WorldWideScience

Sample records for epoxy molding compounds

  1. Effecting aging time of epoxy molding compound to molding process for integrated circuit packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachapitunsuk, Jirayu; Ugsornrat, Kessararat; Srisuwitthanon, Warayoot; Thonglor, Panakamon

    2017-09-01

    This research studied about effecting aging time of epoxy molding compound (EMC) that effect to reliability performance of integrated circuit (IC) package in molding process. Molding process is so important of IC packaging process for protecting IC chip (or die) from temperature and humidity environment using encapsulated EMC. For general molding process, EMC are stored in the frozen at 5°C and left at room temperature at 25 °C for aging time on self before molding of die onto lead frame is 24 hours. The aging time effect to reliability performance of IC package due to different temperature and humidity inside the package. In experiment, aging time of EMC were varied from 0 to 24 hours for molding process of SOIC-8L packages. For analysis, these packages were tested by x-ray and scanning acoustic microscope to analyze properties of EMC with an aging time and also analyzed delamination, internal void, and wire sweep inside the packages with different aging time. The results revealed that different aging time of EMC effect to properties and reliability performance of molding process.

  2. Technical assistance for development of thermally conductive nitride filler for epoxy molding compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Song, Kee Chan; Jung, In Ha

    2005-07-15

    Technical assistance was carried out to develop nitride filler for thermally conductive epoxy molding compounds. Carbothermal reduction method was used to fabricate silicon nitride powder from mixtures of silica and graphite powders. Microstructure and crystal structure were observed by using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction technique. Thermal properties of epoxy molding compounds containing silicon nitride were measured by using laser flash method. Fabrication process of silicon nitride nanowire was developed and was applied to a patent.

  3. The Effect of Epoxy Molding Compound Floor Life to Reliability Performance and mold ability for QFN Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanpunga, Udom; Ugsornrat, Kessararat; Thorlor, Panakamol; Sumithpibul, Chalermsak

    2017-09-01

    This research studied about an epoxy molding compound (EMC) floor life to reliability performance of integrated circuit (IC) package. Molding is the process for protecting the die of IC package form mechanical and chemical reaction from external environment by shaping EMC. From normal manufacturing process, the EMC is stored in the frozen at 5oC and left at around room temperature for aging time or floor life before molding process. The EMC floor life effect to its properties and reliability performance of IC package. Therefore, this work interested in varied the floor life of EMC before molding process to analyze properties of EMC such as spiral flow length, gelation time, and viscosity. In experiment, the floor life of EMC was varied to check the effect of its property to reliability performance. The EMC floor life were varied from 0 hours to 60 hours with a step of 12 hours and observed wire sweep, incomplete EMC, and delamination inside the packages for 3x3, 5x5 and 8x8 mm2 of QFN packages. The evaluation showed about clearly effect of EMC floor life to IC packaging reliability. EMC floor life is not any concern for EMC property, moldabilty, and reliability from 0 hours to 48 hours for molding process of 3x3,5x5 and 8x8 mm2 QFN packaging manufacturing

  4. Active infrared thermography for visualizing subsurface micro voids in an epoxy molding compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ji Yeol [Test and Package Center, Samsung Electronics, Asan(Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Soon Kyu; Choi, Jae Mook; Sohn, Hoon [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    This paper presents an automated subsurface micro void detection technique based on pulsed infrared thermography for inspecting epoxy molding compounds (EMC) used in electronic device packaging. Subsurface micro voids are first detected and visualized by extracting a lock-in amplitude image from raw thermal images. Binary imaging follows to achieve better visualization of subsurface micro voids. A median filter is then applied for removing sparse noise components. The performance of the proposed technique is tested using 36 EMC samples, which have subsurface (below 150 μm ~ 300 μm from the inspection surface) micro voids (150 μm ~ 300 μm in diameter). The experimental results show that the subsurface micro voids can be successfully detected without causing any damage to the EMC samples, making it suitable for automated online inspection.

  5. Organic materials for semiconductor. Epoxy molding compound for IC encapsulation; Handotai kanren no yuki zairyo. Handotai fushiyo epoxy seikei zairyo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusuhara, A. [Sumitomo Bakelite Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-05

    This paper describes organic materials for semiconductor. Based on the composition and raw material, typical materials are epoxy resins, curing agents including phenol-novolak resins, fillers including silica and alumina, flame retardants including brominated epoxy resin and antimony oxide, hardening accelerators including amine compounds and phosphorus compounds, coupling agents including silane compounds and titanate compounds, and the others including colorants and mold lubricants. Raw materials are heated and kneaded after mixing, and produced as tablets after cooling and crushing. Recently, the packages have changed from insertion type to surface mounting type for the small thin IC package and for improving the efficiency of soldering during the incorporation of IC package on the print circuit substrate. High temperature of 260degC has been employed from the conventional limit of 100degC. Reduction of water absorption, improvement of adhesion, reduction of thermal expansion coefficient, and reduction of elastic modulus during heating are promoted for avoiding the peeling and cracking due to the sudden evaporation of adsorbed moisture. This paper also describes the organic materials for BGA. 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Multi-objective robust optimization method for the modified epoxy resin sheet molding compounds of the impeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhang Qu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A kind of modified epoxy resin sheet molding compounds of the impeller has been designed. Through the test, the non-metal impeller has a better environmental aging performance, but must do the waterproof processing design. In order to improve the stability of the impeller vibration design, the influence of uncertainty factors is considered, and a multi-objective robust optimization method is proposed to reduce the weight of the impeller. Firstly, based on the fluid-structure interaction,the analysis model of the impeller vibration is constructed. Secondly, the optimal approximate model of the impeller is constructed by using the Latin hypercube and radial basis function, and the fitting and optimization accuracy of the approximate model is improved by increasing the sample points. Finally, the micro multi-objective genetic algorithm is applied to the robust optimization of approximate model, and the Monte Carlo simulation and Sobol sampling techniques are used for reliability analysis. By comparing the results of the deterministic, different sigma levels and different materials, the multi-objective optimization of the SMC molding impeller can meet the requirements of engineering stability and lightweight. And the effectiveness of the proposed multi-objective robust optimization method is verified by the error analysis. After the SMC molding and the robust optimization of the impeller, the optimized rate reached 42.5%, which greatly improved the economic benefit, and greatly reduce the vibration of the ventilation system.

  7. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  8. Introducing cellulose nanocrystals in sheet molding compounds (SMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir Asadi; Mark Miller; Sanzida Sultana; Robert J. Moon; Kyriaki Kalaitzidou

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of short glass fiber/epoxy composites containing cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) made using sheet molding compound (SMC) manufacturing method as well as the rheological and thermomechanical properties of the CNC-epoxy composites were investigated as a function of the CNC content. CNC up to 1.4 wt% were dispersed in the epoxy to produce the resin...

  9. Determining the effects of thermal conductivity on epoxy molds using profiled cooling channels with metal inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altaf, Khurram; Rani, Abdul Ahmad Majdi; Ahmad, Faiz; Baharom, Masri; Raghavan, Vijay R.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer injection molds are generally manufactured with metallic materials, such as tool steel, which provide reliable working of molds and extended service life. The manufacture of injection molds with steel is a prolonged process because of the strength of steel. For a short prototype production run, one of the suitable choices could be the use of aluminum-filled epoxy material, which can produce a functional mold in a short time as compared with a conventionally machined tool. Aluminum-filled epoxy tooling is a good choice for short production runs for engineering applications, yet works best for relatively simple shapes. The advantages in relation to the fabrication of injection molds with epoxy-based materials include time saving in producing the mold, epoxy curing at ambient temperature, and ease of machining and post processing. Nevertheless, one major drawback of epoxy material is its poor thermal conductivity, which results in a relatively longer cooling time for epoxy injection molds. This study investigates some of the innovative ideas for enhancing the thermal conductivity for epoxy molds. The basic concept behind these ideas was to embed a highly thermally conductive metal insert within the mold between cavities with an innovative design of cooling channels called profiled cooling channels. This technique will increase the effective thermal conductivity of the epoxy mold, leading to the reduction in cooling time for the injection molded polymer part. Experimental analysis conducted in the current study also verified that the mold with profiled cooling channels and embedded metal insert has significantly reduced the cooling time

  10. Determining the effects of thermal conductivity on epoxy molds using profiled cooling channels with metal inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altaf, Khurram; Rani, Abdul Ahmad Majdi; Ahmad, Faiz; Baharom, Masri [Mechanical Engineering Dept., Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Raghavan, Vijay R. [OYL Manufacturing, Sungai Buloh (Malaysia)

    2016-11-15

    Polymer injection molds are generally manufactured with metallic materials, such as tool steel, which provide reliable working of molds and extended service life. The manufacture of injection molds with steel is a prolonged process because of the strength of steel. For a short prototype production run, one of the suitable choices could be the use of aluminum-filled epoxy material, which can produce a functional mold in a short time as compared with a conventionally machined tool. Aluminum-filled epoxy tooling is a good choice for short production runs for engineering applications, yet works best for relatively simple shapes. The advantages in relation to the fabrication of injection molds with epoxy-based materials include time saving in producing the mold, epoxy curing at ambient temperature, and ease of machining and post processing. Nevertheless, one major drawback of epoxy material is its poor thermal conductivity, which results in a relatively longer cooling time for epoxy injection molds. This study investigates some of the innovative ideas for enhancing the thermal conductivity for epoxy molds. The basic concept behind these ideas was to embed a highly thermally conductive metal insert within the mold between cavities with an innovative design of cooling channels called profiled cooling channels. This technique will increase the effective thermal conductivity of the epoxy mold, leading to the reduction in cooling time for the injection molded polymer part. Experimental analysis conducted in the current study also verified that the mold with profiled cooling channels and embedded metal insert has significantly reduced the cooling time.

  11. Molding compound development with semiconductor PKGs; Handotai PKG doko to fushi jushi zairyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, I. [NEC Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-05

    This paper describes the semiconductor packaging and molding compound materials. Major constituents of the molding resins are epoxy resin and inorganic silica, to which various additives are added. In order to make thin packages, biphenyl-based resins with low viscosity are often used in response to high fluidity. To fill the clearance less than 100 {mu}m, size adjusting techniques of the inorganic silica are also significant apart from resins. Since it is heated under the water absorption condition for the packaging in substrates, low water absorption, high adhesion, high strength and low stress are required to avoid peeling and cracking due to the vapor pressure of moisture. Generation of voids is also a problem. Improvement of productivity by reducing the processing period is also significant. In response to the strict environmental regulation, disuse of brominated epoxy and antimony oxide which are flame retardants in the molding resins is an urgent problem to be solved. For the epoxy resins, bisphenol A is to be regulated as a mutation substance. The cost reduction is required with keeping current quality kept. 1 fig.

  12. A One-Component, Fast-Cure, and Economical Epoxy Resin System Suitable for Liquid Molding of Automotive Composite Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiru Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Imidazole cured epoxy resin systems were evaluated for one-component, fast-curing resins for liquid molding of automotive composite parts according to industry requirements. It was demonstrated that an epoxy resin-1-(cyanoethyl-2-ethyl-4-methylimidazol(EP-1C2E4MIM system would cure in a few minutes at 120 °C, while exhibiting acceptable pot life, viscosity profiles, and low water absorption. Moreover, this system yielded high Tg parts with mechanical properties similar to the amine-epoxy systems, which are the mainstream two-component epoxy resin systems for automobiles.

  13. Molding compound trends in a denser packaging world: Qualification tests and reliability concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Lo, R. H. Y.; Chen, A. S.; Belani, J. G.

    1993-12-01

    Molding compound development has traditionally been driven by the memory market, then subsequent applications filter down to other IC technologies such as logic, analog, and ASIC. However, this strategy has changed lately with the introduction of thin packages such as PQFP & TSOP. Rather than targeting a compound for a family of IC such as DRAM or SRAM, compound development efforts are now focused at specific classes of packages. The configurations of these thin packages impose new functional requirements that need to be revisited to provide the optimized combination of properties. The evolution of qualification tests mirrors the advances in epoxy and compounding technologies. From the first standard novolac-based epoxies of the 1970s to the latest 3(sup rd)-generation ultra-low stress materials, longer test times at increasingly harsher environments were achieved. This paper benchmarks the current reliability tests used by the electronic industry, examines those tests that affect and are affected by the molding compounds, discusses the relevance of accelerated testing, and addresses the major reliability issues facing current molding compound development efforts. Six compound-related reliability concerns were selected: moldability, package stresses, package cracking, halogen-induced intermetallic growth at bond pads, moisture-induced corrosion, and interfacial delamination. Causes of each failure type are surveyed and remedies are recommended. Accelerated tests are designed to apply to a limited quantity of devices, bias, or environmental conditions larger than usual ratings, to intensify failure mechanisms that would occur under normal operating conditions. The observed behavior is then extrapolated from the lot to the entire population. Emphasis is on compressing the time necessary to obtain reliability data. This approach has two main drawbacks. With increasingly complex devices, even accelerated tests are expensive. And with new technologies, it becomes

  14. On the epoxy moulding compound aging effect on package reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noijen, S.P.M.; Engelen, R.A.B.; Martens, J.; Opran, A.; Sluis, van der O.

    2009-01-01

    Most semi-conductor devices are encapsulated by epoxy moulding compound (EMC) material. Even after curing at the prescribed temperature and time in accordance with the supplier's curing specifications often the product is not yet 100% fully cured. As a consequence, the curing process of a product

  15. Chemistry of green encapsulating molding compounds at interfaces with other materials in electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scandurra, A.; Zafarana, R.; Tenya, Y.; Pignataro, S

    2004-07-31

    The interface chemistry between encapsulating epoxy phenolic molding compound (EMC) containing phosphorous based organic flame retardant (the so called 'green materials') and copper oxide-hydroxide and aluminum oxide-hydroxide surfaces have been studied in comparison with 'conventional' EMC containing bromine and antimony as flame retardant. These green materials are designed to reduce the presence of toxic elements in the electronic packages and, consequently, in the environment. For the study were used a Scanning Acoustic Microscopy for delamination measurements, a dynamometer for the pull strength measurements and an ESCA spectrometer for chemical analysis of the interface. The general behavior of the green compound in terms of delamination, adhesion, and corrosion is found better or at least comparable than that of the conventional EMC.

  16. Simulation of Injection Molding Process Including Mold Filling and Compound Curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Reza Erfanian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports and discusses the results of a 3D simulation of the injection molding process of a rubber compound that includes the mold flling stage and  material curing, using the computer code is developed in “UDF” part of the Fluent 6.3 CAE software. The data obtained from a rheometer (MDR 2000 is used to characterize the rubber material in order to fnd the cure model parameters which exist in curing model. Because of non-newtonian behavior of rubber, in this work the non-newtonian model for viscosity was used and viscosity parameters were computed by mean of viscometry test by RPA. After calculation of the physical and curing properties, vulcanization process was simulated for a complex rubber article with non-uniform thickness by solving the continuity, momentum, energy and curing process equations. Predicted flling and curing time in a complex and 3D rubber part is compared with experimentally measured data which confrmed  the accuracy and applicability of the method.

  17. Mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has developed a device known as an acoustical generator that can create and disperse molds for rodent ... Sciences) . 2004. Damp Indoor Spaces and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. 3 WHO ( World Health ...

  18. Mold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-05-02

    This podcast answers a listener's question about the risks associated with mold after a natural disaster or severe weather.  Created: 5/2/2011 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH).   Date Released: 5/2/2011.

  19. 49 CFR 173.221 - Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.221 Polymeric beads, expandable and Plastic molding compound. (a) Non-bulk shipments of Polymeric beads (or granules), expandable, evolving flammable vapor and Plastic...

  20. Effect of pretreatment with epoxy compounds on the mechanical properties of bovine pericardial bioprosthetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, T; Liu, F; Xi, B

    1992-07-01

    Early failures of bovine pericardial heart valves are due to leaflet perforation, tearing and calcification. Since glutaraldehyde fixation has been shown to produce marked changes in leaflet mechanics and has been linked to development of calcification, bovine pericardium fixed with the four hydrophilic epoxy formulations and their mechanical properties are studied in this paper. We measured the thicknesses, shrinkage temperatures, stress relaxations and stress-strain curves of bovine pericardiums after different treatments with (1) non-treatment (fresh), (2) glutaraldehyde (GA), (3) epoxy compounds followed by the posttreatment with GA (EP 1#, EP 2#), and (4) epoxy compounds (EP 3# and EP 4#). Results of this study showed that the hydrophilic epoxy compounds are good crosslinking agents. There are no significant differences of shrinkage temperature and ultimate tensile stress among all tissue samples pretreated with GA, EP 1# and EP 2#. However, the stress relaxations of tissue-samples pretreated with epoxy compounds followed by the posttreatment with GA (EP 1# and EP 2#) are significantly slower than that pretreated with GA, and the strains at fracture of EP 1# and EP 2# are also significantly larger than that of GA or epoxy compounds. These facts show that the bovine pericardium pretreated with the epoxy compound followed by the posttreatment with GA (EP 1# and EP 2#) possesses greater tenacity and potential durability in dynamic stress.

  1. Manufacturing of microcapsules with liquid core and their healing performance in epoxy for resin transfer molding

    OpenAIRE

    Yılmaz, Çağatay; Yilmaz, Cagatay

    2013-01-01

    Microcapsules with different active core materials have been receiving a great deal of attention for developing polymer based materials with selfhealing abilities. The self-healing ability is crucial in particular for matrix materials having brittle nature such as epoxy resin. In order for abstaining from an abrupt failure of structural brittle manner polymeric materials, microcapsules can be used excellently as a viable repair agent. In this work, we present a study on the catalyst-free micr...

  2. Block Copolymer Modified Epoxy Amine System for Reactive Rotational Molding: Structures, Properties and Processability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Eva; Nony, Fabien; Tcharkhtchi, Abbas; Gérard, Jean-François

    2011-05-01

    Poly(styrene-butadiene-methylmethacrylate) (SBM) and poly(methylmethacrylate-butyle-acrylate-methylmethacrylate) (MAM) triblock copolymers have been dissolved in liquid DGEBA epoxy resin which is subsequently polymerized by meta-xylene diamine (MXDA) or Jeffamine EDR-148. A chemorheology study of these formulations by plate-plate rheology and by thermal analysis has allowed to conclude that the addition of these copolymer blocks improve the reactive rotational moulding processability without affecting the processing time. Indeed, it prevents the pooling of the formulation at the bottom of the mould and a too rapid build up of resin viscosity of these thermosetting systems. The morphology of the cured blends examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows an increase of fracture surface area and thereby a potential increase of the toughness with the modification of epoxy system. Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMA) and opalescence of final material show that the block PMMA, initially miscible, is likely to induce phase separation from the epoxy-amine matrix. Thereby, the poor compatibilisation between the toughener and the matrix has a detrimental effect on the tensile mechanical properties. The compatibilisation has to be increased to improve in synergy the processability and the final properties of these block copolymer modified formulations. First attempts could be by adapting the length and ratio of each block.

  3. A study on compound contents for plastic injection molding products of metallic resin pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Whan; Kwak, Jae Seob; Lee, Gyu Sang

    2016-01-01

    Injection molding process is widely used for producing most plastic products. In order to make a metal-colored plastic product especially in modern luxury home alliances, metallic pigments which are mixed to a basic resin material for injection molding are available. However, the process control for the metal-colored plastic product is extremely difficult due to non-uniform melt flow of the metallic resin pigments. To improve the process efficiency, a rapid mold cooling method by a compressed cryogenic fluid and electricity mold are also proposed to decrease undesired compound contents within a molded plastic product. In this study, a quality of the metal-colored plastic product is evaluated with process parameters; injection speed, injection pressure, and pigment contents, and an influence of the rapid cooling and heating system is demonstrated

  4. A study on compound contents for plastic injection molding products of metallic resin pigment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Whan; Kwak, Jae Seob [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyu Sang [Alliance Molding Engineering TeamLG Electronics Inc., Osan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Injection molding process is widely used for producing most plastic products. In order to make a metal-colored plastic product especially in modern luxury home alliances, metallic pigments which are mixed to a basic resin material for injection molding are available. However, the process control for the metal-colored plastic product is extremely difficult due to non-uniform melt flow of the metallic resin pigments. To improve the process efficiency, a rapid mold cooling method by a compressed cryogenic fluid and electricity mold are also proposed to decrease undesired compound contents within a molded plastic product. In this study, a quality of the metal-colored plastic product is evaluated with process parameters; injection speed, injection pressure, and pigment contents, and an influence of the rapid cooling and heating system is demonstrated.

  5. Hygrothermal effects on the tensile strength of carbon/epoxy laminates with molded edges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Geraldo Maurício

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interlaminar stresses are confined to a region near the free edge. Therefore, the laminate stacking sequence and the free edge finishing are some of the factors that affect the strength of the laminate and limit its life. The use of molded edges eliminates the need for trimming and machining the laminates edges thus improving productivity. However, this fabrication technique may have a detrimental effect on the laminate strength for certain stacking sequences. This effect in the presence of moisture has not been characterized. This work presents the results of a comparative study of the resistance to delamination of laminates with machined edges and molded edges. Additionally, two environmental conditions were considered: dry laminates and laminates saturated with moisture. The tensile strength of the laminates were measured and micrographs were used to analyze the microstructure of the laminates near the free edges. It is concluded that the mechanical properties of advanced composites depend on the environmental conditions and the fabrication techniques used to produce the laminates. Therefore, it is necessary to account for these factors when experimentally determining the design allowables.

  6. The effect of α-cellulose fiber on the properties of melamine-formaldehyde molding compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatibi, M. A.; Beheshti, M. A.; Morshedian, J.

    2001-01-01

    Melamine-formaldehyde molding compounds have found different industrial applications. This is due to their good mechanical properties such as hardness, gloss and high modulus and strength. One of the major components of these compounds is α-cellulose fiber and has a major effect on the mechanical properties. Although this fiber is being used in these compounds for a long time, there is not much data available of α-cellulose fibers on the physical and mechanical properties of melamine-formaldehyde molding compounds being investigated. Results show that although the microstructures of these two fibers are quite different from each other, but they do not have any effect on the mechanical properties of the molding. Whereas, it has a significant effect on the wettability (processing condition) and glossiness of the mol dings. Since this latter property is very important in house wares applications, the darker mol dings can not be used in domestic applications

  7. Finite element analysis and simulation of rheological properties of bulk molding compound (BMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, M. Fatih; Aydin, Ismail

    2013-12-01

    Bulk molding compound (BMC) is one of the important composite materials with various engineering applications. BMC is a thermoset plastic resin blend of various inert fillers, fiber reinforcements, catalysts, stabilizers and pigments that form a viscous, molding compound. Depending on the end-use application, bulk molding compounds are formulated to achieve close dimensional control, flame and scratch resistance, electrical insulation, corrosion and stain resistance, superior mechanical properties, low shrink and color stability. Its excellent flow characteristics, dielectric properties, and flame resistance make this thermoset material well-suited to a wide variety of applications requiring precision in detail and dimensions as well as high performance. When a BMC is used for these purposes, the rheological behavior and properties of the BMC is the main concern. In this paper, finite element analysis of rheological properties of bulk molding composite material was studied. For this purpose, standard samples of composite material were obtained by means of uniaxial hot pressing. 3 point flexural tests were then carried out by using a universal testing machine. Finite element analyses were then performed with defined material properties within a specific constitutive material behavior. Experimental and numerical results were then compared. Good correlation between the numerical simulation and the experimental results was obtained. It was expected with this study that effects of various process parameters and boundary conditions on the rheological behavior of bulk molding compounds could be determined by means of numerical analysis without detailed experimental work.

  8. Prediction of the epoxy moulding compound aging effect on package reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noijen, S.P.M.; Engelen, R.A.B.; Martens, J.; Opran, A.; Sluis, van der O.; Silfhout, van R.B.R.

    2010-01-01

    Most semi-conductor devices are encapsulated by epoxy moulding compound (EMC) material. Even after curing at the prescribed temperature and time in accordance with the supplier’s curing specifications often the product is not yet 100% fully cured. As a consequence, the curing process of a product

  9. Effect of boron compounds on physical, mechanical, and fire properties of injection molded wood plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Turgay Akbulut; Turker Dundar; Robert H. White; Fatih Mengeloglu; Zeki Candan; Umit Buyuksari; Erkan Avci

    2011-01-01

    Physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the injection-molded wood flour/polypropylene composites (WPCs) incorporated with different levels of boron compounds, borax/boric acid (BX/BA) (0.5:0.5 wt %) and zinc borate (ZB) (4, 8, or 12 wt %) were investigated. The effect of the coupling agent loading (2, 4, or 6 wt %), maleic anhydride-grafted PP (MAPP), on the...

  10. Wall-slip of highly filled powder injection molding compounds: Effect of flow channel geometry and roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausnerova, Berenika; Sanetrnik, Daniel; Paravanova, Gordana

    2014-05-01

    The paper deals with the rheological behavior of highly filled compounds proceeded via powder injection molding (PIM) and applied in many sectors of industry (automotive, medicine, electronic or military). Online rheometer equipped with slit dies varying in surface roughness and dimensions was applied to investigate the wall-slip as a rheological phenomenon, which can be considered as a parameter indicating the separation of compound components (polymer binder and metallic powder) during high shear rates when injection molded.

  11. Color measurement of plastics - From compounding via pelletizing, up to injection molding and extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botos, J.; Murail, N.; Heidemeyer, P.; Kretschmer, K.; Ulmer, B.; Zentgraf, T.; Bastian, M.; Hochrein, T.

    2014-05-01

    The typical offline color measurement on injection molded or pressed specimens is a very expensive and time-consuming process. In order to optimize the productivity and quality, it is desirable to measure the color already during the production. Therefore several systems have been developed to monitor the color e.g. on melts, strands, pellets, the extrudate or injection molded part already during the process. Different kinds of inline, online and atline methods with their respective advantages and disadvantages will be compared. The criteria are e.g. the testing time, which ranges from real-time to some minutes, the required calibration procedure, the spectral resolution and the final measuring precision. The latter ranges between 0.05 to 0.5 in the CIE L*a*b* system depending on the particular measurement system. Due to the high temperatures in typical plastics processes thermochromism of polymers and dyes has to be taken into account. This effect can influence the color value in the magnitude of some 10% and is barely understood so far. Different suitable methods to compensate thermochromic effects during compounding or injection molding by using calibration curves or artificial neural networks are presented. Furthermore it is even possible to control the color during extrusion and compounding almost in real-time. The goal is a specific developed software for adjusting the color recipe automatically with the final objective of a closed-loop control.

  12. Integration of Microchip Electrophoresis with Electrochemical Detection Using an Epoxy-Based Molding Method to Embed Multiple Electrode Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alicia S.; Selimovic, Asmira; Martin, R. Scott

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the use of epoxy-encapsulated electrodes to integrate microchip-based electrophoresis with electrochemical detection. Devices with various electrode combinations can easily be developed. This includes a palladium decoupler with a downstream working electrode material of either gold, mercury/gold, platinum, glassy carbon, or a carbon fiber bundle. Additional device components such as the platinum wires for the electrophoresis separation and the counter electrode for detection can also be integrated into the epoxy base. The effect of the decoupler configuration was studied in terms of the separation performance, detector noise, and the ability to analyze samples of a high ionic strength. The ability of both glassy carbon and carbon fiber bundle electrodes to analyze a complex mixture was demonstrated. It was also shown that a PDMS-based valving microchip can be used along with the epoxy embedded electrodes to integrate microdialysis sampling with microchip electrophoresis and electrochemical detection, with the microdialysis tubing also being embedded in the epoxy substrate. This approach enables one to vary the detection electrode material as desired in a manner where the electrodes can be polished and modified in a similar fashion to electrochemical flow cells used in liquid chromatography. PMID:22038707

  13. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR WEIGHT ON THE YIELD BEHAVIOUR OF EPY EPOXY COMPOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Urbaniak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of epoxy networks with molecular weight between crosslinks (Mc ranging from 117 to 508 g/mol were investigated by employing as DSC and DMA methods and compression testing over a broad range of test temperatures (from 20 to 120 °C and strain rates (from 0.0208 to 20.8 min–1. Mechanical characteristics vs. testing temperature and strain rate developed in relation to working conditions of EPY compound applied for machine foundation chocks as well as effect of crosslinking on glass transition temperature (Tg presented in this paper let to find out the effect of molecular architecture composed chiefly by Mc on the thermal and mechanical properties that govern yield behaviour of the material. The investigations carried out in a.m. ranges of testing temperatures and strain rates showed that whichever change of Mc is related to the change in crosslink density causing relative shift in the Tg of the compound. However, a sensitivity of the polymer material on changes in strain rate falls down with growth of testing temperature. Obtained results prove that yielding in EPY compound can be examined in categories of the Eyring’s plastic flow model in which yielding is described.

