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Sample records for epsilon toxin increases

  1. Recombinant Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins of Clostridium perfringens: Production Strategies and Applications as Veterinary Vaccines

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    Marcos Roberto A. Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is a spore-forming, commensal, ubiquitous bacterium that is present in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans and animals. This bacterium produces up to 18 toxins. The species is classified into five toxinotypes (A–E according to the toxins that the bacterium produces: alpha, beta, epsilon, or iota. Each of these toxinotypes is associated with myriad different, frequently fatal, illnesses that affect a range of farm animals and humans. Alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are the main causes of disease. Vaccinations that generate neutralizing antibodies are the most common prophylactic measures that are currently in use. These vaccines consist of toxoids that are obtained from C. perfringens cultures. Recombinant vaccines offer several advantages over conventional toxoids, especially in terms of the production process. As such, they are steadily gaining ground as a promising vaccination solution. This review discusses the main strategies that are currently used to produce recombinant vaccines containing alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens, as well as the potential application of these molecules as vaccines for mammalian livestock animals.

  2. Clostridium Perfringens Epsilon Toxin Binds to Membrane Lipids and Its Cytotoxic Action Depends on Sulfatide.

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    Carles Gil

    Full Text Available Epsilon toxin (Etx is one of the major lethal toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, being the causal agent of fatal enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep and goats. Etx is synthesized as a non-active prototoxin form (proEtx that becomes active upon proteolytic activation. Etx exhibits a cytotoxic effect through the formation of a pore in the plasma membrane of selected cell targets where Etx specifically binds due to the presence of specific receptors. However, the identity and nature of host receptors of Etx remain a matter of controversy. In the present study, the interactions between Etx and membrane lipids from the synaptosome-enriched fraction from rat brain (P2 fraction and MDCK cell plasma membrane preparations were analyzed. Our findings show that both Etx and proEtx bind to lipids extracted from lipid rafts from the two different models as assessed by protein-lipid overlay assay. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Binding of proEtx to sulfatide, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol (3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol (5-phosphate was detected. Removal of the sulphate groups via sulfatase treatment led to a dramatic decrease in Etx-induced cytotoxicity, but not in proEtx-GFP binding to MDCK cells or a significant shift in oligomer formation, pointing to a role of sulfatide in pore formation in rafts but not in toxin binding to the target cell membrane. These results show for the first time the interaction between Etx and membrane lipids from host tissue and point to a major role for sulfatides in C. perfringens epsilon toxin pathophysiology.

  3. Sialidases affect the host cell adherence and epsilon toxin-induced cytotoxicity of Clostridium perfringens type D strain CN3718.

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    Jihong Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens type B or D isolates, which cause enterotoxemias or enteritis in livestock, produce epsilon toxin (ETX. ETX is exceptionally potent, earning it a listing as a CDC class B select toxin. Most C. perfringens strains also express up to three different sialidases, although the possible contributions of those enzymes to type B or D pathogenesis remain unclear. Type D isolate CN3718 was found to carry two genes (nanI and nanJ encoding secreted sialidases and one gene (nanH encoding a cytoplasmic sialidase. Construction in CN3718 of single nanI, nanJ and nanH null mutants, as well as a nanI/nanJ double null mutant and a triple sialidase null mutant, identified NanI as the major secreted sialidase of this strain. Pretreating MDCK cells with NanI sialidase, or with culture supernatants of BMC206 (an isogenic CN3718 etx null mutant that still produces sialidases enhanced the subsequent binding and cytotoxic effects of purified ETX. Complementation of BMC207 (an etx/nanH/nanI/nanJ null mutant showed this effect is mainly attributable to NanI production. Contact between BMC206 and certain mammalian cells (e.g., enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells resulted in more rapid sialidase production and this effect involved increased transcription of BMC206 nanI gene. BMC206 was shown to adhere to some (e.g. Caco-2 cells, but not all mammalian cells, and this effect was dependent upon sialidase, particularly NanI, expression. Finally, the sialidase activity of NanI (but not NanJ or NanH could be enhanced by trypsin. Collectively these in vitro findings suggest that, during type D disease originating in the intestines, trypsin may activate NanI, which (in turn could contribute to intestinal colonization by C. perfringens type D isolates and also increase ETX action.

  4. Interaction of Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin with biological and model membranes: A putative protein receptor in cells.

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    Manni, Marco M; Sot, Jesús; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-03-01

    Epsilon-toxin (ETX) is a powerful toxin produced by some strains of Clostridium perfringens (classified as types B and D) that is responsible for enterotoxemia in animals. ETX forms pores through the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, consisting of a β-barrel of 14 amphipathic β-strands. ETX shows a high specificity for certain cell lines, of which Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) is the first sensitive cell line identified and the most studied one. The aim of this study was to establish the role of lipids in the toxicity caused by ETX and the correlation of its activity in model and biological membranes. In MDCK cells, using cell counting and confocal microscopy, we have observed that the toxin causes cell death mediated by toxin binding to plasma membrane. Moreover, ETX binds and permeabilizes the membranes of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMV). However, little effect is observed on protein-free vesicles. The data suggest the essential role of a protein receptor for the toxin in cell membranes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased mental slowing associated with the APOE epsilon4 allele after trihexyphenidyl oral anticholinergic challenge in healthy elderly.

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    Pomara, Nunzio; Belzer, Ken; Hernando, Raymundo; De La Pena, Corazon; Sidtis, John J

    2008-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between APOE epsilon4 and subjective effects of trihexyphenidyl on measures reflecting sedation and confusion and to investigate the relationship between trihexyphenidyl-induced subjective effects and objective memory performance. This study comprised 24 cognitively intact, health elderly adults (12 APOE epsilon4 carriers) at an outpatient geriatric psychiatry research clinic. This was a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, three-way, crossover experimental design. All participants received 1.0 mg or 2.0 mg trihexyphenidyl or placebo administered in counterbalanced sequences over a period of three consecutive weeks. Bond and Lader's visual analog scales and alternate versions of the Buschke Selective Reminding Test were administered in a repeated measures design at baseline, 1, 2.5, and 5 hours postdrug administration. A 2.0-mg oral dose of trihexyphenidyl resulted in increased subjective ratings of mental slowness in carriers of the APOE epsilon4 allele only. Drug effects as determined by difference scores between 2.0 mg trihexyphenidyl and placebo on ratings of mental slowness significantly correlated with total and delayed recall on the Buschke Selective Reminding Test in carriers of the APOE epsilon4 allele only. However, no significant effects were found with other visual analog scales reflecting subjective sedation and clear-headedness. The epsilon4 allele in healthy elderly was associated with increased subjective mental slowing after trihexyphenidyl anticholinergic challenge.

  6. Marine algal toxins: origins, health effects, and their increased occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dolah, Frances M.

    2000-01-01

    Certain marine algae produce potent toxins that impact human health through the consumption of contaminated shellfish and finfish and through water or aerosol exposure. Over the past three decades, the frequency and global distribution of toxic algal incidents appear to have increased, and human intoxications from novel algal sources have occurred. This increase is of particular concern, since it parallels recent evidence of large-scale ecologic disturbances that coincide with trends in global warming. The extent to which human activities have contributed to their increase therefore comes into question. This review summarizes the origins and health effects of marine algal toxins, as well as changes in their current global distribution, and examines possible causes for the recent increase in their occurrence. (Author)

  7. Optimization of culture conditions to improve the expression level of beta1–epsilon toxin of Clostridium perfringens type B in Escherichia coli

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    Chuwen Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The detoxified beta1–epsilon (β1–ϵ toxin protein of Clostridium perfringens type B provides protection from C. perfringens types B, C and D infections. Acetate is the primary by-product from the cell growth and expression of β1–ϵ protein. In the present study, the effects of pH and dissolved oxygen (DO on the expression of β1--ϵ protein were investigated. Two-stage pH and DO control strategies were developed for the expression of β1–ϵ protein. The obtained results indicated that higher cell density and concentration of β1--ϵ protein, and lower accumulation of acetate were obtained when pH was maintained at a constant level of 6.5 (0–6 h and 7.0 (6–16 h, and the DO level was maintained at 60% (0–6 h and 30% (6–16 h. Furthermore, the impact of intermittent, DO feedback, pH feedback and glucose-stat feeding on the expression of β1–ϵ protein were studied. By using the DO feedback feeding, combined with the stage control of pH (6.5 for 0–6 h, 7.0 for 6–16 h and DO (60% for 0–6 h, 30% for 6–16 h, the highest cell density of 2.045 (absorbance at 600 nm and a β1–ϵ protein concentration of 63.24 mg/L were obtained, and the accumulation of acetate decreased to 0.872 g/L.

  8. Produção e caracterização de anticorpos monoclonais contra toxina épsilon de Clostridium perfringens Tipo D Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium perfringens Type D epsilon toxin

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    Theonys Diógenes Freitas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens tipo D é o agente etiológico da enterotoxemia em ruminantes, causada pela toxina épsilon e caracterizada por edema cardíaco, pulmonar, renal e cerebral. Anticorpos monoclonais contra toxina épsilon de C. perfringens tipo D foram produzidos a partir da fusão da linhagen de mieloma P3-X63-Ag8 653 com células do baço de camundongos Balb/c imunizados com o toxóide épsilon. Seis linhagens de híbridos secretores de anticorpos monoclonais das classes e IgM e IgG foram estabelecidas.Clostridium perfringens type D is the aetiological agent of enterotoxemia in ruminants. The disease is caused by epsilon toxin characterized by cardiac, pulmonary, kidney and brain edema. Monoclonal antibodies were produced by using myeloma cell line P3-X63-Ag8 653 fused with spleen cells from Balb/c mice, immunized with epsilon toxoid of C. perfringens type D. Six hybrids were established secreting monoclonal antibodies of the IgM class and IgG3 subclass.

  9. Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin kills mice by inducing a major increase in lung vascular permeability.

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    Geny, Blandine; Khun, Huot; Fitting, Catherine; Zarantonelli, Leticia; Mazuet, Christelle; Cayet, Nadège; Szatanik, Marek; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Huerre, Michel; Popoff, Michel R

    2007-03-01

    When intraperitoneally injected into Swiss mice, Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin reproduces the fatal toxic shock syndrome observed in humans and animals after natural infection. This animal model was used to study the mechanism of lethal toxin-induced death. Histopathological and biochemical analyses identified lung and heart as preferential organs targeted by lethal toxin. Massive extravasation of blood fluid in the thoracic cage, resulting from an increase in lung vascular permeability, generated profound modifications such as animal dehydration, increase in hematocrit, hypoxia, and finally, cardiorespiratory failure. Vascular permeability increase induced by lethal toxin resulted from modifications of lung endothelial cells as evidenced by electron microscopy. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that VE-cadherin, a protein participating in intercellular adherens junctions, was redistributed from membrane to cytosol in lung endothelial cells. No major sign of lethal toxin-induced inflammation was observed that could participate in the toxic shock syndrome. The main effect of the lethal toxin is the glucosylation-dependent inactivation of small GTPases, in particular Rac, which is involved in actin polymerization occurring in vivo in lungs leading to E-cadherin junction destabilization. We conclude that the cells most susceptible to lethal toxin are lung vascular endothelial cells, the adherens junctions of which were altered after intoxication.

  10. Epsilon Aurigae

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    Turner, Rebecca; Price, A.; Henden, A.

    2009-05-01

    The IYA 2009 working group on Research Experiences for Students, Teachers, and Citizen-Scientists is planning a multi-year project involving the bright star Eps Aur. The project will go beyond simple observing and also include a major data analysis component. The goal is to introduce the participant to the full scientific process from background research to paper writing for a peer-reviewed journal. It begins with a 10 Star Training Program of several types of binary and transient variable stars that are easy to observe from suburban locations with the naked eye. Participants will be trained both in observing and also in basic data analysis of photometric datasets (light curve and period analysis). Eventually it will lead to a capstone project: monitoring the rare and mysterious 2009-2011 eclipse of Epsilon Aurigae. In the summer of IYA 2009, third-magnitude Eps Aur will experience its next eclipse, which occurs every 27.1 years and lasts 714 days, nearly two years. The star is bright enough to be seen with the naked eye from most urban areas. If fully funded, the project will also involve two public workshops on observing and data analysis in the summers of 2009 and 2010, respectively.

  11. Clostridium difficile toxin CDT induces formation of microtubule-based protrusions and increases adherence of bacteria.

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    Carsten Schwan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis by production of the Rho GTPase-glucosylating toxins A and B. Recently emerging hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains additionally produce the binary ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase, which ADP-ribosylates actin and inhibits actin polymerization. Thus far, the role of CDT as a virulence factor is not understood. Here we report by using time-lapse- and immunofluorescence microscopy that CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, induce redistribution of microtubules and formation of long (up to >150 microm microtubule-based protrusions at the surface of intestinal epithelial cells. The toxins increase the length of decoration of microtubule plus-ends by EB1/3, CLIP-170 and CLIP-115 proteins and cause redistribution of the capture proteins CLASP2 and ACF7 from microtubules at the cell cortex into the cell interior. The CDT-induced microtubule protrusions form a dense meshwork at the cell surface, which wrap and embed bacterial cells, thereby largely increasing the adherence of Clostridia. The study describes a novel type of microtubule structure caused by less efficient microtubule capture and offers a new perspective for the pathogenetic role of CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins in host-pathogen interactions.

  12. Electrophysiological response of chicken's jejunal epithelium to increasing levels of T-2 toxin.

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    Yunus, Agha Waqar; Kröger, Susan; Tichy, Alexander; Zentek, Jürgen; Böhm, Josef

    2013-02-01

    The present investigations were conducted to test the effects of T-2 toxin on electrophysiological variables of jejunal epithelium of chicken. Jejunal segments of broilers were monitored in Ussing chambers in the presence of T-2 toxin at the levels of 0 (negative control), 0 (methanol/vehicle control), 0.1, 1, 5, and 10 μg/ml of buffer. T-2 toxin did not affect basal values of short circuit current (I(sc)), transmural potential difference, or tissue conductivity in the jejunal epithelium. T-2 toxin also did not statistically affect glucose-induced electrophysiological variables during the first 3 min of glucose induction. Compared to the vehicle control, the ouabain-sensitive I(sc) was negatively affected (P = 0.008) only under 5 μg of T-2 toxin/ml. Increasing levels of T-2 toxin negatively affected the ouabain-sensitive I(sc) in a cubic (P = 0.007) fashion. These data indicate that acute exposure to moderate levels of T-2 toxin may progressively impair the cation gradient across the jejunal epithelium.

  13. Standardization of process for increased production of pure and potent tetanus toxin

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    Chellamani Muniandi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available When stationary pot culture was replaced by submerged cultivation of Clostridium tetani, an anaerobic organism, in afermentor using a vibromixer and optimum supply of sterile air to the headspace of the fermentor to flush out the accumulatedgases, a significant increase in the tetanus toxin yield in a short time cultivation (about 5 to 6 days against8 days was noticed. It was found that under optimal conditions of temperature, vibromixing, surface aeration, and analkaline pH favored toxin release. Furthermore, to enhance the production volume, fermentor culture is more suitable.The tetanus toxin was produced with good Limes flocculation (Lf titre and high antigenic purity. Under optimal conditions,the papain digest broth was successfully substituted in place of N.Z Case for the production of pure and potenttetanus toxin. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2013; 3(3: 133-139Key words: Clostridium tetani, modified mueller miller medium, papain digest, limes flocculation

  14. The marine toxin, Yessotoxin, induces apoptosis and increases mitochondrial activity

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    Andrea Fernandez-Araujo

    2014-06-01

    Discussion: Colorimetric MTT assay is widely used as a viability measurement method (McHale and L., 1988;Chiba et al., 1998. But after YTX treatment, MTT assay had shown problems to detect a cell viability decrease. In this sense, in primary cardiac cell cultures, a false increment of the proliferation rate opposite to Sulforhodamine B assay (SRB results was reported after YTX treatment (Dell'Ovo et al., 2008. Also the same effect was obtained in different cancer cell lines after assaying anticancer therapies (Ulukaya et al., 2004. In our study, an increase in cell viability using MTT was observed when the number of cells was high, while by using the LDH assay a significant viability decrease was measured. In these conditions, YTX is activating extrinsic apoptosis cell death by increasing caspase 8 activity and caspase 3 levels. The explanation for this increase was found when the mitochondrial activity was quantified cell by cell in a cytometer. In these conditions a significant increment of mitochondrial activity was detected. Since the cell population is too high, the increase in mitochondrial activity that detects the MTT test disguised the decrease of signal due to the cell death and point to a false proliferation increase. In this sense, a mitochondrial activity decrease was observed after 48 hours YTX treatment in BE(2-M17 neuroblastoma cell line (Leira et al., 2002. However, this study was done in a microplate reader with a small number of cells (Leira et al., 2002. Therefore, to measure the viability by MTT assay is very important to take into account the number of cells per condition when the experiment is designed. Alternative assays, such as LDH test, independently of the direct mitochondrial activity, can be used.

  15. Bioterrorism: toxins as weapons.

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    Anderson, Peter D

    2012-04-01

    The potential for biological weapons to be used in terrorism is a real possibility. Biological weapons include infectious agents and toxins. Toxins are poisons produced by living organisms. Toxins relevant to bioterrorism include ricin, botulinum, Clostridium perfrigens epsilson toxin, conotoxins, shigatoxins, saxitoxins, tetrodotoxins, mycotoxins, and nicotine. Toxins have properties of biological and chemical weapons. Unlike pathogens, toxins do not produce an infection. Ricin causes multiorgan toxicity by blocking protein synthesis. Botulinum blocks acetylcholine in the peripheral nervous system leading to muscle paralysis. Epsilon toxin damages cell membranes. Conotoxins block potassium and sodium channels in neurons. Shigatoxins inhibit protein synthesis and induce apoptosis. Saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin inhibit sodium channels in neurons. Mycotoxins include aflatoxins and trichothecenes. Aflatoxins are carcinogens. Trichothecenes inhibit protein and nucleic acid synthesis. Nicotine produces numerous nicotinic effects in the nervous system.

  16. Differential protection of Cry1Fa toxin against Spodoptera frugiperda larval gut proteases by cadherin orthologs correlates with increased synergism.

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    Rahman, Khalidur; Abdullah, Mohd Amir F; Ambati, Suresh; Taylor, Milton D; Adang, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The Cry proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are the most widely used biopesticides effective against a range of crop pests and disease vectors. Like chemical pesticides, development of resistance is the primary threat to the long-term efficacy of Bt toxins. Recently discovered cadherin-based Bt Cry synergists showed the potential to augment resistance management by improving efficacy of Cry toxins. However, the mode of action of Bt Cry synergists is thus far unclear. Here we elucidate the mechanism of cadherin-based Cry toxin synergism utilizing two cadherin peptides, Spodoptera frugiperda Cad (SfCad) and Manduca sexta Cad (MsCad), which differentially enhance Cry1Fa toxicity to Spodoptera frugiperda neonates. We show that differential SfCad- and MsCad-mediated protection of Cry1Fa toxin in the Spodoptera frugiperda midgut correlates with differential Cry1Fa toxicity enhancement. Both peptides exhibited high affinity for Cry1Fa toxin and an increased rate of Cry1Fa-induced pore formation in S. frugiperda. However, only SfCad bound the S. frugiperda brush border membrane vesicle and more effectively prolonged the stability of Cry1Fa toxin in the gut, explaining higher Cry1Fa enhancement by this peptide. This study shows that cadherin fragments may enhance B. thuringiensis toxicity by at least two different mechanisms or a combination thereof: (i) protection of Cry toxin from protease degradation in the insect midgut and (ii) enhancement of pore-forming ability of Cry toxin.

  17. Heterogeneous Calculation of {epsilon}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Alf

    1961-02-15

    A heterogeneous method of calculating the fast fission factor given by Naudet has been applied to the Carlvik - Pershagen definition of {epsilon}. An exact calculation of the collision probabilities is included in the programme developed for the Ferranti - Mercury computer.

  18. Increased frequency of pink bollworm resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in China.

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    Peng Wan

    Full Text Available Transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt kill some key insect pests, but evolution of resistance by pests can reduce their efficacy. The main approach for delaying pest adaptation to Bt crops uses non-Bt host plants as "refuges" to increase survival of susceptible pests. To delay evolution of pest resistance to transgenic cotton producing Bt toxin Cry1Ac, the United States and some other countries have required refuges of non-Bt cotton, while farmers in China have relied on "natural" refuges of non-Bt host plants other than cotton. The "natural" refuge strategy focuses on cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera, the primary target of Bt cotton in China that attacks many crops, but it does not apply to another major pest, pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella, which feeds almost entirely on cotton in China. Here we report data showing field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac by pink bollworm in the Yangtze River Valley of China. Laboratory bioassay data from 51 field-derived strains show that the susceptibility to Cry1Ac was significantly lower during 2008 to 2010 than 2005 to 2007. The percentage of field populations yielding one or more survivors at a diagnostic concentration of Cry1Ac increased from 0% in 2005-2007 to 56% in 2008-2010. However, the median survival at the diagnostic concentration was only 1.6% from 2008 to 2010 and failure of Bt cotton to control pink bollworm has not been reported in China. The early detection of resistance reported here may promote proactive countermeasures, such as a switch to transgenic cotton producing toxins distinct from Cry1A toxins, increased planting of non-Bt cotton, and integration of other management tactics together with Bt cotton.

  19. Increased CSF-BACE 1 Activity Is Associated with ApoE-[Epsilon]4 Genotype in Subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease

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    Ewers, Michael; Zhong, Zhenyu; Burger, Katharina; Wallin, Anders; Blennow, Kaj; Teipel, Stefan J.; Shen, Yong; Hampel, Harald

    2008-01-01

    The Apolipoprotein (ApoE) [epsilon]4 allele is a major genetic risk factor of Alzheimer's disease, and may affect the production of amyloid beta (A[beta][subscript 1-42]). Recently, we have shown that [beta]-secretase (BACE 1) activity can be reliably detected within the brain and human CSF. Here, we have examined an association between the ApoE…

  20. Padronização da titulação da toxina épsilon de Clostridium perfringens tipo D em linhagem contínua de células como alternativa ao bioensaio animal Standardization of the titration of the epsilon toxin of Clostridium perfringens type D in cell line as an alternative to animal bioassay

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    Milton Formiga Souza Júnior

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxemia, também chamada de doença do rim pulposo, doença que acomete os ruminantes domésticos, é causada pela ação da toxina épsilon produzida pelo Clostridium perfringens tipo D, um anaeróbio comumente isolado do solo e das fezes de animais sadios. O método tradicional de diagnóstico baseia-se na detecção e classificação dessa exotoxina no conteúdo intestinal por meio da soroneutralização em camundongos. Com isso, o objetivo deste estudo foi padronizar um teste para detecção e titulação dessa toxina in vitro e compará-lo ao fenômeno in vivo. Para isso, uma partida de toxina épsilon de Clostridium perfringens tipo D foi titulada em camundongos e em várias linhagens contínuas de células. Após a determinação da linhagem celular mais sensível, realizaram-se ensaios de titulação in vitro de diluições de uma partida de toxina, comparando-os com os títulos in vivo conhecidos. Os resultados foram agrupados, e foi desenvolvida a equação matemática que melhor adaptou-se aos intervalos trabalhados. A linhagem MDCK, além de mais sensível, demonstrou que o fenômeno observado in vitro pode ser expresso por meio da equação matemática que apresenta uma correlação de 98,33%, com a dose mínima mortal determinada in vivo. Portanto, a linhagem MDCK permite titular a toxina épsilon de C. perfringens tipo D de forma específica e sensível, além de ser uma técnica prática, rápida e que dispensa o uso de animais.Enterotoxemia (also called pulpy kidney disease is an enteric disease, that affect ruminants, produced by epsilon toxin from Clostridium perfringens type D, an anaerobic commonly isolated from soil and feces of healthy animals. The diagnostic is based on detection of this exotoxin in the intestinal content by soroneutralization in mice. Therefore, this study aimed to standardize a test for detection and titration of the toxin in vitro, and compare it with the phenomenon in vivo. A volume of epsilon

  1. Albumin, in the Presence of Calcium, Elicits a Massive Increase in Extracellular Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin.

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    Gonyar, Laura A; Gray, Mary C; Christianson, Gregory J; Mehrad, Borna; Hewlett, Erik L

    2017-06-01

    Pertussis (whooping cough), caused by Bordetella pertussis , is resurging in the United States and worldwide. Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is a critical factor in establishing infection with B. pertussis and acts by specifically inhibiting the response of myeloid leukocytes to the pathogen. We report here that serum components, as discovered during growth in fetal bovine serum (FBS), elicit a robust increase in the amount of ACT, and ≥90% of this ACT is localized to the supernatant, unlike growth without FBS, in which ≥90% is associated with the bacterium. We have found that albumin, in the presence of physiological concentrations of calcium, acts specifically to enhance the amount of ACT and its localization to the supernatant. Respiratory secretions, which contain albumin, promote an increase in amount and localization of active ACT that is comparable to that elicited by serum and albumin. The response to albumin is not mediated through regulation of ACT at the transcriptional level or activation of the Bvg two-component system. As further illustration of the specificity of this phenomenon, serum collected from mice that lack albumin does not stimulate an increase in ACT. These data, demonstrating that albumin and calcium act synergistically in the host environment to increase production and release of ACT, strongly suggest that this phenomenon reflects a novel host-pathogen interaction that is central to infection with B. pertussis and other Bordetella species. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Botulinum toxin injection causes hyper-reflexia and increased muscle stiffness of the triceps surae muscle in the rat.

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    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-12-01

    Botulinum toxin is used with the intention of diminishing spasticity and reducing the risk of development of contractures. Here, we investigated changes in muscle stiffness caused by reflex activity or elastic muscle properties following botulinum toxin injection in the triceps surae muscle in rats. Forty-four rats received injection of botulinum toxin in the left triceps surae muscle. Control measurements were performed on the noninjected contralateral side in all rats. Acute experiments were performed, 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk following injection. The triceps surae muscle was dissected free, and the Achilles tendon was cut and attached to a muscle puller. The resistance of the muscle to stretches of different amplitudes and velocities was systematically investigated. Reflex-mediated torque was normalized to the maximal muscle force evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the tibial nerve. Botulinum toxin injection caused severe atrophy of the triceps surae muscle at all time points. The force generated by stretch reflex activity was also strongly diminished but not to the same extent as the maximal muscle force at 2 and 4 wk, signifying a relative reflex hyperexcitability. Passive muscle stiffness was unaltered at 1 wk but increased at 2, 4, and 8 wk (P botulinum toxin causes a relative increase in reflex stiffness, which is likely caused by compensatory neuroplastic changes. The stiffness of elastic elements in the muscles also increased. The data are not consistent with the ideas that botulinum toxin is an efficient antispastic medication or that it may prevent development of contractures. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Are men carrying the apolipoprotein epsilon 4- or epsilon 2 allele less fertile than epsilon 3 epsilon 3 genotypes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Gerdes, C; Hansen, P S

    1996-01-01

    may affect reproductive efficiency, and we therefore compared the distributions of 40-year-old married men with known genotypes by the numbers of their biological children. The distributions were statistically significantly different (P = 0.0026). On average, men with the epsilon 3 epsilon 3 genotype....... These findings are unlikely to be due to gross error in the reported prevalence of childlessness, differences in socioeconomic status or other likely sources of bias. They are compatible with higher fertility in men with the epsilon 3 epsilon 3 genotype than in those with the other common apoE genotypes....

  4. Botulinum toxin A and B raise blood flow and increase survival of critically ischemic skin flaps.

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    Schweizer, Dennis F; Schweizer, Riccardo; Zhang, Shengye; Kamat, Pranitha; Contaldo, Claudio; Rieben, Robert; Eberli, Daniel; Giovanoli, Pietro; Erni, Dominique; Plock, Jan A

    2013-10-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) A and B are commonly used for aesthetic indications and in neuromuscular disorders. New concepts seek to prove efficacy of BTX for critical tissue perfusion. Our aim was to evaluate BTX A and B in a mouse model of critical flap ischemia for preoperative and intraoperative application. BTX A and B were applied on the vascular pedicle of an axial pattern flap in mice preoperatively or intraoperatively. Blood flow, tissue oxygenation, tissue metabolism, flap necrosis rate, apoptosis assay, and RhoA and eNOS expression were endpoints. Blood-flow measurements 1 d after the flap operation revealed a significant reduction to 53% in the control group, while flow was maintained or increased in all BTX groups (103%-129%). Over 5 d all BTX groups showed significant increase in blood flow to 166-187% (P < 0.01). Microdialysis revealed an increase of glucose and reduced lactate/pyruvate ratio and glycerol levels in the flap tissue of all BTX groups. This resulted in significantly improved tissue survival in all BTX groups compared with the control group (62% ± 10%; all P < 0.01): BTX A preconditioning (84% ± 5%), BTX A application intraoperatively (88% ± 4%), BTX B preconditioning (91% ± 4%), and intraoperative BTX B treatment (92% ± 5%). This was confirmed by TUNEL assay. Immunofluorescence demonstrated RhoA and eNOS expression in BTX groups. All BTX applications were similarly effective, despite pharmacologic dissimilarities and different timing. In conclusion, we were able to show on a vascular, tissue, cell, and molecular level that BTX injection to the feeding arteries supports flap survival through ameliorated blood flow and oxygen delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Detection of Cholera Toxin by Optical Methods: A Mechanism-Based Approach to the Generic Detection of Protein Toxins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    ... after its ADP-ribosylation. The sensitive technique of fluorescence spectroscopy can be employed to monitor the action of cholera toxin without regards to the substituents on the acceptor molecule by use of epsilon NAD...

  6. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin increases the susceptibility of Crioceris quatuordecimpunctata to Beauveria bassiana infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spotted asparagus beetle, Crioceris quatuordecimpunctata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is one of the most devastating pests of asparagus in China and elsewhere. In this study, we investigated the interaction of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry3Aa toxin and the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bas...

  7. Mr 40,000 and Mr 39,000 pertussis toxin substrates are increased in surgically denervated dog ventricular myocardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershberger, R.E.; Feldman, A.M.; Anderson, F.L.; Kimball, J.A.; Wynn, J.R.; Bristow, M.R. (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City (USA))

    1991-04-01

    To test the general hypothesis that cardiac innervation may participate in myocardial G protein regulation, we examined the effects of complete intrapericardial surgical denervation or sham operation in dogs. In particulate fractions of dog left ventricular (LV) myocardium harvested 28-33 days after denervation or sham operation, Mr 40,000 and Mr 39,000 pertussis toxin-sensitive substrates (G proteins) were increased by 31% (1.31 +/- 0.084 vs 1.00 +/- 0.058 OD, arbitrary units, p less than 0.01) and 40% (1.40 +/- 0.117 vs. 1.000 +/- 0.084 OD, arbitrary units, p less than 0.02), respectively, as compared with sham-operated controls. The Mr 40,000 pertussis toxin-sensitive band comigrated with a pertussis toxin-sensitive substrate in human erythrocyte membranes known to contain an alpha Gi species. In these same preparations basal, GTP and GppNHp stimulated adenylate cyclase activities were decreased in denervated heart by 20, 26, and 19%, respectively, consistent with increased activity of an inhibitory G protein. In contrast, Gs function was not altered, because cyc(-) membranes reconstituted with membrane extracts and fluoride and beta-receptor-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity were not different between groups. Furthermore, adenylate cyclase catalytic subunit function as assessed with forskolin and manganese stimulation was not different between preparations of control and denervated heart. We conclude that in preparations of surgically denervated dog myocardium Mr 40,000 and Mr 39,000 pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins are increased by 31 and 40%, respectively, and that functional alterations in adenylate cyclase activity exist, consistent with increased inhibitory G-protein function.

  8. Mr 40,000 and Mr 39,000 pertussis toxin substrates are increased in surgically denervated dog ventricular myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershberger, R.E.; Feldman, A.M.; Anderson, F.L.; Kimball, J.A.; Wynn, J.R.; Bristow, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    To test the general hypothesis that cardiac innervation may participate in myocardial G protein regulation, we examined the effects of complete intrapericardial surgical denervation or sham operation in dogs. In particulate fractions of dog left ventricular (LV) myocardium harvested 28-33 days after denervation or sham operation, Mr 40,000 and Mr 39,000 pertussis toxin-sensitive substrates (G proteins) were increased by 31% (1.31 +/- 0.084 vs 1.00 +/- 0.058 OD, arbitrary units, p less than 0.01) and 40% (1.40 +/- 0.117 vs. 1.000 +/- 0.084 OD, arbitrary units, p less than 0.02), respectively, as compared with sham-operated controls. The Mr 40,000 pertussis toxin-sensitive band comigrated with a pertussis toxin-sensitive substrate in human erythrocyte membranes known to contain an alpha Gi species. In these same preparations basal, GTP and GppNHp stimulated adenylate cyclase activities were decreased in denervated heart by 20, 26, and 19%, respectively, consistent with increased activity of an inhibitory G protein. In contrast, Gs function was not altered, because cyc(-) membranes reconstituted with membrane extracts and fluoride and beta-receptor-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity were not different between groups. Furthermore, adenylate cyclase catalytic subunit function as assessed with forskolin and manganese stimulation was not different between preparations of control and denervated heart. We conclude that in preparations of surgically denervated dog myocardium Mr 40,000 and Mr 39,000 pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins are increased by 31 and 40%, respectively, and that functional alterations in adenylate cyclase activity exist, consistent with increased inhibitory G-protein function

  9. Eclipse of epsilon Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2009-07-01

    The bright, long-period, eclipsing binary star epsilon Aurigae is predicted to begin its next eclipse late July or early August of 2009. Epsilon Aurigae is now past solar conjunction and has reappeared as a morning object. All observers -- both visual and instrumental -- are encouraged to contribute observations of the eclipse during the next two years, beginning immediately for morning observers. Observations are urgently requested right now because it is less likely to be observed in the morning, and the eclipse will begin within the next month. The AAVSO is participating in a global campaign to record this eclipse as part of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 celebrations, organized by the Citizen Sky project (http://www.citizensky.org). For experienced visual observers, please observe this star on a weekly basis, using charts available via VSP from the AAVSO website. For novice visual observers, we recommend participating in this observing program by following the Citizen Sky 10-Star tutorial program, which provides a simple training experience in variable star observing. Photoelectric observers belonging to the AAVSO PEP-V program may submit data as usual via the WebObs feature of the AAVSO website Blue&Gold section. Photoelectric observers may also contribute reduced observations in all filters (including infrared J- and H-bands) directly to the AAVSO via WebObs. Observers using wide-field CCD and DSLR systems are also encouraged to participate; avoid saturating the star. For those with narrower-field systems (D Jeffrey Hopkins are co-leading the precision photometry efforts.

  10. First result from KTeV on epsilon epsilon

    CERN Document Server

    Winstein, Bruce D

    1999-01-01

    Based upon an analysis of about 20% of data already collected, KTeV - a new experiment for the study of kaon decays at Fermilab -has just reported a result on $\\epsilon'/\\epsilon$. The result which agrees with that from NA31, establishes direct CP violation -a difference in the decay rates of the neutral kaon and its antiparticle method, the performance of the beam and detector the extraction of the result, checks of its validity, and the important systematic issues.

  11. Shiga Toxin Increases Formation of Clathrin-Coated Pits through Syk Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utskarpen, Audrun; Massol, Ramiro; van Deurs, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Clathrin-dependent endocytosis is a main entry mechanism for the glycolipid-binding Shiga toxin (Stx), although clathrin-independent pathways are also involved. Binding of Stx to its receptor Gb3 not only is essential for Stx retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum and toxicity but also...... activates signaling through the tyrosine kinase Syk. We previously described that Syk activity is important for Stx entry, but it remained unclear how this kinase modulates endocytosis of Stx. Here we characterized the effects of Stx and Syk on clathrin-coated pit formation. We found that acute treatment...

  12. Stool C difficile toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toxin; Colitis - toxin; Pseudomembranous - toxin; Necrotizing colitis - toxin; C difficile - toxin ... be analyzed. There are several ways to detect C difficile toxin in the stool sample. Enzyme immunoassay ( ...

  13. Self-medication as adaptive plasticity: increased ingestion of plant toxins by parasitized caterpillars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Singer

    Full Text Available Self-medication is a specific therapeutic behavioral change in response to disease or parasitism. The empirical literature on self-medication has so far focused entirely on identifying cases of self-medication in which particular behaviors are linked to therapeutic outcomes. In this study, we frame self-medication in the broader realm of adaptive plasticity, which provides several testable predictions for verifying self-medication and advancing its conceptual significance. First, self-medication behavior should improve the fitness of animals infected by parasites or pathogens. Second, self-medication behavior in the absence of infection should decrease fitness. Third, infection should induce self-medication behavior. The few rigorous studies of self-medication in non-human animals have not used this theoretical framework and thus have not tested fitness costs of self-medication in the absence of disease or parasitism. Here we use manipulative experiments to test these predictions with the foraging behavior of woolly bear caterpillars (Grammia incorrupta; Lepidoptera: Arctiidae in response to their lethal endoparasites (tachinid flies. Our experiments show that the ingestion of plant toxins called pyrrolizidine alkaloids improves the survival of parasitized caterpillars by conferring resistance against tachinid flies. Consistent with theoretical prediction, excessive ingestion of these toxins reduces the survival of unparasitized caterpillars. Parasitized caterpillars are more likely than unparasitized caterpillars to specifically ingest large amounts of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. This case challenges the conventional view that self-medication behavior is restricted to animals with advanced cognitive abilities, such as primates, and empowers the science of self-medication by placing it in the domain of adaptive plasticity theory.

  14. Experimental pseudo-symmetric trap EPSILON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skovoroda, A.A.; Arsenin, V.V.; Dlougach, E.D.; Kulygin, V.M.; Kuyanov, A.Yu.; Timofeev, A.V.; Zhil'tsov, V.A.; Zvonkov, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of the conceptual project 'Adaptive Plasma EXperiment' a trap with the closed magnetic field lines 'Experimental Pseudo-Symmetric trap' is examined. The project APEX is directed at the theoretical and experimental development of physical foundations for stationary thermonuclear reactor on the basis of an alternative magnetic trap with tokamak-level confinement of high β plasma. The fundamental principle of magnetic field pseudosymmetry that should be satisfied for plasma to have tokamak-like confinement is discussed. The calculated in paraxial approximation examples of pseudosymmetric curvilinear elements with poloidal direction of B isolines are adduced. The EPSILON trap consisting of two straight axisymmetric mirrors linked by two curvilinear pseudosymmetric elements is considered. The plasma currents are short-circuited within the curvilinear element what increases the equilibrium β. The untraditional scheme of MHD stabilization of a trap with the closed field lines by the use of divertor inserted into axisymmetric mirror is analyzed. The experimental installation EPSILON-OME that is under construction for experimental check of divertor stabilization is discussed. The possibility of ECR plasma production in EPSILON-OME under conditions of high density and small magnetic field is examined. (author)

  15. Measurement of the CP-violation parameter Re(var-epsilon '/var-epsilon)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, L.K.; Barker, A.R.; Briere, R.A.; Makoff, G.; Papadimitriou, V.; Patterson, J.R.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Somalwar, S.V.; Wah, Y.W.; Winstein, B.; Winston, R.; Woods, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Swallow, E.C.; Bock, G.J.; Coleman, R.; Enagonio, J.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Ramberg, E.; Stanfield, K.; Tschirhart, R.; Yamanaka, T.; Gollin, G.D.; Karlsson, M.; Okamitsu, J.K.; Debu, P.; Peyaud, B.; Turlay, R.; Vallage, B.

    1993-01-01

    A measurement of the CP-violation parameter Re(var-epsilon '/var-epsilon) has been made using the full E731 data set. We find Re(var-epsilon '/var-epsilon)=(7.4±5.2±2.9)x10 -4 where the first error is statistical and the second systematic

  16. Muscle disuse caused by botulinum toxin injection leads to increased central gain of the stretch reflex in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Hultborn, Hans; Naslund-Koch, Lui

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (Btx) is used in children with cerebral palsy and other neurological patients to diminish spasticity and reduce the risk of development of contractures. Here, we investigated changes in the central gain of the stretch reflex circuitry in response to botulinum toxin injection...

  17. Kinetics of epsilon antitoxin antibodies in different strategies for active immunization of lambs against enterotoxaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni F. Costa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxaemia, a common disease that affects domestic small ruminants, is mainly caused by the epsilon toxin of Clostridium perfringens type D. The present study tested four distinct immunization protocols to evaluate humoral response in lambs, a progeny of non-vaccinated sheep during gestation. Twenty-four lambs were randomly allocated into four groups according to age (7, 15, 30 and 45 days, receiving the first dose of epsilon toxoid commercial vaccine against clostridiosis with booster after 30 days post vaccination. Indirect ELISA was performed after the first vaccine dose and booster to evaluate the immune response of the lambs. Results showed that for the four protocols tested all lambs presented serum title considered protective (≥0.2UI/ml epsilon antitoxin antibodies and also showed that the anticipation of primovaccination of lambs against enterotoxaemia conferred serum title considered protective allowing the optimization of mass vaccination of lambs.

  18. Botulinum toxin injection causes hyper-reflexia and increased muscle stiffness of the triceps surae muscle in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Lorentzen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is used to diminish spasticity and reduce the risk of development of contractures. Here, we investigated changes in muscle stiffness caused by reflex activity or elastic muscle properties following botulinum toxin injection in the triceps surae muscle in rats. Forty-four rats...... received injection of botulinum toxin in the left triceps surae muscle. Control measurements were performed on the non-injected contralateral side in all rats. Acute experiments were performed 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks following injection. The triceps surae muscle was dissected free, the Achilles tendon was cut...... and attached to a muscle puller. The resistance of the muscle to stretches of different amplitudes and velocities was systematically investigated. Reflex mediated torque was normalized to the maximal muscle force (Mmax) evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the tibial nerve. Botulinum toxin injection caused...

  19. Botulinum toxin injection causes hyper-reflexia and increased muscle stiffness of the triceps surae muscle in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates, for the first time, adaptive plastic changes in the stretch reflex circuitry following denervation induced by botulinum toxin injection. The study also demonstrates alterations of the elastic properties of the muscles following botulinum injection.

  20. epsilon-N-trimethyllysine availability regulates the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebouche, C.J.; Lehman, L.J.; Olson, L.

    1986-01-01

    Rates of carnitine biosynthesis in mammals depend on the availability of substrates and the activity of enzymes subserving the pathway. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine is rate-limiting for synthesis of carnitine in the growing rat and to evaluate diet as a source of this precursor for carnitine biosynthesis. Rats apparently absorbed greater than 90% of a tracer dose of [methyl- 3 H]epsilon-N-trimethyllysine, and approximately 30% of that was incorporated into tissues as [ 3 H]carnitine. Rats given oral supplements of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine (0.5-20 mg/d), but no dietary carnitine, excreted more carnitine than control animals receiving no dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine or carnitine. Rates of carnitine excretion increased in a dose-dependent manner. Tissue and serum levels of carnitine also increased with dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. There was no evidence that the capacity for carnitine biosynthesis was saturated even at the highest level of oral epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. Common dietary proteins (casein, soy protein and wheat gluten) were found to be poor sources of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine for carnitine biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine limits the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat

  1. Nitrate Increased Cucumber Tolerance to Fusarium Wilt by Regulating Fungal Toxin Production and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyan Zhou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber Fusarium wilt, induced by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum (FOC, causes severe losses in cucumber yield and quality. Nitrogen (N, as the most important mineral nutrient for plants, plays a critical role in plant–pathogen interactions. Hydroponic assays were conducted to investigate the effects of different N forms (NH4+ vs. NO3‒ and supply levels (low, 1 mM; high, 5 mM on cucumber Fusarium wilt. The NO3‒-fed cucumber plants were more tolerant to Fusarium wilt compared with NH4+-fed plants, and accompanied by lower leaf temperature after FOC infection. The disease index decreased as the NO3‒ supply increased but increased with the NH4+ level supplied. Although the FOC grew better under high NO3− in vitro, FOC colonization and fusaric acid (FA production decreased in cucumber plants under high NO3− supply, associated with lower leaf membrane injury. There was a positive correlation between the FA content and the FOC number or relative membrane injury. After the exogenous application of FA, less FA accumulated in the leaves under NO3− feeding, accompanied with a lower leaf membrane injury. In conclusion, higher NO3− supply protected cucumber plants against Fusarium wilt by suppressing FOC colonization and FA production in plants, and increasing the plant tolerance to FA.

  2. Nitrate Increased Cucumber Tolerance to Fusarium Wilt by Regulating Fungal Toxin Production and Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinyan; Wang, Min; Sun, Yuming; Gu, Zechen; Wang, Ruirui; Saydin, Asanjan; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2017-03-11

    Cucumber Fusarium wilt, induced by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum (FOC), causes severe losses in cucumber yield and quality. Nitrogen (N), as the most important mineral nutrient for plants, plays a critical role in plant-pathogen interactions. Hydroponic assays were conducted to investigate the effects of different N forms (NH₄⁺ vs. NO₃ ‒ ) and supply levels (low, 1 mM; high, 5 mM) on cucumber Fusarium wilt. The NO₃ ‒ -fed cucumber plants were more tolerant to Fusarium wilt compared with NH₄⁺-fed plants, and accompanied by lower leaf temperature after FOC infection. The disease index decreased as the NO₃ ‒ supply increased but increased with the NH₄⁺ level supplied. Although the FOC grew better under high NO₃ - in vitro, FOC colonization and fusaric acid (FA) production decreased in cucumber plants under high NO₃ - supply, associated with lower leaf membrane injury. There was a positive correlation between the FA content and the FOC number or relative membrane injury. After the exogenous application of FA, less FA accumulated in the leaves under NO₃ - feeding, accompanied with a lower leaf membrane injury. In conclusion, higher NO₃ - supply protected cucumber plants against Fusarium wilt by suppressing FOC colonization and FA production in plants, and increasing the plant tolerance to FA.

  3. High interobserver variability in the assessment of epsilon waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platonov, Pyotr G; Calkins, Hugh; Hauer, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    ) tracings depicting leads V1, V2, and V3 collected from individuals evaluated for ARVC/D (n = 30) were given to panel members who were asked to respond to the question whether ECG patterns meet epsilon wave definition outlined by the Task Force diagnostic criteria. The prevalence and importance of epsilon...... for only 10 cases (33%), 2 of which qualified as epsilon waves and 8 as non-epsilon waves by all panel members. From a pooled data set, 106 patients reportedly had epsilon waves (13%). In 105 of 106 patients with epsilon waves (99%), exclusion of epsilon waves from the diagnostic score would not affect...

  4. Polyamine toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Jensen, Lars S; Vogensen, Stine B

    2005-01-01

    Polyamine toxins, isolated from spiders and wasps, have been used as pharmacological tools for the study of ionotropic receptors, but their use have so far been hampered by their lack of selectivity. In this mini-review, we describe how careful synthetic modification of native polyamine toxins ha...

  5. Sensitivity improvement for correlations involving arginine side-chain N{epsilon}/H{epsilon} resonances in multi-dimensional NMR experiments using broadband {sup 15}N 180{sup o} pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwahara, Junji; Clore, G. Marius [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, Building 5, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease (United States)], E-mail: mariusc@intra.niddk.nih.gov

    2006-12-15

    Due to practical limitations in available {sup 15}N rf field strength, imperfections in {sup 15}N 180{sup o} pulses arising from off-resonance effects can result in significant sensitivity loss, even if the chemical shift offset is relatively small. Indeed, in multi-dimensional NMR experiments optimized for protein backbone amide groups, cross-peaks arising from the Arg guanidino {sup 15}N{epsilon} ({approx}85 ppm) are highly attenuated by the presence of multiple INEPT transfer steps. To improve the sensitivity for correlations involving Arg N{epsilon}-H{epsilon} groups, we have incorporated {sup 15}N broadband 180 deg. pulses into 3D {sup 15}N-separated NOE-HSQC and HNCACB experiments. Two {sup 15}N-WURST pulses incorporated at the INEPT transfer steps of the 3D {sup 15}N-separated NOE-HSQC pulse sequence resulted in a {approx}1.5-fold increase in sensitivity for the Arg N{epsilon}-H{epsilon} signals at 800 MHz. For the 3D HNCACB experiment, five {sup 15}N Abramovich-Vega pulses were incorporated for broadband inversion and refocusing, and the sensitivity of Arg{sup 1}H{epsilon}-{sup 15}N{epsilon}-{sup 13}C{gamma}/{sup 13}C{delta} correlation peaks was enhanced by a factor of {approx}1.7 at 500 MHz. These experiments eliminate the necessity for additional experiments to assign Arg {sup 1}H{epsilon} and {sup 15}N{epsilon} resonances. In addition, the increased sensitivity afforded for the detection of NOE cross-peaks involving correlations with the {sup 15}N{epsilon}/{sup 1}H{epsilon} of Arg in 3D {sup 15}N-separated NOE experiments should prove to be very useful for structural analysis of interactions involving Arg side-chains.

  6. Topical botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ashley; Nasir, Adnan

    2010-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing discipline that capitalizes on the unique properties of matter engineered on the nanoscale. Vehicles incorporating nanotechnology have led to great strides in drug delivery, allowing for increased active ingredient stability, bioavailability, and site-specific targeting. Botulinum toxin has historically been used for the correction of neurological and neuromuscular disorders, such as torticollis, blepharospasm, and strabismus. Recent dermatological indications have been for the management of axillary hyperhydrosis and facial rhytides. Traditional methods of botulinum toxin delivery have been needle-based. These have been associated with increased pain and cost. Newer methods of botulinum toxin formulation have yielded topical preparations that are bioactive in small pilot clinical studies. While there are some risks associated with topical delivery, the refinement and standardization of delivery systems and techniques for the topical administration of botulinum toxin using nanotechnology is anticipated in the near future.

  7. Experimental evolution of defense against a competitive mold confers reduced sensitivity to fungal toxins but no increased resistance in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trienens Monika

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fungal secondary metabolites have been suggested to function as chemical defenses against insect antagonists, i.e. predators and competitors. Because insects and fungi often compete for dead organic material, insects may achieve protection against fungi by reducing sensitivity to fungal chemicals. This, in turn, may lead to increased resistance allowing insects better to suppress the spread of antagonistic but non-pathogenic microbes in their habitat. However, it remains controversial whether fungal toxins serve as a chemical shield that selects for insects that are less sensitive to toxins, and hence favors the evolution of insect resistance against microbial competitors. Results To examine the relationship between the ability to survive competition with toxic fungi, sensitivity to fungal toxins and resistance, we created fungal-selected (FS replicated insect lines by exposing Drosophila melanogaster larvae to the fungal competitor Aspergillus nidulans over 26 insect generations. Compared to unselected control lines (UC, larvae from the FS lines had higher survival rates in the presence of A. nidulans indicating selection for increased protection against the fungal antagonist. In line with our expectation, FS lines were less susceptible to the A. nidulans mycotoxin Sterigmatocystin. Of particular interest is that evolved protection against A. nidulans and Sterigmatocytin was not correlated with increased insect survival in the presence of other fungi and mycotoxins. We found no evidence that FS lines were better at suppressing the expansion of fungal colonies but observed a trend towards a less detrimental effect of FS larvae on fungal growth. Conclusion Antagonistic but non-pathogenic fungi favor insect variants better protected against the fungal chemical arsenal. This highlights the often proposed but experimentally underexplored importance of secondary metabolites in driving animal-fungus interactions. Instead of

  8. Inhibition of B cell proliferation by antisense DNA to both alpha and beta forms of Fc epsilon R II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, L; Behle, K; Stevens, R H

    1992-10-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection activates B lymphocyte proliferation through partially understood mechanisms, resulting in phenotypic changes, including the appearance of new antigens. One such antigen is Fc epsilon R II/CD-23 which may be relevant for B cell proliferation. We have used anti-sense oligonucleotides to study the importance of the two forms of this molecule for proliferation in the EBV-transformed, Fc epsilon R II +ve lymphoblastoid B cell line, RPMI 8866. Anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotides were generated to the two forms of Fc epsilon R II; Fc epsilon R IIa (alpha) and IIb (beta) which differ only in their intracytoplasmic domains. Addition of increasing concentrations of anti-sense oligonucleotides, ranging from 1 to 30 microM, significantly decreased cellular proliferation as measured by the incorporation of [3H]thymidine (inhibition range 8-88%). Optimum inhibition of cellular proliferation was apparent at 15 microM concentration of both anti-sense Fc epsilon R IIa and IIb (Fc epsilon R IIa, mean +/- SE = 75 +/- 7% inhibition, p less than 0.001; Fc epsilon R IIb, mean +/- SE = 71 +/- 7% inhibition, p less than 0.001). Anti-sense oligonucleotides complementary to the common part of Fc epsilon R II resulted in a similar inhibition of proliferation. Sense oligonucleotides did not induce significant inhibition. Preincubation of sense and anti-sense oligonucleotides resulted in an abrogation of proliferation inhibition. Moreover, none of these oligonucleotides had any effect on a Fc epsilon R II -ve cell line. Incubation with both anti-sense IIa and IIb resulted in additive, but not synergistic inhibition of proliferation. Addition of soluble Fc epsilon R II did not reverse inhibition of proliferation, suggesting that membrane-bound or intracellular rather than soluble Fc epsilon R II was important for the induced proliferation. Analysis of cell surface expression for Fc epsilon II indicated that while there was a pronounced effect on cell number

  9. Botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigam P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin, one of the most poisonous biological substances known, is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum elaborates eight antigenically distinguishable exotoxins (A, B, C 1 , C 2 , D, E, F and G. All serotypes interfere with neural transmission by blocking the release of acetylcholine, the principal neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, causing muscle paralysis. The weakness induced by injection with botulinum toxin A usually lasts about three months. Botulinum toxins now play a very significant role in the management of a wide variety of medical conditions, especially strabismus and focal dystonias, hemifacial spasm, and various spastic movement disorders, headaches, hypersalivation, hyperhidrosis, and some chronic conditions that respond only partially to medical treatment. The list of possible new indications is rapidly expanding. The cosmetological applications include correction of lines, creases and wrinkling all over the face, chin, neck, and chest to dermatological applications such as hyperhidrosis. Injections with botulinum toxin are generally well tolerated and side effects are few. A precise knowledge and understanding of the functional anatomy of the mimetic muscles is absolutely necessary to correctly use botulinum toxins in clinical practice.

  10. Casimir elements of epsilon Lie algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheunert, M.

    1982-10-01

    The classical framework for investigating the Casimir elements of a Lie algebra is generalized to the case of an epsilon Lie algebra L. We construct the standard L-module isomorphism of the epsilon-symmetric algebra of L onto its enveloping algebra and we introduce the Harish-Chandra homomorphism. In case the generators of L can be written in a canonical two-index form, we construct the associated standard sequence of Casimir elements and derive a formula for their eigenvalues in an arbitrary highest weight module. (orig.)

  11. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 and protein kinase C-epsilon increase in dorsal root ganglion neurons and spinal glial activation in an adolescent rat model of painful neck injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaar, Christine L; Dong, Ling; Bowman, Alex S; Perez, Federico M; Guarino, Benjamin B; Sweitzer, Sarah M; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2010-12-01

    There is growing evidence that neck pain is common in adolescence and is a risk factor for the development of chronic neck pain in adulthood. The cervical facet joint and its capsular ligament is a common source of pain in the neck in adults, but its role in adolescent pain remains unknown. The aim of this study was to define the biomechanics, behavioral sensitivity, and indicators of neuronal and glial activation in an adolescent model of mechanical facet joint injury. A bilateral C6-C7 facet joint distraction was imposed in an adolescent rat and biomechanical metrics were measured during injury. Following injury, forepaw mechanical hyperalgesia was measured, and protein kinase C-epsilon (PKCɛ) and metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 (mGluR5) expression in the dorsal root ganglion and markers of spinal glial activation were assessed. Joint distraction induced significant mechanical hyperalgesia during the 7 days post-injury (p capsule during injury were 32.8 ± 12.9%, which were consistent with the strains associated with comparable degrees of hypersensitivity in the adult rat. These results suggest that adolescents may have a lower tissue tolerance to induce pain and associated nociceptive response than do adults.

  12. Inhibitory effect of snake venom toxin on NF-κB activity prevents human cervical cancer cell growth via increase of death receptor 3 and 5 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Lim; Park, Mi Hee; Hong, Ji Eun; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Ji Young; Seo, Hyen Ok; Han, Sang-Bae; Yoon, Joo Hee; Lee, Won Hyoung; Song, Ho Sueb; Lee, Ji In; Lee, Ung Soo; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-02-01

    We previously found that snake venom toxin inhibits nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity in several cancer cells. NF-κB is implicated in cancer cell growth and chemoresistance. In our present study, we investigated whether snake venom toxin (SVT) inhibits NF-κB, thereby preventing human cervical cancer cell growth (Ca Ski and C33A). SVT (0-12 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of cervical cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death. These inhibitory effects were associated with the inhibition of NF-κB activity. However, SVT dose dependently increased the expression of death receptors (DRs): DR3, DR5 and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins. Exploration of NF-κB inhibitor (Phenylarsine oxide, 0.1 μM) synergistically further increased SVT-induced DR3 and DR5 expressions accompanied with further inhibition of cancer cells growth. Moreover, deletion of DR3 and DR5 by small interfering RNA significantly abolished SVT-induced cell growth inhibitory effects, as well as NF-κB inactivation. Using TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand resistance cancer cells (A549 and MCF-7), we also found that SVT enhanced the susceptibility of chemoresistance of these cancer cells through down-regulation of NF-κB, but up-regulation of DR3 and DR5. In vivo study also showed that SVT (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth accompanied with inactivation of NF-κB. Thus, our present study indicates that SVT could be applicable as an anticancer agent for cervical cancer, or as an adjuvant agent for chemoresistant cancer cells.

  13. Topical Botulinum Toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Ashley; Nasir, Adnan

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing discipline that capitalizes on the unique properties of matter engineered on the nanoscale. Vehicles incorporating nanotechnology have led to great strides in drug delivery, allowing for increased active ingredient stability, bioavailability, and site-specific targeting. Botulinum toxin has historically been used for the correction of neurological and neuromuscular disorders, such as torticollis, blepharospasm, and strabismus. Recent dermatological indicati...

  14. Asymmetries in global-local processing ability in elderly people with the apolipoprotein e-epsilon4 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Mark W; Delis, Dean C; Lansing, Amy; Houston, Wes; Olsen, Ryan; Wetter, Spencer; Bondi, Mark W; Salmon, David P

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have identified cognitive asymmetries in elderly people at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) by comparing standardized neuropsychological tests of verbal and spatial abilities in both preclinical AD and apolipoprotein epsilon4+ elderly groups. This prospective study investigated cognitive asymmetries within a single test by comparing cognitively intact elderly (with and without the epsilon4+ allele) on a learning and memory measure that uses global and local visuospatial stimuli. Both groups demonstrated comparable overall learning and recall. But the epsilon4+ group had a significantly larger discrepancy between their global and local learning scores and had a greater proportion of individuals with more than a one standard deviation difference between their immediate recall of the global and local elements, relative to the epsilon4- group. These findings build on previous studies identifying subgroups of elderly people at greater risk for AD who often demonstrate increased cognitive asymmetries relative to groups without significant risk factors. Copyright (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. 1982-1984 Eclipse of Epsilon Aurigae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, R.E.

    1985-09-01

    A workshop proceedings concerned with the new data collected during the 1982-1984 eclipse period of the 27-year system Epsilon Aurigae is presented. This binary star has been a classic problem in astrophysics because the opaque eclipsing object is nonstellar, and probably disk shaped. Invited papers concerning the history of the system, optical, infrared and ultraviolet photometry, optical polarimetry and ultraviolet spectroscopy are included. An invited paper concerning comprehensive theoretical interpretation in the context of stellar evolution also is included

  16. Gelatinized and nongelatinized corn starch/ poly(epsilon-caprolactone) blends: characterization by rheological, mechanical and morphological properties

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa,Derval S.; Guedes,Cristina G. F.; Pedroso,Andréa G.

    2004-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/corn starch blends containing 25, 50 and 75 wt.% starch were prepared by mechanical processing and characterized by the melt flow index (MFI), tensile test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For comparison, starch was used in gelatinized and nongelatinized forms and was also characterized by viscography. The addition of starch to poly(epsilon-caprolactone) reduced the MFI values, the tensile strength and the elongation at break, whereas the modulus increased. T...

  17. APOE epsilon4 is associated with impaired verbal learning in patients with MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, G; Panas, M; Giogkaraki, E; Potagas, C; Karadima, G; Sfagos, C; Vassilopoulos, D

    2007-02-20

    To investigate the effect of APOE epsilon4 on different cognitive domains in a population of Greek patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). A total of 125 patients with MS and 43 controls were included in this study and underwent neuropsychological assessment with Rao's Brief Repeatable Battery. All patients with MS were genotyped for APOE. The effect of APOE epsilon4 on different cognitive domains was investigated. Fifty-one percent of patients with MS were cognitively impaired. E4 carriers had a sixfold increase in the relative risk of impairment in verbal learning vs noncarriers (OR 6.28, 95% CI 1.74 to 22.69). This effect was domain-specific and was not observed in other cognitive domains assessed by the battery. We found an association of APOE epsilon4 with impaired verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  18. Toxins as biological weapons for terror-characteristics, challenges and medical countermeasures: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Tamar; Eisenkraft, Arik; Bar-Haim, Erez; Kassirer, Michael; Aran, Adi Avniel; Fogel, Itay

    2016-01-01

    Toxins are hazardous biochemical compounds derived from bacteria, fungi, or plants. Some have mechanisms of action and physical properties that make them amenable for use as potential warfare agents. Currently, some toxins are classified as potential biological weapons, although they have several differences from classic living bio-terror pathogens and some similarities to manmade chemical warfare agents. This review focuses on category A and B bio-terror toxins recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Botulinum neurotoxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B, Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin, and ricin. Their derivation, pathogenesis, mechanism of action, associated clinical signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed in detail. Given their expected covert use, the primary diagnostic challenge in toxin exposure is the early detection of morbidity clusters, apart from background morbidity, after a relatively short incubation period. For this reason, it is important that clinicians be familiar with the clinical manifestations of toxins and the appropriate methods of management and countermeasures.

