtained on thin samples. The risks of brittle fracture may then judged by comparing Ksub(1cd) with the calculated K 1 value, in which corrections for vessel shape are taken into account. It is thus possible to establish the bursting pressure of cracked spherical vessels, with the help of two rules, one for brittle fracture, the other for ductile instability. A practical method is proposed on the basis of the work reported here

  5. Single pit propagation on austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heurtault, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical characterization of metastable events such as pitting corrosion of stainless steel in chloride electrolyte remains complex because many individual processes may occur simultaneously on the alloy surface. To overcome these difficulties, an experimental setup, the flow micro-device, has been developed to achieve the initiation of a single pit and to propagate the single pit in three dimensions. In this work, we take advantage of such a device in order to revisit the pitting process on a 316L stainless steel in a chloride - sulphate bulk. In a first step, the time evolution of the pit geometry (depth, radius) and the chemical evolution of the pit solution investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy have shown that the pit depth propagation depends on the formation of a metal chloride and sulphate gel in the pit solution, and is controlled by the metallic cations diffusion from the pit bottom to the pit mouth. The pit radius growth is defined by the initial surface de-passivation, by the presence of a pit cover and by the gel development in the solution. all of these phenomena are function of applied potential and chemical composition of the solution. In a last step, it was demonstrated that a critical chloride concentration is needed in order to maintain the pit propagation. This critical concentration slightly increases with the pit depth. From statistical analysis performed on identical experiments, a zone diagram showing the pit stability as a function of the chloride concentration and the pit dimensions was built. (author) [fr

  6. Current understanding of SEP acceleration and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klecker, B

    2013-01-01

    The solar energetic particle (SEP) populations of electrons and ions are highly variable in space and time, in intensity, energy, and composition. Over the last ∼20 years advanced instrumentation onboard many spacecraft (e.g. ACE, Coronas, GOES, Hinode, RHESSI, SAMPEX, SDO, SOHO, STEREO, TRACE, Ulysses, Yokoh, to name a few) extended our ability to explore the characteristics of solar energetic particles by in-situ measurements in interplanetary space and by observing their source characteristics near the Sun by remote-sensing observation of electromagnetic emission over a wide frequency range. These measurements provide crucial information for understanding the sources of the particle populations and the acceleration and propagation processes involved. We are now able to measure intensity-time profiles and anisotropies, energy spectra, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the ionic charge of particles over an extended energy range of 0.01 to several 100 MeV/nuc and for a large dynamic range of particle intensities. Furthermore, multi-spacecraft in-situ observations at different solar longitudes and latitudes provide new insight into the acceleration and propagation processes of SEPs near the Sun and in interplanetary space. In this paper we present an overview of SEP observations, their implications for SEP acceleration and propagation processes, and discuss open questions.

  7. Nonlocal wave propagation in an embedded DWBNNT conveying fluid via strain gradient theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A.; Kolahchi, R.; Vossough, H.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the strain gradient and Eringen’s piezoelasticity theories, wave propagation of an embedded double-walled boron nitride nanotube (DWBNNT) conveying fluid is investigated using Euler-Bernoulli beam model. The elastic medium is simulated by the Pasternak foundation. The van der Waals (vdW) forces between the inner and outer nanotubes are taken into account. Since, considering electro-mechanical coupling made the nonlinear motion equations, a numerical procedure is proposed to evaluate the upstream and downstream phase velocities. The results indicate that the effect of nonlinear terms in motion equations on the phase velocity cannot be neglected at lower wave numbers. Furthermore, the effect of fluid-conveying on wave propagation of the DWBNNT is significant at lower wave numbers.

  8. Fatigue crack layer propagation in silicon-iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birol, Y.; Welsch, G.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in metal is almost always accompanied by plastic deformation unless conditions strongly favor brittle fracture. The analysis of the plastic zone is crucial to the understanding of crack propagation behavior as it governs the crack growth kinetics. This research was undertaken to study the fatigue crack propagation in a silicon iron alloy. Kinetic and plasticity aspects of fatigue crack propagation in the alloy were obtained, including the characterization of damage evolution.