  14. EMI Shielding Performance For Varies Frequency by Metal Plating on Mold Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Fee Tai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Conformal metalization on mold compound offers new possibility for IC package design to improve features such as rigidization of the flexible core, heat sink capability, 3D-circuit patterning and the electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding. With the unique processes, the fabrication technology had enabled to achieve the high reliable performance and had passed the electrical test. Following research after the reliability concern, this paper further study the shielding effectiveness of varying coating thickness with respect to laboratory simulated EMI condition, using radio frequency from 10MHz to 5.8 GHz. Different metal namely pure nickel, nickel-phosphorous and pure plated copper are studied for their effectiveness of EMI sheilding. Our first result showed over 35-40dB of shielding effectiveness is achievable on high frequency 868-5800MHz. Nevertheless on low frequency of 10MHz, the shielding effectiveness achievement is below than 25dB. To overcome the shielding need for lower frequency, we further expanded our test by choosing ferromagentic material Nicke/Ironl-alloy in combination with thick copper plating. With this new metal combination, EMI shielding effectiveness for lower frequency is improved to 40dB.

  15. Solid-phase extraction element based on epoxy polymer monolith for determination of polar organic compounds in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tadashi; Odagiri, Kayo; Watanabe, Atsushi; Watanabe, Chuichi; Kubo, Takuya; Hosoya, Ken

    2011-10-01

    A solid-phase extraction element based on epoxy polymer monolith was fabricated for sorptive enrichment of polar compounds from liquid and gaseous samples. After ultrasonication of the element in an aqueous solution for a given period of time, the thermal desorption (TD) using a pyrolyzer with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), in which TD temperature was programmed from 50 to 250 °C for the analytes absorbed in the element, was used to evaluate the element for basic extraction performance using the aqueous standard mixtures consisting of compounds having varied polarities such as hexanol, isoamyl acetate, linalool, furfural and decanoic acid, in concentrations ranging from 10 μg/L to 1 mg/L. Excellent linear relationships were observed for all compounds in the standard mixture, except decanoic acid. In the extraction of beverages such as red wine, the extraction element showed stronger adsorption characteristics for polar compounds such as alcohols and acids than a non-polar polydimethylsiloxane-based element. This feature is derived from the main polymer structure along with hydroxyl and amino groups present in the epoxy-based monolith polymer matrix. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Influence of capillary die geometry on wall slip of highly filled powder injection molding compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sanétrník, D.; Hausnerová, B.; Filip, Petr; Hnátková, E.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 325, February (2018), s. 615-619 ISSN 0032-5910 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-26808S Grant - others:Ministerstvo školství, mládeže a tělovýchovy (MŠMT)(CZ) LO1504 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : powder injection molding * highly filled polymer * wall slip * capillary entrance angle Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.942, year: 2016

  17. Volatile Flavor Compounds Produced by Molds of Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Fungi imperfecti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, E; Stawicki, S; Wasowicz, E

    1974-06-01

    Strains of molds Aspergillus niger, A. ochraceus, A. oryzae, A. parasiticus, Penicillium chrysogenum, P. citrinum, P. funiculosum, P. raistrickii, P. viridicatum, Alternaria, Cephalosporium, and Fusarium sp. were grown on sterile coarse wheat meal at 26 to 28 C for 120 h. The volatiles from mature cultures were distilled at low temperature under reduced pressure. The distillates from traps -40 and -78 C were extracted with methylene chloride and subsequently concentrated. All the concentrates thus obtained were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, chemical reactions of functional groups, and olfactory evaluation. Six components detected in the culture distillates were identified positively: 3-methylbutanol, 3-octanone, 3-octanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 1-octanol, and 2-octen-1-ol. They represented 67 to 97% of all the volatiles occurring in the concentrated distillate. The following 14 components were identified tentatively: octane, isobutyl alcohol, butyl alcohol, butyl acetate, amyl acetate, octyl acetate, pyridine, hexanol, nonanone, dimethylpyrazine, tetramethylpyrazine, benzaldehyde, propylbenzene, and phenethyl alcohol. Among the volatiles produced by molds, 1-octen-3-ol yielding a characteristic fungal odor was found predominant.

  18. Fast prototyping of injection molded polymer microfluidic chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Steen; Selmeczi, David; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2010-01-01

    We present fast prototyping of injection molding tools by the definition of microfluidic structures in a light-curable epoxy (SU-8) directly on planar nickel mold inserts. Optimized prototype mold structures could withstand injection molding of more than 300 replicas in cyclic olefin copolymer (COC...

  19. Fast Etching of Molding Compound by an Ar/O2/CF4 Plasma and Process Improvements for Semiconductor Package Decapsulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, J.; Gruber, D.; Schelen, J.B.J.; Funke, H.J.; Beenakker, C.I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Decapsulation of a SOT23 semiconductor package with 23 um copper wire bonds is conducted with an especially designed microwave induced plasma system. It is found that a 30%-60% CF4 addition in the O2/CF4 etchant gas results in high molding compound etching rate. Si3N4 overetching which is

  20. Stabilization of gamma-irradiated poly(vinyl chloride) by epoxy compounds. III. Conjugated double bonds and degree of unsaturation in gamma-irradiated PVC-stabilizer mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerke, G.; Lerke, I.; Szymanski, W.

    1983-01-01

    The concentration of conjugated polyene sequences was studied in γ-irradiated PVC with 4% admixture of four epoxy stabilizers: diglycidyl ether of 2,2-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methylphenyl)propane (I), styrene oxide (1,2-epoxy ethyl benzene) (IV), epoxidized ricinus oil (VI), and epoxidized soybean oil (Drapex 6.8) (VII). As in the former investigations (Papers I and II), the process of the formation of the polyenes occurs in two stages. The concentration of polyene sequences with n double bonds, H/sub n/ the total amount of polyene sequences, ΣH/sub n/, the average length of the polyene sequence, n, and the extents of reaction x and p, were computed. The stabilizing effect of all compounds used agrees with the increasing content of epoxy groups. The addition of stabilizers diminishes the value of n. The decrease of the fraction of long sequences and the increase of short ones occurs. Apart from the binding of evolved HCl, the protective effect towards the macromolecules of PVC consists mainly in the inhibition of growth of chain dehydrochlorination by the epoxy groups

  1. Microcellular injection-molding of polylactide with chain-extender

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilla, Srikanth; Kramschuster, Adam; Yang Liqiang; Lee, Junghoo; Gong Shaoqin; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The effects of adding an epoxy-based chain-extender (CE) on the properties of injection-molded solid and microcellular polylactide (PLA) were studied. PLA and PLA with 8 wt.% CE (PLA-CE) were melt-compounded using a twin-screw extruder. Solid and microcellular specimens were produced via a conventional and microcellular injection-molding process, respectively. Various characterization techniques including gel permeation chromatography, tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis, scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were applied to study the molecular weight, static and dynamic mechanical properties, cell morphology, and crystallization behavior, respectively. The addition of CE enhanced the molecular weight but decreased the crystallinity of PLA. The addition of CE also reduced the cell size and increased the cell density. Furthermore, the decomposition temperatures and several tensile properties, including specific strength, specific toughness, and strain-at-break of both solid and microcellular PLA specimens, increased with the addition of CE.

  2. An investigation of the use of cerium and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes for the protection of polymeric epoxy compounds in the low Earth orbit environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piness, Jessica Miriam

    with the epoxy-amine matrix. A sedimented layer of the most incompatible POSS moiety was observed at the bottom of bars at the highest loading level of 5 wt% POSS. It was concluded that POSS could form a sedimented layer in this epoxy during cure. Epoxy amine materials containing POSS derivatives were tested by exposure to atomic oxygen at NASA Glenn Research Center with each POSS derivative present in separate samples at 2.5 wt% loading levels. Mass loss did not decrease against an unfilled control and glassification was not observed, leading to the conclusion that POSS could not be effectively concentrated at a surface to reduce degradation given the methods used. Taking this into account, the study transitioned into seeking ways to integrate highly UV absorbent cerium compounds with POSS. This part of the study is reported in Chapter IV. It was anticipated that POSS with a polar pendant group would interact through intermolecular forces with cerium (IV) oxide and produce a suspension that could be cured at the surface of polymers. However, in every experiment, the cerium (IV) oxide was not dispersed. However, a homogeneous dispersion of a cerium-containing compound was achieved by combining trisilanol phenyl POSS with cerium (III) nitrate hexahydrate. NMR and mass spectrometry showed that the mixture of Cerium nitrate and trisilanol phenyl POSS did not result in the formation of a chemical compound but FTIR studies indicated the presence of hydrogen bonding between the POSS silanols and cerium-associated water. The resulting material was termed "CePOSS". CePOSS was more UV absorbent in the UVc region than POSS or other cerium compounds as measured by solution UV-vis spectroscopy. In addition, CePOSS could be mixed into a POSS-epoxy coating, after pre-blending with poly(ethylene glycol) POSS, to produce films that were essentially opaque in the UV region below a wavelength of about 300 nm, and transparent in the visible region above 300 nm. The discovery of a 'window

  3. Warpage of QFN Package in Post Mold Cure Process of integrated circuit packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwithoon, Nattha; Ugsornrat, Kessararat; Srisuwitthanon, Warayoot; Thonglor, Panakamon

    2017-09-01

    This research studied about warpage of QFN package in post mold cure process of integrated circuit (IC) packages using pre-plated (PPF) leadframe. For IC package, epoxy molding compound (EMC) are molded by cross linking of compound stiffness but incomplete crosslinked network and leading the fully cured thermoset by post mold cure (PMC) process. The cure temperature of PMC can change microstructure of EMC in term of stress inside the package and effect to warpage of the package due to coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between EMC and leadframe. In experiment, cure temperatures were varied to check the effect of internal stress due to different cure temperature after completed post mold cure for TDFN 2×3 8L. The cure temperature were varied with 180 °C, 170 °C, 160 °C, and 150°C with cure time 4 and 6 hours, respectively. For analysis, the TDFN 2×3 8L packages were analyzed the warpage by thickness gauge and scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) after take the test samples out from the oven cure. The results confirmed that effect of different CTE between EMC and leadframe due to different cure temperature resulting to warpage of the TDFN 2×3 8L packages.

  4. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - mold; Bronchial asthma - mold; Triggers - mold; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are ...

  5. Characterization of Low Density Glass Filled Epoxies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quesenberry, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    This report discusses the experimental determination and modeling of several thermophysical and mechanical properties of glass filled epoxy composite systems for potential use as electronic potting compounds...

  6. Development study of concrete reinforcement made of aramid fiber-reinforced plastic rods with high radiation resistance. 1. Epoxy resin compounds with a handling at room temperature impregnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, Akira; Seguchi, Tadao; Moriya, Toshio; Matsubara, Sumiyuki; Hongou, Yoshihiko

    1999-03-01

    Aramid fiber-reinforced plastic (ArFRP) rods were developed in order to avoid from conduction current and/or magnetization of the metallic reinforcement using concrete constructions. For the polymer matrix, new epoxy resin compounds consist of tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenylmethane (30%), diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (60%), styrene oxide (10%) and aromatic diamine as a hardner were found to be the best formulation, and which were easily impregnated to the aramid fiber braiding yarn at room temperature. The ArFRP rods has a high radiation resistance, and the tensile strength was maintained to 98% (1.45 GPa) after irradiation dose of 100 MGy (absorbed energy MJ/kg), which is available for the reinforcement of concrete construction for the house of fusion reactor with super conducting magnets. (author)

  7. Molds in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Molds in the Environment What are molds? What are some of the ... molds found? Molds are found in virtually every environment and can be detected, both indoors and outdoors, ...

  8. Molded underfill (MUF) encapsulation for flip-chip package: A numerical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, M. A.; Abdullah, M. K.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Ariff, Z. M.; Saad, Abdullah Aziz; Hamid, M. F.; Ismail, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the numerical simulation of epoxy molding compound (EMC) filling in multi flip-chip packages during encapsulation process. The empty and a group flip chip packages were considered in the mold cavity in order to study the flow profile of the EMC. SOLIDWORKS software was used for three-dimensional modeling and it was incorporated into fluid analysis software namely as ANSYS FLUENT. The volume of fluid (VOF) technique was used for capturing the flow front profiles and Power Law model was applied for its rheology model. The numerical result are compared and discussed with previous experimental and it was shown a good conformity for model validation. The prediction of flow front was observed and analyzed at different filling time. The possibility and visual of void formation in the package is captured and the number of flip-chip is one factor that contributed to the void formation.

  9. Effect of Thermally Reduced Graphene Oxide on Mechanical Properties of Woven Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Nitai Chandra Adak; Suman Chhetri; Naresh Chandra Murmu; Pranab Samanta; Tapas Kuila

    2018-01-01

    Thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRGO) was incorporated as a reinforcing filler in the epoxy resin to investigate the effect on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber (CF)/epoxy composites. At first, the epoxy matrix was modified by adding different wt % of TRGO from 0.05 to 0.4 wt % followed by the preparation of TRGO/CF/epoxy composites througha vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding process. The prepared TRGO was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman Spe...

  10. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

    Primary diamines are prepared for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and preimpregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses a room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  11. Thermo-curable epoxy systems for nanoimprint lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chun-Chang; Hsu, Steve Lien-Chung

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we have used solvent-free thermo-curable epoxy systems for low-pressure and moderate-temperature nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The curing kinetic parameters and conversion of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) resin with different ambient-cure 930 and 954 hardeners were studied by the isothermal DSC technique. They are useful for the study of epoxy resins in the imprinting application. The DGEBA/930 and DGEBA/954 epoxy resists can be imprinted to obtain high-density nano- and micro-scale patterns on a flexible indium tin oxide/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (ITO/PET) substrate. The DGEBA/930 epoxy resin is not only suitable for resist material, but also for plastic mold material. Highly dense nanometer patterns can be successfully imprinted using a UV-curable resist from the DGEBA/930 epoxy mold. Using the replicated DGEBA/930 epoxy mold instead of the expensive master can prevent brittle failure of the silicon molds in the NIL

  12. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Composite Part Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, Chad E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Springfield, Robert M. [Tru Design, LLC, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) collaborated with Tru-Design to test the quality and durability of molds used for making fiber reinforced composites using additive manufacturing. The partners developed surface treatment techniques including epoxy coatings and machining to improve the quality of the surface finish. Test samples made using the printed and surface finished molds demonstrated life spans suitable for one-of-a-kind and low-volume applications, meeting the project objective.

  13. Floods and Mold Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold growth may be a problem after flooding. Excess moisture in the home is cause for concern about indoor air quality primarily because it provides breeding conditions for pests, molds and other microorganisms.

  14. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  15. Development of plastic pulley by injection molding; Shashutsu keisei ni yoru jushi pulley no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizumi, F; Funatsu, A; Yazawa, H [Sumitomo Bakelite Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    We developed plastic pulley for automobile manufactured by injection molding which will reduce manufacturing cost. We have developed product design, injection molding technology especially to improve mechanical strength and phenolic molding compound with good wear resistance and high mechanical strength. We have established `Injection Compression molding` technology to improve mechanical strength of weld portion. We also developed phenolic molding compound which is composed of one step resin and long organic fiber to obtain good wear resistance and high mechanical strength. Manufacturing cost will be reduced by using injection molding combined with lower material cost of the newly developed compound. 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Interactive Mold House Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Get a quick glimpse of some of the most important ways to protect your home from mold by this interactive tour of the Mold House. Room-by-room, you'll learn about common mold issues and how to address them.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Aluminosilicate- and Aluminum Oxide-Filled Thermosets for Injection Molding: Effect of Filler Content, Filler Size and Filler Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, epoxy molding compounds (EMCs with aluminosilicate (AlS and aluminum oxide (AlO were fabricated as fillers by a twin-screw-extruder (TSE and shaped to plate samples using injection molding. AlS and AlO, electrical insulating mineral materials, were used as fillers to improve the thermal conductivity (λc of composites. Composites with different filler particle sizes, filler contents and filler geometry were fabricated and the influence of these variables on the λc was studied. The λc of composites was measured with the hot-disk method. The distribution of fillers in composites was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Using the Lewis-Nielsen equation, experimental values of λc were compared with those predicted. The predicted results fit the experimental values well. The result showed that λc increases significantly when the filler content of composites is approximately over 50 vol %.

  18. Evacuated, displacement compression mold. [of tubular bodies from thermosetting plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process of molding long thin-wall tubular bodies from thermosetting plastic molding compounds is described wherein the tubular body lengths may be several times the diameters. The process is accomplished by loading a predetermined quantity of molding compound into a female mold cavity closed at one end by a force mandrel. After closing the other end of the female mold with a balance mandrel, the loaded cavity is evacuated by applying a vacuum of from one-to-five mm pressure for a period of fifteen-to-thirty minutes. The mold temperature is raised to the minimum temperature at which the resin constituent of the compound will soften or plasticize and a pressure of 2500 psi is applied.

  19. Influence of Coating with Some Natural Based Materials on the Erosion Wear Behavior of Glass Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Aseel Basim Abdul Hussein; Emad Saadi AL-Hassani; Reem Alaa Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, composites were prepared by Hand lay-up molding. The composites constituents were epoxy resin as a matrix, 6% volume fractions of glass fibers (G.F) as reinforcement and 3%, 6% volume fractions of preparation natural material (Rice Husk Ash, Carrot Powder, and Sawdust) as filler. Studied the erosion wear behavior and coating by natural wastes (Rice Husk Ash) with epoxy resin after erosion. The results showed the non – reinforced epoxy have lower resistance erosion than n...

  20. An easy mold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nam Hun; Choe, Jong Sun

    1988-04-01

    This book deals with an easy mold, which introduces what is a mold kinds and classification of mold. It gives descriptions of easy theories such as basic knowledge on shearing work, clearance, power for punching and shear angle, basic knowledge for bending such as transform by bending, the minimal bending radius, spring back, the length of material, flexural strength for bending, fundamental knowledge for drawing work with transform of drawing and limitation of drawing.

  1. Mold After a Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should clean up the mold and fix any water problem, such as leaks in roofs, walls, or plumbing. Controlling moisture in your home is the most critical factor for preventing mold growth. To ... use commercial products, soap and water, or a bleach solution of no more than ...

  2. A two-dimensional simulation model for the molded underfill process in flip chip packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xue Ru; Young, Wen Bin [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China)

    2015-07-15

    The flip chip process involves the deposition of solder bumps on the chip surface and their subsequent direct attachment and connection to a substrate. Underfilling traditional flip chip packaging is typically performed following a two-step approach. The first step uses capillary force to fill the gap between the chip and the substrate, and the second step uses epoxy molding compound (EMC) to overmold the package. Unlike traditional flip chip packaging, the molded underfill (MUF) concept uses a single-step approach to simultaneously achieve both underfill and overmold. MUF is a simpler and faster process. In this study, a 2D numerical model is developed to simulate the front movement of EMC flow and the void formation for different geometric parameters. The 2D model simplifies the procedures of geometric modeling and reduces the modeling time for the MUF simulation. Experiments are conducted to verify the prediction results of the model. The effect on void formation for different geometric parameters is investigated using a 2D model.

  3. Determination of partition coefficients n-octanol/water for treosulfan and its epoxy-transformers: an example of a negative correlation between lipophilicity of unionized compounds and their retention in reversed-phase chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Główka, Franciszek K; Romański, Michał; Siemiątkowska, Anna

    2013-04-01

    For the last decade an alkylating agent treosulfan (TREO) has been successfully applied in clinical trials in conditioning prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pharmacological activity of the pro-drug depends on its epoxy-transformers, monoepoxide (S,S-EBDM) and diepoxide (S,S-DEB), which are formed in a non-enzymatic consecutive reaction accompanied by a release of methanesulfonic acid. In the present study partition coefficient n-octanol/water (POW) of TREO as well as its biologically active epoxy-transformers was determined empirically (applying a classical shake-flask method) and in silico for the first time. In vitro the partition was investigated at 37°C in the system composed of the pre-saturated n-octanol and 0.05 M acetate buffer pH 4.4 adjusted with sodium and potassium chloride to ionic strength of 0.16 M. Concentration of the analytes was quantified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method in which retention time increased from S,S-DEB to TREO. It was shown that neither association nor dissociation of the tested compounds in the applied phases occurred. Calculated logPOW (TREO: -1.58±0.04, S,S-EBDM: -1.18±0.02, S,S-DEB: -0.40±0.03) indicate the hydrophilic character of the all three entities, corresponding to its pharmacokinetic parameters described in the literature. Experimentally determined logPOW of the compounds were best comparable to the values predicted by algorithm ALOGPs. Interestingly, the POW values determined in vitro as well as in silico were inversely correlated with the retention times observed in the endcapped RP-HPLC column. It might be explained by the fact that a cleavage of methansulfonic acid from a small molecule of TREO generates significant changes in the molecular structure. Consequently, despite the common chemical origin, TREO, S,S-EBDM and S,S-DEB do not constitute a 'congeneric' series of compounds. We concluded that this might occur in other low-weight species, therefore

  4. Controlled Contamination of Epoxy Composites with PDMS and Removal by Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank; Ledesma, Rodolfo; Cataldo, Daniel; Lin, Yi; Wohl, Christopher; Gupta, Mool; Connell, John

    2016-01-01

    Surface preparation is critical to the performance of adhesively bonded composites. During manufacturing, minute quantities of mold release compounds are inevitably deposited on faying surfaces and may compromise bond performance. To ensure safety, mechanical fasteners and other crack arrest features must be installed in the bondlines of primary structures, which negates some advantages of adhesively bonded construction. Laser ablation is an automated, repeatable, and scalable process with high potential for the surface preparation of metals and composites in critical applications such as primary airframe structures. In this study, laser ablation is evaluated on composite surfaces for the removal of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a common mold release material. Composite panels were contaminated uniformly with PDMS film thicknesses as low as 6.0 nm as measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. Bond performance was assessed by mechanical testing using a 250 F cure, epoxy adhesive and compared with pre-bond surface inspection results. Water contact angle, optically stimulated electron emission, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy were used to characterize contaminated and laser ablated surfaces. The failure mode obtained from double cantilever beam tests correlated well with surface characterization data. The test results indicated that even low levels of PDMS were not completely removed by laser ablation.

  5. Mold: Cleanup and Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Cleanup and Remediation Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This ... CDC and EPA on mold cleanup, removal and remediation. Cleanup information for you and your family Homeowner’s ...

  6. Mechanical Properties of Epoxy and Its Carbon Fiber Composites Modified by Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive properties are commonly weak parts in structural application of fiber composites. Matrix modification may provide an effective way to improve compressive performance of the composites. In this work, the compressive property of epoxies (usually as matrices of fiber composites modified by different types of nanoparticles was firstly investigated for the following study on the compressive property of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Carbon fiber/epoxy composites were fabricated by vacuum assisted resin infusion molding (VARIM technique using stitched unidirectional carbon fabrics, with the matrices modified with nanosilica, halloysite, and liquid rubber. Testing results showed that the effect of different particle contents on the compressive property of fiber/epoxy composites was more obvious than that in epoxies. Both the compressive and flexural results showed that rigid nanoparticles (nanosilica and halloysite have evident strengthening effects on the compression and flexural responses of the carbon fiber composite laminates fabricated from fabrics.

  7. Static and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Graphene Oxide-Incorporated Woven Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Nitai Chandra; Chhetri, Suman; Kim, Nam Hoon; Murmu, Naresh Chandra; Samanta, Pranab; Kuila, Tapas

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates the synergistic effects of graphene oxide (GO) on the woven carbon fiber (CF)-reinforced epoxy composites. The GO nanofiller was incorporated into the epoxy resin with variations in the content, and the CF/epoxy composites were manufactured using a vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding process and then cured at 70 and 120 °C. An analysis of the mechanical properties of the GO (0.2 wt.%)/CF/epoxy composites showed an improvement in the tensile strength, Young's modulus, toughness, flexural strength and flexural modulus by 34, 20, 83, 55 and 31%, respectively, when compared to the CF/epoxy composite. The dynamic mechanical analysis of the composites exhibited an enhancement of 56, 114 and 22% in the storage modulus, loss modulus and damping capacity (tan δ), respectively, at its glass transition temperature. The fiber-matrix interaction was studied using a Cole-Cole plot analysis.

  8. Transferability of glass lens molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuki, Masahide

    2006-02-01

    Sphere lenses have been used for long time. But it is well known that sphere lenses theoretically have spherical aberration, coma and so on. And, aspheric lenses attract attention recently. Plastic lenses are molded easily with injection machines, and are relatively low cost. They are suitable for mass production. On the other hand, glass lenses have several excellent features such as high refractive index, heat resistance and so on. Many aspheric glass lenses came to be used for the latest digital camera and mobile phone camera module. It is very difficult to produce aspheric glass lenses by conventional process of curve generating and polishing. For the solution of this problem, Glass Molding Machine was developed and is spreading through the market. High precision mold is necessary to mold glass lenses with Glass Molding Machine. The mold core is ground or turned by high precision NC aspheric generator. To obtain higher transferability of the mold core, the function of the molding machine and the conditions of molding are very important. But because of high molding temperature, there are factors of thermal expansion and contraction of the mold and glass material. And it is hard to avoid the factors. In this session, I introduce following items. [1] Technology of glass molding and the machine is introduced. [2] The transferability of glass molding is analyzed with some data of glass lenses molded. [3] Compensation of molding shape error is discussed with examples.

  9. Injection molded self-cleaning surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Emil

    that are superhydrophobic based on topography rather than chemical compounds. Therefore, a novel method for fabricating superhydrophobic polymer surfaces with excellent water-repellant properties is developed. The method is based on microstructure fabrication and superposed nanostructures on silicon wafers. The nano......- and microstructured silicon is electroplated with nickel and the resulting nickel shim with inverse polarity is used in an injection molding process. A versatile injection molding process capable of producing different nano- and microstructures on areas larger than 10 cm2 is developed. Variotherm mold heating is used...... hierarchical structures with nanograss and holes. Water wetting tests are carried out using a pressure cell to control the water pressure. Microscopic wetting behavior of the structures is studied by optical transmission microscopy. Interestingly, it is found that the surface chemistry of the polymer changes...

  10. Preparation and Performance of Amphiphilic Random Copolymer Noncovalently Modified MWCNTs/Epoxy Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An amphiphilic random copolymer of polyglycidyl methacrylate-co-N-vinyl carbazole P(GMA-co-NVC was synthesized by free radical polymerization and was used to noncovalently modify multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The obtained P(GMA-co-NVC/MWCNTs was mixed with epoxy resin and used to reinforce epoxy resin. Polymer modified carbon nanotubes/epoxy resin composites were prepared by a casting molding method. Tensile test, electrical resistivity test and differential scanning calorimeter(DSC analysis were used to study the effect of polymer modified carbon nanotubes on the mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of epoxy resin. The results show that the epoxy composite reinforced with P(GMA-co-NVC/MWCNTs shows a remarkable enhancement in both tensile strength and elongation at break compared to either the pure epoxy or the pristine MWCNTs/epoxy composites. In addition, the electrical conductivity of epoxy is significantly improved and the volume resistivity decreases from 1014Ω·m to 106Ω·m with 0.25% mass fraction loading of P(GMA-co-NVC/MWCNTs. Moreover, glass transition temperature of the epoxy composite also increases from 144℃ to 149℃.