  19. Effects of climate and lifeform on dry matter yield (epsilon) from simulations using BIOME BGC. [ecosystem process model for vegetation biomass production using daily absorbed photosynthetically active radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, E. R., Jr.; Running, Steven W.

    1992-01-01

    An ecosystem process simulation model, BIOME-BGC, is used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the factors that may cause the dry matter yield (epsilon) and annual net primary production to vary for different ecosystems. At continental scales, epsilon is strongly correlated with annual precipitation. At a single location, year-to-year variation in net primary production (NPP) and epsilon is correlated with either annual precipitation or minimum air temperatures. Simulations indicate that forests have lower epsilon than grasslands. The most sensitive parameter affecting forest epsilon is the total amount of living woody biomass, which affects NPP by increasing carbon loss by maintenance respiration. A global map of woody biomass should significantly improve estimates of global NPP using remote sensing.

  20. Secondary digital nerve repair in the foot with resorbable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve conduits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA; Robinson, PH

    Nerve guides are increasingly being used in peripheral nerve repair. In the last decade, Much preclinical research has been undertaken into a resorbable nerve guide composed of p(DLLA-epsilon-CL). This report describes the results of secondary digital nerve reconstruction in the foot in a patient

  1. Dose-dependent utilisation of casein-linked lysinoalanine, N(epsilon)-fructoselysine and N(epsilon)-carboxymethyllysine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, Veronika; Wenzel, Elisabeth; Weiss, Carola; Clawin-Rädecker, Ingrid; Grübel, Nadine; Erbersdobler, Helmut F

    2006-09-01

    During the heat treatment of protein-containing foods, the amino acid lysine is most prone to undergo chemical reactions in the course of amino acid cross-linking or Maillard reactions. Among the reaction products formed, lysinoalanine (LAL), N(epsilon)-fructoselysine (FL) and N(epsilon)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) are those which serve as sensitive markers for the heat treatment applied. From a nutritional perspective, these compounds are ingested with the diet in considerable amounts but information about their metabolic transit and putative in vivo effects is scarce. In the present study, casein-linked LAL, FL and CML were administered to rats in two different doses for 10 days. Quantitation of LAL, FL and CML in plasma, tissue and faeces samples revealed that the kidneys are the predominant sites of accumulation and excretion. The maximum percent of dietary LAL, FL and CML excreted in the urine was 5.6, 5.2 and 29%, whereas the respective recoveries in the kidneys were 0.02, 26 and 1.4%. The plasma and tissue analyses revealed that the endogenous load of either compound is increased by its dietary intake. But the dose-dependent utilisation of dietary protein-linked LAL, FL and CML in rats has been demonstrated for the first time to vary substantially from each other.

  2. Epsilon Aur monitoring during predicted pulsation phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.; Templeton, Matthew R.

    2014-09-01

    Dr. Robert Stencel (University of Denver Astronomy Program) has requested that AAVSO observers monitor epsilon Aurigae from now through the end of the observing season. "Studies of the long-term, out-of-eclipse photometry of this enigmatic binary suggest that intervals of coherent pulsation occur at roughly 1/3 of the 27.1-year orbital period. Kloppenborg, et al. noted that stable variation patterns develop at 3,200-day intervals' implying that 'the next span of dates when such events might happen are circa JD ~2457000 (2014 December)'. "These out-of-eclipse light variations often have amplitudes of ~0.1 magnitude in U, and ~0.05 in V, with characteristic timescales of 60-100 days. The AAVSO light curve data to the present may indicate that this coherent phenomenon has begun, but we encourage renewed efforts by observers...to help deduce whether these events are internal to the F star, or externally-driven by tidal interaction with the companion star." Nightly observations or one observation every few days (CCD/PEP/DSLR, VUBR (amplitude too small for visual)) are requested. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Epsilon Aur was the subject of major international campaigns and the AAVSO's Citizen Sky project as it went through its 27.1-year eclipse in 2009-2011. Over 700 observers worldwide submitted over 20,000 multicolor observations to the AAVSO International Database for this project. Much information on eps Aur is available from the AAVSO, including material on the Citizen Sky website (http://www.aavso.org/epsilon-aurigae and http://www.citizensky.org/content/star-our-project). The Journal of the AAVSO, Volume 40, No. 2 (2012) was devoted to discussion of and research results from this event. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  3. Ultraviolet Flux Variation of Epsilon Aurigae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woon Kang

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available The eighteen ultraviolet light curves of Epsilon Aurigae have been plotted using the integrated fluxes reduced from the 233 IUE low dispersion spectra taken between 1978 and 1986. The times of contacts and depth of eclipse have been determined from the light curves at the wavelength from 2550 Å to 3050 Å. The UV light curves show two brightenings during the totality, the downward slope of the variation from the second to the third contacts, and asymmetry of the eclipse light curve. The two selected spectra note that the energy density distribution is not changed between the totality of the eclipse and out-of-eclipse.

  4. Interleukin-1 beta induced synthesis of protein kinase C-delta and protein kinase C-epsilon in EL4 thymoma cells: possible involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, C L; Royds, J A; Brown, B L; Dobson, P R

    2001-01-01

    We present evidence here that the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) stimulates a significant increase in protein kinase C (PKC)-epsilon and PKC-delta protein levels and increases PKC-epsilon, but not PKC-delta, transcripts in EL4 thymoma cells. Incubation of EL4 cells with IL-1 beta induced protein synthesis of PKC-epsilon (6-fold increase) by 7 h and had a biphasic effect on PKC-delta levels with peaks at 4 h (2-fold increase) and 24 h (4-fold increase). At the level of mRNA, PKC-epsilon, but not PKC-delta levels, were induced after incubation of EL4 cells with IL-1 beta. The signalling mechanisms utilized by IL-1 beta to induce the synthesis of these PKC isoforms were investigated. Two phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase-specific inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002, inhibited IL-1 beta-induced synthesis of PKC-epsilon. However, the PI 3-kinase inhibitors had little effect on the IL-1 beta-induced synthesis of PKC-delta in these cells. Our results indicate that IL-1 beta induced both PKC-delta and PKC-epsilon expression over different time periods. Furthermore, our evidence suggests that IL-1 beta induction of PKC-epsilon, but not PKC-delta, may occur via the PI 3-kinase pathway. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Toxins and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Alan L

    2014-12-15

    Components from venoms have stimulated many drug discovery projects, with some notable successes. These are briefly reviewed, from captopril to ziconotide. However, there have been many more disappointments on the road from toxin discovery to approval of a new medicine. Drug discovery and development is an inherently risky business, and the main causes of failure during development programmes are outlined in order to highlight steps that might be taken to increase the chances of success with toxin-based drug discovery. These include having a clear focus on unmet therapeutic needs, concentrating on targets that are well-validated in terms of their relevance to the disease in question, making use of phenotypic screening rather than molecular-based assays, and working with development partners with the resources required for the long and expensive development process. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Systematic effects in the R({epsilon}`/{epsilon}) measurement for NA31; Effets systematiques sur la mesure de R({epsilon}`/{epsilon}) dans NA31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdereau, O

    1994-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to report the works done by the author during the NA31 experiment from 1989 to 1993. The framework of this work is the measurement of R({epsilon}`/{epsilon}) parameter using 1989 data. The experiment consist in large sample records of kaons into two pions disintegration modes. Differences in detector response for one of the two modes and/or in one of the two beams used has been systematically verified and studied and eventually corrected. After a presentation of the apparatus used in the NA31 experiment, the procedure of reconstruction and analysis of charged and neutral events is described. Monte-Carlo simulations are applied to simulate the different diffused kaon sources after evaluation and removal of the different background noises. Corrections for the effects of accidental particles is taken into account in the background noise estimation. A disturbance in the shower counter measurements has led to the conception of a new control device which can provide additional informations for the calculation of new characteristic quantities for reconstituted particles. These informations have been used for the estimation of accidental triggered events and for the determination of the fraction of lost events due to accidental photon. A satisfactory agreement is observed between the results and results of the superposition method. (J.S.). 77 refs., 129 figs., 40 tabs, 1 ann.

  7. Subset selection for an epsilon-best population : efficiency results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, van der P.

    1991-01-01

    An almost best or an \\epsilon-best population is defined as a population with location parameter on a distance not larger than \\epsilon (\\geq 0) from the best population (with largest value of the location parameter). For the subset selection tables with the relative efficiency of selecting an

  8. Epsilon Aurigae - Two-year Totality Transpiring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Stencel, R. E.; Hopkins, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The 27 year period eclipsing binary, epsilon Aurigae, exhibits the hallmarks of a classical Algol system, except that the companion to the F supergiant primary star is surprisingly under-luminous for its mass. Eclipse ingress appears to have begun shortly after the predicted time in August 2009, near JD 2,455,065. At the University of Denver, we have focused on near-infrared interferometry, spectroscopy, and photometry with the superior instrumentation available today, compared to that of the 1983 eclipse. Previously obtained interferometry indicates that the source is asymmetric (Stencel, et. al. 2009 APLJ) and initial CHARA+MIRC closure-phase imaging shows hints of resolved structures. In parallel, we have pursued SPEX near-IR spectra at NASA IRTF in order to confirm whether CO molecules only seen during the second half of the 1983 eclipse will reappear on schedule. Additionally, we have obtained J and H band photometry using an Optec SSP-4 photometer with a newly written control and analysis suite. Our goal is to refine daytime photometric methods in order to provide coverage of the anticipated mid-eclipse brightening during summer 2010, from our high-altitude observatory atop Mt. Evans, Colorado. Also, many parallel observations are ongoing as part of the epsilon Aurigae international campaign (http://www.hposoft.com/Campaign09.html). In this report, we describe the progress of the eclipse and ongoing observations. We invite interested parties to get involved with the campaign for coverage of the 2009-2011 eclipse via the campaign websites: http://www.hposoft.com/Campaign09.html - and - http://www.du.edu/ rstencel/epsaur.htm - and - http://www.citizensky.org . This research is supported in part by the bequest of William Herschel Womble to the University of Denver. We are grateful to the participants in the observing campaign and invite interested parties to join us in monitoring the star for the balance of the eclipse.

  9. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox - larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography - guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy - guided botulinum toxin treatment; ...

  10. Defense against Toxin Weapons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Franz, David

    1998-01-01

    .... We typically fear what we do not understand. Although un- derstanding toxin poisoning is less useful in a toxin attack than knowledge of cold injury on an Arctic battlefield, information on any threat reduces its potential to harm...

  11. Interplay between toxin transport and flotillin localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pust, Sascha; Dyve, Anne Berit; Torgersen, Maria L

    2010-01-01

    The flotillin proteins are localized in lipid domains at the plasma membrane as well as in intracellular compartments. In the present study, we examined the importance of flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 for the uptake and transport of the bacterial Shiga toxin (Stx) and the plant toxin ricin and we...... for flotillin-1 or -2. However, the Golgi-dependent sulfation of both toxins was significantly reduced in flotillin knockdown cells. Interestingly, when the transport of ricin to the ER was investigated, we obtained an increased mannosylation of ricin in flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 knockdown cells. The toxicity...... of both toxins was twofold increased in flotillin-depleted cells. Since BFA (Brefeldin A) inhibits the toxicity even in flotillin knockdown cells, the retrograde toxin transport is apparently still Golgi-dependent. Thus, flotillin proteins regulate and facilitate the retrograde transport of Stx and ricin....

  12. Metabolic engineering of potato tuber carotenoids through tuber-specific silencing of lycopene epsilon cyclase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papacchioli Velia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Potato is a major staple food, and modification of its provitamin content is a possible means for alleviating nutritional deficiencies. beta-carotene is the main dietary precursor of vitamin A. Potato tubers contain low levels of carotenoids, composed mainly of the xanthophylls lutein, antheraxanthin, violaxanthin, and of xanthophyll esters. None of these carotenoids have provitamin A activity. Results We silenced the first dedicated step in the beta-epsilon- branch of carotenoid biosynthesis, lycopene epsilon cyclase (LCY-e, by introducing, via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, an antisense fragment of this gene under the control of the patatin promoter. Real Time measurements confirmed the tuber-specific silencing of Lcy-e. Antisense tubers showed significant increases in beta-beta-carotenoid levels, with beta-carotene showing the maximum increase (up to 14-fold. Total carotenoids increased up to 2.5-fold. These changes were not accompanied by a decrease in lutein, suggesting that LCY-e is not rate-limiting for lutein accumulation. Tuber-specific changes in expression of several genes in the pathway were observed. Conclusion The data suggest that epsilon-cyclization of lycopene is a key regulatory step in potato tuber carotenogenesis. Upon tuber-specific silencing of the corresponding gene, beta-beta-carotenoid and total carotenoid levels are increased, and expression of several other genes in the pathway is modified.

  13. Plant insecticidal toxins in ecological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Sébastien; Gallet, Christiane; Després, Laurence

    2012-04-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play a key role in plant-insect interactions, whether constitutive or induced, C- or N-based. Anti-herbivore defences against insects can act as repellents, deterrents, growth inhibitors or cause direct mortality. In turn, insects have evolved a variety of strategies to act against plant toxins, e.g., avoidance, excretion, sequestration and degradation of the toxin, eventually leading to a co-evolutionary arms race between insects and plants and to co-diversification. Anti-herbivore defences also negatively impact mutualistic partners, possibly leading to an ecological cost of toxin production. However, in other cases toxins can also be used by plants involved in mutualistic interactions to exclude inadequate partners and to modify the cost/benefit ratio of mutualism to their advantage. When considering the whole community, toxins have an effect at many trophic levels. Aposematic insects sequester toxins to defend themselves against predators. Depending on the ecological context, toxins can either increase insects' vulnerability to parasitoids and entomopathogens or protect them, eventually leading to self-medication. We conclude that studying the community-level impacts of plant toxins can provide new insights into the synthesis between community and evolutionary ecology.

  14. Plant Insecticidal Toxins in Ecological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Ibanez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant secondary metabolites play a key role in plant-insect interactions, whether constitutive or induced, C- or N-based. Anti-herbivore defences against insects can act as repellents, deterrents, growth inhibitors or cause direct mortality. In turn, insects have evolved a variety of strategies to act against plant toxins, e.g., avoidance, excretion, sequestration and degradation of the toxin, eventually leading to a co-evolutionary arms race between insects and plants and to co-diversification. Anti-herbivore defences also negatively impact mutualistic partners, possibly leading to an ecological cost of toxin production. However, in other cases toxins can also be used by plants involved in mutualistic interactions to exclude inadequate partners and to modify the cost/benefit ratio of mutualism to their advantage. When considering the whole community, toxins have an effect at many trophic levels. Aposematic insects sequester toxins to defend themselves against predators. Depending on the ecological context, toxins can either increase insects’ vulnerability to parasitoids and entomopathogens or protect them, eventually leading to self-medication. We conclude that studying the community-level impacts of plant toxins can provide new insights into the synthesis between community and evolutionary ecology.

  15. Induction of CD3 delta epsilon omega by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A; Neisig, A; Wallin, H

    1993-01-01

    The effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on the synthesis, assembly and processing of the components of the T cell receptor (TcR) was studied with special focus on the CD3 omega chain. Treatment of the human leukemic T cell line Jurkat with PMA increased the synthesis of the Ti alpha, CD......3 gamma and CG3 zeta chains two- to threefold and the synthesis of Ti beta and CD3 delta epsilon omega complexes five- to sevenfold as assessed by metabolic labeling, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by scanning densitometry. The amount...... of TcR complexes expressed on the cell surface was decreased after 16 h of PMA treatment. Based on these results we propose a role of CD3 omega in retention of TcR complexes. From PMA-treated CEM cells more than 50-fold the amount of CD3 delta epsilon omega complexes was immunoprecipitated as compared...

  16. Radiolabelling of cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, R.G.; Neves, Nicoli M.J. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Abdalla, L.F.; Brandao, R.L.; Etchehebehere, L. [Ouro Preto Univ., MG (Brazil). Escola de Farmacia. Lab. de Fisiologia e Bioquimica de Microorganismos; Lima, M.E. de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Nicoli, J.R. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Microbiologia

    1999-11-01

    Binding of cholera toxin to ganglioside receptors of enterocyte microvilli catalyzes the activation of adenylate cyclase causing a rise in cAMP which final result is a copious diarrhea. Saccharomyces boulardii, a nonpathogenic yeast has been used to prevent diarrhea. Although the antidiarrheic properties of S. boulardii are widely recognized, this yeast has been used on empirical basis, and the mechanism of this protective effect is unknown. The addition of cholera toxin to S. boulardii induces the raising of cAMP that triggers the activation of neutral trehalase. This suggests that toxin specifically binding to cells, is internalized and active the protein phosphorylation cascade. Our objective is labeling the cholera toxin to verify the presence of binding sites on yeast cell surfaces for the cholera toxin. Cholera toxin was radiolabelled with Na {sup 125} I by a chloramine-T method modified from Cuatrecasas and Griffiths et alii. The {sup 125} I-Cholera toxin showed a specific radioactivity at about 1000 cpm/fmol toxin. Biological activity of labeled cholera toxin measured by trehalase activation was similar to the native toxin. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs.; e-mail: nevesmj at urano.cdtn.br

  17. Radiolabelling of cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, R.G.; Neves, Nicoli M.J.; Abdalla, L.F.; Brandao, R.L.; Etchehebehere, L.; Lima, M.E. de; Nicoli, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Binding of cholera toxin to ganglioside receptors of enterocyte microvilli catalyzes the activation of adenylate cyclase causing a rise in cAMP which final result is a copious diarrhea. Saccharomyces boulardii, a nonpathogenic yeast has been used to prevent diarrhea. Although the antidiarrheic properties of S. boulardii are widely recognized, this yeast has been used on empirical basis, and the mechanism of this protective effect is unknown. The addition of cholera toxin to S. boulardii induces the raising of cAMP that triggers the activation of neutral trehalase. This suggests that toxin specifically binding to cells, is internalized and active the protein phosphorylation cascade. Our objective is labeling the cholera toxin to verify the presence of binding sites on yeast cell surfaces for the cholera toxin. Cholera toxin was radiolabelled with Na 125 I by a chloramine-T method modified from Cuatrecasas and Griffiths et alii. The 125 I-Cholera toxin showed a specific radioactivity at about 1000 cpm/fmol toxin. Biological activity of labeled cholera toxin measured by trehalase activation was similar to the native toxin. (author)

  18. High interobserver variability in the assessment of epsilon waves : Implications for diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platonov, Pyotr G; Calkins, Hugh; Hauer, Richard N; Corrado, Domenico; Svendsen, Jesper H; Wichter, Thomas; Biernacka, Elżbieta Katarzyna; Saguner, Ardan M; Te Riele, Anneline S J M; Zareba, Wojciech

    BACKGROUND: Revision of the Task Force diagnostic criteria for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) has increased their sensitivity for the diagnosis of early and familial forms of the disease. The epsilon wave is a major diagnostic criterion in the context of ARVC/D,

  19. [Intoxication of botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzicka, Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum toxin is an egzotoxin produced by Gram positive bacteria Clostridium botulinum. It is among the most potent toxins known. The 3 main clinical presentations of botulism are as follows: foodborne botulism, infant botulism and wound botulism. The main symptom of intoxication is flat muscles paralysis. The treatment is supportive care and administration of antitoxin. In prevention the correct preparing of canned food is most important. Botulinum toxin is accepted as a biological weapon. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  20. Notes on the genus Epsilon de Saussure, 1855 (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Eumeninae) with description of a new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selis, Marco

    2017-11-28

    The genus Epsilon de Saussure, 1855, is newly recorded from the Moluccas. New distributional records on Epsilon grandipunctatum Gusenleitner, 1996 are provided. Epsilon rufipes Selis, sp. nov. (Moluccas, Aru islands) is described and figured.

  1. [Environmental toxins in breast milk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratlid, Dag

    2009-12-17

    Breast milk is very important to ensure infants a well-composed and safe diet during the first year of life. However, the quality of breast milk seems to be affected by an increasing amount of environmental toxins (particularly so-called Persistent, Bioaccumulative Toxins [PBTs]). Many concerns have been raised about the negative effects this may have on infant health. The article is a review of literature (mainly review articles) identified through a non-systematic search in PubMed. The concentration of PBTs in breast milk is mainly caused by man's position as the terminal link in the nutritional chain. Many breast-fed infants have a daily intake of such toxins that exceed limits defined for the population in general. Animal studies demonstrate effects on endocrine function and neurotoxicity in the offspring, and a number of human studies seem to point in the same direction. However the "original" optimal composition of breast milk still seems to protect against long-term effects of such toxicity. There is international consensus about the need to monitor breast milk for the presence of PBTs. Such surveillance will be a good indicator of the population's general exposure to these toxins and may also contribute to identifying groups as risk who should not breast-feed their children for a long time.

  2. Apolipoprotein E-epsilon 4 frequency in affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L V; Jørgensen, O S

    1999-01-01

    -Bråne-Steen Dementia Rating Scale, and the Global Deterioration Scale. RESULTS: The frequency of APOE-epsilon 4 allele was approximately the same in unipolar patients (.189) and in bipolar patients (.167). Although patients showed more cognitive impairment than controls, no significant overall difference was found...... was found with gender, age at onset, the number of affective episodes, the presence of psychotic features, or the prevalence of familial affective disorder. CONCLUSIONS: It seems that cognitive impairment in affective disorder can be attributed to pathways other than the APOE genotype.......BACKGROUND: The epsilon 4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APOE) as well as affective disorder have been found to be associated with Alzheimer's disease, but it is unclear whether cognitive impairment in affective disorder or subtypes of affective disorder is mediated by the epsilon 4 allele of APOE...

  3. QED in d=3 from the epsilon-expansion.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    In my talk, based on the recent work 1508.06278, I will consider the Renormalization Group flow of Quantum Electrodynamics in d=3 coupled to N_f flavors of fermions. For N_f smaller than a critical value N_f^c, chiral symmetry breaking is believed to take place. For N_f > N_f^c, the theory flows to an interacting fixed point that can be studied in the epsilon-expansion, using the fixed point in d=4-2\\epsilon. I will discuss the computation of the anomalous dimensions of fermion bilinears and quadrilinear operators, as well as some more conceptual aspects concerning the enhancement of global symmetries in d=3. For small N_f, a quadrilinear operator can become relevant in the IR and destabilize the fixed point. Therefore, the epsilon-expansion can be used to estimate N_f^c.

  4. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S. [Regional Center of Neurogenetics, Reims (France)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Broadband Epsilon-near-Zero Reflectors Enhance the Quantum Efficiency of Thin Solar Cells at Visible and Infrared Wavelengths

    KAUST Repository

    Labelle, A. J.; Bonifazi, Marcella; Tian, Y.; Wong, C.; Hoogland, S.; Favraud, Gael; Walters, G.; Sutherland, B.; Liu, M.; Li, Jun; Zhang, Xixiang; Kelley, Shana O.; Sargent, E. H.; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The engineering of broadband absorbers to harvest white light in thin-film semiconductors is a major challenge in developing renewable materials for energy harvesting. Many solution-processed materials with high manufacturability and low cost, such as semiconductor quantum dots, require the use of film structures with thicknesses on the order of 1 μm to absorb incoming photons completely. The electron transport lengths in these media, however, are 1 order of magnitude smaller than this length, hampering further progress with this platform. Herein, we show that, by engineering suitably disordered nanoplasmonic structures, we have created a new class of dispersionless epsilon-near-zero composite materials that efficiently harness white light. Our nanostructures localize light in the dielectric region outside the epsilon-near-zero material with characteristic lengths of 10-100 nm, resulting in an efficient system for harvesting broadband light when a thin absorptive film is deposited on top of the structure. By using a combination of theory and experiments, we demonstrate that ultrathin layers down to 50 nm of colloidal quantum dots deposited atop the epsilon-near-zero material show an increase in broadband absorption ranging from 200% to 500% compared to a planar structure of the same colloidal quantum-dot-absorber average thickness. When the epsilon-near-zero nanostructures were used in an energy-harvesting module, we observed a spectrally averaged 170% broadband increase in the external quantum efficiency of the device, measured at wavelengths between 400 and 1200 nm. Atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence excitation measurements demonstrate that the properties of these epsilon-near-zero structures apply to general metals and could be used to enhance the near-field absorption of semiconductor structures more widely. We have developed an inexpensive electrochemical deposition process that enables scaled-up production of this nanomaterial for large

  6. Broadband Epsilon-near-Zero Reflectors Enhance the Quantum Efficiency of Thin Solar Cells at Visible and Infrared Wavelengths

    KAUST Repository

    Labelle, A. J.

    2017-02-03

    The engineering of broadband absorbers to harvest white light in thin-film semiconductors is a major challenge in developing renewable materials for energy harvesting. Many solution-processed materials with high manufacturability and low cost, such as semiconductor quantum dots, require the use of film structures with thicknesses on the order of 1 μm to absorb incoming photons completely. The electron transport lengths in these media, however, are 1 order of magnitude smaller than this length, hampering further progress with this platform. Herein, we show that, by engineering suitably disordered nanoplasmonic structures, we have created a new class of dispersionless epsilon-near-zero composite materials that efficiently harness white light. Our nanostructures localize light in the dielectric region outside the epsilon-near-zero material with characteristic lengths of 10-100 nm, resulting in an efficient system for harvesting broadband light when a thin absorptive film is deposited on top of the structure. By using a combination of theory and experiments, we demonstrate that ultrathin layers down to 50 nm of colloidal quantum dots deposited atop the epsilon-near-zero material show an increase in broadband absorption ranging from 200% to 500% compared to a planar structure of the same colloidal quantum-dot-absorber average thickness. When the epsilon-near-zero nanostructures were used in an energy-harvesting module, we observed a spectrally averaged 170% broadband increase in the external quantum efficiency of the device, measured at wavelengths between 400 and 1200 nm. Atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence excitation measurements demonstrate that the properties of these epsilon-near-zero structures apply to general metals and could be used to enhance the near-field absorption of semiconductor structures more widely. We have developed an inexpensive electrochemical deposition process that enables scaled-up production of this nanomaterial for large

  7. Microalgal toxin(s): characteristics and importance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prokaryotic and eukaryotic microalgae produce a wide array of compounds with biological activities. These include antibiotics, algicides, toxins, pharmaceutically active compounds and plant growth regulators. Toxic microalgae, in this sense, are common only among the cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. The microalgal ...

  8. Botulinum Toxin: Pharmacology and Therapeutic Roles in Pain States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shilpadevi; Willett, Olga; Thompkins, Terin; Hermann, Robert; Ramanathan, Sathish; Cornett, Elyse M; Fox, Charles J; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-03-01

    Botulinum toxin, also known as Botox, is produced by Clostridium botulinum, a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, and botulinum toxin injections are among the most commonly practiced cosmetic procedures in the USA. Although botulinum toxin is typically associated with cosmetic procedures, it can be used to treat a variety of other conditions, including pain. Botulinum toxin blocks the release of acetylcholine from nerve endings to paralyze muscles and to decrease the pain response. Botulinum toxin has a long duration of action, lasting up to 5 months after initial treatment which makes it an excellent treatment for chronic pain patients. This manuscript will outline in detail why botulinum toxin is used as a successful treatment for pain in multiple conditions as well as outline the risks associated with using botulinum toxin in certain individuals. As of today, the only FDA-approved chronic condition that botulinum toxin can be used to treat is migraines and this is related to its ability to decrease muscle tension and increase muscle relaxation. Contraindications to botulinum toxin treatments are limited to a hypersensitivity to the toxin or an infection at the site of injection, and there are no known drug interactions with botulinum toxin. Botulinum toxin is an advantageous and effective alternative pain treatment and a therapy to consider for those that do not respond to opioid treatment. In summary, botulinum toxin is a relatively safe and effective treatment for individuals with certain pain conditions, including migraines. More research is warranted to elucidate chronic and long-term implications of botulinum toxin treatment as well as effects in pregnant, elderly, and adolescent patients.

  9. Complex epsilon-near-zero metamaterials for broadband light harvesting systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bonifazi, Marcella; Tian, Yi; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    We engineered an epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) material from suitably disordered metallic nanostructures. We create a new class of dispersionless composite materials that efficiently harnesses white light. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Photoluminescence (PLE) measurements we experimentally demonstrate that this nanomaterial increases up to a record value the absorption of ultra-thin light harvesting films at visible and infrared wavelengths. Moreover, we obtained a 170% broadband increase of the external quantum efficiency (EQE) when these ENZ materials are inserted in an energy-harvesting module. We developed an inexpensive electrochemical deposition process that enables large-scale production of this material for energy-harvesting applications.

  10. Complex epsilon-near-zero metamaterials for broadband light harvesting systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bonifazi, Marcella

    2018-02-17

    We engineered an epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) material from suitably disordered metallic nanostructures. We create a new class of dispersionless composite materials that efficiently harnesses white light. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Photoluminescence (PLE) measurements we experimentally demonstrate that this nanomaterial increases up to a record value the absorption of ultra-thin light harvesting films at visible and infrared wavelengths. Moreover, we obtained a 170% broadband increase of the external quantum efficiency (EQE) when these ENZ materials are inserted in an energy-harvesting module. We developed an inexpensive electrochemical deposition process that enables large-scale production of this material for energy-harvesting applications.

  11. VHH Activators and Inhibitors for Protein Kinase C Epsilon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Summanen, M.M.I.

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), which is one of the novel PKC isozymes, is widely expressed throughout the body and has important roles in the function of the nervous, cardiovascular and immune systems. In order to better understand PKCε regulated pathways, isozyme specific activity modulators are

  12. IUE observations of the eclipsing binary Epsilon Aurigae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hack, M.; Selvelli, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    It is stated that the eclipsing binary Epsilon Aur is a most peculiar binary system and it has not been explained satisfactorily. Observations of this system using the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) collected at the Villafranca Satellite Tracking Station of the European Space Agency are here reported. (author)

  13. Energy transfer by magnetopause reconnection and the substorm parameter epsilon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Alarcon, W.D.; Gonzalez, A.L.C. de.

    1983-01-01

    An expression for the magnetopause reconnection power based on the dawn-dusk component of the reconnection electric field, that reduces to the substorm parameter epsilon for the limit that involves equal geomagnetic (B sub(G)) and magnetosheath (B sub(M)) magnetic field amplitudes at the magnetopause, is contrasted with the expression based on the whole reconnection electric field vector obtained by Gonzalez. The correlation examples of this report show that this (more general) expression for the reconnection power seems to correlate with the empirical dissipation parameter U sub(T) from Akasofu, with slightly better correlation coefficients than those obtained from similar correlations between the parameter epsilon and U sub(T). Thus, these (better) correlations show up for the more familiar values of the ratio B sub(G) / B sub(M) > 1. Nevertheless, the (expected) relatively small difference that seems to exist between these correlation coefficients suggests that, for practical purposes, the parameter epsilon could be used as well (instead of the more general expression) in similar correlation studies due to its impler format. On the other hand, studies that refer mainly to the difference in the magnitudes of epsilon and of the more general expression are expected to give results with less negligible differences. (Author) [pt

  14. Epsilon Systems on Geometric Crystals of type A_n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Nakashima

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an epsilon system on a geometric crystal of type A_n, which is a certain set of rational functions with some nice properties. We shall show that it is equipped with a product structure and that it is invariant under the action of tropical R maps.

  15. Fate of the Epsilon Phase in the Oklo Natural Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2005-01-01

    In spent nuclear fuel (SNF), the micron- to submicron-sized epsilon phase (Mo-Ru-Pd-Tc-Rh) is an important host of 99 Tc which has a long half life (2.13 x 10 5 years) and can be an important contributor to dose in safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. In addition, Tc is predominantly present as TcO 4 - under oxidizing conditions at wide range of pH, weakly adsorbed onto mineral surfaces, and unlikely to be incorporated into alteration uranyl minerals. In the Oklo natural reactor (2.0 Ga), essentially all of the 99 Tc has decayed to 99 Ru. Thus, this study focuses on Ru and the other metals of the epsilon phase in order to investigate the occurrence and the fate of the epsilon phase during the corrosion of this natural SNF. Samples from reactor zone (RZ)-10 (836, 819, 687); from RZ-13 (864, 910); were investigated using TEM (transmission electron microscopy). Within the UO 2 matrix, a Bi-Pd particle (40-60 nm), fioodite, PdBi 2 , was observed with trace amounts of As, Fe, and Te surrounded by an amorphous Pb-rich area. (Pd,Rh) 2 As, palladodymite or rhodarsenide, was observed (400-500 nm in size). Ruthenarsinite, (Ru,Ni)As, was identified in most samples: with a representative composition of As, 59.9: Co, 2.5: Ni, 5.2; Ru, 18.6; Rh, 8.4; Pd, 3.1; Sb, 2.4 in atomic percent. The particles diameters are a few hundred nanometers and, in most cases, surrounded by a Pb-rich phase (400-500 nm). Typically, the ruthenarsenite does not occur as single particle but an aggregate of ∼200 nm-sized particles. Some Ru-particles revealed a complex phase separation within the grain such as a Ru-particle (600-700 nm) with Pb at the core of the particle and enrichment of Ni, Co, and As at the rim. Some ruthenarsenite crystals were embedded in chlorite immediately adjacent to uraninite. A few particles were still coated by Pb. These results suggest a history for the epsilon phases: (1) The original epsilon phase was transformed to, in most cases, ruthenarsenite. (2) All

  16. Botulinum toxin type a for chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Avi

    2010-03-01

    Chronic migraine (CM) is the leading cause of chronic daily headache, a common and debilitating headache syndrome. The management of CM patients is challenging, with only limited benefit from available oral preventive medications. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) has been used extensively to treat disorders associated with increased muscle tone. More recent scientific data support an analgesic effect of the toxin. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of BoNT make it an appealing candidate for migraine prevention. Results from older clinical trials on the efficacy of the toxin in CM were inconclusive. However, recent trials using more stringent inclusion criteria have shown positive results, supporting the use of the toxin in some patients with this disorder. This review summarizes the scientific data on the analgesic properties of BoNT, as well as the clinical data on the efficacy of the toxin in treating CM.

  17. Epsilon wave on an electronic loop in a case of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia with myocarditis: an updated definition of the Epsilon wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Guy Hugues; Duthoit, Guillaume; Li, Guoliang; Andreoletti, L; Gandjbakhch, Estelle; Frank, Robert

    2017-07-01

    A young man presented with a history of myocarditis with palpitations and dizziness. He had implantation of a loop recorder that showed repetitive short episodes of VT. In addition, there were fragmented potentials immediately following the large and sharp electrograms (EGMs) before as well as after episodes of VT suggesting an Epsilon wave. This signal can be observed in multiple cardiac conditions including coronary artery disease. It was originally recorded on the epicardium as well as on the endocardium. However, in ARVD it can be defined as an electric signal observed after the end of the QRS complex in the right as opposed to the left precordial leads (difference ≥ 25 ms). It can also be an aid to the diagnosis of patients with ARVD who have other signs or symptoms suggesting ARVD including episodes of myocarditis. This potential consists of a slurring at the end of the QRS complex or an independent potential after the return to the isoelectric line. It can be better observed by increasing amplification of the ECG tracing as well as double speed using the Fontaine lead system. Epsilon wave too small to be recorded on the standard ECG can be extracted by Signal Averaging ECG SAECG). Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Epsilon-Q: An Automated Analyzer Interface for Mass Spectral Library Search and Label-Free Protein Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jin-Young; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Paik, Young-Ki

    2017-12-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a widely used proteome analysis tool for biomedical science. In an MS-based bottom-up proteomic approach to protein identification, sequence database (DB) searching has been routinely used because of its simplicity and convenience. However, searching a sequence DB with multiple variable modification options can increase processing time, false-positive errors in large and complicated MS data sets. Spectral library searching is an alternative solution, avoiding the limitations of sequence DB searching and allowing the detection of more peptides with high sensitivity. Unfortunately, this technique has less proteome coverage, resulting in limitations in the detection of novel and whole peptide sequences in biological samples. To solve these problems, we previously developed the "Combo-Spec Search" method, which uses manually multiple references and simulated spectral library searching to analyze whole proteomes in a biological sample. In this study, we have developed a new analytical interface tool called "Epsilon-Q" to enhance the functions of both the Combo-Spec Search method and label-free protein quantification. Epsilon-Q performs automatically multiple spectral library searching, class-specific false-discovery rate control, and result integration. It has a user-friendly graphical interface and demonstrates good performance in identifying and quantifying proteins by supporting standard MS data formats and spectrum-to-spectrum matching powered by SpectraST. Furthermore, when the Epsilon-Q interface is combined with the Combo-Spec search method, called the Epsilon-Q system, it shows a synergistic function by outperforming other sequence DB search engines for identifying and quantifying low-abundance proteins in biological samples. The Epsilon-Q system can be a versatile tool for comparative proteome analysis based on multiple spectral libraries and label-free quantification.

  19. A precision measurement of $\\epsilon^{\\prime}$/$\\epsilon$ in CP violating K$^{0}$ $\\rightarrow$ 2$\\pi$ decays

    CERN Multimedia

    Kalmus, G E; Munday, D J; Wotton, S; Monnier, E; Winston, R; Gudzovskiy, E; Gurev, D; Hristov, P Z; Kuz'Min, N; Madigozhin, D; Pis'Mennyy, R; Potrebenikov, Y; Slepnev, I; Rubin, P D; Szleper, M; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; Gianoli, A; Savrie, M; Wahl, H; Calvetti, M; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Veltri, M; Bocquet, G; Bremer, J; Cattai, A; Ceccucci, A; Formenti, F; Gatignon, L; Osmic, F; Panzer-Steindel, B; Piccini, M; Ruggiero, G; Unal, G P; Bloch-Devaux, B; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Derre, J; Gouge, G; Legou, P; Marel, G; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Vallage, B; Behler, M; Eppard, K; Kleinknecht, K; Masetti, L; Moosbrugger, U; Morales Morales, C; Renk, B; Wanke, R; Cornebise, P; Martin-Chassard, G; Anzivino, G; Cenci, P; Nappi, A; Papi, A; Pepe, M S; Petrucci, M C; Valdata, M; Cerri, C; Collazuol, G; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Ferrini, F; Mannelli, I; Raffaelli, G; Sozzi, M; Holder, M; Maier, A; Ziolkowski, M; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Cundy, D; Goy Lopez, S; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Nassalski, J P; Dibon, H; Jeitler, M; Markytan, M; Neuhofer, G; Pernicka, M; Taurok, A

    2002-01-01

    The prime goal of the experiment is to measure the CP violating parameter Re($\\epsilon^{\\prime}/\\epsilon$) with an accuracy of $2 \\times 10 ^{-4}$. The experiment uses two nearly collinear $K _{S}$ and $K _{L} $ beams produced concurrently and distinguished by tagging the protons producing the $K _{S}$ component. In this way the double ratio $R$ of decay rates of the $K_{L}$ and $K_{S}$ into two pions, \\\\\\\\ $R=1-6\\cdot Re(\\frac{\\epsilon^\\prime}{\\epsilon}) =\\frac{\\mid\\eta_{00}\\mid^{2}}{\\mid\\eta_{+-}\\mid^{2}} =\\frac{\\Gamma(K_{L} \\rightarrow \\pi^{0} \\pi^{0})} {\\Gamma(K_{S}\\rightarrow \\pi^{0} \\pi^{0})}/ \\frac{\\Gamma(K_{L}\\rightarrow \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-})} {\\Gamma(K_{S}\\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi{-})}$ \\\\\\\\is measured with minimal systematic uncertainties. Charged mode decays $K \\rightarrow \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ are measured in a magnetic spectrometer with a central dipole magnet and two pairs of large and high precision drift chambers on each side. Neutral mode decays $K \\rightarrow \\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ are recorded in a ten m$^...

  20. Temperature Effects Explain Continental Scale Distribution of Cyanobacterial Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzouki, Evanthia; Lürling, Miquel; Fastner, Jutta; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette; Wilk-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Koreivienė, Judita; Seelen, Laura; Teurlincx, Sven; Verstijnen, Yvon; Krztoń, Wojciech; Walusiak, Edward; Karosienė, Jūratė; Kasperovičienė, Jūratė; Savadova, Ksenija; Vitonytė, Irma; Cillero-Castro, Carmen; Budzyńska, Agnieszka; Goldyn, Ryszard; Kozak, Anna; Rosińska, Joanna; Szeląg-Wasielewska, Elżbieta; Domek, Piotr; Jakubowska-Krepska, Natalia; Kwasizur, Kinga; Messyasz, Beata; Pełechaty, Aleksandra; Pełechaty, Mariusz; Kokocinski, Mikolaj; García-Murcia, Ana; Real, Monserrat; Romans, Elvira; Noguero-Ribes, Jordi; Duque, David Parreño; Fernández-Morán, Elísabeth; Karakaya, Nusret; Häggqvist, Kerstin; Demir, Nilsun; Beklioğlu, Meryem; Filiz, Nur; Levi, Eti E.; Iskin, Uğur; Bezirci, Gizem; Tavşanoğlu, Ülkü Nihan; Özhan, Koray; Gkelis, Spyros; Panou, Manthos; Fakioglu, Özden; Avagianos, Christos; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; Çelik, Kemal; Yilmaz, Mete; Marcé, Rafael; Catalán, Nuria; Bravo, Andrea G.; Buck, Moritz; Colom-Montero, William; Mustonen, Kristiina; Pierson, Don; Yang, Yang; Raposeiro, Pedro M.; Gonçalves, Vítor; Antoniou, Maria G.; Tsiarta, Nikoletta; McCarthy, Valerie; Perello, Victor C.; Feldmann, Tõnu; Laas, Alo; Panksep, Kristel; Tuvikene, Lea; Gagala, Ilona; Mankiewicz-Boczek, Joana; Yağcı, Meral Apaydın; Çınar, Şakir; Çapkın, Kadir; Yağcı, Abdulkadir; Cesur, Mehmet; Bilgin, Fuat; Bulut, Cafer; Uysal, Rahmi; Obertegger, Ulrike; Boscaini, Adriano; Flaim, Giovanna; Salmaso, Nico; Cerasino, Leonardo; Richardson, Jessica; Visser, Petra M.; Verspagen, Jolanda M. H.; Karan, Tünay; Soylu, Elif Neyran; Maraşlıoğlu, Faruk; Napiórkowska-Krzebietke, Agnieszka; Ochocka, Agnieszka; Pasztaleniec, Agnieszka; Antão-Geraldes, Ana M.; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Morais, João; Vale, Micaela; Köker, Latife; Akçaalan, Reyhan; Albay, Meriç; Špoljarić Maronić, Dubravka; Stević, Filip; Žuna Pfeiffer, Tanja; Fonvielle, Jeremy; Straile, Dietmar; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo; Bláha, Luděk; Geriš, Rodan; Fránková, Markéta; Koçer, Mehmet Ali Turan; Alp, Mehmet Tahir; Remec-Rekar, Spela; Elersek, Tina; Triantis, Theodoros; Zervou, Sevasti-Kiriaki; Hiskia, Anastasia; Haande, Sigrid; Skjelbred, Birger; Madrecka, Beata; Nemova, Hana; Drastichova, Iveta; Chomova, Lucia; Edwards, Christine; Sevindik, Tuğba Ongun; Tunca, Hatice; Önem, Burçin; Aleksovski, Boris; Krstić, Svetislav; Vucelić, Itana Bokan; Nawrocka, Lidia; Salmi, Pauliina; Machado-Vieira, Danielle; de Oliveira, Alinne Gurjão; Delgado-Martín, Jordi; García, David; Cereijo, Jose Luís; Gomà, Joan; Trapote, Mari Carmen; Vegas-Vilarrúbia, Teresa; Obrador, Biel; Grabowska, Magdalena; Karpowicz, Maciej; Chmura, Damian; Úbeda, Bárbara; Gálvez, José Ángel; Özen, Arda; Christoffersen, Kirsten Seestern; Warming, Trine Perlt; Kobos, Justyna; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Pérez-Martínez, Carmen; Ramos-Rodríguez, Eloísa; Arvola, Lauri; Alcaraz-Párraga, Pablo; Toporowska, Magdalena; Pawlik-Skowronska, Barbara; Niedźwiecki, Michał; Pęczuła, Wojciech; Leira, Manel; Hernández, Armand; Moreno-Ostos, Enrique; Blanco, José María; Rodríguez, Valeriano; Montes-Pérez, Jorge Juan; Palomino, Roberto L.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Estela; Carballeira, Rafael; Camacho, Antonio; Picazo, Antonio; Rochera, Carlos; Santamans, Anna C.; Ferriol, Carmen; Romo, Susana; Soria, Juan Miguel; Dunalska, Julita; Sieńska, Justyna; Szymański, Daniel; Kruk, Marek; Kostrzewska-Szlakowska, Iwona; Jasser, Iwona; Žutinić, Petar; Gligora Udovič, Marija; Plenković-Moraj, Anđelka; Frąk, Magdalena; Bańkowska-Sobczak, Agnieszka; Wasilewicz, Michał; Özkan, Korhan; Maliaka, Valentini; Kangro, Kersti; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Paerl, Hans W.; Carey, Cayelan C.; Ibelings, Bas W.

    2018-04-13

    Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light. In summer 2015, we collected samples across Europe to investigate the effect of nutrient and temperature gradients on the variability of toxin production at a continental scale. Direct and indirect effects of temperature were the main drivers of the spatial distribution in the toxins produced by the cyanobacterial community, the toxin concentrations and toxin quota. Generalized linear models showed that a Toxin Diversity Index (TDI) increased with latitude, while it decreased with water stability. Increases in TDI were explained through a significant increase in toxin variants such as MC-YR, anatoxin and cylindrospermopsin, accompanied by a decreasing presence of MC-LR. While global warming continues, the direct and indirect effects of increased lake temperatures will drive changes in the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins in Europe, potentially promoting selection of a few highly toxic species or strains.

  1. Temperature Effects Explain Continental Scale Distribution of Cyanobacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanthia Mantzouki

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins. Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light. In summer 2015, we collected samples across Europe to investigate the effect of nutrient and temperature gradients on the variability of toxin production at a continental scale. Direct and indirect effects of temperature were the main drivers of the spatial distribution in the toxins produced by the cyanobacterial community, the toxin concentrations and toxin quota. Generalized linear models showed that a Toxin Diversity Index (TDI increased with latitude, while it decreased with water stability. Increases in TDI were explained through a significant increase in toxin variants such as MC-YR, anatoxin and cylindrospermopsin, accompanied by a decreasing presence of MC-LR. While global warming continues, the direct and indirect effects of increased lake temperatures will drive changes in the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins in Europe, potentially promoting selection of a few highly toxic species or strains.

  2. Mechanisms of Action and Cell Death Associated with Clostridium perfringens Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio A. Navarro

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens uses its large arsenal of protein toxins to produce histotoxic, neurologic and intestinal infections in humans and animals. The major toxins involved in diseases are alpha (CPA, beta (CPB, epsilon (ETX, iota (ITX, enterotoxin (CPE, and necrotic B-like (NetB toxins. CPA is the main virulence factor involved in gas gangrene in humans, whereas its role in animal diseases is limited and controversial. CPB is responsible for necrotizing enteritis and enterotoxemia, mostly in neonatal individuals of many animal species, including humans. ETX is the main toxin involved in enterotoxemia of sheep and goats. ITX has been implicated in cases of enteritis in rabbits and other animal species; however, its specific role in causing disease has not been proved. CPE is responsible for human food-poisoning and non-foodborne C. perfringens-mediated diarrhea. NetB is the cause of necrotic enteritis in chickens. In most cases, host–toxin interaction starts on the plasma membrane of target cells via specific receptors, resulting in the activation of intracellular pathways with a variety of effects, commonly including cell death. In general, the molecular mechanisms of cell death associated with C. perfringens toxins involve features of apoptosis, necrosis and/or necroptosis.

  3. [Botulinum toxin: An important complement for facial rejuvenation surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Louarn, C

    2017-10-01

    The improved understanding of the functional anatomy of the face and of the action of the botulinum toxin A leads us to determine a new injection procedure which consequently decreases the risk of eyebrow and eyelid ptosis and increases the toxin's injection possibilities and efficiencies. With less units of toxin, the technique herein described proposes to be more efficient on more muscles: variable toxin injections concentration adapted to each injected muscle are used. Thanks to a new procedure in the upper face, toxin A injection can be quite close to an endoscopic surgical action. In addition, interesting results are achievable to rejuvenate the lateral canthus with injection on the upper lateral tarsus, to rejuvenate the nose with injection at the alar base, the jawline and the neck region. Lastly, a smoothing effect on the skin (meso botox) is obtained by the anticholinergic action of the toxin A on the dermal receptors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. AB toxins: a paradigm switch from deadly to desirable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odumosu, Oludare; Nicholas, Dequina; Yano, Hiroshi; Langridge, William

    2010-07-01

    To ensure their survival, a number of bacterial and plant species have evolved a common strategy to capture energy from other biological systems. Being imperfect pathogens, organisms synthesizing multi-subunit AB toxins are responsible for the mortality of millions of people and animals annually. Vaccination against these organisms and their toxins has proved rather ineffective in providing long-term protection from disease. In response to the debilitating effects of AB toxins on epithelial cells of the digestive mucosa, mechanisms underlying toxin immunomodulation of immune responses have become the focus of increasing experimentation. The results of these studies reveal that AB toxins may have a beneficial application as adjuvants for the enhancement of immune protection against infection and autoimmunity. Here, we examine similarities and differences in the structure and function of bacterial and plant AB toxins that underlie their toxicity and their exceptional properties as immunomodulators for stimulating immune responses against infectious disease and for immune suppression of organ-specific autoimmunity.

  5. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J; Noonan, Carmel P

    2017-03-02

    published or unpublished studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTS) of any use of botulinum toxin treatment for strabismus. Two review authors independently selected studies and extracted data. We used standard methods expected by Cochrane and assessed the certainty of the evidence using GRADE. We defined ocular alignment as an angle of deviation of less than or equal to 10 prism dioptres. Six RCTs were eligible for inclusion. We judged the included studies as at a mixture of low, unclear and high risk of bias. We did not consider any of the included studies as at low risk of bias for all domains.Two trials conducted in Spain (102 people, number of eyes not specified) compared botulinum toxin with surgery in children that required retreatment for acquired or infantile esotropia. These two studies provided low-certainty evidence that children who received botulinum toxin may have a similar or slightly reduced chance of achieving ocular alignment (pooled risk ratio (RR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.71 to 1.16), binocular single vision (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.23), sensory fusion (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.23) and stereopsis (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.25) compared with children who received surgery. One trial from Canada compared botulinum toxin with surgery in 30 adults (30 eyes) with horizontal strabismus and reported a reduced chance of ocular alignment with botulinum toxin (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.85; low-certainty evidence).One trial in the UK suggested that botulinum toxin may result in a similar or slightly improved chance of ocular alignment in people with acute onset sixth nerve palsy compared with observation (RR 1.19, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.48; 47 participants, low-certainty evidence).Very low-certainty evidence from one trial from Brazil suggested that adjuvant botulinum toxin in strabismus surgery may increase the chances of ocular alignment compared with strabismus surgery alone (RR 1.83, 95% CI 0.41 to 8.11; 23 participants).One trial from

  6. Toxins That Affect Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yonghua

    2017-10-26

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are critical in generation and conduction of electrical signals in multiple excitable tissues. Natural toxins, produced by animal, plant, and microorganisms, target VGSCs through diverse strategies developed over millions of years of evolutions. Studying of the diverse interaction between VGSC and VGSC-targeting toxins has been contributing to the increasing understanding of molecular structure and function, pharmacology, and drug development potential of VGSCs. This chapter aims to summarize some of the current views on the VGSC-toxin interaction based on the established receptor sites of VGSC for natural toxins.

  7. Botulinum toxin for treatment of glandular hypersecretory disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, T A

    2012-02-03

    SUMMARY: The use of botulinum toxin to treat disorders of the salivary glands is increasing in popularity in recent years. Recent reports of the use of botulinum toxin in glandular hypersecretion suggest overall favourable results with minimal side-effects. However, few randomised clinical trials means that data are limited with respect to candidate suitability, treatment dosages, frequency and duration of treatment. We report a selection of such cases from our own department managed with botulinum toxin and review the current data on use of the toxin to treat salivary gland disorders such as Frey\\'s syndrome, excessive salivation (sialorrhoea), focal and general hyperhidrosis, excessive lacrimation and chronic rhinitis.

  8. MIMO scheme performance and detection in epsilon noise

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanov, Sander

    2006-01-01

    New approach for analysis and decoding MIMO signaling is developed for usual model of nongaussion noise consists of background and impulsive noise named epsilon - noise. It is shown that non-gaussion noise performance significantly worse than gaussion ones. Stimulation results strengthen out theory. Robust in statistical sense detection rule is suggested for such kind of noise features much best robust detector performance than detector designed for Gaussian noise in impulsive environment and...

  9. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (CONICET), C.C. 67 Sucursal 28, C1428EHA-Buenos Aires (Argentina); Brown, B. P. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Soderblom, D. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Henry, T. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302 (United States); Hall, J. C. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Basu, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  10. Advanced k-epsilon modeling of heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Okey; Ames, Forrest E.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes two approaches to low Reynolds-number k-epsilon turbulence modeling which formulate the eddy viscosity on the wall-normal component of turbulence and a length scale. The wall-normal component of turbulence is computed via integration of the energy spectrum based on the local dissipation rate and is bounded by the isotropic condition. The models account for the anisotropy of the dissipation and the reduced mixing length due to the high strain rates present in the near-wall region. The turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate were computed from the k and epsilon transport equations of Durbin. The models were tested for a wide range of turbulent flows and proved to be superior to other k-epsilon models, especially for nonequilibrium anisotropic flows. For the prediction of airfoil heat transfer, the models included a set of empirical correlations for predicting laminar-turbulent transition and laminar heat transfer augmentation due to the presence of freestream turbulence. The predictions of surface heat transfer were generally satisfactory.

  11. Marine and freshwater toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, James M

    2006-01-01

    In a very busy and exciting year, 2005 included First Action approval of a much needed official method for paralytic shellfish toxins and multiple international toxin symposia highlighted by groundbreaking research. These are the first-year milestones and activities of the Marine and Freshwater Toxins Task Force and Analytical Community. Inaugurated in 2004 and described in detail in last year's General Referee Report (1) this international toxins group has grown to 150 members from many regions and countries. Perhaps most important they are now making important and global contributions to food safety and to providing alternatives to animal-based assays. Official Method 2005.06 was first approved in late 2004 by the Task Force and subsequently Official First Action in 2005 (2) by the Methods Committee on Natural Toxins and Food Allergens and the Official Methods Board. This nonproprietary method (3) is a precolumn oxidation, liquid chromatographic method that makes good use of fluorescence detection to provide high sensitivity detection of the saxitoxins. It has also proven to be rugged enough for regulatory use and the highest level of validation. As pointed out in the report of method principle investigator and Study Director James Lawrence, approval of 2005.06 now provides the first official alternative to the mouse bioassay after many decades of shellfish monitoring. This past year in April 2005 the group also held their first international conference, "Marine and Freshwater Toxins Analysis: Ist Joint Symposium and AOAC Task Force Meeting," in Baiona, Spain. The 4-day conference consisted of research and stakeholder presentations and symposium-integrated subgroup sessions on ciguatoxins, saxitoxin assays and liquid chromatography (LC) methods for saxitoxins and domoic acids, okadaiates and azaspiracids, and yessotoxins. Many of these subgroups were recently formed in 2005 and are working towards their goals of producing officially validated analytical methods

  12. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Bachran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery.

  13. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery.

  14. Mutations in the Histone-like Nucleoid Structuring Regulatory Gene (hns) Decrease the Adherence of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli 091:H21 Strain B2F1 to Human Colonic Epithelial Cells and Increase the Production of Hemolysin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-19

    osmoregulation of outer membrane proteins and virulence determinants in Vibrio cholerae requires toxR. J. Bacteriol. 170:2575-2583. Mobley, H. L., D. M. Green...produced by ETEC organisms is homologous to the toxin encoded by Y: cholerae . These toxins are the primary cause of the watery diarrhea associated with ETEC...Escherichia coli as a cause ofdiarrhea among children in Mexico . J. Clin. Microbiol. 25:1913-1919. Maurelli, A. T., and P. J. Sansonetti. 1988

  15. Toxins of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Deepak; Yu, Jiujiang; Ehrlich, Kenneth C

    2002-01-01

    Mycotoxins are low-molecular-weight secondary metabolites of fungi. The most significant mycotoxins are contaminants of agricultural commodities, foods and feeds. Fungi that produce these toxins do so both prior to harvest and during storage. Although contamination of commodities by toxigenic fungi occurs frequently in areas with a hot and humid climate (i.e. conditions favorable for fungal growth), they can also be found in temperate conditions. Production of mycotoxins is dependent upon the type of producing fungus and environmental conditions such as the substrate, water activity (moisture and relative humidity), duration of exposure to stress conditions and microbial, insect or other animal interactions. Although outbreaks of mycotoxicoses in humans have been documented, several of these have not been well characterized, neither has a direct correlation between the mycotoxin and resulting toxic effect been well established in vivo. Even though the specific modes of action of most of the toxins are not well established, acute and chronic effects in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, including humans have been reported. The toxicity of the mycotoxins varies considerably with the toxin, the animal species exposed to it, and the extent of exposure, age and nutritional status. Most of the toxic effects of mycotoxins are limited to specific organs, but several mycotoxins affect many organs. Induction of cancer by some mycotoxins is a major concern as a chronic effect of these toxins. It is nearly impossible to eliminate mycotoxins from the foods and feed in spite of the regulatory efforts at the national and international levels to remove the contaminated commodities. This is because mycotoxins are highly stable compounds, the producing fungi are ubiquitous, and food contamination can occur both before and after harvest. Nevertheless, good farm management practices and adequate storage facilities minimize the toxin contamination problems. Current research is

  16. Gelatinized and nongelatinized corn starch/ poly(epsilon-caprolactone blends: characterization by rheological, mechanical and morphological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derval S. Rosa

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Poly(epsilon-caprolactone/corn starch blends containing 25, 50 and 75 wt.% starch were prepared by mechanical processing and characterized by the melt flow index (MFI, tensile test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. For comparison, starch was used in gelatinized and nongelatinized forms and was also characterized by viscography. The addition of starch to poly(epsilon-caprolactone reduced the MFI values, the tensile strength and the elongation at break, whereas the modulus increased. The reductions in the MFI and tensile properties were most evident when gelatinized starch was used. Viscography and SEM showed that starch was well gelatinized by the gelatinization process. Blends containing nongelatinized starch showed a good dispersion of starch but poor interfacial interactions.

  17. Treatment of anismus in intractable constipation with botulinum A toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallan, R I; Williams, N S; Melling, J; Waldron, D J; Womack, N R; Morrison, J F

    1988-09-24

    In seven patients with anismus the striated sphincter muscle complex was selectively weakened by local injection of Clostridium botulinum type A toxin. Symptom scores improved significantly and correlated with a significant reduction in the maximum voluntary and canal squeeze pressure and a significant increase in the anorectal angle on straining. Botulinum A toxin seems to be promising treatment for some patients with anismus.

  18. Increased levels of SV2A botulinum neurotoxin receptor in clinical sensory disorders and functional effects of botulinum toxins A and E in cultured human sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiangou Y

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Yiangos Yiangou1 Uma Anand1,2, William R. Otto2, Marco Sinisi3, Michael Fox3, Rolfe Birch3 Keith A. Foster4, Gaurav Mukerji1,5, Ayesha Akbar1,6, Sanjiv K. Agarwal5, Praveen Anand11Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London; 2Histopathology Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, London; 3Peripheral Nerve Injury Unit, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore; 4Syntaxin Ltd, Oxford; 5Department of Urology; 6Department of Gastroenterology, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom Background: There is increasing evidence that botulinum neurotoxin A may affect sensory nociceptor fibers, but the expression of its receptors in clinical pain states, and its effects in human sensory neurons, are largely unknown.Methods: We studied synaptic vesicle protein subtype SV2A, a receptor for botulinum neurotoxin A, by immunostaining in a range of clinical tissues, including human dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, peripheral nerves, the urinary bladder, and the colon. We also determined the effects of botulinum neurotoxins A and E on localization of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, and functional sensitivity to capsaicin stimuli in cultured human dorsal root ganglion neurons.Results: Image analysis showed that SV2A immunoreactive nerve fibers were increased in injured nerves proximal to the injury (P = 0.002, and in painful neuromas (P = 0.0027; the ratio of percentage area SV2A to neurofilaments (a structural marker was increased proximal to injury (P = 0.0022 and in neuromas (P = 0.0001, indicating increased SV2A levels in injured nerve fibers. In the urinary bladder, SV2A nerve fibers were found in detrusor muscle and associated with blood vessels, with a significant increase in idiopathic detrusor overactivity (P = 0.002 and painful bladder syndrome (P = 0.0087. Colon biopsies showed numerous SV2A-positive nerve fibers, which were increased in quiescent

  19. Uptake and bioaccumulation of Cry toxins by an aphidophagous predator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, Débora P.; Andow, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of Cry toxins by insect natural enemies has rarely been considered and bioaccumulation has not yet been demonstrated. Uptake can be demonstrated by the continued presence of Cry toxin after exposure has stopped and gut contents eliminated. Bioaccumulation can be demonstrated by showing uptake and that the concentration of Cry toxin in the natural enemy exceeds that in its food. We exposed larvae of the aphidophagous predator, Harmonia axyridis, to Cry1Ac and Cry1F through uniform and constant tritrophic exposure via an aphid, Myzus persicae, and looked for toxin presence in the pupae. We repeated the experiment using only Cry1F and tested newly emerged adults. Both Cry toxins were detected in pupae, and Cry1F was detected in recently emerged, unfed adults. Cry1Ac was present 2.05 times and Cry1F 3.09 times higher in predator pupae than in the aphid prey. Uptake and bioaccumulation in the third trophic level might increase the persistence of Cry toxins in the food web and mediate new exposure routes to natural enemies. - Highlights: • Uptake and bioaccumulation of two Cry toxins by a larval coccinellid was tested. • Uptake was demonstrated by presence of the toxins in pupae and adults. • Bioaccumulation was shown by higher toxin concentration in pupae than prey. • Cry1Ac was present 2.05× and Cry1F 3.09× higher in predator pupae than prey. • This might increase persistence of Cry toxins in food webs with new exposure routes. - Immatures of the predaceous coccinellid Harmonia axyridis can uptake and bioaccumulate Cry toxins delivered via their aphid prey.