  9. Visual attitude propagation for small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawashdeh, Samir A.

    As electronics become smaller and more capable, it has become possible to conduct meaningful and sophisticated satellite missions in a small form factor. However, the capability of small satellites and the range of possible applications are limited by the capabilities of several technologies, including attitude determination and control systems. This dissertation evaluates the use of image-based visual attitude propagation as a compliment or alternative to other attitude determination technologies that are suitable for miniature satellites. The concept lies in using miniature cameras to track image features across frames and extracting the underlying rotation. The problem of visual attitude propagation as a small satellite attitude determination system is addressed from several aspects: related work, algorithm design, hardware and performance evaluation, possible applications, and on-orbit experimentation. These areas of consideration reflect the organization of this dissertation. A "stellar gyroscope" is developed, which is a visual star-based attitude propagator that uses relative motion of stars in an imager's field of view to infer the attitude changes. The device generates spacecraft relative attitude estimates in three degrees of freedom. Algorithms to perform the star detection, correspondence, and attitude propagation are presented. The Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) approach is applied to the correspondence problem to successfully pair stars across frames while mitigating falsepositive and false-negative star detections. This approach provides tolerance to the noise levels expected in using miniature optics and no baffling, and the noise caused by radiation dose on orbit. The hardware design and algorithms are validated using test images of the night sky. The application of the stellar gyroscope as part of a CubeSat attitude determination and control system is described. The stellar gyroscope is used to augment a MEMS gyroscope attitude propagation

  10. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High threshold load at the interface between the ceramic layer and the bond coat was required to propagate the crack further into the bond coat. Once the threshold load was surpassed the crack propagated into the brittle bond coat without an appreciable increase in the load. At temperatures of 800°C the crack propagated ...

  11. A photon propagator on de Sitter in covariant gauges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domazet, S.; Prokopec, T.

    2014-01-01

    We construct a de Sitter invariant photon propagator in general covariant gauges. Our result is a natural generalization of the Allen-Jacobson photon propagator in Feynman gauge. Our propagator reproduces the correct response to a point static charge and the one-loop electromagnetic stress-energy

  12. Feynman propagator and space-time transformation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassar, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    We evaluate the exact propagator for the time-dependent two-dimensional charged harmonic oscillator in a time-varying magnetic field, by taking direct recourse to the corresponding Schroedinger equation. Through the usage of an appropriate space-time transformation, we show that such a propagator can be obtained from the free propagator in the new space-time coordinate system. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic Field Effects and Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Highly Collisional Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Steven Paul

    The homogeneity and size of radio frequency (RF) and microwave driven plasmas are often limited by insufficient penetration of the electromagnetic radiation. To investigate increasing the skin depth of the radiation, we consider the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a weakly ionized plasma immersed in a steady magnetic field where the dominant collision processes are electron-neutral and ion-neutral collisions. Retaining both the electron and ion dynamics, we have adapted the theory for cold collisionless plasmas to include the effects of these collisions and obtained the dispersion relation at arbitrary frequency omega for plane waves propagating at arbitrary angles with respect to the magnetic field. We discuss in particular the cases of magnetic field enhanced wave penetration for parallel and perpendicular propagation, examining the experimental parameters which lead to electromagnetic wave propagation beyond the collisional skin depth. Our theory predicts that the most favorable scaling of skin depth with magnetic field occurs for waves propagating nearly parallel to B and for omega << Omega_{rm e} where Omega_{rm e} is the electron cyclotron frequency. The scaling is less favorable for propagation perpendicular to B, but the skin depth does increase for this case as well. Still, to achieve optimal wave penetration, we find that one must design the plasma configuration and antenna geometry so that one generates primarily the appropriate angles of propagation. We have measured plasma wave amplitudes and phases using an RF magnetic probe and densities using Stark line broadening. These measurements were performed in inductively coupled plasmas (ICP's) driven with a standard helical coil, a reverse turn (Stix) coil, and a flat spiral coil. Density measurements were also made in a microwave generated plasma. The RF magnetic probe measurements of wave propagation in a conventional ICP with wave propagation approximately perpendicular to B show an increase in

  14. Propagation of a normal-superconducting interface in type I superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delon, P.

    1976-01-01

    The speed of propagation of an N-S boundary was measured as a function of temperature, and, when the superconductive phase increases, two minima are observed in the speed. Limited thermal conductivity gives the minimum situated at the highest temperature, the second minimum is caused by interference of quasi-particles through a superconductive sheet which covers a part of the normal state [fr

  15. Q-Band (37-41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37-41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cut-paraboloidal reflector.

  16. Q-Band (37 to 41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37 to 41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cutparaboloidal reflector.