  11. Effect of Thermally Reduced Graphene Oxide on Mechanical Properties of Woven Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitai Chandra Adak

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRGO was incorporated as a reinforcing filler in the epoxy resin to investigate the effect on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber (CF/epoxy composites. At first, the epoxy matrix was modified by adding different wt % of TRGO from 0.05 to 0.4 wt % followed by the preparation of TRGO/CF/epoxy composites througha vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding process. The prepared TRGO was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM techniques. It was observed that the wrinkled structure of synthesized TRGO may be helpful to interlock with the epoxy resin and CF.The inter-laminar shear strength, in-plane fracture toughness and impact strength increased by ~67%, 62% and 93% at 0.2 wt % of TRGO loading in the CF/epoxy composites as compared to the CF reinforced epoxy. The mechanical properties of the hybrid composites decreased beyond the 0.2 wt % of TRGO incorporation in the epoxy resin. The fracture surfaces of the hybrid composites were studied by FE-SEM image analysis to investigate the synergistic effect of TRGO in the CF/epoxy composite. This study suggested that TRGO could be used asgood nanofiller to resist the matrix and fiber fracture.

  12. Dynamic of taking out molding parts at injection molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ragan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Most plastic parts used in automobile production are manufactured by injection molding. Their quality depends also on taking out molding and on the manipulators for it. Task of this contribution is to theoretically describe a transport of molding at taking out after injection molding in relation on its regulation. The following quantities are derived at it: the transition characteristic of the taking out system, the blocking diagram of taking out molding regulation, the amplitude and phase characteristic and the transition characteristic of action quantity at taking out molding regulation.

  13. Differentiation of Toxic Molds via Headspace SPME-GC/MS and Canine Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth G. Furton

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Indoor mold growth has recently become a concern in the legal world in regards to insurance litigation. Hazardous mold exposure to humans has been linked to many acute and chronic adverse health effects including death. As it grows, mold produces several types of primary and secondary metabolites, including microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs. Microbial volatile organic compound emission may be used as a preliminary indication of a mold infestation that is invisible to the unaided eye. The objective of the study is to identify the unique odor signatures of three species of molds, Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Stachybotrys chartarum by SPME-GC/MS analysis. Determining the compounds that are emitted by the selected species has made it possible to conduct validation studies of canine detection of these mold species through a series of field tests.

  14. High Cost/High Risk Components to Chalcogenide Molded Lens Model: Molding Preforms and Mold Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-10-05

    This brief report contains a critique of two key components of FiveFocal's cost model for glass compression molding of chalcogenide lenses for infrared applications. Molding preforms and mold technology have the greatest influence on the ultimate cost of the product and help determine the volumes needed to select glass molding over conventional single-point diamond turning or grinding and polishing. This brief report highlights key areas of both technologies with recommendations for further study.

  15. Desenvolvimento de PVC reforçado com fibras de vidro longas para fabricação de produtos moldados Long glass fiber reinforcement of PVC molding compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro H. Grizzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foi desenvolvido um método para reforçar PVC rígido com fibras de vidro longas através da incorporação pelo processo de recobrimento da fibra contínua com um composto de PVC plastificado. Posteriormente o filamento foi picotado para a formação de grânulos, com fibras de vidro já incorporadas, que foram misturados mecanicamente ao PVC rígido granulado para alimentação direta por moldagem. A moldagem por injeção direta foi realizada com sucesso não sendo necessário a compostagem prévia, o que foi considerado conveniente, pois reduziu as etapas de processamento da resina de PVC e que proporcionou, possivelmente, redução de custos, redução da degradação do comprimento médio das fibras de vidro e diminuição da possibilidade de degradação da resina de PVC. O reforçamento do PVC rígido com 20% em massa de fibras de vidro longas de comprimento inicial entre 13 e 14 mm resultou em adequadas propriedades mecânicas, bem superiores ao PVC rígido não reforçado. Os módulos (tração e flexão e a resistência ao impacto Charpy praticamente dobraram, mesmo com os compósitos apresentando grande quantidade de plastificante em sua formulação, que possibilita ao PVC ser utilizado em outras aplicações não antes possíveis como em peças técnicas de engenharia.In this paper, a method to reinforce rigid PVC with long glass fibers (LGF was developed through the incorporation of continuous glass fibers, as rovings, with plasticized vinyl matrix prepared by the wire coating technique. The plasticized vinyl rovings were pelletized. The pellets (13-14 mm were then blended to a granulated rigid PVC formulation and directly injection molded as testing specimens. The direct injection molding, eliminating the preliminary melt-compounding process, was achieved successfully, which was considered convenient because it reduced the number of processing steps, which allowed cutting expenses, reduced the deterioration of the

  16. Latent Hardeners for the Assembly of Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank; Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.; Mercado, Zoar; Galloway, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale composite structures are commonly joined by secondary bonding of molded-and-cured thermoset components. This approach may result in unpredictable joint strengths. In contrast, assemblies made by co-curing, although limited in size by the mold, result in stable structures, and are certifiable for commercial aviation because of structural continuity through the joints. Multifunctional epoxy resins were prepared that should produce fully-cured subcomponents with uncured joining surfaces, enabling them to be assembled by co-curing in a subsequent out-of-autoclave process. Aromatic diamines were protected by condensation with a ketone or aldehyde to form imines. Properties of the amine-cured epoxy were compared with those of commercially available thermosetting epoxy resins and rheology and thermal analysis were used to demonstrate the efficacy of imine protection. Optimum conditions to reverse the protecting chemistry in the solid state using moisture and acid catalysis were determined. Alternative chemistries were also investigated. For example, chain reaction depolymerization and photoinitiated catalysts would be expected to minimize liberation of volatile organic content upon deprotection and avoid residual reactive species that could damage the resin. Results from the analysis of protected and deprotected resins will be presented.

  17. Rubber molds for investment casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibtain, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the project is to investigate different types of molding rubbers used for investment casting. The level of shape complexity which can be achieved by using these rubber molds is also studied. It was almost impossible to make complex shapes molds using metal molds, in that cases rubber molds are very important because they arc flexible and give accurate and precise part dimensions. Turbine blades are hi-tech components with air-foil geometries that have close dimensional tolerances. They are made of super-alloys and manufactured by investment casting. The final blade profile depends upon the dimensional accuracy in each of the processing steps. In the present work experimental study for the production of high quality low cost castings of turbine blades using rubber molds and injected wax patterns is presented. Natural Rubber molds and wax patterns from these molds were made. Different types of molding rubbers were studied including natural rubber, silicone rubber and liquid silicone rubber. It was found that by using rubber molds we can make most complex shape with very less finishing required. The shrinkage was 12% as compared to original master pattern. Rubber molds were made using laboratory hot press. Three layers of rubber above and below the master pattern. After that vulcanization was done by giving temperature and pressure. (author)

  18. Method for compression molding of thermosetting plastics utilizing a temperature gradient across the plastic to cure the article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for compression molding of thermosetting plastics composition. Heat is applied to the compressed load in a mold cavity and adjusted to hold molding temperature at the interface of the cavity surface and the compressed compound to produce a thermal front. This thermal front advances into the evacuated compound at mean right angles to the compression load and toward a thermal fence formed at the opposite surface of the compressed compound.

  19. Chemorheology of in-mold coating for compression molded SMC applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seunghyun; Straus, Elliott J.; Castro, Jose M.

    2015-05-01

    In-mold coating (IMC) is applied to compression molded sheet molding compound (SMC) exterior automotive or truck body panels as an environmentally friendly alternative to make the surface conductive for subsequent electrostatic painting operations. The coating is a thermosetting liquid that when injected onto the surface of the part cures and bonds to provide a smooth conductive surface. In order to optimize the IMC process, it is essential to predict the time available for flow, that is the time before the thermosetting reaction starts (inhibition time) as well as the time when the coating has enough structural integrity so that the mold can be opened without damaging the part surface (cure time). To predict both the inhibition time and the cure time, it is critical to study the chemorheology of IMC. In this paper, we study the chemorheology for a typical commercial IMC system, and show its relevance to both the flow and cure time for the IMC stage during SMC compression molding.

  20. Extremely low temperature properties of epoxy GFRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadotani, Kenzo; Nagai, Matao; Aki, Fumitake.

    1983-01-01

    The examination of fiber-reinforced plastics, that is, plastics such as epoxy, polyester and polyimide reinforced with high strength fibers such as glass, carbon, boron and steel, for extremely low temperature use began from the fuel tanks of rockets. Therafter, the trial manufacture of superconducting generators and extremely low temperature transformers and the manufacture of superconducting magnets for nuclear fusion experimental setups became active, and high performance FRPs have been adopted, of which the extremely low temperature properties have been sufficiently grasped. Recently, the cryostats made of FRPs have been developed, fully utilizing such features of FRPs as high strength, high rigidity, non-magnetic material, insulation, low heat conductivity, light weight and the freedom of molding. In this paper, the mechanical properties at extremely low temperature of the plastic composite materials used as insulators and structural materials for extremely low temperature superconducting equipment is outlined, and in particular, glass fiber-reinforced epoxy laminates are described somewhat in detail. The fracture strain of GFRP at extremely low temperature is about 1.3 times as large as that at room temperature, but at extremely low temperature, clear cracking occurred at 40% of the fracture strain. The linear thermal contraction of GFRP showed remarkable anisotropy. (Kako, I.)

  1. Ceramic injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego

    1988-01-01

    Interest in making complex net-shape ceramic parts with good surface finishing and sharp tolerances without machining is a driving force for studying the injection molding technique. This method consists of softhening the ceramic material by means of adding some plastic and heating in order to inject the mixture under pressure into a relatively cold mold where solidification takes place. Essentially, it is the same process used in thermoplastic industry but, in the present case, the ceramic powder load ranges between 80 to 90 wt.%. This work shows results obtained from the fabrication of pieces of different ceramic materials (alumina, barium titanate ferrites, etc.) in a small scale, using equipments developed and constructed in the laboratory. (Author) [es

  2. Microstructure Reconstruction of Sheet Molding Composite Using a Random Chips Packing Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Tianyu; Xu, Hongyi; Chen, Wei

    2017-04-06

    Fiber-reinforced polymer composites are strong candidates for structural materials to replace steel and light alloys in lightweight vehicle design because of their low density and relatively high strength. In the integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) development of carbon fiber composites, microstructure reconstruction algorithms are needed to generate material microstructure representative volume element (RVE) based on the material processing information. The microstructure RVE reconstruction enables the material property prediction by finite element analysis (FEA)This paper presents an algorithm to reconstruct the microstructure of a chopped carbon fiber/epoxy laminate material system produced by compression molding, normally known as sheet molding compounds (SMC). The algorithm takes the result from material’s manufacturing process as inputs, such as the orientation tensor of fibers, the chopped fiber sheet geometry, and the fiber volume fraction. The chopped fiber sheets are treated as deformable rectangle chips and a random packing algorithm is developed to pack these chips into a square plate. The RVE is built in a layer-by-layer fashion until the desired number of lamina is reached, then a fine tuning process is applied to finalize the reconstruction. Compared to the previous methods, this new approach has the ability to model bended fibers by allowing limited amount of overlaps of rectangle chips. Furthermore, the method does not need SMC microstructure images, for which the image-based characterization techniques have not been mature enough, as inputs. Case studies are performed and the results show that the statistics of the reconstructed microstructures generated by the algorithm matches well with the target input parameters from processing.

  3. Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D [Albuquerque, NM; Irvine, Kevin [Huntsville, AL; Berger, Paul [Rome, NY; Comstock, Robert [Bel Air, MD

    2010-02-16

    Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

  4. Fabrication and mechanical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/epoxy nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, M.-K.; Hsieh, T.-H.; Tai, N.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have better physical and mechanical behavior than the traditional materials. In this study, the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were added to the epoxy resin as a reinforcement to fabricate MWNTs/epoxy nanocomposites. The pressure and temperature were applied to cure the MWNTs/epoxy compound by hot press method. Mechanical properties such as tensile strength, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio were measured. The effect of weight percentages of the MWNTs was investigated. Morphologies of the fracture surface of MWNTs/epoxy nanocomposites were observed by scanning electron microscope

  5. Enhanced Injection Molding Simulation of Advanced Injection Molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Zink

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The most time-consuming phase of the injection molding cycle is cooling. Cooling efficiency can be enhanced with the application of conformal cooling systems or high thermal conductivity copper molds. The conformal cooling channels are placed along the geometry of the injection-molded product, and thus they can extract more heat and heat removal is more uniform than in the case of conventional cooling systems. In the case of copper mold inserts, cooling channels are made by drilling and heat removal is facilitated by the high thermal conductivity coefficient of copper, which is several times that of steel. Designing optimal cooling systems is a complex process; a proper design requires injection molding simulations, but the accuracy of calculations depends on how precise the input parameters and boundary conditions are. In this study, three cooling circuit designs and three mold materials (Ampcoloy 940, 1.2311 (P20 steel, and MS1 steel were used and compared using numerical methods. The effect of different mold designs and materials on cooling efficiency were examined using calculated and measured results. The simulation model was adjusted to the measurement results by considering the joint gap between the mold inserts.

  6. Wear resistance and electrical properties of functionally graded epoxy-resin/silica composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rihan, Y. A.; Abd El-Bary, B.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper graded Silica/Epoxy composite fabricated by controlled mold filling to obtain a stepwise graded structure. The generated graded structure was controlled by the w 1% content of silica particulates of size range from (45 μm-250 μm). Microstructural characterization was conducted using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Electrical properties were conducted in High Voltage-Lab using Sphere-Plate Electrode System and Insulating resistance equipment s. Wear characteristics were studied using Block-on-Ring wear testing machine for the different layers of the graded silica/epoxy composites, The prepared materials are used as coating materials for the floors of chemical laboratories. (Author)

  7. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    Background. Epoxy resin monomers are strong skin sensitizers that are widely used in industrial sectors. In Denmark, the law stipulates that workers must undergo a course on safe handling of epoxy resins prior to occupational exposure, but the effectiveness of this initiative is largely unknown...... in an educational programme. Conclusion. The 1% prevalence of epoxy resin contact allergy is equivalent to reports from other countries. The high occurrence of epoxy resin exposure at work, and the limited use of protective measures, indicate that reinforcement of the law is required....

  8. Bio-Based Aromatic Epoxy Monomers for Thermoset Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Ng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of polymers from renewable resources is a burning issue that is actively investigated. Polyepoxide networks constitute a major class of thermosetting polymers and are extensively used as coatings, electronic materials, adhesives. Owing to their outstanding mechanical and electrical properties, chemical resistance, adhesion, and minimal shrinkage after curing, they are used in structural applications as well. Most of these thermosets are industrially manufactured from bisphenol A (BPA, a substance that was initially synthesized as a chemical estrogen. The awareness on BPA toxicity combined with the limited availability and volatile cost of fossil resources and the non-recyclability of thermosets implies necessary changes in the field of epoxy networks. Thus, substitution of BPA has witnessed an increasing number of studies both from the academic and industrial sides. This review proposes to give an overview of the reported aromatic multifunctional epoxide building blocks synthesized from biomass or from molecules that could be obtained from transformed biomass. After a reminder of the main glycidylation routes and mechanisms and the recent knowledge on BPA toxicity and legal issues, this review will provide a brief description of the main natural sources of aromatic molecules. The different epoxy prepolymers will then be organized from simple, mono-aromatic di-epoxy, to mono-aromatic poly-epoxy, to di-aromatic di-epoxy compounds, and finally to derivatives possessing numerous aromatic rings and epoxy groups.

  9. Radiation processing of carbon fiber-acrylated epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.; Saunders, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composites, specifically carbon fiber reinforced epoxies, are being used for a variety of demanding structural applications, primarily because of their high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios, corrosion resistance, and damage tolerance characteristics. For these composites the key advantages of using electron beam (EB), rather than thermal curing, are curing at ambient temperature, reduced curing times for individual components, improved resin stability, fewer volatiles, and better control of the profile of energy absorption. Epoxy compounds do, however, have to be modified to make them EB curable. The electron beam penetration limit, a function of beam energy, product density, and the thickness of any container required, must also be examined when considering EB processing. Research is being conducted to develop EB-curable carbon fiber-acrylated epoxy composites. The tensile properties of these laminates are comparable to those of thermally cured epoxy laminates. Research is continuing to develop suitable resin formulations and coupling agents to optimize the mechanical properties of EB-cured carbon fiber laminates. In this chapter the EB curing of epoxies, processing considerations, and typical properties of EB-cured carbon fiber-acrylated epoxy laminates are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Performance of molded plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gen, N.S.; Leman, V.E.; Solomonov, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of molded plastic scintillators is studied. The plastic scintillators studied were formed by transfer molding and intrusion from a scintillation composition consisting of polystyrene and a standard system of luminescent additives: 2 mass % of paraterphenyl + 0.06 mass % 1,4-di-/2-[5-phenyloxazoyly]/benzene and a plasticizer. The combined effect of mechanical load and temperature was studied. The effect of radiation on molded plastic scintillators was studied using gamma radiation from a 60 Co source. The studies show that the main operating characteristics of molded plastic scintillators are on a par with those of polymerized plastic scintillators. At the same time, molded plastic scintillators are superior in thermal stability at temperatures below the glass transition temperature and with respect to their working temperature range

  11. Electrically Conductive Epoxy Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive adhesives are widely used in electronic packaging applications such as die attachment and solderless interconnections, component repair, display interconnections, and heat dissipation. The effects of film thickness as functions of filler volume fraction, conductive filler size, shape, as well as uncured adhesive matrix viscosity on the electrical conduction behavior of epoxy-based adhesives are presented in this work. For this purpose, epoxy-based adhesives were prepared using conductive fillers of different size, shape, and types, including Ni powder, flakes, and filaments, Ag powder, and Cu powder. The filaments were 20 μm in diameter, and 160 or 260 μm in length. HCl and H3PO4 acid solutions were used to etch and remove the surface oxide layers from the fillers. The plane resistance of filled adhesive films was measured using the four-point method. In all cases of conductive filler addition, the planar resistivity levels for the composite adhesive films increased when the film thickness was reduced. The shape of resistivity-thickness curves was negative exponential decaying type and was modeled using a mathematical relation. The relationships between the conductive film resistivities and the filler volume fractions were also derived mathematically based on the experimental data. Thus, the effects of surface treatment of filler particles, the type, size, shape of fillers, and the uncured epoxy viscosity could be included empirically by using these mathematical relations based on the experimental data. By utilizing the relations we proposed to model thickness-dependent and volume fraction-dependent conduction behaviors separately, we were able to describe the combined and coupled volume fraction-film thickness relationship mathematically based on our experimental data.

  12. Aliphatic amine cured PDMS–epoxy interpenetrating network ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Tg, heat-distortion temperature and reduced the percentage weight loss with ... The siliconized epoxy IPN, with better impact and thermal resistance, ... However, these materials also deteriorate ... the method of compounding remains the state of the art. ... geneity and to ascertain any chemical change during storage.

  13. Occupational exposure to epoxy resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Kersting, K.

    2014-01-01

    Products based on epoxy resins as a binder have become popular in various settings, among which the construction industry and in windmill blade production, as a result of their excellent technical properties. However, due to the same properties epoxy products are a notorious cause of allergic skin

  14. Prototyping of radially oriented piezoelectric ceramic-polymer tube composites using fused deposition and lost mold processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Thomas Francis

    Piezoelectric tube composite hydrophones of 3-1, 3-2, and 2-2 connectivity were developed using Fused Deposition (FD) and lost mold processing (LMP). In this work, a new series of thermoplastic binder formulations, named the ECG series, were developed for the FD process. The ECG-9 formulation exhibits mechanical, thermal, and rheological properties suitable for the Fused Deposition of functional lead zirconate titanate ceramic devices. This binder consists of 100 parts (by weight) Vestoplast 408, 20 parts Escorez 2520, 15 parts Vestowax A-227, and 5 parts Indopol H-1500. Oleic acid, oleyl alcohol, stearic acid, and stearyl alcohol (in toluene) were tested for use as a dispersant in the PZT/ECG-9 system. It was found that stearic acid adsorbs the most onto PZT powder, adsorbing 8.1 mg/m2. Using stearic acid, solutions of increasing concentration (5.0--50.0 g/l) were measured for adsorption. It was found that 30.0 g/l is the minimum concentration necessary for optimum surface coverage. The surfactant-coated powder was compounded with ECG-9 binder to create a 54 vol.% mix. The mix was extruded using a single screw extrusion apparatus into continuous lengths (>30 m) of 1.78 mm diameter filament. Fused Deposition was used to create composite designs of 3-1, 3-2, and 2-2 connectivity. After sintering, samples exhibit a sintered density greater than 97%. Sanders Prototyping (SPI) was used to manufacture molds for use with LMP techniques. Molds of 3-1, 3-2, and 2-2 connectivity were developed. The molds were infiltrated with a 55 vol.% aqueous based PZT slurry. The parts were subjected to a binder decomposition cycle, followed by sintering. Resultant samples were highly variable due to random macro-pores present in the samples after sintering. The resultant preforms were embedded in epoxy, and polished to dimensions of 8.0 mm inside diameter (ID), 14.0 mm outside diameter (OD), and 10.0 mm length (l) the OD and l dimensions are accurate to +/--2%, while the ID is accurate

  15. Three-Dimensional Graphene Foam Induces Multifunctionality in Epoxy Nanocomposites by Simultaneous Improvement in Mechanical, Thermal, and Electrical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embrey, Leslie; Nautiyal, Pranjal; Loganathan, Archana; Idowu, Adeyinka; Boesl, Benjamin; Agarwal, Arvind

    2017-11-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) macroporous graphene foam based multifunctional epoxy composites are developed in this study. Facile dip-coating and mold-casting techniques are employed to engineer microstructures with tailorable thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties. These processing techniques allow capillarity-induced equilibrium filling of graphene foam branches, creating epoxy/graphene interfaces with minimal separation. Addition of 2 wt % graphene foam enhances the glass transition temperature of epoxy from 106 to 162 °C, improving the thermal stability of the polymer composite. Graphene foam aids in load-bearing, increasing the ultimate tensile strength by 12% by merely 0.13 wt % graphene foam in an epoxy matrix. Digital image correlation (DIC) analysis revealed that the graphene foam cells restrict and confine the deformation of the polymer matrix, thereby enhancing the load-bearing capability of the composite. Addition of 0.6 wt % graphene foam also enhances the flexural strength of the pure epoxy by 10%. A 3D network of graphene branches is found to suppress and deflect the cracks, arresting mechanical failure. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) of the composites demonstrated their vibration damping capability, as the loss tangent (tan δ) jumps from 0.1 for the pure epoxy to 0.24 for ∼2 wt % graphene foam-epoxy composite. Graphene foam branches also provide seamless pathways for electron transfer, which induces electrical conductivity exceeding 450 S/m in an otherwise insulator epoxy matrix. The epoxy-graphene foam composite exhibits a gauge factor as high as 4.1, which is twice the typical gauge factor for the most common metals. Simultaneous improvement in thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties of epoxy due to 3D graphene foam makes epoxy-graphene foam composite a promising lightweight and multifunctional material for aiding load-bearing, electrical transport, and motion sensing in aerospace, automotive, robotics, and smart device structures.

  16. Leach and mold resistance of essential oil metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2011-01-01

    Purified primary metabolites from essential oils were previously shown to be bioactive inhibitors of mold fungi on unleached Southern pine sapwood, either alone or in synergy with a second metabolite. This study evaluated the leachability of these compounds in Southern pine that was either dip- or vacuum-treated. Following laboratory leach tests, specimens were...

  17. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  18. Rapid control of mold temperature during injection molding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liparoti, Sara; Titomanlio, Giuseppe [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Hunag, Tsang Min; Cakmak, Mukerrem [Department of Polymer Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States); Sorrentino, Andrea [Institute for Polymers, Composite and Biomaterials (IPCB) - CNR, P. Enrico Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2015-05-22

    The control of mold surface temperature is an important factor that determines surface morphology and its dimension in thickness direction. It can also affect the frozen molecular orientation and the mold surface replicability in injection molded products. In this work, thin thermally active films were used to quickly control the mold surface temperature. In particular, an active high electrical conductivity carbon black loaded polyimide composites sandwiched between two insulating thin polymeric layers was used to condition the mold surface. By controlling the heating time, it was possible to control precisely the temporal variation of the mold temperature surface during the entire cycle. The surface heating rate was about 40°C/s and upon contact with the polymer the surface temperature decreased back to 40°C within about 5 s; the overall cycle time increased only slightly. The effect on cross section sample morphology of samples of iPP were analyzed and discussed on the basis of the recorded temperature evolution.

  19. Functional nanostructures on injection molded plastic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Alicia Charlotte; Søgaard, Emil; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard

    Nanotechnology can be used to make inexpensive plastic parts with functional surfaces. The plastic parts can be molded using a standard injection molding process. The nanostructures are directly transferred from the surface of the molding tool to the surface of the molded plastic part during...

  20. Injection Molding of High Aspect Ratio Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matschuk, Maria; Larsen, Niels Bent

    We present a process for injection molding of 40 nm wide and >100 nm high pillars (pitch: 200 nm). We explored the effects of mold coatings and injection molding conditions on the replication quality of nanostructures in cyclic olefin copolymer. We found that optimization of molding parameters...

  1. White mold of Jerusalem artichoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is a Native American food plant closely related to the common sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Tubers of Jerusalem artichoke are increasingly available in retail grocery outlets. White mold (Sclerotinia stem rot), caused by the fungus, Sclerotinia sclerotioru...

  2. Molded polymer solar water heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.

    2004-11-09

    A solar water heater has a rotationally-molded water box and a glazing subassembly disposed over the water box that enhances solar gain and provides an insulating air space between the outside environment and the water box. When used with a pressurized water system, an internal heat exchanger is integrally molded within the water box. Mounting and connection hardware is included to provide a rapid and secure method of installation.

  3. Epoxy-based carbon nanotubes reinforced composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available of the three major epoxy resin producers worldwide [May, 1987]. Epoxy resin is most commonly used as a matrix for advanced composites due to their superior thermal, mechanical and electrical properties; dimensional stability and chemical resistance. Epoxy... and modifiers to create products with an almost unlimited range and variety of performance properties [The epoxy book, 2000]. Epoxy resins are widely used as high-grade synthetic resins, for example, in the electronics, aeronautics and astronautic industries...

  4. Butyl Rubber: Compound Development and Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sloan, James

    2000-01-01

    ...), to develop the standard butyl rubber compound. The strategy of this work was to compound- and compression-mold high-quality, uniform butyl rubber experimental sheets and to evaluate their cure properties, mechanical properties...

  5. Stronger Fire-Resistant Epoxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlen, George M.; Parker, John A.; Kumar, Devendra

    1988-01-01

    New curing agent improves mechanical properties and works at lower temperature. Use of aminophenoxycyclotriphosphazene curing agents yields stronger, more heat- and fire-resistant epoxy resins. Used with solvent if necessary for coating fabrics or casting films.

  6. Flame resistant hybrid epoxy composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Śliwa, R.; Oleksy, M.; Heneczkowski, M.; Oliwa, R.; Budzik, G.; Kozik, B.; Markowska, O.; Strachota, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 10 (2015), s. 667-670 ISSN 0032-2725 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : epoxy resin * quaternary phosphonium salts * modified bentonite Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.718, year: 2015

  7. Effect of Alkyl Phenol from Cashew Nutshell Liquid on Mechanical and Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Panda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A phenalkamine made from the reaction of alkyl phenol from cashew nutshell liquid (CSNL and polyamine was added at three different weight percentages (30%, 40%, and 50% as a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA epoxy hardener. This curing agent was compared to a traditional polyamine epoxy hardener. It was observed that an increase in phenalkamine concentration resulted in considerable improvement to impact strength and elongation, which ultimately translated to better wear resistance of the cured epoxy compound. Lancaster–Ratner correlations between mechanical and wear resistance properties were found to be linear. Optical microscope observations were used to understand the wear mechanisms of the cured epoxy materials.