  20. Botulinum Toxin in Management of Limb Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Zakin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Essential tremor is characterized by persistent, usually bilateral and symmetric, postural or kinetic activation of agonist and antagonist muscles involving either the distal or proximal upper extremity. Quality of life is often affected and one’s ability to perform daily tasks becomes impaired. Oral therapies, including propranolol and primidone, can be effective in the management of essential tremor, although adverse effects can limit their use and about 50% of individuals lack response to oral pharmacotherapy. Locally administered botulinum toxin injection has become increasingly useful in the management of essential tremor. Targeting of select muscles with botulinum toxin is an area of active research, and muscle selection has important implications for toxin dosing and functional outcomes. The use of anatomical landmarks with palpation, EMG guidance, electrical stimulation, and ultrasound has been studied as a technique for muscle localization in toxin injection. Earlier studies implemented a standard protocol for the injection of (predominantly wrist flexors and extensors using palpation and EMG guidance. Targeting of muscles by selection of specific activators of tremor (tailored to each patient using kinematic analysis might allow for improvement in efficacy, including functional outcomes. It is this individualized muscle selection and toxin dosing (requiring injection within various sites of a single muscle that has allowed for success in the management of tremors.

  1. Headache and botulinum toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Porta, M.; Camerlingo, M.

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss clinical and international experience about botulinum toxins (BTX types A and B) in headache treatment. Data from literature suggest good results for the treatment of tensiontype headache, migraine and chronic tension–type headache. In the present paper mechanisms of action and injection sites will also be discussed.

  2. Botulinum Toxin for Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Cengiz; Ismi, Onur

    2016-08-01

    Rhinitis is a common clinical entity. Besides nasal obstruction, itching, and sneezing, one of the most important symptoms of rhinitis is nasal hypersecretion produced by nasal glands and exudate from the nasal vascular bed. Allergic rhinitis is an IgE-mediated inflammatory reaction of nasal mucosa after exposure to environmental allergens. Idiopathic rhinitis describes rhinitis symptoms that occur after non-allergic, noninfectious irritants. Specific allergen avoidance, topical nasal decongestants, nasal corticosteroids, immunotherapy, and sinonasal surgery are the main treatment options. Because the current treatment modalities are not enough for reducing rhinorrhea in some patients, novel treatment options are required to solve this problem. Botulinum toxin is an exotoxin generated by Clostridium botulinum. It disturbs the signal transmission at the neuromuscular and neuroglandular junction by inhibiting the acetylcholine release from the presynaptic nerve terminal. It has been widely used in neuromuscular, hypersecretory, and autonomic nerve system disorders. There have been a lot of published articles concerning the effect of this toxin on rhinitis symptoms. Based on the results of these reports, intranasal botulinum toxin A administration appears to be a safe and effective treatment method for decreasing rhinitis symptoms in rhinitis patients with a long-lasting effect. Botulinum toxin type A will be a good treatment option for the chronic rhinitis patients who are resistant to other treatment methods.

  3. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Brodsky

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion.Methods: This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method. It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB.Results: Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others.Discussion: Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected.

  4. A novel optimization algorithm based on epsilon constraint-RBF neural network for tuning PID controller in decoupled HVAC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaran, Seyed Mohammad; Yusof, Rubiyah; Selamat, Hazlina

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Decoupling of a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system is presented. • RBF models were identified by Epsilon constraint method for temperature and humidity. • Control settings derived from optimization of the decoupled model. • Epsilon constraint-RBF based on PID controller was implemented to keep thermal comfort and minimize energy. • Enhancements of controller parameters of the HVAC system are desired. - Abstract: The energy efficiency of a heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system optimized using a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) combined with the epsilon constraint (EC) method is reported. The new method adopts the advanced algorithm of RBFNN for the HVAC system to estimate the residual errors, increase the control signal and reduce the error results. The objective of this study is to develop and simulate the EC-RBFNN for a self tuning PID controller for a decoupled bilinear HVAC system to control the temperature and relative humidity (RH) produced by the system. A case study indicates that the EC-RBFNN algorithm has a much better accuracy than optimization PID itself and PID-RBFNN, respectively.

  5. Autoproteolytic Activation of Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6, which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins.

  6. Botulinum Toxin and Muscle Atrophy: A Wanted or Unwanted Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Paul D; Couto, Rafael A; Isakov, Raymond; Yoo, Donald B; Azizzadeh, Babak; Guyuron, Bahman; Zins, James E

    2016-04-01

    While the facial rejuvenating effect of botulinum toxin type A is well known and widespread, its use in body and facial contouring is less common. We first describe its use for deliberate muscle volume reduction, and then document instances of unanticipated and undesirable muscle atrophy. Finally, we investigate the potential long-term adverse effects of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy. Although the use of botulinum toxin type A in the cosmetic patient has been extensively studied, there are several questions yet to be addressed. Does prolonged botulinum toxin treatment increase its duration of action? What is the mechanism of muscle atrophy and what is the cause of its reversibility once treatment has stopped? We proceed to examine how prolonged chemodenervation with botulinum toxin can increase its duration of effect and potentially contribute to muscle atrophy. Instances of inadvertent botulinum toxin-induced atrophy are also described. These include the "hourglass deformity" secondary to botulinum toxin type A treatment for migraine headaches, and a patient with atrophy of multiple facial muscles from injections for hemifacial spasm. Numerous reports demonstrate that muscle atrophy after botulinum toxin type A treatment occurs and is both reversible and temporary, with current literature supporting the notion that repeated chemodenervation with botulinum toxin likely responsible for both therapeutic and incidental temporary muscle atrophy. Furthermore, duration of response may be increased with subsequent treatments, thus minimizing frequency of reinjection. Practitioners should be aware of the temporary and reversible effect of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy and be prepared to reassure patients on this matter. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Prokaryotic adenylate cyclase toxin stimulates anterior pituitary cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin, M.J.; Evans, W.S.; Rogol, A.D.; Weiss, A.A.; Thorner, M.O.; Orth, D.N.; Nicholson, W.E.; Yasumoto, T.; Hewlett, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis synthesis a variety of virulence factors including a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin. Treatment of anterior pituitary cells with this AC toxin resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels that was associated with accelerated exocytosis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). The kinetics of release of these hormones, however, were markedly different; GH and prolactin were rapidly released, while LH and ACTH secretion was more gradually elevated. Neither dopamine agonists nor somatostatin changes the ability of AC toxin to generate cAMP (up to 2 h). Low concentrations of AC toxin amplified the secretory response to hypophysiotrophic hormones. The authors conclude that bacterial AC toxin can rapidly elevate cAMP levels in anterior pituitary cells and that it is the response that explains the subsequent acceleration of hormone release

  8. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of vocal fold nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui E; Belafsky, Peter C

    2009-12-01

    Promising new techniques in the management of vocal fold nodules have been developed in the past 2 years. Simultaneously, the therapeutic use of botulinum toxin has rapidly expanded. This review explores the use of botulinum toxin in treatment of vocal nodules and summarizes current therapeutic concepts. New microsurgical instruments and techniques, refinements in laser technology, radiosurgical excision and steroid intralesional injections are all promising new techniques in the management of vocal nodules. Botulinum toxin-induced 'voice rest' is a new technique we have employed in patients with recalcitrant nodules. Successful resolution of nodules is possible with this technique, without the risk of vocal fold scarring inherent in dissection/excision techniques. Botulinum toxin usage is exponentially increasing, and large-scale, long-term studies demonstrate its safety profile. Targeted vocal fold temporary paralysis induced by botulinum toxin injection is a new, well tolerated and efficacious treatment in patients with persistent vocal fold nodules.

  9. Precipitation of Epsilon Copper in Ferrite Antibacterial Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixia ZHANG; Gang LIN; Zhou XU

    2008-01-01

    The precipitation of epsilon copper at 1023 K ageing in ferrite antibacterial stainless steel was investigated by a combination of electron microscopy and micro-Vickers hardness measurement. The results show that epsilon copper precipitation occurs within 90 s. Complex rnultilayer structure confirmed as twins and stacking faults on {111}ε-Cu planes was observed in the precipitates. The precipitates grow by the lengthwise enlargement of a set of parallel layers, having [111]ε-Cu and [112]ε-Cu preferred growth orientations. The volume fraction of precipitates f formed within 120 min can be predicted by a modified Avrami equation (In 1/1-f= kt+b).Simultaneously, substituent atom clusters with a size of 5-10 nm was found to occur in the solution and cause matrix strain. The precipitate morphology and distribution on the surface of ferrite antibacterial stainlesss teel are associated with surface crystallographic orientation of the matrix. The precipitates are predominantly located within the ferrite grains of orientation. The precipitates located on {111}α-Fe surface planes have sphere or ellipse shape.

  10. Biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides versus autologous nerve grafts : Electromyographic and video analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional effects of bridging a gap in the sciatic nerve of the rat with either a biodegradable copolymer of (DL)-lactide and epsilon -caprolactone [p(DLLA-epsilon -CL)] nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. Electromyograms (EMGs) of the gastrocnemius

  11. A new fully human recombinant FSH (follitropin epsilon): two phase I randomized placebo and comparator-controlled pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elaziz, Khalid; Duijkers, Ingrid; Stöckl, Lars; Dietrich, Bruno; Klipping, Christine; Eckert, Kelvin; Goletz, Steffen

    2017-08-01

    150 IU once daily [QD], or 150 IU every other day [QAD], 10 subjects each) and 27 subjects received 150 IU Gonal-f, 150 IU Bravelle, or placebo for 7 days (11/10/6 subjects). Blood samples for measuring PK as well as PD parameters were collected systematically before, during and after dosing. Adverse events (AEs) and other relevant safety parameters were recorded. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. The single- and multiple-dose PK parameters maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-last) increased in a linear fashion with increasing dose levels of follitropin epsilon. Follitropin epsilon showed PK characteristics comparable to the comparators indicating that well established treatment schemes could be applied. There was a dose-response effect of single and multiple doses of follitropin epsilon on follicular growth, which was shown for the biomarker inhibin B as well as for the mean number and size of follicles. Multiple doses of 75 IU follitropin epsilon given daily, as well as 150 IU follitropin epsilon every second day, showed a follicle growth comparable with 150 IU Gonal-f given daily, while in case of daily administration of 150 IU Bravelle only weak follicle stimulation was observed. Multiple doses of 150 IU follitropin epsilon induced a much higher follicle growth compared to the same dose of Gonal-f. All single and multiple follitropin epsilon doses tested were safe and well tolerated, and overall there were no relevant differences between follitropin epsilon and the comparators in terms of safety. The average number of AEs increased with increasing dose levels. No clinically relevant abnormalities were reported for any of the other safety parameters assessed. No follitropin epsilon anti-drug antibodies were observed. The studies were conducted as a single-blind design. Hormone levels or other parameters assessed in serum are generally not considered as being subject to bias. Other assessments directly

  12. Broadband perfect infrared absorption by tuning epsilon-near-zero and epsilon-near-pole resonances of multilayer ITO nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kun; Cheng, Qiang; Song, Jinlin; Lu, Lu; Jia, Zhihao; Li, Junwei

    2018-01-01

    We numerically investigate the broadband perfect infrared absorption by tuning epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) and epsilon-near-pole (ENP) resonances of multilayer indium tin oxide nanowires (ITO NWs). The monolayer ITO NWs array shows intensive absorption at ENZ and ENP wavelengths for p polarization, while only at the ENP wavelength for s polarization. Moreover, the ENP resonances are almost omnidirectional and the ENZ resonances are angularly dependent. Therefore, the absorption bandwidth is broader for p polarization than that for s polarization when polarized waves are incident obliquely. The ENZ resonances can be tuned by altering the doping concentration and volume filling factor of ITO NWs. However, the ENP resonances only can be tuned by changing the doping concentration of ITO NWs, and volume filling factor impacts little on the ENP resonances. Based on the strong absorption properties of each layer at their own ENP and ENZ resonances, the tuned absorption of the bilayer ITO NWs with the different doping concentrations can be broader and stronger. Furthermore, multilayer ITO NWs can achieve broadband perfect absorption by controlling the doping concentration, volume filling factor, and length of the NWs in each layer. This study has the potential to apply to applications requiring efficient absorption and energy conversion.

  13. [Experiments with sausage meat on the formation of N epsilon-carboxymethyllysine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartkopf, J; Erbersdobler, H F

    1995-07-01

    In model experiments the influence of ingredients normally used for sausage production to a meat homogenate on the formation of N epsilon-carboxymethyllysine (CML) was investigated. The formation of CML is obviously more promoted from the reaction of ascorbate with lysine than from that of glucose with lysine. The addition of ascorbate in a practical concentration yielded 35 mg, the addition of glucose only 23 mg compared to 17 mg CML/kg protein in the control sample. The addition of diphosphate in a practical concentration besides glucose significantly increased the CML values from 23 mg to 30 mg CML/kg protein. On the other hand, nitrite did not enhance the formation of CML (21 mg/kg protein) in the sausage when used in concentrations usually applied in meat processing. Generally the values found in the meat products are quite low compared to data in other foods like milk products.

  14. DMPD: Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-mediated disorders. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14643884 Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-m...g) (.html) (.csml) Show Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-mediated di...sorders. PubmedID 14643884 Title Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to contro

  15. Diphtheria toxin-induced channels in Vero cells selective for monovalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandvig, K.; Olsnes, S.

    1988-01-01

    Ion fluxes associated with translocation of diphtheria toxin across the surface membrane of Vero cells were studied. When cells with surface-bound toxin were exposed to low pH to induce toxin entry, the cells became permeable to Na+, K+, H+, choline+, and glucosamine+. There was no increased permeability to Cl-, SO4(-2), glucose, or sucrose, whereas the uptake of 45 Ca2+ was slightly increased. The influx of Ca2+, which appears to be different from that of monovalent cations, was reduced by several inhibitors of anion transport and by verapamil, Mn2+, Co2+, and Ca2+, but not by Mg2+. The toxin-induced fluxes of N+, K+, and protons were inhibited by Cd2+. Cd2+ also protected the cells against intoxication by diphtheria toxin, suggesting that the open cation-selective channel is required for toxin translocation. The involvement of the toxin receptor is discussed

  16. Fate of Fusarium Toxins during Brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habler, Katharina; Geissinger, Cajetan; Hofer, Katharina; Schüler, Jan; Moghari, Sarah; Hess, Michael; Gastl, Martina; Rychlik, Michael

    2017-01-11

    Some information is available about the fate of Fusarium toxins during the brewing process, but only little is known about the single processing steps in detail. In our study we produced beer from two different barley cultivars inoculated with three different Fusarium species, namely, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium sporotrichioides, and Fusarium avenaceum, producing a wide range of mycotoxins such as type B trichothecenes, type A trichothecenes, and enniatins. By the use of multi-mycotoxin LC-MS/MS stable isotope dilution methods we were able to follow the fate of Fusarium toxins during the entire brewing process. In particular, the type B trichothecenes deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol showed similar behaviors. Between 35 and 52% of those toxins remained in the beer after filtration. The contents of the potentially hazardous deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside and the type A trichothecenes increased during mashing, but a rapid decrease of deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside content was found during the following steps of lautering and wort boiling. The concentration of enniatins greatly decreased with the discarding of spent grains or finally with the hot break. The results of our study show the retention of diverse Fusarium toxins during the brewing process and allow for assessing the food safety of beer regarding the monitored Fusarium mycotoxins.

  17. Spectrophotometry of Epsilon Aur, 3295-8880 A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, G. W.; Thompson, D. T.; Lutz, B. L.; Sowell, J.

    1985-01-01

    Spectrophotometric scans were obtained at 8 A resolution from 3295 to 8880 A on twenty nights before, during, and after the recent eclipse of epsilon Aurigae, beginning with a pre-eclipse observation on 5 March 1982 U.T. The observations were reduced to absolute flux using the standard stars 109 Vir or xi(2) Ceti. The data confirm that the eclipse is essentially gray over the entire visible spectrum, as others have noted from broadband photometry. High resolution echellograms (450 to 6700 A) made through mid-eclipse and the scans show changes in the equivalent widths of H alpha, Na D, and O I as large as a factor of two.

  18. Preferential emission into epsilon-near-zero metamaterial [Invited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galfsky, Tal; Sun, Zheng; Jacob, Zubin; Menon, Vinod M.

    2015-01-01

    We report the use of epsilon near zero (ENZ) metamaterial to control spontaneous emission from Zinc-Oxide (ZnO) excitons. The ENZ material consists of alternating layers of silver and alumina with subwavelength thicknesses, resulting in an effective medium where one of the components of the dielectric constant approach zero between 370nm-440nm wavelength range. Bulk ZnO with photoluminescence maximum in the ENZ regime was deposited via atomic layer deposition to obtain a smooth film with near field coupling to the ENZ metamaterial. Preferential emission from the ZnO layer into the metamaterial with suppression of forward emission by 90% in comparison to ZnO on silicon is observed. We attribute this observation to the presence of dispersionless plasmonic modes in the ENZ regime as shown by the results of theoretical modeling presented here. Integration of ENZ metamaterials with light emitters is an attractive platform for realizing a low threshold subwavelength laser

  19. The toxins of Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patocka, J

    2001-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, formerly called "blue-green algae", are simple, primitive photosynthetic microorganism wide occurrence in fresh, brackish and salt waters. Forty different genera of Cyanobacteria are known and many of them are producers of potent toxins responsible for a wide array of human illnesses, aquatic mammal and bird morbidity and mortality, and extensive fish kills. These cyanotoxins act as neurotoxins or hepatotoxins and are structurally and functionally diverse, and many are derived from unique biosynthetic pathways. All known cyanotoxins and their chemical and toxicological characteristics are presented in this article.

  20. Occurrence of Beta2 toxigenic Clostridium perfringens isolates with different toxin types in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabbari, A.R.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of enteric diseases in both human and animals. The bacteria produce several toxins which play key roles in the pathogenesis of diseases and are classified into five toxin types, on the basis of the differential production of Alpha, Beta, Epsilon and Iota toxins. In this study a single PCR assay was developed and used for detection of cpb2 gene to identify the Beta2 harboring isolates among different types of C. perfringens isolated from animal enteric diseases in Iran. It was found that cpb2 presents among C. perfringens isolates types A, B, C and D with 54.5% (6/11, 62% (13/21, 42.8% (6/14, 69.25% (9/13, respectively. Totally 34 of 59 (56.7% isolates screened by PCR were cpb2-positive. This is the first report of cpb2 positive isolates of C. perfringens causing enteric diseases of animals in Iran. Further studies to demonstrate the exact role of Beta2 toxin in pathogenesis of the bacterium is suggested.

  1. Lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C.G.; Armstrong, G.D. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated human T-lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin by affinity isolation and photoaffinity labeling procedures. T lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral human blood, surface iodinated, and solubilized in Triton X-100. The iodinated mixture was then passed through pertussis toxin-agarose, and the fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiography of the fixed, dried gels revealed several bands in the pertussis toxin-bound fraction that were not observed in fractions obtained from histone or fetuin-agarose. Further investigations employed a photoaffinity labeling reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)-1,3'-dithiopropionate, to identify pertussis toxin receptors in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytic cells, T lymphocytes, and Jurkat cells. In all three cell systems, the pertussis toxin affinity probe specifically labeled a single protein species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000 that was not observed when the procedure was performed in the presence of excess unmodified pertussis toxin. A protein comparable in molecular weight to the one detected by the photoaffinity labeling technique was also observed among the species that bound to pertussis toxin-agarose. The results suggest that pertussis toxin may bind to a 70,000-Da receptor in human T lymphocytes.

  2. Botulinum toxin: bioweapon & magic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Singh, Padma; Gupta, Pallavi

    2010-11-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins, causative agents of botulism in humans, are produced by Clostridium botulinum, an anaerobic spore-former Gram positive bacillus. Botulinum neurotoxin poses a major bioweapon threat because of its extreme potency and lethality; its ease of production, transport, and misuse; and the need for prolonged intensive care among affected persons. A single gram of crystalline toxin, evenly dispersed and inhaled, can kill more than one million people. The basis of the phenomenal potency of botulinum toxin is enzymatic; the toxin is a zinc proteinase that cleaves neuronal vesicle associated proteins responsible for acetylcholine release into the neuromuscular junction. As a military or terrorist weapon, botulinum toxin could be disseminated via aerosol or by contamination of water or food supplies, causing widespread casualties. A fascinating aspect of botulinum toxin research in recent years has been development of the most potent toxin into a molecule of significant therapeutic utility . It is the first biological toxin which is licensed for treatment of human diseases. In the late 1980s, Canada approved use of the toxin to treat strabismus, in 2001 in the removal of facial wrinkles and in 2002, the FDA in the United States followed suit. The present review focuses on both warfare potential and medical uses of botulinum neurotoxin.

  3. Synthesis of protein in intestinal cells exposed to cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.W.; Berg, W.D. Jr.; Coppenhaver, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism by which cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), formed by intestinal epithelial cells in response to cholera toxin, ultimately results in alterations in water and electrolyte transport is poorly understood. Several studies have indicated that inhibitors of transcription or translation block much of the transport of ions and water in the intestine and edema formation in tissue elicited by cholera toxin. Data presented in this study confirmed the inhibitory effects of cycloheximide on cholera toxin-induced fluid accumulation in the rabbit intestinal loop model. Neither cycloheximide nor actinomycin D altered the amount of cyclic AMP that accumulated in intestinal cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to cholera toxin. An increase in [ 3 H] leucine incorporation was readily demonstrable in intestinal epithelial cells from rabbits challenged with Vibrio cholerae. Similarly, intestinal epithelial cells incubated with cholera toxin for 4 hr synthesized substantially more protein than controls as determined by relative incorporation of [ 35 S] methionine. Most of the new protein synthesized in response to cholera toxin was membrane associated and of high molecular weight. The possible significance of the toxin-induced protein relative to cholera pathogenesis was discussed

  4. Toxins for Transgenic Resistance to Hemipteran Pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chougule, Nanasaheb P.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2012-01-01

    The sap sucking insects (Hemiptera), which include aphids, whiteflies, plant bugs and stink bugs, have emerged as major agricultural pests. The Hemiptera cause direct damage by feeding on crops, and in some cases indirect damage by transmission of plant viruses. Current management relies almost exclusively on application of classical chemical insecticides. While the development of transgenic crops expressing toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has provided effective plant protection against some insect pests, Bt toxins exhibit little toxicity against sap sucking insects. Indeed, the pest status of some Hemiptera on Bt-transgenic plants has increased in the absence of pesticide application. The increased pest status of numerous hemipteran species, combined with increased prevalence of resistance to chemical insecticides, provides impetus for the development of biologically based, alternative management strategies. Here, we provide an overview of approaches toward transgenic resistance to hemipteran pests. PMID:22822455

  5. Toxin-Based Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Benhar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein toxins confer a defense against predation/grazing or a superior pathogenic competence upon the producing organism. Such toxins have been perfected through evolution in poisonous animals/plants and pathogenic bacteria. Over the past five decades, a lot of effort has been invested in studying their mechanism of action, the way they contribute to pathogenicity and in the development of antidotes that neutralize their action. In parallel, many research groups turned to explore the pharmaceutical potential of such toxins when they are used to efficiently impair essential cellular processes and/or damage the integrity of their target cells. The following review summarizes major advances in the field of toxin based therapeutics and offers a comprehensive description of the mode of action of each applied toxin.

  6. Toxin-Based Therapeutic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Assaf; Benhar, Itai

    2010-01-01

    Protein toxins confer a defense against predation/grazing or a superior pathogenic competence upon the producing organism. Such toxins have been perfected through evolution in poisonous animals/plants and pathogenic bacteria. Over the past five decades, a lot of effort has been invested in studying their mechanism of action, the way they contribute to pathogenicity and in the development of antidotes that neutralize their action. In parallel, many research groups turned to explore the pharmaceutical potential of such toxins when they are used to efficiently impair essential cellular processes and/or damage the integrity of their target cells. The following review summarizes major advances in the field of toxin based therapeutics and offers a comprehensive description of the mode of action of each applied toxin. PMID:22069564

  7. Microbial synthesis of poly(epsilon-lysine) and its various applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ing-Lung; Shen, Ming-Haw; Van, Yi-Tsong

    2006-06-01

    This review article deals with the microbial synthesis, physiochemical properties, and potential applications of poly-epsilon-lysine (epsilon-PL), which is a naturally occurring biomaterial that is water soluble, biodegradable, edible and non-toxic toward humans and the environment. The potential applications of epsilon-PL as food preservatives, emulsifying agent, dietary agent, biodegradable fibers, highly water absorbable hydrogels, drug carriers, anticancer agent enhancer, biochip coatings in the fields of food, medicine, agriculture and electronics are also discussed in this review.

  8. Gold Nanoparticles Protected with Thiol-Derivatized Amphiphilic Poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Hvilsted, Søren

    2009-01-01

    ) of tent-butyl acrylate (tBA) in a controlled fashion by use of NiBr2(PPh3)(2) catalyst to produce Prot-PCL-b-PtBA with narrow polydispersities (1.17-1.39). Subsequent mild deprotection protocols provided HS-PCL-b-PAA. Reduction of a gold salt in the presence of this macroligand under thiol......Amphiphilic poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid) (HS-PCL-b-PAA) with a thiol functionality in the PCL terminal has been prepared in a novel synthetic cascade. Initially, living anionic ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of epsilon-caprolactone (epsilon-CL) employing the difunctional...

  9. Prediction of Toxin Genes from Chinese Yellow Catfish Based on Transcriptomic and Proteomic Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fish venom remains a virtually untapped resource. There are so few fish toxin sequences for reference, which increases the difficulty to study toxins from venomous fish and to develop efficient and fast methods to dig out toxin genes or proteins. Here, we utilized Chinese yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco as our research object, since it is a representative species in Siluriformes with its venom glands embedded in the pectoral and dorsal fins. In this study, we set up an in-house toxin database and a novel toxin-discovering protocol to dig out precise toxin genes by combination of transcriptomic and proteomic sequencing. Finally, we obtained 15 putative toxin proteins distributed in five groups, namely Veficolin, Ink toxin, Adamalysin, Za2G and CRISP toxin. It seems that we have developed a novel bioinformatics method, through which we could identify toxin proteins with high confidence. Meanwhile, these toxins can also be useful for comparative studies in other fish and development of potential drugs.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin ExoU induces a PAF-dependent impairment of alveolar fibrin turnover secondary to enhanced activation of coagulation and increased expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the course of mice pneumosepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suassuna José HR

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ExoU, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxin with phospholipase A2 activity, was shown to induce vascular hyperpermeability and thrombus formation in a murine model of pneumosepsis. In this study, we investigated the toxin ability to induce alterations in pulmonary fibrinolysis and the contribution of the platelet activating factor (PAF in the ExoU-induced overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1. Methods Mice were intratracheally instilled with the ExoU producing PA103 P. aeruginosa or its mutant with deletion of the exoU gene. After 24 h, animal bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF were analyzed and lung sections were submitted to fibrin and PAI-1 immunohistochemical localization. Supernatants from A549 airway epithelial cells and THP-1 macrophage cultures infected with both bacterial strains were also analyzed at 24 h post-infection. Results In PA103-infected mice, but not in control animals or in mice infected with the bacterial mutant, extensive fibrin deposition was detected in lung parenchyma and microvasculature whereas mice BALF exhibited elevated tissue factor-dependent procoagulant activity and PAI-1 concentration. ExoU-triggered PAI-1 overexpression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In in vitro assays, PA103-infected A549 cells exhibited overexpression of PAI-1 mRNA. Increased concentration of PAI-1 protein was detected in both A549 and THP-1 culture supernatants. Mice treatment with a PAF antagonist prior to PA103 infection reduced significantly PAI-1 concentrations in mice BALF. Similarly, A549 cell treatment with an antibody against PAF receptor significantly reduced PAI-1 mRNA expression and PAI-1 concentrations in cell supernatants, respectively. Conclusion ExoU was shown to induce disturbed fibrin turnover, secondary to enhanced procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity during P. aeruginosa pneumosepsis, by a PAF-dependent mechanism. Besides its possible pathophysiological relevance, in

  11. New prediction for the direct CP-violating parameter var-epsilon prime/var-epsilon and the ΔI=1/2 rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yue-Liang

    2001-01-01

    The low-energy dynamics of QCD is investigated with special attention paid to the matching between QCD and chiral perturbation theory (ChPT), and also to some useful algebraic chiral operator relations which survive even when we include chiral loop corrections. It then allows us to evaluate the hadronic matrix elements below the energy scale Λ χ ≅1GeV. Based on the new analyses, we present a consistent prediction for both the direct CP-violating parameter var-epsilonprime/var-epsilon and the ΔI=1/2 rule in kaon decays. In the leading 1/N c approximation, the isospin amplitudes A 0 and A 2 are found to agree well with the data, and the direct CP-violating parameter var-epsilonprime/var-epsilon is predicted to be large, which also confirms our earlier conclusion. Its numerical value is var-epsilonprime/var-epsilon=23.6 -7.8 +12.4 x10 -4 (Imλ t /= 1.2x10 -4 ) which is no longer sensitive to the strange quark mass due to the matching conditions. Taking into account a simultaneous consistent analysis on the isospin amplitudes A 0 and A 2 , the ratio var-epsilonprime/var-epsilon is in favor of the values var-epsilonprime/var-epsilon=(20±9)x10 -4

  12. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site

  13. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L. (Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-03

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site.

  14. Temperature Effects Explain Continental Scale Distribution of Cyanobacterial Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Mantzouki, Evanthia; Lürling, Miquel; Fastner, Jutta; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette; Wilk-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Koreivienė, Judita; Seelen, Laura; Teurlincx, Sven; Verstijnen, Yvon; Krztoń, Wojciech; Walusiak, Edward; Karosienė, Jūratė; Kasperovičienė, Jūratė; Savadova, Ksenija; Vitonytė, Irma

    2018-01-01

    Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and li...

  15. Temperature effects explain continental scale distribution of cyanobacterial toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Mantzouki, Evanthia; Lürling, Miquel; Fastner, Jutta; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette; Wilk-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Koreivienė, Judita; Seelen, Laura; Teurlincx, Sven; Verstijnen, Yvon; Krztoń, Wojciech; Walusiak, Edward; Karosienė, Jūratė; Kasperovičienė, Jūratė; Savadova, Ksenija; Vitonytė, Irma

    2018-01-01

    Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and li...

  16. Treatment of chronic tension-type headache with botulinum toxin: a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padberg, M.; de Bruijn, S. F. T. M.; de Haan, R. J.; Tavy, D. L. J.

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is increasingly advocated as effective treatment in chronic tension-type headache. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial to prove efficacy of botulinum toxin in chronic tension-type headache. Patients were randomly assigned to receive botulinum toxin (maximum

  17. Tumor accumulation of {epsilon}-poly-lysines-based polyamines conjugated with boron clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umano, Masayuki; Uechi, Kazuhiro; Uriuda, Takatoshi; Murayama, Sayuri; Azuma, Hideki [Department of Applied Chemistry and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 5588585 (Japan); Shinohara, Atsuko [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1138421 (Japan); Liu, Young; Ono, Koji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori 5900494 (Japan); Kirihata, Mitsunori [Department of Bioscience and Informatics, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai 5998531 (Japan); Yanagie, Hironobu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1138656 (Japan); Nagasaki, Takeshi, E-mail: nagasaki@bioa.eng.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 5588585 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is one of the potent cancer radiotherapies using nuclear reaction between {sup 10}B atoms and the neutron. Whether BNCT will succeed or not depends on tumor selective delivery of {sup 10}B compounds. {epsilon}-Poly-L-lysine is a naturally occurring polyamine characterized by the peptide linkages between the carboxyl and {epsilon}-amino groups of L-lysine. Because of high safety {epsilon}-PLL is applied practically as a food additive due to its strong antimicrobial activity. In this study, we focus on a development of a novel polymeric delivery system for BNCT using biodegradable {epsilon}-PLL conjugated with {sup 10}B-containing clusters (BSH). This polymeric boron carrier will be expected to deliver safely and efficiently into tumor tissues based on Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect.

  18. Food toxin detection with atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Externally introduced toxins or internal spoilage correlated pathogens and their metabolites are all potential sources of food toxins. To prevent and protect unsafe food, many food toxin detection techniques have been developed to detect various toxins for quality control. Although several routine m...

  19. Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Sections Botulinum Toxin (Botox) ... Facial Wrinkles How Does Botulinum Toxin (Botox) Work? Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Leer en Español: La ...

  20. Bio Warfare and Terrorism: Toxins and Other Mid-Spectrum Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Madsen, James M

    2005-01-01

    ... counterparts are still by definition toxins. Related terms include phycotoxins (toxins from algae), mycotoxins (fungal toxins), phytotoxins (plant toxins), and venoms (toxins from animals, especially vertebrates...

  1. Plasmonic Lithography Utilizing Epsilon Near Zero Hyperbolic Metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Fan; Liang, Gaofeng; Li, Qiaochu; Guo, L Jay

    2017-10-24

    In this work, a special hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) metamaterial is investigated for plasmonic lithography of period reduction patterns. It is a type II HMM (ϵ ∥ 0) whose tangential component of the permittivity ϵ ∥ is close to zero. Due to the high anisotropy of the type II epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) HMM, only one plasmonic mode can propagate horizontally with low loss in a waveguide system with ENZ HMM as its core. This work takes the advantage of a type II ENZ HMM composed of aluminum/aluminum oxide films and the associated unusual mode to expose a photoresist layer in a specially designed lithography system. Periodic patterns with a half pitch of 58.3 nm were achieved due to the interference of third-order diffracted light of the grating. The lines were 1/6 of the mask with a period of 700 nm and ∼1/7 of the wavelength of the incident light. Moreover, the theoretical analyses performed are widely applicable to structures made of different materials such as silver as well as systems working at deep ultraviolet wavelengths including 193, 248, and 365 nm.

  2. The R + var-epsilon R2 cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis presents the study of a model cosmology based on the R + var-epsilon R 2 gravitational Lagrangian. It may be roughly divided into two distinct parts. First, the classical inflationary scenario is developed. Then, the formalism of quantum cosmology is employed to determined initial conditions for the classical model. In the work on the classical model, the evolution equations for an isotropic and homogeneous universe are solved to exhibit both early-time inflation and a smooth transition to subsequent radiation-dominated behavior. Then perturbations on this isotropic background are evolved through the model to provide constraints on the model parameters from the observational limits on anisotropy today. In the work on the wave function, the two boundary conditions of Vilenkin and Hartle and Hawking are compared. The wave functions obtained are restricted to the initial edge of classical Lorentzian inflationary trajectories as distributions over initial conditions for the classical inflationary model. It is found that Vilenkin's wave function prefers the universe to undergo a great deal of inflation, whereas Hartle and Hawking's wave function prefers the universe to undergo little inflation. Finally, both boundary conditions are shown to require the inhomogeneous perturbative modes start out in their ground states

  3. Citizen Sky, Solving the Mystery of epsilon Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Rebecca; Price, A.; Kloppenborg, B.; Henden, A.

    2010-01-01

    Citizen Sky is a multi-year, NSF funded citizen science project involving the bright star eps Aur. The project was conceived by the IYA 2009 working group on Research Experiences for Students, Teachers, and Citizen-Scientists. Citizen Sky goes beyond simple observing to include a major data analysis component. The goal is to introduce the participant to the full scientific process from background research to paper writing for a peer-reviewed journal. It begins with a 10 Star Training Program of several types of binary and transient variable stars that are easy to observe from suburban locations with the naked eye. Participants then move on to monitoring the rare and mysterious 2009-2011 eclipse (already underway) of epsilon Aurigae. This object undergoes eclipses only every 27.1 years and each eclipse lasts nearly two years. The star is bright enough to be seen with the naked eye from most urban areas. Training will be provided in observing techniques as well as basic data analysis of photometric and visual datasets (light curve and period analysis). The project also involves two public workshops, one on observing (already held in August of 2009) and one on data analysis and scientific paper writing (to be held in 2010.) This project has been made possible by the National Science Foundation.

  4. Botulinum toxin in trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Hernando de la Bárcena, Ignacio; Marzo-Sola, María Eugenia

    2017-01-06

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most disabling facial pain syndromes, with a significant impact on patients' quality of life. Pharmacotherapy is the first choice for treatment but cases of drug resistance often require new strategies, among which various interventional treatments have been used. In recent years a new therapeutic strategy consisting of botulinum toxin has emerged, with promising results. We reviewed clinical cases and case series, open-label studies and randomized clinical trials examining the use of botulinum toxin for drug-refractory trigeminal neuralgia published in the literature. The administration of botulinum toxin has proven to be a safe and effective therapeutic strategy in patients with drug-refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, but many questions remain unanswered as to the precise role of botulinum toxin in the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Toxin-Based Therapeutic Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Itai Benhar; Assaf Shapira

    2010-01-01

    Protein toxins confer a defense against predation/grazing or a superior pathogenic competence upon the producing organism. Such toxins have been perfected through evolution in poisonous animals/plants and pathogenic bacteria. Over the past five decades, a lot of effort has been invested in studying their mechanism of action, the way they contribute to pathogenicity and in the development of antidotes that neutralize their action. In parallel, many research groups turned to explore the pharmac...

  6. Changes in protease activity and Cry3Aa toxin binding in the Colorado potato beetle: implications for insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olga Loseva; Mohamed Ibrahim; Mehmet Candas; C. Noah Koller; Leah S. Bauer; Lee A. Jr. Bulla

    2002-01-01

    Widespread commercial use of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins to control pest insects has increased the likelihood for development of insect resistance to this entomopathogen. In this study, we investigated protease activity profiles and toxin-binding capacities in the midgut of a strain of Colorado potato beetle (CPB) that has developed resistance...

  7. AB Toxins: A Paradigm Switch from Deadly to Desirable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oludare Odumosu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available To ensure their survival, a number of bacterial and plant species have evolved a common strategy to capture energy from other biological systems. Being imperfect pathogens, organisms synthesizing multi-subunit AB toxins are responsible for the mortality of millions of people and animals annually. Vaccination against these organisms and their toxins has proved rather ineffective in providing long-term protection from disease. In response to the debilitating effects of AB toxins on epithelial cells of the digestive mucosa, mechanisms underlying toxin immunomodulation of immune responses have become the focus of increasing experimentation. The results of these studies reveal that AB toxins may have a beneficial application as adjuvants for the enhancement of immune protection against infection and autoimmunity. Here, we examine similarities and differences in the structure and function of bacterial and plant AB toxins that underlie their toxicity and their exceptional properties as immunomodulators for stimulating immune responses against infectious disease and for immune suppression of organ-specific autoimmunity.

  8. Botulinum toxin treatment for facial palsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lilli; Lui, Michael; Nduka, Charles

    2017-06-01

    Facial palsy may be complicated by ipsilateral synkinesis or contralateral hyperkinesis. Botulinum toxin is increasingly used in the management of facial palsy; however, the optimum dose, treatment interval, adjunct therapy and performance as compared with alternative treatments have not been well established. This study aimed to systematically review the evidence for the use of botulinum toxin in facial palsy. The Cochrane central register of controlled trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE(R) (1946 to September 2015) and Embase Classic + Embase (1947 to September 2015) were searched for randomised studies using botulinum toxin in facial palsy. Forty-seven studies were identified, and three included. Their physical and patient-reported outcomes are described, and observations and cautions are discussed. Facial asymmetry has a strong correlation to subjective domains such as impairment in social interaction and perception of self-image and appearance. Botulinum toxin injections represent a minimally invasive technique that is helpful in restoring facial symmetry at rest and during movement in chronic, and potentially acute, facial palsy. Botulinum toxin in combination with physical therapy may be particularly helpful. Currently, there is a paucity of data; areas for further research are suggested. A strong body of evidence may allow botulinum toxin treatment to be nationally standardised and recommended in the management of facial palsy. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Can a toxin gene NAAT be used to predict toxin EIA and the severity of Clostridium difficile infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I. Garvey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI is controversial because of the many laboratory methods available and their lack of ability to distinguish between carriage, mild or severe disease. Here we describe whether a low C. difficile toxin B nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT cycle threshold (CT can predict toxin EIA, CDI severity and mortality. Methods A three-stage algorithm was employed for CDI testing, comprising a screening test for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, followed by a NAAT, then a toxin enzyme immunoassay (EIA. All diarrhoeal samples positive for GDH and NAAT between 2012 and 2016 were analysed. The performance of the NAAT CT value as a classifier of toxin EIA outcome was analysed using a ROC curve; patient mortality was compared to CTs and toxin EIA via linear regression models. Results A CT value ≤26 was associated with ≥72% toxin EIA positivity; applying a logistic regression model we demonstrated an association between low CT values and toxin EIA positivity. A CT value of ≤26 was significantly associated (p = 0.0262 with increased one month mortality, severe cases of CDI or failure of first line treatment. The ROC curve probabilities demonstrated a CT cut off value of 26.6. Discussions Here we demonstrate that a CT ≤26 indicates more severe CDI and is associated with higher mortality. Samples with a low CT value are often toxin EIA positive, questioning the need for this additional EIA test. Conclusions A CT ≤26 could be used to assess the potential for severity of CDI and guide patient treatment.

  10. Allele doses of apolipoprotein E type {epsilon}4 in sporadic late-onset Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, G.; Aouizerate, A.; Gerard, N. [Regional Center of Neurogenetics, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    Apoliprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE-{epsilon}4) is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD). We have found that the cumulative probability of remaining unaffected over time decreases for each dose of ApoE-{epsilon}4 in sporadic, late-onset French AD. The effect of genotypes on age at onset of AD was analyzed using the product limit method, to compare unaffected groups during aging. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in interstellar space. IV - The lines of sight to Delta, Epsilon, and Iota Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; York, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    Deuterium absorption features in spectra of Delta, Epsilon, and Iota Ori obtained with Copernicus are analyzed. The Iota Ori line-of-sight analysis, which is quite detailed because of the high-velocity H I components superposed on the deuterium features, gives a D/H ratio (which is uncertain because of a complex profile) of 0.000014. A D/H ratio of the order of 7 millionths is determined for Delta and Epsilon Ori. For the complex line profiles involved, one may regard this as a formal lower limit. Several attempts were made to increase the ratio N(D I)/N(H I) in the context of reasonable models for the line of sight, but with no success; the derived values are therefore regarded as actual values, not lower limits. Since the derived value is an average on the line of sight, the possibility cannot be ruled out that the true ratios N(D I)/N(H I) in individual nearby components differ from the mean values. The mean value for these two directions is lower by a factor of 4 than the best value for the Zeta Pup line of sight (the highest yet derived for path lengths greater than 50 pc).

  12. Ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in interstellar space. IV. The lines of sight to delta, epsilon, and iota Orionis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; York, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    We have analyzed the deuterium absorption features in the spectra of delta, epsilon, and iota Ori obtained with Copernicus. The iota Ori line-of-sight analysis, which is quite detailed because of the high-velocity H I components superposed on the deuterium features, gives a D/H ratio (which is uncertain because of a complex profile) of 1.4 x 10 -5 . We determined a D/H ratio of the order of 7 x 10 -6 for delta and epsilon Ori. For the complex line profiles involved, one may regard this as a formal lower limit. Several attempts were made to increase the ratio N (DI)/N (H I) in the context of reasonable models for the line of sight, but with no success; we therefore regard the derived values as actual values, not lower limits. Since our derived value is an average on the line of sight, we cannot rule out the possibility that the true ratios N (D I)/N (H I) in individual nearby components (Δν -1 ) differ from the mean values. Our mean value for these two directions is lower by a factor of 4 than our best value for the zeta Pup line of sight

  13. Mechanical properties of Bi,Pb(2223) single filaments and I sub c (epsilon) behaviour in longitudinally strained tapes

    CERN Document Server

    Passerini, R; Seeber, B; Flükiger, R

    2002-01-01

    The Young's modulus and fracture stress of isolated Bi,Pb(2223) filaments were deduced from three-point bending tests performed at different stages of the tapes preparation. These results were introduced in the model describing the evolution of critical current of tapes submitted to a longitudinal strain in view to predict their irreversible strain limit epsilon sub i sub r sub r. These calculated irreversible strain limits were compared to measured values, taken from a set of tapes made with different filling factors and composite matrices. This experiment shows that the predicted irreversible strain limits correspond to the measured ones. Presenting the I sub c behaviour of highly stressed tapes in a magnetic field, we discuss the evolution of the ratio I sup s sup t sup r sup o sup n sup g sub c sub 0 /I sub c sub 0 versus strain. This value, representative of the fraction of the critical current attributed to strongly connected grains, increases significantly during the crack formation regime at epsilon >...

  14. A toxin-binding alkaline phosphatase fragment synergizes Bt toxin Cry1Ac against susceptible and resistant Helicoverpa armigera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Chen

    Full Text Available Evolution of resistance by insects threatens the continued success of pest control using insecticidal crystal (Cry proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt in sprays and transgenic plants. In this study, laboratory selection with Cry1Ac yielded five strains of cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, with resistance ratios at the median lethal concentration (LC50 of activated Cry1Ac ranging from 22 to 1700. Reduced activity and reduced transcription of an alkaline phosphatase protein that binds Cry1Ac was associated with resistance to Cry1Ac in the four most resistant strains. A Cry1Ac-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase from H. armigera (HaALP1f was not toxic by itself, but it increased mortality caused by Cry1Ac in a susceptible strain and in all five resistant strains. Although synergism of Bt toxins against susceptible insects by toxin-binding fragments of cadherin and aminopeptidase N has been reported previously, the results here provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by a toxin-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase. The results here also provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by any toxin-binding peptide against resistant insects.

  15. Lessons Learned During the Recent Epsilon Aurigae Eclipse Observing Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stencel, Robert E.

    2011-05-01

    The 18 month long eclipse of the 3rd magnitude star, epsilon Aurigae, is forecast to end during May 2011, based on six eclipse events, in 2010, 1982, 1955, 1930, 1902 and 1874. In partnership with AAVSO, Hopkins Phoenix Observatory and others, we have organized observing campaigns during the past several years in order to maximize data acquired during this rare event and to promote reporting and analysis of observations of all kinds. Hundreds of registered participants have signed up for alert notices and newsletters, and many dozens of observers have contributed photometry, spectra and ideas to the ongoing effort - see websites: www.CitizenSky.org and www.hposoft.com/Campaign09.html . In this presentation, I will provide an update on the participation leading to extensive photometric results. Similarly, bright star spectroscopy has greatly benefited from small telescope plus spectrometer capabilities, now widely available, that complement traditional but less-frequent large telescope high dispersion work. Polarimetry provided key insights during the last eclipse, and we promoted the need for new data using this method. Finally, interferometry has come of age since the last eclipse, leading to the direct detection of the transiting dark disk causing the eclipse. Along with these traditional measurements, I will outline campaign-related efforts to promote Citizen Science opportunities among the public. Support for these efforts derives in part from AAVSO/NSF-Informal Science Education, NSF AAG grant 10-16678 and a bequest to the University of Denver Astronomy Program by alumnus William Herschel Womble, for which I am grateful.

  16. Botulinum toxin in pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colhado, Orlando Carlos Gomes; Boeing, Marcelo; Ortega, Luciano Bornia

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is one of the most potent bacterial toxins known and its effectiveness in the treatment of some pain syndromes is well known. However, the efficacy of some of its indications is still in the process of being confirmed. The objective of this study was to review the history, pharmacological properties, and clinical applications of BTX in the treatment of pain of different origins. Botulinum toxin is produced by fermentation of Clostridium botulinum, a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium. Commercially, BTX comes in two presentations, types A and B. Botulinum toxin, a neurotoxin with high affinity for cholinergic synapses, blocks the release of acetylcholine by nerve endings without interfering with neuronal conduction of electrical signals or synthesis and storage of acetylcholine. It has been proven that BTX can selectively weaken painful muscles, interrupting the spasm-pain cycle. Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of BTX-A in the treatment of tension headaches, migraines, chronic lumbar pain, and myofascial pain. Botulinum toxin type A is well tolerated in the treatment of chronic pain disorders in which pharmacotherapy regimens can cause side effects. The reduction in the consumption of analgesics and length of action of 3 to 4 months per dose represent other advantages of its use. However, further studies are necessary to establish the efficacy of BTX-A in chronic pain disorders and its exact mechanism of action, as well as its potential in multifactorial treatments.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of injection molded poly ({epsilon}-caprolactone) and poly ({epsilon}-caprolactone)/hydroxyapatite scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Zhixiang [Zhengzhou University, Henan (China); Nelson, Brenton; Peng, YiYan [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Li Ke [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Pilla, Srikanth; Li Wanju [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Turng, Lih-Sheng, E-mail: turng@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin (United States); South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Huazhong University of Science of Technology, Wuhan (China); Shen Changyu, E-mail: shency@zzu.edu.cn [Zhengzhou University, Henan (China)

    2012-08-01

    In this study, poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) (PCL)/sodium chloride (NaCl), PCL/poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)/NaCl and PCL/PEO/NaCl/hydroxyapatite (HA) composites were injection molded and characterized. The water soluble and sacrificial polymer, PEO, and NaCl particulates in the composites were leached by deionized water to produce porous and interconnected microstructures. The effect of leaching time on porosity, and residual contents of NaCl and NaCl/HA, as well as the effect of HA addition on mechanical properties was investigated. In addition, the biocompatibility was observed via seeding human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on PCL and PCL/HA scaffolds. The results showed that the leaching time depends on the spatial distribution of sacrificial PEO phase and NaCl particulates. The addition of HA has significantly improved the elastic (E Prime ) and loss moduli (E Double-Prime ) of PCL/HA scaffolds. Human MSCs were observed to have attached and proliferated on both PCL and PCL/HA scaffolds. Taken together, the molded PCL and PCL/HA scaffolds could be good candidates as tissue engineering scaffolds. Additionally, injection molding would be a potential and high throughput technology to fabricate tissue scaffolds. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCL/NaCl, PCL/PEO/NaCl and PCL/PEO/NaCl/HA composites were injection molded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Leaching time depends on the distribution of PEO phase and NaCl particulates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The elastic and loss moduli of PCL/HA scaffolds have significantly improved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human hMSCs have attached, survived and proliferated well on PCL and PCL/HA scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molded PCL and PCL/HA scaffolds could be good candidates for tissue engineering.

  18. Enhanced Solar-to-Hydrogen Generation with Broadband Epsilon-Near-Zero Nanostructured Photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Yi

    2017-05-08

    The direct conversion of solar energy into fuels or feedstock is an attractive approach to address increasing demand of renewable energy sources. Photocatalytic systems relying on the direct photoexcitation of metals have been explored to this end, a strategy that exploits the decay of plasmonic resonances into hot carriers. An efficient hot carrier generation and collection requires, ideally, their generation to be enclosed within few tens of nanometers at the metal interface, but it is challenging to achieve this across the broadband solar spectrum. Here the authors demonstrate a new photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution based on metal epsilon-near-zero metamaterials. The authors have designed these to achieve broadband strong light confinement at the metal interface across the entire solar spectrum. Using electron energy loss spectroscopy, the authors prove that hot carriers are generated in a broadband fashion within 10 nm in this system. The resulting photocatalyst achieves a hydrogen production rate of 9.5 µmol h-1  cm-2 that exceeds, by a factor of 3.2, that of the best previously reported plasmonic-based photocatalysts for the dissociation of H2 with 50 h stable operation.

  19. Entry of Shiga toxin into cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvig, Kirsten; van Deurs, Bo

    1994-01-01

    Cellebiologi, Shiga toxin, receptors, glycolipids, endocytosis, trans-Golgi network, endoplasmic reticulum, retrograde transport......Cellebiologi, Shiga toxin, receptors, glycolipids, endocytosis, trans-Golgi network, endoplasmic reticulum, retrograde transport...

  20. Effects of anti-inflammatory drugs on fever and neutrophilia induced by Clostridium difficile toxin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Cardoso

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the ability of Clostridium difficile toxin B, isolated from the VPI 10463 strain, to induce fever and neutrophilia in rats. Intravenous injection of toxin B (0.005–0.5 μg/kg evoked a dose-dependent increase in body temperature. The febrile response to 0.5 μg/kg of the toxin started in 2.5 h, peaked at 5 h, and subsided fully within 24 h. Toxin B also induced a dosedependent neutrophilia. Pretreatment with indomethacin (2 mg/kg, i.p. did not affect the neutrophilia induced by toxin B, but significantly reduced the febrile response measured 4 to 8 h after toxin B injection. Dexamethasone (0.5 mg/ kg also markedly diminished the febrile response induced by toxin B. These results show that Clostridium difficile toxin B induced a febrile response susceptible to inhibition by dexamethasone and indomethacin. Furthermore, they suggest that prostaglandins are not involved in the neutrophilia caused by this toxin.

  1. Inhibition of cholera toxin and other AB toxins by polyphenolic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    All AB-type protein toxins have intracellular targets despite an initial extracellular location. These toxins use different methods to reach the cytosol and have different effects on the target cell. Broad-spectrum inhibitors against AB toxins are therefore hard to develop because the toxins use dif...

  2. Toxin synergism in snake venoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    Synergism between venom toxins exists for a range of snake species. Synergism can be derived from both intermolecular interactions and supramolecular interactions between venom components, and can be the result of toxins targeting the same protein, biochemical pathway or physiological process. Few...... simple systematic tools and methods for determining the presence of synergism exist, but include co-administration of venom components and assessment of Accumulated Toxicity Scores. A better understanding of how to investigate synergism in snake venoms may help unravel strategies for developing novel...

  3. Pneumothorax complicating botulinum toxin injection in the body of a dilated oesophagus in achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Samsom, Melvin; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is used for an increasing number of indications in the field of gastroenterology. We report a case in which injection of botulinum toxin in the dilated tubular oesophagus in a patient with achalasia was complicated by a pneumothorax necessitating suction drainage

  4. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of orofacial tardive dyskinesia : A single blind study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotema, Christina W.; van Harten, Peter N.; Bruggeman, Richard; Hoek, Hans W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Orofacial tardive dyskinesia (OTD) is difficult to treat and Botulinium Toxin A (BTA) may be an option. Methods: In a single blind (raters were blind) study (N= 12, duration 33 weeks) OTD was treated with Botulinum Toxin A in three consecutive sessions with increasing dosages. The

  5. No muscle involvement in myoclonus-dystonia caused by epsilon-sarcoglycan gene mutations1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermind, L.E.; Vissing, J.; Asmus, F.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the epsilon-sarcoglycan gene (SGCE) can cause autosomal dominant inherited myoclonus-dystonia (M-D). Defects in other sarcoglycans; alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta can cause autosomal recessive inherited limb girdle muscular dystrophies. epsilon- and alpha-sarcoglycans are very...... strength and mass showed no difference between M-D patients and controls. Our findings indicate that patients with M-D have no signs or symptoms of muscle disease. This suggests a different role of the sarcoglycan complex epsilonbetagammadelta versus alphabetagammadelta complex in humans, as earlier...

  6. The O(epsilon2) scaling law for dsigma/dt in the Reggeon field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, J.W.; Grandou, Thierry.

    1979-04-01

    The two loop contributions were calculated within the epsilon-expansion to the Reggeon Field Theory scaling law for dsigma/dt, derived using the renormalization group and a general renormalization point for the Pomeron propagator. This generalizes the O(epsilon) work of Abarbanel, Bartels, Bronzan, and Sidhu. The invariance of the results under certain coupling constant rescalings is demonstrated. Some qualitative comments were made regarding phenomenological applications. Our amplitude in a certain limit approximates the form of the low energy diffractive amplitude advocated by Kane

  7. Aitken extrapolation and epsilon algorithm for an accelerated solution of weakly singular nonlinear Volterra integral equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesgarani, H; Parmour, P; Aghazadeh, N

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we apply Aitken extrapolation and epsilon algorithm as acceleration technique for the solution of a weakly singular nonlinear Volterra integral equation of the second kind. In this paper, based on Tao and Yong (2006 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 324 225-37.) the integral equation is solved by Navot's quadrature formula. Also, Tao and Yong (2006) for the first time applied Richardson extrapolation to accelerating convergence for the weakly singular nonlinear Volterra integral equations of the second kind. To our knowledge, this paper may be the first attempt to apply Aitken extrapolation and epsilon algorithm for the weakly singular nonlinear Volterra integral equations of the second kind.

  8. Multiple groups of endogenous epsilon-like retroviruses conserved across primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine; Emes, Richard D; Tarlinton, Rachael E

    2014-11-01

    Several types of cancer in fish are caused by retroviruses, including those responsible for major outbreaks of disease, such as walleye dermal sarcoma virus and salmon swim bladder sarcoma virus. These viruses form a phylogenetic group often described as the epsilonretrovirus genus. Epsilon-like retroviruses have become endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) on several occasions, integrating into germ line cells to become part of the host genome, and sections of fish and amphibian genomes are derived from epsilon-like retroviruses. However, epsilon-like ERVs have been identified in very few mammals. We have developed a pipeline to screen full genomes for ERVs, and using this pipeline, we have located over 800 endogenous epsilon-like ERV fragments in primate genomes. Genomes from 32 species of mammals and birds were screened, and epsilon-like ERV fragments were found in all primate and tree shrew genomes but no others. These viruses appear to have entered the genome of a common ancestor of Old and New World monkeys between 42 million and 65 million years ago. Based on these results, there is an ancient evolutionary relationship between epsilon-like retroviruses and primates. Clearly, these viruses had the potential to infect the ancestors of primates and were at some point a common pathogen in these hosts. Therefore, this result raises questions about the potential of epsilonretroviruses to infect humans and other primates and about the evolutionary history of these retroviruses. Epsilonretroviruses are a group of retroviruses that cause several important diseases in fish. Retroviruses have the ability to become a permanent part of the DNA of their host by entering the germ line as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), where they lose their infectivity over time but can be recognized as retroviruses for millions of years. Very few mammals are known to have epsilon-like ERVs; however, we have identified over 800 fragments of endogenous epsilon-like ERVs in the genomes of all major

  9. The efficiency of subset selection of an epsilon-best uniform population relative to selection of the best one

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, van der P.

    1993-01-01

    Assume k (\\geq 2) uniform populations are given on (\\mu_i - ½, \\mu_i + ½) with location parameter \\mu_i \\in R^1, i = 1, ..., k. The best population is defined as the population with the largest value of the location parameter. In \\epsilon-best population (with \\epsilon \\geq 0) is a population with

  10. The constitution and crystallography of thin thermal oxide layers on epsilon-Fesub2Nsub1-x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graat, Peter C.J.; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2000-01-01

    Oxide layers formed on epsilon-Fe2N1-x were investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and in particular with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Prior to oxidation, the epsilon-Fe2N1-x substrates were either exposed to air at room temperature, or subject...

  11. Risk Assessment of Shellfish Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Munday

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex secondary metabolites, some of which are highly toxic to mammals, are produced by many marine organisms. Some of these organisms are important food sources for marine animals and, when ingested, the toxins that they produce may be absorbed and stored in the tissues of the predators, which then become toxic to animals higher up the food chain. This is a particular problem with shellfish, and many cases of poisoning are reported in shellfish consumers each year. At present, there is no practicable means of preventing uptake of the toxins by shellfish or of removing them after harvesting. Assessment of the risk posed by such toxins is therefore required in order to determine levels that are unlikely to cause adverse effects in humans and to permit the establishment of regulatory limits in shellfish for human consumption. In the present review, the basic principles of risk assessment are described, and the progress made toward robust risk assessment of seafood toxins is discussed. While good progress has been made, it is clear that further toxicological studies are required before this goal is fully achieved.

  12. Food irradiation and bacterial toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranter, H.S.; Modi, N.K.; Hambleton, P.; Melling, J.; Rose, S.; Stringer, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors' findings indicate that irradiation confers no advantage over heat processing in respect of bacterial toxins (clostridium botulinum, neurotoxin A and staphylococcal enterotoxin A). It follows that irradiation at doses less than the ACINF recommended upper limit of 10 kGy could not be used to improve the ambient temperature shelf life on non-acid foods. (author)

  13. Botulinum toxin for vaginismus treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Juliana Rocha; Souza, Renan Pedra

    2012-01-01

    Vaginismus is characterized by recurrent or persistent involuntary contraction of the perineal muscles surrounding the outer third of the vagina when penile, finger, tampon, or speculum penetration is attempted. Recent results have suggested the use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of vaginismus. Here, we assessed previously published data to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of botulinum toxin for vaginismus. We have carried out a systematic review followed by a meta-analysis. Our results indicate that botulinum toxin is an effective therapeutic option for patients with vaginismus (pooled odds ratio of 8.723 with 95% confidence interval limits of 1.942 and 39.162, p = 0.005). This may hold particularly true in treatment-refractory patients because most of the studies included in this meta-analysis have enrolled these subjects in their primary analysis. Botulinum toxin appears to bea reasonable intervention for vaginismus. However, this conclusion should be read carefully because of the deficiency of placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials and the quality issues presented in the existing ones.

  14. Shigella Sonnei and Shiga Toxin

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-07-28

    Katherine Lamba, an infectious disease epidemiologist with the California Department of Public Health, discusses Shiga Toxin producing Shigella sonnei.  Created: 7/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/28/2016.