  17. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizas on the growth rate of mist-propagated olive plantlets

    OpenAIRE

    Porras Piedra, A.; Soriano Martín, M.L.; Porras Soriano, A.; Fernández Izquierdo, G.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the influence of early inoculation of semi-woody olive cuttings (cv. Cornicabra), cultivated under mist propagation conditions, with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. A strongly positive response was seen to root inoculation with the three fungal species tested —Glomus mosseae, G. intraradices and G. claroideum— both in nursery phase plantlets, and in older plants grown in 5 L pots.

  18. 3D geometric modeling and simulation of laser propagation through turbulence with plenoptic functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chensheng; Nelson, William; Davis, Christopher C.

    2014-10-01

    Plenoptic functions are functions that preserve all the necessary light field information of optical events. Theoretical work has demonstrated that geometric based plenoptic functions can serve equally well in the traditional wave propagation equation known as the "scalar stochastic Helmholtz equation". However, in addressing problems of 3D turbulence simulation, the dominant methods using phase screen models have limitations both in explaining the choice of parameters (on the transverse plane) in real-world measurements, and finding proper correlations between neighboring phase screens (the Markov assumption breaks down). Though possible corrections to phase screen models are still promising, the equivalent geometric approach based on plenoptic functions begins to show some advantages. In fact, in these geometric approaches, a continuous wave problem is reduced to discrete trajectories of rays. This allows for convenience in parallel computing and guarantees conservation of energy. Besides the pairwise independence of simulated rays, the assigned refractive index grids can be directly tested by temperature measurements with tiny thermoprobes combined with other parameters such as humidity level and wind speed. Furthermore, without loss of generality one can break the causal chain in phase screen models by defining regional refractive centers to allow rays that are less affected to propagate through directly. As a result, our work shows that the 3D geometric approach serves as an efficient and accurate method in assessing relevant turbulence problems with inputs of several environmental measurements and reasonable guesses (such as Cn 2 levels). This approach will facilitate analysis and possible corrections in lateral wave propagation problems, such as image de-blurring, prediction of laser propagation over long ranges, and improvement of free space optic communication systems. In this paper, the plenoptic function model and relevant parallel algorithm computing

  19. Two spatial light modulator system for laboratory simulation of random beam propagation in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Toselli, Italo; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-02-10

    An optical system consisting of a laser source and two independent consecutive phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs) is shown to accurately simulate a generated random beam (first SLM) after interaction with a stationary random medium (second SLM). To illustrate the range of possibilities, a recently introduced class of random optical frames is examined on propagation in free space and several weak turbulent channels with Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov statistics.

  20. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of nonstoichiometric wuestite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramoto, Maki [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Okinaka, Noriyuki [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Akiyama, Tomohiro, E-mail: takiyama@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The manuscript describes an SHS method of producing Fe{sub x}O. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Focus on the effects of nonstoichiometric Fe content and diluent addition on the phase of the SHS product. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without the NaCl diluent, the lattice parameter of SHS Fe{sub 0.947}O corresponded to the theoretical lattice parameter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nonstoichiometric compounds of Fe{sub x}O (0.942 {<=} x {<=} 0.952) were obtained through SHS without additional external heating. - Abstract: This paper describes the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) of nonstoichiometric Fe{sub x}O (x = 0.833-1), with particular focus on the effects of nonstoichiometric Fe content and diluent addition on the phase of the SHS product. In the SHS process, the raw materials Fe, NaClO{sub 4} (oxidizer), and NaCl (diluent) were thoroughly mixed in the desired ratio by ball milling, and the lower surfaces of the disk-shaped green compacts were subsequently electrically ignited to produce Fe{sub x}O through the propagation of the sustainable exothermic reaction. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the SHS products comprised double phases of Fe{sub x}O and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The peaks of products with 0.947 {<=} x {<=} 1.00 shifted to lower angles in comparison to those of the product with x = 0.833 attributed to the lattice parameter distortion of the crystal structure because of the Fe defects. In the presence of the NaCl diluent, the raw materials were converted to high-purity Fe{sub x}O powders during the SHS process. Without the NaCl diluent, the lattice parameter of SHS Fe{sub 0.947}O corresponded to the theoretical lattice parameter. Nonstoichiometric compounds of Fe{sub x}O (0.942 {<=} x {<=} 0.952) were obtained through SHS without additional external heating.