  8. Mathematical modeling of the in-mold coating process for injection-molded thermoplastic parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu

    In-Mold Coating (IMC) has been successfully used for many years for exterior body panels made from compression molded Sheet Molding Compound (SMC). The coating material is a single component reactive fluid, designed to improve the surface quality of SMC moldings in terms of functional and cosmetic properties. When injected onto a cured SMC part, IMC cures and bonds to provide a pain-like surface. Because of its distinct advantages, IMC is being considered for application to injection molded thermoplastic parts. For a successful in mold coating operation, there are two key issues related to the flow of the coating. First, the injection nozzle should be located such that the thermoplastic substrate is totally covered and the potential for air trapping is minimized. The selected location should be cosmetically acceptable since it most likely will leave a mark on the coated surface. The nozzle location also needs to be accessible for easy of maintenance. Secondly, the hydraulic force generated by the coating injection pressure should not exceed the available clamping tonnage. If the clamping force is exceeded, coating leakage will occur. In this study, mathematical models for IMC flow on the compressible thermoplastic substrate have been developed. Finite Difference Method (FDM) is first used to solve the 1 dimensional (1D) IMC flow problem. In order to investigate the application of Control Volume based Finite Element Method (CV/FEM) to more complicated two dimensional IMC flow, that method is first evaluated by solving the 1D IMC flow problem. An analytical solution, which can be obtained when a linear relationship between the coating thickness and coating injection pressure is assumed, is used to verify the numerical results. The mathematical models for the 2 dimensional (2D) IMC flow are based on the generalized Hele-Shaw approximation. It has been found experimentally that the power law viscosity model adequately predicts the rheological behavior of the coating

  9. Effect of thermally reduced graphene oxide on dynamic mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Nitai Chandra; Chhetri, Suman; Murmu, Naresh Chandra; Samanta, Pranab; Kuila, Tapas

    2018-03-01

    The Carbon fiber (CF)/epoxy composites are being used in the automotive and aerospace industries owing to their high specific mechanical strength to weight ratio compared to the other conventional metal and alloys. However, the low interfacial adhesion between fiber and polymer matrix results the inter-laminar fracture of the composites. Effects of different carbonaceous nanomaterials i.e., carbon nanotubes (CNT), graphene nanosheets (GNPs), graphene oxide (GO) etc. on the static mechanical properties of the composites were investigated in detail. Only a few works focused on the improvement of the dynamic mechanical of the CF/epoxy composites. Herein, the effect of thermally reduced grapheme oxide (TRGO) on the dynamic mechanical properties of the CF/epoxy composites was investigated. At first, GO was synthesized using modified Hummers method and then reduced the synthesized GO inside a vacuum oven at 800 °C for 5 min. The prepared TRGO was dispersed in the epoxy resin to modify the epoxy matrix. Then, a number of TRGO/CF/epoxy laminates were manufactured incorporating different wt% of TRGO by vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) technique. The developed laminates were cured at room temperature for 24 h and then post cured at 120 °C for 2 h. The dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA 8000 Perkin Elmer) was used to examine the dynamic mechanical properties of the TRGO/CF/epoxy composites according to ASTM D7028. The dimension of the specimen was 44×10×2.4 mm3 for the DMA test. This test was carried out under flexural loading mode (duel cantilever) at a frequency of 1 Hz and amplitude of 50 μm. The temperature was ramped from 30 to 200 °C with a heating rate of 5 °C min-1. The dynamic mechanical analysis of the 0.2 wt% TRGO incorporated CF/epoxy composites showed ~ 96% enhancement in storage modulus and ~ 12 °C increments in glass transition temperature (Tg) compared to the base CF/epoxy composites. The fiber-matrix interaction was studied by Cole

  10. Evaluation of mechanical properties of four different carbon/epoxy composites used in aeronautical field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Maria Faulstich de Paiva

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Four families of carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFRC used in aeronautical industry were evaluated by flexural and interlaminar shear tests. It is also characterized three families of non-conditioned and conditioned CFRC by compression test. The composites were obtained by hand lay-up process in autoclave by using prepregs based on epoxy matrices (F155 and F584 and carbon fiber fabric reinforcements (PW-"Plain Weave" and 8HS-"Eight Harness Satin". The F155-epoxy matrix was cured at 121 °C and the F584-epoxy type at 177 °C. After molding, the laminates were cut in specimens attending the ASTM D790 for the flexural test, the ASTM D2344 for the interlaminar shear test (ILSS and the ASTM D3410 for the compressive test. The compressive tests were performed for testing the specimens before and after hygrothermal conditioning. The results show that the F584-epoxy matrix laminates present higher mechanical properties when compared to the F155-epoxy ones. The shear-tested samples observed by scanning electron microscopy and that ones tested in flexural, analyzed by stereoscopy, revealed that the fractured surfaces present typical aspects. The compressive results show that the hygrothermal conditioning caused the decrease of the compressive strength in, approximately, 8-20% depending on the laminate type. The failure modes of the tested specimens were evaluated showing good agreement with the literature.

  11. Synthesis of polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin J

    2014-10-07

    The synthesis of a polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy uses a one-step cure by applying an external stimulus to release the acid from the polyoxometalate and thereby catalyze the cure reaction of the epoxy resin. Such polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites afford the cured epoxy unique properties imparted by the intrinsic properties of the polyoxometalate. For example, polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites can be used as corrosion resistant epoxy coatings, for encapsulation of electronics with improved dielectric properties, and for structural applications with improved mechanical properties.

  12. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Long-Chain 3,4-Epoxy-2-alkanones

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, William F.

    2010-01-01

    3,4-Epoxy-2-dodecanone, a major component in the preorbital gland of the African grey duiker (Sylvicapra grimmia), showed antimicrobial activity in preliminary tests. The C11 to C17 homologues of this compound were prepared and their activity against several pathogenic dermal bacteria and fungi was tested. 3,4-Epoxy-2-dodecanone and 3,4-epoxy-2-tridecanone inhibited the growth of Trichophyton mentagrophytes at 25 μg/mL. Moderate inhibition of the growth of the bacteria Propionibacterium acnes...

  13. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of long-chain 3,4-Epoxy-2-alkanones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William F

    2010-01-01

    3,4-Epoxy-2-dodecanone, a major component in the preorbital gland of the African grey duiker (Sylvicapra grimmia), showed antimicrobial activity in preliminary tests. The C(11) to C(17) homologues of this compound were prepared and their activity against several pathogenic dermal bacteria and fungi was tested. 3,4-Epoxy-2-dodecanone and 3,4-epoxy-2-tridecanone inhibited the growth of Trichophyton mentagrophytes at 25 Îg/mL. Moderate inhibition of the growth of the bacteria Propionibacterium acnes and the lipophilic yeast, Pityrosporum ovale, was seen for several of the homologues.

  14. Process for molding improved polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Masanori; Aine, Norio; Nakada, Shinsaku.

    1962-01-01

    Various configurations in size and shape of polyethylene are molded by: (a) irradiating powders of polyethylene with ionizing radiations in the presence of oxygen to the extent of producing substantially no cross-linking among the molecules of polyethylene, and thereafter (b) molding the thus irradiated powders of polyethylene at 100-250 0 C to cross-link the molding. In this process, a uniform and desirable degree of cross-linking and any desirable configuration are provided for the polyethylene molding. Any extruder and any molding machine producing heat can be employed in this process. In embodiments, the radiation dose units may preferably be 1x10 6 to 1.5x10 7 roentgen. The ionizing radiations may be X-rays, gamma-rays or electron beams, but preferably gamma-rays. The preheating prior to molding may be effected in vacuum, in inert gas, or in oxygen at 100-250 0 C, but preferably in oxygen at 100 0 C. In an example, a polyethylene powder of 100 mesh was irradiated with gamma-rays from a Co-60 source with a dose of 3.1x10 6 r at a dose rate of 5.5x10 4 r/hr in air, then preheated in air at 80 0 C for 1 hr, and finally extruded to form a rod of 5 mm phi at 200 0 C. max. The degree of product cross-linking was 0% after irradiation in step (a), and 38% after heating in step (b). (Iwakiri, K.)

  15. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  16. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starbuck, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified

  17. Facts about Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... there is moisture from water damage, excessive humidity, water leaks, condensation, water infiltration, or flooding. Constant moisture is ... visible mold. The conditions causing mold (such as water leaks, condensation, infiltration, or flooding) should be corrected to ...

  18. Silane based coating of aluminium mold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    having at least one closed cavity is provided, at least one surface of the at least one cavity being an aluminium surface coated with a silane based coating layer. The silane based anti-stiction coating improves the anti-stiction properties of the mold which may allow for molding and demolding...... of structures which would otherwise be difficult to mold. The resistance of the coated aluminium mold is significantly improved by applying a silane-based coating layer....

  19. Mold production for polymer optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerret, Rainer; Raab, Jonas; Speich, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The fields of application for polymer optics are huge and thus the need for polymer optics is steadily growing. Most polymer optics are produced in high numbers by injection molding. Therefore molds and dies that fulfill special requirements are needed. Polishing is usually the last process in the common process chain for production of molds for polymer optics. Usually this process step is done manually by experienced polishers. Due to the small number of skilled professionals and health problems because of the monotonous work the idea was to support or probably supersede manual polishing. Polishing using an industrial robot as movement system enables totally new possibilities in automated polishing. This work focuses on the surface generation with a newly designed polishing setup and on the code generation for the robot movement. The process starts on ground surfaces and with different tools and polishing agents surfaces that fulfill the requirements for injection molding of optics can be achieved. To achieve this the attention has to be focused not only on the process itself but also on tool path generation. A proprietary software developed in the Centre for Optical Technologies in Aalen University allows the tool path generation on almost any surface. This allows the usage of the newly developed polishing processes on different surfaces and enables an easy adaption. Details of process and software development will be presented as well as results from different polishing tests on different surfaces.

  20. Environmental Sustainability and Mold Hygiene in Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haoxiang; Ng, Tsz Wai; Wong, Jonathan Wc; Lai, Ka Man

    2018-04-04

    Environmental sustainability is one of the key issues in building management. In Hong Kong, one of the initiatives is to reduce the operation hours of air-conditioning in buildings to cut down energy consumption. In this study, we reported a mold contamination case in a newly refurbished laboratory, in which the air-conditioner was switched from 24- to 18-h mode after refurbishment. In order to prevent mold recurrence, the air-conditioner was switched back to 24-h mode in the laboratory. During the mold investigation, visible mold patches in the laboratory were searched and then cultured, counted and identified. Building and environmental conditions were recorded, and used to deduce different causes of mold contamination. Eight contaminated sites including a wall, a bench, some metal and plastic surfaces and seven types of molds including two Cladosporium spp., two Aspergillus spp., one Rhizopus sp., one Trichoderma sp., and one Tritirachium sp. were identified. Cladosporium spp. were the most abundant and frequently found molds in the laboratory. The contaminated areas could have one to five different species on them. Based on the mold and environmental conditions, several scenarios causing the mold contamination were deduced, and different mold control measures were discussed to compare them with the current solution of using 24-h air-conditioning to control mold growth. This study highlights the importance of mold hygiene in sustainable building management.

  1. Environmental Sustainability and Mold Hygiene in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoxiang Wu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental sustainability is one of the key issues in building management. In Hong Kong, one of the initiatives is to reduce the operation hours of air-conditioning in buildings to cut down energy consumption. In this study, we reported a mold contamination case in a newly refurbished laboratory, in which the air-conditioner was switched from 24- to 18-h mode after refurbishment. In order to prevent mold recurrence, the air-conditioner was switched back to 24-h mode in the laboratory. During the mold investigation, visible mold patches in the laboratory were searched and then cultured, counted and identified. Building and environmental conditions were recorded, and used to deduce different causes of mold contamination. Eight contaminated sites including a wall, a bench, some metal and plastic surfaces and seven types of molds including two Cladosporium spp., two Aspergillus spp., one Rhizopus sp., one Trichoderma sp., and one Tritirachium sp. were identified. Cladosporium spp. were the most abundant and frequently found molds in the laboratory. The contaminated areas could have one to five different species on them. Based on the mold and environmental conditions, several scenarios causing the mold contamination were deduced, and different mold control measures were discussed to compare them with the current solution of using 24-h air-conditioning to control mold growth. This study highlights the importance of mold hygiene in sustainable building management.

  2. Mold inhibition on unseasoned southern pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2003-01-01

    Concerns about indoor air quality due to mold growth have increased dramatically in the United States. In the absence of moisture management, fungicides need to be developed for indoor use to control mold establishment. An ideal fungicide for prevention of indoor mold growth on wood-based materials needs to specifically prevent spore germination and provide long-term...

  3. The Influence of Hydroxylated Carbon Nanotubes on Epoxy Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoxia Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxylated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs/epoxy resin nanocomposites were prepared with ultrasonic dispersion and casting molding. The effect of hydroxylated MWNTs content on reactive activity of composites is discussed. Then the flexural and electrical properties were studied. Transmission electron microscope was employed to characterize the microstructure of nanocomposites. As a result, the reactive activity of nanocomposites obtained increases with the increasing content of MWNTs. When MWNTs content of the composites is 1 wt%, as compared to neat resin, the flexural strength increases from 143 Mpa to 156 MPa, the modulus increases from 3563 Mpa to 3691 MPa, and the volume and surface resistance of nanocomposites decrease by two orders of magnitude, respectively.

  4. Mechanical behavior of nanocellulose coated jute/green epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, A.; Militký, J.; Ali, A.; Usman Javed, M.

    2017-10-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of nanocellulose coating on the mechanical behavior of jute/green epoxy composites. Cellulose was purified from waste jute fibers, converted to nanocellulose by acid hydrolysis and subsequently 3, 5 and 10 wt % of nanocellulose suspensions were coated over woven jute reinforcement. The composites were prepared by hand layup and compression molding technique. The surface topologies of treated jute fibers, jute cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), nanocellulose coated jute fabrics and fractured surfaces of composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The prepared composites were evaluated for tensile, flexural, fatigue and fracture toughness properties. The results revealed the improvement in tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus, fatigue life and fracture toughness of composites with the increase in concentration of nanocellulose coating over jute reinforcement except the decrease in tensile strength.

  5. Epoxy-based carbon nanotubes reinforced composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available of the three major epoxy resin producers worldwide [May, 1987]. Epoxy resin is most commonly used as a matrix for advanced composites due to their superior thermal, mechanical and electrical properties; dimensional stability and chemical resistance. Epoxy... are electrical insulators, and the widespread use of the epoxy resins for many high-performance applications is constrained because of their inherent brittleness, delamination and fracture toughness limitations. There were quite a few approaches to enhance...

  6. Surface Replication of Molded Products with Microneedle Features in Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiumi, Kazuyasu; Takayama, Tetsuo; Ito, Hiroshi; Inou, Akinori

    Micro-molding of microneedle features was conducted using several injection-molding techniques. Injection compression molding and injection molding were performed with supercritical carbon dioxide fluid and with or without vacuum processing inside the mold cavity. Effects of process parameters on processability and surface replication of the molded parts were evaluated. The height replication ratio for microneedles was improved using injection compression molding. At a shorter compression stroke, the needle height was improved, and the influence of compression delay time was also small. Moreover, the effects of vacuum processing inside the mold cavity under the filling process were slight. The height replication ratio for microneedles showed the highest values using injection molding using supercritical carbon dioxide fluid with vacuum inside the mold cavity.

  7. Isolation and Identification of Contaminant Molds on Pumpkin Candy From Sumbawa Besar

    OpenAIRE

    Henny Nurul Khasanah, Utami Sri Hastuti, Linda Hapsari

    2015-01-01

    Pumpkin candy is a sort of pumpkin fruit processed products that is typical food from Sumbawa Besar. Pumpkin candy contains carbohydrates, fats, protein, fiber, and minerals. The mold can contaminate and degradate the pumpkin candy compounds, thus lowering the quality of the pumpkins candy. The purpose of this research were: 1) to identify the species of contaminant mold on candy pumpkin; 2) to determining the most dominant species on the pumpkins candy. The research were conducted at the Mic...

  8. Implementation of Molding Constraints in Topology Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marx, S.; Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2009-01-01

    In many cases the topology optimization method yield inadmissible solutions in respect to a particular manufacturing process, e.g. injection molding. In the present work it is chosen to focus on the most common injection molding parameters/factors determining the quality of the mold geometry, i.......e. uniform thickness, filling of the die and ejection of the molded item, i.e. extrusion. The mentioned injection mold parameters/factors are introduced in the topology optimization by defining a centerline of the initial domain and then penalize elements in respect to the distance to the defined centerline...

  9. Microstructured metal molds fabricated via investment casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, Andrew H; King, William P

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an investment casting process to produce aluminum molds having integrated microstructures. Unlike conventional micromolding tools, the aluminum mold was large and had complex curved surfaces. The aluminum was cast from curved microstructured ceramic molds which were themselves cast from curved microstructured rubber. The aluminum microstructures had an aspect ratio of 1:1 and sizes ranging from 25 to 50 µm. Many structures were successfully cast into the aluminum with excellent replication fidelity, including circular, square and triangular holes. We demonstrate molding of large, curved surfaces having surface microstructures using the aluminum mold.

  10. Effective Control of Molds Using a Combination of Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Auyeung

    Full Text Available Molds are filamentous fungi able to grow on a variety of surfaces, including constructed surfaces, food, rotten organic matter, and humid places. Mold growth is characterized by having an unpleasant odor in enclosed or non-ventilated places and a non-aesthetic appearance. They represent a health concern because of their ability to produce and release mycotoxins, compounds that are toxic to animals and humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate commercial nanoparticles (NPs that can be used as an additive in coatings and paints to effectively control the growth of harmful molds. Four different NPs were screened for their antifungal activities against the mycotoxin producing mold strains Aspergillus flavus and A. fumigatus. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of the NPs were determined in broth media, whereas an agar diffusion test was used to assess the antimold activity on acrylic- and water-based paints. The cytotoxic activity and the inflammatory response of the NPs were also evaluated using the established human derived macrophage cell line THP-1. Results showed that a combination of mix metallic- and ZnO-NPs (50:10 μg/mL effectively inhibited the fungal growth when exposed to fluorescent light. Neither cytotoxic effect nor inflammatory responses were recorded, suggesting that this combination can be safely used in humid or non-ventilated environments without any health concerns.

  11. Studies on mechanical, thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of untreated (raw) and treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Kumar, S.M.; Duraibabu, D.; Subramanian, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • UTCSE and TCSE composites have been fabricated by compression molding technique. • The prepared specimens were characterized by FTIR, DMA, TGA and SEM techniques. • TCSE composite showed higher mechanical properties compared to UTCSE composite. • DMA showed that TCSE composite exhibited higher storage modulus than UTCSE composite. • TCSE composite showed higher thermal stability than UTCSE composite. - Abstract: The untreated (raw) coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy (UTCSE) composite and treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy (TCSE) composite have been fabricated using hand layup followed by compression molding technique. The prepared specimens were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The prepared specimens are cut as per ASTM Standards to measure tensile, flexural and impact strengths by using universal testing machine and izod impact tester respectively. The treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composite (TCSE) posses higher mechanical strength and thermal stability compared to untreated (raw) coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composite (UTCSE). In the SEM fracture analysis, TCSE composite showed better fiber–matrix bonding and absence of voids compared to UTCSE composite

  12. Sensibilización a bisfenol A y bisfenol F en trabajadores expuestos a resinas epoxi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jiménez Bajo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Las aplicaciones de las diferentes resinas epoxi basadas en bisfenol A y F son extensas. Las resinas epoxi basadas en bisfenol F son más nuevas y resistentes que las de bisfenol A, y ambas son causa conocida de dermatitis de contacto alérgica. Se estudian 39 casos de sensibilización a resinas epoxi en los últimos 5 años. Los resultados obtenidos son: prevalencia de sensibilización a resinas epoxi entre los pacientes estudiados del 2%, 27 varones y 8 mujeres, con una edad media de 42.77, un período de medio sensibilización de 23,8 meses. La sensibilización a bisfenol F desde que se incluye para las pruebas del parche en la batería de resinas epoxi es del 100% para los casos sensibilizados a la resina. La localización mayoritaria se dio en las manos, con una relevancia actual del 84%. Se recomendó un cambio de puesto en el trabajo al 46% de estos pacientes. El aumento de la sensibilización encontrada a bisfenol F puede explicarse por una sensibilización concomitante con bisfenol A, una declaración incorrecta de la composición de la resina o una reactividad cruzada de ambos.The applications of epoxy resins based on bisphenol A and F are extensive. Epoxy resins based on bisphenol F are new and more resistant than epoxy resins based on bisphenol A. Both of them cause allergic contact dermatitis. In the last 5 years, we have studied 39 cases of sensitization to epoxy resin. The results of our study were these: the global prevalence of epoxy resin sensitization was 2%, 27 men and 8 women. The mean age was 42.77 years and the sensitization period was 23.8 months. The most frequent localization of the lesions were hands (84% of the patients. Since bisphenol F was included in epoxy resin battery for patch testing, a 100% of positives responses in patients sensitized to epoxy resin have been found. Sensitization to epoxy resins was a cause of change in workplace in 46% of cases in our series. There has been an increase in sensitization of

  13. Chromatographic assessment of two hybrid monoliths prepared via epoxy-amine ring-opening polymerization and methacrylate-based free radical polymerization using methacrylate epoxy cyclosiloxane as functional monomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Ou, Junjie; Lin, Hui; Liu, Zhongshan; Huang, Guang; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-11-07

    Two kinds of hybrid monolithic columns were prepared by using methacrylate epoxy cyclosiloxane (epoxy-MA) as functional monomer, containing three epoxy moieties and one methacrylate group. One column was in situ fabricated by ring-opening polymerization of epoxy-MA and 1,10-diaminodecane (DAD) using a porogenic system consisting of isopropanol (IPA), H2O and ethanol at 65°C for 12h. The other was prepared by free radical polymerization of epoxy-MA and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) using 1-propanol and 1,4-butanediol as the porogenic solvents at 60°C for 12h. Two hybrid monoliths were investigated on the morphology and chromatographic assessment. Although two kinds of monolithic columns were prepared with epoxy-MA, their morphologies looked rather different. It could be found that the epoxy-MA-DAD monolith possessed higher column efficiencies (25,000-34,000plates/m) for the separation of alkylbenzenes than the epoxy-MA-EDMA monolith (12,000-13,000plates/m) in reversed-phase nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC). Depending on the remaining epoxy or methacrylate groups on the surface of two pristine monoliths, the epoxy-MA-EDMA monolith could be easily modified with 1-octadecylamine (ODA) via ring-opening reaction, while the epoxy-MA-DAD monolith could be modified with stearyl methacrylate (SMA) via free radical reaction. The chromatographic performance for the separation of alkylbenzenes on SMA-modified epoxy-MA-DAD monolith was remarkably improved (42,000-54,000 plates/m) when compared with that on pristine epoxy-MA-DAD monolith, while it was not obviously enhanced on ODA-modified epoxy-MA-EDMA monolith when compared with that on pristine epoxy-MA-EDMA monolith. The enhancement of the column efficiency of epoxy-MA-DAD monolith after modification might be ascribed to the decreased mass-transfer resistence. The two kinds of hybrid monoliths were also applied for separations of six phenols and seven basic compounds in nano-LC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  14. Hearing loss in workers exposed to epoxy adhesives and noise: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsiao-Yu; Shie, Ruei-Hao; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2016-02-18

    Epoxy adhesives contain organic solvents and are widely used in industry. The hazardous effects of epoxy adhesives remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the risk of hearing loss among workers exposed to epoxy adhesives and noise. Cross-sectional study. For this cross-sectional study, we recruited 182 stone workers who were exposed to both epoxy adhesives and noise, 89 stone workers who were exposed to noise only, and 43 workers from the administrative staff who had not been exposed to adhesives or noise. We obtained demographic data, occupational history and medical history through face-to-face interviews and arranged physical examinations and pure-tone audiometric tests. We also conducted walk-through surveys in the stone industry. A total of 40 representative noise assessments were conducted in 15 workplaces. Air sampling was conducted at 40 workplaces, and volatile organic compounds were analysed using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) TO-15 method. The mean sound pressure level was 87.7 dBA (SD 9.9). The prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss was considerably increased in the stone workers exposed to epoxy adhesives (42%) compared with the stone workers who were not exposed to epoxy adhesives (21%) and the administrative staff group (9.3%). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that exposure to epoxy adhesives significantly increased the risk of hearing loss between 2 and 6 kHz after adjusting for age. Significant interactions between epoxy adhesives and noise and hearing impairment were observed at 3, 4 and 6 kHz. Epoxy adhesives exacerbate hearing impairment in noisy environments, with the main impacts occurring in the middle and high frequencies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Epoxy cracking in the epoxy-impregnated superconducting winding: nonuniform dissipation of stress energy in a wire-epoxy matrix model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, O.; Iwasa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The authors present the epoxy-crack-induced temperature data of copper wires imbedded in wire-epoxy resin composite model at 4.2 K. The experimental results show that the epoxy-crackinduced temperature rise is higher in the copper wires than in the epoxy matrix, indicating that in stress-induced wire-epoxy failure, stress energy stored in the wire-epoxy matrix is preferrentially dissipated in the wire. A plausible mechanism of the nonuniform dissipation is presented

  16. Study on polyethylene glycol/epoxy resin composite as a form-stable phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yutang; Kang Huiying; Wang Weilong; Liu Hong; Gao Xuenong

    2010-01-01

    Form-stable polyethylene glycol (PEG)/epoxy resin (EP) composite as a novel phase change material (PCM) was prepared using casting molding method. In this new material, PEG acts as the latent heat storage material and EP polymer serves as the supporting material, which provides structural strength and prevents the leakage of the melted PEG. The structure and morphology of the novel composite were observed using Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FTIR) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The thermo-mechanical property and transition behavior were characterized by polarizing optical microscope (POM), static thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The experimental results show that, as a result of the physical tangled function of the epoxy resin carrier to the PEG segment, the composite macroscopically presents the solid-solid phase change characteristic.

  17. Mechanical performance of carbon-epoxy laminates. Part II: quasi-static and fatigue tensile properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Tarpani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In Part II of this work, quasi-static tensile properties of four aeronautical grade carbon-epoxy composite laminates, in both the as-received and pre-fatigued states, have been determined and compared. Quasi-static mechanical properties assessed were tensile strength and stiffness, tenacity (toughness at the maximum load and for a 50% load drop-off. In general, as-molded unidirectional cross-ply carbon fiber (tape reinforcements impregnated with either standard or rubber-toughened epoxy resin exhibited the maximum performance. The materials also displayed a significant tenacification (toughening after exposed to cyclic loading, resulting from the increased stress (the so-called wear-in phenomenon and/or strain at the maximum load capacity of the specimens. With no exceptions, two-dimensional woven textile (fabric pre-forms fractured catastrophically under identical cyclic loading conditions imposed to the fiber tape architecture, thus preventing their residual properties from being determined.

  18. Effect of heat treatment on carbon fiber surface properties and fibers/epoxy interfacial adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Zhishuang; Zhang Baoyan; Shi Fenghui; Li Min; Zhang Zuoguang; Gu Yizhuo

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fiber surface properties are likely to change during the molding process of carbon fiber reinforced matrix composite, and these changes could affect the infiltration and adhesion between carbon fiber and resin. T300B fiber was heat treated referring to the curing process of high-performance carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites. By means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), activated carbon atoms can be detected, which are defined as the carbon atoms conjunction with oxygen and nitrogen. Surface chemistry analysis shows that the content of activated carbon atoms on treated carbon fiber surface, especially those connect with the hydroxyl decreases with the increasing heat treatment temperature. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) analysis reveals that the dispersive surface energy γ S d increases and the polar surface energy γ S sp decreases as the heat treatment temperature increases to 200. Contact angle between carbon fiber and epoxy E51 resin, which is studied by dynamic contact angle test (DCAT) increases with the increasing heat treatment temperature, indicating the worse wettability comparing with the untreated fiber. Moreover, micro-droplet test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the treated carbon fiber/epoxy is lower than that of the untreated T300B fiber which is attributed to the decrement of the content of reactive functional groups including hydrogen group and epoxy group.

  19. Enhanced microwave shielding and mechanical properties of high loading MWCNT–epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B. P.; Prasanta; Choudhary, Veena; Saini, Parveen; Pande, Shailaja; Singh, V. N.; Mathur, R. B.

    2013-01-01

    Dispersion of high loading of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in epoxy resin is a challenging task for the development of efficient and thin electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials. Up to 20 wt% of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loading in the composite was achieved by forming CNT prepreg in the epoxy resin as a first step. These prepreg laminates were then compression molded to form composites which resulted in EMI shielding effectiveness of −19 dB for 0.35 mm thick film and −60 dB at for 1.75 mm thick composites in the X-band (8.2–12.4 GHz). One of the reasons for such high shielding is attributed to the high electrical conductivity of the order of 9 S cm −1 achieved in these composites which is at least an order of magnitude higher than previously reported results at this loading. In addition, an improvement of 40 % in the tensile strength over the neat resin value is observed. Thermal conductivity of the MWCNTs–epoxy composite reached 2.18 W/mK as compared to only 0.14 W/mK for cured epoxy.