  15. DMPD: Are the IKKs and IKK-related kinases TBK1 and IKK-epsilon similarly activated? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18353649 Are the IKKs and IKK-related kinases TBK1 and IKK-epsilon similarly activa...e IKKs and IKK-related kinases TBK1 and IKK-epsilon similarly activated? PubmedID... 18353649 Title Are the IKKs and IKK-related kinases TBK1 and IKK-epsilon similarly activated? Authors Chau

  16. Fidaxomicin Inhibits Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Mediated Enteritis in the Mouse Ileum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Hon Wai; Ho, Samantha; Hing, Tressia C.; Cheng, Michelle; Chen, Xinhua; Ichikawa, Yoshi; Kelly, Ciarán P.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common, debilitating infection with high morbidity and mortality. C. difficile causes diarrhea and intestinal inflammation by releasing two toxins, toxin A and toxin B. The macrolide antibiotic fidaxomicin was recently shown to be effective in treating CDI, and its beneficial effect was associated with fewer recurrent infections in CDI patients. Since other macrolides possess anti-inflammatory properties, we examined the possibility that fidaxomicin alters C. difficile toxin A-induced ileal inflammation in mice. The ileal loops of anesthetized mice were injected with fidaxomicin (5, 10, or 20 μM), and after 30 min, the loops were injected with purified C. difficile toxin A or phosphate-buffered saline alone. Four hours after toxin A administration, ileal tissues were processed for histological evaluation (epithelial cell damage, neutrophil infiltration, congestion, and edema) and cytokine measurements. C. difficile toxin A caused histologic damage, evidenced by increased mean histologic score and ileal interleukin-1β (IL-1β) protein and mRNA expression. Treatment with fidaxomicin (20 μM) or its primary metabolite, OP-1118 (120 μM), significantly inhibited toxin A-mediated histologic damage and reduced the mean histology score and ileal IL-1β protein and mRNA expression. Both fidaxomicin and OP-1118 reduced toxin A-induced cell rounding in human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts. Treatment of ileal loops with vancomycin (20 μM) and metronidazole (20 μM) did not alter toxin A-induced histologic damage and IL-1β protein expression. In addition to its well known antibacterial effects against C. difficile, fidaxomicin may possess anti-inflammatory activity directed against the intestinal effects of C. difficile toxins. PMID:24890583

  17. In-situ polymerization and characterization of poly ({epsilon} -caprolactone) urethane/ SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xiaodong; Zhou Nanqiao [National Engineering Research Center of Novel Equipment for Polymer Processing, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510640 (China); Zhang Hai [Guangzhou SCUT Bestry Technology Joint-stock Co. Ltd, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510640 (China)], E-mail: cxdzlgzhnlg2003@163.com

    2009-09-01

    Nanocomposites of poly({epsilon} -caprolactone) (PCL) castable polyurethane elastomer (CPUE) with nano-SiO{sub 2} particles of different surface properties were prepared via in-situ polymerization. An electronmechanical universal testing machine, a durometer, a rubber resilience experimental machine, a dynamic-mechanical analyzer, a thermogravimetric analysis and a scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the macro -static/dynamic mechanical properties, micro-dispersed state and thermostability. The results showed that the modulus at 100% and 300%, elongation at break, tensile strength and tear strength of poly({epsilon} -caprolactone) urethane nanocomposites were increased by introducing a certain amount of nano-SiO{sub 2}. Especially the tensile strength and tear strength at 100 deg. C of the PCL CPUE with 5% nano-SiO{sub 2} pretreated by {gamma}-glycidochloropropyl methyl trimethoxy silane (trade name A-187) were 1.50 and 1.94 times than those of the pure PCL CPUE, respectively. The addition of the nano-SiO{sub 2} had little effect on the hardness, but the impact resilience decreased slightly. The loss factor peaks of two nano-SiO{sub 2} polyurethane composites were higher obviously than the pure PCL CPUE and the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of the two nano-SiO{sub 2} polyurethane composites increased to higher temperature region. The surface treatment by the optimum silane coupling agent influenced the dispersibility of nano-SiO{sub 2} in the PCL CPUE distinctly. The agglomerating phenomenon, and even some nano-agglomerates with more than 1 {mu}m diameter can be observed in the PCL CPUE with 5% untreated nano-SiO{sub 2}, but the nano-SiO{sub 2} pretreated by A-187 was dispersed in the PCL CPUE at nano-scale.

  18. Chimeric immunoglobulin E reactive with tumor-associated antigen activates human Fc epsilon RI bearing cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Warnaar, S. O.; Schuurman, J.; Pasmans, S. G.; Latour, S.; Daëron, M.; Fleuren, G. J.; Litvinov, S. V.

    1997-01-01

    Crosslinking of immunoglobulin E molecules that are bound to the Fc epsilon receptors expressed on mast cells or basophils triggers activation of these cells, resulting in the development of a type I hypersensitivity. Targeting this potent immune reaction towards tumors by using IgE that reacts with

  19. Peripheral nerve regeneration through P(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Dunnen, WFA; Meek, MF; Robinson, PH; Schakernraad, JM

    1998-01-01

    P(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides can be used perfectly for short nerve gaps in rats, and are even better than short autologous nerve grafts. The tube dimensions, such as the internal diameter and wall thickness, are very important for the final outcome of peripheral nerve regeneration, as well as the

  20. The Use of Visual Approach in Teaching and Learning the Epsilon-Delta Definition of Continuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pešic, Duška; Pešic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new collaborative technique in teaching and learning the epsilon-delta definition of a continuous function at the point from its domain, which connects mathematical logic, combinatorics and calculus. This collaborative approach provides an opportunity for mathematical high school students to engage in mathematical…

  1. The initial oxidation of epsilon-Fesub2Nsub1-x: growth kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graat, Peter C.J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    1999-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of epsilon-Fe2N1-x, subjected either to a sputter cleaning pretreatment or a sputter cleaning and an additional annealing pretreatment, at P-O2 = 1 x 10(-4) Pa and at temperatures ranging from 300 to 500 K, was investigated with ellipsometry. The initial oxidation rate of s...

  2. 1/N expansions in P(phi2)sub(4-epsilon) theory. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symanzik, K.

    1977-01-01

    1/N expansions in O(N) invariant one-scale massless P(phi vector 2 )4-epsilon theory are derived for finite and infinite bare coupling constant. Since superficially relevant (phi vector 2 )sup(m), m >= 3, interactions can hereby be transformed into interactions irrelevant for large-distance behaviour, the scale-invariant limit theory is universal. (orig.) [de

  3. Selective Inhibition of Casein Kinase 1 epsilon Minimally Alters Circadian Clock Period

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Walton, K. M.; Fisher, K.; Rubitski, D.; Marconi, M.; Meng, Q.-J.; Sládek, Martin; Adams, J.; Bass, M.; Chandrasekaran, R.; Butler, T.; Griffor, M.; Rajamohan, F.; Serpa, M.; Chen, Y.; Claffey, M.; Hastings, M.; Loudon, A.; Maywood, E.; Ohren, J.; Doran, A.; Wager, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 330, č. 2 (2009), s. 430-439 ISSN 0022-3565 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : circadian clock * casein kinase 1 epsilon * inhibitor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.093, year: 2009

  4. Meniscal tissue regeneration in porous 50/50 copoly(L-lactide/epsilon-caprolactone) implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, J. H.; Zijlstra, F. M.; Kuipers, HW; Pennings, A. J.; Veth, RPH; Jansen, HWB

    Porous materials of a high-molecular-weight 50/50 copolymer of L-lactide and epsilon-caprolactone with different compression moduli were used for meniscal repair. In contrast to the previously used 4,4'-diphenylmethane and 1,6-trans-cyclohexane diisocyanates containing polyurethanes, degradation

  5. Using contour plots in elecgroproduction to examine regions in {epsilon}, Q{sup 2}, W space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funsten, H. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    In determining incident CEBAF beam energies for CLAS electroproduction experiments that separate the longitudinal and transverse cross section components, contour plots of {epsilon} defined over a 2 dimensional Q{sup 2}, W space can be useful. This note describes an approximate method of constructing such plots.

  6. Evaluation of Rapid, Early Warning Approaches to Track Shellfish Toxins Associated with Dinophysis and Alexandrium Blooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa K. Hattenrath-Lehmann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine biotoxin-contaminated seafood has caused thousands of poisonings worldwide this century. Given these threats, there is an increasing need for improved technologies that can be easily integrated into coastal monitoring programs. This study evaluates approaches for monitoring toxins associated with recurrent toxin-producing Alexandrium and Dinophysis blooms on Long Island, NY, USA, which cause paralytic and diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (PSP and DSP, respectively. Within contrasting locations, the dynamics of pelagic Alexandrium and Dinophysis cell densities, toxins in plankton, and toxins in deployed blue mussels (Mytilus edulis were compared with passive solid-phase adsorption toxin tracking (SPATT samplers filled with two types of resin, HP20 and XAD-2. Multiple species of wild shellfish were also collected during Dinophysis blooms and used to compare toxin content using two different extraction techniques (single dispersive and double exhaustive and two different toxin analysis assays (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and the protein phosphatase inhibition assay (PP2A for the measurement of DSP toxins. DSP toxins measured in the HP20 resin were significantly correlated (R2 = 0.7–0.9, p < 0.001 with total DSP toxins in shellfish, but were detected more than three weeks prior to detection in deployed mussels. Both resins adsorbed measurable levels of PSP toxins, but neither quantitatively tracked Alexandrium cell densities, toxicity in plankton or toxins in shellfish. DSP extraction and toxin analysis methods did not differ significantly (p > 0.05, were highly correlated (R2 = 0.98–0.99; p < 0.001 and provided complete recovery of DSP toxins from standard reference materials. Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis and ribbed mussels (Geukensia demissa were found to accumulate DSP toxins above federal and international standards (160 ng g−1 during Dinophysis blooms while Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica and soft shell clams (Mya

  7. The cyanobacteria toxins, microcystins – emerging risks to human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialysis patients appear to be at increased risk for exposure to cyanobacteria toxins; episodes of microcystin (MCYST) exposure via dialysate during 1996 and 2001 have been previously reported. During 2001, as many as 44 renal insufficiency patients were exposed to contaminated d...

  8. Temperature Effects Explain Continental Scale Distribution of Cyanobacterial Toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantzouki, Evanthia; Lürling, Miquel; Fastner, Jutta; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette; Wilk-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Koreivienė, Judita; Seelen, Laura; Teurlincx, Sven; Verstijnen, Yvon; Krztoń, Wojciech; Walusiak, Edward; Karosienė, Jūratė; Kasperovičienė, Jūratė; Savadova, Ksenija; Vitonytė, Irma; Cillero-Castro, Carmen; Budzyńska, Agnieszka; Goldyn, Ryszard; Kozak, Anna; Rosińska, Joanna; Szeląg-Wasielewska, Elżbieta; Domek, Piotr; Jakubowska-Krepska, Natalia; Kwasizur, Kinga; Messyasz, Beata; Pełechaty, Aleksandra; Pełechaty, Mariusz; Kokocinski, Mikolaj; García-Murcia, Ana; Real, Monserrat; Romans, Elvira; Noguero-Ribes, Jordi; Duque, David Parreño; Fernández-Morán, Elísabeth; Karakaya, Nusret; Häggqvist, Kerstin; Demir, Nilsun; Beklioğlu, Meryem; Filiz, Nur; Levi, Eti E.; Iskin, Uğur; Bezirci, Gizem; Tavşanoğlu, Ülkü Nihan; Özhan, Koray; Gkelis, Spyros; Panou, Manthos; Fakioglu, Özden; Avagianos, Christos; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; Çelik, Kemal; Yilmaz, Mete; Marcé, Rafael; Catalán, Nuria; Bravo, Andrea G.; Buck, Moritz; Colom-Montero, William; Mustonen, Kristiina; Pierson, Don; Yang, Yang; Raposeiro, Pedro M.; Gonçalves, Vítor; Antoniou, Maria G.; Tsiarta, Nikoletta; McCarthy, Valerie; Perello, Victor C.; Feldmann, Tõnu; Laas, Alo; Panksep, Kristel; Tuvikene, Lea; Gagala, Ilona; Mankiewicz-Boczek, Joana; Yağcı, Meral Apaydın; Çınar, Şakir; Çapkın, Kadir; Yağcı, Abdulkadir; Cesur, Mehmet; Bilgin, Fuat; Bulut, Cafer; Uysal, Rahmi; Obertegger, Ulrike; Boscaini, Adriano; Flaim, Giovanna; Salmaso, Nico; Cerasino, Leonardo; Richardson, Jessica; Visser, Petra M; Verspagen, Jolanda M. H.; Karan, Tünay; Soylu, Elif Neyran; Maraşlıoğlu, Faruk; Napiórkowska-Krzebietke, Agnieszka; Ochocka, Agnieszka; Pasztaleniec, Agnieszka; Antão-Geraldes, Ana M.; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Morais, João; Vale, Micaela; Köker, Latife; Akçaalan, Reyhan; Albay, Meriç; Špoljarić Maronić, Dubravka; Stević, Filip; Žuna Pfeiffer, Tanja; Fonvielle, Jeremy; Straile, Dietmar; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo; Bláha, Luděk; Geriš, Rodan; Fránková, Markéta; Koçer, Mehmet Ali Turan; Alp, Mehmet Tahir; Remec-Rekar, Spela; Elersek, Tina; Triantis, Theodoros; Zervou, Sevasti-Kiriaki; Hiskia, Anastasia; Haande, Sigrid; Skjelbred, Birger; Madrecka, Beata; Nemova, Hana; Drastichova, Iveta; Chomova, Lucia; Edwards, Christine; Sevindik, Tuğba Ongun; Tunca, Hatice; Önem, Burçin; Aleksovski, Boris; Krstić, Svetislav; Vucelić, Itana Bokan; Nawrocka, Lidia; Salmi, Pauliina; Machado-Vieira, Danielle; de Oliveira, Alinne Gurjão; Delgado-Martín, Jordi; García-García, David; Cereijo, Jose Luís; Gomà, Joan; Trapote, Mari Carmen; Vegas-Vilarrúbia, Teresa; Obrador, Biel; Grabowska, Magdalena; Karpowicz, Maciej; Chmura, Damian; Úbeda, Bárbara; Gálvez, José Ángel; Özen, Arda; Christoffersen, Kirsten Seestern; Warming, Trine Perlt; Kobos, Justyna; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Pérez-Martínez, Carmen; Ramos-Rodríguez, Eloísa; Arvola, Lauri; Alcaraz-Párraga, Pablo; Toporowska, Magdalena; Pawlik-Skowronska, Barbara; Niedźwiecki, Michał; Pęczuła, Wojciech; Leira, Manel; Hernández, Armand; Moreno-Ostos, Enrique; Blanco, José María; Rodríguez, Valeriano; Montes-Pérez, Jorge Juan; Palomino, Roberto L.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Estela; Carballeira, Rafael; Camacho, Antonio; Picazo, Antonio; Rochera, Carlos; Santamans, Anna C.; Ferriol, Carmen; Romo, Susana; Soria, Juan Miguel; Dunalska, Julita; Sieńska, Justyna; Szymański, Daniel; Kruk, Marek; Kostrzewska-Szlakowska, Iwona; Jasser, Iwona; Žutinić, Petar; Gligora Udovič, Marija; Plenković-Moraj, Anđelka; Frąk, Magdalena; Bańkowska-Sobczak, Agnieszka; Wasilewicz, Michał; Özkan, Korhan; Maliaka, Valentini; Kangro, Kersti; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Paerl, Hans W.; Carey, Cayelan C.; Ibelings, Bas W.

    2018-01-01

    Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and

  9. Bupivacaine and botulinum toxin to treat comitant strabismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Moreira Hopker

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the change in ocular motility and muscle thickness measured with ultrasonography after intramuscular injection of bupivacaine and botulinum toxin A. METHODS: Eight patients (five female were enrolled to measure ocular motility prior and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after one injection of 2 ml of 1.5% bupivacaine and 2.5 U of botulinum toxin A in agonist and antagonist muscles, respectively, of eight amblyopic eyes. Muscle thickness was measured prior and on days 1, 7 and 30 after injection using 10-MHz ultrasonography (eyelid technique. RESULTS: Mean change in alignment was 10 prism diopters after 180 days (n=6. An average increase of 1.01 mm in muscle thickness was observed after 30 days of bupivacaine injection and 0.28 mm increase was observed after botulinum toxin A injection, as measured by ultrasonography. Lateral rectus muscles injected with bupivacaine had a mean increase of 1.5 mm in muscle thickness. CONCLUSION: In this study, a change in ocular motility was observed after 180 days of intramuscular injection of bupivacaine and botulinum toxin in horizontal extraocular muscles. Overall, there was an increase of muscle thickness in both botulinum toxinum A and bupivacaine injected muscles after 30 days of injection when measured by ultrasonography. This change was more pronounced on lateral rectus muscles after bupivacaine injection.

  10. Redundant role of protein kinase C delta and epsilon during mouse embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carracedo

    Full Text Available Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon are mediators of important cellular events, such as cell proliferation, migration or apoptosis. The formation of blood vessels, i.e., vasculo- and angiogenesis, is a process where these isoforms have also been shown to participate. However, mice deficient in either Protein Kinase C delta or epsilon are viable and therefore their individual contribution to the formation of the vasculature appeared so far dispensable. In this study, we show that double null mutation of Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon causes embryonic lethality at approximately E9.5. At this stage, whole mount staining of the endothelial marker CD31 in double null embryos revealed defective blood vessel formation. Moreover, culture of double deficient mouse allantois showed impaired endothelial cell organization, and analyses of double deficient embryo sections showed dilated vessels, decreased endothelial-specific adherent junctions, and decreased contact of endothelial cells with mural cells. Protein kinase C delta and epsilon also appeared essential for vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation, since α-smooth muscle actin, a classical marker for vascular smooth muscle cells, was almost undetectable in double deficient embryonic aorta at E9.5. Subsequent qPCR analyses showed decreased VE-cadherin, Vegfr2, Cd31, Cdh2, Ets1, and Fli-1, among other angiogenesis related transcripts in double deficient embryos. Taken together, these data suggest for the first time an in vivo redundant role between members of the novel Protein Kinase C subfamily that allows for mutual compensation during mouse embryonic development, with vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as an obvious common function of these two Protein Kinase Cs. Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon might therefore be useful targets for inhibiting vasculo- and/or angiogenesis.

  11. Uremic Toxins Enhance Statin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Differentiated Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Uchiyama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The risk of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis is considerably increased in statin users with end-stage renal failure (ESRF. Uremic toxins, which accumulate in patients with ESRF, exert cytotoxic effects that are mediated by various mechanisms. Therefore, accumulation of uremic toxins might increase statin-induced cytotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of four uremic toxins—hippuric acid, 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionate, indole-3-acetic acid, and 3-indoxyl sulfate—on statin-induced myopathy. Differentiated rhabdomyosarcoma cells were pre-treated with the uremic toxins for seven days, and then the cells were treated with pravastatin or simvastatin. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by viability assays and flow cytometry. Pre-treatment with uremic toxins increased statin- but not cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. In addition, the pre-treatment increased statin-induced apoptosis, which is one of the cytotoxic factors (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. However, mevalonate, farnesol, and geranylgeraniol reversed the effects of uremic toxins and lowered statin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. These results demonstrate that uremic toxins enhance statin-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity. The mechanism underlying this effect might be associated with small G-protein geranylgeranylation. In conclusion, the increased severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in patients with ESRF is likely due to the accumulation of uremic toxins.

  12. Why do we study animal toxins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Venom (toxins) is an important trait evolved along the evolutionary tree of animals. Our knowledges on venoms, such as their origins and loss, the biological relevance and the coevolutionary patterns with other organisms are greatly helpful in understanding many fundamental biological questions, i.e., the environmental adaptation and survival competition, the evolution shaped development and balance of venoms, and the sophisticated correlations among venom, immunity, body power, intelligence, their genetic basis, inherent association, as well as the cost-benefit and trade-offs of biological economy. Lethal animal envenomation can be found worldwide. However, from foe to friend, toxin studies have led lots of important discoveries and exciting avenues in deciphering and fighting human diseases, including the works awarded the Nobel Prize and lots of key clinic therapeutics. According to our survey, so far, only less than 0.1% of the toxins of the venomous animals in China have been explored. We emphasize on the similarities shared by venom and immune systems, as well as the studies of toxin knowledge-based physiological toxin-like proteins/peptides (TLPs). We propose the natural pairing hypothesis. Evolution links toxins with humans. Our mission is to find out the right natural pairings and interactions of our body elements with toxins, and with endogenous toxin-like molecules. Although, in nature, toxins may endanger human lives, but from a philosophical point of view, knowing them well is an effective way to better understand ourselves. So, this is why we study toxins. PMID:26228472

  13. Specificity and combinatorial effects of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins in the context of GMO environmental risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eHilbeck

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stacked GM crops expressing up to six Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis are today replacing the formerly grown single- transgene GM crop varieties. Stacking of multiple Cry toxins not only increase the environmental load of toxins but also raise the question on how possible interactions of the toxins can be assessed for risk assessment, which is mandatory for GM crops. However, no operational guidelines for a testing strategy or testing procedures exist. From the developers point of view, little data testing for combinatorial effects of Cry toxins is necessary as the range of affected organisms is focused on pest species and no evidence is claimed to exists pointing to combinatorial effects on nontarget organisms. We have examined this rationale critically using information reported in the scientific literature. To do so we address the hypothesis of narrow specificity of Cry toxins subdivided into three underlying different conceptual conditions i 'efficacy' in target pests as indicator for 'narrow specificity', ii lack of reported adverse effects of Cry toxins on nontarget organisms, and iii proposed modes of action of Cry toxins (or the lack thereof as mechanisms underlying the reported activity/efficacy/specificity of Cry toxins. Complementary to this information we evaluate reports about outcomes of combinatorial effect testing of Cry toxins in the scientific literature and relate those findings to the practice of the environmental risk assessment of Bt-corps in general and of stacked Bt-events in particular.

  14. Evaluation of the side effects of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanocapsules containing atrazine towards maize plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Halley; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia; Sousa, Gustavo; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo; Fraceto, Leonardo

    2015-10-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been used as a carrier system for the herbicide atrazine, which is commonly applied to maize. We demonstrated previously that these atrazine containing polymeric nanocapsules were ten-fold more effective in the control of mustard plants (a target species), as compared to a commercial atrazine formulation. Since atrazine can have adverse effects on non-target crops, here we analyzed the effect of encapsulated atrazine on growth, physiological and oxidative stress parameters of soil-grown maize plants (Zea mays L.). One day after the post-emergence treatment with PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine (1 mg mL-1), maize plants presented 15 and 21 % decreases in maximum quantum yield of photosystem II and in net CO2 assimilation rate, respectively, as compared to water-sprayed plants. The same treatment led to a 1.8-fold increase in leaf lipid peroxidation in comparison with control plants. However, all of these parameters were unaffected four and eight days after the application of encapsulated atrazine. These results suggested that the negative effects of atrazine were transient, probably due to the ability of maize plants to detoxify the herbicide. When encapsulated atrazine was applied at a ten-fold lower concentration (0.1 mg mL-1), a dosage that is still effective for weed control, no effects were detected even shortly after application. Regardless of the herbicide concentration, neither pre- nor post-emergence treatment with the PCL nanocapsules carrying atrazine resulted in the development of any macroscopic symptoms in maize leaves, and there were no impacts on shoot growth. Additionally, no effects were observed when plants were sprayed with PCL nanocapsules without atrazine. Overall, these results suggested that the use of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine did not lead to persistent side effects in maize plants, and that the technique could offer a safe tool for weed control without affecting crop growth.

  15. Evaluation of the side effects of poly(epsilon-caprolactone nanocapsules containing atrazine towards maize plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halley Caixeta Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly(epsilon-caprolactone (PCL nanocapsules have been used as a carrier system for the herbicide atrazine, which is commonly applied to maize. We demonstrated previously that these atrazine containing polymeric nanocapsules were ten-fold more effective in the control of mustard plants (a target species, as compared to a commercial atrazine formulation. Since atrazine can have adverse effects on non-target crops, here we analyzed the effect of encapsulated atrazine on growth, physiological and oxidative stress parameters of soil-grown maize plants (Zea mays L.. One day after the post-emergence treatment with PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine (1 mg mL-1, maize plants presented 15 and 21 % decreases in maximum quantum yield of photosystem II and in net CO2 assimilation rate, respectively, as compared to water-sprayed plants. The same treatment led to a 1.8-fold increase in leaf lipid peroxidation in comparison with control plants. However, all of these parameters were unaffected four and eight days after the application of encapsulated atrazine. These results suggested that the negative effects of atrazine were transient, probably due to the ability of maize plants to detoxify the herbicide. When encapsulated atrazine was applied at a ten-fold lower concentration (0.1 mg mL-1, a dosage that is still effective for weed control, no effects were detected even shortly after application. Regardless of the herbicide concentration, neither pre- nor post-emergence treatment with the PCL nanocapsules carrying atrazine resulted in the development of any macroscopic symptoms in maize leaves, and there were no impacts on shoot growth. Additionally, no effects were observed when plants were sprayed with PCL nanocapsules without atrazine. Overall, these results suggested that the use of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine did not lead to persistent side effects in maize plants, and that the technique could offer a safe tool for weed control without affecting

  16. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin modulates skin host response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Lianghua; Kim, Byung Eui; Brauweiler, Anne; Goleva, Elena; Streib, Joanne; Ji, Yinduo; Schlievert, Patrick M; Leung, Donald Y M

    2012-09-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) with a history of eczema herpeticum have increased staphylococcal colonization and infections. However, whether Staphylococcus aureus alters the outcome of skin viral infection has not been determined. We investigated whether S aureus toxins modulated host response to herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and vaccinia virus (VV) infections in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) and in murine infection models. NHKs were treated with S aureus toxins before incubation of viruses. BALB/c mice were inoculated with S aureus 2 days before VV scarification. Viral loads of HSV-1 and VV were evaluated by using real-time PCR, a viral plaque-forming assay, and immunofluorescence staining. Small interfering RNA duplexes were used to knockdown the gene expression of the cellular receptor of α-toxin, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). ADAM10 protein and α-toxin heptamers were detected by using Western blot assays. We demonstrate that sublytic staphylococcal α-toxin increases viral loads of HSV-1 and VV in NHKs. Furthermore, we demonstrate in vivo that the VV load is significantly greater (P skin inoculated with an α-toxin-producing S aureus strain compared with murine skin inoculated with the isogenic α-toxin-deleted strain. The viral enhancing effect of α-toxin is mediated by ADAM10 and is associated with its pore-forming property. Moreover, we demonstrate that α-toxin promotes viral entry in NHKs. The current study introduces the novel concept that staphylococcal α-toxin promotes viral skin infection and provides a mechanism by which S aureus infection might predispose the host toward disseminated viral infections. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clostridium difficile chimeric toxin receptor binding domain vaccine induced protection against different strains in active and passive challenge models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing-Hui; Glenn, Gregory; Flyer, David; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Ye; Sullivan, Eddie; Wu, Hua; Cummings, James F; Elllingsworth, Larry; Smith, Gale

    2017-07-24

    Clostridium difficile is the number one cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea in developed countries. Historically, pathogenesis was attributed two homologous glucosylating toxins, toxin-A (TcdA) and toxin-B (TcdB). Over the past decade, however, highly virulent epidemic strains of C. difficile (B1/NAP1/027) have emerged and are linked to an increase in morbidity and mortality. Increased virulence is attributed to multiple factors including: increased production of A- and B-toxins; production of binary toxin (CDT); and the emergence of more toxic TcdB variants (TcdB (027) ). TcdB (027) is more cytotoxicity to cells; causes greater tissue damage and toxicity in animals; and is antigenically distinct from historical TcdB (TcdB (003) ). Broadly protective vaccines and therapeutic antibody strategies, therefore, may target TcdA, TcdB variants and CDT. To facilitate the generation of multivalent toxin-based C. difficile vaccines and therapeutic antibodies, we have generated fusion proteins constructed from the receptor binding domains (RBD) of TcdA, TcdB (003) , TcdB (027) and CDT. Herein, we describe the development of a trivalent toxin (T-toxin) vaccine (CDTb/TcdB (003) /TcdA) and quadravalent toxin (Q-toxin) vaccine (CDTb/TcB (003) /TcdA/TcdB (027) ) fusion proteins that retain the protective toxin neutralizing epitopes. Active immunization of mice or hamsters with T-toxin or Q-toxin fusion protein vaccines elicited the generation of toxin neutralizing antibodies to each of the toxins. Hamsters immunized with the Q-toxin vaccine were broadly protected against spore challenge with historical C. difficile 630 (toxinotype 0/ribotype 003) and epidemic NAP1 (toxinotype III/ribotype 027) strains. Fully human polyclonal antitoxin IgG was produced by immunization of transgenic bovine with these fusion proteins. In passive transfer studies, mice were protected against lethal toxin challenge. Hamsters treated with human antitoxin IgG were completely protected when

  18. 14-3-3epsilon contributes to tumour suppression in laryngeal carcinoma by affecting apoptosis and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong; Xu, Zhen-Ming; Shang, Chao; Sun, Kai-Lai; Fu, Wei-Neng

    2010-01-01

    14-3-3epsilon regulates a wide range of biological processes, including cell cycle control, proliferation, and apoptosis, and plays a significant role in neurogenesis and the formation of malignant tumours. However, the exact function and regulatory mechanism of 14-3-3epsilon in carcinogenesis have not been elucidated. The expression of 14-3-3epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR and western blotting. The invasiveness and viability of Hep-2 cells were determined by the transwell migration assay and MTT assay, respectively. Cell cycle and apoptosis of Hep-2 cells were detected by flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein expression of 14-3-3epsilon in larynx squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissues were significantly lower than those in clear surgical margin tissues. Statistical analysis showed that the 14-3-3epsilon protein level in metastatic lymph nodes was lower than that in paired tumour tissues. In addition, the protein level of 14-3-3epsilon in stage III or IV tumours was significantly lower than that in stage I or II tumours. Compared with control Hep-2 cells, the percentages of viable cells in the 14-3-3epsilon-GFP and negative control GFP groups were 36.68 ± 14.09% and 71.68 ± 12.10%, respectively. The proportions of S phase were 22.47 ± 3.36%, 28.17 ± 3.97% and 46.15 ± 6.82%, and the apoptotic sub-G1 populations were 1.23 ± 1.02%, 2.92 ± 1.59% and 13.72 ± 3.89% in the control, negative control GFP and 14-3-3epsilon-GFP groups, respectively. The percentages of the apoptotic cells were 0.84 ± 0.25%, 1.08 ± 0.24% and 2.93 ± 0.13% in the control, negative control GFP and 14-3-3epsilon-GFP groups, respectively. The numbers of cells that penetrated the filter membrane in the control, negative control GFP and 14-3-3epsilon-GFP groups were 20.65 ± 1.94, 17.63 ± 1.04 and 9.1 ± 0.24, respectively, indicating significant differences among the different groups. Decreased expression of 14-3-3epsilon in LSCC tissues contributes to the initiation and progression of LSCC

  19. Effect of High Pressure and Heat on Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Margosch

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though the inactivation of microorganisms by high pressure treatment is a subject of intense investigations, the effect of high pressure on bacterial toxins has not been studied so far. In this study, the influence of combined pressure/temperature treatment (0.1 to 800 MPa and 5 to 121 °C on bacterial enterotoxins was determined. Therefore, heat-stable enterotoxin (STa of cholera toxin (CT from Vibrio cholerae, staphylococcal enterotoxins A-E, haemolysin BL (HBL from Bacillus cereus, and Escherichia coli (STa were subjected to different treatment schemes. Structural alterations were monitored in enzyme immunoassays (EIAs. Cytotoxicity of the pressure treated supernatant of toxigenic B. cereus DSM 4384 was investigated with Vero cells. High pressure of 200 to 800 MPa at 5 °C leads to a slight increase of the reactivity of the STa of E. coli. However, reactivity decreased at 800 MPa and 80 °C to (66±21 % after 30 min and to (44±0.3 % after 128 min. At ambient pressure no decrease in EIA reactivity could be observed after 128 min. Pressurization (0.1 to 800 MPa of heat stable monomeric staphylococcal toxins at 5 and 20 °C showed no effect. A combined heat (80 °C and pressure (0.1 to 800 MPa treatment lead to a decrease in the immuno-reactivity to 20 % of its maximum. For cholera toxin a significant loss in latex agglutination was observable only at 80 °C and 800 MPa for holding times higher than 20 min. Interestingly, the immuno-reactivity of B. cereus HBL toxin increased with the increase of pressure (182 % at 800 MPa, 30 °C, and high pressure showed only minor effects on cytotoxicity to Vero cells. Our results indicate that pressurization can increase inactivation observed by heat treatment, and combined treatments may be effective at lower temperatures and/or shorter incubation time.

  20. Investigation of inactivation of Clostridium botulinum toxin by nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaltenhaeuser, A.; Werner, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of nuclear radiation on the toxicity and the molecular structure of the toxin produced by the microorganism Clostridium botulinum type A was investigated. The radiation induced changes in the structure of the toxin molecule. This effect is influenced by the composition or the medium above the toxin solution as well as by the temperature during the irradiation. The results of the investigation indicate that with increasing irradiation dose a new molecule was formed with immunological properties similar to the properties of the original molecule however with a greater molecular weight. After exposure to a radiation dose of 3,4 Mrad at normal temperature in air, complete detoxification of the substance was found. Immunizing experiments with the toxoid with two guinea-pigs indicated a pronounced increase of the antibody titer in the serum after 4 weeks. Vaccination experiments with the toxoid on animals show, that the protection against the effect of the toxin corresponds to the demands of the European Pharmacopoeia. The efficiency of the toxoid shows a similar efficiency as toxoids produced by chemical methods. The production of a toxoid-viccine with the relatively simple method of nuclear radiation appears possible. (orig./MG) With 12 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs [de

  1. Computational Studies of Snake Venom Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Paola G. Ojeda; David Ramírez; Jans Alzate-Morales; Julio Caballero; Quentin Kaas; Wendy González

    2017-01-01

    Most snake venom toxins are proteins, and participate to envenomation through a diverse array of bioactivities, such as bleeding, inflammation, and pain, cytotoxic, cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects. The venom of a single snake species contains hundreds of toxins, and the venoms of the 725 species of venomous snakes represent a large pool of potentially bioactive proteins. Despite considerable discovery efforts, most of the snake venom toxins are still uncharacterized. Modern bioinformatics t...

  2. Collaborative Research Program on Seafood Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-14

    Crystallographic Structures of Saxitoxins Cl and C2 Appendix C: Collaborative Research Program an Seafcod Toxins Progress Report on Ciguatera and Related...radioimmunoassay for PSP were also evalumted. The Hokama stick test for ciguatera toxin was also evaluated. 4. initiate Studies on the Accumulation...tco•d which caie a form of b-mnn poisoning referred to as ciguatera . The respcnsible toxins originate from ll1ular rine algae of the division

  3. Genotoxicity and potential carcinogenicity of cyanobacterial toxins - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegura, Bojana; Straser, Alja; Filipič, Metka

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms has increased significantly in many regions of the world in the last century due to water eutrophication. These blooms are hazardous to humans, animals, and plants due to the production of cyanotoxins, which can be classified in five different groups: hepatotoxins, neurotoxins, cytotoxins, dermatotoxins, and irritant toxins (lipopolysaccharides). There is evidence that certain cyanobacterial toxins are genotoxic and carcinogenic; however, the mechanisms of their potential carcinogenicity are not well understood. The most frequently occurring and widespread cyanotoxins in brackish and freshwater blooms are the cyclic heptapeptides, i.e., microcystins (MCs), and the pentapeptides, i.e., nodularins (NODs). The main mechanism associated with potential carcinogenic activity of MCs and NOD is the inhibition of protein phosphatases, which leads to the hyperphosphorylation of cellular proteins, which is considered to be associated with their tumor-promoting activity. Apart from this, MCs and NOD induce increased formation of reactive oxygen species and, consequently, oxidative DNA damage. There is also evidence that MCs and NOD induce micronuclei, and NOD was shown to have aneugenic activity. Both cyanotoxins interfere with DNA damage repair pathways, which, along with DNA damage, is an important factor involved in the carcinogenicity of these agents. Furthermore, these toxins increase the expression of TNF-α and early-response genes, including proto-oncogenes, genes involved in the response to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Rodent studies indicate that MCs and NOD are tumor promotors, whereas NOD is thought to have also tumor-initiating activity. Another cyanobacterial toxin, cylindrospermopsin (CYN), which has been neglected for a long time, is lately being increasingly found in the freshwater environment. The principal mechanism of its toxicity is the irreversible inhibition of protein synthesis. It is pro

  4. Failure of botulinum toxin injection for neurogenic detrusor overactivity: Switch of toxin versus second injection of the same toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronnet, Benoit; Castel-Lacanal, Evelyne; Manunta, Andréa; Roumiguié, Mathieu; Marque, Philippe; Rischmann, Pascal; Gamé, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a second injection of the same toxin versus switching to a different botulinum toxin A after failure of a first detrusor injection in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The charts of all patients who underwent detrusor injections of botulinum toxin A (either abobotulinumtoxinA or onabotulinumtoxinA) for the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Patients in whom a first detrusor injection had failed were included in the present study. They were managed by a second injection of the same toxin at the same dosage or by a new detrusor injection using a different botulinum toxin A. Success was defined as a resolution of urgency, urinary incontinence and detrusor overactivity in a patient self-catheterizing seven times or less per 24 h. A total of 58 patients were included for analysis. A toxin switch was carried out in 29 patients, whereas the other 29 patients received a reinjection of the same toxin at the same dose. The success rate was higher in patients who received a toxin switch (51.7% vs. 24.1%, P = 0.03). Patients treated with a switch from abobotulinumtoxinA to onabotulinumtoxinA and those treated with a switch from onabotulinumtoxinA to abobotulinumtoxinA had similar success rates (52.9% vs. 50%, P = 0.88). After failure of a first detrusor injection of botulinum toxin for neurogenic detrusor overactivity, a switch to a different toxin seems to be more effective than a second injection of the same toxin. The replacement of onabotulinumtoxin by abobotulinumtoxin or the reverse provides similar results. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  5. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with the cell membrane. This involves a large number (17 million per cell) of high affinity binding sites which belong to a single class. Binding of biologically active 125 I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected in the isolated cells. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) of the enterocytes to cholera toxin is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels at steady stae. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl - -independent Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorporomazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na + entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na + influx into the enterocytes provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT and Na + during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na + but no Cl - influx in our villus cell preparation can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na + /H + neutral exchange system

  6. Phenomenological quantum electrodynamics when epsilonμ=l: Theory and some applications including the Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevik, I.

    1983-01-01

    The canonical quantum theory for an electromagnetic field within an isotropic nondispersive medium, whose permittivity, epsilon, and permeability μ satisfy the condition epsilonμ=1, is developed. This condition is found to simplify the electromagnetic formalism considerably and is of interest not only to quantum electrodynamics (QED) but also to quantum chromodynamics (QDC) in view of the formal analogy existing between these two theories to the zero-order in the gauge coupling constant. After giving a survey of the general formalism, this paper discusses appropriate modifications of known experiments in optics: the Ashkin-Dziedzic pressure experiment (1973), the Barlow experiment (1912), and the levitation experiment of Ashkin (1970) and others. Finally, a calculation is given of Casimir (i.e., zero-point) surface force acting on one of two spherical interfaces separating three media from each other, under certain simplifying conditions

  7. Application of a k-epsilon closure to a heated turbulent offset jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, G.; Kumar, R.; Liburdy, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The complex flow which occurs when a heated turbulent jet discharges above a cool, isothermal surface was investigated numerically. This flow is influenced by significant flow curvature, buoyancy, impingement, and recirculation. The main features of the flow have been characterized in the literature by the exit Reynolds number and offset ratio. It is the purpose of this study to assess the applicability of a modified k-epsilon closure model to this flow. Comparisons with limited data for the unheated case and flow predictions for the heated case are presented. The impingement distance is determined to within 2 percent of the experimental results. However, detailed velocity profiles are not well predicted near the wall. Curvature modification and the wall boundary condition for epsilon significantly affect the solution. 15 references

  8. The study of microstrip electromagnetic properties and method of measuring {epsilon} sub r

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Ali, Wan Khairuddin [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    1994-12-31

    Equivalent circuits have been derived for microstrip ring resonator using transmission lines theory. From the analysis, two equations were derived. The first equation relates all the parameters of a ring into a single equation. This equation has been used in the design process to determine the ring dimensions. The second equation was used to calculate S sub 21 and was given as a function of relative permittivity, {epsilon} sub r, and angular frequency, {omega}. A procedure has been suggested on how these equations can be used to determine the value of {epsilon} sub r for an unknown substrate. The calculations using the data from experiment were compared with the values given by the manufacturer and was found to be within 8% different.

  9. Two-loop massive operator matrix elements for unpolarized heavy flavor production to O({epsilon})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierenbaum, I.; Bluemlein, J.; Klein, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Schneider, C. [Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz (Austria). Research Inst. for Symbolic Computation

    2008-02-15

    We calculate the O({alpha}{sup 2}{sub s}) massive operator matrix elements for the twist-2 operators, which contribute to the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients in unpolarized deeply inelastic scattering in the region Q{sup 2}>>m{sup 2}, up to the O({epsilon}) contributions. These terms contribute through the renormalization of the O({alpha}{sup 3}{sub s}) heavy flavor Wilson coefficients of the structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}). The calculation has been performed using light-cone expansion techniques without using the integration-by-parts method. We represent the individual Feynman diagrams by generalized hypergeometric structures, the {epsilon}-expansion of which leads to infinite sums depending on the Mellin variable N. These sums are finally expressed in terms of nested harmonic sums using the general summation techniques implemented in the Sigma package. (orig.)

  10. Effects of sterilisation by high-energy radiation on biomedical poly-(epsilon-caprolactone)/hydroxyapatite composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Foggia, Michele; Corda, Ugo; Plescia, Elena; Taddei, Paola; Torreggiani, Armida

    2010-06-01

    The effects of a high energy sterilization treatment on poly-epsilon-caprolactone/carbonated hydroxyapatite composites have been investigated. Poly-epsilon-caprolactone is a biodegradable polymer used as long-term bioresorbable scaffold for bone tissue engineering and carbonated hydroxyapatite is a bioactive material able to promote bone growth. The composites were gamma-irradiated in air or under nitrogen atmosphere with doses ranging from 10 to 50 kGy (i.e. to a value higher than that recommended for sterilization). The effects of the irradiation treatment were evaluated by vibrational spectroscopy (IR and Raman spectroscopies) coupled to thermal analysis (Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermogravimetry) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy. Irradiation with the doses required for sterilization induced acceptable structural changes and damaging effects: only a very slight fragmentation of the polymeric chains and some defects in the inorganic component were observed. Moreover, the radiation sensitivity of the composites proved almost the same under the two different atmospheres.

  11. Coherent production of {epsilon}{sup +} particles in crystal using proton beam from SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okorokov, V.V.; Dubin, A.Yu. [ITER, Moscow, (Russian Federation)

    1995-05-01

    The unique possibilities of the SSC can be ideally used for a new generation of coherent generation experiments with relativistic protons which require 20 Tev energy of the incident beam. The availability of 20 Tev proton beam at SSC allows new experiments on coherent production of {var_epsilon}{sup +} particle by relativistic proton in crystal. Experiment carried out at low energies can now be extended with protons in very narrow energy region (resonance energy, which easy can be calculated) using the new accelerator facilities at SSC. We propose to study coherent production via the Coulomb field of the cristal atoms to excite the transition p + {gamma}{implies} {var_epsilon} {sup +} (1189).

  12. Yessotoxins, a Group of Marine Polyether Toxins: an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Fernández

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Yessotoxin (YTX is a marine polyether toxin that was first isolated in 1986 from the scallop Patinopecten yessoensis. Subsequently, it was reported that YTX is produced by the dinoflagellates Protoceratium reticulatum, Lingulodinium polyedrum and Gonyaulax spinifera. YTXs have been associated with diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP because they are often simultaneously extracted with DSP toxins, and give positive results when tested in the conventional mouse bioassay for DSP toxins. However, recent evidence suggests that YTXs should be excluded from the DSP toxins group, because unlike okadaic acid (OA and dinophyisistoxin-1 (DTX-1, YTXs do not cause either diarrhea or inhibition of protein phosphatases . In spite of the increasing number of molecular studies focused on the toxicity of YTX, the precise mechanism of action is currently unknown. Since the discovery of YTX, almost forty new analogues isolated from both mussels and dinoflagellates have been characterized by NMR or LC-MS/MS techniques. These studies indicate a wide variability in the profile and the relative abundance of YTXs in both, bivalves and dinoflagellates. This review covers current knowledge on the origin, producer organisms and vectors, chemical structures, metabolism, biosynthetic origin, toxicological properties, potential risks to human health and advances in detection methods of YTXs.

  13. Botulinum toxin in bruxism treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Piech

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bruxism is defined as abnormal, fixed, unconscious chewing organ function, deviating qualitatively and quantitatively from normal function. Another definition speaks of motor dysfunction in the mouth, characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth, occurring during sleep. The etiology of this disorder has not been explained until now, but it is believed to be related to localized, mental, nervous and neurotransmitter disorders. Purpose: The aim of the study is to review literature and knowledge about the use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of bruxism. Methods of treatment: The patient reports to the physician usually after a distressing, difficult to locate pain. The basis for proper treatment is to detect parafunctions and to make the patient aware of their existence. Diagnostic symptoms include dentinal lesions, recesses, enamel cracks and abfractive cavities, as well as changes in the mucosal area of the cheeks. Treatment begins with the use of an occlusive therapy to relax muscles, reduce parafunction and relieve pain. In the form of severe pain, NSAIDs are introduced and, if necessary, anxiolytics, sedatives and antidepressants. In the absence of response to the treatment used, botulinum toxin type A injections are used. The dose of the agent depends on the initial muscle tone and the effect of decrease in its activity is maintained for 4 to 6 months. Conclusions: The use of botulinum toxin makes it possible to selectively exclude overactive muscles, which is a great advantage over other techniques. An additional benefit of this therapy is achieved good cosmetic effect, reversible effect and minimal amount of side effects.

  14. {epsilon}-Caprolactam migration from irradiated PA-6 food packaging: kinetic simulation and measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Faena Machado Leite [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Felix, Juliana; Araujo, Henrique Peres; Monteiro, Magali [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Alimentos e Nutricao; Padula, Marisa [Instituto de Tecnologia de Alimentos (ITAL), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia de Embalagem; Manzoli, Jose Eduardo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Sao Judas Tadeu (USJT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: jmanzoli@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Migration of low molecular mass compounds (LMMC), such as monomers and additives, from plastic packaging into food simulants is a very important issue, concerning public health and chemical contamination of foods. Sterilization of food packaging materials with ionizing radiation is considered an alternative to other sterilization methods, but when polymers are irradiated, LMMC may be formed, as radiolysis products. According to the Brazilian legislation, specific migration tests, such as those of LMMC from packaging into simulants, should be carried out at certain temperature and time, depending on the real conditions of contact. In this work, multilayer flexible films with polyamide 6 (PA-6), used for meat foodstuffs, were studied. The {epsilon}-caprolactam (PA-6 monomer) specific migration into acetic acid 3% simulant at 40 deg C during 10 days and at 100 deg C during 30 minutes was performed. The initial monomer level in the irradiated and non irradiated PA-6 films was quantified by high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC). Radiation doses were 3 and 7 kGy. {epsilon}-caprolactam specific migration was carried out only with non irradiated films. The results showed that radiation causes a significant change in the monomer level, up or down, depending on the multilayer film type. The kinetic of the {epsilon}-caprolactam migration at both temperatures, 40 and 100 deg C was clearly explained by the numerical simulation, combining an Arrhenius equation with the Fick's second law, although this kinetic was not experimentally studied. This simulation allowed to predict diffusion parameters estimates, like diffusion coefficients and activation energies of {epsilon}-caprolactam in the films or simulant. (author)

  15. The epsilon regime of chiral perturbation theory with Wilson-type fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Shindler, A. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Division

    2009-11-15

    In this proceeding contribution we report on the ongoing effort to simulate Wilson-type fermions in the so called epsilon regime of chiral perturbation theory (cPT).We present results for the chiral condensate and the pseudoscalar decay constant obtained with Wilson twisted mass fermions employing two lattice spacings, two different physical volumes and several quark masses. With this set of simulations we make a first attempt to estimate the systematic uncertainties. (orig.)

  16. Dipion decay modes of the UPSILON family from a universal epsilon coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffou, E.; Martinis, M.; Mikuta-Martinis, V.

    1986-01-01

    In the framework of a universal-epsilon-coupling scheme we obtain predictions for the decay rates of UPSILON'→UPSILONππ, UPSILON''→UPSILONππ, and UPSILON''→UPSILON'ππ in agreement with CLEO and CUSB measurements. We also predict the shape of the dipion mass distribution for these transitions. The shape predicted for UPSILON'→UPSILONππ is found to be in excellent agreement with experiment

  17. The epsilon regime of chiral perturbation theory with Wilson-type fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, K.; Shindler, A.

    2009-11-01

    In this proceeding contribution we report on the ongoing effort to simulate Wilson-type fermions in the so called epsilon regime of chiral perturbation theory (cPT).We present results for the chiral condensate and the pseudoscalar decay constant obtained with Wilson twisted mass fermions employing two lattice spacings, two different physical volumes and several quark masses. With this set of simulations we make a first attempt to estimate the systematic uncertainties. (orig.)

  18. Botulinum toxin: The Midas touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpa, P S; Kaul, Rachna; Sultana, Nishat; Bhat, Suraksha

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum Toxin (BT) is a natural molecule produced during growth and autolysis of bacterium called Clostridium botulinum. Use of BT for cosmetic purposes has gained popularity over past two decades, and recently, other therapeutic uses of BT has been extensively studied. BT is considered as a minimally invasive agent that can be used in the treatment of various orofacial disorders and improving the quality of life in such patients. The objective of this article is to review the nature, mechanism of action of BT, and its application in various head and neck diseases.

  19. Botulinum toxin drugs: brief history and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, D

    2016-03-01

    The global botulinum toxin (BT) market is currently undergoing rapid changes: this may be the time to review the history and the future of BT drug development. Since the early 1990s Botox(®) and Dysport(®) dominated the international BT market. Later, Myobloc(®)/NeuroBloc(®), a liquid BT type B drug, came out, but failed. Xeomin(®) is the latest major BT drug. It features removal of complexing proteins and improved neurotoxin purity. Several new BT drugs are coming out of Korea, China and Russia. Scientific challenges for BT drug development include modification of BT's duration of action, its transdermal transport and the design of BT hybrid drugs for specific target tissues. The increased competition will change the global BT market fundamentally and a re-organisation according to large indication groups, such as therapeutic and cosmetic applications, might occur.

  20. [Applications of botulinum toxin in Neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J

    2013-07-07

    At present, botulinum toxin (BT) is one of the most fundamental available drugs in Neurology, only comparable with levodopa. BT is currently used in those entities characterized by excessive muscle contraction, including dystonia and spasticity. In addition, BT has been used to control pain associated with increased muscle contraction in dystonia and spasticity, but also is useful to control chronic pain not associated with muscle contraction, such as chronic daily headache. Finally, BT is useful in sialorrhoea and bruxism. The mechanism of action is complex, mainly acting on terminal neuromuscular junction, but also exhibiting analgesic properties, probably through inhibition of pain neurotransmitters release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Anthrax toxin: the long and winding road that leads to the kill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrami, Laurence; Reig, Nuria; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2005-02-01

    The past five years have led to a tremendous increase in our molecular understanding of the mode of action of the anthrax toxin, one of the two main virulence factors produced by Bacillus anthracis. The structures of each of the three components of the toxin--lethal factor (LF), edema factor (EF) and protective antigen (PA)--have been solved not only in their monomeric forms but, depending on the subunit, in a heptameric form, bound to their substrate, co-factor or receptor. The endocytic route followed by the toxin has also been unraveled and the enzymatic mechanisms of EF and LF elucidated.

  2. Synthesis and biology of cyclic imine toxins, an emerging class of potent, globally distributed marine toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivala, Craig E; Benoit, Evelyne; Aráoz, Rómulo; Servent, Denis; Novikov, Alexei; Molgó, Jordi; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-03-01

    From a small group of exotic compounds isolated only two decades ago, Cyclic Imine (CI) toxins have become a major class of marine toxins with global distribution. Their distinct chemical structure, biological mechanism of action, and intricate chemistry ensures that CI toxins will continue to be the subject of fascinating fundamental studies in the broad fields of chemistry, chemical biology, and toxicology. The worldwide occurrence of potent CI toxins in marine environments, their accumulation in shellfish, and chemical stability are important considerations in assessing risk factors for human health. This review article aims to provide an account of chemistry, biology, and toxicology of CI toxins from their discovery to the present day.

  3. Measurements of the Fast Fission Factor ({epsilon}) in UO{sub 2}-Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nylund, O

    1961-03-15

    These experiments were undertaken in order to check the {epsilon} - calculations for the R3/Adam reactor project and to obtain a more rigorous basis for calculations on fuel elements similar to the R3/Adam clusters. Different number of rods (19, 7, 1) and coolants (air, D{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O) have been investigated. The measurements were performed in the central channel of the R1 research reactor making it possible also to study the influence due to adjacent R1 fuel rods. The method used (an activation technique) gives directly the relationship R between the fission rates in {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U . Knowing this quantity it is possible to compute {epsilon}. However, since {epsilon} is dependent on how it is defined, it is more convenient to use R in a comparison with calculated values. Calculations for some of the cases studied experimentally have been made according to a new heterogeneous method. The agreement between the calculated and measured R-values is relatively good, but there is a tendency for the latter to be somewhat higher, especially for the 19-rod element.

  4. Nesprin-2 epsilon: A novel nesprin isoform expressed in human ovary and Ntera-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Le Thanh; Boehm, Sabrina V.; Roberts, Roland G.; Morris, Glenn E.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A novel epsilon isoform of nesprin-2 has been discovered. → This 120 kDa protein was predicted by bioinformatic analysis, but has not previously been observed. → It is the main isoform expressed in a teratocarcinoma cell line and is also found in ovary. → Like other nesprins, it is located at the nuclear envelope. → We suggest it may have a role in very early development or in some ovary-specific function. -- Abstract: The nuclear envelope-associated cytoskeletal protein, nesprin-2, is encoded by a large gene containing several internal promoters that produce shorter isoforms. In a study of Ntera-2 teratocarcinoma cells, a novel isoform, nesprin-2-epsilon, was found to be the major mRNA and protein product of the nesprin-2 gene. Its existence was predicted by bioinformatic analysis, but this is the first direct demonstration of both the mRNA and the 120 kDa protein which is located at the nuclear envelope. In a panel of 21 adult and foetal human tissues, the nesprin-2-epsilon mRNA was strongly expressed in ovary but was a minor isoform elsewhere. The expression pattern suggests a possible link with very early development and a likely physiological role in ovary.

  5. Biodistribution and catabolism of 18F-labelled isopeptide N(epsilon)-(gamma-glutamyl)-L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultsch, C; Bergmann, R; Pawelke, B; Pietzsch, J; Wuest, F; Johannsen, B; Henle, T

    2005-12-01

    Isopeptide bonds between the epsilon-amino group of lysine and the gamma-carboxamide group of glutamine are formed during strong heating of pure proteins or, more important, by enzymatic reaction mediated by transglutaminases. Despite the wide use of a microbial transglutaminase in food biotechnology, up to now little is known about the metabolic fate of the isopeptide N(epsilon)-(gamma-glutamyl)-L-lysine. In the present study, N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate was used to modify N(epsilon)-(gamma-glutamyl)-L-lysine at each of its two alpha-amino groups, resulting in the 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoylated derivatives, for which biodistribution, catabolism, and elimination were investigated in male Wistar rats. A significant different biochemical behavior of the two labelled isopeptides was observed in terms of in vitro stability, in vivo metabolism as well as biodistribution. The results suggest that the metabolic fate of isopeptides is likely to be dependent on how they are reabsorbed - free or peptide bound.

  6. Modeling of lipase catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, G; Madras, Giridhar

    2004-01-01

    Enzymatic ring-opening polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone by various lipases was investigated in toluene at various temperatures. The determination of molecular weight and structural identification was carried out with gel permeation chromatography and proton NMR, respectively. Among the various lipases employed, an immobilized lipase from Candida antartica B (Novozym 435) showed the highest catalytic activity. The polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone by Novozym 435 showed an optimal temperature of 65 degrees C and an optimum toluene content of 50/50 v/v of toluene and epsilon-caprolactone. As lipases can degrade polyesters, a maximum in the molecular weight with time was obtained due to the competition of ring opening polymerization and degradation by specific chain end scission. The optimum temperature, toluene content, and the variation of molecular weight with time are consistent with earlier observations. A comprehensive model based on continuous distribution kinetics was developed to model these phenomena. The model accounts for simultaneous polymerization, degradation and enzyme deactivation and provides a technique to determine the rate coefficients for these processes. The dependence of these rate coefficients with temperature and monomer concentration is also discussed.

  7. Tunable magnetization of infrared epsilon-near-zero media via field-effect modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salary, Mohammad Mahdi; Mosallaei, Hossein

    2018-04-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate that field effect modulation enables electrical tuning of the effective permeability of epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) media at infrared frequencies. In particular, hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) is incorporated as an epsilon-near-zero host in a gated 6H-SiC/SiO2/Si heterostructure. The change in the applied voltage leads to a change in the carrier concentration of the accumulation layer formed at the interface of 6H-SiC and SiO2 which can alter the effective permeability of the heterostructure by virtue of the photonic doping effect. We will rigorously model and analyze the structure by linking charge transport and electromagnetic models. The presented mechanism allows for tuning the impedance and magnetization of ENZ materials in real-time while capturing extreme cases of epsilon-and-mu-near-zero and magnetic conductor. As such, it can be used for various applications such as real-time engineering of thermal emission, dynamic switching, reconfigurable tunneling, and holography.

  8. Dissecting the role of ADAM10 as a mediator of Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hoven, Gisela; Rivas, Amable J; Neukirch, Claudia; Klein, Stefan; Hamm, Christian; Qin, Qianqian; Meyenburg, Martina; Füser, Sabine; Saftig, Paul; Hellmann, Nadja; Postina, Rolf; Husmann, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacterial infections in humans, including life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia and sepsis. Its small membrane-pore-forming α-toxin is considered an important virulence factor. By destroying cell-cell contacts through cleavage of cadherins, the metalloproteinase ADAM10 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10) critically contributes to α-toxin-dependent pathology of experimental S. aureus infections in mice. Moreover, ADAM10 was proposed to be a receptor for α-toxin. However, it is unclear whether the catalytic activity or specific domains of ADAM10 are involved in mediating binding and/or subsequent cytotoxicity of α-toxin. Also, it is not known how α-toxin triggers ADAM10's enzymatic activity, and whether ADAM10 is invariably required for all α-toxin action on cells. In the present study, we show that efficient cleavage of the ADAM10 substrate epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) requires supra-cytotoxic concentrations of α-toxin, leading to significant increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)]; the fall in cellular ATP levels, typically following membrane perforation, became observable at far lower concentrations. Surprisingly, ADAM10 was dispensable for α-toxin-dependent xenophagic targeting of S. aureus, whereas a role for α-toxin attack on the plasma membrane was confirmed. The catalytic site of ADAM10, furin cleavage site, cysteine switch and intracellular domain of ADAM10 were not required for α-toxin binding and subsequent cytotoxicity. In contrast, an essential role for the disintegrin domain and the prodomain emerged. Thus, co-expression of the prodomain with prodomain-deficient ADAM10 reconstituted binding of α-toxin and susceptibility of ADAM10-deficient cells. The results of the present study may help to inform structural analyses of α-toxin-ADAM10 interactions and to design novel strategies to counteract S. aureus α-toxin action. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf

  9. A Quantitative Electrochemiluminescence Assay for Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Merrill, Gerald A; Rivera, Victor R; Neal, Dwayne D; Young, Charles; Poli, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    .... Biotinylated antibodies to C. perfringens alpha toxin bound to streptavidin paramagnetic beads specifically immunoadsorbed soluble sample alpha toxin which subsequently selectively immunoadsorbed ruthenium (Ru...

  10. Uric Acid: The Unknown Uremic Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño-Becerra, Alejandro

    2018-01-01

    This review brings together concepts of uric acid metabolism affecting renal parenchyma and its function and the current therapies to reduce hyperuricemia (HyU) and avoid renal disease progression. High uric acid plays an important role in several chronic diseases including kidney diseases such as lithiasis, gout nephropathy, and preeclampsia. In the last 30 years, it has been shown that reducing HyU with low protein and low purine diets in addition to allopurinol creates physiopathological conditions that produce a slight increase in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). In recent years, in a new era of research in clinical, genetics, pharmacological, and epidemiologic fields, they have been moving forward to support the idea that reduction in HyU could benefit the chronic renal failure (CRF) patients (stage III-IV), thereby avoiding the drop of GFR for undefined mechanisms. There are several clinical trials in progress that show the HyU reducing to very low values and an increased GFR. In a young population, when treating HyU there is a reduction in high blood pressure. There are some reports showing that HyU could play a role in the diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, there have been some speculations that HyU treatment could stop the progression of CRF modifying the natural history of the diseases. So there will be new clinical trials with old and new medication and metabolic procedure to maintain a very low blood levels in the unknown uremic toxin know as uric acid which seems to be the toxin to the damage kidney. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The development and characterization of a primarily mineral calcium phosphate - poly(epsilon-caprolactone) biocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkley, Ian Robert

    Orthopaedic reconstruction often involves the surgical introduction of structural implants that provide for rigid fixation, skeletal stabilization, and bone integration. The high stresses incurred by these implanted devices have historically limited material choices to metallic and select polymeric formulations. While mechanical requirements are achieved, these non-degradable materials do not participate actively in the remodeling of the skeleton and present the possibility of long-term failure or rejection. This is particularly relevant in cervical fusion, an orthopaedic procedure to treat damaged, degenerative or diseased intervertebral discs. A significant improvement on the available synthetic bone replacement/regeneration options for implants to treat these conditions in the cervical spine may be achieved with the development of primarily mineral biocomposites comprised of a bioactive ceramic matrix reinforced with a biodegradable polymer. Such a biocomposite may be engineered to possess the clinically required mechanical properties of a particular application, while maintaining the ability to be remodeled completely by the body. A biocomposite of Si-doped calcium phosphate (Si-CaP) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) was developed for application as such a synthetic bone material for potential use as a fusion device in the cervical spine. In this thesis, a method by which high mineral content Si-CaP/PCL biocomposites with interpenetrating matrices of mineral and polymer phases may be prepared will be demonstrated, in addition to the effects of the various preparation parameters on the biocomposite density, porosity and mechanical properties. This new technique by which dense, primarily ceramic Si-CaP/PCL biocomposites were prepared, allowed for the incorporation of mineral contents ranging between 45-97vol%. Polymer infiltration, accomplished solely by passive capillary uptake over several days, was found to be capable of fully infiltrating the microporosity

  12. Toxin-Antitoxin Battle in Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cataudella, Ilaria

    This PhD thesis consists of three research projects revolving around the common thread of investigation of the properties and biological functions of Toxin-Antitoxin loci. Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) loci are transcriptionally regulated via an auto-inhibition mechanism called conditional cooperativity, ...

  13. Stealth and mimicry by deadly bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yates, S.P.; Jørgensen, Rene; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2006-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin and exotoxin A are well-characterized members of the ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin family that serve as virulence factors in the pathogenic bacteria, Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.  New high-resolution structural data of the Michaelis complex...

  14. Acid Sphingomyelinase Promotes Cellular Internalization of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Takehara, Masaya; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Ishidoh, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2018-05-20

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin is a binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxin composed of the enzymatic component Ia and receptor binding component Ib. Ib binds to a cell surface receptor, forms Ib oligomer in lipid rafts, and associates with Ia. The Ia-Ib complex then internalizes by endocytosis. Here, we showed that acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) facilitates the cellular uptake of iota-toxin. Inhibitions of ASMase and lysosomal exocytosis by respective blockers depressed cell rounding induced by iota-toxin. The cytotoxicity of the toxin increased in the presence of Ca 2+ in extracellular fluids. Ib entered target cells in the presence but not the absence of Ca 2+ . Ib induced the extracellular release of ASMase in the presence of Ca 2+ . ASMase siRNA prevented the cell rounding induced by iota-toxin. Furthermore, treatment of the cells with Ib resulted in the production of ceramide in cytoplasmic vesicles. These observations showed that ASMase promotes the internalization of iota-toxin into target cells.

  15. Influence of Selenium on the Production of T-2 Toxin by Fusarium poae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bolun; Zhang, Yan; Tong, Bei; Yin, Hong

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selenium on the production of T-2 toxin by a Fusarium poae strain cultured in a synthetic medium containing different concentrations of selenium. The T-2 toxin contents in fermentative products were evaluated by a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the production of T-2 toxin was correlated with the concentration of selenium added to the medium. In all three treatments, the addition of 1 mg/L selenium to the medium resulted in a lower toxin yield than the control (0 mg/L); the yield of the toxin began to increase when selenium concentration was 10 mg/L, while it decreased again at 20 mg/L. In summary, T-2 toxin yield in the fermentative product was affected by the addition of selenium to the medium, and a selenium concentration of 20 mg/L produced the maximum inhibitory effect of T-2 toxin yield in the fermentative product of F. poae.

  16. Interaction of the alpha-toxin of Staphylococcus aureus with the liposome membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikigai, H; Nakae, T

    1987-02-15

    When the liposome membrane is exposed to the alpha-toxin of Staphylococcus aureus, fluorescence of the tryptophan residue(s) of the toxin molecule increases concomitantly with the degree of toxin-hexamer formation (Ikigai, H., and Nakae, T. (1985) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 130, 175-181). In the present study, the toxin-membrane interaction was distinguished from the hexamer formation by the fluorescence energy transfer from the tryptophan residue(s) of the toxin molecule to the dansylated phosphatidylethanolamine in phosphatidylcholine liposome. Measurement of these two parameters yielded the following results. The effect of the toxin concentration and phospholipid concentration on these two parameters showed first order kinetics. The effect of liposome size on the energy transfer and the fluorescence increment of the tryptophan residue(s) was only detectable in small liposomes. Under moderately acidic or basic conditions, the fluorescence energy transfer always preceded the fluorescence increment of the tryptophan residue(s). The fluorescence increment at 336 nm at temperatures below 20 degrees C showed a latent period, whereas the fluorescence energy transfer did not. These results were thought to indicate that when alpha-toxin damages the target membrane, the molecule interacts with the membrane first, and then undergoes oligomerization within the membrane.

  17. Adenylate cyclase toxin promotes internalisation of integrins and raft components and decreases macrophage adhesion capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Martín

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the bacterium that causes whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT that must be post-translationally palmitoylated in the bacterium cytosol to be active. The toxin targets phagocytes expressing the CD11b/CD18 integrin receptor. It delivers a catalytic adenylate cyclase domain into the target cell cytosol producing a rapid increase of intracellular cAMP concentration that suppresses bactericidal functions of the phagocyte. ACT also induces calcium fluxes into target cells. Biochemical, biophysical and cell biology approaches have been applied here to show evidence that ACT and integrin molecules, along with other raft components, are rapidly internalized by the macrophages in a toxin-induced calcium rise-dependent process. The toxin-triggered internalisation events occur through two different routes of entry, chlorpromazine-sensitive receptor-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-independent internalisation, maybe acting in parallel. ACT locates into raft-like domains, and is internalised, also in cells devoid of receptor. Altogether our results suggest that adenylate cyclase toxin, and maybe other homologous pathogenic toxins from the RTX (Repeats in Toxin family to which ACT belongs, may be endowed with an intrinsic capacity to, directly and efficiently, insert into raft-like domains, promoting there its multiple activities. One direct consequence of the integrin removal from the cell surface of the macrophages is the hampering of their adhesion ability, a fundamental property in the immune response of the leukocytes that could be instrumental in the pathogenesis of Bordetella pertussis.

  18. Adenylate cyclase toxin promotes internalisation of integrins and raft components and decreases macrophage adhesion capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, César; Uribe, Kepa B; Gómez-Bilbao, Geraxane; Ostolaza, Helena

    2011-02-23

    Bordetella pertussis, the bacterium that causes whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) that must be post-translationally palmitoylated in the bacterium cytosol to be active. The toxin targets phagocytes expressing the CD11b/CD18 integrin receptor. It delivers a catalytic adenylate cyclase domain into the target cell cytosol producing a rapid increase of intracellular cAMP concentration that suppresses bactericidal functions of the phagocyte. ACT also induces calcium fluxes into target cells. Biochemical, biophysical and cell biology approaches have been applied here to show evidence that ACT and integrin molecules, along with other raft components, are rapidly internalized by the macrophages in a toxin-induced calcium rise-dependent process. The toxin-triggered internalisation events occur through two different routes of entry, chlorpromazine-sensitive receptor-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-independent internalisation, maybe acting in parallel. ACT locates into raft-like domains, and is internalised, also in cells devoid of receptor. Altogether our results suggest that adenylate cyclase toxin, and maybe other homologous pathogenic toxins from the RTX (Repeats in Toxin) family to which ACT belongs, may be endowed with an intrinsic capacity to, directly and efficiently, insert into raft-like domains, promoting there its multiple activities. One direct consequence of the integrin removal from the cell surface of the macrophages is the hampering of their adhesion ability, a fundamental property in the immune response of the leukocytes that could be instrumental in the pathogenesis of Bordetella pertussis.

  19. DNA aptamers as a novel approach to neutralize Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekananda, Jeevalatha; Salgado, Christi; Millenbaugh, Nancy J

    2014-02-14

    Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile pathogen capable of causing a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from superficial skin infections to life threatening conditions such as endocarditis, septicemia, pneumonia and toxic shock syndrome. In vitro and in vivo studies identified an exotoxin, α-toxin, as a major cause of S. aureus toxicity. Because S. aureus has rapidly evolved resistance to a number of antibiotics, including methicillin, it is important to identify new therapeutic strategies, other than antibiotics, for inhibiting the harmful effects of this pathogen. Aptamers are single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides with three-dimensional folded conformations that bind with high affinity and selectivity to targets and modulate their biological functions. The goal of this study was to isolate DNA aptamers that specifically inhibit the cytotoxic activity of α-toxin. After 10 rounds of Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment (SELEX), 49 potential anti-α-toxin aptamers were identified. In vitro neutralization assays demonstrated that 4 of these 49 aptamers, AT-27, AT-33, AT-36, and AT-49, significantly inhibited α-toxin-mediated cell death in Jurkat T cells. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis revealed that α-toxin increased the transcription of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-17 and that anti-α-toxin aptamers AT-33 and AT-36 inhibited the upregulation of these genes. Collectively, the data suggest the feasibility of generating functionally effective aptamers against α-toxin for treatment of S. aureus infections. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. ADP-ribosylation of transducin by pertussis toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, P.A.; Burns, D.L.; Kanaho, Y.; Liu, T.Y.; Hewlett, E.L.; Moss, J.

    1985-01-01

    Transducin, the guanyl nucleotide-binding regulatory protein of retinal rod outer segments that couples the photon receptor, rhodopsin, with the light-activated cGMP phosphodiesterase, can be resolved into two functional components, T alpha and T beta gamma. T alpha (39 kDa), which is [ 32 P]ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin and [ 32 P]NAD in rod outer segments and in purified transducin, was also labeled by the toxin after separation from T beta gamma (36 kDa and approximately 10 kDa); neither component of T beta gamma was a pertussis toxin substrate. Labeling of T alpha was enhanced by T beta gamma and was maximal at approximately 1:1 molar ratio of T alpha : T beta gamma. Limited proteolysis by trypsin of T alpha in the presence of guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) resulted in the sequential appearance of proteins of 38 and 32 kDa. The amino terminus of both 38- and 32 -kDa proteins was leucine, whereas that of T alpha could not be identified and was assumed to be blocked. The 32 -kDa peptide was not a pertussis toxin substrate. Labeling of the 38-kDa protein was poor and was not enhanced by T beta gamma. Trypsin treatment of [ 32 P]ADP-ribosyl-T alpha produced a labeled 37-38-kDa doublet followed by appearance of radioactivity at the dye front. It appears, therefore, that, although the 38-kDa protein was poor toxin substrate, it contained the ADP-ribosylation site. Without rhodopsin, labeling of T alpha (in the presence of T beta gamma) was unaffected by Gpp(NH)p, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S), GTP, GDP, and guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) but was increased by ATP. When photolyzed rhodopsin and T beta gamma were present, Gpp(NH)p and GTP gamma S decreased [ 32 P]ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin. Thus, pertussis toxin-catalyzed [ 32 P]ADP-ribosylation of T alpha was affected by nucleotides, rhodopsin and light in addition to T beta gamma

  1. Brown spider dermonecrotic toxin directly induces nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaim, Olga Meiri; Sade, Youssef Bacila; Bertoni da Silveira, Rafael; Toma, Leny; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Chavez-Olortegui, Carlos; Mangili, Oldemir Carlos; Gremski, Waldemiro; Dietrich, Carl Peter von; Nader, Helena B.; Sanches Veiga, Silvio

    2006-01-01

    Brown spider (Loxosceles genus) venom can induce dermonecrotic lesions at the bite site and systemic manifestations including fever, vomiting, convulsions, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hemolytic anemia and acute renal failure. The venom is composed of a mixture of proteins with several molecules biochemically and biologically well characterized. The mechanism by which the venom induces renal damage is unknown. By using mice exposed to Loxosceles intermedia recombinant dermonecrotic toxin (LiRecDT), we showed direct induction of renal injuries. Microscopic analysis of renal biopsies from dermonecrotic toxin-treated mice showed histological alterations including glomerular edema and tubular necrosis. Hyalinization of tubules with deposition of proteinaceous material in the tubule lumen, tubule epithelial cell vacuoles, tubular edema and epithelial cell lysis was also observed. Leukocytic infiltration was neither observed in the glomerulus nor the tubules. Renal vessels showed no sign of inflammatory response. Additionally, biochemical analyses showed such toxin-induced changes in renal function as urine alkalinization, hematuria and azotemia with elevation of blood urea nitrogen levels. Immunofluorescence with dermonecrotic toxin antibodies and confocal microscopy analysis showed deposition and direct binding of this toxin to renal intrinsic structures. By immunoblotting with a hyperimmune dermonecrotic toxin antiserum on renal lysates from toxin-treated mice, we detected a positive signal at the region of 33-35 kDa, which strengthens the idea that renal failure is directly induced by dermonecrotic toxin. Immunofluorescence reaction with dermonecrotic toxin antibodies revealed deposition and binding of this toxin directly in MDCK epithelial cells in culture. Similarly, dermonecrotic toxin treatment caused morphological alterations of MDCK cells including cytoplasmic vacuoles, blebs, evoked impaired spreading and detached cells from each other and from

  2. Crystallization of isoelectrically homogeneous cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangler, B.D.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Past difficulty in growing good crystals of cholera toxin has prevented the study of the crystal structure of this important protein. The authors have determined that failure of cholera toxin to crystallize well has been due to its heterogeneity. They have now succeeded in overcoming the problem by isolating a single isoelectric variant of this oligomeric protein (one A subunit and five B subunits). Cholera toxin purified by their procedure readily forms large single crystals. The crystal form has been described previously. They have recorded data from native crystals of cholera toxin to 3.0-angstrom resolution with our electronic area detectors. With these data, they have found the orientation of a 5-fold symmetry axis within these crystals, perpendicular to the screw dyad of the crystal. They are now determining the crystal structure of cholera toxin by a combination of multiple heavy-atom isomorphous replacement and density modification techniques, making use of rotational 5-fold averaging of the B subunits

  3. Immunotoxins: The Role of the Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David FitzGerald

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin bifunctional molecules that rely on intracellular toxin action to kill target cells. Target specificity is determined via the binding attributes of the chosen antibody. Mostly, but not exclusively, immunotoxins are purpose-built to kill cancer cells as part of novel treatment approaches. Other applications for immunotoxins include immune regulation and the treatment of viral or parasitic diseases. Here we discuss the utility of protein toxins, of both bacterial and plant origin, joined to antibodies for targeting cancer cells. Finally, while clinical goals are focused on the development of novel cancer treatments, much has been learned about toxin action and intracellular pathways. Thus toxins are considered both medicines for treating human disease and probes of cellular function.

  4. Changes in intestinal fluid and mucosal immune responses to cholera toxin in Giardia muris infection and binding of cholera toxin to Giardia muris trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungström, I; Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A M; Ferrante, A

    1985-10-01

    The effect of Giardia muris infection on the diarrheal response and gut mucosal antibody response to cholera toxin was examined in mice. The results obtained showed that the fluid accumulation in intestinal loops exposed to cholera toxin was increased in mice infected with a low number (5 X 10(4) ) of G. muris cysts compared with the response in noninfected mice. This effect was associated with a marked reduction in absorption of oral rehydration fluid from the intestine. In contrast, mice infected with a high dose (2 X 10(5) ) of cysts showed a marked decrease in fluid accumulation in response to the toxin. This decrease might be related to the finding that both G. muris and Giardia lamblia trophozoites can bind significant amounts of cholera toxin. Evidence is presented which suggests that the gut mucosal antibody response, mainly immunoglobulin A but also immunoglobulin G, to an immunization course with perorally administered cholera toxin was depressed in mice infected with G. muris. The reduction in antibody levels was particularly evident when the primary immunization was made very early after infection. The serum antitoxin antibodies to the oral immunization with cholera toxin were, however, not affected. Likewise, the delayed-type hypersensitivity response against sheep erythrocytes in animals primed subcutaneously with sheep erythrocytes was not modified during the course of G. muris infection.

  5. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.A.; Bailey, N.E.; Stringer, M.F.; Modi, N.K.; Tranter, H.S.; Hambleton, P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neutotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author)

  6. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, S A; Bailey, N E; Stringer, M F [Campden Food and Drink Research Association, Chipping Campden (UK); Modi, N K; Tranter, H S [Porton International plc., London (UK); Hambleton, P [Centre for Applied Microbiological Research, Porton Down (UK)

    1988-10-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author).

  7. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.A.; Bailey, N.E.; Stringer, M.F.; Modi, N.K.; Tranter, H.S.; Hambleton, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author)

  8. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, S.A.; Bailey, N.E.; Stringer, M.F. (Campden Food and Drink Research Association, Chipping Campden (UK)); Modi, N.K.; Tranter, H.S. (Centre for Applied Micobiological Research, Porton Down, (UK)); Hambleton, P. (Porton International plc, London (UK))

    1989-09-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neutotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author).

  9. Activity of daptomycin- and vancomycin-loaded poly-epsilon-caprolactone microparticles against mature staphylococcal biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Ferreira I

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inês Santos Ferreira,1 Ana F Bettencourt,1 Lídia MD Gonçalves,1 Stefanie Kasper,2 Bertrand Bétrisey,3 Judith Kikhney,2 Annette Moter,2 Andrej Trampuz,4 António J Almeida1 1Research Institute for Medicines (iMed.ULisboa, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Biofilmcenter, German Heart Institute Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3Infectious Diseases Service, Department of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland; 4Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charité – University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany Abstract: The aim of the present study was to develop novel daptomycin-loaded poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL microparticles with enhanced antibiofilm activity against mature biofilms of clinically relevant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Daptomycin was encapsulated into PCL microparticles by a double emulsion-solvent evaporation method. For comparison purposes, formulations containing vancomycin were also prepared. Particle morphology, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, surface charge, thermal behavior, and in vitro release were assessed. All formulations exhibited a spherical morphology, micro­meter size, and negative surface charge. From a very early time stage, the released concentrations of daptomycin and vancomycin were higher than the minimal inhibitory concentration and continued so up to 72 hours. Daptomycin presented a sustained release profile with increasing concentrations of the drug being released up to 72 hours, whereas the release of vancomycin stabilized at 24 hours. The antibacterial activity of the microparticles was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry against planktonic and sessile MRSA and S. epidermidis. Regarding planktonic bacteria, daptomycin-loaded PCL microparticles presented the highest antibacterial activity against both strains. Isothermal

  10. Assessing the presence of marine toxins in bivalve molluscs from southwest India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew D; Dhanji-Rapkova, Monika; Rowland-Pilgrim, Stephanie; Turner, Lucy M; Rai, Ashwin; Venugopal, Moleyur N; Karunasagar, Indrani; Godhe, Anna

    2017-12-15

    The south west coast of India has been showing a steady increase in shellfish cultivation both for local consumption and fishery export, over recent years. Perna viridis and Crassostrea madrasensis are two species of bivalve molluscs which grow in some selected regions of southern Karnataka, close to the city of Mangalore. In the early 1980s, shellfish consumers in the region were affected by intoxication from Paralytic Shellfish Poison present in local bivalves (clams and oysters) resulting in hospitalisation of many, including one fatality. Since then, there have been no further reports of serious shellfish intoxication and there is little awareness of the risks from natural toxins and no routine monitoring programme in place to protect shellfish consumers. This study presents the findings from the first ever systematic assessment of the presence of marine toxins in mussels and oysters grown in four different shellfish harvesting areas in the region. Shellfish were collected and subjected to analysis for ASP, PSP and lipophilic toxins, as well as a suite of non-EU regulated toxins such as tetrodotoxin and selected cyclic imines. Results revealed the presence of low levels of PSP toxins in oysters throughout the study period. Overall, total toxicities reached a maximum of 10% of the EU regulatory limit of 800 μg STX eq/kg. Toxin profiles were similar to those reported from the 1980 outbreak. No evidence was found for significant levels of ASP and lipophilic toxins, although some cyclic imines were detected, including gymnodimine. The results indicated that the risk to shellfish consumers during this specific study period would have been low. However, with historical evidence for extremely high levels of PSP toxins in molluscs, there is a strong need for routine surveillance of shellfish production areas for marine toxins, in order to mitigate against human health impacts resulting from unexpected harmful algal blooms, with potentially devastating socio

  11. Filaggrin-dependent secretion of sphingomyelinase protects against staphylococcal α-toxin-induced keratinocyte death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauweiler, Anne M; Bin, Lianghua; Kim, Byung Eui; Oyoshi, Michiko K; Geha, Raif S; Goleva, Elena; Leung, Donald Y M

    2013-02-01

    The skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) has defects in keratinocyte differentiation, particularly in expression of the epidermal barrier protein filaggrin. AD skin lesions are often exacerbated by Staphylococcus aureus-mediated secretion of the virulence factor α-toxin. It is unknown whether lack of keratinocyte differentiation predisposes to enhanced lethality from staphylococcal toxins. We investigated whether keratinocyte differentiation and filaggrin expression protect against cell death induced by staphylococcal α-toxin. Filaggrin-deficient primary keratinocytes were generated through small interfering RNA gene knockdown. RNA expression was determined by using real-time PCR. Cell death was determined by using the lactate dehydrogenase assay. Keratinocyte cell survival in filaggrin-deficient (ft/ft) mouse skin biopsies was determined based on Keratin 5 staining. α-Toxin heptamer formation and acid sphingomyelinase expression were determined by means of immunoblotting. We found that filaggrin expression, occurring as the result of keratinocyte differentiation, significantly inhibits staphylococcal α-toxin-mediated pathogenicity. Furthermore, filaggrin plays a crucial role in protecting cells by mediating the secretion of sphingomyelinase, an enzyme that reduces the number of α-toxin binding sites on the keratinocyte surface. Finally, we determined that sphingomyelinase enzymatic activity directly prevents α-toxin binding and protects keratinocytes against α-toxin-induced cytotoxicity. The current study introduces the novel concept that S aureus α-toxin preferentially targets and destroys filaggrin-deficient keratinocytes. It also provides a mechanism to explain the increased propensity for S aureus-mediated exacerbation of AD skin disease. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Botulinum toxin A, brain and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Ivica; Lacković, Zdravko

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is one of the most potent toxins known and a potential biological threat. At the same time, it is among the most widely used therapeutic proteins used yearly by millions of people, especially for cosmetic purposes. Currently, its clinical use in certain types of pain is increasing, and its long-term duration of effects represents a special clinical value. Efficacy of BoNT/A in different types of pain has been found in numerous clinical trials and case reports, as well as in animal pain models. However, sites and mechanisms of BoNT/A actions involved in nociception are a matter of controversy. In analogy with well known neuroparalytic effects in peripheral cholinergic synapses, presently dominant opinion is that BoNT/A exerts pain reduction by inhibiting peripheral neurotransmitter/inflammatory mediator release from sensory nerves. On the other hand, growing number of behavioral and immunohistochemical studies demonstrated the requirement of axonal transport for BoNT/A's antinociceptive action. In addition, toxin's enzymatic activity in central sensory regions was clearly identified after its peripheral application. Apart from general pharmacology, this review summarizes the clinical and experimental evidence for BoNT/A antinociceptive activity and compares the data in favor of peripheral vs. central site and mechanism of action. Based on literature review and published results from our laboratory we propose that the hypothesis of peripheral site of BoNT/A action is not sufficient to explain the experimental data collected up to now. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Algal Toxins Alter Copepod Feeding Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A.; Waggett, Rebecca J.; Place, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod’s feeding appendages–a “sampling beating” that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration “grazing beating” that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod’s grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod’s feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  14. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarong Hong

    Full Text Available Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods.

  15. Diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxin esters in Danish blue mussels and surf clams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kevin; Scanlon, Sine Hedegaard; Jensen, L.B.

    2005-01-01

    Until recently, little focus was given to the presence of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning ( DSP) toxin esters in seafood products. However, during the last few years, the occurrence of a high percentage of esters of the total amount of DSP toxins present in some seafood products has been observed....... importance because of the increased use of chemical methods instead of mouse bioassay for the detection of DSP toxicity....

  16. Dietary toxins, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettiarachchi, Kalindi D; Zimmet, Paul Z; Myers, Mark A

    2008-05-01

    The incidence of Type 1 diabetes has been increasing at a rate too rapid to be due to changes in genetic risk. Instead changes in environmental factors are the likely culprit. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays an important role in the production of newly synthesized proteins and interference with these processes leads to ER stress. The insulin-producing beta cells are particularly prone to ER stress as a result of their heavy engagement in insulin production. Increasing evidence suggests ER stress is central to initiation and progression of Type 1 diabetes. An early environmental exposure, such as toxins and viral infections, can impart a significant physiological load on beta cells to initiate abnormal processing of proinsulin, ER stress and insulin secretory defects. Release of altered proinsulin from the beta cells early in life may trigger autoimmunity in those with genetic susceptibility leading to cytokine-induced nitric oxide production and so exacerbating ER stress in beta cells, ultimately leading to apoptosis of beta cells and diabetes. Here we suggest that ER stress is an inherent cause of beta cell dysfunction and environmental factors, in particular dietary toxins derived from Streptomyces in infected root vegetables, can impart additional stress that aggravates beta cell death and progression to diabetes. Furthermore, we propose that the increasing incidence of Type 1 diabetes may be accounted for by increased dietary exposure to ER-stress-inducing Streptomyces toxins.

  17. Novel star-type methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) (PCL) copolymeric nanoparticles for controlled release of curcumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Runliang; Zhu Wenxia; Song Zhimei, E-mail: zhimei_song@126.com [University of Jinan, Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Medicine and Life Sciences (China); Zhao Liyan [Hebei North University, Department of Pharmacy (China); Zhai Guangxi [Shandong University, Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy (China)

    2013-06-15

    To improve curcumin's (CURs) water solubility and release property, a novel star methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) (MPEG-PCL) copolymer was synthesized through O-alkylation, basic hydrolysis and ring-opening polymerization reaction with MPEG, epichlorohydrin, and {epsilon}-caprolactone as raw materials. The structure of the novel copolymer was characterized by {sup 1}H NMR, FT-IR, and GPC. The results of FT-IR and differential scanning calorimeter of CUR-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by dialysis method showed that CUR was successfully encapsulated into the SMP12 copolymeric NPs with 98.2 % of entrapment efficiency, 10.91 % of drug loading, and 88.4 {+-} 11.2 nm of mean particle diameter in amorphous forms. The dissolubility of nanoparticulate CUR was increased by 1.38 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} times over CUR in water. The obtained blank copolymer showed no hemolysis. A sustained CUR release to a total of approximately 56.13 % was discovered from CUR-NPs in 40 % of ethanol saline solution within 72 h on the use of dialysis method. The release behavior fitted the ambiexponent and biphasic kinetics equation. In conclusion, the copolymeric NPs loading CUR might serve as a potential nanocarrier to improve the solubility and release property of CUR.

  18. Climate change impacts on natural toxins in food production systems, exemplified by deoxynivalenol in wheat and diarrhetic shellfish toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Olesen, J E; Naustvoll, L-J; Friocourt, Y; Mengelers, M J B; Christensen, J H

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is expected to affect food and feed safety, including the occurrence of natural toxins in primary crop and seafood production; however, to date, quantitative estimates are scarce. This study aimed to estimate the impact of climate change effects on mycotoxin contamination of cereal grains cultivated in the terrestrial area of north west Europe, and on the frequency of harmful algal blooms and contamination of shellfish with marine biotoxins in the North Sea coastal zone. The study focused on contamination of wheat with deoxynivalenol, and on abundance of Dinophysis spp. and the possible relationship with diarrhetic shellfish toxins. The study used currently available data and models. Global and regional climate models were combined with models of crop phenology, mycotoxin prediction models, hydrodynamic models and ecological models, with the output of one model being used as input for the other. In addition, statistical data analyses using existing national datasets from the study area were performed to obtain information on the relationships between Dinophysis spp. cell counts and contamination of shellfish with diarrhetic shellfish toxins as well as on frequency of cereal cropping. In this paper, a summary of the study is presented, and overall conclusions and recommendations are given. Climate change projections for the years 2031-2050 were used as the starting point of the analyses relative to a preceding 20-year baseline period from which the climate change signal was calculated. Results showed that, in general, climate change effects lead to advanced flowering and harvest of wheat, and increased risk of contamination of wheat with deoxynivalenol. Blooms of dinoflagellates were estimated to occur more often. If the group of Dinophysis spp. behaves similarly to other flagellates in the future then frequency of harmful algal blooms of Dinophysis spp. may also increase, but consequences for contamination of shellfish with diarrhetic shellfish

  19. Fyn kinase controls Fc{epsilon}RI receptor-operated calcium entry necessary for full degranulation in mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Miranda, Elizabeth; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Sede Sur, Calzada de los Tenorios 235, Col. Granjas Coapa, CP 14330 Mexico City (Mexico); Gonzalez-Espinosa, Claudia, E-mail: cgonzal@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Sede Sur, Calzada de los Tenorios 235, Col. Granjas Coapa, CP 14330 Mexico City (Mexico)

    2010-01-22

    IgE-antigen-dependent crosslinking of the high affinity IgE receptor (Fc{epsilon}RI) on mast cells leads to degranulation, leukotriene synthesis and cytokine production. Calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) mobilization is a sine qua non requisite for degranulation, allowing the rapid secretion of stored pro-inflammatory mediators responsible for allergy symptoms. Fyn is a Src-family kinase that positively controls Fc{epsilon}RI-induced mast cell degranulation. However, our understanding of the mechanism connecting Fyn activation to secretion of pre-synthesized mediators is very limited. We analyzed Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) differentiated from WT and Fyn -/- knock out mice. Fyn -/- BMMCs showed a marked defect in extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx after Fc{epsilon}RI crosslinking but not after thapsigargin addition. High concentrations of Gadolinium (Gd{sup 3+}) partially blocked Fc{epsilon}RI-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx in WT cells but, in contrast, completely inhibited Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in Fyn -/- cells. Low concentrations of an inhibitor of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) Ca{sup 2+} channels (2-aminoethoxyphenyl-borane, 2-APB) blocked Fc{epsilon}RI-induced maximal Ca{sup 2+} rise in WT but not in Fyn -/- cells. Ca{sup 2+} entry through Fyn-controlled, 2-APB sensitive channels was found to be important for full degranulation and IL-2 mRNA accumulation in WT cells. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that Fyn kinase interacts with TRPC 3/6/7 channels after IgE-antigen stimulation, but its association is not related to protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Results indicate Fyn kinase mediates the receptor-dependent activation of TRPC channels that contribute to degranulation in Fc{epsilon}RI-stimulated mast cells.

  20. Analysis of dependence of fission cross section and angular anisotropy of the 235U fission fragment escape induced by neutrons of intermediate energies (epsilon < or approximately200 keV) on target nucleus orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data on dependence of fission cross section Σsub(f) (epsilon) and angular anisotropy W(epsilon, 0 deg)/W(epsilon, 90 deg) of sup(235)U fission fragment escape by neutrons with energy epsilon=100 and 200 keV on orientation of target nuclei are analyzed. 235 U (Isup(πsub(0))=7/2sup(-)) nuclei were orientated at the expense of interaction of quadrupole nucleus momenta with nonuniform electric field of uranyl-rubidium nitrate crystal at crystal cooling to T=0.2 K. The analysis was carried out with three different sets of permeability factors T(epsilon). Results of the analysis weakly depend on T(epsilon) choice. It is shown that a large number of adjusting parameters (six fissionabilities γsup(f)(Jsup(π), epsilon) and six momenta sub(Jsup(π))) permit to described experimental data on Σsub(f)(epsilon) and W(epsilon, 0 deg)/W(epsilon, 90 deg), obtained at epsilon=200 keV by introducing essential dependence of γsup(f)(Jsup(π), epsilon) and sub(Jsup(π)) on Jsup(π). Estimations of fission cross sections Σsub(f)(epsilon) and angular distribution W(epsilon, n vector) up to T approximately equal to 0.01 K in two geometries of the experiment: the orientation axis is parallel and perpendicular to momentum direction p vector of incident neutrons, are conducted

  1. Resveratrol-loaded poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) microparticles: preparation and characterization; Microparticulas de poli({epsilon}-caprolactona) contendo resveratrol: preparacao e caracterizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Resveratrol-loaded poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) (PCL) microparticles were obtained by simple emulsion/solvent evaporation method. Three drug-loaded formulations were prepared with the aim of investigating the influence of composition on the encapsulation efficiency. Morphological and spectroscopic methods were performed for these materials. The microparticles revealed residual moisture close to 1.5% and encapsulation efficiency above 80%. Spherical shape and smooth surface were observed by SEM. No pores were either verified. Resveratrol-loaded microparticles showed an average particle size of around 50 {mu}m. X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that the microencapsulation reduced the drug crystallinity. The FTIR results suggest that no chemical bond was formed between polymer and drug. (author)

  2. Nutrients Turned into Toxins: Microbiota Modulation of Nutrient Properties in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Prado, Raul; Esteras, Raquel; Perez-Gomez, Maria Vanessa; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Gonzalez-Parra, Emilio; Sanz, Ana B; Ortiz, Alberto; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores

    2017-05-12

    In chronic kidney disease (CKD), accumulation of uremic toxins is associated with an increased risk of death. Some uremic toxins are ingested with the diet, such as phosphate and star fruit-derived caramboxin. Others result from nutrient processing by gut microbiota, yielding precursors of uremic toxins or uremic toxins themselves. These nutrients include l-carnitine, choline/phosphatidylcholine, tryptophan and tyrosine, which are also sold over-the-counter as nutritional supplements. Physicians and patients alike should be aware that, in CKD patients, the use of these supplements may lead to potentially toxic effects. Unfortunately, most patients with CKD are not aware of their condition. Some of the dietary components may modify the gut microbiota, increasing the number of bacteria that process them to yield uremic toxins, such as trimethylamine N-Oxide (TMAO), p-cresyl sulfate, indoxyl sulfate and indole-3 acetic acid. Circulating levels of nutrient-derived uremic toxins are associated to increased risk of death and cardiovascular disease and there is evidence that this association may be causal. Future developments may include maneuvers to modify gut processing or absorption of these nutrients or derivatives to improve CKD patient outcomes.

  3. Cyanobacterial toxins: risk management for health protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codd, Geoffrey A.; Morrison, Louise F.; Metcalf, James S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the occurrence and properties of cyanobacterial toxins, with reference to the recognition and management of the human health risks which they may present. Mass populations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria in natural and controlled waterbodies include blooms and scums of planktonic species, and mats and biofilms of benthic species. Toxic cyanobacterial populations have been reported in freshwaters in over 45 countries, and in numerous brackish, coastal, and marine environments. The principal toxigenic genera are listed. Known sources of the families of cyanobacterial toxins (hepato-, neuro-, and cytotoxins, irritants, and gastrointestinal toxins) are briefly discussed. Key procedures in the risk management of cyanobacterial toxins and cells are reviewed, including derivations (where sufficient data are available) of tolerable daily intakes (TDIs) and guideline values (GVs) with reference to the toxins in drinking water, and guideline levels for toxigenic cyanobacteria in bathing waters. Uncertainties and some gaps in knowledge are also discussed, including the importance of exposure media (animal and plant foods), in addition to potable and recreational waters. Finally, we present an outline of steps to develop and implement risk management strategies for cyanobacterial cells and toxins in waterbodies, with recent applications and the integration of Hazard Assessment Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles

  4. Computational Studies of Snake Venom Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Paola G; Ramírez, David; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Caballero, Julio; Kaas, Quentin; González, Wendy

    2017-12-22

    Most snake venom toxins are proteins, and participate to envenomation through a diverse array of bioactivities, such as bleeding, inflammation, and pain, cytotoxic, cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects. The venom of a single snake species contains hundreds of toxins, and the venoms of the 725 species of venomous snakes represent a large pool of potentially bioactive proteins. Despite considerable discovery efforts, most of the snake venom toxins are still uncharacterized. Modern bioinformatics tools have been recently developed to mine snake venoms, helping focus experimental research on the most potentially interesting toxins. Some computational techniques predict toxin molecular targets, and the binding mode to these targets. This review gives an overview of current knowledge on the ~2200 sequences, and more than 400 three-dimensional structures of snake toxins deposited in public repositories, as well as of molecular modeling studies of the interaction between these toxins and their molecular targets. We also describe how modern bioinformatics have been used to study the snake venom protein phospholipase A2, the small basic myotoxin Crotamine, and the three-finger peptide Mambalgin.

  5. Computational Studies of Snake Venom Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola G. Ojeda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most snake venom toxins are proteins, and participate to envenomation through a diverse array of bioactivities, such as bleeding, inflammation, and pain, cytotoxic, cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects. The venom of a single snake species contains hundreds of toxins, and the venoms of the 725 species of venomous snakes represent a large pool of potentially bioactive proteins. Despite considerable discovery efforts, most of the snake venom toxins are still uncharacterized. Modern bioinformatics tools have been recently developed to mine snake venoms, helping focus experimental research on the most potentially interesting toxins. Some computational techniques predict toxin molecular targets, and the binding mode to these targets. This review gives an overview of current knowledge on the ~2200 sequences, and more than 400 three-dimensional structures of snake toxins deposited in public repositories, as well as of molecular modeling studies of the interaction between these toxins and their molecular targets. We also describe how modern bioinformatics have been used to study the snake venom protein phospholipase A2, the small basic myotoxin Crotamine, and the three-finger peptide Mambalgin.

  6. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinastepe, Neslihan; Küçük, Burcu Bal; Oral, Koray

    2015-10-01

    Botulinum toxin, the most potent biological toxin, has been shown to be effective for a variety of disorders in several medical conditions, when used both therapeutically and cosmetically. In recent years, there has been a rising trend in the use of this pharmacological agent to control bruxing activity, despite its reported adverse effects. The aim of this review was to provide a brief overview to clarify the underlying essential ideas for the use of botulinum toxin in bruxism based on available scientific papers. An electronic literature search was performed to identify publications related to botulinum toxin and its use for bruxism in PubMed. Hand searching of relevant articles was also made to identify additional studies. Of the eleven identified studies, only two were randomized controlled trials, compared with the effectiveness of botulinum toxins on the reduction in the frequency of bruxism events and myofascial pain after injection. The authors of these studies concluded that botulinum toxin could be used as an effective treatment for reducing nocturnal bruxism and myofascial pain in patients with bruxism. Evidence-based research was limited on this topic. More randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm that botulinum toxin is safe and reliable for routine clinical use in bruxism.

  7. Engineering toxins for 21st century therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaddock, John A; Acharya, K Ravi

    2011-04-01

    'Engineering Toxins for 21st Century Therapies' (9-10 September 2010) was part of the Royal Society International Seminar series held at the Kavli International Centre, UK. Participants were assembled from a range of disciplines (academic, industry, regulatory, public health) to discuss the future potential of toxin-based therapies. The meeting explored how the current structural and mechanistic knowledge of toxins could be used to engineer future toxin-based therapies. To date, significant progress has been made in the design of novel recombinant biologics based on domains of natural toxins, engineered to exhibit advantageous properties. The meeting concluded, firstly that future product development vitally required the appropriate combination of creativity and innovation that can come from the academic, biotechnology and pharma sectors. Second, that continued investigation into understanding the basic science of the toxins and their targets was essential in order to develop new opportunities for the existing products and to create new products with enhanced properties. Finally, it was concluded that the clinical potential for development of novel biologics based on toxin domains was evident. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  8. Stellar model chromospheres. IV - The formation of the H-epsilon feature in the sun /G2 V/ and Arcturus /K2 III/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T. R.; Linsky, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The formation of the Balmer-series member H-epsilon in the near-red wing of the Ca II H line is discussed for two cases: the sun (H-epsilon absorption profile) and Arcturus (H-epsilon emission profile). It is shown that although the H-epsilon source functions in both stars are dominated by the Balmer-continuum radiation field through photoionizations, the line-formation problems in the two stars are quantitatively different, owing to a substantial difference in the relative importance of the stellar chromosphere temperature inversion as compared with the stellar photosphere.

  9. Mouse splenic and bone marrow cell populations that express high-affinity Fc epsilon receptors and produce interleukin 4 are highly enriched in basophils.

    OpenAIRE

    Seder, R A; Paul, W E; Dvorak, A M; Sharkis, S J; Kagey-Sobotka, A; Niv, Y; Finkelman, F D; Barbieri, S A; Galli, S J; Plaut, M

    1991-01-01

    Splenic and bone marrow cells from normal mice, and from mice that have been polyclonally activated by injection of anti-IgD antibody, contain cells that produce interleukin 4 (IL-4) in response to crosslinkage of Fc epsilon receptors (Fc epsilon R) or Fc gamma R or to ionomycin. Isolated Fc epsilon R+ cells have recently been shown to contain all of the IL-4-producing capacity of the nonlymphoid compartment of spleen and bone marrow. Here, purified Fc epsilon R+ cells are shown to be enriche...

  10. Role of Botulinum Toxin in Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Mascarenhas, Sonia S; Hashmi, Aqeel; Prokop, Larry J; John, Vineeth; Okusaga, Olaoluwa; Singh, Balwinder

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this review was to consolidate the evidence concerning the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (onabotulinumtoxinA) in depression. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, and Scopus through May 5, 2014, for studies evaluating the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in depression. Only randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. A pooled mean difference in primary depression score, and pooled odds ratio for response and remission rate with 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran Q test and χ statistic. Of the 639 articles that were initially retrieved, 5 studies enrolling 194 subjects (age 49±9.6 y) were included in the systematic review, and 3 randomized controlled trials enrolling 134 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed a significant decrease in mean primary depression scores among patients who received botulinum toxin A compared with placebo (-9.80; 95% CI, -12.90 to -6.69) with modest heterogeneity between the studies (Cochran Q test, χ=70). Response and remission rates were 8.3 and 4.6 times higher, respectively, among patients receiving botulinum toxin A compared with placebo, with no heterogeneity between the studies. The 2 studies excluded from the meta-analysis also found a significant decrease in primary depression scores in patients after receiving botulinum toxin A. A few subjects had minor side effects, which were similar between the groups receiving botulinum toxin and those receiving placebo. This study suggests that botulinum toxin A can produce significant improvement in depressive symptoms and is a safe adjunctive treatment for patients receiving pharmacotherapy for depression. Future trials are needed to evaluate the antidepressant effect per se of botulinum toxin A and to further elucidate the underlying antidepressant mechanism of botulinum toxin A.

  11. Botulinum toxin: yesterday, today, tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Artemenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin (BoNT is a bacterial neurotoxin presented with seven serotypes that inhibit neurotransmitter release from nerve endings. The serotypes of BoNT are antigenically dissimilar, act via different, but interconnected mechanisms, and are not interchangeable. The activity of BoNT is associated with impaired neuroexocytosis occurring in several steps: from the binding of BoNT to its specific receptor on the axon terminal membrane to the proteolytic enzymatic cleavage of SNARE substrate. The effect of BoNT is considered to be restricted to the peripheral nervous system, but when given in particularly high doses, it has been recently shown to affect individual brain structures. In addition, by modulating peripheral afferentation, BoNT may influence the excitability of central neuronal structures at both spinal and cortical levels. Only BoNT serotypes A and B are used in clinical practice and aesthetic medicine. The type A has gained the widest acceptance as a therapeutic agent for more than 100 abnormalities manifesting themselves as muscular hyperactivity, hyperfunction of endocrine gland, and chronic pain. The effect of BoNT preparations shows itself 2-5 days after injection, lasts 3 months or more, and gradually decreases with as a result of pharmacokinetic and intracellular reparative processes. Biotechnology advances and potentialities allow purposefully modification of the protein molecular structure of BoNT, which expands the use and efficiency of performed therapy with neurotoxins. Recombinant technologies provide a combination of major therapeutic properties of each used BoNT serotype and expand indications for recombinant chimeric toxins.

  12. [Botulinum toxin type A in headache treatment : Established and experimental indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, C; Holle-Lee, D; Straube, A

    2016-08-01

    In recent years botulinum toxin type A has been used increasingly more in the treatment of specific headache disorders. Especially regarding chronic migraine with and without combined medication overuse, convincing randomized studies have proven the efficacy of this treatment option and have led to approval for this indication. Regarding other headache entities, such as episodic migraine, tension-type headache, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC), neuralgic, neuropathic and myofascial pain, currently available scientific data on the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A are scarce and often ambiguous. The exact underlying mechanisms of the influence of botulinum toxin type A on the pathophysiology of headache are not completely clear but an influence on the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) seems to play a crucial role. This article summarizes the most important studies as well as experiences of treatment with botulinum toxin type A regarding different headache entities.

  13. Toxin production in Dinophysis and the fate of these toxins in marine mussels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Tor

    Diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) poses a considerable threat to food safety and to the economy of shellfish fishers and farmers in many parts of the world. Thousands of DSP intoxications have been reported, and bivalve harvesting can sometimes be closed down several months in a row. The toxins....... acuta. I grew the two species in laboratory cultures at different irradiances (7-130 μmol photons m-2 s-1) and with different food availability. The results showed that irradiance had no effects on toxin profiles, and only limited effects of the cellular toxin contents. Rather, toxin production rates...... are primarily produced by the marine mixotrophic dinoflagellates Dinophysis spp., known to occur in most parts of the world. Dinophysis can, along with other planktonic organisms, be consumed by filter-feeding bivalves, and thus the toxins can accumulate. Dinophysis can produce the three toxin groups, okadaic...

  14. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with a large number of high affinity binding sites in the cell membrane. Binding of 125 I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) is linear with time for 40 to 50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels (10 to 15 picomole cAMP/mg cellular protein) at steady state. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl - -independent Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorpromazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na + entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na + influx provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na + during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na + but not Cl - influx preparations can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na + /H + neutral exchange system. Data on the coupling relationship between Na + transport and the intra- and extracellular pH in the enterocytes show that an amiloride-sensitive electroneutral Na + /H + exchange process occurs. This coupling between Na + and H + is partially inhibited by CT and dbcAMP, suggesting that the Na + /H + exchange may be a cAMP-regulated process. 31 references, 32 figures, 5 tables

  15. Growth and microstructure of iron nitride layers and pore formation in {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middendorf, C.; Mader, W. [Univ. Bonn, Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie, Bonn (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    Layers of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N and {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N on ferrite were produced by nitriding iron single crystals or rolled sheets of iron in flowing ammonia at 520 C. The nitride layers were characterised using X-ray diffraction, light microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The compound layer consists of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N at the surface and of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N facing the ferrite. After 4 h of nitriding, pores develop in the near surface region of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N showing more or less open porosity. Growth of the entire compound layer as well as of the massive and the porous {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N sublayer is diffusion-controlled and follows a parabolic growth rate. The {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N layer is formed as a transition phase within a narrow interval of nitrogen activity, and it shows little growth in thickness. The transformation of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N to {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N is topotactic, where the orientation of the closed-packed iron layers of the crystal structures is preserved. Determination of lattice plane spacings was possible by X-ray diffraction, and this was correlated to the nitrogen content of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N. While the porous layer exhibits an enhanced nitrogen content corresponding to the chemical composition Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.1}, the massive e Fe{sub 3}N layer corresponds to Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.0}. The pore formation in {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.1} is concluded to be the result of excess nitrogen atoms on non-structural sites, which have a high mobility. Therefore, recombination of excess nitrogen to molecular N{sub 2} at lattice defects is preferred in {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N with high nitrogen content compared to stoichiometric {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.0} with nitrogen on only structural sites. (orig.)

  16. Botulinum toxin type A versus botulinum toxin type B for cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Gonçalo S; Castelão, Mafalda; Rodrigues, Filipe B; Marques, Raquel E; Ferreira, Joaquim; Sampaio, Cristina; Moore, Austen P; Costa, João

    2016-10-26

    , with a higher probability of benefit from BtA treatment. None of the trials were free of for-profit bias, nor did they provide information regarding registered study protocols. All trials evaluated the effect of a single Bt treatment session, and not repeated treatment sessions, using doses from 100 U to 250 U of BtA (all onabotulinumtoxinA, or Botox, formulations) and 5000 U to 10,000 U of BtB (rimabotulinumtoxinB, or Myobloc/Neurobloc).We found no difference between the two types of botulinum toxin in terms of overall efficacy, with a mean difference of -1.44 (95% CI -3.58 to 0.70) points lower on the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) for BtB-treated participants, measured at two to four weeks after injection. The proportion of participants with adverse events was also not different between BtA and BtB (BtB versus BtA risk ratio (RR) 1.40; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.96). However, when compared to BtA, treatment with BtB was associated with an increased risk of one adverse events of special interest, namely treatment-related sore throat/dry mouth (BtB versus BtA RR of 4.39; 95% CI 2.43 to 7.91). Treatment-related dysphagia (swallowing difficulties) was not different between BtA and BtB (RR 2.89; 95% CI 0.80 to 10.41). The two types of botulinum toxin were otherwise clinically non-distinguishable in all the remaining outcomes. The previous version of this review did not include any trials, since these were still ongoing at the time. Therefore, with this update we are able to change the conclusions of this review. There is low quality evidence that a single treatment session of BtA (specifically onabotulinumtoxinA) and a single treatment session of BtB (rimabotulinumtoxinB) are equally effective and safe in the treatment of adults with certain types of cervical dystonia. Treatment with BtB appears to present an increased risk of sore throat/dry mouth, compared to BtA. Overall, there is no clinical evidence from these single-treatment trials to support or

  17. Conditional Toxin Splicing Using a Split Intein System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Spencer C; O'Sullivan, Connor; Howard, Perry L

    2017-01-01

    Protein toxin splicing mediated by split inteins can be used as a strategy for conditional cell ablation. The approach requires artificial fragmentation of a potent protein toxin and tethering each toxin fragment to a split intein fragment. The toxin-intein fragments are, in turn, fused to dimerization domains, such that addition of a dimerizing agent reconstitutes the split intein. These chimeric toxin-intein fusions remain nontoxic until the dimerizer is added, resulting in activation of intein splicing and ligation of toxin fragments to form an active toxin. Considerations for the engineering and implementation of conditional toxin splicing (CTS) systems include: choice of toxin split site, split site (extein) chemistry, and temperature sensitivity. The following method outlines design criteria and implementation notes for CTS using a previously engineered system for splicing a toxin called sarcin, as well as for developing alternative CTS systems.

  18. Sox6 directly silences epsilon globin expression in definitive erythropoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Sox6 is a member of the Sox transcription factor family that is defined by the conserved high mobility group (HMG DNA binding domain, first described in the testis determining gene, Sry. Previous studies have suggested that Sox6 plays a role in the development of the central nervous system, cartilage, and muscle. In the Sox6-deficient mouse, p100H, epsilony globin is persistently expressed, and increased numbers of nucleated red cells are present in the fetal circulation. Transfection assays in GM979 (erythroleukemic cells define a 36-base pair region of the epsilony proximal promoter that is critical for Sox6 mediated repression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays demonstrate that Sox6 acts as a repressor by directly binding to the epsilony promoter. The normal expression of Sox6 in wild-type fetal liver and the ectopic expression of epsilony in p100H homozygous fetal liver demonstrate that Sox6 functions in definitive erythropoiesis. The present study shows that Sox6 is required for silencing of epsilony globin in definitive erythropoiesis and suggests a role for Sox6 in erythroid cell maturation. Thus, Sox6 regulation of epsilony globin might provide a novel therapeutical target in the treatment of hemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia.

  19. Fast and Epsilon-Optimal Discretized Pursuit Learning Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, JunQi; Wang, Cheng; Zhou, MengChu

    2015-10-01

    Learning automata (LA) are powerful tools for reinforcement learning. A discretized pursuit LA is the most popular one among them. During an iteration its operation consists of three basic phases: 1) selecting the next action; 2) finding the optimal estimated action; and 3) updating the state probability. However, when the number of actions is large, the learning becomes extremely slow because there are too many updates to be made at each iteration. The increased updates are mostly from phases 1 and 3. A new fast discretized pursuit LA with assured ε -optimality is proposed to perform both phases 1 and 3 with the computational complexity independent of the number of actions. Apart from its low computational complexity, it achieves faster convergence speed than the classical one when operating in stationary environments. This paper can promote the applications of LA toward the large-scale-action oriented area that requires efficient reinforcement learning tools with assured ε -optimality, fast convergence speed, and low computational complexity for each iteration.

  20. The NH2-terminal php domain of the alpha subunit of the Escherichia coli replicase binds the epsilon proofreading subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Anna; McHenry, Charles S

    2006-05-05

    The alpha subunit of the replicase of all bacteria contains a php domain, initially identified by its similarity to histidinol phosphatase but of otherwise unknown function (Aravind, L., and Koonin, E. V. (1998) Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 3746-3752). Deletion of 60 residues from the NH2 terminus of the alpha php domain destroys epsilon binding. The minimal 255-residue php domain, estimated by sequence alignment with homolog YcdX, is insufficient for epsilon binding. However, a 320-residue segment including sequences that immediately precede the polymerase domain binds epsilon with the same affinity as the 1160-residue full-length alpha subunit. A subset of mutations of a conserved acidic residue (Asp43 in Escherichia coli alpha) present in the php domain of all bacterial replicases resulted in defects in epsilon binding. Using sequence alignments, we show that the prototypical gram+ Pol C, which contains the polymerase and proofreading activities within the same polypeptide chain, has an epsilon-like sequence inserted in a surface loop near the center of the homologous YcdX protein. These findings suggest that the php domain serves as a platform to enable coordination of proofreading and polymerase activities during chromosomal replication.

  1. An Analysis of the Long-term Photometric Behavior of epsilon Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppenborg, B. K.; Hopkins, J. L.; Stencel, R. E.

    2012-10-01

    The lure of a 50% reduction in light has brought a multitude of observers and researchers to epsilon Aur every twenty-seven years, but few have paid attention to the system outside of eclipse. As early as the late 1800s, it was clear that the system undergoes some form of quasi-periodic variation outside of totality, but few considered this effect in their research until the mid-1950s. In this work we focus exclusively on the out-of-eclipse (OOE) variations seen in this system. We have digitized twenty-seven sources of historic photometry from eighty-one different observers. Two of these sources provide twenty-seven years of inter-eclipse UBV photometry which we have analyzed using modern period finding techniques. We have discovered the F-star variations are multi-periodic with at least two periods that evolve in time at DP ≈ -1.5 day/year. These periods are detected when they manifest as near-sinusoidal variations at 3,200-day intervals. We discuss our work in an evolutionary context by comparing the behavior found in epsilon Aur with bona-fide supergiant and post-AGB stars of similar spectral type. Based upon our qualitative comparison, we find the photometric behavior of the F-star in the epsilon Aur system is more indicative of supergiant behavior. Therefore the star is more likely to be a "traditional supergiant" than a post-AGB object. We encourage continued photometric monitoring of this system to test our predictions.

  2. Initial Evaluation of Processing Methods for an Epsilon Metal Waste Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Zumhoff, Mac R.

    2012-01-01

    During irradiation of nuclear fuel in a reactor, the five metals, Mo, Pd, Rh, Ru, and Tc, migrate to the fuel grain boundaries and form small metal particles of an alloy known as epsilon metal ((var e psilon)-metal). When the fuel is dissolved in a reprocessing plant, these metal particles remain behind with a residue - the undissolved solids (UDS). Some of these same metals that comprise this alloy that have not formed the alloy are dissolved into the aqueous stream. These metals limit the waste loading for a borosilicate glass that is being developed for the reprocessing wastes. Epsilon metal is being developed as a waste form for the noble metals from a number of waste streams in the aqueous reprocessing of used nuclear fuel (UNF) - (1) the (var e psilon)-metal from the UDS, (2) soluble Tc (ion-exchanged), and (3) soluble noble metals (TRUEX raffinate). Separate immobilization of these metals has benefits other than allowing an increase in the glass waste loading. These materials are quite resistant to dissolution (corrosion) as evidenced by the fact that they survive the chemically aggressive conditions in the fuel dissolver. Remnants of (var e psilon)-metal particles have survived in the geologically natural reactors found in Gabon, Africa, indicating that they have sufficient durability to survive for ∼ 2.5 billion years in a reducing geologic environment. Additionally, the (var e psilon)-metal can be made without additives and incorporate sufficient foreign material (oxides) that are also present in the UDS. Although (var e psilon)-metal is found in fuel and Gabon as small particles (∼10 (micro)m in diameter) and has survived intact, an ideal waste form is one in which the surface area is minimized. Therefore, the main effort in developing (var e psilon)-metal as a waste form is to develop a process to consolidate the particles into a monolith. Individually, these metals have high melting points (2617 C for Mo to 1552 C for Pd) and the alloy is expected

  3. Occlusion therapy of unilateral amblyopia with botulinum toxin induced ptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkiadakis, Ioannis; Iliaki, Olga; Kalyvianaki, Maria I; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of botulinum toxin induced ptosis as an occlusion method to treat unilateral deep strabismic amblyopia in two uncooperative children, we injected 0.2 ml of diluted botulinum toxin in the levator palpaebrae; low sedation was necessary in one of the two children. In both cases a marked ptosis was achieved, which lasted about four weeks and then gradually resolved completely. The visual acuity of the ablyopic eye increased in both children, making patching easy thereafter. One child developed amblyopia in the injected eye, which was handled successfully using part-time occlusion. No other side effects were noted. Whether this new method could be a simple, safe and effective alternative method of occlusion for the treatment of deep amblyopia in uncooperative children needs to be proven with a larger series of children.

  4. Cryogenic grinding of electrospun poly-epsilon-caprolactone mesh submerged in liquid media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knotek, P.; Pouzar, M.; Buzgo, Matej; Křížková, B.; Vlček, Milan; Míčková, Andrea; Plencner, Martin; Návesník, J.; Amler, Evžen; Bělina, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2012), s. 1366-1374 ISSN 0928-4931 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) GA UK 330611; GA MŠk(CZ) GA UK 384311; GA MŠk(CZ) GA UK 99610; GA MŠk(CZ) ME 10145; GA MŠk(CZ) MSM0021627501; GA MŠk(CZ) ERA-NET Carsila ME10145; EU FP7(XE) BIOSCENT ID 214539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : cryogenic grinding * poly-epsilon-caprolactone * nano/micro-mesh Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.404, year: 2012

  5. A unique airborne observation. [Martian atmospheric temperature and abundances from occultation of Epsilon Geminorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, J. L.; Dunham, E.; Church, C.

    1976-01-01

    The occultation of 3rd magnitude Epsilon Geminorum by Mars was observed using a 36-inch telescope equipped with a photoelectric photometer at the bent Cassegrain focus, carried aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory at altitudes up to 45,000 feet. Scintillation from the earth's atmosphere was greatly reduced in comparison with ground observations. The observations clearly show the central flash, caused by the symmetrical refraction of light by the atmosphere of Mars. The data are being analyzed to obtain temperature profiles and to assess the relative abundance of argon and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of the planet.

  6. Super-resolution with a positive epsilon multi-quantum-well super-lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, A. O.; Giannini, V.; Maier, S. A.; Phillips, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    We design an anisotropic and dichroic quantum metamaterial that is able to achieve super-resolution without the need for a negative permittivity. When exploring the parameters of the structure, we take into account the limits of semiconductor fabrication technology based on quantum well stacks. By heavily doping the structure with free electrons, we infer an anisotropic effective medium with a prolate ellipsoid dispersion curve which allows for near-diffractionless propagation of light (similar to an epsilon-near-zero hyperbolic lens). This, coupled with low absorption, allows us to resolve images at the sub-wavelength scale at distances 6 times greater than equivalent natural materials

  7. Goos-Hänchen shift of partially coherent light fields in epsilon-near-zero metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddin; Chuang, You-Lin; Qamar, Sajid; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2016-05-01

    The Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts in the reflected light are investigated both for p and s polarized partial coherent light beams incident on epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) metamaterials. In contrary to the coherent counterparts, the magnitude of GH shift becomes non-zero for p polarized partial coherent light beam; while GH shift can be relatively large with a small degree of spatial coherence for s polarized partial coherent beam. Dependence on the beam width and the permittivity of ENZ metamaterials is also revealed for partial coherent light fields. Our results on the GH shifts provide a direction on the applications for partial coherent light sources in ENZ metamaterials.

  8. epsilon : A tool to find a canonical basis of master integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausa, Mario

    2017-10-01

    In 2013, Henn proposed a special basis for a certain class of master integrals, which are expressible in terms of iterated integrals. In this basis, the master integrals obey a differential equation, where the right hand side is proportional to ɛ in d = 4 - 2 ɛ space-time dimensions. An algorithmic approach to find such a basis was found by Lee. We present the tool epsilon, an efficient implementation of Lee's algorithm based on the Fermat computer algebra system as computational back end.

  9. Effect of headspace CO2 concentration on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in MAP, irradiated fresh pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, A.D.; Smith, J.P.; Dodds, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of five initial levels of CO2 (15, 30, 45, 60, and 75%) and three irradiation doses (0, 0.5, and 1.0 kGy) on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in inoculated fresh pork were studied using factorial design experiments. Headspace CO2 levels increased in all samples during storage at 15 degrees C. In most treatments, spoilage preceded toxigenesis. Toxin production occurred faster in samples initially packaged with 15 to 30% of CO2 while higher levels of CO2 (45-75%) delayed toxin production. Low-dose irradiation delayed toxin production at all levels of CO2 in the package headspace. Contrary to expectations, including a CO2 absorbent in the package enhanced toxin production by C. botulinum. This was attributed to production of H2 by the CO2 absorbent, possibly resulting in a decrease in the oxido-reduction potential of the meat

  10. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Is an Inductor of Transcription Factor Activating Protein 2 Epsilon Expression during Chondrogenic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Niebler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor AP-2ε (activating enhancer-binding protein epsilon is expressed in cartilage of humans and mice. However, knowledge about regulatory mechanisms influencing AP-2ε expression is limited. Using quantitative real time PCR, we detected a significant increase in AP-2ε mRNA expression comparing initial and late stages of chondrogenic differentiation processes in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, in these samples the expression pattern of the prominent hypoxia marker gene angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4 strongly correlated with that of AP-2ε suggesting that hypoxia might represent an external regulator of AP-2ε expression in mammals. In order to show this, experiments directly targeting the activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1, the complex mediating responses to oxygen deprivation, were performed. While the HIF1-activating compounds 2,2′-dipyridyl and desferrioxamine resulted in significantly enhanced mRNA concentration of AP-2ε, siRNA against HIF1α led to a significantly reduced expression rate of AP-2ε. Additionally, we detected a significant upregulation of the AP-2ε mRNA level after oxygen deprivation. In sum, these different experimental approaches revealed a novel role for the HIF1 complex in the regulation of the AP-2ε gene in cartilaginous cells and underlined the important role of hypoxia as an important external regulatory stimulus during chondrogenic differentiation modulating the expression of downstream transcription factors.

  11. NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis - 2015. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  12. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of resistant pathogens.

  13. Bacterial toxins as pathogen weapons against phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana edo Vale

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxins are virulence factors that manipulate host cell functions and take over the control of vital processes of living organisms to favour microbial infection. Some toxins directly target innate immune cells, thereby annihilating a major branch of the host immune response. In this review we will focus on bacterial toxins that act from the extracellular milieu and hinder the function of macrophages and neutrophils. In particular, we will concentrate on toxins from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that manipulate cell signalling or induce cell death by either imposing direct damage to the host cells cytoplasmic membrane or enzymatically modifying key eukaryotic targets. Outcomes regarding pathogen dissemination, host damage and disease progression will be discussed.