  20. Enhanced microwave shielding and mechanical properties of high loading MWCNT-epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B. P.; Prasanta; Choudhary, Veena; Saini, Parveen; Pande, Shailaja; Singh, V. N.; Mathur, R. B.

    2013-04-01

    Dispersion of high loading of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in epoxy resin is a challenging task for the development of efficient and thin electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials. Up to 20 wt% of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loading in the composite was achieved by forming CNT prepreg in the epoxy resin as a first step. These prepreg laminates were then compression molded to form composites which resulted in EMI shielding effectiveness of -19 dB for 0.35 mm thick film and -60 dB at for 1.75 mm thick composites in the X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz). One of the reasons for such high shielding is attributed to the high electrical conductivity of the order of 9 S cm-1 achieved in these composites which is at least an order of magnitude higher than previously reported results at this loading. In addition, an improvement of 40 % in the tensile strength over the neat resin value is observed. Thermal conductivity of the MWCNTs-epoxy composite reached 2.18 W/mK as compared to only 0.14 W/mK for cured epoxy.

  1. Preparation of epoxy/zirconia hybrid materials via in situ polymerization using zirconium alkoxide coordinated with acid anhydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochi, Mitsukazu; Nii, Daisuke; Harada, Miyuki

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Novel epoxy/zirconia hybrid materials were synthesized via in situ polymerization using zirconium alkoxide coordinated with acid anhydride. → The half-ester compound of acid anhydride desorbed from zirconium played as curing agent of epoxy resin. → The zirconia was uniformly dispersed in the epoxy matrix on the nanometer or sub-nanometer scale by synchronizing the epoxy curing and sol-gel reactions. → The refractive indices of the hybrid materials significantly improved with an increase in the zirconia content. - Abstract: Novel epoxy/zirconia hybrid materials were synthesized using a bisphenol A epoxy resin (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A; DGEBA), zirconium(IV)-n-propoxide (ZTNP), and hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) via in situ polymerization. HHPA played two roles in this system: it acted as a modifier to control the hydrolysis and condensation reactions of zirconium alkoxide and also as a curing agent - the half-ester compound of HHPA desorbed from zirconium reacted with the epoxy resin to form the epoxy network. As a result, both the sol-gel reaction and epoxy curing occurred simultaneously in a homogeneous solution, and organic-inorganic hybrid materials were readily obtained. Further, the zirconia produced by the in situ polymerization was uniformly dispersed in the epoxy matrix on the nanometer or sub-nanometer scale; thus, hybrid materials that exhibited excellent optical transparency were obtained. Furthermore, the heat resistance of the hybrid materials could be improved by hybridization with zirconia. And, the refractive indices of the hybrid materials significantly improved with an increase in the zirconia content.

  2. Effect of Functional Nano Channel Structures Different Widths on Injection Molding and Compression Molding Replication Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, M.; Tosello, G.; Garnaes, J.

    The present study investigates the capabilities of the two employed processes, injection molding (IM) and injection compression molding (ICM) on replicating different channel cross sections. Statistical design of experiment was adopted to optimize replication quality of produced polymer parts wit...

  3. Characterization of Hybrid Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcha, Shelly; Dotan, Ana; Kenig, Samuel; Dodiuk, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the effect of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) content and its surface treatment on thermo-mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites. MWCNTs were surface treated and incorporated into two epoxy systems. MWCNT's surface treatments were based on: (a) Titania coating obtained by sol-gel process and (b) a nonionic surfactant. Thermo-mechanical properties improvement was obtained following incorporation of treated MWCNT. It was noticed that small amounts of titania coated MWCNT (0.05 wt %) led to an increase in the glass transition temperature and stiffness. The best performance was achieved adding 0.3 wt % titania coated MWCNT where an increase of 10 °C in the glass transition temperature and 30% in storage modulus were obtained. PMID:28348313

  4. Porous media heat transfer for injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-05-31

    The cooling of injection molded plastic is targeted. Coolant flows into a porous medium disposed within an injection molding component via a porous medium inlet. The porous medium is thermally coupled to a mold cavity configured to receive injected liquid plastic. The porous medium beneficially allows for an increased rate of heat transfer from the injected liquid plastic to the coolant and provides additional structural support over a hollow cooling well. When the temperature of the injected liquid plastic falls below a solidifying temperature threshold, the molded component is ejected and collected.

  5. Fabrication of silicon molds for polymer optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Daniel; Jensen, Søren; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2003-01-01

    A silicon mold used for structuring polymer microcavities for optical applications is fabricated, using a combination of DRIE (deep reactive ion etching) and anisotropic chemical wet etching with KOH + IPA. For polymer optical microcavities, low surface roughness and vertical sidewalls are often ...... and KOH + IPA etch have been optimized. To reduce stiction between the silicon mold and the polymers used for molding, the mold is coated with a teflon-like material using the DRIE system. Released polymer microstructures characterized with AFM and SEM are also presented....

  6. Hydrogen silsesquioxane mold coatings for improved replication of nanopatterns by injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobæk, Thor Christian; Matschuk, Maria; Kafka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    of replication, thus allowing more time to fill the nanoscale cavities compared to standard metal molds. A monolayer of a fluorinated silane (heptadecafluorotrichlorosilane) deposited on the mold surface reduces the mold/polymer interfacial energy to support demolding of the polymer replica. The mechanical...

  7. Mechanical Properties Analysis Of Composite Magnetic Base On hexa ferrite And Polyester Or Epoxy Matrix With Silane Additive Addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudirman; Ridwan; Mujamilah; K K, Aloma; Rembulan, Marisa; Fitriyanti

    2003-01-01

    Application of composite magnetic especially hexa ferrite magnet for industry and home industry in Indonesia has been used. Research purposes were making composite magnetic by mixing hexa ferrite powder with polyester or epoxy and studying the effect of coupling agent 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APE) addition on mechanical properties of composite magnetic. The coupling agent may increase bonding properties between magnetic powder and matrix polymer, so that tensile strength of magnetic composite will increase without decreasing the magnetic properties. Magnetic powder (SrM or BaM) wich be coated by coupling agent were added to matrix polyester and mekpo or epoxy and versamid, mixed until homogen then pressing into to the dumbbell form molding. For epoxy matrix, pressing was done in hot press at 70 deg. C and 150 kg/cm 2 following by cooling in cold press, while for polyester matrix pressing was done in hydraulic press and following by curing at 70 deg. C in an oven for 1 hour. The composition of magnetic powder were varied to 30, 40 and 50% volume fraction and coupling agent were varied to 5, 10 and 15 ml for every volume fraction. The result showed that 10 ml added of coupling agent was give best mechanical properties both polyester and epoxy matrix. However generally, increasing of magnetic powder content decreased the tensile strength of magnetic composite. The properties of magnetic composite SrM was better than BaM either in polyester or epoxy matrix

  8. Reinforced carbon fiber laminates with oriented carbon nanotube epoxy nanocomposites: Magnetic field assisted alignment and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuxin; Yang, Song; Liu, Hu; Shao, Qian; Chen, Qiuyu; Lu, Chang; Jiang, Yuanli; Liu, Chuntai; Guo, Zhanhu

    2018-05-01

    The epoxy nanocomposites with ordered multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used to influence the micro-cracks resistance of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy (CF/EP) laminate at 77 K, Oxidized MWCNTs functionalized with Fe 3 O 4 (Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs) with good magnetic properties were prepared by co-precipitation method and used to modify epoxy (EP) for cryogenic applications. Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs reinforced carbon fiber epoxy composites were also prepared through vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). The ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs were observed to have effectively improved the mechanical properties of epoxy (EP) matrix at 77 K and reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of EP matrix. The ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs also obviously improved the micro-cracks resistance of CF/EP composites at 77 K. Compared to neat EP, the CTE of ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs modified CF/EP composites was decreased 37.6%. Compared to CF/EP composites, the micro-cracks density of ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs modified CF/EP composites at 77 K was decreased 37.2%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermally activated, single component epoxy systems

    KAUST Repository

    Unruh, David A.

    2011-08-23

    A single component epoxy system in which the resin and hardener components found in many two-component epoxies are combined onto the same molecule is described. The single molecule precursor to the epoxy resin contains both multiple epoxide moieties and a diamine held latent by thermally degradable carbamate linkages. These bis-carbamate "single molecule epoxies" have an essentially infinite shelf life and access a significant range in curing temperatures related to the structure of the carbamate linkages used. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. Thermally activated, single component epoxy systems

    KAUST Repository

    Unruh, David A.; Pastine, Stefan J.; Moreton, Jessica C.; Frechet, Jean

    2011-01-01

    A single component epoxy system in which the resin and hardener components found in many two-component epoxies are combined onto the same molecule is described. The single molecule precursor to the epoxy resin contains both multiple epoxide moieties and a diamine held latent by thermally degradable carbamate linkages. These bis-carbamate "single molecule epoxies" have an essentially infinite shelf life and access a significant range in curing temperatures related to the structure of the carbamate linkages used. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Occupational contact dermatitis caused by aniline epoxy resins in the aircraft industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, Maria; Suuronen, Katri; Jolanki, Riitta; Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Valtanen, Ilona; Alanko, Kristiina

    2015-08-01

    Tetraglycidyl-4,4'-methylenedianiline (TGMDA) is an aniline epoxy resin used in, for example, resin systems of pre-impregnated composite materials (prepregs) of the aircraft industry. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by TGMDA in prepregs has been described previously. To report on 9 patients with occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by TGMDA in epoxy glues used in helicopter assembly. The patients were examined with patch testing at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health in 2004-2009. The first patient was diagnosed by testing both components of two epoxy glues from the workplace, and was also tested with glue ingredients, including TGMDA. The following patients were tested with the glues and TGMDA. The resin parts of the glues were analysed for their epoxy compounds, including TGMDA. All of the patients had a patch test reaction to one or both of the resin parts of the TGMDA-containing glues. Eight of them had a strong allergic reaction to TGMDA, and one had a doubtful reaction to TGMDA. Two of the patients also had an allergic reaction to triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP), another aniline epoxy resin, which was not present in the TGMDA-containing glues. In aircraft industry workers with suspected occupational dermatitis, aniline epoxy resins should be considered and patch tested as possible contact allergens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Synthesis of cuprous oxide epoxy nanocomposite as an environmentally antimicrobial coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M El Saeed, Ashraf; Abd El-Fattah, M; Azzam, Ahmed M; Dardir, M M; Bader, Magd M

    2016-08-01

    Cuprous oxide is commonly used as a pigment; paint manufacturers begin to employ cuprous oxide as booster biocides in their formulations, to replace the banned organotins as the principal antifouling compounds. Epoxy coating was reinforced with cuprous oxide nanoparticles (Cu2O NPs). The antibacterial as well as antifungal activity of Cu2O epoxy nanocomposite (Cu2O EN) coating films was investigated. Cu2O NPs were also experimented for antibiofilm and time-kill assay. The thermal stability and the mechanical properties of Cu2O EN coating films were also investigated. The antimicrobial activity results showed slowdown, the growth of organisms on the Cu2O EN coating surface. TGA results showed that incorporating Cu2O NPs into epoxy coating considerably enhanced the thermal stability and increased the char residue. The addition of Cu2O NPs at lower concentration into epoxy coating also led to an improvement in the mechanical resistance such as scratch and abrasion. Cu2O NPs purity was confirmed by XRD. The TEM photograph demonstrated that the synthesized Cu2O NPs were of cubic shape and the average diameter of the crystals was around 25nm. The resulting perfect dispersion of Cu2O NPs in epoxy coating revealed by SEM ensured white particles embedded in the epoxy matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of high-latency microcapsules containing an aluminium complex with an epoxy-functionalised trialkoxysilane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kazunobu; Suzuki, Noboru

    2016-12-01

    Some aluminium complexes are excellent catalysts of cationic polymerisation and are used for low-temperature and fast-curing adhesive, used in electronic part mounting. Microencapsulation is a suitable technique for getting high latency of the catalysts and long shelf life of the adhesives. For the higher latency in a cycloaliphatic epoxy compound, the microcapsule surface which retained small amount of aluminium complex was coated with epoxy polymer and the effect was examined. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic results, the surface was recognised to be sufficiently coated and the differential scanning calorimetric analyses showed that the coating did not significantly affect the low-temperature and fast-curing properties of adhesive. After storing the mixture of cycloaliphatic epoxy compound, coated microcapsules, triphenylsilanol and silane coupling agent for 48 h at room temperature, the increase in viscosity was only 0.01 Pa s, resulting in the excellent shelf life.

  14. Compound cast product and method for producing a compound cast product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas N.; Viswanathan, Srinath

    2002-09-17

    A compound cast product is formed in a casting mold (14) having a mold cavity (16) sized and shaped to form the cast product. A plurality of injectors (24) is supported from a bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). The injectors (24) are in fluid communication with the mold cavity (16) through the bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). A molten material holder furnace (12) is located beneath the casting mold (14). The holder furnace (12) defines molten material receiving chambers (36) configured to separately contain supplies of two different molten materials (37, 38). The holder furnace (12) is positioned such that the injectors (24) extend downward into the receiving chamber (36). The receiving chamber (36) is separated into at least two different flow circuits (51, 52). A first molten material (37) is received in a first flow circuit (51), and a second molten material (38) is received into a second flow circuit (52). The first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into the mold cavity (16) by the injectors (24) acting against the force of gravity. The injectors (24) are positioned such that the first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into different areas of the mold cavity (16). The molten materials (37, 38) are allowed to solidify and the resulting compound cast product is removed from the mold cavity (16).

  15. Nano-ceramics and its molding technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian; Xu Yunshu

    2007-01-01

    Nano-ceramics and its related knowledge were introduced. Fabrication of nano-ceramic powder, as well as the molding and sintering technologies of nano-ceramics were reviewed. Features of the present molding technologies were analyzed. The applications of nano-ceramics were prospected. (authors)

  16. Digital Twin concept for smart injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liau, Y.; Lee, H.; Ryu, K.

    2018-03-01

    Injection molding industry has evolved over decades and became the most common method to manufacture plastic parts. Monitoring and improvement in the injection molding industry are usually performed separately in each stage, i.e. mold design, mold making and injection molding process. However, in order to make a breakthrough and survive in the industrial revolution, all the stages in injection molding need to be linked and communicated with each other. Any changes in one stage will cause a certain effect in other stage because there is a correlation between each other. Hence, the simulation should not only based on the input of historical data, but it also needs to include the current condition of equipment and prediction of future events in other stages to make the responsive decision. This can be achieved by implementing the concept of Digital Twin that models the entire process as a virtual model and enables bidirectional control with the physical process. This paper presented types of data and technology required to build the Digital Twin for the injection molding industry. The concept includes Digital Twin of each stage and integration of these Digital Twin model as a thoroughgoing model of the injection molding industry.

  17. Thermal Stress of Surface of Mold Cavities and Parting Line of Silicone Molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajčičák Martin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the study of thermal stress of surface of mold cavities and parting line of silicone molds after pouring. The silicone mold White SD - THT was thermally stressed by pouring of ZnAl4Cu3 zinc alloy with pouring cycle 20, 30 and 40 seconds. The most thermally stressed part of surface at each pouring cycle is gating system and mold cavities. It could be further concluded that linear increase of the pouring cycle time leads to the exponential increasing of the maximum temperature of mold surface after its cooling. The elongated pouring cycle increases the temperature accumulated on the surface of cavities and the ability of silicone mold to conduct the heat on its surface decreases, because the low thermal conductivity of silicone molds enables the conduction of larger amount of heat into ambient environment.

  18. Mechanical properties of hybrid SiC/CNT filled toughened epoxy nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratim, S.; Ahmad, S.; Bonnia, N. N.; Yahaya, Sabrina M.

    2018-01-01

    Mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites filled single filler have been extensively studied by various researchers. However, there are not much discovery on the behavior of hybrid nanocomposite. In this study, single and hybrid nanocomposites of toughened epoxy filled CNT/SiC nanoparticles were investigated. The hybrid nanocomposites samples were prepared by combining CNT and SiC nanoparticles in toughened epoxy matrix via mechanical stirring method assisted with ultrasonic cavitations. Epoxy resin and liquid epoxidized natural rubber (LENR) mixture were first blend prior to the addition of nanofillers. Then, the curing process of the nanocomposite samples were conducted by compression molding technique at 130°C for 2 hours. The purpose of this study is to investigate the hybridization effect of CNT and SiC nanoparticles on mechanical properties toughened epoxy matrix. The total loading of single and hybrid nanofillers were fixed to 4% volume are 0, 4C, 4S, 3S1C, 2S2C, and 1S3C. Mechanical properties of hybrid composites show that the highest value of tensile strength achieved by 3S1C sample at about 7% increment and falls between their single composite values. Meanwhile, the stiffness of the same sample is significantly increased at about 31% of the matrix. On the other hand, a highest flexural property is obtained by 1S3C sample at about 20% increment dominated by CNT content. However, the impact strength shows reduction trend with the addition of SiC and CNT into the matrix. The hybridization of SiC and CNT show highest value in sample 1S3C at about 3.37 kJ/m2 of impact energy absorbed. FESEM micrograph have confirmed that better distributions and interaction observed between SiC nanoparticles and matrix compared to CNT, which contributed to higher tensile strength and modulus.

  19. Immune Response among Patients Exposed to Molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan N. Fink

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrocyclic trichothecenes, mycotoxins produced by Stachybotrys chartarum, have been implicated in adverse reactions in individuals exposed to mold-contaminated environments. Cellular and humoral immune responses and the presence of trichothecenes were evaluated in patients with mold-related health complaints. Patients underwent history, physical examination, skin prick/puncture tests with mold extracts, immunological evaluations and their sera were analyzed for trichothecenes. T-cell proliferation, macrocyclic trichothecenes, and mold specific IgG and IgA levels were not significantly different than controls; however 70% of the patients had positive skin tests to molds. Thus, IgE mediated or other non-immune mechanisms could be the cause of their symptoms.

  20. Computer-aided injection molding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K. K.; Shen, S. F.; Cohen, C.; Hieber, C. A.; Isayev, A. I.

    1982-10-01

    Achievements are reported in cavity-filling simulation, modeling viscoelastic effects, measuring and predicting frozen-in birefringence in molded parts, measuring residual stresses and associated mechanical properties of molded parts, and developing an interactive mold-assembly design program and an automatic NC maching data generation and verification program. The Cornell Injection Molding Program (CIMP) consortium is discussed as are computer user manuals that have been published by the consortium. Major tasks which should be addressed in future efforts are listed, including: (1) predict and experimentally determine the post-fillin behavior of thermoplastics; (2) simulate and experimentally investigate the injection molding of thermosets and filled materials; and (3) further investigate residual stresses, orientation and mechanical properties.

  1. Additive technology of soluble mold tooling for embedded devices in composite structures: A study on manufactured tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Madhuparna

    Composite textiles have found widespread use and advantages in various industries and applications. The constant demand for high quality products and services requires companies to minimize their manufacturing costs, and delivery time in order to compete in general and niche marketplaces. Advanced manufacturing methods aim to provide economical methods of mold production. Creation of molding and tooling options for advanced composites encompasses a large portion of the fabrication time, making it a costly process and restraining factor. This research discusses a preliminary investigation into the use of soluble polymer compounds and additive manufacturing to fabricate soluble molds. These molds suffer from dimensional errors due to several factors, which have also been characterized. The basic soluble mold of a composite is 3D printed to meet the desired dimensions and geometry of holistic structures or spliced components. The time taken to dissolve the mold depends on the rate of agitation of the solvent. This process is steered towards enabling the implantation of optoelectronic devices within the composite to provide sensing capability for structural health monitoring. The shape deviation of the 3D printed mold is also studied and compared to its original dimensions to optimize the dimensional quality to produce dimensionally accurate parts. Mechanical tests were performed on compact tension (CT) resin samples prepared from these 3D printed molds and revealed crack propagation towards an embedded intact optical fiber.

  2. Comparing suppository mold variability which can lead to dosage errors for suppositories prepared with the same or different molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kenneth S; Baki, Gabriella; Hart, Christine; Hejduk, Courtney; Chillas, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Suppository molds must be properly calibrated to ensure accurate dosing. There are often slight differences between molds and even in the cavities within a mold. A method is presented for the calibration of standard aluminum 6-, 12-, 50-, or 100-well suppository molds. Ten different molds were tested using water for volume calibration, and cocoa butter for standardization involving establishing the density factor. This method is shown to be straightforward and appropriate for calibrating suppository molds.

  3. Filler size effects on the conductivity of polymer nanocomposites: semiconductive phthalocyanine nanoparticles in epoxy matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, M.; Brokken-Zijp, J.C.M.; Huijbregts, L.J.; With, de G.

    2008-01-01

    Three Cobalt(III) phthalocyanine (Phthalcon) powders with different particle sizes and chemical compositions, but almost equal XRD spectra and powder conductivity were synthesized and used as conductive fillers in crosslinked epoxy matrices. Two of these Phthalcons are new compounds. The relation

  4. Thermoset epoxy polymers from renewable resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Anthony [Madison, NJ; Jaffe, Michael [Maplewood, NJ; Zhang, Yi [Harrison, NJ; Catalani, Luiz H [Carapicuiba, BR

    2009-11-17

    Novel thermoset epoxy polymers using the bisglycidyl ethers of anhydrosugars, such as isosorbide, isomannide, and isoidide, are disclosed. The bisglycidyl ethers are useful as substitutes for bisphenol A in the manufacture of thermoset epoxy ethers. The anhydrosugars are derived from renewable sources and the bisglycidyl ethers are not xenoestrogenic and the thermoset curing agents are likewise derived form renewable resources.

  5. Characterization of Injection Molded Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Ling; Søgaard, Emil; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard

    for different applications. We show how to correlate the structures of the polymer replicas with respect to their functionalities. Furthermore, we introduce how we coordinate with all partners in the “Nanoplast” project, and how we utilize the existing facilities of each method to understand structure......Microscopy has been widely applied to understand surface structures of solid samples. According to the instrumental methodology, there are different microscopy methods: optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and scanning probe microscopy (SPM). These microscopy methods have individual advantages...... and limitations. Therefore, it would be difficult to characterize complex, especially hierarchical structures by using only one method. Here we present a combined optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and scanning probe microscopy study on injection molded structures. These structures are used...

  6. EPOXI at comet Hartley 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A'Hearn, Michael F; Belton, Michael J S; Delamere, W Alan; Feaga, Lori M; Hampton, Donald; Kissel, Jochen; Klaasen, Kenneth P; McFadden, Lucy A; Meech, Karen J; Melosh, H Jay; Schultz, Peter H; Sunshine, Jessica M; Thomas, Peter C; Veverka, Joseph; Wellnitz, Dennis D; Yeomans, Donald K; Besse, Sebastien; Bodewits, Dennis; Bowling, Timothy J; Carcich, Brian T; Collins, Steven M; Farnham, Tony L; Groussin, Olivier; Hermalyn, Brendan; Kelley, Michael S; Kelley, Michael S; Li, Jian-Yang; Lindler, Don J; Lisse, Carey M; McLaughlin, Stephanie A; Merlin, Frédéric; Protopapa, Silvia; Richardson, James E; Williams, Jade L

    2011-06-17

    Understanding how comets work--what drives their activity--is crucial to the use of comets in studying the early solar system. EPOXI (Extrasolar Planet Observation and Deep Impact Extended Investigation) flew past comet 103P/Hartley 2, one with an unusually small but very active nucleus, taking both images and spectra. Unlike large, relatively inactive nuclei, this nucleus is outgassing primarily because of CO(2), which drags chunks of ice out of the nucleus. It also shows substantial differences in the relative abundance of volatiles from various parts of the nucleus.

  7. Medical diagnostics for indoor mold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurraß, Julia; Heinzow, Birger; Aurbach, Ute; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bufe, Albrecht; Buzina, Walter; Cornely, Oliver A; Engelhart, Steffen; Fischer, Guido; Gabrio, Thomas; Heinz, Werner; Herr, Caroline E W; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Köberle, Martin; Lichtnecker, Herbert; Lob-Corzilius, Thomas; Merget, Rolf; Mülleneisen, Norbert; Nowak, Dennis; Rabe, Uta; Raulf, Monika; Seidl, Hans Peter; Steiß, Jens-Oliver; Szewszyk, Regine; Thomas, Peter; Valtanen, Kerttu; Wiesmüller, Gerhard A

    2017-04-01

    In April 2016, the German Society of Hygiene, Environmental Medicine and Preventative Medicine (Gesellschaft für Hygiene, Umweltmedizin und Präventivmedizin (GHUP)) together with other scientific medical societies, German and Austrian medical societies, physician unions and experts has provided an AWMF (Association of the Scientific Medical Societies) guideline 'Medical diagnostics for indoor mold exposure'. This guideline shall help physicians to advise and treat patients exposed indoors to mold. Indoor mold growth is a potential health risk, even without a quantitative and/or causal association between the occurrence of individual mold species and health effects. Apart from the allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and the mycoses caused by mold, there is only sufficient evidence for the following associations between moisture/mold damages and different health effects: Allergic respiratory diseases, asthma (manifestation, progression, exacerbation), allergic rhinitis, exogenous allergic alveolitis and respiratory tract infections/bronchitis. In comparison to other environmental allergens, the sensitizing potential of molds is estimated to be low. Recent studies show a prevalence of sensitization of 3-10% in the total population of Europe. The evidence for associations to mucous membrane irritation and atopic eczema (manifestation, progression, exacerbation) is classified as limited or suspected. Inadequate or insufficient evidence for an association is given for COPD, acute idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage in children, rheumatism/arthritis, sarcoidosis, and cancer. The risk of infections from indoor molds is low for healthy individuals. Only molds that are capable to form toxins can cause intoxications. The environmental and growth conditions and especially the substrate determine whether toxin formation occurs, but indoor air concentrations are always very low. In the case of indoor moisture/mold damages, everyone can be affected by odor effects and

  8. Injection molding of Y-TZP powders prepared by colloidal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Y.; Mineshita, O.; Kaga, T.; Tokinaga, T.; Obitsu, M.