  14. How Parkinsonian Toxins Dysregulate the Autophagy Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben K. Dagda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, Parkinsonian toxins (6-hydroxydopamine, MPP+, paraquat, and rotenone have been widely employed as in vivo and in vitro chemical models of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Alterations in mitochondrial homeostasis, protein quality control pathways, and more recently, autophagy/mitophagy have been implicated in neurotoxin models of PD. Here, we highlight the molecular mechanisms by which different PD toxins dysregulate autophagy/mitophagy and how alterations of these pathways play beneficial or detrimental roles in dopamine neurons. The convergent and divergent effects of PD toxins on mitochondrial function and autophagy/mitophagy are also discussed in this review. Furthermore, we propose new diagnostic tools and discuss how pharmacological modulators of autophagy/mitophagy can be developed as disease-modifying treatments for PD. Finally, we discuss the critical need to identify endogenous and synthetic forms of PD toxins and develop efficient health preventive programs to mitigate the risk of developing PD.

  15. NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  16. Factors affecting growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum type E on irradiated (0.3 Mrad) chicken skins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firstenberg-Eden, R.; Rowley, D.B.; Shattuck, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    A model system (chicken skins with chicken exudate) was used to determine if Clostridium botulinum type E (Beluga) spores, stressed by low dose irradiation, would develop and produce toxin at abuse temperatures of 10 and 30 0 C in the absence of characteristic spoilage. Unstressed spores germinated, multiplied, and produced toxin on vacuum-packed chicken skins, stored at either 30 or 10 0 C. Cell numbers increased faster and toxin was evident sooner at 30 0 C than at 10 0 C. At 30 0 C, growth occurred and toxin was produced more slowly when samples were incubated aerobically than anaerobically. When samples were incubated aerobically at 10 0 C, no toxin was detected within a test period of 14 days. An irradiation dose of 0.3 Mrad at 5 0 C reduced a spore population on vacuum-sealed chicken skins by about 90%. The surviving population produced toxin at 30 0 C under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, at 10 0 C no toxin was detected even on skins incubated anaerobically. Under the worst conditions (30 0 C, vacuum packed) toxin was not detected prior to characteristic spoilage caused by the natural flora surviving 0.3 Mrad

  17. Updates on tetanus toxin: a fundamental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ahaduzzaman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium tetani is an anaerobic bacterium that produces second most poisonous protein toxins than any other bacteria. Tetanus in animals is sporadic in nature but difficult to combat even by using antibiotics and antiserum. It is crucial to understand the fundamental mechanisms and signals that control toxin production for advance research and medicinal uses. This review was intended for better understanding the basic patho-physiology of tetanus and neurotoxins (TeNT among the audience of related field.

  18. Steady-state levels of G-protein beta-subunit expression are regulated by treatment of cells with bacterial toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, D.C.; Northup, J.K.; Malbon, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Cultures of 3T3-L1 cells were incubated with either 10 ng/ml cholera toxin or 10 ng/ml pertussis toxin from 4 days prior to the initiation of differentiation and throughout the subsequent incubation. Toxin concentrations were sufficient to completely prevent the labelling of alpha-subunits with [ 32 P]NAD + and pertussis toxin and to prevent by more than 90% the labelling with [ 32 P]NAD + and cholera toxin in membranes prepared from these cells. Neither toxin prevented the differentiation to the adipocyte phenotype. Neither toxin prevented the increases in the relative amounts of G-proteins which occur upon differentiation. Both toxins dramatically decreased the amount of beta-subunits. As measured by quantitative immunoblotting with antisera specific for both the 35 kDa and 36 kDa beta-subunits, levels of beta-subunit were decreased by more than 50% of steady-state level of control cells. Thus, bacterial toxins which modifies G-protein alpha-subunits are capable of modulating the levels of beta-subunits in vivo. The basis for the regulation of G-protein subunit expression by bacterial toxins is under study

  19. Botulinum toxin therapy for limb dystonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, D M; Aminoff, M J; Olney, R K

    1992-03-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of botulinum toxin in 17 patients with limb dystonias (10 with occupational cramps, three with idiopathic dystonia unrelated to activity, and two each with post-stroke and parkinsonian dystonia) in a placebo-controlled, blinded study. We identified affected muscles clinically and by recording the EMG from implanted wire electrodes at rest and during performance of tasks that precipitated abnormal postures. There were three injections given with graded doses of toxin (average doses, 5 to 10, 10 to 20, and 20 to 40 units per muscle) and one with placebo, in random order. Subjective improvement occurred after 53% of injections of botulinum toxin, and this was substantial in 24%. Only one patient (7%) improved after placebo injection. Subjective improvement occurred in 82% of patients with at least one dose of toxin, lasting for 1 to 4 months. Response rates were similar between clinical groups. Objective evaluation failed to demonstrate significant improvement following treatment with toxin compared with placebo. The major side effect was transient focal weakness after 53% of injections of toxin.

  20. [Adsorbent effect of activated carbon on small molecular uremic toxin and its influence factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yun-sheng; Li, Jun

    2003-06-01

    To analyze the adsorbent effect of activated carbon on uremic toxin and its influence factors. Uremic toxins (urea, creatinine and uric acid) were dissolved in the distilled water to obtain uremic toxic solution. Activated carbon was added to the solution, and the concentrations of uremic toxins were measured at different time spots. To determine the influence factors, some possible related materials, such as bile, amino acid, Ringer's, solution of glucose, HCl or NaOH respectively were added simultaneously. The concentrations of toxins in uremic toxic solution decreased 5 min after adding the activated carbon. The concentration of urea was the lowest at 30 min, but it increased after 50 min; while the concentrations of creatinine and uric acid reached the lowest level from 10 to 30 min after adding the activated carbon, and maintained at the same level after that. The bile, amino acid, electrolyte, glucose and pH value did not influence the adsorption of uric acid significantly, but they influenced the adsorption of urea and creatinine. Bile and amino acid influenced the concentration of urea remarkably, following glucose, NaOH and HCl. The effect of pH 2.0 solution on the creatinine concentration was the most significant, following glucose. Activated carbon has adsorptive effect on uremic toxins, but its adsorptive effect decreases as time goes on. Bile, glucose, amino acid, NaOH and HCl can affect the adsorptive effect of activated carbon on uremic toxins to some extent.

  1. Autoradiographic assay of mutants resistant to diphtheria toxin in mammalian cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, A.; Gingerich, J.D.; Duncan, A.M.V.; Heddle, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Diptheria toxin kills mammalian cells by ribosylating elongation factor 2, a protein factor necessary for protein synthesis. The frequency of cells able to form colonies in the presence of the toxin can be used as an assay for mutation to diphtheria toxin resistance. Resistance to diphtheria toxin can also be detected autoradiographically in cells exposed to [ 3 H]leucine after treatment with the toxin. In cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells, the frequency of such resistant cells is increased by exposure of the cells to γ-rays, ultraviolet light, ethylnitrosourea, mitomycin c, ethidium bromide, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The resistant cells form discrete microcolonies if they are allowed to divide several times before intoxication which indicates that they are genuine mutants. The assay is potentially adaptable to any cell population that can be intoxicated with diphtheria toxin and labeled with [ 3 H]leucine, whether or not the cells can form colonies. It may be useful, therefore, for measuring mutation rates in slowly growing or nondividing cell populations such as breast, brain, and liver, as well as in cells that do divide but cannot be readily cloned, such as the colonic epithelium. 23 references, 6 figures

  2. Development of an ELISA microarray assay for the sensitive and simultaneous detection of ten biodefense toxins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenko, Kathryn; Zhang, Yanfeng; Kostenko, Yulia; Fan, Yongfeng; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2014-10-21

    Plant and microbial toxins are considered bioterrorism threat agents because of their extreme toxicity and/or ease of availability. Additionally, some of these toxins are increasingly responsible for accidental food poisonings. The current study utilized an ELISA-based protein antibody microarray for the multiplexed detection of ten biothreat toxins, botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) A, B, C, D, E, F, ricin, shiga toxins 1 and 2 (Stx), and staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB), in buffer and complex biological matrices. The multiplexed assay displayed a sensitivity of 1.3 pg/mL (BoNT/A, BoNT/B, SEB, Stx-1 and Stx-2), 3.3 pg/mL (BoNT/C, BoNT/E, BoNT/F) and 8.2 pg/mL (BoNT/D, ricin). All assays demonstrated high accuracy (75-120 percent recovery) and reproducibility (most coefficients of variation < 20%). Quantification curves for the ten toxins were also evaluated in clinical samples (serum, plasma, nasal fluid, saliva, stool, and urine) and environmental samples (apple juice, milk and baby food) with overall minimal matrix effects. The multiplex assays were highly specific, with little crossreactivity observed between the selected toxin antibodies. The results demonstrate a multiplex microarray that improves current immunoassay sensitivity for biological warfare agents in buffer, clinical, and environmental samples.

  3. Regulating Toxin-Antitoxin Expression: Controlled Detonation of Intracellular Molecular Timebombs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finbarr Hayes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes for toxin-antitoxin (TA complexes are widely disseminated in bacteria, including in pathogenic and antibiotic resistant species. The toxins are liberated from association with the cognate antitoxins by certain physiological triggers to impair vital cellular functions. TAs also are implicated in antibiotic persistence, biofilm formation, and bacteriophage resistance. Among the ever increasing number of TA modules that have been identified, the most numerous are complexes in which both toxin and antitoxin are proteins. Transcriptional autoregulation of the operons encoding these complexes is key to ensuring balanced TA production and to prevent inadvertent toxin release. Control typically is exerted by binding of the antitoxin to regulatory sequences upstream of the operons. The toxin protein commonly works as a transcriptional corepressor that remodels and stabilizes the antitoxin. However, there are notable exceptions to this paradigm. Moreover, it is becoming clear that TA complexes often form one strand in an interconnected web of stress responses suggesting that their transcriptional regulation may prove to be more intricate than currently understood. Furthermore, interference with TA gene transcriptional autoregulation holds considerable promise as a novel antibacterial strategy: artificial release of the toxin factor using designer drugs is a potential approach to induce bacterial suicide from within.

  4. Affinity chromatography of tetanus toxin, tetanus toxoid, and botulinum A toxin on synaptosomes, and differentiation of their acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habermann, E [Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pharmakologisches Inst.

    1976-01-01

    /sup 125/I-labelled tetanus toxin and /sup 125/I-labelled botulinum A neurotoxin are known to be specifically bound to brain synaptosomes. In order to discriminate between active toxin and inactive admixtures present in the starting material or arising during iodination, synaptosome columns were prepared using bromacetylcellulose and/or kieselgur (Celite) as carriers. Both types of columns adsorb the toxins from low ionic strength medium and release them if the pH and ionic strength are raised. Botulinum toxin was eluted with lower ionic strength than tetanus toxin, and could be freed from nontoxic admixtures. Analysis by affinity chromatography disclosed partially toxoided tetanus toxin in both labelled and unlabelled toxin samples. High concentrations of formaldehyde (0.5%) destroyed both toxicity and affinity to the synaptosomes of tetanus toxin. Low concentrations of formaldehyde (0.05%) yielded a derivative of low toxicity which was still, however less firmly, bound to synaptosomes. Tetanus and botulinum toxin differ by their acceptors. Whereas unlabelled botulinum toxin is unable to compete with labelled tetanus toxin, unlabelled tetanus toxin slightly competes with botulinum toxin. Both labelled toxins display anomalous binding behaviour in that they cannot be displaced completely even with a large excess of unlabelled toxin.

  5. Affinity chromatography of tetanus toxin, tetanus toxoid, and botulinum A toxin on synaptosomes, and differentiation of their acceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habermann, E.

    1976-01-01

    125 I-labelled tetanus toxin and 125 I-labelled botulinum A neurotoxin are known to be specifically bound to brain synaptosomes. In order to discriminate between active toxin and inactive admixtures present in the starting material or arising during iodination, synaptosome columns were prepared using bromacetylcellulose and/or kieselgur (Celite) as carriers. Both types of columns adsorb the toxins from low ionic strength medium and release them if the pH and ionic strength are raised. Botulinum toxin was eluted with lower ionic strength than tetanus toxin, and could be freed from nontoxic admixtures. Analysis by affinity chromatography disclosed partially toxoided tetanus toxin in both labelled and unlabelled toxin samples. High concentrations of formaldehyde (0.5%) destroyed both toxicity and affinity to the synaptosomes of tetanus toxin. Low concentrations of formaldehyde (0.05%) yielded a derivative of low toxicity which was still, however less firmly, bound to synaptosomes. Tetanus and botulinum toxin differ by their acceptors. Whereas unlabelled botulinum toxin is unable to compete with labelled tetanus toxin, unlabelled tetanus toxin slightly competes with botulinum toxin. Both labelled toxins display anomalous binding behaviour in that they cannot be displaced completely even with a large excess of unlabelled toxin. (orig.) [de

  6. Biodistribution and catabolism of 18F-labeled N-epsilon-fructoselysine as a model of Amadori products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultsch, Christina; Hellwig, Michael; Pawelke, Beate; Bergmann, Ralf; Rode, Katrin; Pietzsch, Jens; Krause, René; Henle, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    Amadori products are formed in the early stage of the so-called Maillard reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids or proteins. Such nonenzymatic glycosylation may occur during the heating or storage of foods, but also under physiological conditions. N-epsilon-fructoselysine is formed via this reaction between the epsilon-amino group of peptide-bound lysine and glucose. Despite the fact that, in certain heated foods, up to 50% of lysyl moieties may be modified to such lysine derivatives, up to now, very little is known about the metabolic fate of alimentary administered Amadori compounds. In the present study, N-succinimidyl-4-[18F]fluorobenzoate was used to modify N-epsilon-fructoselysine at the alpha-amino group of the lysyl moiety. The in vitro stability of the resulting 4-[18F]fluorobenzoylated derivative was tested in different tissue homogenates. Furthermore, the 4-[18F]fluorobenzoylated N-epsilon-fructoselysine was used in positron emission tomography studies, as well as in studies concerning biodistribution and catabolism. The results show that the 4-[18F]fluorobenzoylated N-epsilon-fructoselysine is phosphorylated in vitro, as well as in vivo. This phosphorylation is caused by fructosamine 3-kinases and occurs in vivo, particularly in the kidneys. Despite the action of these enzymes, it was shown that a large part of the intravenously applied radiolabeled N-epsilon-fructoselysine was excreted nearly unchanged in the urine. Therefore, it was concluded that the predominant part of peptide-bound lysine that was fructosylated during food processing is not available for nutrition.

  7. Biodistribution and catabolism of {sup 18}F-labeled N-{epsilon}-fructoselysine as a model of Amadori products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultsch, Christina [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Research Center Rossendorf, P.O. Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Hellwig, Michael [Institute of Food Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Pawelke, Beate [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Research Center Rossendorf, P.O. Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Bergmann, Ralf [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Research Center Rossendorf, P.O. Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Rode, Katrin [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Research Center Rossendorf, P.O. Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Pietzsch, Jens [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Research Center Rossendorf, P.O. Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Krause, Rene [Institute of Food Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Henle, Thomas [Institute of Food Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    Amadori products are formed in the early stage of the so-called Maillard reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids or proteins. Such nonenzymatic glycosylation may occur during the heating or storage of foods, but also under physiological conditions. N-{epsilon}-fructoselysine is formed via this reaction between the {epsilon}-amino group of peptide-bound lysine and glucose. Despite the fact that, in certain heated foods, up to 50% of lysyl moieties may be modified to such lysine derivatives, up to now, very little is known about the metabolic fate of alimentary administered Amadori compounds. In the present study, N-succinimidyl-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoate was used to modify N-{epsilon}-fructoselysine at the {alpha}-amino group of the lysyl moiety. The in vitro stability of the resulting 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoylated derivative was tested in different tissue homogenates. Furthermore, the 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoylated N-{epsilon}-fructoselysine was used in positron emission tomography studies, as well as in studies concerning biodistribution and catabolism. The results show that the 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoylated N-{epsilon}-fructoselysine is phosphorylated in vitro, as well as in vivo. This phosphorylation is caused by fructosamine 3-kinases and occurs in vivo, particularly in the kidneys. Despite the action of these enzymes, it was shown that a large part of the intravenously applied radiolabeled N-{epsilon}-fructoselysine was excreted nearly unchanged in the urine. Therefore, it was concluded that the predominant part of peptide-bound lysine that was fructosylated during food processing is not available for nutrition.

  8. Regulation of CCK-induced ERK1/2 activation by PKC epsilon in rat pancreatic acinar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenwei Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular signal-regulated kinase ERK1/2 is activated in pancreatic acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK and other secretagogues with this activation mediated primarily by protein kinase C (PKC. To identify the responsible PKC isoform, we utilized chemical inhibitors, cell permeant inhibitory peptides and overexpression of individual PKC dominant negative variants by means of adenoviral vectors. While the broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor GF109203X strongly inhibited ERK1/2 activation induced by 100 pM CCK, Go6976 which inhibits the classical PKC isoforms (alpha, beta and gamma, as well as Rottlerin, a specific PKC delta inhibitor, had no inhibitory effect. To test the role of PKC epsilon, we used specific cell permeant peptide inhibitors which block PKC interaction with their intracellular receptors or RACKs. Only PP93 (PKC epsilon peptide inhibitor inhibited CCK-induced ERK1/2 activation, while PP95, PP101 and PP98, which are PKC alpha, delta and zeta peptide inhibitors respectively, had no effect. We also utilized adenovirus to express dominant negative PKC isoforms in pancreatic acini. Only PKC epsilon dominant negative inhibited CCK-induced ERK1/2 activation. Dominant negative PKC epsilon expression similarly blocked the effect of carbachol and bombesin to activate ERK1/2. Immunoprecipitation results demonstrated that CCK can induce an interaction of c-Raf-1 and PKC epsilon, but not that of other isoforms of Raf or PKC. We conclude that PKC epsilon is the isoform of PKC primarily involved with CCK-induced ERK1/2 activation in pancreatic acinar cells.

  9. Viscoelastic optical nonlocality of doped cadmium oxide epsilon-near-zero thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, Ting S.; De Ceglia, Domenico; Scalora, Michael; Vincenti, Maria A.; Campione, Salvatore; Kelley, Kyle; Maria, Jon-Paul; Keeler, Gordon A.

    2017-08-01

    Optical nonlocalities are elusive and hardly observable in traditional plasmonic materials like noble and alkali metals. Here we experimentally observe and theoretically model viscoelastic nonlocalities in the infrared optical response of a doped, cadmium oxide epsilon-near-zero thin film. The nonlocality is clearly detectable thanks to the low damping rate of conduction electrons and the virtual absence of interband transitions at infrared wavelengths. We describe the motion of conduction electrons using a hydrodynamic model for a viscoelastic fluid, and find excellent agreement with experimental results. The electrons’ elasticity blue-shifts the infrared plasmonic resonance associated with the main epsilon-near-zero mode, and triggers the onset of higher-order resonances due to the excitation of electron-pressure modes above the bulk plasma frequency. We also provide evidence of the existence of nonlocal damping, i.e., viscosity, in the motion of optically-excited conduction electrons using a combination of spectroscopic ellipsometry data and predictions based on the viscoelastic hydrodynamic model.

  10. MESA models of the evolutionary state of the interacting binary epsilon Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Justus L.; Stencel, Robert E.

    2018-06-01

    Using MESA code (Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics, version 9575), an evaluation was made of the evolutionary state of the epsilon Aurigae binary system (HD 31964, F0Iap + disc). We sought to satisfy several observational constraints: (1) requiring evolutionary tracks to pass close to the current temperature and luminosity of the primary star; (2) obtaining a period near the observed value of 27.1 years; (3) matching a mass function of 3.0; (4) concurrent Roche lobe overflow and mass transfer; (5) an isotopic ratio 12C/13C = 5 and, (6) matching the interferometrically determined angular diameter. A MESA model starting with binary masses of 9.85 + 4.5 M⊙, with a 100 d initial period, produces a 1.2 + 10.6 M⊙ result having a 547 d period, and a single digit 12C/13C ratio. These values were reached near an age of 20 Myr, when the donor star comes close to the observed luminosity and temperature for epsilon Aurigae A, as a post-RGB/pre-AGB star. Contemporaneously, the accretor then appears as an upper main-sequence, early B-type star. This benchmark model can provide a basis for further exploration of this interacting binary, and other long-period binary stars.

  11. Stellar model chromospheres. VIII - 70 Ophiuchi A /K0 V/ and Epsilon Eridani /K2 V/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelch, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Model atmospheres for the late-type active-chromosphere dwarf stars 70 Oph A and Epsilon Eri are computed from high-resolution Ca II K line profiles as well as Mg II h and k line fluxes. A method is used which determines a plane-parallel homogeneous hydrostatic-equilibrium model of the upper photosphere and chromosphere which differs from theoretical models by lacking the constraint of radiative equilibrium (RE). The determinations of surface gravities, metallicities, and effective temperatures are discussed, and the computational methods, model atoms, atomic data, and observations are described. Temperature distributions for the two stars are plotted and compared with RE models for the adopted effective temperatures and gravities. The previously investigated T min/T eff vs. T eff relation is extended to Epsilon Eri and 70 Oph A, observed and computed Ca II K and Mg II h and k integrated emission fluxes are compared, and full tabulations are given for the proposed models. It is suggested that if less than half the observed Mg II flux for the two stars is lost in noise, the difference between an active-chromosphere star and a quiet-chromosphere star lies in the lower-chromospheric temperature gradient.

  12. A Galilean and tensorial invariant k-epsilon model for near wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Shih, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    A k-epsilon model is proposed for wall bounded turbulent flows. In this model, the eddy viscosity is characterized by a turbulent velocity scale and a turbulent time scale. The time scale is bounded from below by the Kolmogorov time scale. The dissipation rate equation is reformulated using this time scale and no singularity exists at the wall. A new parameter R = k/S(nu) is introduced to characterize the damping function in the eddy viscosity. This parameter is determined by local properties of both the mean and the turbulent flow fields and is free from any geometry parameter. The proposed model is then Galilean and tensorial invariant. The model constants used are the same as in the high Reynolds number Standard k-epsilon Model. Thus, the proposed model will also be suitable for flows far from the wall. Turbulent channel flows and turbulent boundary layer flows with and without pressure gradients are calculated. Comparisons with the data from direct numerical simulations and experiments show that the model predictions are excellent for turbulent channel flows and turbulent boundary layers with favorable pressure gradients, good for turbulent boundary layers with zero pressure gradients, and fair for turbulent boundary layer with adverse pressure gradients.

  13. New time scale based k-epsilon model for near-wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Shih, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    A k-epsilon model is proposed for wall bonded turbulent flows. In this model, the eddy viscosity is characterized by a turbulent velocity scale and a turbulent time scale. The time scale is bounded from below by the Kolmogorov time scale. The dissipation equation is reformulated using this time scale and no singularity exists at the wall. The damping function used in the eddy viscosity is chosen to be a function of R(sub y) = (k(sup 1/2)y)/v instead of y(+). Hence, the model could be used for flows with separation. The model constants used are the same as in the high Reynolds number standard k-epsilon model. Thus, the proposed model will be also suitable for flows far from the wall. Turbulent channel flows at different Reynolds numbers and turbulent boundary layer flows with and without pressure gradient are calculated. Results show that the model predictions are in good agreement with direct numerical simulation and experimental data.

  14. Low cytotoxic tissue adhesive based on oxidized dextran and epsilon-poly-L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Nakajima, Naoki; Sugai, Hajime; Matsumura, Kazuaki

    2014-08-01

    A novel adhesive hydrogel consisting of dextran and epsilon-poly(L-lysine) (dextran-PL) with multiple biomedical applications was developed. Periodate oxidation in aqueous media almost stoichiometrically introduces aldehyde groups in dextran molecules, and aldehyde dextran can react with the primary amino groups in epsilon-PL (ɛ-PL) at neutral pH to form a hydrogel. The gelation time of the hydrogel can be easily controlled by the extent of oxidation in dextran and of the acylation in ɛ-PL by anhydrides. The shear adhesion strength of dextran-PL was 10 times higher than that of fibrin glue, when wet collagen sheets were selected as test specimens. The cytotoxicity of aldehyde dextran and ɛ-PL were 1000 times lower than that of glutaraldehyde and poly(allylamine). The considerably low cytotoxicity of aldehyde dextran could be ascribed to its low reactivity with amine species when compared with glutaraldehyde. In contrast, a high reactivity of amino groups in ɛ-PL was observed when compared with glycine, L-lysine, and gelatin, which could be explained by their poor dissociation at neutral pH, thus leading to low cytotoxicity. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Diversity of peptidic and proteinaceous toxins from social Hymenoptera venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos-Pinto, José Roberto Aparecido; Perez-Riverol, Amilcar; Lasa, Alexis Musacchio; Palma, Mario Sergio

    2018-06-15

    Among venomous animals, Hymenoptera have been suggested as a rich source of natural toxins. Due to their broad ecological diversity, venom from Hymenoptera insects (bees, wasps and ants) have evolved differentially thus widening the types and biological functions of their components. To date, insect toxinology analysis have scarcely uncovered the complex composition of bee, wasp and ant venoms which include low molecular weight compounds, highly abundant peptides and proteins, including several allergens. In Hymenoptera, these complex mixtures of toxins represent a potent arsenal of biological weapons that are used for self-defense, to repel intruders and to capture prey. Consequently, Hymenoptera venom components have a broad range of pharmacological targets and have been extensively studied, as promising sources of new drugs and biopesticides. In addition, the identification and molecular characterization of Hymenoptera venom allergens have allowed for the rational design of component-resolved diagnosis of allergy, finally improving the outcome of venom immunotherapy (VIT). Until recently, a limited number of Hymenoptera venoms had been unveiled due to the technical limitations of the approaches used to date. Nevertheless, the application of novel techniques with high dynamic range has significantly increased the number of identified peptidic and proteinaceous toxins. Considering this, the present review summarizes the current knowledge about the most representative Hymenoptera venom peptides and proteins which are under study for a better understanding of the insect-caused envenoming process and the development of new drugs and biopesticides. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Botulinum toxin in parkinsonism: The when, how, and which for botulinum toxin injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Francisco

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a review of the use of injections of botulinum toxin in the management of selected symptoms and signs of Parkinson's disease and other forms of parkinsonism. Sialorrhea is defined as inability to control oral secretions, resulting in excessive saliva in the oropharynx. There is a high level of evidence for the treatment of sialorrhea in parkinsonism with injections of different forms of botulinum toxin type A as well as botulinum toxin type B. Tremor can be improved by the use of botulinum toxin injections but improved tremor control often leads to concomitant motor weakness, limiting its use. Levodopa induced dyskinesias are difficult to treat with botulinum toxin injections because of their variable frequency and direction. Apraxia of eyelid opening, a sign more commonly seen in progressive supranuclear palsy and other tauopathies, often improves after botulinum toxin injections. Recent data suggest that regardless of the underlying mechanism, pain in parkinsonism can be alleviated by botulinum toxin injections. Finally, freezing of gait, camptocormia and Pisa syndrome in parkinsonism almost invariably fail to respond to botulinum toxin injections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cholera toxin B subunit-binding and ganglioside GM1 immuno-expression are not necessarily correlated in human salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend

    2014-01-01

    human submandibular, parotid and palatinal glands using cholera toxin sub-unit B and two polyclonal antibodies against ganglioside GM1 as biomarkers. RESULTS: Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the toxin and antibodies were co-localized in some acini but not in others. The cholera toxin mainly...... reacted with the cell membranes of the mucous acini in the submandibular gland, while incubation with the antibody against GM1 gave rise to a staining of the cytoplasm. The cytoplasm in some secretory acinar cells in the parotid gland was stained by the cholera toxin, whereas only small spots...... on the plasma membranes reacted with anti-GM1. The plasma membranes in the parotid excretory ducts appeared to react to anti-GM1, but not to cholera toxin. CONCLUSIONS: Cholera toxin induces the expression of ion channels and carriers in the small intestine and increases the production of secretory mucins...

  18. Warm temperature acclimation impacts metabolism of paralytic shellfish toxins from Alexandrium minutum in commercial oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Hazel; Seebacher, Frank; O'Connor, Wayne; Zammit, Anthony; Harwood, D Tim; Murray, Shauna

    2015-09-01

    Species of Alexandrium produce potent neurotoxins termed paralytic shellfish toxins and are expanding their ranges worldwide, concurrent with increases in sea surface temperature. The metabolism of molluscs is temperature dependent, and increases in ocean temperature may influence both the abundance and distribution of Alexandrium and the dynamics of toxin uptake and depuration in shellfish. Here, we conducted a large-scale study of the effect of temperature on the uptake and depuration of paralytic shellfish toxins in three commercial oysters (Saccostrea glomerata and diploid and triploid Crassostrea gigas, n = 252 per species/ploidy level). Oysters were acclimated to two constant temperatures, reflecting current and predicted climate scenarios (22 and 27 °C), and fed a diet including the paralytic shellfish toxin-producing species Alexandrium minutum. While the oysters fed on A. minutum in similar quantities, concentrations of the toxin analogue GTX1,4 were significantly lower in warm-acclimated S. glomerata and diploid C. gigas after 12 days. Following exposure to A. minutum, toxicity of triploid C. gigas was not affected by temperature. Generally, detoxification rates were reduced in warm-acclimated oysters. The routine metabolism of the oysters was not affected by the toxins, but a significant effect was found at a cellular level in diploid C. gigas. The increasing incidences of Alexandrium blooms worldwide are a challenge for shellfish food safety regulation. Our findings indicate that rising ocean temperatures may reduce paralytic shellfish toxin accumulation in two of the three oyster types; however, they may persist for longer periods in oyster tissue. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Single toxin dose-response models revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidenko, Eugene, E-mail: eugened@dartmouth.edu [Department of Biomedical Data Science, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH03756 (United States); Glaholt, SP, E-mail: sglaholt@indiana.edu [Indiana University, School of Public & Environmental Affairs, Bloomington, IN47405 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH03755 (United States); Kyker-Snowman, E, E-mail: ek2002@wildcats.unh.edu [Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH03824 (United States); Shaw, JR, E-mail: joeshaw@indiana.edu [Indiana University, School of Public & Environmental Affairs, Bloomington, IN47405 (United States); Chen, CY, E-mail: Celia.Y.Chen@dartmouth.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH03755 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to offer a rigorous analysis of the sigmoid shape single toxin dose-response relationship. The toxin efficacy function is introduced and four special points, including maximum toxin efficacy and inflection points, on the dose-response curve are defined. The special points define three phases of the toxin effect on mortality: (1) toxin concentrations smaller than the first inflection point or (2) larger then the second inflection point imply low mortality rate, and (3) concentrations between the first and the second inflection points imply high mortality rate. Probabilistic interpretation and mathematical analysis for each of the four models, Hill, logit, probit, and Weibull is provided. Two general model extensions are introduced: (1) the multi-target hit model that accounts for the existence of several vital receptors affected by the toxin, and (2) model with a nonzero mortality at zero concentration to account for natural mortality. Special attention is given to statistical estimation in the framework of the generalized linear model with the binomial dependent variable as the mortality count in each experiment, contrary to the widespread nonlinear regression treating the mortality rate as continuous variable. The models are illustrated using standard EPA Daphnia acute (48 h) toxicity tests with mortality as a function of NiCl or CuSO{sub 4} toxin. - Highlights: • The paper offers a rigorous study of a sigmoid dose-response relationship. • The concentration with highest mortality rate is rigorously defined. • A table with four special points for five morality curves is presented. • Two new sigmoid dose-response models have been introduced. • The generalized linear model is advocated for estimation of sigmoid dose-response relationship.

  20. Analysis of Life Cycle within Various Strains of Cyanobacteria with a Focus on Internal Regulators & Toxin Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic bacteria that exhibit some similarities to algae and can be found naturally in lakes, streams, ponds, and other surface waters. However, toxin producing cyanobacteria have become an increasing concern as growth rates have been escalating. Neverthe...

  1. Sensitive assays enable detection of serum IgG antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A and toxin B in healthy subjects and patients with Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuemei; Bender, Florent; Shukla, Rajiv; Kang, John J; Caro-Aguilar, Ivette; Laterza, Omar F

    2016-04-01

    Pathogenic Clostridium difficile produces two proinflammatory exotoxins, toxin A and toxin B. Low level of serum antitoxin IgG antibodies is a risk factor for the development of primary and recurrent C. difficile infection (CDI). We developed and validated two sensitive, titer-based electrochemiluminescence assays for the detection of serum antibody levels against C. difficile toxins A and B. These assays demonstrated excellent precision. The sensitivity of the assays allowed the detection of antitoxin A and antitoxin B IgG antibodies in all tested serum samples during assay validation. The validated titer-based assays enable assessment of antitoxin A and antitoxin B IgG antibodies as potential biomarkers to identify patients with CDI at increased risk for CDI recurrence.

  2. Large dielectric constant ({epsilon}/{epsilon}{sub 0}>6000) Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}TiO{sub 3} thin films for high-performance microwave phase shifters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, C. M. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Rivkin, T. V. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Parilla, P. A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Perkins, J. D. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Ginley, D. S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Kozyrev, A. B. [Electrotechnical University of St. Petersburg, St. Petersburg, Russia 197376 (Russian Federation); Oshadchy, V. N. [Electrotechnical University of St. Petersburg, St. Petersburg, Russia 197376 (Russian Federation); Pavlov, A. S. [Electrotechnical University of St. Petersburg, St. Petersburg, Russia 197376 (Russian Federation)

    2000-04-03

    We deposited epitaxial Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}TiO{sub 3} (BST) films via laser ablation on MgO and LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO) substrates for tunable microwave devices. Postdeposition anneals ({approx}1100 degree sign C in O{sub 2}) improved the morphology and overall dielectric properties of films on both substrates, but shifted the temperature of maximum dielectric constant (T{sub max}) up for BST/LAO and down for BST/MgO. These substrate-dependent T{sub max} shifts had opposite effects on the room-temperature dielectric properties. Overall, BST films on MgO had the larger maximum dielectric constant ({epsilon}/{epsilon}{sub 0}{>=}6000) and tunability ({delta}{epsilon}/{epsilon}{>=}65%), but these maxima occurred at 227 K. 30 GHz phase shifters made from similar films had figures of merit (ratio of maximum phase shift to insertion loss) of {approx}45 degree sign /dB and phase shifts of {approx}400 degree sign under 500 V ({approx}13 V/{mu}m) bias, illustrating their utility for many frequency-agile microwave devices. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Expression of cytoplasmic CD3 epsilon proteins in activated human adult natural killer (NK) cells and CD3 gamma, delta, epsilon complexes in fetal NK cells. Implications for the relationship of NK and T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanier, L. L.; Chang, C.; Spits, H.; Phillips, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    NK cells have been defined as CD3-, CD16+, and/or CD56+ lymphocytes that mediate MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity against certain tumors and virus-infected cells. Although CD3 epsilon transcripts have been detected in some NK clones, it has generally been thought that NK cells do not express CD3

  4. Contribution of the net charge to the regulatory effects of amino acids and epsilon-poly(L-lysine) on the gelatinization behavior of potato starch granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Azusa; Hattori, Makoto; Yoshida, Tadashi; Takahashi, Koji

    2006-01-01

    The effects of lysine (Lys), monosodium glutamate (GluNa), glycine, alanine and epsilon-poly(L-lysine) (PL) with different degrees of polymerization on the gelatinization behavior of potato starch granules were investigated by DSC, viscosity and swelling measurements, microscopic observation, and measurement of the retained amino acid amount to clarify the contribution of the net charge to their regulatory effects on the gelatinization behavior. The amino acids and PL each contributed to an increase in the gelatinization temperature, and a decrease in the peak viscosity and swelling. These effects strongly depended on the absolute value of their net charge. The disappearance of a negative or positive net charge by adjusting the pH value weakened the contribution. The swelling index and size of the potato starch granules changed according to replacement of the swelling medium. The amino acids and PL were easily retained by the swollen potato starch granules according to replacement of the outer solution of the starch granules.

  5. Synthesis, characterizations and biocompatibility of novel biodegradable star block copolymers based on poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] and poly(epsilon-caprolactone)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Linping; Wang, Liang; Wang, Xiaojuan

    2010-01-01

    Star block copolymers based on poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), termed SPHBCL, were successfully synthesized with structural variation on arm numbers and lengths via coupling reactions and ring opening polymerizations. Arm numbers 3, 4 and 6 of SPHBCL were...... weights of the SPHBCL due to the discrepancy of star copolymer structures. The melting temperature of SPHBCL decreased with increasing degree of branching. Thermal decomposition temperature was revealed to be lower than that of linear block copolymer LPHBCL counterparts based on PHB and PCL. Films made...... from various SPHBCL copolymers had different porous or networking surface morphology, and all possessed improved biocompatibility in terms of less blood clotting and more osteoblast cell growth compared with their corresponding homopolymers PHB and PCL. Among them, it was found, however, that the 4-arm...

  6. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  7. Array biosensor for detection of toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligler, Frances S.; Taitt, Chris Rowe; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Sapsford, Kim E.; Shubin, Yura; Golden, Joel P.

    2003-01-01

    The array biosensor is capable of detecting multiple targets rapidly and simultaneously on the surface of a single waveguide. Sandwich and competitive fluoroimmunoassays have been developed to detect high and low molecular weight toxins, respectively, in complex samples. Recognition molecules (usually antibodies) were first immobilized in specific locations on the waveguide and the resultant patterned array was used to interrogate up to 12 different samples for the presence of multiple different analytes. Upon binding of a fluorescent analyte or fluorescent immunocomplex, the pattern of fluorescent spots was detected using a CCD camera. Automated image analysis was used to determine a mean fluorescence value for each assay spot and to subtract the local background signal. The location of the spot and its mean fluorescence value were used to determine the toxin identity and concentration. Toxins were measured in clinical fluids, environmental samples and foods, with minimal sample preparation. Results are shown for rapid analyses of staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, cholera toxin, botulinum toxoids, trinitrotoluene, and the mycotoxin fumonisin. Toxins were detected at levels as low as 0.5 ng mL(-1).

  8. USE OF BOTULINUM TOXIN TYPE A IN THE TREATMENT OF SPASTICITY IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Lazić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy has an incidence of about 1-2 per 1000 live births, and in spite of the progress of neonatal medicine, it seems that the incidence will not subside in the near future. The most important characteristic of cerebral palsy is movement abnormality: spasticity, chorea, athetosis, ataxia, dystonia, as well as their different combinations. About 70% of children who suffer from cerebral palsy also suffer from some form of spasticity. Spasticity is a type of muscle hypertonicity characterized by rapid increase in resistance to passive stretching of muscles. The interest for botulinum toxin application in the treatment of spasticity has dramatically increased in the last 10 years. Botulinum toxin is the most powerful neurotoxin that is found in nature. It is produced by anaerobic bacteria – clostridium botulinum. It is produced in eight serotypes of which type A is the most commonly used. Botulinum toxin blocks neuromuscular transmission and causes irreversible weakness of the treated muscle. It has been used since 1993 in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. The toxin effect is permanent and it results in irreversible denervation. Functional recovery is possible after 2-4 months, due to sprouting of nerve endings and the formation of new synaptic contacts. Treatment with botulinum toxin is safe. Adverse effects are rare, temporary and completely reversible. Application of botulinum toxin prevents or reduces contractures and deformities, and thus delays or avoids surgical treatment. Yet, physical therapy, which prolongs and improves the effects of botulinum toxin, remains an essential and most important form of therapy in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy.

  9. Radiation toxins: molecular mechanisms of action and radiomimetic properties .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav

    . Injection of SRD-3 in toxic doses to experimen-tal animals. The clinical symptoms were: increased peristalsis, vomiting, diarrhea with blood. Postmortem section demonstrated multiple petechiae on the cell walls and serous membranes of the abdomen. Experiment N4. Injection of SRD-4 to experimental animals resulted in develop-ment lymphocytopenia, leukocytopenia, trombocytopenia. Autopsy of those animals that died showed changes that are specific a Hematopoietic form of the ARS with development of marked hemorrhagias into tissues of internal organs. Conclusion: 1. Administration of radiation toxins of SRD group to radiation naive animals in toxic doses 0.1 mg/kg; 0,5 mg/kg; 1 mg/kg; 2 mg/kg;3 mg/kg up to 30 mg/kg and more initiates development of specific toxic reactions with symptoms of the ARS. 2.Biological molecules of the Radiation Toxins SRD-group possess both toxic and antigenic properties.

  10. Over-production, renaturation and reconstitution of delta and epsilon subunits from chloroplast and cyanobacterial F1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinemann, D.; Lill, H; Junge, Wolfgang; Engelbrecht, Siegfried

    1994-01-01

    We studied the functioning of chimeric F0F1-ATPases by replacing subunits delta and epsilon of spinach CF1 with their counterparts from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The sequence identities between these subunits are 26 and 41%, respectively. For a systematic approach to such studies and later

  11. Triblock copolymers based on epsilon-caprolactone and trimethylene carbonate for the 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guney, Aysun; Malda, Jos; Dhert, Wouter J. A.; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    Background: Biodegradable PCL-b-PTMC-b-PCL triblock copolymers based on trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and epsilon-caprolactone (CL) were prepared and used in the 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds. Triblock copolymers of various molecular weights containing equal amounts of TMC and CL were

  12. Transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids from biogas plant digestates often belong to the IncP-1 epsilon subgroup

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wolters, B.; Kyselková, Martina; Krögerrecklenfort, E.; Kreuzig, R.; Smalla, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, January (2015), Article 765 ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : IncP-1 epsilon plasmid * class 1 integrons * biogas plant digestate * antibiotic resistance * exogenous plasmid isolation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.165, year: 2015

  13. Evaluation of functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a new biodegradable poly (DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; denDunnen, WFA; Robinson, PH; Pennings, AJ; Schakenraad, JM

    The aim of this study was to evaluate functional nerve recovery following reconstruction of a 1 cm gap in the sciatic nerve of a rat, using a new biodegradable p (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide. To evaluate both motor and sensory nerve recovery, walking track analysis and electrostimulation tests were

  14. Ellipsometric analysis of the oxidation of alpha-iron and epsilon-Fesub2Nsub1-x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graat, Peter C.J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    1999-01-01

    The initial oxidation of polycrystalline alpha-Fe and polycrystalline epsilon-Fe2N1-x was investigated with ellipsometry. Prior to oxidation the sample surfaces were subjected to a sputter cleaning pretreatment or a sputter cleaning plus annealing pretreatment. For the wavelength applied in the e...

  15. Long-term evaluation of degradation and foreign-body reaction of subcutaneously implanted poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    denDunnen, WFA; Robinson, PH; vanWessel, R; Pennings, AJ; vanLeeuwen, MBM; Schakenraad, JM

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degradation and foreign-body reaction of poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLA(85)CL(50)) bars. This specific biomaterial is used for the construction of nerve guides, which can be used in the reconstruction of short nerve gaps. Subcutaneously implanted

  16. Morphology in binary blends of poly(vinyl methyl ether) and epsilon-caprolactone-trimethylene carbonate diblock copolymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luyten, MC; Bogels, EJF; vanEkenstein, GORA; tenBrinke, G; Bras, W; Komanschek, BE; Ryan, AJ

    The morphology of symmetric diblock copolymer of epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) and trimethylene carbonate (PTMC), in blends with poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) is investigated with (modulated) differential scanning calorimetry (d.s.c.), time resolved small angle (SAXS) and wide angle (WAXS) X-ray

  17. Mycorrhizae Alter Toxin Sequestration and Performance of Two Specialist Herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Meier

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Multitrophic species interactions are shaped by both top-down and bottom-up factors. Belowground symbionts of plants, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, can alter the strength of these forces by altering plant phenotype. For example, AMF-mediated changes in foliar toxin and nutrient concentrations may influence herbivore growth and fecundity. In addition, many specialist herbivores sequester toxins from their host plants to resist natural enemies, and the extent of sequestration varies with host plant secondary chemistry. Therefore, by altering plant phenotype, AMF may affect both herbivore performance and their resistance to natural enemies. We examined how inoculation of plants with AMF influences toxin sequestration and performance of two specialist herbivores feeding upon four milkweed species (Asclepias incarnata, A. curassavica, A. latifolia, A. syriaca. We raised aphids (Aphis nerii and caterpillars (Danaus plexippus on plants for 6 days in a fully factorial manipulation of milkweed species and level of AMF inoculation (zero, medium, and high. We then assessed aphid and caterpillar sequestration of toxins (cardenolides and performance, and measured defensive and nutritive traits of control plants. Aphids and caterpillars sequestered higher concentrations of cardenolides from plants inoculated with AMF across all milkweed species. Aphid per capita growth rates and aphid body mass varied non-linearly with increasing AMF inoculum availability; across all milkweed species, aphids had the lowest performance under medium levels of AMF availability and highest performance under high AMF availability. In contrast, caterpillar survival varied strongly with AMF availability in a plant species-specific manner, and caterpillar growth was unaffected by AMF. Inoculation with AMF increased foliar cardenolide concentrations consistently among milkweed species, but altered aboveground biomasses and foliar phosphorous concentrations in a plant

  18. Mechanism of Shiga Toxin Clustering on Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Gao, Haifei; Arumugam, Senthil

    2017-01-01

    between them. The precise mechanism by which this clustering occurs remains poorly defined. Here, we used vesicle and cell systems and computer simulations to show that line tension due to curvature, height, or compositional mismatch, and lipid or solvent depletion cannot drive the clustering of Shiga...... toxin molecules. By contrast, in coarse-grained computer simulations, a correlation was found between clustering and toxin nanoparticle-driven suppression of membrane fluctuations, and experimentally we observed that clustering required the toxin molecules to be tightly bound to the membrane surface...... molecules (several nanometers), and persist even beyond. This force is predicted to operate between manufactured nanoparticles providing they are sufficiently rigid and tightly bound to the plasma membrane, thereby suggesting a route for the targeting of nanoparticles to cells for biomedical applications....

  19. Update on botulinum toxin and dermal fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbos, Zachary J; Lipham, William J

    2010-09-01

    The art and science of facial rejuvenation is an ever-evolving field of medicine, as evidenced by the continual development of new surgical and nonsurgical treatment modalities. Over the past 10 years, the use of botulinum toxin and dermal fillers for aesthetic purposes has risen sharply. Herein, we discuss properties of several commonly used injectable products and provide basic instruction for their use toward the goal of achieving facial rejuvenation. The demand for nonsurgical injection-based facial rejuvenation products has risen enormously in recent years. Used independently or concurrently, botulinum toxin and dermal filler agents offer an affordable, minimally invasive approach to facial rejuvenation. Botulinum toxin and dermal fillers can be used to diminish facial rhytides, restore facial volume, and sculpt facial contours, thereby achieving an aesthetically pleasing, youthful facial appearance.

  20. Marine toxins and their toxicological significance: An overview

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    , Hemolysins-1 and hemolysin-2, saxitoxin, neosaxitoxin, gonyautoxin, tetrodotoxin, ptychodiscus brevis toxin and theonellamide F. According to their mode of action, these toxins are classified into different categories such as cytotoxin, enterotoxin...

  1. Vth Pan American Symposium on Animal, Plant and Microbial Toxins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ownby, Charlotte

    1996-01-01

    .... Presentations on arthropod toxins included work on scorpion neurotoxins, K+ channel-blocking peptides, lice and wasp proteins, stinging insect venom allergens and Australian funnel-web spider toxins...

  2. One-Dimensional Chirality: Strong Optical Activity in Epsilon-Near-Zero Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizza, Carlo; Di Falco, Andrea; Scalora, Michael; Ciattoni, Alessandro

    2015-07-31

    We suggest that electromagnetic chirality, generally displayed by 3D or 2D complex chiral structures, can occur in 1D patterned composites whose components are achiral. This feature is highly unexpected in a 1D system which is geometrically achiral since its mirror image can always be superposed onto it by a 180 deg rotation. We analytically evaluate from first principles the bianisotropic response of multilayered metamaterials and we show that the chiral tensor is not vanishing if the system is geometrically one-dimensional chiral; i.e., its mirror image cannot be superposed onto it by using translations without resorting to rotations. As a signature of 1D chirality, we show that 1D chiral metamaterials support optical activity and we prove that this phenomenon undergoes a dramatic nonresonant enhancement in the epsilon-near-zero regime where the magnetoelectric coupling can become dominant in the constitutive relations.

  3. Directive Emission Obtained by Mu and Epsilon-Near-Zero Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we use Mu and Epsilon-Near-Zero (MENZ metamaterials to realize the substrates that can modify the emission of an embedded line source. Simulation results show that the cylindrical waves emitted from the line source can be perfectly converted to plane wave through the MENZ metamaterial slab with planar exit face. Hence the line source together with the metamaterial slab constructs a high directive slab antenna. The directive radiation pattern of the MENZ metamaterial-assisted slab antenna is independent on the thickness of the slab, the position of the line source, and the shape of the entrance face of the slab, but the slab with grooved entrance side will result in stronger far-field intensity. We also show that the MENZ metamaterials can be applied to the design of antenna array. Moreover, compared with the high directive slab antenna obtained by coordinate transformation approach, the MENZ metamaterial-assisted antenna is more preferable.

  4. Fuchsia. A tool for reducing differential equations for Feynman master integral to epsilon form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gituliar, Oleksandr; Magerya, Vitaly

    2017-01-01

    We present Fuchsia - an implementation of the Lee algorithm, which for a given system of ordinary differential equations with rational coefficients ∂ x f(x,ε)=A(x,ε)f(x,ε) finds a basis transformation T(x,ε), i.e., f(x,ε)=T(x,ε)g(x,ε), such that the system turns into the epsilon form: ∂ x g(x,ε)=εS(x)g(x,ε), where S(x) is a Fuchsian matrix. A system of this form can be trivially solved in terms of polylogarithms as a Laurent series in the dimensional regulator ε. That makes the construction of the transformation T(x,ε) crucial for obtaining solutions of the initial system. In principle, Fuchsia can deal with any regular systems, however its primary task is to reduce differential equations for Feynman master integrals. It ensures that solutions contain only regular singularities due to the properties of Feynman integrals.

  5. Microencapsulation of superoxide dismutase into poly(epsilon-caprolactone) microparticles by reverse micelle solvent evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youan, Bi-Botti Célestin

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to encapsulate superoxide dismutase (SOD) in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) microparticles by reverse micelle solvent evaporation. The concentration of PCL, the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), and concentration of the sucrose ester used as surfactant in the organic phase were investigated as formulation variables. Relatively higher encapsulation efficiency (approximately 48%) and retained enzymatic activity (>90%) were obtained with microparticle formulation made from the 20% (w/v) PCL and 0.05% (w/v) sucrose ester of HLB = 6. This formulation allowed the in vitro release of SOD for at least 72 hr. These results showed that reverse micelle solvent evaporation can be used to efficiently encapsulate SOD in PCL microparticles. Such formulations may improve the bioavailability of SOD.

  6. Fuchsia : A tool for reducing differential equations for Feynman master integrals to epsilon form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gituliar, Oleksandr; Magerya, Vitaly

    2017-10-01

    We present Fuchsia - an implementation of the Lee algorithm, which for a given system of ordinary differential equations with rational coefficients ∂x J(x , ɛ) = A(x , ɛ) J(x , ɛ) finds a basis transformation T(x , ɛ) , i.e., J(x , ɛ) = T(x , ɛ) J‧(x , ɛ) , such that the system turns into the epsilon form : ∂xJ‧(x , ɛ) = ɛ S(x) J‧(x , ɛ) , where S(x) is a Fuchsian matrix. A system of this form can be trivially solved in terms of polylogarithms as a Laurent series in the dimensional regulator ɛ. That makes the construction of the transformation T(x , ɛ) crucial for obtaining solutions of the initial system. In principle, Fuchsia can deal with any regular systems, however its primary task is to reduce differential equations for Feynman master integrals. It ensures that solutions contain only regular singularities due to the properties of Feynman integrals. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/zj6zn9vfkh.1 Licensing provisions: MIT Programming language:Python 2.7 Nature of problem: Feynman master integrals may be calculated from solutions of a linear system of differential equations with rational coefficients. Such a system can be easily solved as an ɛ-series when its epsilon form is known. Hence, a tool which is able to find the epsilon form transformations can be used to evaluate Feynman master integrals. Solution method: The solution method is based on the Lee algorithm (Lee, 2015) which consists of three main steps: fuchsification, normalization, and factorization. During the fuchsification step a given system of differential equations is transformed into the Fuchsian form with the help of the Moser method (Moser, 1959). Next, during the normalization step the system is transformed to the form where eigenvalues of all residues are proportional to the dimensional regulator ɛ. Finally, the system is factorized to the epsilon form by finding an unknown transformation which satisfies a system of linear equations. Additional comments

  7. Cooperativity Between Oncogenic PKC Epsilon and Pten Loss in Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    are elevated in prostate cancer cells and that PKCε is causally associated with the elevated production and release of this chemokine. We also...Contents Page 1. Introduction …………………………………………………………. 1 2. Keywords……………………………………………………………. 1 3. Accomplishments………..…………………………………………... 1 4... INTRODUCTION A main goal is to understand how protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) contributes to the progression of human prostate cancer. We and others have

  8. Versatile Production of Poly(Epsilon-Caprolactone Fibers by Electrospinning Using Benign Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Liverani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrospinning technique is widely used for the fabrication of micro- and nanofibrous structures. Recent studies have focused on the use of less toxic and harmful solvents (benign solvents for electrospinning, even if those solvents usually require an accurate and longer process of optimization. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the versatility of the use of benign solvents, like acetic acid and formic acid, for the fabrication of microfibrous and nanofibrous electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone mats. The solvent systems were also shown to be suitable for the fabrication of electrospun structures with macroporosity, as well as for the fabrication of composite electrospun mats, fabricated by the addition of bioactive glass (45S5 composition particles in the polymeric solution.

  9. Development of inhomogeneous {kappa}-{epsilon}-{upsilon}{sup 2} turbulence model for 3D flow analysis of SMART-P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, K. H.; Whang, Y. D.; Yoon, H. Y.; Kim, H. C

    2003-07-01

    The objective of the present report is to select and develop a turbulence model that will be implemented in TASS-3D code for 3-D heat and fluid analysis on the integral reactor, SMART-P primary coolant system. The turbulence model was selected with the consideration on the economy, accuracy, theorization and applicability for the complex three dimensional flow, natural convection and the high Reynolds number turbulent flow of SMART-P.On the models investigated in this present study, the standard {kappa}-{epsilon} model of high Reynolds model, the {kappa}-{epsilon}-{upsilon}{sup 2} model and ERRSM of low Reynolds model were selected out of them finally. The {kappa}-{epsilon}-{upsilon}{sup 2} model was selected as the applicable turbulence model for three dimensional flow analysis of SMART-P. The problem of original {kappa}-{epsilon}-{upsilon}{sup 2} model is the amplification of the pressure strain rate in the log region. The amplification is caused by Elliptic Relaxation Equation(ERE). The present model approaches inhomogeneous for the source term of the ERE to reduce the pressure-strain amplification. The source term was decomposed into homogeneous part and inhomogeneous part and derived as a form of variable coefficients of the ERE. The pressure strain and dissipation terms were fully coupled with the source term of the ERE. The pressure diffusion was modified to treat the boundary conditions indirectly and the pressure strain of the inhomogeneous correction ERE was noticeably decreased in both log layer and outer layer. The results of the inhomogeneous correction {kappa}-{epsilon}-{upsilon}{sup 2} model showed a good agreement with DNS results for channel flows and estimated improved results on the turbulent components in comparison with other models.

  10. Selenium deficiency aggravates T-2 toxin-induced injury of primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes through ER stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Pan, Shengchi; Gan, Fang; Hao, Shu; Liu, Dandan; Xu, Haibin; Huang, Kehe

    2018-04-01

    Keshan disease is a potentially fatal cardiomyopathy in humans. Selenium deficiency, T-2 toxin, and myocarditis virus are thought to be the major factors contributing to Keshan disease. But the relationship among these three factors is poorly described. This study aims to explore whether selenium deficiency aggravates T-2 toxin-induced cardiomyocyte injury and its underlying mechanism. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from neonatal rat and cultured at the physiological (2.0 μM) or lower concentrations of selenium with different concentrations of T-2 toxin. Our results showed that selenium deficiencies aggravated T-2 toxin-induced cardiomyocyte injury in a concentration-dependent manner as demonstrated by MTT bioassay, LDH activity, reactive oxygen species levels and caspase 3 protein expressions. T-2 toxin treatment significantly increased mRNA expressions for stress proteins GRP78 and CHOP in cardiomyocytes compared with the control. Selenium deficiencies further promoted GRP78, CHOP and p-eIF2α expressions. Knockdown of CHOP by the specific small interfering RNA eliminated the effect of selenium deficiencies on T-2 toxin-induced injury. It could be concluded that selenium deficiency aggravates T-2 toxin-induced cardiomyocyte injury through initiating more aggressive endoplasmic reticulum stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MESA models for the evolutionary status of the epsilon Aurigae disk-eclipsed binary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Gibson, Justus

    2018-06-01

    The brightest member of the class of disk-eclipsed binary stars is the Algol-like long-period binary, epsilon Aurigae (HD 31964, F0Iap + disk, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9907E..17S ). Using MESA (Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics, version 9575), we have made an evaluation of its evolutionary state. We sought to satisfy several observational constraints, including: (1) requiring evolutionary tracks to pass close to the current temperature and luminosity of the primary star; (2) obtaining a period near the observed value of 27.1 years; (3) matching a mass function of 3.0; (4) concurrent Roche lobe overflow and mass transfer; (5) an isotopic ratio 12C / 13C = 5 and, (6) matching the interferometrically determined angular diameter. A MESA model starting with binary masses of 9.85 + 4.5 solar masses, with a 100 day initial period, produces a 1.2 + 10.6 solar masses result having a 547 day period, plus a single digit 12C / 13C ratio. These values were reached near an age of 20 Myr, when the donor star comes close to the observed luminosity and temperature for epsilon Aurigae A, as a post-RGB/pre-AGB star. Contemporaneously, the accretor then appears as an upper main sequence, early B-type star. This benchmark model can provide a basis for further exploration of this interacting binary, and other long period binary stars. This report has been submitted to MNRAS, along with a parallel investigation of mass transfer stream and disk sub-structure. The authors are grateful to the estate of William Herschel Womble for the support of astronomy at the University of Denver.

  12. The woodrat gut microbiota as an experimental system for understanding microbial metabolism of dietary toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Kohl

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The microbial communities inhabiting the alimentary tracts of mammals, particularly those of herbivores, are estimated to be one of the densest microbial reservoirs on Earth. The significance of these gut microbes in influencing the physiology, ecology and evolution of their hosts is only beginning to be realized. To understand the microbiome of herbivores with a focus on nutritional ecology, while evaluating the roles of host evolution and environment in sculpting microbial diversity, we have developed an experimental system consisting of the microbial communities of several species of herbivorous woodrats (genus Neotoma that naturally feed on a variety of dietary toxins. We designed this system to investigate the long-standing, but experimentally neglected hypothesis that ingestion of toxic diets by herbivores is facilitated by the gut microbiota. Like several other rodent species, the woodrat stomach has a sacculated, nongastric foregut portion. We have documented a dense and diverse community of microbes in the woodrat foregut, with several genera potentially capable of degrading dietary toxins and/or playing a role in stimulating hepatic detoxification enzymes of the host. The biodiversity of these gut microbes appears to be a function of host evolution, ecological experience and diet, such that dietary toxins increase microbial diversity in hosts with experience with these toxins while novel toxins depress microbial diversity. These microbial communities are critical to the ingestion of a toxic diet as reducing the microbial community with antibiotics impairs the host’s ability to feed on dietary toxins. Furthermore, the detoxification capacity of gut microbes can be transferred from Neotoma both intra and interspecifically to naïve animals that lack ecological and evolutionary history with these toxins. In addition to advancing our knowledge of complex host-microbes interactions, this system holds promise for identifying microbes that

  13. Cellular Entry of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Takehara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin are composed of two non-linked proteins, one being the enzymatic component and the other being the binding/translocation component. These latter components recognize specific receptors and oligomerize in plasma membrane lipid-rafts, mediating the uptake of the enzymatic component into the cytosol. Enzymatic components induce actin cytoskeleton disorganization through the ADP-ribosylation of actin and are responsible for cell rounding and death. This review focuses upon the recent advances in cellular internalization of clostridial binary toxins.

  14. Cellular Entry of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Masaya; Takagishi, Teruhisa; Seike, Soshi; Oda, Masataka; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Hisatsune, Junzo; Ochi, Sadayuki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2017-08-11

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin are composed of two non-linked proteins, one being the enzymatic component and the other being the binding/translocation component. These latter components recognize specific receptors and oligomerize in plasma membrane lipid-rafts, mediating the uptake of the enzymatic component into the cytosol. Enzymatic components induce actin cytoskeleton disorganization through the ADP-ribosylation of actin and are responsible for cell rounding and death. This review focuses upon the recent advances in cellular internalization of clostridial binary toxins.

  15. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology

    OpenAIRE

    Marius Alexandru Moga; Oana Gabriela Dimienescu; Andreea Bălan; Ioan Scârneciu; Barna Barabaș; Liana Pleș

    2018-01-01

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G). Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT...

  16. 77 FR 9888 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service... toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145). This new date..., that are contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26, O45, O103, O111, O121...

  17. Military Importance of Natural Toxins and Their Analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitschmann, Vladimír; Hon, Zdeněk

    2016-04-28

    Toxin weapon research, development, production and the ban on its uses is an integral part of international law, with particular attention paid to the protection against these weapons. In spite of this, hazards associated with toxins cannot be completely excluded. Some of these hazards are also pointed out in the present review. The article deals with the characteristics and properties of natural toxins and synthetic analogs potentially constituting the basis of toxin weapons. It briefly describes the history of military research and the use of toxins from distant history up to the present age. With respect to effective disarmament conventions, it mentions certain contemporary concepts of possible toxin applications for military purposes and the protection of public order (suppression of riots); it also briefly refers to the question of terrorism. In addition, it deals with certain traditional as well as modern technologies of the research, synthesis, and use of toxins, which can affect the continuing development of toxin weapons. These are, for example, cases of new toxins from natural sources, their chemical synthesis, production of synthetic analogs, the possibility of using methods of genetic engineering and modern biotechnologies or the possible applications of nanotechnology and certain pharmaceutical methods for the effective transfer of toxins into the organism. The authors evaluate the military importance of toxins based on their comparison with traditional chemical warfare agents. They appeal to the ethics of the scientific work as a principal condition for the prevention of toxin abuse in wars, military conflicts, as well as in non-military attacks.