    1991-01-01

    TZP powders containing 3mol% Y 2 O 3 were prepared from ZrOCl 2 solution via an aqueous colloidal suspension of ZrO 2 . Processing variables were optimized to obtain powders suitable for injection molding. Wettability of powders with binders, fluidity of melting compound, removal of binder from green body, and properties of sintered body were investigated

  9. Molded ultra-low density microcellular foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, P.B.; Montoya, O.J.

    1986-07-01

    Ultra-low density (< 0.01 g/cc) microcellular foams were required for the NARYA pulsed-power-driven x-ray laser development program. Because of their extreme fragility, molded pieces would be necessary to successfully field these foams in the pulsed power accelerator. All of the foams evaluated were made by the thermally induced phase separation technique from solutions of water soluble polymers. The process involved rapidly freezing the solution to induce the phase separation, and then freeze drying to remove the water without destroying the foam's structure. More than sixty water soluble polymers were evaluated by attempting to make their solutions into foams. The foams were evaluated for shrinkage, density, and microstructure to determine their suitability for molding and meeting the required density and cell size requirements of 5.0 mg/cc and less than twenty μmeters. Several promising water soluble polymers were identified including the polyactylic acids, guar gums, polyactylamide, and polyethylene oxide. Because of thier purity, structure, and low shrinkage, the polyacrylic acids were chosen to develop molding processes. The initial requirements were for 2.0 cm. long molded rods with diameters of 1.0, 2.0. and 3.0 mm. These rods were made by freezing the solution in thin walled silicon rubber molds, extracting the frozen preform from the mold, and then freeze drying. Requirements for half rods and half annuli necessitated using aluminum molds. Again we successfully molded these shapes. Our best efforts to date involve molding annuli with 3.0 mm outside diameters and 2.0 mm inside diameters

  10. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Fiber Deformation and Formability in Thermoforming Process Using a Fast-Cure Carbon Prepreg: Effect of Stacking Sequence and Mold Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Daeryeong; Kim, Shino; Lee, Wonoh; Yi, Jin Woo; Um, Moon Kwang; Seong, Dong Gi

    2018-01-01

    A fast-cure carbon fiber/epoxy prepreg was thermoformed against a replicated automotive roof panel mold (square-cup) to investigate the effect of the stacking sequence of prepreg layers with unidirectional and plane woven fabrics and mold geometry with different drawing angles and depths on the fiber deformation and formability of the prepreg. The optimum forming condition was determined via analysis of the material properties of epoxy resin. The non-linear mechanical properties of prepreg at the deformation modes of inter- and intra-ply shear, tensile and bending were measured to be used as input data for the commercial virtual forming simulation software. The prepreg with a stacking sequence containing the plain-woven carbon prepreg on the outer layer of the laminate was successfully thermoformed against a mold with a depth of 20 mm and a tilting angle of 110°. Experimental results for the shear deformations at each corner of the thermoformed square-cup product were compared with the simulation and a similarity in the overall tendency of the shear angle in the path at each corner was observed. The results are expected to contribute to the optimization of parameters on materials, mold design and processing in the thermoforming mass-production process for manufacturing high quality automotive parts with a square-cup geometry. PMID:29883413

  11. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Fiber Deformation and Formability in Thermoforming Process Using a Fast-Cure Carbon Prepreg: Effect of Stacking Sequence and Mold Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeryeong Bae

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A fast-cure carbon fiber/epoxy prepreg was thermoformed against a replicated automotive roof panel mold (square-cup to investigate the effect of the stacking sequence of prepreg layers with unidirectional and plane woven fabrics and mold geometry with different drawing angles and depths on the fiber deformation and formability of the prepreg. The optimum forming condition was determined via analysis of the material properties of epoxy resin. The non-linear mechanical properties of prepreg at the deformation modes of inter- and intra-ply shear, tensile and bending were measured to be used as input data for the commercial virtual forming simulation software. The prepreg with a stacking sequence containing the plain-woven carbon prepreg on the outer layer of the laminate was successfully thermoformed against a mold with a depth of 20 mm and a tilting angle of 110°. Experimental results for the shear deformations at each corner of the thermoformed square-cup product were compared with the simulation and a similarity in the overall tendency of the shear angle in the path at each corner was observed. The results are expected to contribute to the optimization of parameters on materials, mold design and processing in the thermoforming mass-production process for manufacturing high quality automotive parts with a square-cup geometry.

  12. Mold contamination of automobile air conditioner systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P; Lopez, M; Fan, W; Cambre, K; Elston, R C

    1990-02-01

    Eight cars belonging to patients who were found to have exacerbation of allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma after turning on the air conditioner in their cars were examined. Mold concentrations inside the passenger compartment with the a/c turned off and at different climate control settings were lower than concentrations in the outside air. After turning on the air conditioner to "Max", cultures obtained at various intervals revealed that mold concentrations decreased significantly with time. Furthermore, placement of a filter at the portal of entry of outside air significantly reduced the mold concentration in the passenger compartment.

  13. Evaluation of Impact Strength of Epoxy Based Hybrid Composites Reinforced with E-Glass/Kevlar 49

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUBHAN ALIJOGI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In hybridization different fibers are stacked layer by layer to produce laminates have specific strength and stiffness and employed in light weight high strength applications. Physically mean fabricated hybrid composites used in aerospace, under water, body armors and armed forces establishment. In present work drop-weight impact response of hybrid composites were investigated by making laminates of hybrid composites. In Hybridization layers of E-glass (roving and Kevlar 49 fabrics stacked with epoxy resin. The layers formulation was set up by hand layup method. Impregnationsof epoxy resin of commercial grade (601A in fabrics were accomplished by VRTM (Vacuum Bagging Resin Transfer Molding technique. Layup placementof Glass fibers/ Kevlar at 0°/90°, 45°/45° and 30°/60° were set for this work. Mechanical properties such as impact strength, bear resistance and break resistance were analyzed by usingASTM D-256 and D-3763 standard.Experimental investigation was conducted using instrumented Dart impact and Izod Impact test. E-glass/Kevlar 49 at layup 0°/90°and 30°/60°exhibited improvedimpact strength than 45°/45°. The surface morphology and fractography were also investigated by capturing different images of Specimens by using the SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy. The fiberreinforcement and matrix fracture were also observed by using SEM.The SEM images suggest that epoxy resin tightly bonded with Kevlar fibers whereas Glass fibers were pulled out from laminations.

  14. Evaluation of impact strength of epoxy based hybrid composites reinforced with e-glass/kevlar 49

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jogi, S.A.; Memon, I.A.; Baloch, M.; Chandio, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    In hybridization different fibers are stacked layer by layer to produce laminates have specific strength and stiffness and employed in light weight high strength applications. Physically mean fabricated hybrid composites used in aerospace, under water, body armors and armed forces establishment. In present work drop-weight impact response of hybrid composites were investigated by making laminates of hybrid composites. In Hybridization layers of E-glass (roving) and Kevlar 49 fabrics stacked with epoxy resin. The layers formulation was set up by hand layup method. Impregnations of epoxy resin of commercial grade (601A) in fabrics were accomplished by VRTM (Vacuum Bagging Resin Transfer Molding) technique. Layup placementof Glass fibers/ Kevlar at 0 degree/90 degree, 45 degree/45 degree and 30 degree/60 degree were set for this work. Mechanical properties such as impact strength, bear resistance and break resistance were analyzed by using ASTM D-256 and D-3763 standard. Experimental investigation was conducted using instrumented Dart impact and Izod Impact test. E-glass/Kevlar 49 at layup 0 degree/90 degree and 30 degree/60 degree exhibited improvedimpact strength than 45 degree/45 degree. The surface morphology and fractography were also investigated by capturing different images of Specimens by using the SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The fiberreinforcement and matrix fracture were also observed by using SEM.The SEM images suggest that epoxy resin tightly bonded with Kevlar fibers whereas Glass fibers were pulled out from laminations. (author)

  15. The application of epoxy resin coating in grounding grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Chen, Z. R.; Xi, L. J.; Wang, X. Y.; Wang, H. F.

    2018-01-01

    Epoxy resin anticorrosion coating is widely used in grounding grid corrosion protection because of its wide range of materials, good antiseptic effect and convenient processing. Based on the latest research progress, four kinds of epoxy anticorrosive coatings are introduced, which are structural modified epoxy coating, inorganic modified epoxy coating, organic modified epoxy coating and polyaniline / epoxy resin composite coating. In this paper, the current research progress of epoxy base coating is analyzed, and prospected the possible development direction of the anti-corrosion coating in the grounding grid, which provides a reference for coating corrosion prevention of grounding materials.

  16. Ultrasound - Aided ejection in micro injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masato, D.; Sorgato, M.; Lucchetta, G.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, an ultrasound-aided ejection system was designed and tested for different polymers (PS, COC and POM) and mold topographies. The proposed solution aims at reducing the ejection friction by decreasing the adhesion component of the frictional force, which is controlled by the contact area developed during the filling stage of the injection molding process. The experimental results indicate a positive effect of ultrasound vibration on the friction force values, with a maximum reduction of 16. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the ultrasound effect is strictly related to both polymer selection and mold roughness. The combined effect on the ejection force of mold surface roughness, melt viscosity during filling and polymer elastic modulus at ejection was modeled to the experimental data, in order to demonstrate that the effect of ultrasound vibration on the ejection friction reduction is due to the heating of the contact interface and the consequent reduction of the polymer elastic modulus.

  17. National Allergy Bureau Pollen and Mold Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search AAAAI National Allergy Bureau Pollen and Mold Report Date: May 19, 2018 Location: San Antonio (2), ... 18/2018 ( click here to view ). Our Allergen Report Email Service can automatically email you daily pollen ...

  18. MATERIALS FOR PRODUCTION OF METAL MOLDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ju. Jakovlev

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of alloying with manganese, chromium, nickel, copper and molybdenum on mechanical characteristics and thermocyclic endurance of grayed steel and possibility of its application for metal casting molds is investigated.

  19. Molds on Food: Are They Dangerous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refrigerator every few months with 1 tablespoon of baking soda dissolved in a quart of water. Rinse ... Francisco, Italian, and Eastern European types — have a characteristic thin, white mold coating which is safe to ...

  20. Surface microstructure replication in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Uffe Arlø; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    topography is transcribed onto the plastic part through complex mechanisms. This replication, however, is not perfect, and the replication quality depends on the plastic material properties, the topography itself, and the process conditions. This paper describes and discusses an investigation of injection...... molding of surface microstructures. The fundamental problem of surface microstructure replication has been studied. The research is based on specific microstructures as found in lab-on-a-chip products and on rough surfaces generated from EDM (electro discharge machining) mold cavities. Emphasis is put...... on the ability to replicate surface microstructures under normal injection-molding conditions, i.e., with commodity materials within typical process windows. It was found that within typical process windows the replication quality depends significantly on several process parameters, and especially the mold...

  1. Antimicrobial Treatments of Indoor Mold and Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological contaminants especially mold in buildings are known to act as sources of indoor air pollution, discomfort, asthma and pulmonary disease to building occupants. Sick buildings are evidence of extremely problematic indoor air quality (IAQ), often resulting from unacceptab...

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Wind Turbine Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Richardson, Bradley [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lloyd, Peter [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Love, Lonnie [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nolet, Stephen [TPI Composites, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Hannan, James [TPI Composites, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this project was to explore the utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for low cost manufacturing of wind turbine molds. Engineers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and TPI Composites (TPI) collaborated to design and manufacture a printed mold that can be used for resin infusion of wind turbine components. Specific focus was on required material properties (operating temperatures and pressures, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), thermal conductivity), surface finish (accuracy and coatings) and system integration (integrated vacuum ports, and heating element). The project began with a simple proof of principle components, targeting surface coatings and material properties for printing a small section (approximately 4’ x 4’ x 2’) of a mold. Next, the second phase scaled up and integrated with the objective of capturing all of the necessary components (integrated heating to accelerate cure time, and vacuum, sealing) for resin infusion on a mold of significant size (8’ x 20’ x 6’).

  3. Tunable Thermosetting Epoxies Based on Fractionated and Well-Characterized Lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Claudio; Lo Re, Giada; Lawoko, Martin; Berglund, Lars

    2018-03-21

    Here we report the synthesis of thermosetting resins from low molar mass Kraft lignin fractions of high functionality, refined by solvent extraction. Such fractions were fully characterized by 31 P NMR, 2D-HSQC NMR, SEC, and DSC in order to obtain a detailed description of the structures. Reactive oxirane moieties were introduced on the lignin backbone under mild reaction conditions and quantified by simple 1 H NMR analysis. The modified fractions were chemically cross-linked with a flexible polyether diamine ( M n ≈ 2000), in order to obtain epoxy thermosets. Epoxies from different lignin fractions, studied by DSC, DMA, tensile tests, and SEM, demonstrated substantial differences in terms of thermo-mechanical properties. For the first time, strong relationships between lignin structures and epoxy properties could be demonstrated. The suggested approach provides unprecedented possibilities to tune network structure and properties of thermosets based on real lignin fractions, rather than model compounds.

  4. Epoxy resin systems for FGD units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brytus, V.; Puglisi, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses ongoing research work which is directed towards epoxy resins and curing agents which are designed to withstand aggressive environments. This work includes not only a chemical description of the materials involved, but the application testing necessary to verify the usefulness of these systems. It demonstrates that new high performance epoxy systems are superior to those which traditionally come to mind when one thinks epoxy. Finally, it discusses the results of testing designed specifically to screen candidates for use in FGD units

  5. Epoxy Nanocomposites Containing Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cong; Mullins, Michael; Hawkins, Spencer; Kotaki, Masaya; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2018-01-10

    Zeolitic imidazole framework-8 (ZIF-8) is utilized as a functional filler and a curing agent in the preparation of epoxy nanocomposites. The imidazole group on the surface of the ZIF-8 initiates epoxy curing, resulting in covalent bonding between the ZIF-8 crystals and epoxy matrix. A substantial reduction in dielectric constant and increase in tensile modulus were observed. The implication of the present study for utilization of metal-organic framework to improve physical and mechanical properties of polymeric matrixes is discussed.

  6. Molding apparatus. [for thermosetting plastic compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus for compression molding of thermosetting plastics compositions including interfitting hollow male and female components is reported. The components are adapted to be compressed to form a rocket nozzle in a cavity. A thermal jacket is provided exteriorly adjacent to the female component for circulating a thermal transfer fluid to effect curing of a thermosetting plastics material being molded. Each of the male and female components is provided with suitable inlets and outlets for circulating a thermal transfer fluid.

  7. Development of improved asbestos reinforced phenolic insulating composites (optimization of physical properties as a function of molding technique and post cure conditions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, L. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Detailed data are presented on phenolic-glass and phenolic-asbestos compounds which compare the effect of compression molding without degas to the effects of four variations of compression molding. These variations were designed to improve elimination of entrapped volatiles and the volatile products of the condensate reaction associated with the cure of phenolic resins. The utilization of conventional methods of degas plus degas by vacuum and directional heat flow methods are involved. Detailed data are also presented on these same compounds, comparing the effect of changes in post-bake time, and post-bake temperature for the five molding techniques.

  8. Traditional Mold Analysis Compared to a DNA-based Method of Mold Analysis with Applications in Asthmatics' Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditional environmental mold analysis is based-on microscopic observations and counting of mold structures collected from the air on a sticky surface or culturing of molds on growth media for identification and quantification. A DNA-based method of mold analysis called mol...

  9. Factors influencing microinjection molding replication quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Julie; Brulez, Anne-Catherine; Contraires, Elise; Larochette, Mathieu; Trannoy-Orban, Nathalie; Pignon, Maxime; Mauclair, Cyril; Valette, Stéphane; Benayoun, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in producing and providing high-precision plastic parts that can be manufactured by microinjection molding: gears, pumps, optical grating elements, and so on. For all of these applications, the replication quality is essential. This study has two goals: (1) fabrication of high-precision parts using the conventional injection molding machine; (2) identification of robust parameters that ensure production quality. Thus, different technological solutions have been used: cavity vacuuming and the use of a mold coated with DLC or CrN deposits. AFM and SEM analyses were carried out to characterize the replication profile. The replication quality was studied in terms of the process parameters, coated and uncoated molds and crystallinity of the polymer. Specific studies were processed to quantify the replicability of injection molded parts (ABS, PC and PP). Analysis of the Taguchi experimental designs permits prioritization of the impact of each parameter on the replication quality. A discussion taking into account these new parameters and the thermal and spreading properties on the coatings is proposed. It appeared that, in general, increasing the mold temperature improves the molten polymer fill in submicron features except for the steel insert (for which the presence of a vacuum is the most important factor). Moreover, the DLC coating was the best coating to increase the quality of the replication. This result could be explained by the lower thermal diffusivity of this coating. We noted that the viscosity of the polymers is not a primordial factor of the replication quality.

  10. Die Casting Mold Design for Aluminum Alloy Shell of Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about die casting mold design for aluminum alloy shell of instrument. Three-dimensional model of the casting and mold are designed by using Pro/Engineer and AutoCad which can analyze forming quality. Digital design and theoretical calculation can greatly shorten product development cycle and mold design cycle, improve the accuracy of product design and mold design, and reduce the cost of mold design.

  11. Dielectric and Electrical Properties of WS2 Nanotubes/Epoxy Composites and Their Use for Stress Monitoring of Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sedova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric and electrical characteristics of the semiconductive WS2 nanotubes/epoxy composites were studied as a function of the nanotubes concentration and the pressure applied during their molding. In addition, the ability of WS2 nanotubes to serve as stress sensors in epoxy based nanocomposites, for health-monitoring applications, was studied. The nanocomposite elements were loaded in three-point bending configuration. The direct current was monitored simultaneously with stress-strain measurements. It was found that, in nanocomposites, above the percolation concentrations of the nanotubes, the electrical conductivity increases considerably with the applied load and hence WS2 nanotubes can be potentially used as sensors for health monitoring of structural components.

  12. Development of metallic molds for the large volume plastic scintillator fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, Wilson A.P.; Vieira, Jose M.; Rela, Paulo R.; Bruzinga, Wilson A.; Araujo, Eduardo P.; Costa Junior, Nelson P.; Hamada, Margarida M.

    1997-01-01

    The plastic scintillators are radiation detectors made of organic fluorescent compounds dissolved in a solidified polymer matrix. The manufacturing process of large volume detectors (55 liters) at low cost, by polymerization of the styrene monomer plus PPO and POPOP scintillators, was studied in this paper. Metallic molds of ASTM 1200 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel were produced by TIG welding process since the polymerization reaction is very exothermic. The measurements of transmittance, luminescence, X-ray fluorescence and light output were carried out in the plastic scintillators made using different metallic molds. The characterization results of the detectors produced in an open system using ASTM 1200 aluminum mold show that there is not quality change in the scintillator, even with aluminum being considered as unstable for styrene monomer. Therefore, the ASTM 1200 aluminum was found to be the best alternative to produce the detector by an open system polymerization. (author). 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  13. Ionic Liquid Epoxy Composite Cryotanks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this work is to determine the optimal process for manufacturing lightweight linerless cryogenic storage tanks using ionic liquid epoxy composite...

  14. Action of ionizing radiation on epoxy resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, M. E.

    1970-12-01

    The resistance of classical and experimental epoxy resins to irradiation was studied. The resistance to irradiation of epoxy resins of diverse compositions as well as the development of resins having a radioresistance that approaches that of certain ceramics are discussed. Sources of irradiation and the techniques of dosimetry used are described. The structures of certain epoxy resins and of hardeners are given. The preparation of these resins and their physical properties is described. The effects of radiation on epoxy resins, as well as conditions of irradiation, and suggested mechanisms for degradation of the irradiated resins are discussed. The relationship between chemical structure of the resins and their physical properties is evaluated. (115 references) (JCB)

  15. Synthesis, Characterization and Curing Studies of Thermosetting Epoxy Resin with Amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshmi, B.; Mahendra, K. N.; Shivananda, K. N.

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid thermosetting maleimido epoxy compound 4-(N-maleimidophenyl) glycidylether (N-MPGE) is prepared by reacting N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) maleimide (HPM) with Epichlorohydrin by using benzyltrimethylammonium chloride as a catalyst. The resulting compound possesses both the oxirane ring and maleimide group. The curing reaction of these maleimidophenyl glycidylether epoxy compound (N-MPGE) with amines as curing agents such as ethylendiamine (EDA), diethylentriamine (DETA) and triethylenetetramine (TETA), aminoethylpiperazine (AEP) and isophoronediamine, IPDA), are studied. Incorporation of maleimide groups in the epichlorohydrin provides cyclic imide structure and high cross-linking density to the cured resins. The cured samples exhibited good thermal stability, excellent chemical (acid/alkali/solvent) and water absorption resistance. Morphological studies by the SEM technique further confirmed the phase homogeneity net work of the cured systems

  16. Synthesis, Characterization and Curing Studies of Thermosetting Epoxy Resin with Amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshmi, B.; Mahendra, K. N. [Bangalore University, Bangalore (India); Shivananda, K. N. [Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2010-08-15

    A new hybrid thermosetting maleimido epoxy compound 4-(N-maleimidophenyl) glycidylether (N-MPGE) is prepared by reacting N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) maleimide (HPM) with Epichlorohydrin by using benzyltrimethylammonium chloride as a catalyst. The resulting compound possesses both the oxirane ring and maleimide group. The curing reaction of these maleimidophenyl glycidylether epoxy compound (N-MPGE) with amines as curing agents such as ethylendiamine (EDA), diethylentriamine (DETA) and triethylenetetramine (TETA), aminoethylpiperazine (AEP) and isophoronediamine, IPDA), are studied. Incorporation of maleimide groups in the epichlorohydrin provides cyclic imide structure and high cross-linking density to the cured resins. The cured samples exhibited good thermal stability, excellent chemical (acid/alkali/solvent) and water absorption resistance. Morphological studies by the SEM technique further confirmed the phase homogeneity net work of the cured systems.

  17. Reinforcing styrene butadiene rubber with lignin-novolac epoxy resin networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, lignin-novolac epoxy resin networks were fabricated in the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR matrix by combination of latex compounding and melt mixing. Firstly, SBR/lignin compounds were co-coagulated by SBR latex and lignin aqueous solution. Then the novolac epoxy resin (F51 was added in the SBR/lignin compounds by melt compounding method. F51 was directly cured by lignin via the ring-opening reaction of epoxy groups of F51 and OH groups (or COOH groups of lignin during the curing process of rubber compounds, as was particularly evident from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR studies and maximum torque of the curing analysis. The existence of lignin-F51 networks were also detected by scanning electron microscope (SEM and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. The structure of the SBR/lignin/F51 was also characterized by rubber process analyzer (RPA, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and determination of crosslinking density. Due to rigid lignin-F51 networks achieved in SBR/lignin/F51 composites, it was found that the hardness, modulus, tear strength, crosslinking density, the temperature of 5 and 10% weight-loss were significantly enhanced with the loading of F51.

  18. Effects of fast mold temperature evolution on micro features replication quality during injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liparoti, S.; Calaon, M.; Speranza, V.

    2017-01-01

    lithography and subsequent nickel electroplating. The mold temperature was controlled by a thin heating device (composed by polyimide as insulating layer and polyimide carbon black loaded as electrical conductive layer) able to increase the temperature on mold surface in a few seconds (40°C/s) by Joule...

  19. Fast Mold Temperature Evolution on Micro Features Replication Quality during Injection Molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liparoti, S.; Calaon, Matteo; Speranza, V.

    2016-01-01

    lithography and subsequent nickel electroplating. The mold temperature was controlled by a thin heating device (composed by polyimide as insulating layer and polyimide carbon black loaded aselectrical conductive layer) able to increase the temperature on mold surface in a few seconds (40°C/s) by Joule effect...

  20. Application of atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet for bread mold decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonglor, P.; Amnuaycheewa, P.

    2017-09-01

    Atmospheric-pressure argon plasma (APAP) is a promising non-thermal technology for microbial control and prevention minimally affecting quality of foods. Effect of APAP jet on the growth of bread molds, including two Aspergillus sp., Rhizopus stolonifer, and Penicillium roqueforti, isolated from white bread were investigated. The molds were isolated, verified, cultured to fully grown on potato dextrose agar (PDA), and subsequently treated with APAP jet using plasma generating power at 24 W for 5, 10, and 20 min, respectively. The inhibition of mold growth was investigated by comparing fungal dry weights and the effect on fungal cell structure was observed using compound light microscope. The results indicated that the 20-min treatment time is most effective in retarding the growth of the three bread molds. However, this level of generating power did not lead to destruction of the cellular structures for all the four fungi. Plasma generating power and treatment time are significant parameters determining the success of bread mold decontamination and further investigation on real bread matrix is needed.

  1. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Aslam, Muhammad, E-mail: klaira73@gmail.com; Altaf, Khurram, E-mail: khurram.altaf@petronas.com.my; Shirazi, Irfan, E-mail: irfanshirazi@hotmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  2. Creating mold-free buildings: a key to avoiding health effects of indoor molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Bruce M

    2003-08-01

    In view of the high costs of building diagnostics and repair subsequent to water damage--as well as the large medical diagnostic and healthcare costs associated with mold growth in buildings--commitment to a philosophy of proactive preventive maintenance for home, apartment, school, and commercial buildings could result in considerable cost savings and avoidance of major health problems among building occupants. The author identifies common causes of mold growth in buildings and summarizes key building design and construction principles essential for preventing mold contamination indoors. Physicians and healthcare workers must be made aware of conditions within buildings that can give rise to mold growth, and of resulting health problems. Timely advice provided to patients already sensitized by exposure to molds could save these individuals, and their families, from further exposures as a result of inadequate building maintenance or an inappropriate choice of replacement housing.

  3. Injection molding of high aspect ratio sub-100 nm nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matschuk, Maria; Larsen, Niels B

    2013-01-01

    We have explored the use of mold coatings and optimized processing conditions to injection mold high aspect ratio nanostructures (height-to-width >1) in cyclic olefin copolymer (COC). Optimizing the molding parameters on uncoated nickel molds resulted in slight improvements in replication quality...... as described by height, width and uniformity of the nanoscopic features. Use of a mold temperature transiently above the polymer glass transition temperature (Tg) was the most important factor in increasing the replication fidelity. Surface coating of the nickel molds with a fluorocarbon-containing thin film...... (FDTS) greatly enhanced the quality of replicated features, in particular at transient mold temperatures above Tg. Injection molding using the latter mold temperature regime resulted in a bimodal distribution of pillar heights, corresponding to either full or very poor replication of the individual...

  4. Nanostructuring steel for injection molding tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azawi, A; Smistrup, K; Kristensen, A

    2014-01-01

    The production of nanostructured plastic items by injection molding with ridges down to 400 nm in width, which is the smallest line width replicated from nanostructured steel shims, is presented. Here we detail a micro-fabrication method where electron beam lithography, nano-imprint lithography and ion beam etching are combined to nanostructure the planar surface of a steel wafer. Injection molded plastic parts with enhanced surface properties, like anti-reflective, superhydrophobic and structural colors can be achieved by micro- and nanostructuring the surface of the steel molds. We investigate the minimum line width that can be realized by our fabrication method and the influence of etching angle on the structure profile during the ion beam etching process. Trenches down to 400 nm in width have been successfully fabricated into a 316 type electro-polished steel wafer. Afterward a plastic replica has been produced by injection molding with good structure transfer fidelity. Thus we have demonstrated that by utilizing well-established fabrication techniques, nanostructured steel shims that are used in injection molding, a technique that allows low cost mass fabrication of plastic items, are produced. (paper)

  5. Tribological performance of the epoxy-based composite reinforced by WS{sub 2} fullerene-like nanoparticles and nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shneider, Mark; Dodiuk, Hanna; Kenig, Shmuel [Shenkar College of Engineering and Design, Ramat Gan 52526 (Israel); Rapoport, Lev; Moshkovich, Alexey; Zak, Alla [Department of Science, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 305, Holon 58102 (Israel); Tenne, Reshef [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2013-11-15

    Recently large amounts of inorganic nanotubes (INT) and inorganic fullerene-like (IF) nanoparticles of WS{sub 2} became available and methods for their dispersion in different media were developed. In the present work the tribological properties of epoxy composite compounded with tungsten disulfide particles of different sizes and morphologies, including quasi-spherical IF nanoparticles, one-dimensional INT as well as micron-size platelets (2H) were investigated. The coefficient of friction and wear loss were measured under dry contact conditions using different tribological rigs. Remarkable reduction in wear and also friction (under high load) was demonstrated for the IF/INT epoxy nanocomposite. The reduced wear is attributed in general to the reinforcement of the polymer matrix by nanoparticles and the simultaneous reduction of the epoxy brittleness. Contrarily, the friction of the neat epoxy sample and epoxy mixed with platelets was accompanied with strong wear and transfer of a polymer film onto the rubbed surfaces. These results are consistent with the recently reported improvements in the fracture toughness, peel and shear strength of the epoxy-nanoparticles (IF/INT) composites. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Tribological performance of the epoxy-based composite reinforced by WS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles and nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shneider, Mark; Dodiuk, Hanna; Kenig, Shmuel; Rapoport, Lev; Moshkovich, Alexey; Zak, Alla; Tenne, Reshef

    2013-01-01

    Recently large amounts of inorganic nanotubes (INT) and inorganic fullerene-like (IF) nanoparticles of WS 2 became available and methods for their dispersion in different media were developed. In the present work the tribological properties of epoxy composite compounded with tungsten disulfide particles of different sizes and morphologies, including quasi-spherical IF nanoparticles, one-dimensional INT as well as micron-size platelets (2H) were investigated. The coefficient of friction and wear loss were measured under dry contact conditions using different tribological rigs. Remarkable reduction in wear and also friction (under high load) was demonstrated for the IF/INT epoxy nanocomposite. The reduced wear is attributed in general to the reinforcement of the polymer matrix by nanoparticles and the simultaneous reduction of the epoxy brittleness. Contrarily, the friction of the neat epoxy sample and epoxy mixed with platelets was accompanied with strong wear and transfer of a polymer film onto the rubbed surfaces. These results are consistent with the recently reported improvements in the fracture toughness, peel and shear strength of the epoxy-nanoparticles (IF/INT) composites. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Contact allergy to epoxy (meth)acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Jungewelter, Soile; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Kuuliala, Outi; Jolanki, Riitta

    2009-07-01

    Contact allergy to epoxy (meth)acrylates, 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (bis-GMA), 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-acryloxypropoxy)phenyl]-propane (bis-GA), 2,2-bis[4-(methacryl-oxyethoxy)phenyl] propane (bis-EMA), 2,2-bis[4-(methacryloxy)phenyl]-propane (bis-MA), and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) is often manifested together with contact allergy to diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin. To analyse patterns of concomitant allergic reactions to the five epoxy (meth)acrylates in relation to exposure. We reviewed the 1994-2008 patch test files at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) for reactions to the five epoxy (meth)acrylates, and examined the patients' medical records for exposure. Twenty-four patients had an allergic reaction to at least one of the studied epoxy (meth)acrylates, but specific exposure was found only in five patients: two bis-GMA allergies from dental products, two bis-GA allergies from UV-curable printing inks, and one bis-GA allergy from an anaerobic glue. Only 25% of the patients were negative to DGEBA epoxy resin. The great majority of allergic patch test reactions to bis-GMA, bis-GA, GMA and bis-EMA were not associated with specific exposure, and cross-allergy to DGEBA epoxy resin remained a probable explanation. However, independent reactions to bis-GA indicated specific exposure. Anaerobic sealants may induce sensitization not only to aliphatic (meth)acrylates but also to aromatic bis-GA.

  8. Fabrication of Polydimethylsiloxane Microlenses Utilizing Hydrogel Shrinkage and a Single Molding Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bader Aldalali

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS microlenses and microlens arrays on flat and curved substrates fabricated via a relatively simple process combining liquid-phase photopolymerization and a single molding step. The mold for the formation of the PDMS lenses is fabricated by photopolymerizing a polyacrylamide (PAAm pre-hydrogel. The shrinkage of PAAm after its polymerization forms concave lenses. The lenses are then transferred to PDMS by a single step molding to form PDMS microlens array on a flat substrate. The PAAm concave lenses are also transferred to PDMS and another flexible polymer, Solaris, to realize artificial compound eyes. The resultant microlenses and microlens arrays possess good uniformity and optical properties. The focal length of the lenses is inversely proportional to the shrinkage time. The microlens mold can also be rehydrated to change the focal length of the ultimate PDMS microlenses. The spherical aberration is 2.85 μm and the surface roughness is on the order of 204 nm. The microlenses can resolve 10.10 line pairs per mm (lp/mm and have an f-number range between f/2.9 and f/56.5. For the compound eye, the field of view is 113°.

  9. Double blind placebo controlled exposure to molds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, H W; Jensen, K A; Nielsen, K F

    2005-01-01

    non-significant, and at the same level as after placebo exposure. The developed exposure system based on the Particle-Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (P-FLEC) makes it possible to deliver a precise and highly controlled dose of mold spores from water-damaged building materials, imitating realistic......The objective was to develop an experimental setup for human exposure to mold spores, and to study the clinical effect of this exposure in sensitive subjects who had previously experienced potentially building-related symptoms (BRS) at work. From three water-damaged schools eight employees....... In conclusion this is, to our knowledge, the first study to successfully conduct a human exposure to a highly controlled dose of fungal material aerosolized directly from wet building materials. This short-term exposure to high concentrations of two different molds induced no more reactions than exposure...

  10. Nanostructuring steel for injection molding tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Azawi, A.; Smistrup, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The production of nanostructured plastic items by injection molding with ridges down to 400 nm in width, which is the smallest line width replicated from nanostructured steel shims, is presented. Here we detail a micro-fabrication method where electron beam lithography, nano-imprint lithography...... and ion beam etching are combined to nanostructure the planar surface of a steel wafer. Injection molded plastic parts with enhanced surface properties, like anti-reflective, superhydrophobic and structural colors can be achieved by micro-and nanostructuring the surface of the steel molds. We investigate...... the minimum line width that can be realized by our fabrication method and the influence of etching angle on the structure profile during the ion beam etching process. Trenches down to 400 nm in width have been successfully fabricated into a 316 type electro-polished steel wafer. Afterward a plastic replica...

  11. Curing behavior and thermal properties of trifunctional epoxy resin cured by 4, 4’-diaminodiphenyl sulfone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel trifunctional epoxy resin 4-(3, 3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2, 4, 4-trimethyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-yl-1, 3-benzenediol glycidyl (shorted as TMBPBTH-EPOXY was synthesized in our lab to improve thermal performance. Its curing behavior and performance were studied by using 4, 4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS as hardener with the mass ratio of 100:41 of TMBPBTH-EPOXY and DDS. The curing activation energy was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC to be 64.0 kJ/mol estimated by Kissinger’s method and 68.7 kJ/mol estimated by Flynn-Wall-Ozawa method respectively. Thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA was used to investigate the thermal decomposition of cured compounds. It was found that when curing temperature was lower than 180°C, the thermal decomposition temperature increased with the rise of curing temperature and curing time. On the other hand, when the curing temperature was higher than 180°C, the thermal decomposition temperature went down instead with the increase of curing time that might be the over-crosslinking of TMBPBTH-EPOXY and DDS hardener. The glass transition temperature (Tg of cured TMBPBTH-EPOXY/DDS compound determined by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA is 290.1°C.

  12. Tool steel quality and surface finishing of plastic molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Agnelli Mesquita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic industry is today in a constant growth, demanding several products from other segments, which includes the plastic molds, mainly used in the injection molding process. Considering all the requirements of plastic molds, the surface finishing is of special interest, as the injected plastic part is able to reproduce any details (and also defects from the mold surface. Therefore, several aspects on mold finishing are important, mainly related to manufacturing conditions - machining, grinding, polishing and texturing, and also related to the tool steel quality, in relation to microstructure homogeneity and non-metallic inclusions (cleanliness. The present paper is then focused on this interrelationship between steel quality and manufacturing process, which are both related to the final quality of plastic mold surfaces. Examples are discussed in terms of surface finishing of plastic molds and the properties or the microstructure of mold steels.

  13. Lightweight custom composite prosthetic components using an additive manufacturing-based molding technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Michael T; Belter, Joseph T; Gemmell, Kevin D; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D printing becomes higher quality and more inexpensive. The idea of 3D printed prosthetics components promises affordable, customizable devices, but these systems currently have major shortcomings in durability and function. In this paper, we propose a fabrication method for custom composite prostheses utilizing additive manufacturing, allowing for customizability, as well the durability of professional prosthetics. The manufacturing process is completed using 3D printed molds in a multi-stage molding system, which creates a custom finger or palm with a lightweight epoxy foam core, a durable composite outer shell, and soft urethane gripping surfaces. The composite material was compared to 3D printed and aluminum materials using a three-point bending test to compare stiffness, as well as gravimetric measurements to compare weight. The composite finger demonstrates the largest stiffness with the lowest weight compared to other tested fingers, as well as having customizability and lower cost, proving to potentially be a substantial benefit to the development of upper-limb prostheses.

  14. Validation of three-dimensional micro injection molding simulation accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Costa, F.S.; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2011-01-01

    length, injection pressure profile, molding mass and flow pattern. The importance of calibrated micro molding process monitoring for an accurate implementation strategy of the simulation and its validation has been demonstrated. In fact, inconsistencies and uncertainties in the experimental data must...... be minimized to avoid introducing uncertainties in the simulation calculations. Simulations of bulky sub-100 milligrams micro molded parts have been validated and a methodology for accurate micro molding simulations was established....

  15. COMPUTER AIDED THREE DIMENSIONAL DESIGN OF MOLD COMPONENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerim ÇETİNKAYA

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Sheet metal molding design with classical methods is formed in very long times calculates and drafts. At the molding design, selection and drafting of most of the components requires very long time because of similar repetative processes. In this study, a molding design program has been developed by using AutoLISP which has been adapted AutoCAD packet program. With this study, design of sheet metal molding, dimensioning, assemly drafting has been realized.

  16. Aging in CTBN modified epoxy resin stocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creed, K.E. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The cause of degradation in the glass transition temperature (T/sub G/) of a partially crystallized polymer was investigated. Sample epoxy resin filled capacitors were cured at 90 0 C for 24 hours, then stored at room atmospheric conditions. These showed typical degradation in T/sub G/ after storage for one month. One set of epoxy resin castings was stored at room atmosphere and another set was stored in a dry box at 0% relative humidity and 27 0 C. The samples at room atmospheric conditions showed typical degradation in T/sub G/, while the T/sub G/ for those stored in the dry box increased. Further tests were then made on epoxy resin castings at various curing temperatures and times at both room atmosphere and 0% humidity. Resulting data indicated that absorption of moisture during storage was the predominant cause of T/sub G/ degradation, with stress relaxation another, though smaller, contributing factor

  17. Spall Strength Measurements in Transparent Epoxy Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Jonathan; Rahmat, Meysam; Petel, Oren

    2017-06-01

    Polymer nanocomposites are seeing more frequent use in transparent armour applications. The role of the microstructure on the performance of these materials under dynamic tensile loading conditions is of particular interest. In the present study, a series of plate impact experiments was conducted in order to evaluate the dynamic response of an epoxy (EPON 828) cured with two differed hardeners. The purpose was to compare the role of these hardeners on the dynamic performance of the resulting transparent epoxy. The material response was resolved with a multi-channel photonic Doppler velocimeter. This system was used to determine the shock Hugoniot and dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the materials. The experimental results are presented in reference to spall theory and are evaluated against results predicted by an analytical model of the impacts. While varying the hardener did not change the shock Hugoniot of the epoxy, it did have an effect on the measured spall strengths.

  18. Epoxy Nanocomposites filled with Carbon Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gallego, M; Yuste-Sanchez, V; Sanchez-Hidalgo, R; Verdejo, R; Lopez-Manchado, M A

    2018-01-10

    Over the past decades, the development of high performance lightweight polymer nanocomposites and, in particular, of epoxy nanocomposites has become one the greatest challenges in material science. The ultimate goal of epoxy nanocomposites is to extrapolate the exceptional intrinsic properties of the nanoparticles to the bulk matrix. However, in spite of the efforts, this objective is still to be attained at commercially attractive scales. Key aspects to achieve this are ultimately the full understanding of network structure, the dispersion degree of the nanoparticles, the interfacial adhesion at the phase boundaries and the control of the localization and orientation of the nanoparticles in the epoxy system. In this Personal Account, we critically discuss the state of the art and evaluate the strategies to overcome these barriers. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Solvent-assisted polymer micro-molding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN LuLu; ZHOU Jing; GONG Xiao; GAO ChangYou

    2009-01-01

    The micro-molding technology has played an important role in fabrication of polymer micro-patterns and development of functional devices.In such a process,suitable solvent can swell or dissolve the polymer films to decrease their glass transition temperature (Tg) and viscosity and thereby improve flowing ability.Consequently,it is easy to obtain the 2D and 3D patterns with high fidelity by the solvent-assisted micro-molding.Compared with the high temperature molding,this technology overcomes some shortcomings such as shrinking after cooling,degradation at high temperature,difficulty in processing some functional materials having high Tg,etc.It can be applied to making patterns not only on polymer monolayers but also on polyelectrolyte multilayers.Moreover,the compressioninduced patterns on the multilayers are chemically homogenous but physically heterogeneous.In this review,the controlling factors on the pattern quality are also discussed,including materials of the mold,solvent,pressure,temperature and pattern density.

  20. Progress in Titanium Metal Powder Injection Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall M. German

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal powder injection molding is a shaping technology that has achieved solid scientific underpinnings. It is from this science base that recent progress has occurred in titanium powder injection molding. Much of the progress awaited development of the required particles with specific characteristics of particle size, particle shape, and purity. The production of titanium components by injection molding is stabilized by a good understanding of how each process variable impacts density and impurity level. As summarized here, recent research has isolated the four critical success factors in titanium metal powder injection molding (Ti-MIM that must be simultaneously satisfied—density, purity, alloying, and microstructure. The critical role of density and impurities, and the inability to remove impurities with sintering, compels attention to starting Ti-MIM with high quality alloy powders. This article addresses the four critical success factors to rationalize Ti-MIM processing conditions to the requirements for demanding applications in aerospace and medical fields. Based on extensive research, a baseline process is identified and reported here with attention to linking mechanical properties to the four critical success factors.

  1. Molding cork sheets to complex shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, M. H.; Simpson, W. G.; Walker, H. M.

    1977-01-01

    Partially cured cork sheet is easily formed to complex shapes and then final-cured. Temperature and pressure levels required for process depend upon resin system used and final density and strength desired. Sheet can be bonded to surface during final cure, or can be first-formed in mold and bonded to surface in separate step.

  2. A REVOLUTION IN MOLD IDENTIFICATION AND ENUMERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    More than 100 assay were developed to identify and quantify indoor molds using quantitiative PCR (QPCR) assays. This technology incorporates fluorigenic 5' nuclease (TaqMan�) chemistry directed at the nuclear ribosomal RNA operon internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 or ITS2...

  3. The effect of mold surface topography on plastic parat in-process shrinkage in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kjær, Erik Michael

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study of the effect of mold surface roughness on in-process in-flow linear part shrinkage in injection molding has been carried out. The investigation is based on an experimental two-cavity tool, where the cavities have different surface topographies, but are otherwise identical....... The study has been carried out for typical commercial polystyrene and polypropylene grades. The relationship between mold surface topography and linear shrinkage has been investigated with an experimental two-cavity mold producing simple rectangular parts with the nominal dimensions 1 x 25 x 50 mm (see...... figure 1). The cavities have different surface topographies on one side, but are otherwise identical (see discussion of other contribution factors)....

  4. 21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Phenolic resins in molded articles. 177.2410... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2410 Phenolic resins in molded articles. Phenolic resins identified in this section may be safely used as the food-contact surface of molded...

  5. Analysis of cracking in glass molds made of cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leushin, I. O.; Chistyakov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    The cracking in the parts of cast iron molds intended for glass is considered, and this cracking substantially affects the operation of glass-blowing equipment, maintainability, and the replacement of mold sets. The processes that cause cracking in the parts of glass molds and initiate crack growth are studied.

  6. Diagnosis of mold allergy by RAST and skin prick testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordvall, S L; Agrell, B; Malling, H J; Dreborg, S

    1990-11-01

    Sera from 33 patients with mold allergy proven by bronchial provocation were analyzed for specific IgE against six mold species comparing an improved Phadebas RAST with four other techniques. The new method was more sensitive and gave significantly higher IgE antibody concentrations for all tested molds except Cladosporium herbarum.

  7. Atomistic modeling of thermomechanical properties of SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Nicholas; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to compute thermomechanical properties of cured epoxy resins reinforced with pristine and covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes. A DGEBA-DDS epoxy network was built using the ‘dendrimer’ growth approach where 75% of available epoxy sites were cross-linked. The epoxy model is verified through comparisons to experiments, and simulations are performed on nanotube reinforced cross-linked epoxy matrix using the CVFF force field in LAMMPS. Full stiffness matrices and linear coefficient of thermal expansion vectors are obtained for the nanocomposite. Large increases in stiffness and large decreases in thermal expansion were seen along the direction of the nanotube for both nanocomposite systems when compared to neat epoxy. The direction transverse to nanotube saw a 40% increase in stiffness due to covalent functionalization over neat epoxy at 1 K whereas the pristine nanotube system only saw a 7% increase due to van der Waals effects. The functionalized SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite showed an additional 42% decrease in thermal expansion along the nanotube direction when compared to the pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. The stiffness matrices are rotated over every possible orientation to simulate the effects of an isotropic system of randomly oriented nanotubes in the epoxy. The randomly oriented covalently functionalized SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites showed substantial improvements over the plain epoxy in terms of higher stiffness (200% increase) and lower thermal expansion (32% reduction). Through MD simulations, we develop means to build simulation cells, perform annealing to reach correct densities, compute thermomechanical properties and compare with experiments.

  8. Electroactive polymer gels based on epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samui, A. B.; Jayakumar, S.; Jayalakshmi, C. G.; Pandey, K.; Sivaraman, P.

    2007-04-01

    Five types of epoxy gels have been synthesized from common epoxy resins and hardeners. Fumed silica and nanoclay, respectively, were used as fillers and butyl methacrylate/acrylamide were used as monomer(s) for making interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) in three compositions. Swelling study, tensile property evaluation, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and electroactive property evaluation were done. The gels have sufficient mechanical strength and the time taken for bending to 20° was found to be 22 min for forward bias whereas it was just 12 min for reverse bias.

  9. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gultom, O.; Suryanto; Sayogo; Ramdan

    1997-01-01

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  10. Kevlar 49/Epoxy COPV Aging Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, James K.; Salem, Jonathan L.; Thesken, John C.; Russell, Richard W.; Littell, Justin; Ruggeri, Charles; Leifeste, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA initiated an effort to determine if the aging of Kevlar 49/Epoxy composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV) affected their performance. This study briefly reviews the history and certification of composite pressure vessels employed on NASA Orbiters. Tests to evaluate overwrap tensile strength changes compared 30 year old samples from Orbiter vessels to new Kevlar/Epoxy pressure vessel materials. Other tests include transverse compression and thermal analyses (glass transition and moduli). Results from these tests do not indicate a noticeable effect due to aging of the overwrap materials.

  11. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Lee, Elizabeth (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Kallam, Alekhya (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Majumdar, Partha (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J. (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Celina, Mathias C.; Bahr, James (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  12. Verification of a three-dimensional resin transfer molding process simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerson, John C.; Loos, Alfred C.; Dexter, H. Benson

    1995-01-01

    Experimental evidence was obtained to complete the verification of the parameters needed for input to a three-dimensional finite element model simulating the resin flow and cure through an orthotropic fabric preform. The material characterizations completed include resin kinetics and viscosity models, as well as preform permeability and compaction models. The steady-state and advancing front permeability measurement methods are compared. The results indicate that both methods yield similar permeabilities for a plain weave, bi-axial fiberglass fabric. Also, a method to determine principal directions and permeabilities is discussed and results are shown for a multi-axial warp knit preform. The flow of resin through a blade-stiffened preform was modeled and experiments were completed to verify the results. The predicted inlet pressure was approximately 65% of the measured value. A parametric study was performed to explain differences in measured and predicted flow front advancement and inlet pressures. Furthermore, PR-500 epoxy resin/IM7 8HS carbon fabric flat panels were fabricated by the Resin Transfer Molding process. Tests were completed utilizing both perimeter injection and center-port injection as resin inlet boundary conditions. The mold was instrumented with FDEMS sensors, pressure transducers, and thermocouples to monitor the process conditions. Results include a comparison of predicted and measured inlet pressures and flow front position. For the perimeter injection case, the measured inlet pressure and flow front results compared well to the predicted results. The results of the center-port injection case showed that the predicted inlet pressure was approximately 50% of the measured inlet pressure. Also, measured flow front position data did not agree well with the predicted results. Possible reasons for error include fiber deformation at the resin inlet and a lag in FDEMS sensor wet-out due to low mold pressures.

  13. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevin Jerome Sutherland

    2001-01-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ((mu)TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods

  14. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.

  15. Hydrophobicity Tuning by the Fast Evolution of Mold Temperature during Injection Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Liparoti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The surface topography of a molded part strongly affects its functional properties, such as hydrophobicity, cleaning capabilities, adhesion, biological defense and frictional resistance. In this paper, the possibility to tune and increase the hydrophobicity of a molded polymeric part was explored. An isotactic polypropylene was injection molded with fast cavity surface temperature evolutions, obtained adopting a specifically designed heating system layered below the cavity surface. The surface topology was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM and, concerning of hydrophobicity, by measuring the water static contact angle. Results show that the hydrophobicity increases with both the temperature level and the time the cavity surface temperature was kept high. In particular, the contact angle of the molded sample was found to increase from 90°, with conventional molding conditions, up to 113° with 160 °C of cavity surface temperature kept for 18 s. This increase was found to be due to the presence of sub-micro and nano-structures characterized by high values of spatial frequencies which could be more accurately replicated by adopting high heating temperatures and times. The surface topography and the hydrophobicity resulted therefore tunable by selecting appropriate injection molding conditions.

  16. Cure Kinetics of Epoxy Nanocomposites Affected by MWCNTs Functionalization: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Bakhshandeh, Ehsan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali; Mäder, Edith; Scheffler, Christina; Heinrich, Gert

    2013-01-01

    The current paper provides an overview to emphasize the role of functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in manipulating cure kinetics of epoxy nanocomposites, which itself determines ultimate properties of the resulting compound. In this regard, the most commonly used functionalization schemes, that is, carboxylation and amidation, are thoroughly surveyed to highlight the role of functionalized nanotubes in controlling the rate of autocatalytic and vitrification kinetics. The current literature elucidates that the mechanism of curing in epoxy/MWCNTs nanocomposites remains almost unaffected by the functionalization of carbon nanotubes. On the other hand, early stage facilitation of autocatalytic reactions in the presence of MWCNTs bearing amine groups has been addressed by several researchers. When carboxylated nanotubes were used to modify MWCNTs, the rate of such reactions diminished as a consequence of heterogeneous dispersion within the epoxy matrix. At later stages of curing, however, the prolonged vitrification was seen to be dominant. Thus, the type of functional groups covalently located on the surface of MWCNTs directly affects the degree of polymer-nanotube interaction followed by enhancement of curing reaction. Our survey demonstrated that most widespread efforts ever made to represent multifarious surface-treated MWCNTs have not been directed towards preparation of epoxy nanocomposites, but they could result in property synergism. PMID:24348181

  17. Low Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development Reaction Injection Molded 7.5 Meter Wind Turbine Blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David M. Wright; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-07-31

    An optimized small turbine blade (7.5m radius) was designed and a partial section molded with the RIM (reaction-injection molded polymer) process for mass production. The intended market is for generic three-bladed wind turbines, 100 kilowatts or less, for grid-assist end users with rural and semi-rural sites, such as the farm/ranch market, having low to moderate IEC Class 3-4 wind regimes. This blade will have substantial performance improvements over, and be cheaper than, present-day 7.5m blades. This is made possible by the injection-molding process, which yields high repeatability, accurate geometry and weights, and low cost in production quantities. No wind turbine blade in the 7.5m or greater size has used this process. The blade design chosen uses a RIM skin bonded to a braided infused carbon fiber/epoxy spar. This approach is attractive to present users of wind turbine blades in the 5-10m sizes. These include rebladeing California wind farms, refurbishing used turbines for the Midwest farm market, and other manufacturers introducing new turbines in this size range.

  18. Characterization of Epoxy Functionalized Graphite Nanoparticles and the Physical Properties of Epoxy Matrix Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Bauer, Jonathan L.; Maryanski, Michael J.; Heimann, Paula J.; Barlow, Jeremy P.; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Allred, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to the functionalization of graphite nanoparticles. The technique provides a mechanism for covalent bonding between the filler and matrix, with minimal disruption to the sp2 hybridization of the pristine graphene sheet. Functionalization proceeded by covalently bonding an epoxy monomer to the surface of expanded graphite, via a coupling agent, such that the epoxy concentration was measured as approximately 4 wt.%. The impact of dispersing this material into an epoxy resin was evaluated with respect to the mechanical properties and electrical conductivity of the graphite-epoxy nanocomposite. At a loading as low as 0.5 wt.%, the electrical conductivity was increased by five orders of magnitude relative to the base resin. The material yield strength was increased by 30% and Young s modulus by 50%. These results were realized without compromise to the resin toughness.

  19. Vegetable oil-derived epoxy monomers and polymer blends: A comparative study with review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Schuman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycidyl esters of epoxidized fatty acids derived from soybean oil (EGS and linseed oil (EGL have been synthesized to have higher oxirane content, more reactivity and lower viscosity than epoxidized soybean oil (ESO or epoxidized linseed oil (ELO. The EGS and ESO, for comparison, were used neat and in blends with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA. Thermosetting resins were fabricated with the epoxy monomers and either BF3 catalyst or anhydride. The curing behaviors, glass transition temperatures, crosslink densities and mechanical properties were tested. The results indicated that polymer glass transition temperatures were mostly a function of oxirane content with additional influence of glycidyl versus internal oxirane reactivity, pendant chain content, and chemical structure and presence of saturated components. EGS provided better compatibility with DGEBA, improved intermolecular crosslinking and glass transition temperature, and yielded mechanically stronger polymerized materials than materials obtained using ESO. Other benefits of the EGS resin blend systems were significantly reduced viscosities compared to either DGEBA or ESO-blended DGEBA counterparts. Therefore, EGS that is derived from renewable sources has improved potential for fabrication of structural and structurally complex epoxy composites, e.g., by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding.

  20. Effects of stitching on fracture toughness of uniweave textile graphite/epoxy laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Bhavani V.; Sharma, Suresh

    1995-01-01

    The effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact damage resistance, impact damage tolerance, and Mode 1 and Mode 2 fracture toughness of textile graphite/epoxy laminates were studied experimentally. Graphite/epoxy laminates were fabricated from AS4 graphite uniweave textiles and 3501-6 epoxy using Resin Transfer Molding. The cloths were stitched with Kevlar(tm) and glass yarns before resin infusion. Delamination was implanted during processing to simulate impact damage. Sublaminate buckling tests were performed in a novel fixture to measure Compression After Impact (CAI) strength of stitched laminates. The results show that CAI strength can be improved up to 400% by through-the-thickness stitching. Double Cantilever Beam tests were performed to study the effect of stitching on Mode 1 fracture toughness G(sub 1c). It was found that G(sub 1c) increased 30 times for a low stitching density of 16 stitches/sq in. Mode 2 fracture toughness was measured by testing the stitched beams in End Notch Flexure tests. Unlike in the unstitiched beams, crack propagation in the stitched beams was steady. The current formulas for ENF tests were not found suitable for determining G(sub 2C) for stitched beams. Hence two new methods were developed - one based on crack area measured from ultrasonic C-scanning and the other based on equivalent crack area measured from the residual stiffness of the specimen. The G(sub 2c) was found to be at least 5-15 times higher for the stitched laminates. The mechanisms by which stitching increases the CAI strength and fracture toughness are discussed.

  1. Radiation damage on high polymer epoxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, H M [Royal Military Coll. of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The effect of irradiation in a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor on the adhesive strength of epoxy resins was studied using the ASTM D897 standard testing procedure. Although the results were variable, indicating the doses were not well defined, nevertheless, there was evidence of strengthening associated with radiation-induced crosslinking. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centrefor Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1/2 page)

  3. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1 page)

  4. Mold exposure and health effects following hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Deborah N; Grimsley, L Faye; White, LuAnn E; El-Dahr, Jane M; Lichtveld, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    The extensive flooding in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita created conditions ideal for indoor mold growth, raising concerns about the possible adverse health effects associated with indoor mold exposure. Studies evaluating the levels of indoor and outdoor molds in the months following the hurricanes found high levels of mold growth. Homes with greater flood damage, especially those with >3 feet of indoor flooding, demonstrated higher levels of mold growth compared with homes with little or no flooding. Water intrusion due to roof damage was also associated with mold growth. However, no increase in the occurrence of adverse health outcomes has been observed in published reports to date. This article considers reasons why studies of mold exposure after the hurricane do not show a greater health impact.

  5. A comparison of molding procedures - Contact, injection and vacuum injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathiard, G.

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic aspects of the contact, injection and vacuum injection molding of reinforced plastic components are compared for the example of a tractor roof with a gel-coated surface. Consideration is given to the possibility of reinforcement, number of smooth faces, condition of the gel-coated surface, reliability, and labor and workplace requirements of the three processes, and advantages of molding between the mold and a countermold in smooth faces, reliability, labor requirements, working surface and industrial hygiene are pointed out. The times and labor requirements of each step in the molding cycles are examined, and material requirements and yields, investment costs, amortization and product cost prices of the processes are compared. It is concluded that, for the specific component examined, the processes of vacuum injection and injection molding appear very interesting, with injection molding processes resulting in lower cost prices than contact molding for any production volume.

  6. Direct molding of pavement tiles made of ground tire rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrini, Fabrizio; Gagliardi, Donatella; Tedde, Giovanni Matteo; Santo, Loredana; Musacchi, Ettore

    2016-10-01

    Large rubber products can be molded by using only ground tire rubber (GTR) without any additive or binder due to a new technology called "direct molding". Rubber granules and powders from tire recycling are compression molded at elevated temperatures and pressures. The feasibility of this process was clearly shown in laboratory but the step to the industrial scale was missing. Thanks to an European Project (SMART "Sustainable Molding of Articles from Recycled Tires") this step has been made and some results are reported in this study. The press used for compression molding is described. Some tests were made to measure the energy consumption so as to evaluate costs for production in comparison with conventional technologies for GTR molding (by using binders). Results show that 1 m2 tiles can be easily molded with several thicknesses in a reasonable low time. Energy consumption is higher than conventional technologies but it is lower than the cost for binders.