  18. A High-Throughput, Precipitating Colorimetric Sandwich ELISA Microarray for Shiga Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gehring

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxins 1 and 2 (Stx1 and Stx2 from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC bacteria were simultaneously detected with a newly developed, high-throughput antibody microarray platform. The proteinaceous toxins were immobilized and sandwiched between biorecognition elements (monoclonal antibodies and pooled horseradish peroxidase (HRP-conjugated monoclonal antibodies. Following the reaction of HRP with the precipitating chromogenic substrate (metal enhanced 3,3-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride or DAB, the formation of a colored product was quantitatively measured with an inexpensive flatbed page scanner. The colorimetric ELISA microarray was demonstrated to detect Stx1 and Stx2 at levels as low as ~4.5 ng/mL within ~2 h of total assay time with a narrow linear dynamic range of ~1–2 orders of magnitude and saturation levels well above background. Stx1 and/or Stx2 produced by various strains of STEC were also detected following the treatment of cultured cells with mitomycin C (a toxin-inducing antibiotic and/or B-PER (a cell-disrupting, protein extraction reagent. Semi-quantitative detection of Shiga toxins was demonstrated to be sporadic among various STEC strains following incubation with mitomycin C; however, further reaction with B-PER generally resulted in the detection of or increased detection of Stx1, relative to Stx2, produced by STECs inoculated into either axenic broth culture or culture broth containing ground beef.

  19. Effect of sodium nitrite on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in bacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, L N; Tompkin, R B; Shaparis, A B; Kueper, T V; Johnston, R W; Kautter, D A; Kolari, O J

    1974-04-01

    Pork bellies were formulated to 0, 30, 60, 120, 170, or 340 mug of nitrite per g of meat and inoculated with Clostridium botulinum via pickle or after processing and slicing. Processed bacon was stored at 7 or 27 C and assayed for nitrite, nitrate, and botulinal toxin at different intervals. Nitrite levels declined during processing and storage. The rate of decrease was more rapid at 27 than at 7 C. Although not added to the system, nitrate was detected in samples during processing and storage at 7 and 27 C. The amount of nitrate found was related to formulated nitrite levels. No toxin was found in samples incubated at 7 C throughout the 84-day test period. At 27 C, via pickle, inoculated samples with low inoculum (210 C. botulinum per g before processing and 52 per g after processing) became toxic if formulated with 120 mug of nitrite per g of meat or less. Toxin was not detected in bacon formulated with 170 or 340 mug of nitrite per g of meat under these same conditions. Toxin was detected at all formulated nitrite levels in bacon inoculated via the pickle with 19,000 C. botulinum per g (4,300 per g after processing) and in samples inoculated after slicing. However, increased levels of formulated nitrite decreased the probability of botulinal toxin formation in bacon inoculated by both methods.

  20. Review of botulinum toxin type A for the prophylactic treatment of chronic daily headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Evers

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Stefan EversDepartment of Neurology, University of Münster, Münster, GermanyAbstract: Botulinum toxin A is increasingly used in the treatment of idiopathic and symptomatic headache disorders. However, only few controlled trials are available and many trials can hardly be compared to each other because of different endpoints and different trial designs. In particular chronic daily headache, which is defined as an idiopathic headache occurring on more than 15 days per month for at least 3 months and a daily duration of at least 4 hours, is considered as a headache disorder with possible efficacy of botulinum toxin A. For the prophylactic treatment of chronic tension-type headache and chronic migraine, no sufficient positive evidence for a successful treatment can be obtained from randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials to date. For the treatment of chronic daily headache including medication overuse headache, there is some positive evidence for efficacy in a subgroup of patients. To date, the majority of double-blind and placebo-controlled studies do not suggest that botulinum toxin A is efficacious in the treatment of chronic idiopathic headache disorders. However, it is possible that some subgroups of patients with chronic daily headache will benefit from a long-term treatment with botulinum toxin A.Keywords: botulinum toxin A, chronic daily headache, chronic tension-type headache, chronic migraine

  1. Current advances in aptamer-assisted technologies for detecting bacterial and fungal toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, N; Memar, M Y; Mehramuz, B; Abibiglou, S S; Hemmati, F; Samadi Kafil, H

    2018-03-01

    Infectious diseases are among the common leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Associated with the emergence of new infectious diseases, the increasing number of antimicrobial-resistant isolates presents a serious threat to public health and hospitalized patients. A microbial pathogen may elicit several host responses and use a variety of mechanisms to evade host defences. These methods and mechanisms include capsule, lipopolysaccharides or cell wall components, adhesions and toxins. Toxins inhibit phagocytosis, cause septic shock and host cell damages by binding to host surface receptors and invasion. Bacterial and fungal pathogens are able to apply many different toxin-dependent mechanisms to disturb signalling pathways and the structural integrity of host cells for establishing and maintaining infections Initial techniques for analysis of bacterial toxins were based on in vivo or in vitro assessments. There is a permanent demand for appropriate detection methods which are affordable, practical, careful, rapid, sensitive, efficient and economical. Aptamers are DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are selected by systematic evolution of ligands using exponential enrichment (SELEX) methods and can be applied in diagnostic applications. This review provides an overview of aptamer-based methods as a novel approach for detecting toxins in bacterial and fungal pathogens. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. A pilot study to evaluate effectiveness of botulinum toxin in treatment of androgenetic alopecia in males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehdev Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Androgenetic alopecia is a common form of alopecia with multifactorial etiology. Finasteride and minoxidil are approved by the FDA for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Balding scalp is believed to have relative microvascular insufficiency. Blood vessels in the scalp travel through the intramuscular plane. Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin relaxes muscles and thereby increases blood flow in balding scalp. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin in androgenetic alopecia management. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care center. A total of 10 male patients with androgenetic alopecia meeting inclusion criteria of the study were included. In the scalp, 30 sites were injected with 5 U of botulinum toxin in each site. Preprocedure photograph taken and evaluation was done, which was repeated after 24 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by photography and self-assessment scoring was done by patients. Results: Of 10 patients, 8 had good to excellent response on photographic assessment. At the end of 24 weeks, 1 patient showed poor and 1 showed fair response to treatment. As per self-assessment, 7of 10 patients showed good to excellent response. Two patients had fair response and 1 patient showed poor response to treatment. Conclusion: Botulinum toxin was found to be safe and effective therapy for the management of androgenetic alopecia in this pilot study. Studies with larger sample size and randomized controlled trials are required to establish the role of botulinum toxin in the management of androgenetic alopecia.

  3. Antioxidant effect of minocycline in gingival epithelium induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype B toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernie Maduratna Setiawati

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa serotype B has been associated with aggressive periodontitis. Gingival epithelial cell is exquisitely sensitive to the toxin and may lead to the epithel protective barrier disruption. Experimental models show that minocycline is not related to it’s antimicrobial effect and protection against neuron cell apoptosis of a number experimental models of brain injury and Parkinson’s disease. Purpose: This study, examined antioxidant effect of minocycline to inhibit apoptosis of gingival epithelium induced crude toxin bacteria Aa serotype B in mice. Methods: Thirty adult mice strain Swiss Webster (balb C were divided randomly into three groups: control group (group A, toxin group (group B and toxin and minocycline group (group C. The mice were taken at 24 hours after application, and then the tissue sections of gingival epithelium were stained with tunnel assay and immunohistochemistry. Result: Treatment with these toxin induced apoptosis of gingival epithelium and was associated with DNA fragmentation and reduced gluthatione (GSH. Minocycline 100 nM significantly increased GSH and reduced apoptosis (p < 0.05. Minocycline provides antioxidant effect against citotoxicity of bacteria Aa serotipe B. Conclusion: Nanomolar concentration of minocycline potential as new therapeutic agent to prevent progressivity of aggressiveness of periodontitis.

  4. Botulinum toxin as a therapeutic agent to prevent relapse in deep bite patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücke, Thomas; Löffel, Anja; Kanatas, Anastasios; Karnezi, Sandy; Rana, Majeed; Fichter, Andreas; Haarmann, Stephan; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Loeffelbein, Denys John

    2016-05-01

    The etiology of deep bite is multifactorial. One of the causes is increased muscular activity. This makes the treatment of deep bite malocclusions difficult and often results in relapse in many cases. In this work we compared patients with surgical orthognathic treatment only and surgical orthognathic treatment with additional injections of botulinum toxin after mandibular advancement for class II division 2 malocclusion. This is a prospective study. Adult patients were assessed pretreatment (T1), posttreatment (T2), and long-term after 1 year (T3). In total, 32 patients (mean age, 30.7 years; 23 women and 9 men) reached the study end point (T3); 24 patients were treated without botulinum toxin and 8 patients received preoperative injections of botulinum toxin. Significant differences between both groups were observed, with a more stable result for the experimental group treated with botulinum toxin. In a selective group of adult patients with a class II division II incisor relationship and with a class II skeletal base, botulinum toxin injections can effectively prevent relapse. This may present an alternative to a conventional myotomy. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Amino acid residues involved in membrane insertion and pore formation of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Alexander E; Neumeyer, Tobias; Sun, Jianjun; Collier, R John; Benz, Roland; Aktories, Klaus

    2008-08-12

    The actin-ADP-ribosylating Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin consists of the enzymatic component C2I and the binding component C2II. C2II forms heptameric channels involved in translocation of the enzymatic component into the target cell. On the basis of the heptameric toxin channel, we studied functional consequences of mutagenesis of amino acid residues probably lining the lumen of the toxin channel. Substitution of glutamate-399 of C2II with alanine blocked channel formation and cytotoxicity of the holotoxin. Although cytotoxicity and rounding up of cells by C2I were completely blocked by exchange of phenylalanine-428 with alanine, the mutation increased potassium conductance caused by C2II in artificial membranes by about 2-3-fold over that of wild-type toxin. In contrast to its effects on single-channel potassium conductance in artificial membranes, the F428A mutation delayed the kinetics of pore formation in lipid vesicles and inhibited the activity of C2II in promoting (86)Rb (+) release from preloaded intact cells after pH shift of the medium. Moreover, F428A C2II exhibited delayed and diminished formation of C2II aggregates at low pH, indicating major changes of the biophysical properties of the toxin. The data indicate that phenylalanine-428 of C2II plays a major role in conformational changes occurring during pore formation of the binding component of C2II.

  6. Botulinum Toxin in Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Levi D'Ancona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin on urodynamic parameters and quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Methods Thirty four adult patients with spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity were selected. The patients received 300 units of botulinum toxin type A. The endpoints evaluated with the episodes of urinary incontinence and measured the maximum cystometric capacity, maximum amplitude of detrusor pressure and bladder compliance at the beginning and end of the study (24 weeks and evaluated the quality of life by applying the Qualiveen questionnaire. Results A significant decrease in the episodes of urinary incontinence was observed. All urodynamic parameters presented a significant improvement. The same was observed in the quality of life index and the specific impact of urinary problems scores from the Qualiveen questionnaire. Six patients did not complete the study, two due to incomplete follow-up, and four violated protocol and were excluded from the analyses. No systemic adverse events of botulinum toxin type A were reported. Conclusions A botulinum toxin type A showed a significantly improved response in urodynamics parameters and specific and general quality of life.

  7. Bioengineered kidney tubules efficiently excrete uremic toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Jitske; Fedecostante, M.; Wilmer, M.; Peters, J.G.; Kreuser, U.M.; Broek, P.H.; Mensink, R.A.; Boltje, T.J.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wetzels, J.F.; van der Heuvel, L.P.; Hoenderop, J.G.; Masereeuw, R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a biotechnological platform for the removal of waste products (e.g. uremic toxins), often bound to proteins in plasma, is a prerequisite to improve current treatment modalities for patients suffering from end stage renal disease (ESRD). Here, we present a newly designed

  8. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient...

  9. Diffusion, spread, and migration of botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Castaneda, Juan; Jankovic, Joseph; Comella, Cynthia; Dashtipour, Khashayar; Fernandez, Hubert H; Mari, Zoltan

    2013-11-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is an acetylcholine release inhibitor and a neuromuscular blocking agent used for the treatment of a variety of neurologic and medical conditions. The efficacy and safety of BoNT depends on accurate selection and identification of intended targets but also may be determined by other factors, including physical spread of the molecule from the injection site, passive diffusion, and migration to distal sites via axonal or hematogenous transport. The passive kinetic dispersion of the toxin away from the injection site in a gradient-dependent manner may also play a role in toxin spread. In addition to unique properties of the various BoNT products, volume and dilution may also influence local and systemic distribution of BoNT. Most of the local and remote complications of BoNT injections are thought to be due to unwanted spread or diffusion of the toxin's biologic activity into adjacent and distal muscles. Despite widespread therapeutic and cosmetic use of BoNT over more than three decades, there is a remarkable paucity of published data on the mechanisms of distribution and its effects on clinical outcomes. The primary aim of this article is to critically review the available experimental and clinical literature and place it in the practical context. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Investigation of inactivation of Clostridium botulinum toxin by nuclear radiation. Final report. Untersuchung zur Desaktivierung des Clostridium botulinum Toxins durch Kernstrahlung. Endbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenhaeuser, A.; Werner, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of nuclear radiation on the toxicity and the molecular structure of the toxin produced by the microorganism Clostridium botulinum type A was investigated. The radiation induced changes in the structure of the toxin molecule. This effect is influenced by the composition or the medium above the toxin solution as well as by the temperature during the irradiation. The results of the investigation indicate that with increasing irradiation dose a new molecule was formed with immunological properties similar to the properties of the original molecule however with a greater molecular weight. After exposure to a radiation dose of 3,4 Mrad at normal temperature in air, complete detoxification of the substance was found. Immunizing experiments with the toxoid with two guinea-pigs indicated a pronounced increase of the antibody titer in the serum after 4 weeks. Vaccination experiments with the toxoid on animals show, that the protection against the effect of the toxin corresponds to the demands of the European Pharmacopoeia. The efficiency of the toxoid shows a similar efficiency as toxoids produced by chemical methods. The production of a toxoid-viccine with the relatively simple method of nuclear radiation appears possible. (orig./MG) With 12 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  11. Mutant with diphtheria toxin receptor and acidification function but defective in entry of toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Kenji; Hayes, H.; Mekada, Eisuke; Uchida, Tsuyoshi

    1987-01-01

    A mutant of Chinese hamster ovary cells, GE1, that is highly resistant to diphtheria toxin was isolated. The mutant contains 50% ADP-ribosylatable elongation factor 2, but its protein synthesis was not inhibited by the toxin even at concentrations above 100 μg/ml. 125 I-labeled diphtheria toxin was associated with GE1 cells as well as with the parent cells but did not block protein synthesis of GE1 cells even when the cells were exposed to low pH in the presence or absence of NH 4 Cl. The infections of GE1 cells and the parent cells by vesicular stomatitis virus were similar. GE1 cells were cross-resistant to Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and so were about 1,000 times more resistant to this toxin than the parent cells. Hybrids of GE1 cells and the parent cells or mutant cells lacking a functional receptor were more sensitive to diphtheria toxin than GE1 cells. These results suggest that entry of diphtheria toxin into cells requires a cellular factor(s) in addition to those involved in receptor function and acidification of endosomes and that GE1 cells do not express this cellular factor. This character is recessive in GE1 cells

  12. Higher cytotoxicity of divalent antibody-toxins than monovalent antibody-toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, JaeSeon; Nam, PilWon; Lee, YongChan; Choe, MuHyeon

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant antibody-toxins are constructed via the fusion of a 'carcinoma-specific' antibody fragment to a toxin. Due to the high affinity and high selectivity of the antibody fragments, antibody-toxins can bind to surface antigens on cancer cells and kill them without harming normal cells [L.H. Pai, J.K. Batra, D.J. FitzGerald, M.C. Willingham, I. Pastan, Anti-tumor activities of immunotoxins made of monoclonal antibody B3 and various forms of Pseudomonas exotoxin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 3358-3362]. In this study, we constructed the antibody-toxin, Fab-SWn-PE38, with SWn (n = 3, 6, 9) sequences containing n-time repeated (G 4 S) between the Fab fragment and PE38 (38 kDa truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A). The SWn sequence also harbored one cysteine residue that could form a disulfide bridge between two Fab-SWn-PE38 monomers. We assessed the cytotoxicity of the monovalent (Fab-SWn-PE38), and divalent ([Fab-SWn-PE38] 2 ) antibody-toxins. The cytotoxicity of the dimer against the CRL1739 cell line was approximately 18.8-fold higher than that of the monomer on the ng/ml scale, which was approximately 37.6-fold higher on the pM scale. These results strongly indicate that divalency provides higher cytotoxicity for an antibody-toxin.

  13. Characterization of Hemagglutinin Negative Botulinum Progenitor Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a disease involving intoxication with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, toxic proteins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other clostridia. The 150 kDa neurotoxin is produced in conjunction with other proteins to form the botulinum progenitor toxin complex (PTC, alternating in size from 300 kDa to 500 kDa. These progenitor complexes can be classified into hemagglutinin positive or hemagglutinin negative, depending on the ability of some of the neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs to cause hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin positive progenitor toxin complex consists of BoNT, nontoxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and three hemagglutinin proteins; HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17. Hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes contain BoNT and NTNH as the minimally functional PTC (M-PTC, but not the three hemagglutinin proteins. Interestingly, the genome of hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes comprises open reading frames (orfs which encode for three proteins, but the existence of these proteins has not yet been extensively demonstrated. In this work, we demonstrate that these three proteins exist and form part of the PTC for hemagglutinin negative complexes. Several hemagglutinin negative strains producing BoNT/A, /E, and /F were found to contain the three open reading frame proteins. Additionally, several BoNT/A-containing bivalent strains were examined, and NAPs from both genes, including the open reading frame proteins, were associated with BoNT/A. The open reading frame encoded proteins are more easily removed from the botulinum complex than the hemagglutinin proteins, but are present in several BoNT/A and /F toxin preparations. These are not easily removed from the BoNT/E complex, however, and are present even in commercially-available purified BoNT/E complex.

  14. Effects of cholera toxin and isobutylmethylxanthine on growth of human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, B.; Wharton, W.

    1986-01-01

    Cholera toxin produced a dose-dependent decrease in the restimulation of G 0 /G 1 traverse in density-arrested human fibroblasts but did not inhibit the stimulation of cells arrested in G 0 after serum starvation at low density. In addition, cholera toxin did not inhibit the proliferation of sparse logarithmically growing human fibroblasts, even when low concentrations of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) were also present. However, the final density to which sparse cells grew was limited by cholera toxin, when added either alone or together with low concentrations of IBMX. In contrast, high concentrations of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor alone produced a profound inhibition in the growth of sparse human fibrobasts. IBMX produced an inhibition both in the G 1 and in the G 2 phases of the cell cycle by a mechanism(s) that was not related to the magnitude of the increases in adenosine 3,5-cyclic monophosphate concentrations

  15. The effect of irradiation on the viability and toxin production of various species of fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellyei, Gy-ne.; Vanyi, A.; Petri, A.

    1979-01-01

    The procedure to sterilize various kinds of food by irradiation has been used successfully for many years. The irradiation resistance of fodder contaminating moulds and their toxins was examined. Irradiation, heat treatment, and irradiation combined with heat treatment were used in experiments with Fusarium. However, only irradiation was used with the conidium suspensions of Aspergillus and Penicillium. After an appropriate time of incubation, the survival and the toxin producing capacity were determined. The heat treatment killed Fusarium but failed to kill Aspergillus and Penicillium. Owing to irradiation the reproductive capacity all of the fungi tested decreased, but in the surviving cultures the mycotoxin production increased. Using heat treatment combined with irradiation the toxin content of samples reached a high level in a short time and became stabilized. (author)

  16. Artificial activation of toxin-antitoxin systems as an antibacterial strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julia J; Hergenrother, Paul J

    2012-06-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are unique modules that effect plasmid stabilization via post-segregational killing of the bacterial host. The genes encoding TA systems also exist on bacterial chromosomes, and it has been speculated that these are involved in a variety of cellular processes. Interest in TA systems has increased dramatically over the past 5 years as the ubiquitous nature of TA genes on bacterial genomes has been revealed. The exploitation of TA systems as an antibacterial strategy via artificial activation of the toxin has been proposed and has considerable potential; however, efforts in this area remain in the early stages and several major questions remain. This review investigates the tractability of targeting TA systems to kill bacteria, including fundamental requirements for success, recent advances, and challenges associated with artificial toxin activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Discovery of novel bacterial toxins by genomics and computational biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxey, Andrew C; Mansfield, Michael J; Montecucco, Cesare

    2018-06-01

    Hundreds and hundreds of bacterial protein toxins are presently known. Traditionally, toxin identification begins with pathological studies of bacterial infectious disease. Following identification and cultivation of a bacterial pathogen, the protein toxin is purified from the culture medium and its pathogenic activity is studied using the methods of biochemistry and structural biology, cell biology, tissue and organ biology, and appropriate animal models, supplemented by bioimaging techniques. The ongoing and explosive development of high-throughput DNA sequencing and bioinformatic approaches have set in motion a revolution in many fields of biology, including microbiology. One consequence is that genes encoding novel bacterial toxins can be identified by bioinformatic and computational methods based on previous knowledge accumulated from studies of the biology and pathology of thousands of known bacterial protein toxins. Starting from the paradigmatic cases of diphtheria toxin, tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins, this review discusses traditional experimental approaches as well as bioinformatics and genomics-driven approaches that facilitate the discovery of novel bacterial toxins. We discuss recent work on the identification of novel botulinum-like toxins from genera such as Weissella, Chryseobacterium, and Enteroccocus, and the implications of these computationally identified toxins in the field. Finally, we discuss the promise of metagenomics in the discovery of novel toxins and their ecological niches, and present data suggesting the existence of uncharacterized, botulinum-like toxin genes in insect gut metagenomes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Successful use of botulinum toxin type a in the treatment of refractory postoperative dyspareunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Amy J; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R

    2009-08-01

    Refractory dyspareunia presents a challenging therapeutic dilemma. A woman with defecatory dysfunction and dyspareunia presented with stage 2 prolapse. She underwent laparoscopic and vaginal pelvic floor reconstruction with excision of endometriosis. The patient experienced increased dyspareunia and de novo vaginismus postoperatively that were refractory to trigger point injections, physical therapy, and medical and surgical management. She underwent botulinum toxin type A injections into her levator ani muscles, which allowed her to have sexual intercourse again after 2 years of apareunia with no recurrence of pain for 12 months. Injecting botulinum toxin into the levator ani muscles shows promise for postoperative patients who develop vaginismus and do not respond to conservative therapy.

  19. Induction of diphtheria toxin-resistant mutants in human cells by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchi, P.; Ferreri, A.M.; Capucci, A.; Prodi, G.

    1981-01-01

    Stable spontaneous mutants resistant to the protein synthesis inhibitor diphtheria toxin (DT) have been selected in human cell line EUE at a very low frequency (less than 8 x 10(-6)). U.v.-induced mutation has been quantitatively measured: treatment of cells with u.v. light increased the frequencies of diphtheria toxin resistant (DTr) mutants up to 1000-fold. The maximum recovery of DTr mutants was observed after a short expression period, for all u.v. doses tested, and was followed by a decrease in mutation frequency on subsequent passages

  20. Induction of diphtheria toxin-resistant mutants in human cells by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchi, P.; Ferreri, A.M.; Capucci, A.; Prodi, G.

    1981-01-01

    Stable spontaneous mutants resistant to the protein synthesis inhibitor diphtheria toxin (DT) have been selected in human cell line EUE at a very low frequency ( -6 ). U.v.-induced mutation has been quantitatively measured: treatment of cells with u.v. light increased the frequencies of diphtheria toxin resistant (DTsup(r)) mutants up to 1000-fold. The maximum recovery of DTsup(r) mutants was observed after a short expression period, for all u.v. doses tested, and was followed by a decrease in mutation frequency on subsequent passages. (author)

  1. A neurophysiological method of rapid detection and analysis of marine algal toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerr, DS; Bødtkjer, Donna Briggs; Saba, HI

    1999-01-01

    a robust, reversible increase in amplitude mic spikes, and the appearance of multiple spikes (i.e., epileptiform activity) within minutes of toxin wash-in. Other notable features of the domoic acid signature included a significant decrease in amplitude of the field EPSPs, and a complete absence of effect...... responsive fashion at toxin concentrations of 25-200 nM, and tests of naturally contaminated shellfish confirmed the utility of this assay as a screening method for PSP. Our findings suggest that the in vitro hippocampal slice preparation has potential in the detection and analysis of three marine algal...

  2. Parallel direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows in rotor-stator cavities. Comparison with k-{epsilon} modeling; Simulation numerique directe parallele d`ecoulements turbulents en cavites rotor-stator comparaisons avec les modilisations k-{epsilon}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, R.; Le Quere, P.; Daube, O. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 91 - Orsay (France)

    1997-12-31

    Turbulent flows between a fixed disc and a rotating disc are encountered in various applications like turbo-machineries or torque converters of automatic gear boxes. These flows are characterised by particular physical phenomena mainly due to the effects of rotation (Coriolis and inertia forces) and thus, classical k-{epsilon}-type modeling gives approximative results. The aim of this work is to study these flows using direct numerical simulation in order to provide precise information about the statistical turbulent quantities and to improve the k-{epsilon} modeling in the industrial MATHILDA code of the ONERA and used by SNECMA company (aerospace industry). The results presented are restricted to the comparison between results obtained with direct simulation and results obtained with the MATHILDA code in the same configuration. (J.S.) 8 refs.

  3. Radioimmunoassay for yeast killer toxin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, F.A.; Bussey, H.

    1981-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for the K1 killer toxin from strain T158C/S14a of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Iodine 125-labelled toxin was made to a specific activity of 100 μCi/mg of protein. Antibody to purified toxin was prepared in rabbits using toxin cross-linked to itself. These antibodies, partially purified by 50 percent ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography, produced one precipitation band with killer toxin and bound 125 I-labelled toxin in a radioimmunoassay. The antibody preparation also bound with the toxins from another K1 killer, A364A, and three chromosomal superkiller mutants derived from it. (auth)

  4. Diffusion in the uranium - plutonium system and self-diffusion of plutonium in epsilon phase; Diffusion dans le systeme uranium-plutonium et autodiffusion du plutonium epsilon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    A survey of uranium-plutonium phase diagram leads to confirm anglo-saxon results about the plutonium solubility in {alpha} uranium (15 per cent at 565 C) and the uranium one in {zeta} phase (74 per cent at 565 C). Interdiffusion coefficients, for concentration lower than 15 per cent had been determined in a temperature range from 410 C to 640 C. They vary between 0.2 and 6 10{sup 12} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, and the activation energy between 13 and 20 kcal/mole. Grain boundary, diffusion of plutonium in a uranium had been pointed out by micrography, X-ray microanalysis and {alpha} autoradiography. Self-diffusion of plutonium in {epsilon} phase (bcc) obeys Arrhenius law: D = 2. 10{sup -2} exp -(18500)/RT. But this activation energy does not follow empirical laws generally accepted for other metals. It has analogies with 'anomalous' bcc metals ({beta}Zr, {beta}Ti, {beta}Hf, U{sub {gamma}}). (author) [French] Une etude du diagramme d'equilibre uranium-plutonium conduit a confirmer les resultats anglo-saxons relatifs a la solubilite du plutonium dans l'uranium {alpha} (15 pour cent a 565 C) et de l'uranium dans la phase {zeta} (74 pour cent a 565 C). Les coefficients de diffusion chimique, pour des concentrations inferieures a 15 pour cent ont ete determines a des temperatures comprises entre 410 et 640 C. Ils se situent entre 0.2 et 6. 10{sup 12} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. L'energie d'activation varie entre 13 et 20 kcal/mole. La diffusion intergranulaire du plutonium dans l'uranium a a ete mise en evidence par micrographie, microanalyse X et autoradiographie {alpha}. L' autodiffusion du plutonium {beta} cubique centree obeit a la loi d'Arrhenius D = 2. 10{sup -2} exp - (18500)/RT. Son energie d'activation n'obeit pas aux lois empiriques generalement admises pour les autres metaux. Elle possede des analogies avec les cubiques centres ''anormaux'' (Zr{beta}, Ti{beta}, Hf{beta}, U{gamma}). (auteur)

  5. Toxin Mediates Sepsis Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial sepsis is a major killer in hospitalized patients. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS with the leading species Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most frequent causes of nosocomial sepsis, with most infectious isolates being methicillin-resistant. However, which bacterial factors underlie the pathogenesis of CNS sepsis is unknown. While it has been commonly believed that invariant structures on the surface of CNS trigger sepsis by causing an over-reaction of the immune system, we show here that sepsis caused by methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis is to a large extent mediated by the methicillin resistance island-encoded peptide toxin, PSM-mec. PSM-mec contributed to bacterial survival in whole human blood and resistance to neutrophil-mediated killing, and caused significantly increased mortality and cytokine expression in a mouse sepsis model. Furthermore, we show that the PSM-mec peptide itself, rather than the regulatory RNA in which its gene is embedded, is responsible for the observed virulence phenotype. This finding is of particular importance given the contrasting roles of the psm-mec locus that have been reported in S. aureus strains, inasmuch as our findings suggest that the psm-mec locus may exert effects in the background of S. aureus strains that differ from its original role in the CNS environment due to originally "unintended" interferences. Notably, while toxins have never been clearly implied in CNS infections, our tissue culture and mouse infection model data indicate that an important type of infection caused by the predominant CNS species is mediated to a large extent by a toxin. These findings suggest that CNS infections may be amenable to virulence-targeted drug development approaches.

  6. Multidose Botulinum Toxin A for Intralaryngeal Injection: A Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Mark R; Young, VyVy N; Smith, Libby J; Rosen, Clark A

    2018-01-04

    Botulinum toxin A (BtxA) injection is the mainstay treatment for laryngeal dystonias. BtxA product labeling states that reconstituted toxin should be used within 4 hours on a single patient despite several studies that have demonstrated multidose BtxA to be safe and effective. Many insurance carriers mandate the use of an outside pharmacy which necessitates a single-use approach. This study compares the cost savings of multidose BtxA for laryngeal dystonia compared to single-use. This is a retrospective review and projected cost savings analysis. Records and billing information were reviewed for patients receiving BtxA for intralaryngeal injection at a single laryngology division in 2015. Inclusion criteria included CPT 64617 or J0585; exclusion criteria included CPT 64616. The price of BtxA 100 unit vial for calculation was $670. A total of 142 patients were seen for intralaryngeal BtxA injection resulting in 337 visits over 1 year. The average BtxA dose per visit was 2.86 units with an average of 3.06 procedure visits per year. The calculated cost of BtxA treatment using a single vial approach was found to be $2,050 per patient per year. If billed instead for $7/unit with 5 units wastage charge per visit, the yearly per patient charge is $168. Single vial-use of BtxA injection thus represents a 1,118% price increase versus multidose use. When estimated for yearly prevalence of spasmodic dysphonia, multidose BtxA use would save almost $100 million annually. Multidose botulinum toxin A application utilizing per unit billing is significantly less expensive than per single-use vial billing and would save the health-care system significant amount of money without any sacrifice in safety or effectiveness. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. General synthesis of β-alanine-containing spider polyamine toxins and discovery of nephila polyamine toxins 1 and 8 as highly potent inhibitors of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Simon; Poulsen, Mette H; Nørager, Niels G

    2012-01-01

    Certain spiders contain large pools of polyamine toxins, which are putative pharmacological tools awaiting further discovery. Here we present a general synthesis strategy for this class of toxins and prepare five structurally varied polyamine toxins. Electrophysiological testing at three ionotrop...

  8. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin A Intramuscular Injections in After-Stroke Spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Karaçam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Spasticity is a common dysfunction in stroke patients. It hinders the performance of everyday living activities and lowers the quality of life. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of botulinum toxin A therapy on various aspects, such as muscle tone, pain, daily living activities and disability. METHODS: Fifteen patients with stroke presenting with focal spasticity in the botulinum toxin outpatient unit were evaluated. Results before and after treatment were evaluated by applying different scales. Modified Ashworth Scale was applied for the severity of spasticity. The Medical Council Research Scale was used to test muscle power, and the disability scoring scale, Visual Analogue Pain Scale and Barthel index were the other measures tested. RESULTS: It was found that therapy with botulinum toxin A was effective in spasticity. The increased muscle tone and the disability scores decreased prominently after the treatment (p< 0.05. Lower values in pain scores (p< 0.05 also contributed to better functional outcome (p< 0.01. Along with the significantly good outcome according to the scales, the higher scores in quality of life, feeling of well-being, good performance during the physiotherapy sessions, and less medications needed for spasticity were also indications in commencing the therapy of botulinum toxin A in spasticity. CONCLUSION: Spasticity is a complicated condition causing serious disability. Botulinum toxin A is a preferred therapy when there is an increased motor activity. The effects of the agent are reversible and reliable. The duration of the treatment is long-lasting. Since botulinum toxin A is easily applied and the outcome in focal spasticity is favorable, it is recommended as the first-line choice in the treatment of focal spasticity

  9. Laboratory injection molder for the fabrication of polymeric porous poly-epsilon-caprolactone scaffolds for preliminary mesenchymal stem cells tissue engineering applications

    KAUST Repository

    Limongi, Tania; Lizzul, Lucia; Giugni, Andrea; Tirinato, Luca; Pagliari, Francesca; Tan, Hua; Das, Gobind; Moretti, Manola; Marini, Monica; Brusatin, Giovanna; Falqui, Andrea; Torre, Bruno; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2016-01-01

    with the poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) granules using a screwed thermo regulated extruder, than the biocompatible scaffolds are fabricated through injection molding. The micro/nano structure of the samples and their different grade of porosity were

  10. Yeast β-1,6-glucan is a primary target for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K2 toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukša, Juliana; Podoliankaitė, Monika; Vepštaitė, Iglė; Strazdaitė-Žielienė, Živilė; Urbonavičius, Jaunius; Servienė, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Certain Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains secrete different killer proteins of double-stranded-RNA origin. These proteins confer a growth advantage to their host by increasing its survival. K2 toxin affects the target cell by binding to the cell surface, disrupting the plasma membrane integrity, and inducing ion leakage. In this study, we determined that K2 toxin saturates the yeast cell surface receptors in 10 min. The apparent amount of K2 toxin, bound to a single cell of wild type yeast under saturating conditions, was estimated to be 435 to 460 molecules. It was found that an increased level of β-1,6-glucan directly correlates with the number of toxin molecules bound, thereby impacting the morphology and determining the fate of the yeast cell. We observed that the binding of K2 toxin to the yeast surface receptors proceeds in a similar manner as in case of the related K1 killer protein. It was demonstrated that the externally supplied pustulan, a poly-β-1,6-glucan, but not the glucans bearing other linkage types (such as laminarin, chitin, and pullulan) efficiently inhibits the K2 toxin killing activity. In addition, the analysis of toxin binding to the intact cells and spheroplasts confirmed that majority of K2 protein molecules attach to the β-1,6-glucan, rather than the plasma membrane-localized receptors. Taken together, our results reveal that β-1,6-glucan is a primary target of K2 toxin and is important for the execution of its killing property. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. The apolipoprotein E epsilon4-allele and antihypertensive treatment are associated with increased risk of cerebral MRI white matter hyperintensities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, P; Garde, Ellen; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2007-01-01

    ) in a community-based sample of elderly subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From a cohort of 976 subjects born in 1914, APOE genotype was determined and MRI examinations were carried out in 75 subjects. WMH were rated using a standard semi-quantitative method. ANOVA and regression analyses were conducted to explore...... the relative importance of the potential risk factors. RESULTS: APOE genotype and antihypertensive treatment were significantly associated with severity of total WMH load (P Pharmaceutical treatment for arterial...

  12. Application of low Reynolds number k-{epsilon} turbulence models to the study of turbulent wall jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kechiche, Jamel; Mhiri, Hatem [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et Thermique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, route de Ouardanine, 5000, Monastir (Tunisia); Le Palec, Georges; Bournot, Philippe [Institut de Mecanique de Marseille, 60, rue Joliot-Curie, Technopole de Chateau-Gombert, 13453 cedex 13, Marseille (France)

    2004-02-01

    In this work, we use closure models called ''low Reynolds number k-{epsilon} models'', which are self-adapting ones using different damping functions, in order to explore the computed behavior of a turbulent plane two-dimensional wall jets. In this study, the jet may be either isothermal or submitted to various wall boundary conditions (uniform temperature or a uniform heat flux) in forced convection regime. A finite difference method, using a staggered grid, is employed to solve the coupled governing equations with the inlet and the boundary conditions. The predictions of the various low Reynolds number k-{epsilon} models with standard or modified C{sub {mu}} adopted in this work were presented and compared with measurements and numerical results found in the literature. (authors)

  13. Inactivation Kinetics of the Cyanobacterial Toxin Microcystin-LR by Free Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide, the increasing occurrence of toxins produced by cyanobacteria in water bodies used as source waters for drinking water has become an important public health issue. Microcystin-LR is one of the most commonly found cyanotoxins. A detailed evaluation of the free chlorine ...

  14. The use of botulinum toxin type A in cosmetic facial procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, G. W. C.; Pijpe, J.; Jansma, J.

    Over the past decade, facial cosmetic procedures have become more commonplace ill dentistry and oral and maxillofacial surgery. An increasing number of patients seek minimal invasive procedures. One of the most requested procedures is treatment with botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA). Treatment of

  15. The physiological adaptations and toxin profiles of the toxic Alexandrium fundyense on the eastern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea shelves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuike, Masafumi; Oikawa, Hiroshi; Matsuno, Kohei; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Imai, Ichiro

    2017-03-01

    Abundant cyst distributions of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense (previous A. tamarense north American clade) were recently observed on the north Chukchi Sea shelf and on the eastern Bering Sea shelf, suggesting that A. fundyense is both highly adapted to the local environments in the high latitude areas and might cause toxin contamination of plankton feeders. However, little is known about the physiological characteristics and toxin profiles of A. fundyense in these areas, which are characterized by low water temperatures, weak sunlight, and more or less permanent ice cover during winter. To clarify the physiological characteristics of A. fundyense, the effects of water temperature and light intensity on the vegetative growth and toxin profiles of this species were examined using A. fundyense strains isolated from one sediment sample collected from each area. Using the same sediments samples, seasonal changes of the cyst germination in different water temperatures were investigated. Vegetative cells grew at temperatures as low as 5°C and survived at 1°C under relatively low light intensity. They also grew at moderate water temperatures (10-15°C). Their cysts could germinate at low temperatures (1°C) and have an endogenous dormancy period from late summer to early spring, and warmer water temperatures (5-15°C) increased germination success. These physiological characteristics suggest that A. fundyense in the Chukchi Sea and eastern Bering Sea is adapted to the environments of high latitude areas. In addition, the results suggest that in the study areas A. fundyense has the potential to germinate and grow when water temperatures increase. Cellular toxin amounts of A. fundyense strains from the eastern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea were ranged from 7.2 to 38.2 fmol cell -1 . These toxin amounts are comparable with A. fundyense strains isolated from other areas where PSP toxin contamination of bivalves occurs. The dominant toxin of the strains isolated

  16. Effect of carbon on interstitial ordering and magnetic properties of epsilon-Fe-2(N,C)(1-z)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brink, B. K.; Stahl, K.; Christiansen, T. L.; Frandsen, C.; Hansen, M. F.; Beran, Přemysl; Somers, M. A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 694, FEB (2017), s. 282-291 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : neutron diffraction * vibrating sample magnotometry * Epsilon iron nitride * thermal expansion * interstitial order Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.133, year: 2016

  17. Effect of halloysite nanotubes on the thermal degradation behaviour of poly(.epsilon.-caprolactone)/poly(lactic acid) microfibrillar composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luyt, A. S.; Kelnar, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, July (2017), s. 166-172 ISSN 0142-9418 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-15255S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : poly(lactic acid) * poly(epsilon-caprolactone) * halloysite nanotubes Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 2.464, year: 2016

  18. Mobility of adsorbed Cry1Aa insecticidal toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) on montmorillonite measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helassa, Nordine; Daudin, Gabrielle; Noinville, Sylvie; Janot, Jean-Marc; Déjardin, Philippe; Staunton, Siobhán; Quiquampoix, Hervé

    2010-06-01

    The insecticidal toxins produced by genetically modified Bt crops are introduced into soil through root exudates and tissue decomposition and adsorb readily on soil components, especially on clays. This immobilisation and the consequent concentration of the toxins in "hot spots" could increase the exposure of soil organisms. Whereas the effects on non-target organisms are well documented, few studies consider the migration of the toxin in soil. In this study, the residual mobility of Bt Cry1Aa insecticidal toxin adsorbed on montmorillonite was assessed using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). This technique, which is usually used to study dynamics of cytoplasmic and membrane molecules in live cells, was applied for the first time to a protein adsorbed on a finely divided swelling clay mineral, montmorillonite. No mobility of adsorbed toxin was observed at any pH and at different degrees of surface saturation.

  19. epsilon-fructoselysine in urine of rats fed 14C-lysine-labeled casein browned by amino-carbonyl reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Bunpei; Kojima, Kazumi; Saito, Susumu

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive substances were identified in urine of rats fed on browned casein, which had been labeled with U- 14 C-L-lysine. When browned casein was ingested by growing rats, high radioactivity was found in urine taken for 24 hr after feeding. Urinary recovery of radioactivity and specific radioactivity were about 9-times as high as those of the control. The radioactive substances were separated by Sephadex gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography 75 - 83% of the total radioactivity was recovered in the first peak of Sephadex gel filtration. The material with radioactivity was separated into two fractions by ionexchange chromatography. The ratio of radioactivity of these peaks on the chromatogram was about 30 to 70. The main peak was identified as epsilon-fructoselysine with an amino acid autoanalyzer. Urinary epsilon-fructoselysine content of 24 hr after a single dose feeding of 600 mg browned labeled casein was 13 - 18 mg per head. The relationship between epsilon-fructoselysine content as an absorption delayed-material in the small intestinal lumen and the amount excreted in urine was explained in a scheme together with results from previous studies. (author)

  20. D'une ouverture de la voyelle /epsilon/ en finale absolue en francais quebecois : analyse acoustique et perceptive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riverin-Coutlee, Josiane

    Cette contribution est consacree a l'ouverture du /epsilon/ en finale absolue, un phenomene phonetique repute etre en declin en francais quebecois et caracteristique de locuteurs âges, peu scolarises, issus de milieux populaires et s'exprimant en situation de communication informelle. Une analyse acoustique de 480 voyelles /epsilon/ issues de la parole formelle de 40 jeunes etudiants universitaires originaires des centres urbains de Saguenay et de Quebec revele toutefois que le phenomene est encore bien vivant en francais quebecois et qu'il est plus frequent chez les locuteurs de Saguenay, une tendance validee auditivement par accord inter-juges. Les resultats d'un test de discrimination et d'identification mene aupres de 26 etudiants universitaires originaires de ces deux memes villes indiquent que les auditeurs naifs de Saguenay semblent moins sensibles a la variation et moins enclins a juger de l'origine geographique d'un locuteur a partir de sa prononciation de la voyelle /epsilon/ en fin de mot.

  1. Iron Carbides in Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis: Theoretical and Experimental Understanding in Epsilon-Iron Carbide Phase Assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xing-Wu; Cao, Zhi; Zhao, Shu; Gao, Rui

    2017-01-01

    As active phases in low-temperature Fischer–Tropsch synthesis for liquid fuel production, epsilon iron carbides are critically important industrial materials. However, the precise atomic structure of epsilon iron carbides remains unclear, leading to a half-century of debate on the phase assignment of the ε-Fe 2 C and ε’-Fe 2.2 C. Here, we resolve this decades-long question by a combining theoretical and experimental investigation to assign the phases unambiguously. First, we have investigated the equilibrium structures and thermal stabilities of ε-Fe x C, (x = 1, 2, 2.2, 3, 4, 6, 8) by first-principles calculations. We have also acquired X-ray diffraction patterns and Mössbauer spectra for these epsilon iron carbides, and compared them with the simulated results. These analyses indicate that the unit cell of ε-Fe 2 C contains only one type of chemical environment for Fe atoms, while ε’-Fe 2.2 C has six sets of chemically distinct Fe atoms.

  2. Sphincter of Oddi botulinum toxin injection to prevent pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackert, Thilo; Klaiber, Ulla; Hinz, Ulf; Kehayova, Tzveta; Probst, Pascal; Knebel, Phillip; Diener, Markus K; Schneider, Lutz; Strobel, Oliver; Michalski, Christoph W; Ulrich, Alexis; Sauer, Peter; Büchler, Markus W

    2017-05-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula represents the most important complication after distal pancreatectomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a preoperative endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin into the sphincter of Oddi to prevent postoperative pancreatic fistula (German Clinical Trials Register number: DRKS00007885). This was an investigator-initiated, prospective clinical phase I/II trial with an exploratory study design. We included patients who underwent preoperative endoscopic sphincter botulinum toxin injection (100 units of Botox). End points were the feasibility, safety, and postoperative outcomes, including postoperative pancreatic fistula within 30 days after distal pancreatectomy. Botulinum toxin patients were compared with a control collective of patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy without botulinum toxin injection by case-control matching in a 1:1 ratio. Between February 2015 and February 2016, 29 patients were included. All patients underwent successful sphincter of Oddi botulinum toxin injection within a median of 6 (range 0-10) days before operation. One patient had an asymptomatic, self-limiting (48 hours) increase in serum amylase and lipase after injection. Distal pancreatectomy was performed in 24/29 patients; 5 patients were not resectable. Of the patients receiving botulinum toxin, 7 (29%) had increased amylase levels in drainage fluid on postoperative day 3 (the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery definition of postoperative pancreatic fistula grade A) without symptoms or need for reintervention. Importantly, no clinically relevant fistulas (International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery grades B/C) were observed in botulinum toxin patients compared to 33% postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B/C in case-control patients (P botulinum toxin injection is a novel and safe approach to decrease the incidence of clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy. The results of

  3. Feasibility study on production of a matrix reference material for cyanobacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingdale, Christie; Thomas, Krista; Lewis, Nancy; Békri, Khalida; McCarron, Pearse; Quilliam, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    The worldwide increase in cyanobacterial contamination of freshwater lakes and rivers is of great concern as many cyanobacteria produce potent hepatotoxins and neurotoxins (cyanotoxins). Such toxins pose a threat to aquatic ecosystems, livestock, and drinking water supplies. In addition, dietary supplements prepared from cyanobacteria can pose a risk to consumers if they contain toxins. Analytical monitoring for toxins in the environment and in consumer products is essential for the protection of public health. Reference materials (RMs) are an essential tool for the development and validation of analytical methods and are necessary for ongoing quality control of monitoring operations. Since the availability of appropriate RMs for cyanotoxins has been very limited, the present study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of producing a cyanobacterial matrix RM containing various cyanotoxins. The first step was large-scale culturing of various cyanobacterial cultures that produce anatoxins, microcystins, and cylindrospermopsins. After harvesting, the biomass was lyophilized, blended, homogenized, milled, and bottled. The moisture content and physical characteristics were assessed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the production process. Toxin levels were measured by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and ultraviolet detection. The reference material was found to be homogeneous for toxin content. Stability studies showed no significant degradation of target toxins over a period of 310 days at temperatures up to +40 °C except for the anatoxin-a, which showed some degradation at +40 °C. These results show that a fit-for-purpose matrix RM for cyanotoxins can be prepared using the processes and techniques applied in this work.

  4. Diphtheria toxin translocation across cellular membranes is regulated by sphingolipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spilsberg, Bjorn; Hanada, Kentaro; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is translocated across cellular membranes when receptor-bound toxin is exposed to low pH. To study the role of sphingolipids for toxin translocation, both a mutant cell line lacking the first enzyme in de novo sphingolipid synthesis, serine palmitoyltransferase, and a specific inhibitor of the same enzyme, myriocin, were used. The serine palmitoyltransferase-deficient cell line (LY-B) was found to be 10-15 times more sensitive to diphtheria toxin than the genetically complemented cell line (LY-B/cLCB1) and the wild-type cell line (CHO-K1), both when toxin translocation directly across the plasma membrane was induced by exposing cells with surface-bound toxin to low pH, and when the toxin followed its normal route via acidified endosomes into the cytosol. Toxin binding was similar in these three cell lines. Furthermore, inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase activity by addition of myriocin sensitized the two control cell lines (LY-B/cLCB1 and CHO-K1) to diphtheria toxin, whereas, as expected, no effect was observed in cells lacking serine palmitoyltransferase (LY-B). In conclusion, diphtheria toxin translocation is facilitated by depletion of membrane sphingolipids

  5. Formation of epsilon martensite by high-pressure torsion in a TRIP steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, Roberto B.; Sicupira, Felipe L.; Malheiros, Livia Raquel C.; Kawasaki, Megumi; Santos, Dagoberto B.; Langdon, Terence G.

    2015-01-01

    An Fe–17% Mn–0.06% C–2% Si–3% Al–1% Ni steel exhibiting a phase transformation induced by room temperature deformation was processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) using a pressure of 6.0 GPa and with the samples subjected to different amounts of torsional straining up to a maximum of 10 turns. A microstructural analysis revealed a phase transformation in the early stages of deformation and a gradual evolution towards a fully-deformed structure. Microhardness measurements showed two stages of hardening with eventual softening at large strains. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, there is evidence for a reverse martensitic transformation and the stabilization of an h.c.p. epsilon (ε) structure. The formation of an h.c.p. structure takes place in this steel at lower pressures than for pure iron but the results agree with earlier reports of the presence of an ε phase in stainless steel processed by HPT and with the expected reduction in the transition pressure due to the Mn addition

  6. Fuchsia. A tool for reducing differential equations for Feynman master integral to epsilon form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gituliar, Oleksandr [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Magerya, Vitaly

    2017-01-15

    We present Fuchsia - an implementation of the Lee algorithm, which for a given system of ordinary differential equations with rational coefficients ∂{sub x}f(x,ε)=A(x,ε)f(x,ε) finds a basis transformation T(x,ε), i.e., f(x,ε)=T(x,ε)g(x,ε), such that the system turns into the epsilon form: ∂{sub x}g(x,ε)=εS(x)g(x,ε), where S(x) is a Fuchsian matrix. A system of this form can be trivially solved in terms of polylogarithms as a Laurent series in the dimensional regulator ε. That makes the construction of the transformation T(x,ε) crucial for obtaining solutions of the initial system. In principle, Fuchsia can deal with any regular systems, however its primary task is to reduce differential equations for Feynman master integrals. It ensures that solutions contain only regular singularities due to the properties of Feynman integrals.

  7. Experimental Realization of an Epsilon-Near-Zero Graded-Index Metalens at Terahertz Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Peña, Victor; Engheta, Nader; Kuznetsov, Sergei; Gentselev, Alexandr; Beruete, Miguel

    2017-09-01

    The terahertz band has been historically hindered by the lack of efficient generators and detectors, but a series of recent breakthroughs have helped to effectively close the "terahertz gap." A rapid development of terahertz technology has been possible thanks to the translation of revolutionary concepts from other regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Among them, metamaterials stand out for their unprecedented ability to control wave propagation and manipulate electromagnetic response of matter. They have become a workhorse in the development of terahertz devices such as lenses, polarizers, etc., with fascinating features. In particular, epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) metamaterials have attracted much attention in the past several years due to their unusual properties such as squeezing, tunneling, and supercoupling where a wave traveling inside an electrically small channel filled with an ENZ medium can be tunneled through it, reducing reflections and coupling most of its energy. Here, we design and experimentally demonstrate an ENZ graded-index (GRIN) metamaterial lens operating at terahertz with a power enhancement of 16.2 dB, using an array of narrow hollow rectangular waveguides working near their cutoff frequencies. This is a demonstration of an ENZ GRIN device at terahertz and can open the path towards other realizations of similar devices enabling full quasioptical processing of terahertz signals.

  8. Insulin-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanoparticles: efficient, sustained and safe insulin delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Thiago M; Teixeira, Zaine; Barbosa-Sampaio, Helena C; Rezende, Luiz F; Boschero, Antonio C; Durán, Nelson; Höehr, Nelci F

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an efficient, biodegradable, biocompatible and safe controlled release system using insulin-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanoparticles. The insulin-loaded PCL nanoparticles were prepared by double emulsion method (water-in-oil-in-water) using Pluronic F68 as emulsifier. Using the double emulsion method a high insulin encapsulation efficiency (90.6 +/-1.6%) with a zeta potential of -29 +/-2.7 mV and average particle size of 796 +/-10.5 nm was obtained. Insulin-loaded PCL nanoparticles showed no toxicity to MIN6 cells. Insulin nanoparticles administered subcutaneously and intraperitoneally in rats reduced glycaemia of basal levels after 15 minutes, and presented a sustainable hypoglycemic effect on insulin-dependent type 1 diabetic rats, showing to be more efficient than unencapsulated insulin. Furthermore, these nanoparticles were not hepatotoxic, as evaluated by the effect over liver cell-death and oxidative stress scavenger system in rats. These results suggest that insulin-loaded PCL nanoparticles prepared by water-in-oil-in-water emulsion method are biocompatible, efficient and safe insulin-delivering system with controlled insulin release, which indicates that it may be a powerful tool for insulin-dependent patients care.

  9. Diphtheria toxoid loaded poly-(epsilon-caprolactone) nanoparticles as mucosal vaccine delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasvinder; Pandit, Sreenivas; Bramwell, Vincent W; Alpar, H Oya

    2006-02-01

    Poly-(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-PCL blend and co-polymer nanoparticles encapsulating diphtheria toxoid (DT) were investigated for their potential as a mucosal vaccine delivery system. The nanoparticles, prepared using a water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsion solvent evaporation method, demonstrated release profiles which were dependent on the properties of the polymers. An in vitro experiment using Caco-2 cells showed significantly higher uptake of PCL nanoparticles in comparison to polymeric PLGA, the PLGA-PCL blend and co-polymer nanoparticles. The highest uptake mediated by the most hydrophobic nanoparticles using Caco-2 cells was mirrored in the in vivo studies following nasal administration. PCL nanoparticles induced DT serum specific IgG antibody responses significantly higher than PLGA. A significant positive correlation between hydrophobicity of the nanoparticles and the immune response was observed following intramuscular administration. The positive correlation between hydrophobicity of the nanoparticles and serum DT specific IgG antibody response was also observed after intranasal administration of the nanoparticles. The cytokine assays showed that the serum IgG antibody response induced is different according to the route of administration, indicated by the differential levels of IL-6 and IFN-gamma. The nanoparticles eliciting the highest IgG antibody response did not necessarily elicit the highest levels of the cytokines IL-6 and IFN-gamma.

  10. Compact triple band-stop filter using novel epsilon-shaped metamaterial with lumped capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, W. A. E.; Hamdalla, M. Z. M.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents the design of a novel epsilon-shaped metamaterial unit cell structure that is applicable for single-band and multi-band applications. A closed-form formulas to control the resonance frequencies of the proposed design are included. The proposed unit cell, which exhibits negative permeability at its frequency bands, is etched from the ground plane to form a band-stop filter. The filter design is constructed to validate the band-notched characteristics of the proposed unit cell. A lumped capacitor is inserted for size reduction purpose in addition to multi-resonance generation. The fundamental resonance frequency is translated from 3.62 GHz to 2.45 GHz, which means that the filter size will be more compact (more than 32% size reduction). The overall size of the proposed filter is 13 × 6 × 1.524 mm3, where the electrical size is 0.221λg × 0.102λg × 0.026λg at the lower frequency band (2.45 GHz). Two other resonance frequencies are generated at 5.3 GHz and 9.2 GHz, which confirm the multi-band behavior of the proposed filter. Good agreement between simulated and measured characteristics of the fabricated filter prototype is achieved.

  11. A poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) device for sustained release of an anti-glaucoma drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natu, Madalina V; De Sousa, HermInio C; Gil, M H [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-290, Coimbra (Portugal); Gaspar, Manuel N; Fontes Ribeiro, Carlos A [Institute of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas, 3000-354, Coimbra (Portugal); Correia, IlIdio J; Silva, Daniela, E-mail: hgil@eq.uc.pt [Centro de Investigacao em Ciencias da Saude, Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal)

    2011-04-15

    Implantable dorzolamide-loaded discs were prepared by blending poly({epsilon}-caprolactone), PCL, with poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide), Lu. By blending, crystallinity, water uptake and mass loss were modified relative to the pure polymers. Burst was diminished by coating the discs with a PCL shell. All samples presented burst release except PCL-coated samples that showed controlled release during 18 days. For PCL-coated samples, barrier control of diffusion coupled with partition control from the core slowed down the release, while for 50/50 Lu/PCL-coated samples, the enhancement in the porosity of the core diminished partition control of drug release. Nonlinear regression analysis suggested that a degradation model fully describes the release curve considering a triphasic release mechanism: the instantaneous diffusion (burst), diffusion and polymer degradation stages. The MTT test indicated that the materials are not cytotoxic for corneal endothelial cells. A good in vitro-in vivo correlation was obtained, with similar amounts of drug released in vitro and in vivo. The discs decreased intraocular pressure (IOP) in normotensive rabbit eyes by 13.0% during 10 days for PCL-coated and by 13.0% during 4 days for 50/50 Lu/PCL-coated samples. The percentages of IOP decrease are similar to those obtained by dorzolamide eyedrop instillation (11.0%).

  12. Formation of epsilon martensite by high-pressure torsion in a TRIP steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Roberto B., E-mail: figueiredo-rb@ufmg.br [Department of Materials Engineering and Civil Construction, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 (Brazil); Sicupira, Felipe L.; Malheiros, Livia Raquel C. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 (Brazil); Kawasaki, Megumi [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Santos, Dagoberto B. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 (Brazil); Langdon, Terence G. [Materials Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Departments of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States)

    2015-02-11

    An Fe–17% Mn–0.06% C–2% Si–3% Al–1% Ni steel exhibiting a phase transformation induced by room temperature deformation was processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) using a pressure of 6.0 GPa and with the samples subjected to different amounts of torsional straining up to a maximum of 10 turns. A microstructural analysis revealed a phase transformation in the early stages of deformation and a gradual evolution towards a fully-deformed structure. Microhardness measurements showed two stages of hardening with eventual softening at large strains. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, there is evidence for a reverse martensitic transformation and the stabilization of an h.c.p. epsilon (ε) structure. The formation of an h.c.p. structure takes place in this steel at lower pressures than for pure iron but the results agree with earlier reports of the presence of an ε phase in stainless steel processed by HPT and with the expected reduction in the transition pressure due to the Mn addition.

  13. Blends of poly(hydroxybutyrate and poly (epsilon-caprolactone obtained from melting mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília M. Antunes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB is a thermoplastic polyester with a great potential owing to its biodegradability, bioreabsorbation and biological synthesis from a renewable source. Despite these characteristics, the applications of this polymer are very restricted due to its poor mechanical properties and thermal instability at temperatures above its melting point (around 175°C. Among the possibilities of improvement of these materials, the development of blends is a relatively fast and inexpensive option. Poly(epsilon-caprolactone (PCL is a semi-crystalline polymer that may be used as a biomaterial. It presents good mechanical properties, a low melting point (around 55 °C, and could be a good option to develop PHB blends, maintaining the biodegradability and bioreabsorption properties. The objective of the present work was to obtain blends of PHB and PCL by melting mixture in an internal mixer. The compositions varied from 0 to 30 wt% of PCL. DSC, DMA, and SEM were used to characterize the blends. The blends were found to be imiscible with no indication of interaction either the amorphous or crystalline state. The morphology shows PHB as the matrix and PCL as the dispersed phase.

  14. Components in the interstellar medium toward epsilon persei and delta persei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, E.R.; York, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    We analyze the lines of sight toward epsilon Persei and delta Persei with a procedure that gives velocity components for various interstellar ions. The column densities found for ions expected to be relatively undepleted are used to estimate the column density of neutral hydrogen in each component. The velocities found correspond well with those determined from previous optical studies when the optical components can be resolved. Whenever possible we calculate electron density, calcium and titanium depletion, molecular hydrogen excitation temperature, and hydrogen volume density for each component. Toward each star there is one dominent component with high column density, low LSR velocity, a large depletion in Ca and Ti, and low H 2 excitation temperature. The H 2 results also indicate that the dominant component has a high hydrogen volume density. The components at higher velocities are characterized by lower column densities and less Ca and Ti depletion, relative to the dominant component. There is also evidence that there is one component toward each star which contains mostly ionized gas. While the electron densities found seem consistent with previous results, questions are raised concerning the formation rate of H 2 and the abundance variations of certain species from cloud to cloud

  15. Flow simulation in piping system dead legs using second moment, closure and k-epsilon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, E.; Mechitoua, N.; Mattei, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with an industrial application of second moment closure turbulence model in in numerical simulation of 3D turbulent flows in piping system dead legs. Calculations performed with the 3D ESTET code are presented which contrast the performance of k-epsilon eddy viscosity model and second moment closure turbulence models. Coarse (100 000), medium (400 000) and fine (1 500 000) meshes were used. The second moment closure performs significantly better than eddy viscosity model and predicts with a good agreement the vortex penetration in dead legs provided to use sufficiently refined meshes. The results point out the necessity to be able to perform calculations using fine mesh before introducing refined physical models such as second moment closure turbulence model in a numerical code. This study illustrates the ability of second moment closure turbulence model to simulate 3D turbulent industrial flows. Reynolds stress model computation does not require special care, the calculation is carried on as simply as the k-ξ one. The CPU time needed is less that twice the CPU time needed using k-ξ model. (authors)

  16. Optical Time Reversal from Time-Dependent Epsilon-Near-Zero Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, Stefano; Bruno, Vincenzo; DeVault, Clayton; Roger, Thomas; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Ferrera, Marcello; Clerici, Matteo; Dubietis, Audrius; Faccio, Daniele

    2018-01-01

    Materials with a spatially uniform but temporally varying optical response have applications ranging from magnetic field-free optical isolators to fundamental studies of quantum field theories. However, these effects typically become relevant only for time variations oscillating at optical frequencies, thus presenting a significant hurdle that severely limits the realization of such conditions. Here we present a thin-film material with a permittivity that pulsates (uniformly in space) at optical frequencies and realizes a time-reversing medium of the form originally proposed by Pendry [Science 322, 71 (2008), 10.1126/science.1162087]. We use an optically pumped, 500 nm thick film of epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) material based on Al-doped zinc oxide. An incident probe beam is both negatively refracted and time reversed through a reflected phase-conjugated beam. As a result of the high nonlinearity and the refractive index that is close to zero, the ENZ film leads to time reversed beams (simultaneous negative refraction and phase conjugation) with near-unit efficiency and greater-than-unit internal conversion efficiency. The ENZ platform therefore presents the time-reversal features required, e.g., for efficient subwavelength imaging, all-optical isolators and fundamental quantum field theory studies.

  17. Optimal Dosing of Botulinum Toxin for Treatment of Chronic Anal Fissure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin Xin; Krishna, Sanjeev; Su'a, Bruce; Hill, Andrew G

    2016-09-01

    Chronic anal fissures are associated with significant morbidity and reduced quality of life. Studies have investigated the efficacy of botulinum toxin with variable results; thus, there is currently no consensus on botulinum toxin dose or injection sites. This study aimed to systematically analyze trials studying the efficacy of botulinum toxin for treatment of chronic anal fissure to identify an optimum dosage and injection regimen. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. PubMed/Medline, Embase, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library were searched from inception to June 2015. All clinical trials that investigated the efficacy of botulinum toxin for chronic anal fissure were selected according to specific criteria. The interventions used were various doses of botulinum toxin. Clinical outcomes, dosage, and injection site data were evaluated with weighted pooled results for each dosage and 95% confidence intervals. There were 1158 patients, with 661 in botulinum toxin treatment arms, from 18 clinical trials included in this review. The outcomes of interest were 3-month healing, incontinence, and recurrence rates. Meta-regression analysis demonstrated a small decrease in healing rate (0.34%; 95% CI, 0-0.68; p = 0.048) with each increase in dosage, a small increase in incontinence rate (1.02 times; 95% CI, 1.0002-1.049; p = 0.048) with each increase in dosage and a small increase in recurrence rate (1.037 times; 95% CI, 1.018-1.057; p = 0.0002) with each increase in dosage. The optimum injection site could not be determined. This study was limited by weaknesses in the underlying evidence, such as variable quality, short follow-up, and a limited range of doses represented. Fissure healing with lower doses of botulinum toxin is as effective as with high doses. Lower doses also reduce the risk of incontinence and recurrence in the long term.

  18. Bacterial Signaling to the Nervous System through Toxins and Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nicole J; Chiu, Isaac M

    2017-03-10

    Mammalian hosts interface intimately with commensal and pathogenic bacteria. It is increasingly clear that molecular interactions between the nervous system and microbes contribute to health and disease. Both commensal and pathogenic bacteria are capable of producing molecules that act on neurons and affect essential aspects of host physiology. Here we highlight several classes of physiologically important molecular interactions that occur between bacteria and the nervous system. First, clostridial neurotoxins block neurotransmission to or from neurons by targeting the SNARE complex, causing the characteristic paralyses of botulism and tetanus during bacterial infection. Second, peripheral sensory neurons-olfactory chemosensory neurons and nociceptor sensory neurons-detect bacterial toxins, formyl peptides, and lipopolysaccharides through distinct molecular mechanisms to elicit smell and pain. Bacteria also damage the central nervous system through toxins that target the brain during infection. Finally, the gut microbiota produces molecules that act on enteric neurons to influence gastrointestinal motility, and metabolites that stimulate the "gut-brain axis" to alter neural circuits, autonomic function, and higher-order brain function and behavior. Furthering the mechanistic and molecular understanding of how bacteria affect the nervous system may uncover potential strategies for modulating neural function and treating neurological diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of Botulinum toxin in 55 children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BTA inhibits presynaptic release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction and has reportedly been successful in the treatment of spastic disorders.To evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin on cerebral palsied children with spastic or mixed type of the disease, especially those patiens having spasticity as a cardinal symptom without joint contracture, we designed the following study. Ninety-one cases (55 of referred patients to pediatic Neurology outpatient clinics of children’s Medical Center were given BTA injections in affected muscles of the lower limb. They were reevaluating 3 to 5 weeks and 3 months later for type of walking and range of affected joints’ movement. The study showed a clinically significant gait improvement in 71.2% of patients (P<0.0005 and also an overall increased range of motion in affected limbs after BTA injection (P<0.04. Side effects occurred only in two cases as transient generalized weakness, gent recurvatum and ptosis. Drug effectiveness was time-limited, lasting abot 3 months in all patients ( a golden time for rehabilitation therapists to improve the patients’ condition. Overall, BTA has improved both the type of walking as well as the range of joints motion in our patients. So its’ administration is suggested in cerebral palsied children if the spasticity is a major and disabling sign

  20. Sub-Lethal Dose of Shiga toxin 2 from Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Affects Balance and Cerebellar Cythoarquitecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana eD’Alessio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli may damage the central nervous system before or concomitantly to manifested hemolytic uremic syndrome symptoms. The cerebellum is frequently damaged during this syndrome, however the deleterious effects of Shiga toxin 2 has never been integrally reported by ultrastructural, physiological and behavioral means. The aim of this study was to determine the cerebellar compromise after intravenous administration of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin 2 by measuring the cerebellar blood brain barrier permeability, behavioral task of cerebellar functionality (inclined plane test, and ultrastructural analysis (transmission electron microscope. Intravenous administration of vehicle (control group, sub-lethal dose of 0.5 ηg and 1 ηg of Stx2 per mouse were tested for behavioral and ultrastructural studies. A set of three independent experiments were performed for each study (n=6. Blood–Brain Barrier resulted damaged and consequently its permeability was significantly increased. Lower scores obtained in the inclined plane task denoted poor cerebellar functionality in comparison to their controls. The most significant lower score was obtained after 5 days of 1ηg of toxin administration. Transmission electron microscope micrographs from the Stx2-treated groups showed neurons with a progressive neurodegenerative condition in a dose dependent manner. As sub-lethal intravenous Shiga toxin 2 altered the blood brain barrier permeability in the cerebellum the toxin penetrated the cerebellar parenchyma and produced cell damaged with significant functional implications in the test balance.

  1. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, Marius Alexandru; Dimienescu, Oana Gabriela; Bălan, Andreea; Scârneciu, Ioan; Barabaș, Barna; Pleș, Liana

    2018-04-21

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G). Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT serotype (BoNT-X) has been reported in some studies. BoNT-X has not been shown to actually be an active neurotoxin despite its catalytically active LC, so it should be described as a putative eighth serotype. The mechanism of action of the serotypes is similar: they inhibit the release of acetylcholine from the nerve endings but their therapeutically potency varies. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) is the most studied serotype for therapeutic purposes. Regarding the gynecological pathology, a series of studies based on the efficiency of its use in the treatment of refractory myofascial pelvic pain, vaginism, dyspareunia, vulvodynia and overactive bladder or urinary incontinence have been reported. The current study is a review of the literature regarding the efficiency of BoNT-A in the gynecological pathology and on the long and short-term effects of its administration.

  2. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Alexandru Moga

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxins (BoNTs are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G. Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT serotype (BoNT-X has been reported in some studies. BoNT-X has not been shown to actually be an active neurotoxin despite its catalytically active LC, so it should be described as a putative eighth serotype. The mechanism of action of the serotypes is similar: they inhibit the release of acetylcholine from the nerve endings but their therapeutically potency varies. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A is the most studied serotype for therapeutic purposes. Regarding the gynecological pathology, a series of studies based on the efficiency of its use in the treatment of refractory myofascial pelvic pain, vaginism, dyspareunia, vulvodynia and overactive bladder or urinary incontinence have been reported. The current study is a review of the literature regarding the efficiency of BoNT-A in the gynecological pathology and on the long and short-term effects of its administration.

  3. The Biology of the Cytolethal Distending Toxins

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    Teresa Frisan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs, produced by a variety of Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, are the first bacterial genotoxins described, since they cause DNA damage in the target cells. CDT is an A-B2 toxin, where the CdtA and CdtC subunits are required to mediate the binding on the surface of the target cells, allowing internalization of the active CdtB subunit, which is functionally homologous to the mammalian deoxyribonuclease I. The nature of the surface receptor is still poorly characterized, however binding of CDT requires intact lipid rafts, and its internalization occurs via dynamin-dependent endocytosis. The toxin is retrograde transported through the Golgi complex and the endoplasmic reticulum, and subsequently translocated into the nuclear compartment, where it exerts the toxic activity. Cellular intoxication induces DNA damage and activation of the DNA damage responses, which results in arrest of the target cells in the G1 and/or G2 phases of the cell cycle and activation of DNA repair mechanisms. Cells that fail to repair the damage will senesce or undergo apoptosis. This review will focus on the well-characterized aspects of the CDT biology and discuss the questions that still remain unanswered.

  4. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Goossens, Evy; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet; Wade, Kristin R; Tweten, Rodney; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-05-14

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250-300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis.

  5. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

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    Stefanie Verherstraeten

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin, a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC. PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250–300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis.

  6. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  7. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R.; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  8. Contralateral botulinum toxin injection to improve facial asymmetry after acute facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin

    2013-02-01

    The application of botulinum toxin to the healthy side of the face in patients with long-standing facial paralysis has been shown to be a minimally invasive technique that improves facial symmetry at rest and during facial motion, but our experience using botulinum toxin therapy for facial sequelae prompted the idea that botulinum toxin might be useful in acute cases of facial paralysis, leading to improve facial asymmetry. In cases in which medical or surgical treatment options are limited because of existing medical problems or advanced age, most patients with acute facial palsy are advised to await spontaneous recovery or are informed that no effective intervention exists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin treatment for facial asymmetry in 18 patients after acute facial palsy who could not be optimally treated by medical or surgical management because of severe medical or other problems. From 2009 to 2011, nine patients with Bell's palsy, 5 with herpes zoster oticus and 4 with traumatic facial palsy (10 men and 8 women; age range, 22-82 yr; mean, 50.8 yr) participated in this study. Botulinum toxin A (Botox; Allergan Incorporated, Irvine, CA, USA) was injected using a tuberculin syringe with a 27-gauge needle. The amount injected per site varied from 2.5 to 3 U, and the total dose used per patient was 32 to 68 U (mean, 47.5 +/- 8.4 U). After administration of a single dose of botulinum toxin A on the nonparalyzed side of 18 patients with acute facial paralysis, marked relief of facial asymmetry was observed in 8 patients within 1 month of injection. Decreased facial asymmetry and strengthened facial function on the paralyzed side led to an increased HB and SB grade within 6 months after injection. Use of botulinum toxin after acute facial palsy cases is of great value. Such therapy decreases the relative hyperkinesis contralateral to the paralysis, leading to greater symmetric function. Especially in patients with medical

  9. Recent Insights into Clostridium perfringens Beta-Toxin

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    Masahiro Nagahama

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens beta-toxin is a key mediator of necrotizing enterocolitis and enterotoxemia. It is a pore-forming toxin (PFT that exerts cytotoxic effect. Experimental investigation using piglet and rabbit intestinal loop models and a mouse infection model apparently showed that beta-toxin is the important pathogenic factor of the organisms. The toxin caused the swelling and disruption of HL-60 cells and formed a functional pore in the lipid raft microdomains of sensitive cells. These findings represent significant progress in the characterization of the toxin with knowledge on its biological features, mechanism of action and structure-function having been accumulated. Our aims here are to review the current progresses in our comprehension of the virulence of C. perfringens type C and the character, biological feature and structure-function of beta-toxin.

  10. A novel regulator controls Clostridium difficile sporulation, motility and toxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Tamayo, Rita; McBride, Shonna M

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic pathogen that forms spores which promote survival in the environment and transmission to new hosts. The regulatory pathways by which C. difficile initiates spore formation are poorly understood. We identified two factors with limited similarity to the Rap sporulation proteins of other spore-forming bacteria. In this study, we show that disruption of the gene CD3668 reduces sporulation and increases toxin production and motility. This mutant was more virulent and exhibited increased toxin gene expression in the hamster model of infection. Based on these phenotypes, we have renamed this locus rstA, for regulator of sporulation and toxins. Our data demonstrate that RstA is a bifunctional protein that upregulates sporulation through an unidentified pathway and represses motility and toxin production by influencing sigD transcription. Conserved RstA orthologs are present in other pathogenic and industrial Clostridium species and may represent a key regulatory protein controlling clostridial sporulation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Incipient resistance of Helicoverpa punctigera to the Cry2Ab Bt toxin in Bollgard II cotton.

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    Sharon Downes

    Full Text Available Combinations of dissimilar insecticidal proteins ("pyramids" within transgenic plants are predicted to delay the evolution of pest resistance for significantly longer than crops expressing a single transgene. Field-evolved resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt transgenic crops has been reported for first generation, single-toxin varieties and the Cry1 class of proteins. Our five year data set shows a significant exponential increase in the frequency of alleles conferring Cry2Ab resistance in Australian field populations of Helicoverpa punctigera since the adoption of a second generation, two-toxin Bt cotton expressing this insecticidal protein. Furthermore, the frequency of cry2Ab resistance alleles in populations from cropping areas is 8-fold higher than that found for populations from non-cropping regions. This report of field evolved resistance to a protein in a dual-toxin Bt-crop has precisely fulfilled the intended function of monitoring for resistance; namely, to provide an early warning of increases in frequencies that may lead to potential failures of the transgenic technology. Furthermore, it demonstrates that pyramids are not 'bullet proof' and that rapid evolution to Bt toxins in the Cry2 class is possible.

  12. Cnidarian Toxins Acting on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

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    Robert M. Greenberg

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Voltage-gated ion channels generate electrical activity in excitable cells. As such, they are essential components of neuromuscular and neuronal systems, and are targeted by toxins from a wide variety of phyla, including the cnidarians. Here, we review cnidarian toxins known to target voltage-gated ion channels, the specific channel types targeted, and, where known, the sites of action of cnidarian toxins on different channels.

  13. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems: more than selfish entities?

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence Van Melderen; Manuel Saavedra De Bast

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial toxin?antitoxin (TA) systems are diverse and widespread in the prokaryotic kingdom. They are composed of closely linked genes encoding a stable toxin that can harm the host cell and its cognate labile antitoxin, which protects the host from the toxin's deleterious effect. TA systems are thought to invade bacterial genomes through horizontal gene transfer. Some TA systems might behave as selfish elements and favour their own maintenance at the expense of their host. As a consequence,...

  14. Military Importance of Natural Toxins and Their Analogs

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    Vladimír Pitschmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxin weapon research, development, production and the ban on its uses is an integral part of international law, with particular attention paid to the protection against these weapons. In spite of this, hazards associated with toxins cannot be completely excluded. Some of these hazards are also pointed out in the present review. The article deals with the characteristics and properties of natural toxins and synthetic analogs potentially constituting the basis of toxin weapons. It briefly describes the history of military research and the use of toxins from distant history up to the present age. With respect to effective disarmament conventions, it mentions certain contemporary concepts of possible toxin applications for military purposes and the protection of public order (suppression of riots; it also briefly refers to the question of terrorism. In addition, it deals with certain traditional as well as modern technologies of the research, synthesis, and use of toxins, which can affect the continuing development of toxin weapons. These are, for example, cases of new toxins from natural sources, their chemical synthesis, production of synthetic analogs, the possibility of using methods of genetic engineering and modern biotechnologies or the possible applications of nanotechnology and certain pharmaceutical methods for the effective transfer of toxins into the organism. The authors evaluate the military importance of toxins based on their comparison with traditional chemical warfare agents. They appeal to the ethics of the scientific work as a principal condition for the prevention of toxin abuse in wars, military conflicts, as well as in non-military attacks.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus α-Toxin: Nearly a Century of Intrigue

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    Bryan J. Berube

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus secretes a number of host-injurious toxins, among the most prominent of which is the small β-barrel pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin. Initially named based on its properties as a red blood cell lytic toxin, early studies suggested a far greater complexity of α-hemolysin action as nucleated cells also exhibited distinct responses to intoxication. The hemolysin, most aptly referred to as α-toxin based on its broad range of cellular specificity, has long been recognized as an important cause of injury in the context of both skin necrosis and lethal infection. The recent identification of ADAM10 as a cellular receptor for α-toxin has provided keen insight on the biology of toxin action during disease pathogenesis, demonstrating the molecular mechanisms by which the toxin causes tissue barrier disruption at host interfaces lined by epithelial or endothelial cells. This review highlights both the historical studies that laid the groundwork for nearly a century of research on α-toxin and key findings on the structural and functional biology of the toxin, in addition to discussing emerging observations that have significantly expanded our understanding of this toxin in S. aureus disease. The identification of ADAM10 as a proteinaceous receptor for the toxin not only provides a greater appreciation of truths uncovered by many historic studies, but now affords the opportunity to more extensively probe and understand the role of α-toxin in modulation of the complex interaction of S. aureus with its human host.

  16. Dose-dependent Effect of T-2 Toxin on the Immunity against Newcastle Disease Virus in Chickens

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    M. Weber

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 2.35 (a and 4.18 (b mg kg-1 feed T-2 toxin dose for 14 days on the haemagglutination inhibition titres against Newcastle disease virus was investigated in broiler chickens. The animals were divided into four groups and two separate experiments were carried out (a, b: (1 intact control group; (2 birds were fed with T-2 toxin contaminated feed and not vaccinated; (3 repeatedly vaccinated (on day 23 of age control group which received uncontaminated feed; (4 birds were both repeatedly vaccinated and fed the T-2 toxin contaminated diet. Blood samples, from which sera titres were measured, were taken on days 7 and 14 of the experiments. It was found that heamagglutination titres were different in the two experiments even in the control (1 group because of the different efficiency of the first immunization at the hatchery. Titres on day 7 showed increases in all groups except for the group fed lower T-2 contaminated diet (a, group 2 but during the second week they increased only in the groups fed the diet with a lower dose of T-2 toxin. On the contrary, a higher dose of T-2 toxin contamination of the diet resulted in a dramatic decrease during the second week (b, groups 2 and 4. The results suggested that contrary to most of the previously published data, feeding of T-2 toxin contaminated feed with an amount of 2.35 mg.kg-1 did not decrease, but increase the antibody formation against attenuated Newcastle disease virus even without a second vaccination on day 1 of the experiment, whereas a higher amount of T-2 toxin (4.18 mg kg-1 decreased to day 14 after the repeated vaccination.

  17. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associ...

  18. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Genetic toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassaux, Georges; Lemoine, Nick R

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy was initially envisaged as a potential treatment for genetically inherited, monogenic disorders. The applications of gene therapy have now become wider, however, and include cardiovascular diseases, vaccination and cancers in which conventional therapies have failed. With regard to oncology, various gene therapy approaches have been developed. Among them, the use of genetic toxins to kill cancer cells selectively is emerging. Two different types of genetic toxins have been developed so far: the metabolic toxins and the dominant-negative class of toxins. This review describes these two different approaches, and discusses their potential applications in cancer gene therapy

  19. Dysport: pharmacological properties and factors that influence toxin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Andy

    2009-10-01

    The pharmacological properties of Dysport that influence toxin action are reviewed and compared with other botulinum toxin products. In particular, the subject of diffusion is examined and discussed based upon the evidence that currently exists, both from laboratory studies and from clinical data. Diffusion of botulinum toxin products is not related to the size of the toxin complex in the product since the complex dissociates under physiological conditions, releasing the naked neurotoxin to act. The active neurotoxin in Type A products is the same and therefore diffusion is equal when equal doses are administered.

  20. Development of EPSILON. A gamma ray imaging system for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrant, P.T.

    1999-06-01

    In recent years, much effort has been focused on the need to characterise, stabilise, decontaminate and eventually decommission radioactively contaminated nuclear facilities. These tasks can be complex and hazardous and are often hampered by a lack of knowledge of the nature and distribution of the contamination. A gamma-ray imaging system, capable of remotely mapping a contaminated scene, could be a useful tool in many tasks related to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. This thesis describes and discusses the design, development, commissioning and characterisation of EPSILON, a multipurpose gamma-ray imaging system designed to meet the needs of a range of applications in the nuclear industry. Following a review of the range of potential applications and a critical assessment of the imaging systems available at the time, a set of design criteria for a multi-purpose gamma-ray imaging system are identified. The design and development of an imaging system to meet these criteria is described in detail. Suitable image-formation techniques are discussed and a pinhole collimator selected as the most appropriate. Consideration is given to the use of a scintillator-photodiode array as the imager detection plane but this option is rejected in favour of a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The development of two data-acquisition systems is described and comparisons made between the performance of these two techniques. The factors affecting the performance and image quality of this pinhole imaging system are discussed and a prototype design presented for a well-shielded, high-sensitivity imager. Experimental results obtained with this prototype are presented. These results demonstrate a good angular resolution of 1.6 deg across a 12.8 deg FOV and a factor of 7 improvement in sensitivity over a comparable resolution, single-pixel scanning-system. The spectral resolution of this prototype imager did not meet the design criteria. A modified design is

  1. Differential expression of phospholipase C epsilon 1 is associated with chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer.

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    Jun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic inflammation plays a causal role in gastric tumor initiation. The identification of predictive biomarkers from gastric inflammation to tumorigenesis will help us to distinguish gastric cancer from atrophic gastritis and establish the diagnosis of early-stage gastric cancer. Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCε1 is reported to play a vital role in inflammation and tumorigenesis. This study was aimed to investigate the clinical significance of PLCε1 in the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Firstly, the mRNA and protein expression of PLCε1 were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting in normal gastric mucous epithelial cell line GES-1 and gastric cancer cell lines AGS, SGC7901, and MGC803. The results showed both mRNA and protein levels of PLCε1 were up-regulated in gastric cancer cells compared with normal gastric mucous epithelial cells. Secondly, this result was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection in a tissue microarray including 74 paired gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Thirdly, an independence immunohistochemical analysis of 799 chronic atrophic gastritis tissue specimens demonstrated that PLCε1 expression in atrophic gastritis tissues were down-regulated since PLCε1 expression was negative in 524 (65.6% atrophic gastritis. In addition, matched clinical tissues from atrophic severe gastritis and gastric cancer patients were used to further confirm the previous results by analyzing mRNA and protein levels expression of PLCε1 in clinical samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: Our results suggested that PLCε1 protein may be a potential biomarker to distinguish gastric cancer from inflammation lesion, and could have great potential in applications such as diagnosis and pre-warning of early-stage gastric cancer.

  2. Differential expression of phospholipase C epsilon 1 is associated with chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Ji, Jiajia; Qian, Qirong; Lu, Lungeng; Fu, Hualin; Jin, Weilin; Cui, Daxiang

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a causal role in gastric tumor initiation. The identification of predictive biomarkers from gastric inflammation to tumorigenesis will help us to distinguish gastric cancer from atrophic gastritis and establish the diagnosis of early-stage gastric cancer. Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCε1) is reported to play a vital role in inflammation and tumorigenesis. This study was aimed to investigate the clinical significance of PLCε1 in the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. Firstly, the mRNA and protein expression of PLCε1 were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting in normal gastric mucous epithelial cell line GES-1 and gastric cancer cell lines AGS, SGC7901, and MGC803. The results showed both mRNA and protein levels of PLCε1 were up-regulated in gastric cancer cells compared with normal gastric mucous epithelial cells. Secondly, this result was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection in a tissue microarray including 74 paired gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Thirdly, an independence immunohistochemical analysis of 799 chronic atrophic gastritis tissue specimens demonstrated that PLCε1 expression in atrophic gastritis tissues were down-regulated since PLCε1 expression was negative in 524 (65.6%) atrophic gastritis. In addition, matched clinical tissues from atrophic severe gastritis and gastric cancer patients were used to further confirm the previous results by analyzing mRNA and protein levels expression of PLCε1 in clinical samples. Our results suggested that PLCε1 protein may be a potential biomarker to distinguish gastric cancer from inflammation lesion, and could have great potential in applications such as diagnosis and pre-warning of early-stage gastric cancer.

  3. Epsilon Aminocaproic Acid to Reduce Blood Loss and Transfusion After Total Hip and Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Juliann C; Welsby, Ian J; Green, Cynthia L; Dhakal, Ishwori B; Wellman, Samuel S

    2018-01-01

    Total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA and TKA) are associated with significant blood loss and some patients require postoperative blood transfusion. While tranexamic acid has been studied extensively among this population, we tested the hypothesis that epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA) can reduce blood loss and transfusion after joint arthroplasty. In April 2014, our Veterans Affairs Medical Center introduced a protocol to administer EACA during THA and TKA. No antifibrinolytics were used previously. We retrospectively compared blood loss and incidence of transfusion among patients who underwent primary arthroplasty in the year before standardized administration of EACA with patients having the same procedures the following year. Blood loss was measured as delta hemoglobin (preoperative hemoglobin - hemoglobin on postoperative day 1). All patients undergoing primary THA or TKA were included. Patients having revision surgery were excluded. We identified 185 primary arthroplasty patients from the year before and 184 from the year after introducing the EACA protocol. There were no changes in surgical technique or attending surgeons during this period. Delta hemoglobin was significantly lower in the EACA group (2.7 ± 0.8 mg/dL) compared to the control group (3.4 ± 1.1 mg/dL) (P blood transfusion was also significantly lower in the EACA group (2.7%) compared to the control group (25.4%) (P transfusion following introduction of the EACA protocol in patients undergoing primary arthroplasty. EACA offers a lower cost alternative to TXA for reducing blood loss and transfusion in this population. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Selected results from the epsilon Aurigae eclipse campaign, and what lies ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stencel, Robert E.

    2013-07-01

    The torrent of data generated during the 2009-2011 eclipse of the enigmatic binary, epsilon Aurigae, has provided abundant opportunity to test and refine the many ideas associated with this system. The UBVRIJH photometric light curves established times of ingress and egress, and also revealed that the differential color of the disk varied, relative to pre- or post- mid-eclipse phase. Inter-eclipse monitoring indicated secular variations suggestive of a rapidly evolving F supergiant star. Interferometric imaging decisively identified the eclipse-causing agent to be an opaque disk (CHARA+MIRC). Spectroscopy has shown that a hot source occupies the center of this disk (He I 10830A, Far-UV excess), that the disk exhibits substructure (K I 7699A) and may have an extended atmosphere (CHARA+VEGA), and that the disk is isotopically-enhanced in 13C (GNIRS) and in rare-earth elements during a third contact "still-stand" in the light curve, suggestive of a mass transfer stream. Polarimetry and spectro-polarimetry provided additional constraints on the F star atmospheric variation and the nature of the dust scattering in the disk. Numerical models of the disk are exploring its relationship to the wider class of transitional and debris-type disks, and how differential heating of the dust may reveal properties not otherwise detected spectroscopically. As the system moves to quadrature in coming years, continued observing opportunities will continue to exist. I am grateful for support from the estate of William Herschel Womble for astronomy at the University of Denver, which has made possible two decades of research on this star that otherwise has revealed its secrets only very slowly.

  5. Neutral interstellar gas toward epsilon persei: H I, H2, D I, N I, O I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, A.; Ferlet, R.; Laurent, C.; York, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    The study of the interstellar medium toward epsilon Per, a moderately reddened (E/sub B/-V = 0.1) B0.5 star, through the analysis of H I, D I, H 2 , N I, O I, and Ar I absorption features, revealed the following structure of the line of sight: (1) a main interstellar, cold (Tapprox.100 K; b = 2.9 km s -1 ) component, (2) a weak (approx.1% of the main one) probably cold component, and (3) a weak (also approx.1% of the main one) and hot component (Tapprox.8000 K). All three components have normal abundances. Comparison with ground-based observations or other UV studies reveals the presence on the line of sight of an H II region not detected in the neutral species observed in this study. High-velocity H I gas is also detected, located either in the interstellar medium or very likely in the stellar wind for the blue-shifted components. One of these features is blended with the deuterium lines and therefore obscures our D/H evaluation. All we can say is that the data are compatible with a D/H ratio equal to 1.5 x 10 -5 . This blended feature proved to vary by at least a factor of 3 in column density within few hours, a result which sustains our interpretation of the stellar wind origin of the blueshifted high-velocity H I component. However, the alternative interpretation of a high D/H (approx.10 -4 ) value is also compatible with our data

  6. Emergence of Escherichia coli encoding Shiga toxin 2f in human Shiga toxin-producing E-coli (STEC) infections in the Netherlands, January 2008 to December 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesema, I.; van der Zwaluw, K.; Schuurman, T.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; Franz, E.; van Duynhoven, Y.; van Pelt, W.

    2014-01-01

    The Shiga toxins of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) can be divided into Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) and Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) with several sub-variants. Variant Stx(2f) is one of the latest described, but has been rarely associated with symptomatic human infections. In the enhanced STEC

  7. The Uremic Toxin Acrolein Promotes Suicidal Erythrocyte Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Siyabeldin E. Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anemia is a major complication of end stage renal disease. The anemia is mainly the result of impaired formation of erythrocytes due to lack of erythropoietin and iron deficiency. Compelling evidence, however, points to the contribution of accelerated erythrocyte death, which decreases the life span of circulating erythrocytes. Erythrocytes may enter suicidal death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and by cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. Erythrocytes could be sensitized to cytosolic Ca2+ by ceramide. In end stage renal disease, eryptosis may possibly be stimulated by uremic toxins. The present study explored, whether the uremic toxin acrolein could trigger eryptosis. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin-V-binding, hemolysis from hemoglobin release, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and ceramide from fluorescent antibodies. Results: A 48 h exposure to acrolein (30 - 50 µM did not significantly modify [Ca2+]i but significantly decreased forward scatter and increased annexin-V-binding. Acrolein further triggered slight, but significant hemolysis and increased ceramide formation in erythrocytes. Acrolein (50 µM induced annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted in the nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+. Acrolein augmented the annexin-V-binding following treatment with Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM. Conclusion: Acrolein stimulates suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, an effect at least in part due to stimulation of ceramide formation with subsequent sensitisation of the erythrocytes to cytosolic Ca2+.

  8. Different Effects of Six Antibiotics and Ten Traditional Chinese Medicines on Shiga Toxin Expression by Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Ling Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the effects of ten types of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs and six different antibiotics on E. coli O157:H7 Shiga toxin gene (stx2 mRNA expression level based on real-time PCR and the expression level of Stx toxin using an ELISA quantitative assay. We also compared their effects on the induction of the SOS response. The results clearly indicated that all ten TCMs had negative results in the SOS response induction test, while most TCMs did not increase the levels of stx2 mRNA and the Stx toxin. Some TCMs did increase the mRNA levels of the stx2 gene and the Stx toxin level, but their increases were much lower than those caused by antibiotics. With the exception of cefotaxime, the six antibiotics increased the Stx toxin level and increased the stx2 gene mRNA level. With the exceptions of cefotaxime and tetracycline, the antibiotics increased the SOS induction response. These results suggest that TCMs may have advantages compared with antibiotics, when treating E. coli O157:H7; TCMs did not greatly increase Stx toxin production and release.

  9. Molecular evolution and diversification of snake toxin genes, revealed by analysis of intron sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimi, T J; Nakajyo, T; Nishimura, E; Ogura, E; Tsuchiya, T; Tamiya, T

    2003-08-14

    The genes encoding erabutoxin (short chain neurotoxin) isoforms (Ea, Eb, and Ec), LsIII (long chain neurotoxin) and a novel long chain neurotoxin pseudogene were cloned from a Laticauda semifasciata genomic library. Short and long chain neurotoxin genes were also cloned from the genome of Laticauda laticaudata, a closely related species of L. semifasciata, by PCR. A putative matrix attached region (MAR) sequence was found in the intron I of the LsIII gene. Comparative analysis of 11 structurally relevant snake toxin genes (three-finger-structure toxins) revealed the molecular evolution of these toxins. Three-finger-structure toxin genes diverged from a common ancestor through two types of evolutionary pathways (long and short types), early in the course of evolution. At a later stage of evolution in each gene, the accumulation of mutations in the exons, especially exon II, by accelerated evolution may have caused the increased diversification in their functions. It was also revealed that the putative MAR sequence found in the LsIII gene was integrated into the gene after the species-level divergence.

  10. Molecular Approaches to Improve the Insecticidal Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner A. Lucena

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt is a gram-positive spore-forming soil bacterium that is distributed worldwide. Originally recognized as a pathogen of the silkworm, several strains were found on epizootic events in insect pests. In the 1960s, Bt began to be successfully used to control insect pests in agriculture, particularly because of its specificity, which reflects directly on their lack of cytotoxicity to human health, non-target organisms and the environment. Since the introduction of transgenic plants expressing Bt genes in the mid-1980s, numerous methodologies have been used to search for and improve toxins derived from native Bt strains. These improvements directly influence the increase in productivity and the decreased use of chemical insecticides on Bt-crops. Recently, DNA shuffling and in silico evaluations are emerging as promising tools for the development and exploration of mutant Bt toxins with enhanced activity against target insect pests. In this report, we describe natural and in vitro evolution of Cry toxins, as well as their relevance in the mechanism of action for insect control. Moreover, the use of DNA shuffling to improve two Bt toxins will be discussed together with in silico analyses of the generated mutations to evaluate their potential effect on protein structure and cytotoxicity.

  11. Detection of Genes for Superantigen Toxins in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taj, Y.; Fatima, I.; Ali, S. W.; Kazmi, S. U.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To detect genes for enterotoxins, exfoliative and toxic shock syndrome toxins in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains isolated from clinical specimens. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Molecular Genetics, Dr. Ziauddin Hospital, Karachi, from January to December 2010. Methodology: Two hundred and ninety eight S. aureus clinical isolates were obtained from various clinical samples received at Dr. Ziauddin Hospital, Karachi. Out of these, 115 were detected as methicillin resistant (MRSA) by cefoxitin disk diffusion test showing a prevalence rate of 38.6%. Detection of individual toxin genes was performed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) by using only one primer pair for each tube. Uniplex primers were preferred as multiplex primers are longer in base pairs and have the potential for cross reaction due to non-specific binding and increase in optimization time. Results: The possession of a single gene or more than a single gene in MRSA isolates was found in 61.73% of clinical samples; the highest number was found in pus swab, followed by sputum, blood, urethral swab, and urine. The prevalence of toxin genes was higher in MRSA as compared to methicillin sensitive (MSSA) isolates (19.12%). Conclusion: PCR detects strains possessing toxin genes independent of their expression. The possession of genes for super-antigens seems to be a frequent and habitual trait of S. aureus more so in MRSA. (author)

  12. Role of Peptide YY3-36 and Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide in Anorexia Induction by Trichothecences T-2 Toxin, HT-2 Toxin, Diacetoxyscirpenol, and Neosolaniol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Jia, Hui; Wang, Qingqing; Zhang, Yajie; Wu, Wenda; Zhang, Haibin

    2017-09-01

    Trichothecences, secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium, are serious health risks to humans and animals worldwide. Although type A trichothecence-induced food refusal has been observed, the mechanism underlying the anorexia caused by these compounds is not fully understood. In this study, we hypothesized that anorexia induced by type A trichothecenes, including T-2 toxin (T-2), HT-2 toxin (HT-2), diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS), and neosolaniol (NEO), in mice corresponds to the changes in the gut satiety hormones peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in plasma. A well-characterized mouse food refusal model was used in this assay. Oral exposure to or intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 1 mg/kg bw T-2, HT-2, DAS, or NEO resulted in dramatically decreased food intake, and PYY3-36 and GIP concentrations were elevated accordingly. Specifically, the PYY3-36 and GIP concentrations peaked at 2 h following oral exposure to these 4 toxins individually, although the durations were not identical. After ip administration of T-2 or HT-2, PYY3-36 significantly increased within 6 h. However, no significant difference was found in the DAS and NEO groups. The GIP levels peaked within 2, 2, 0.5, and 0.5 h, respectively, and remained increased up to 6, 6, 2, and 6 h, respectively, following T-2, HT-2, DAS, or NEO ip exposure. The increase in GIP was greater than that of PYY3-36 after exposure to the 4 toxins using 2 administration routes. Together, these findings suggest that PYY3-36 and GIP play a role in T-2-, HT-2-, DAS-, and NEO-induced anorexia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Botulinum toxin for treatment of restrictive strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Pilar S; Vera, Rebeca E; Mariñas, Laura G; Gómez de Liaño, Pilar S; Escribano, Jose V

    To study the types of acquired restrictive strabismus treated in a tertiary hospital and the outcome of treatment with botulinum toxin. We performed a 10-year retrospective study of patients with restrictive strabismus aged ≥18 years who were treated with botulinum toxin. Treatment was considered successful if the final vertical deviation was ≤5 PD, horizontal deviation ≤10 PD, with no head turn or diplopia. We included 27 cases (mean age, 61.9 years). Horizontal strabismus was diagnosed in 11.1%, vertical in 51.9%, and mixed in 37%. Strabismus was secondary to cataract surgery in 6 cases, high myopia in 6, orbital fractures in 5, retinal surgery in 5, Graves ophthalmopathy in 4, and repair of conjunctival injury in 1 case. Diplopia was diagnosed in all patients, head turn in 33.3%. The initial deviation was 14 PD (range, 2-40), the mean number of injections per patient was 1.6 (range, 1-3), and the mean dose was 9.5 IU (range, 2.5-22.5). At the end of follow-up, diplopia was recorded in 59.3%, head turn in 18.5%, surgical treatment in 51.9%, and need for prism glasses in 14.8%. Outcome was successful in 37% of patients (4 high myopia, 3 orbital fractures, 2 post-surgical retinal detachment, and 1 post-cataract surgery). Mean follow-up was 3±1.8 years. Vertical deviation was observed in half of the sample. The most frequent deviation was secondary to cataract surgery and high myopia. Treatment with botulinum toxin was successful in one-third of the patients at the end of follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Khatkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key conditions for achieving the desirable result during botulinum toxin therapy for muscular dystonia, spasticity, and other diseases accompanied by spasm, pain, and autonomic dysfunction (dystonias, spasticity, etc. is the proper administration of the agent into the muscles directly involved in the pathological process. The exact entry of botulinum toxin into the target muscles is essential for successful and safe treatment because its injection into a normal muscle may cause side effects. The most common errors are the incorrect depth and incorrect direction of a needle on insertion. Therefore, the exact injection of the agent particularly into the shallow and deep muscles is a difficult task even for an experienced specialist and requires the use of controlling methods.The European Consensus on Botulinum Toxin Therapy points out that various injection techniques are needed for the better identification of necessary muscles. However, there are currently no reports on the clear advantage of any technique. In our country, injections using palpation and anatomical landmarks have been widely used in routine practice so far; electromyographic monitoring and electrostimulation have been less frequently applied. In recent years, the new method ultrasound-guided injection has continued to grow more popular. This effective, accessible, and easy-to-use method makes it possible to manage a real-time injection process and to ensure the exact entry of the agent into the muscle. This paper is dedicated to a comparative analysis of different injection methods and to a description of the ultrasound-guided technique and its advantages over others. 

  15. Prevention, control and detection of Fusarial toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nešić Ksenija D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The past couple of decades have provided considerable details on fungi and the toxins that they produce, as well on the mechanism of toxin action, toxicity and effects on animal and human health. But, since they are natural contaminants, their presence is often inevitable. Fusaria are widespread in all cereal-growing territories of the world, but they are especially common in our geographic area. Therefore, special attention is paid to the prevention and control, and also to the improvement of methods for their detection. Although all collected data were critical for understanding this worldwide problem, managing the impact of these toxins on the feed and food safety is still great practical challenge. There are a number of approaches that can be taken to minimize mycotoxin contamination in this chain: prevention of fungal growth and thus mycotoxin formation, strategies to reduce or eliminate mycotoxins from contaminated feedstuffs or diverting the contaminated products to low risk uses. A control program for mycotoxins from field to table should in­volve the criteria of an HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points approach. It requires an understanding of the important aspects of the interactions of the toxigenic fungi with crop plants, the on-farm production and harvest methods for crops, the production of livestock using grains and processed feeds, including diagnostic capabilities for mycotoxicoses, and all the way to the development of processed foods for human consumption, as well as understanding the marketing and trade channels including storage and delivery of foods to the consumer’s table. A good testing protocol for mycotoxins is necessary to manage all of the control points and in order to be able to ensure a food supply free of toxic levels of mycotoxins for the consumer. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46009

  16. Binding of Diphtheria Toxin to Phospholipids in Liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alving, Carl R.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Urban, Katharine A.; Moss, Joel; Richards, Roberta L.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1980-04-01

    Diphtheria toxin bound to the phosphate portion of some, but not all, phospholipids in liposomes. Liposomes consisting of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol did not bind toxin. Addition of 20 mol% (compared to dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine) of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid, dicetyl phosphate, phosphatidylinositol phosphate, cardiolipin, or phosphatidylserine in the liposomes resulted in substantial binding of toxin. Inclusion of phosphatidylinositol in dimyristol phosphatidylcholine / cholesterol liposomes did not result in toxin binding. The calcium salt of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid was more effective than the sodium salt, and the highest level of binding occurred with liposomes consisting only of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (calcium salt) and cholesterol. Binding of toxin to liposomes was dependent on pH, and the pattern of pH dependence varied with liposomes having different compositions. Incubation of diphtheria toxin with liposomes containing dicetyl phosphate resulted in maximal binding at pH 3.6, whereas binding to liposomes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphate was maximal above pH 7. Toxin did not bind to liposomes containing 20 mol% of a free fatty acid (palmitic acid) or a sulfated lipid (3-sulfogalactosylceramide). Toxin binding to dicetyl phosphate or phosphatidylinositol phosphate was inhibited by UTP, ATP, phosphocholine, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate, but not by uracil. We conclude that (a) diphtheria toxin binds specifically to the phosphate portion of certain phospholipids, (b) binding to phospholipids in liposomes is dependent on pH, but is not due only to electrostatic interaction, and (c) binding may be strongly influenced by the composition of adjacent phospholipids that do not bind toxin. We propose that a minor membrane phospholipid (such as phosphatidylinositol phosphate or phosphatidic acid), or that some other phosphorylated membrane molecule (such as a phosphoprotein) may be important in the initial binding of

  17. Analgesic Effects of Botulinum Toxin in Children with CP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl Michelsen, Josephine; Normann, Gitte; Wong, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Experiencing pain is the greatest contributor to a reduced quality of life in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The presence of pain is quite common (~60%) and increases with age. This leads to missed school days, less participation, and reduced ambulation. Despite these alarming consequences...... of disorders and could potentially have an analgesic effect in children with CP as well. Even though most of the studies presented here show promising results, many also have limitations in their methodology as it is unlikely to capture all dimensions of pain in this heterogeneous group using only one...... assessment tool. In this review, we present a new way of examining the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin in children with CP using a variety of pain scores....

  18. Fate of Fusarium Toxins during the Malting Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habler, Katharina; Hofer, Katharina; Geißinger, Cajetan; Schüler, Jan; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Hess, Michael; Gastl, Martina; Rychlik, Michael

    2016-02-17

    Little is known about the fate of Fusarium mycotoxins during the barley malting process. To determine the fungal DNA and mycotoxin concentrations during malting, we used barley grain harvested from field plots that we had inoculated with Fusarium species that produce type A or type B trichothecenes or enniatins. Using a recently developed multimycotoxin liquid chromatography-tandem mass stable isotope dilution method, we identified Fusarium-species-specific behaviors of mycotoxins in grain and malt extracts and compared toxin concentrations to amounts of fungal DNA in the same samples. In particular, the type B trichothecenes and Fusarium culmorum DNA contents were increased dramatically up to 5400% after kilning. By contrast, the concentrations of type A trichothecenes and Fusarium sporotrichioides DNA decreased during the malting process. These data suggest that specific Fusarium species that contaminate the raw grain material might have different impacts on malt quality.

  19. Isolation of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli harboring variant Shiga toxin genes from seafood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreepriya Prakasan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC are important pathogens of global significance. STEC are responsible for numerous food-borne outbreaks worldwide and their presence in food is a potential health hazard. The objective of the present study was to determine the incidence of STEC in fresh seafood in Mumbai, India, and to characterize STEC with respect to their virulence determinants. Materials and Methods: A total of 368 E. coli were isolated from 39 fresh seafood samples (18 finfish and 21 shellfish using culture-based methods. The isolates were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the genes commonly associated with STEC. The variant Shiga toxin genes were confirmed by Southern blotting and hybridization followed by DNA sequencing. Results: One or more Shiga toxins genes were detected in 61 isolates. Of 39 samples analyzed, 10 (25.64% samples harbored STEC. Other virulence genes, namely, eaeA (coding for an intimin and hlyA (hemolysin A were detected in 43 and 15 seafood isolates, respectively. The variant stx1 genes from 6 isolates were sequenced, five of which were found to be stx1d variants, while one sequence varied considerably from known stx1 sequences. Southern hybridization and DNA sequence analysis suggested putative Shiga toxin variant genes (stx2 in at least 3 other isolates. Conclusion: The results of this study showed the occurrence of STEC in seafood harboring one or more Shiga toxin genes. The detection of STEC by PCR may be hampered due to the presence of variant genes such as the stx1d in STEC. This is the first report of stx1d gene in STEC isolated from Indian seafood.

  20. Saccharomyces boulardii Stimulates Intestinal Immunoglobulin A Immune Response to Clostridium difficile Toxin A in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Amir; Aboudola, Samer; Warny, Michel; Michetti, Pierre; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; LaMont, J. Thomas; Kelly, Ciarán P.

    2001-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is a nonpathogenic yeast that protects against antibiotic-associated diarrhea and recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis. The administration of C. difficile toxoid A by gavage to S. boulardii-fed BALB/c mice caused a 1.8-fold increase in total small intestinal immunoglobulin A levels (P = 0.003) and a 4.4-fold increase in specific intestinal anti-toxin A levels (P boulardii-mediated protection against diarrheal illnesses. PMID:11254650

  1. Mutant RBL mast cells defective in Fc epsilon RI signaling and lipid raft biosynthesis are reconstituted by activated Rho-family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, K A; Apgar, J R; Hong-Geller, E; Siraganian, R P; Baird, B; Holowka, D

    2000-10-01

    Characterization of defects in a variant subline of RBL mast cells has revealed a biochemical event proximal to IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI)-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation that is required for multiple functional responses. This cell line, designated B6A4C1, is deficient in both Fc epsilon RI-mediated degranulation and biosynthesis of several lipid raft components. Agents that bypass receptor-mediated Ca(2+) influx stimulate strong degranulation responses in these variant cells. Cross-linking of IgE-Fc epsilon RI on these cells stimulates robust tyrosine phosphorylation but fails to mobilize a sustained Ca(2+) response. Fc epsilon RI-mediated inositol phosphate production is not detectable in these cells, and failure of adenosine receptors to mobilize Ca(2+) suggests a general deficiency in stimulated phospholipase C activity. Antigen stimulation of phospholipases A(2) and D is also defective. Infection of B6A4C1 cells with vaccinia virus constructs expressing constitutively active Rho family members Cdc42 and Rac restores antigen-stimulated degranulation, and active Cdc42 (but not active Rac) restores ganglioside and GPI expression. The results support the hypothesis that activation of Cdc42 and/or Rac is critical for Fc epsilon RI-mediated signaling that leads to Ca(2+) mobilization and degranulation. Furthermore, they suggest that Cdc42 plays an important role in the biosynthesis and expression of certain components of lipid rafts.

  2. Solving binary-state multi-objective reliability redundancy allocation series-parallel problem using efficient epsilon-constraint, multi-start partial bound enumeration algorithm, and DEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili-Damghani, Kaveh; Amiri, Maghsoud

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a procedure based on efficient epsilon-constraint method and data envelopment analysis (DEA) is proposed for solving binary-state multi-objective reliability redundancy allocation series-parallel problem (MORAP). In first module, a set of qualified non-dominated solutions on Pareto front of binary-state MORAP is generated using an efficient epsilon-constraint method. In order to test the quality of generated non-dominated solutions in this module, a multi-start partial bound enumeration algorithm is also proposed for MORAP. The performance of both procedures is compared using different metrics on well-known benchmark instance. The statistical analysis represents that not only the proposed efficient epsilon-constraint method outperform the multi-start partial bound enumeration algorithm but also it improves the founded upper bound of benchmark instance. Then, in second module, a DEA model is supplied to prune the generated non-dominated solutions of efficient epsilon-constraint method. This helps reduction of non-dominated solutions in a systematic manner and eases the decision making process for practical implementations. - Highlights: ► A procedure based on efficient epsilon-constraint method and DEA was proposed for solving MORAP. ► The performance of proposed procedure was compared with a multi-start PBEA. ► Methods were statistically compared using multi-objective metrics.

  3. 76 FR 78215 - Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and Toxins; Biennial Review; Proposed Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... agents and toxins list; whether minimum standards for personnel reliability, physical and cyber security... toxins list; (3) whether minimum standards for personnel reliability, physical and cyber security should...

  4. Guaranteed epsilon-optimal treatment plans with the minimum number of beams for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarmand, Hamed; Winey, Brian; Craft, David

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is characterized by delivering a high amount of dose in a short period of time. In SBRT the dose is delivered using open fields (e.g., beam’s-eye-view) known as ‘apertures’. Mathematical methods can be used for optimizing treatment planning for delivery of sufficient dose to the cancerous cells while keeping the dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) minimal. Two important elements of a treatment plan are quality and delivery time. Quality of a plan is measured based on the target coverage and dose to OARs. Delivery time heavily depends on the number of beams used in the plan as the setup times for different beam directions constitute a large portion of the delivery time. Therefore the ideal plan, in which all potential beams can be used, will be associated with a long impractical delivery time. We use the dose to OARs in the ideal plan to find the plan with the minimum number of beams which is guaranteed to be epsilon-optimal (i.e., a predetermined maximum deviation from the ideal plan is guaranteed). Since the treatment plan optimization is inherently a multi-criteria-optimization problem, the planner can navigate the ideal dose distribution Pareto surface and select a plan of desired target coverage versus OARs sparing, and then use the proposed technique to reduce the number of beams while guaranteeing epsilon-optimality. We use mixed integer programming (MIP) for optimization. To reduce the computation time for the resultant MIP, we use two heuristics: a beam elimination scheme and a family of heuristic cuts, known as ‘neighbor cuts’, based on the concept of ‘adjacent beams’. We show the effectiveness of the proposed technique on two clinical cases, a liver and a lung case. Based on our technique we propose an algorithm for fast generation of epsilon-optimal plans. (paper)

  5. ASTEROSEISMOLOGY OF THE NEARBY SN II PROGENITOR RIGEL. II. {epsilon}-MECHANISM TRIGGERING GRAVITY-MODE PULSATIONS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moravveji, Ehsan [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moya, Andres [Departamento de Astrofisica, Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), P.O. Box 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Guinan, Edward F., E-mail: moravveji@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Astronomy, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA (United States)

    2012-04-10

    The cores of luminous B- and A-type (BA) supergiant stars are the seeds of later core-collapse supernovae. Thus, constraining the near-core conditions in this class of stars can place tighter constraints on the size, mass, and chemical composition of supernova remnants. Asteroseismology of these massive stars is one possible approach into such investigations. Recently, Moravveji et al. in 2012 (hereafter Paper I) extracted 19 significant frequencies from a 6-year radial velocity monitoring of Rigel ({beta} Ori, B8 Ia). The periods they determined broadly range from 1.22 to 74.74 days. Based on our differentially rotating stellar structure and evolution model, Rigel, at its current evolutionary state, is undergoing core He burning and shell H burning. Linear fully non-adiabatic non-radial stability analyses result in the excitation of a dense spectrum of non-radial gravity-dominated mixed modes. The fundamental radial mode (l = 0) and its overtones are all stable. When the hydrogen-burning shell is located even partially in the radiative zone, a favorable condition for destabilization of g-modes through the so-called {epsilon}-mechanism becomes viable. Only those g-modes that have high relative amplitudes in the hydrogen-burning (radiative) zone can survive the strong radiative damping. From the entire observed range of variability periods of Rigel (found in Paper I), and based on our model, only those modes with periods ranging between 21 and 127 days can be theoretically explained by the {epsilon}-mechanism. The origin of the short-period variations (found in Paper I) still remains unexplained. Because Rigel is similar to other massive BA supergiants, we believe that the {epsilon}-mechanism may be able to explain the long-period variations in {alpha} Cygni class of pulsating stars.

  6. Snake venom toxin from vipera lebetina turanica induces apoptosis of colon cancer cells via upregulation of ROS- and JNK-mediated death receptor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mi Hee; Jo, MiRan; Won, Dohee; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang Bae; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-01-01

    Abundant research suggested that the cancer cells avoid destruction by the immune system through down-regulation or mutation of death receptors. Therefore, it is very important that finding the agents that increase the death receptors of cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the snake venom toxin from Vipera lebetina turanica induce the apoptosis of colon cancer cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) dependent death receptor (DR4 and DR5) expression. We used cell viability assays, DAPI/TUNEL assays, as well as western blot for detection of apoptosis related proteins and DRs to demonstrate that snake venom toxin-induced apoptosis is DR4 and DR5 dependent. We carried out transient siRNA knockdowns of DR4 and DR5 in colon cancer cells. We showed that snake venom toxin inhibited growth of colon cancer cells through induction of apoptosis. We also showed that the expression of DR4 and DR5 was increased by treatment of snake venom toxin. Moreover, knockdown of DR4 or DR5 reversed the effect of snake venom toxin. Snake venom toxin also induced JNK phosphorylation and ROS generation, however, pretreatment of JNK inhibitor and ROS scavenger reversed the inhibitory effect of snake venom toxin on cancer cell proliferation, and reduced the snake venom toxin-induced upregulation of DR4 and DR5 expression. Our results indicated that snake venom toxin could inhibit human colon cancer cell growth, and these effects may be related to ROS and JNK mediated activation of death receptor (DR4 and DR5) signals

  7. Shiga Toxin (Stx) Gene Detection and Verotoxigenic Potentials of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR-AMADI

    Nigerian Journal of Basic and Applied Science (June, 2016), 24(1): 98-105 .... dangerous pathogenic shiga- toxin producing E. coli from the food product. Consequent .... Table 3: Vero Toxin Analysis of non – 0157 E. coli Isolates From Nono Sold in Nigeria. City .... receptors in their plasma membranes and will detect all ...

  8. EFFECT OF MARINE TOXINS ON THERMOREGULATION IN MICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine algal toxins are extremely toxic and can represent a major health problem to humans and animals. Temperature regulation is one of many processes to be affected by exposure to these toxins. Mice and rats become markedly hypothermic when subjected to acute exposure to the ma...

  9. Clostridial Binary Toxins: Iota and C2 Family Portraits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Wigelsworth, Darran J.; Popoff, Michel R.; Barth, Holger

    2011-01-01

    There are many pathogenic Clostridium species with diverse virulence factors that include protein toxins. Some of these bacteria, such as C. botulinum, C. difficile, C. perfringens, and C. spiroforme, cause enteric problems in animals as well as humans. These often fatal diseases can partly be attributed to binary protein toxins that follow a classic AB paradigm. Within a targeted cell, all clostridial binary toxins destroy filamentous actin via mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin by the A component. However, much less is known about B component binding to cell-surface receptors. These toxins share sequence homology amongst themselves and with those produced by another Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium also commonly associated with soil and disease: Bacillus anthracis. This review focuses upon the iota and C2 families of clostridial binary toxins and includes: (1) basics of the bacterial source; (2) toxin biochemistry; (3) sophisticated cellular uptake machinery; and (4) host–cell responses following toxin-mediated disruption of the cytoskeleton. In summary, these protein toxins aid diverse enteric species within the genus Clostridium. PMID:22919577

  10. Cellular Uptake of the Clostridium perfringens Binary Iota-Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöcker, Dagmar; Behlke, Joachim; Aktories, Klaus; Barth, Holger

    2001-01-01

    The binary iota-toxin is produced by Clostridium perfringens type E strains and consists of two separate proteins, the binding component iota b (98 kDa) and an actin-ADP-ribosylating enzyme component iota a (47 kDa). Iota b binds to the cell surface receptor and mediates the translocation of iota a into the cytosol. Here we studied the cellular uptake of iota-toxin into Vero cells. Bafilomycin A1, but not brefeldin A or nocodazole, inhibited the cytotoxic effects of iota-toxin, indicating that toxin is translocated from an endosomal compartment into the cytoplasm. Acidification (pH ≤ 5.0) of the extracellular medium enabled iota a to directly enter the cytosol in the presence of iota b. Activation by chymotrypsin induced oligomerization of iota b in solution. An average mass of 530 ± 28 kDa for oligomers was determined by analytical ultracentrifugation, indicating heptamer formation. The entry of iota-toxin into polarized CaCo-2 cells was studied by measuring the decrease in transepithelial resistance after toxin treatment. Iota-toxin led to a significant decrease in resistance when it was applied to the basolateral surface of the cells but not following application to the apical surface, indicating a polarized localization of the iota-toxin receptor. PMID:11292715

  11. Oxidative Stress in Shiga Toxin Production by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Licznerska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Virulence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC strains depends on production of Shiga toxins. These toxins are encoded in genomes of lambdoid bacteriophages (Shiga toxin-converting phages, present in EHEC cells as prophages. The genes coding for Shiga toxins are silent in lysogenic bacteria, and prophage induction is necessary for their efficient expression and toxin production. Under laboratory conditions, treatment with UV light or antibiotics interfering with DNA replication are commonly used to induce lambdoid prophages. Since such conditions are unlikely to occur in human intestine, various research groups searched for other factors or agents that might induce Shiga toxin-converting prophages. Among other conditions, it was reported that treatment with H2O2 caused induction of these prophages, though with efficiency significantly lower relative to UV-irradiation or mitomycin C treatment. A molecular mechanism of this phenomenon has been proposed. It appears that the oxidative stress represents natural conditions provoking induction of Shiga toxin-converting prophages as a consequence of H2O2 excretion by either neutrophils in infected humans or protist predators outside human body. Finally, the recently proposed biological role of Shiga toxin production is described in this paper, and the “bacterial altruism” and “Trojan Horse” hypotheses, which are connected to the oxidative stress, are discussed.

  12. Short Toxin-like Proteins Abound in Cnidaria Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Linial

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cnidaria is a rich phylum that includes thousands of marine species. In this study, we focused on Anthozoa and Hydrozoa that are represented by the Nematostella vectensis (Sea anemone and Hydra magnipapillata genomes. We present a method for ranking the toxin-like candidates from complete proteomes of Cnidaria. Toxin-like functions were revealed using ClanTox, a statistical machine-learning predictor trained on ion channel inhibitors from venomous animals. Fundamental features that were emphasized in training ClanTox include cysteines and their spacing along the sequences. Among the 83,000 proteins derived from Cnidaria representatives, we found 170 candidates that fulfill the properties of toxin-like-proteins, the vast majority of which were previously unrecognized as toxins. An additional 394 short proteins exhibit characteristics of toxin-like proteins at a moderate degree of confidence. Remarkably, only 11% of the predicted toxin-like proteins were previously classified as toxins. Based on our prediction methodology and manual annotation, we inferred functions for over 400 of these proteins. Such functions include protease inhibitors, membrane pore formation, ion channel blockers and metal binding proteins. Many of the proteins belong to small families of paralogs. We conclude that the evolutionary expansion of toxin-like proteins in Cnidaria contributes to their fitness in the complex environment of the aquatic ecosystem.

  13. Physiological effect of the toxin from Xanthomonas retroflexus on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physiological effect of the toxin from Xanthomonas retroflexus on redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus). Z Sun, M Li, J Chen, Y Li. Abstract. A new toxin from Xanthomonas retroflexus could cause a series of physiological responses on seedlings of redroot pigweed. The experimental results revealed that respiratory ratio ...

  14. T-2 toxin Analysis in Poultry and Cattle Feedstuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholampour Azizi, Issa; Azarmi, Masumeh; Danesh Pouya, Naser; Rouhi, Samaneh

    2014-05-01

    T-2 toxin is a mycotoxin that is produced by the Fusarium fungi. Consumption of food and feed contaminated with T-2 toxin causes diseases in humans and animals. In this study T-2 toxin was analyzed in poultry and cattle feedstuff in cities of Mazandaran province (Babol, Sari, Chalus), Northern Iran. In this study, 90 samples were analyzed for T-2 toxin contamination by the ELISA method. Out of 60 concentrate and bagasse samples collected from various cities of Mazandaran province, 11.7% and 3.3% were contaminated with T-2 toxin at concentrations > 25 and 50 µg/kg, respectively. For mixed poultry diets, while 10% of the 30 analyzed samples were contaminated with > 25 µg/kg, none of the tested samples contained T-2 toxin at levels > 50 µg/kg. The results obtained from this study show that poultry and cattle feedstuff can be contaminated with different amounts of T-2 toxin in different conditions and locations. Feedstuff that are contaminated by this toxin cause different diseases in animals; thus, potential transfer of mycotoxins to edible by-products from animals fed mycotoxin-contaminated feeds drives the need to routinely monitor mycotoxins in animal feeds and their components. This is the basis on which effective management of mycotoxins and their effects can be implemented.

  15. Retrograde transport of protein toxins through the Golgi apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvig, Kirsten; Skotland, Tore; van Deurs, Bo

    2013-01-01

    at the cell surface, and they are endocytosed both by clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent mechanisms. Sorting to the Golgi and retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are common to these toxins, but the exact mechanisms turn out to be toxin and cell-type dependent. In the ER...

  16. Short inventory of EU legislation on plant toxins in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, de M.; Noordam, M.Y.; Mol, H.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Plant toxins, secondary metabolites that are not essential for the survival of the organism itself but are toxic to human health, are produced by many plants. Plant toxins can be present as inherent metabolites in daily foods such as potatoes, herbs and spices or in herbal preparations. Plant

  17. 9 CFR 121.3 - VS select agents and toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... genetically modified. (d) VS select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria are excluded from... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS POSSESSION, USE, AND... recombinant organisms: (1) Nucleic acids that can produce infectious forms of any of the select agent viruses...

  18. Solid-phase synthesis of polyamine toxin analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Hasse; Krikstolaityte, Sonata; Andersen, Anne J

    2002-01-01

    The wasp toxin philanthotoxin-433 (PhTX-433) is a nonselective and noncompetitive antagonist of ionotropic receptors, such as ionotropic glutamate receptors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Polyamine toxins are extensively used for the characterization of subtypes of ionotropic glutamate re...

  19. Guidelines for safe handling of toxins. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, M.

    1995-11-01

    Toxins are highly toxic chemicals which cause illness through all routes of entry into the body. This technical note has been prepared to ensure that preparation, handling, and disposal of toxins does not constitute a greater occupational hazard than is necessary. It includes hazards that may be encountered and the precautions that should be taken against such hazards.

  20. Recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of polyamine toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, K; Andersen, K; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2001-01-01

    This review describes the recent developments in the field of polyamine toxins, with focus on structure activity relationship investigations, including studies of importance of the polyamine moiety for biological activity, photolabeling studies using polyamine toxins as templates, as well as use ...