  7. Adhesion between coating layers based on epoxy and silicone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jacob R.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Kiil, Søren

    2007-01-01

    The adhesion between a silicon tie-coat and epoxy primers, used in marine coating systems, has been studied in this work. Six epoxy coatings (with varying chain lengths of the epoxy resins), some of which have shown problems with adhesion to the tie-coat during service life, have been considered....... The experimental investigation includes measurements of the surface tension of the tie-coat and the critical surface tensions of the epoxies, topographic investigation of the surfaces of cured epoxy coatings via atomic force microscopy (AFM), and pull-off tests for investigating the strength of adhesion...... to the silicon/epoxy systems. Calculations for determining the roughness factor of the six epoxy coatings (based on the AFM topographies) and the theoretical work of adhesion have been carried out. The coating surfaces are also characterized based on the van Oss-Good theory. Previous studies on the modulus...

  8. Molding of L band niobium superconductor cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Koizumi, Susumu [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    A cavity to produce high accelerating electron field was developed. The L-band (1.3 GHz) niobium superconductor unit cell cavity was ellipsoid with {phi}217.3 mm outer diameter and 2.5 mm thickness and consisted of two pieces of half cell, two beam pipes and flange. A deep drawing process was adapted. In spite of the first trial manufacture, each good cavity was obtained. Characteristic properties of niobium materials, molding method of cavity, extension of sheet after molding, production of beam pipe, accuracy and the cost were explained. Niobium materials. showed tensile strength 15.6 kg/mm{sup 2}, load-carrying capacity 4.1 kg/mm{sup 2}, density 8.57, extension 42.5% and RRR (resistance residual ratio){>=}200. (S.Y.)

  9. Manufacturing Science of Improved Molded Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    Evaluation of a Bench-Top Precision Glass Molding Machine, Advances in Mechanical Engineering, (04 2013): 0. doi: 10.1155/2013/178680 Erick Koontz ...reviewed journals: 3.00 (b) Papers published in non-peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) E. Koontz , P. Wachtel, J. David Musgraves, K. Richardson...2013 Conference, Rochester, NY October 14-17 2013. E. Koontz , P. Wachtel, J. David Musgraves, K. Richardson, S. Mourad, M. Huber, A. Kunz, M

  10. Modification of bifunctional epoxy resin using CO{sub 2} fixation process and nanoclay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoshkish, Morteza; Bouhendi, Hosein, E-mail: H.boohendi@ippi.ac.ir; Vafayan, Mehdi

    2014-10-15

    A bifunctional epoxy resin was modified by using a CO{sub 2} fixation solution process in the presence of tetra n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) as catalyst and the modified treated resin was treated by cloisite 30B as nano additive. The Unmodified epoxy resin (UME), CO{sub 2} fixated modified epoxy resin (CFME), and CFME/clay nano composite (CFMEN), were cured by diethylenetriamine (DETA). A cycloaliphatic compound as a reactive diluent was used to control the viscosity of high viscose CFME. The exfoliation of organoclay in UME and CFME was investigated by X-ray diffraction and activation energy was computed using the advanced integral isoconversional method. The activation energy dependency demonstrated that the mechanism of UME curing did not change in the presence of nanoclay. In contrast, the CO{sub 2} fixation results showed a significant change in the activation energy dependency. The Thermal stability parameters include the initial degradation temperature (IDT), the temperature at the maximum rate of weight loss (T{sub max}), and the decomposition activation energy (E{sub d}) were determined by thermal gravimetry analysis. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis measurements showed that the presence of organoclay in CFME increases the T{sub g} of nano composite in contrast to UME. The fracture roughness of UME, CFME and CFNE were determined by scanning electron microscope. The exfoliated UME/1%clay nanocomposite was confirmed by TEM image. - Highlights: • A new epoxy resin was synthesized using CO{sub 2} fixation reaction. • The synthesized epoxy resin was modified by an organo nano-clay. • CO{sub 2} fixation noticeably changed the curing mechanism. • CO{sub 2} fixation reaction consumes CO{sub 2} which is a harmful greenhouse gas.

  11. Effect of aluminium particles on mechanical and morphological properties of epoxy nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello Sefiu A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bumper is a front or rear part of automobiles. It is designed and shaped to be impact absorbing and protecting automobiles from damage in low impact collisions. Initially, they were made from heavy steels, increasing the weight of automobiles and fuel consumption. Also, high impacts of steel bumpers on pedestrians during accidental collision cause fatalities and or disabilities. An effort to enhance fuel efficiency, safety, freedom of design and shape detailing, heavy alloys for automobile applications are now being replaced with polymeric composites. Aluminium micro particles and nanoparticles were prepared from aluminium cans through sand casting, lathe machine spinning, and ball milling techniques. Both types of aluminium particles were incorporated into a mixture of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA, epoxy resin cured with amine base hardener (ABH. Phases of the epoxy polymer and composites were identified using Xray Diffraction (XRD. Spatial arrangement of the phases within the matrix and their elemental composition were examined using Scanning Electron Microscope with attached energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX. Tensile, impact and micro hardness tests were conducted on the prepared epoxy/aluminium composites. Results of the XRD showed the presence of aluminium compounds/phases due to chemical reactions between aluminium particles and DGEBA/ABH system. SEM confirmed a homogeneous distribution of the phases within the epoxy matrix, and that there is a strong adhesion between the epoxy matrix and aluminium particles. Correlation between the mechanical properties of the prepared nanocomposite and the procured bumper materials exhibited a fair suitability of the prepared nanocomposites for automobile applications.

  12. Modification of bifunctional epoxy resin using CO2 fixation process and nanoclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshkish, Morteza; Bouhendi, Hosein; Vafayan, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    A bifunctional epoxy resin was modified by using a CO 2 fixation solution process in the presence of tetra n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) as catalyst and the modified treated resin was treated by cloisite 30B as nano additive. The Unmodified epoxy resin (UME), CO 2 fixated modified epoxy resin (CFME), and CFME/clay nano composite (CFMEN), were cured by diethylenetriamine (DETA). A cycloaliphatic compound as a reactive diluent was used to control the viscosity of high viscose CFME. The exfoliation of organoclay in UME and CFME was investigated by X-ray diffraction and activation energy was computed using the advanced integral isoconversional method. The activation energy dependency demonstrated that the mechanism of UME curing did not change in the presence of nanoclay. In contrast, the CO 2 fixation results showed a significant change in the activation energy dependency. The Thermal stability parameters include the initial degradation temperature (IDT), the temperature at the maximum rate of weight loss (T max ), and the decomposition activation energy (E d ) were determined by thermal gravimetry analysis. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis measurements showed that the presence of organoclay in CFME increases the T g of nano composite in contrast to UME. The fracture roughness of UME, CFME and CFNE were determined by scanning electron microscope. The exfoliated UME/1%clay nanocomposite was confirmed by TEM image. - Highlights: • A new epoxy resin was synthesized using CO 2 fixation reaction. • The synthesized epoxy resin was modified by an organo nano-clay. • CO 2 fixation noticeably changed the curing mechanism. • CO 2 fixation reaction consumes CO 2 which is a harmful greenhouse gas

  13. Adaptive temporal refinement in injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyofylli, Violeta; Schmitz, Mauritius; Hopmann, Christian; Behr, Marek

    2018-05-01

    Mold filling is an injection molding stage of great significance, because many defects of the plastic components (e.g. weld lines, burrs or insufficient filling) can occur during this process step. Therefore, it plays an important role in determining the quality of the produced parts. Our goal is the temporal refinement in the vicinity of the evolving melt front, in the context of 4D simplex-type space-time grids [1, 2]. This novel discretization method has an inherent flexibility to employ completely unstructured meshes with varying levels of resolution both in spatial dimensions and in the time dimension, thus allowing the use of local time-stepping during the simulations. This can lead to a higher simulation precision, while preserving calculation efficiency. A 3D benchmark case, which concerns the filling of a plate-shaped geometry, is used for verifying our numerical approach [3]. The simulation results obtained with the fully unstructured space-time discretization are compared to those obtained with the standard space-time method and to Moldflow simulation results. This example also serves for providing reliable timing measurements and the efficiency aspects of the filling simulation of complex 3D molds while applying adaptive temporal refinement.

  14. Experimental Investigation on Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Marble Dust Particulate-Filled Needle-Punched Nonwoven Jute Fiber/Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ankush; Patnaik, Amar

    2018-03-01

    The present investigation evaluates the effects of waste marble dust, collected from the marble industries of Rajasthan, India, on the mechanical properties of needle-punched nonwoven jute fiber/epoxy composites. The composites with varying filler contents from 0 wt.% to 30 wt.% marble dust were prepared using vacuum-assisted resin-transfer molding. The influences of the filler material on the void content, tensile strength, flexural strength, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), and thermal conductivity of the hybrid composites have been analyzed experimentally under the desired optimal conditions. The addition of marble dust up to 30 wt.% increases the flexural strength, ILSS, and thermal conductivity, but decreases the tensile strength. Subsequently, the fractured surfaces of the particulate-filled jute/epoxy composites were analyzed microstructurally by field-emission scanning electron microscopy.

  15. The Influence of Biochemical Modification on the Properties of Adhesive Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Rudawska; Izabela Haniecka; Magdalena Jaszek; Monika Osińska-Jaroszuk

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the effect of biochemical modification of epoxy adhesive compounds on the mechanical properties of a cured adhesive exposed to various climatic factors. The epoxy adhesive was modified by lyophilized fungal metabolites and prepared by three methods. Additionally, the adhesive compound specimens were seasoned for two months at a temperature of 50 °C and 50% humidity in a climate test chamber, Espec SH 661. The tensile strength tests of the adh...

  16. Modification of (DGEBA epoxy resin with maleated depolymerised natural rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DEGBA type epoxy resin has been modified with maleated depolymerised natural rubber (MDPR. MDPR was prepared by grafting maleic anhydride onto depolymerised natural rubber. MDPR has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. MDPR was blended with epoxy resin at three different ratios (97/3, 98/2 and 99/1, by keeping the epoxy resin component as the major phase and maleated depolymerised natural rubber component as the minor phase. The reaction between the two blend components took place between the acid/anhydride group in the MDPR and the epoxide group of the epoxy resin. The proposed reaction schemes were supported by the FT-IR spectrum of the uncured Epoxy/MDPR blends. The neat epoxy resin and Epoxy/MDPR blends were cured by methylene dianiline (DDM at 100°C for three hours. Thermal, morphological and mechanical properties of the neat epoxy and the blends were investigated. Free volume studies of the cured, neat epoxy and Epoxy/MDPR blends were correlated with the morphological and mechanical properties of the same systems using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Studies.

  17. Microinjection molding of thermoplastic polymers: morphological comparison with conventional injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giboz, Julien; Mélé, Patrice; Copponnex, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    The skin–core crystalline morphology of injection-molded semi-crystalline polymers is well documented in the scientific literature. The thermomechanical environment provokes temperature and shear gradients throughout the entire thickness of the part during molding, thus influencing the polymer crystallization. Crystalline morphologies of a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) micromolded part (μpart) and a classical part (macropart) are compared with optical, thermal and x-ray diffraction analyses. Results show that the crystalline morphologies with regard to thickness vary between the two parts. While a 'skin–core' morphology is present for the macropart, the μpart exhibits a specific 'core-free' morphology, i.e. no spherulite is present at the center of the thickness. This result seems to be generated under the specific conditions used in microinjection molding that lead to the formation of smaller and more oriented crystalline entities

  18. Predicting shrinkage and warpage in injection molding: Towards automatized mold design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicke, Florian; Behr, Marek; Elgeti, Stefanie

    2017-10-01

    It is an inevitable part of any plastics molding process that the material undergoes some shrinkage during solidification. Mainly due to unavoidable inhomogeneities in the cooling process, the overall shrinkage cannot be assumed as homogeneous in all volumetric directions. The direct consequence is warpage. The accurate prediction of such shrinkage and warpage effects has been the subject of a considerable amount of research, but it is important to note that this behavior depends greatly on the type of material that is used as well as the process details. Without limiting ourselves to any specific properties of certain materials or process designs, we aim to develop a method for the automatized design of a mold cavity that will produce correctly shaped moldings after solidification. Essentially, this can be stated as a shape optimization problem, where the cavity shape is optimized to fulfill some objective function that measures defects in the molding shape. In order to be able to develop and evaluate such a method, we first require simulation methods for the diffierent steps involved in the injection molding process that can represent the phenomena responsible for shrinkage and warpage ina sufficiently accurate manner. As a starting point, we consider the solidification of purely amorphous materials. In this case, the material slowly transitions from fluid-like to solid-like behavior as it cools down. This behavior is modeled using adjusted viscoelastic material models. Once the material has passed a certain temperature threshold during cooling, any viscous effects are neglected and the behavior is assumed to be fully elastic. Non-linear elastic laws are used to predict shrinkage and warpage that occur after this point. We will present the current state of these simulation methods and show some first approaches towards optimizing the mold cavity shape based on these methods.

  19. Adhesion strength between thermoplastics and its polyurethane coating made by using the technology combination of injection molding and reaction injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloß, P.; Böhme, A.; Müller, J.; Krajewsky, P.; Michaelis, J.

    2014-05-01

    A complete equipment for injection molding (IM) of a thermoplastic (TP) carrier and reaction injection molding (RIM) of polyurethane (PUR) coatings including IM and RIM machines, a color module for PUR, and a robot was built up. A modularly composed sliding split mold was constructed and manufactured allowing different parts including thicker (2 mm thickness) soft touch and thin (0.4 mm) lacquer PUR coatings. As TP PC/ABS and PA6 GF15 compounds were used, and aromatic and aliphatic PUR systems as well. From the parts made by IM+RIM, test specimens for peel force measurements were cut. These investigations were performed prior and after ageing under climatic conditions @ 50 % RH and temperature changes between -30 °C and 90 °C. By varying IM processing parameters, we have found that mold and TP temperatures are particularly important for the adhesion strength between TP and PUR. The waiting time between the end of TP cooling and PUR injection has a minor influence on its mean value. However, to short waiting times may result in inhomogeneous adhesion. It was surprising that surface defects of the TP carrier leads also to inhomogeneous adhesion. We have observed that ageing may cause an increase and decrease of adhesions strength depending on the TP+PUR system used. We have found that the results are valid only for the actual TP and PUR combination. A generalization seems to be inappropriate, hence, the actual combination should be investigated to prevent unwanted surprises when the coated TP part is in its application.

  20. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Glass Lens Molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2015-01-01

    The required accuracy for the final dimensions of the molded lenses in wafer-based precision glass molding as well as the need for elimination of costly experimental trial and error calls for numerical simulations. This study deals with 3D thermo-mechanical modeling of the wafer-based precision...... glass lens molding process. First, a comprehensive 3D thermo-mechanical model of glass is implemented into a FORTRAN user subroutine (UMAT) in the FE program ABAQUS, and the developed FE model is validated with both a well-known sandwich seal test and experimental results of precision molding of several...... glass rings. Afterward, 3D thermo-mechanical modeling of the wafer-based glass lens manufacturing is performed to suggest a proper molding program (i.e., the proper set of process parameters including preset force-time and temperature-time histories) for molding a wafer to a desired dimension...

  1. Gold Nanospheres Dispersed Light Responsive Epoxy Vitrimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitrimers represent a new class of smart materials. They are covalently crosslinked like thermosets, yet they can be reprocessed like thermoplastics. The underlying mechanism is the rapid exchange reactions which form new bonds while breaking the old ones. So far, heating is the most widely used stimulus to activate the exchange reaction. Compared to heating, light not only is much more convenient to achieve remote and regional control, but can also offer fast healing. Gold nanospheres are excellent photothermal agents, but they are difficult to disperse into vitrimers as they easily aggregate. In this paper, we use polydopamine to prepare gold nanospheres. The resultant polydopamine-coated gold nanospheres (GNS can be well dispersed into epoxy vitrimers, endowing epoxy vitrimers with light responsivity. The composites can be reshaped permanently and temporarily with light at different intensity. Efficient surface patterning and healing are also demonstrated.

  2. Epoxy polyurethane nanocomposites filled with fullerite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhnova, R.A.; Galatenko, N.A.; Lukashevich, S.A.; Shirokov, O.D.; Levenets', Je.G.

    2015-01-01

    New nanocomposite materials based on epoxy polyurethane (EPU) containing nanoscale fullerite in its composition are produced. The influence of small impurities of fullerite on physical and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites is established. The effect of a nanofiller and its concentration on the structure and properties of the composite and the ability to biodegradation in vitro is studied. The developed nanocomposites exhibit the biodegradability, and the presence of nanofillers in the EPU facilitates the course of the process

  3. Understanding the impact of molds on indoor air quality and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molds are multi-celled, colony forming, eukaryotic microorganisms lacking chlorophyll belonging to the Kingdom Fungi. Furthermore, molds are ubiquitous in both indoor and outdoor environments. There are more than 200 different types of fungi to which people are routinely exposed (NAS. 2000). The growth of molds in homes, schools, offices, and other public buildings has been implicated as the cause of a wide variety of adverse health effects. Headlines resulting from moldy, water-damaged homes, particularly

  4. Biobased Epoxy Nanocomposites Derived from Lignin-Based Monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shou; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2015-07-13

    Biobased epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized based on 2-methoxy-4-propylphenol (dihydroeugenol, DHE), a molecule that has been obtained from the lignin component of biomass. To increase the content of hydroxyl groups, DHE was o-demethylated using aqueous HBr to yield propylcatechol (DHEO), which was subsequently glycidylated to epoxy monomer. Optimal conditions in terms of yield and epoxy equivalent weight were found to be 60 °C with equal NaOH/phenolic hydroxyl molar ratio. The structural evolution from DHE to cured epoxy was followed by (1)H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The nano-montmorillonite modified DHEO epoxy exhibited improved storage modulus and thermal stability as determined from dynamic mechanical analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. This study widens the synthesis routes of biobased epoxy thermosets from lignin-based molecules.

  5. Antidiarrheal Thymol Derivatives from Ageratina glabrata. Structure and Absolute Configuration of 10-Benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxy-6-hydroxythymol Isobutyrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Bustos-Brito

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical investigation of the leaves from Ageratina glabrata yielded four new thymol derivatives, namely: 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-dehydro-6-hydroxythymol isobutyrate (4, 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-dehydrothymol (5, 10-benzoyloxythymol (6 and 10-benzoyloxy-6,8-dihydroxy-9-isobutyryl-oxythymol (7. In addition, (8S-10-benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxy-6-hydroxythymol isobutyrate (1, together with other two already known thymol derivatives identified as 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxy-6-methoxythymol isobutyrate (2 and 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxythymol isobutyrate (3 were also obtained. In this paper, we report the structures and complete assignments of the 1H and 13C-NMR data of compounds 1–7, and the absolute configuration for compound 1, unambiguously established by single crystal X-ray diffraction, and evaluation of the Flack parameter. The in vitro antiprotozoal assay showed that compound 1 and its derivative 1a were the most potent antiamoebic and antigiardial compounds. Both compounds showed selectivity and good antiamoebic activity comparable to emetine and metronidazole, respectively, two antiprotozoal drugs used as positive controls. In relation to anti-propulsive effect, compound 1 and 1a showed inhibitory activity, with activities comparable to quercetin and compound 9, two natural antipropulsive compounds used as positive controls. These data suggest that compound 1 may play an important role in antidiarrheal properties of Ageratina glabrata.

  6. Characterization of wood-based molding bonded with citric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Umemura, Kenji; Ueda, Tomohide; Kawai, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    The wood-based moldings were fabricated by using only citric acid as an adhesive. The mechanical properties, water resistances, thermal properties and chemical structure were investigated. Wood powder obtained from Acacia mangium was mixed with citric acid under certain weight ratios (0-40 wt%), and each powder mixture was molded using two types of metal molds at 200 °C and 4MPa for 10 min. The modulus of rupture (MOR) and the modulus of elasticity (MOE) values of the wood-based molding conta...

  7. Deformation analysis considering thermal expansion of injection mold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Hyung; Yi, Dae Eun; Jang, Jeong Hui; Lee, Min Seok

    2015-01-01

    In the design of injection molds, the temperature distribution and deformation of the mold is one of the most important parameters that affect the flow characteristics, flash generation, and surface appearance, etc. Plastic injection analyses have been carried out to predict the temperature distribution of the mold and the pressure distribution on the cavity surface. As the input loads, we transfer the temperature and pressure results to the structural analysis. We compare the structural analysis results with the thermal expansion effect using the actual flash and step size of a smartphone cover part. To reduce the flash problem, we proposed a new mold design, and verified the results by performing simulations

  8. Additive Manufacturing of Molds for Fabrication of Insulated Concrete Block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, Lonnie J. [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D. [ORNL

    2018-02-01

    ORNL worked with concrete block manufacturer, NRG Insulated Block, to demonstrate additive manufacturing of a multi-component block mold for its line of insulated blocks. Solid models of the mold parts were constructed from existing two-dimensional drawings and the parts were fabricated on a Stratasys Fortus 900 using ULTEM 9085. Block mold parts were delivered to NRG and installed on one of their fabrication lines. While form and fit were acceptable, the molds failed to function during NRG’s testing.

  9. Replication of optical microlens arrays using photoresist coated molds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, Maumita; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Stubager, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    A cost reduced method of producing injection molding tools is reported and demonstrated for the fabrication of optical microlens arrays. A standard computer-numerical-control (CNC) milling machine was used to make a rough mold in steel. Surface treatment of the steel mold by spray coating...... with photoresist is used to smooth the mold surface providing good optical quality. The tool and process are demonstrated for the fabrication of an ø50 mm beam homogenizer for a color mixing LED light engine. The acceptance angle of the microlens array is optimized, in order to maximize the optical efficiency from...

  10. Deformation analysis considering thermal expansion of injection mold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Hyung; Yi, Dae Eun; Jang, Jeong Hui; Lee, Min Seok [Samsung Electronics Co., LTD., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    In the design of injection molds, the temperature distribution and deformation of the mold is one of the most important parameters that affect the flow characteristics, flash generation, and surface appearance, etc. Plastic injection analyses have been carried out to predict the temperature distribution of the mold and the pressure distribution on the cavity surface. As the input loads, we transfer the temperature and pressure results to the structural analysis. We compare the structural analysis results with the thermal expansion effect using the actual flash and step size of a smartphone cover part. To reduce the flash problem, we proposed a new mold design, and verified the results by performing simulations.

  11. Comparison of two setups for induction heating in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menotti, Stefano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    To eliminate defects and improve the quality of molded parts, increasing the mold temperature is one of the applicable solutions. A high mold temperature can increase the path flow of the polymer inside the cavity allowing reduction of the number of injection points, reduction of part thickness......, and moulding of smaller and more complex geometries. The last two aspects are very important in micro injection molding. In this paper, a new embedded induction heating system is proposed and validated and two different coil setups were tested and compared. An experimental investigation was performed based...

  12. Applying simulation to optimize plastic molded optical parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Matthew; Bakharev, Alexander; Costa, Franco; Friedl, Chris

    2012-10-01

    Optical injection molded parts are used in many different industries including electronics, consumer, medical and automotive due to their cost and performance advantages compared to alternative materials such as glass. The injection molding process, however, induces elastic (residual stress) and viscoelastic (flow orientation stress) deformation into the molded article which alters the material's refractive index to be anisotropic in different directions. Being able to predict and correct optical performance issues associated with birefringence early in the design phase is a huge competitive advantage. This paper reviews how to apply simulation analysis of the entire molding process to optimize manufacturability and part performance.

  13. Prediction of brittle fracture of epoxy-aluminum flanging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korbel J.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fracture mechanical approach for estimation of critical bending load of different types of aluminum-epoxy flanging and comparison with experimental measurements. For this purpose, several designs of the flanges were investigated. The flanges were glued to the epoxy bars and adhesive-epoxy interface was considered as a bi-material notch. Prediction of the failure is based on generalized stress intensity factor and generalized fracture toughness.

  14. Rapid microwave processing of epoxy nanocomposites using carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Luhyna, Nataliia; Inam, Fawad; Winnington, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Microwave processing is one of the rapid processing techniques for manufacturing nanocomposites. There is very little work focussing on the addition of CNTs for shortening the curing time of epoxy nanocomposites. Using microwave energy, the effect of CNT addition on the curing of epoxy nanocomposites was researched in this work. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to determine the degree of cure for epoxy and nanocomposite samples. CNT addition significantly reduced the duration ...

  15. Corrosion Protection of Steel by Epoxy-Organoclay Nanocomposite Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Domna Merachtsaki; Panagiotis Xidas; Panagiotis Giannakoudakis; Konstantinos Triantafyllidis; Panagiotis Spathis

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to study the corrosion behavior of steel coated with epoxy-(organo) clay nanocomposite films. The investigation was carried out using salt spray exposures, optical and scanning electron microscopy examination, open circuit potential, and electrochemical impedance measurements. The mechanical, thermomechanical, and barrier properties of pristine glassy epoxy polymer and epoxy-clay nanocomposites were examined. The degree of intercalation/exfoliation of clay ...

  16. Atomistic modeling of thermomechanical properties of SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasanella, Nicholas; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to compute thermomechanical properties of cured epoxy resins reinforced with pristine and covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes. A DGEBA-DDS epoxy network was built using the ‘dendrimer’ growth approach where 75% of available epoxy sites were cross-linked. The epoxy model is verified through comparisons to experiments, and simulations are performed on nanotube reinforced cross-linked epoxy matrix using the CVFF force field in LAMMPS. Full stiffness matrices and linear coefficient of thermal expansion vectors are obtained for the nanocomposite. Large increases in stiffness and large decreases in thermal expansion were seen along the direction of the nanotube for both nanocomposite systems when compared to neat epoxy. The direction transverse to nanotube saw a 40% increase in stiffness due to covalent functionalization over neat epoxy at 1 K whereas the pristine nanotube system only saw a 7% increase due to van der Waals effects. The functionalized SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite showed an additional 42% decrease in thermal expansion along the nanotube direction when compared to the pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. The stiffness matrices are rotated over every possible orientation to simulate the effects of an isotropic system of randomly oriented nanotubes in the epoxy. The randomly oriented covalently functionalized SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites showed substantial improvements over the plain epoxy in terms of higher stiffness (200% increase) and lower thermal expansion (32% reduction). Through MD simulations, we develop means to build simulation cells, perform annealing to reach correct densities, compute thermomechanical properties and compare with experiments. (paper)

  17. Accelerated thermal aging of rubber modified epoxy encapsulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayre, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    A program is outlined to enable prediction of physical properties of rubber modified epoxy encapsulants over the life time of the extended life neutron generators. Preliminary results show that the chief aging phenomenon occurring is increased crosslink density of the epoxy matrix. No changes in the rubber phase have been detected. The effect of increased epoxy crosslink density has been higher volume resistivity at 66 0 C, increased tensile strength, and decreased ultimate elongation

  18. Positron lifetime study of electron-irradiated epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; Wojnarovits, L.; Foeldiak, G.; Liszkai, L.; Kajcsos, Zs.

    1990-01-01

    Two bisphenol-A type epoxy resins were irradiated by electron beam and studied afterwards by positron lifetime spectroscopy. An interesting result is that despite of the considerable amount of free-radicals, no inhibition of positronium formation was observed in the two epoxies. Nevertheless, several serious differences were detected between the studied polymers. The results suggest that the radiation-resistant properties of epoxies depend strongly on the amount of the curing agent. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  19. Molding method of buffer material for underground disposal of radiation-contaminated material, and molded buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akasaka, Hidenari; Shimura, Satoshi; Kawakami, Susumu; Ninomiya, Nobuo; Yamagata, Junji; Asano, Eiichi

    1995-01-01

    Upon molding of a buffer material to be used upon burying a vessel containing radiation-contaminated materials in a sealed state, a powdery buffer material to be molded such as bentonite is disposed at the periphery of a mandrel having a cylindrical portion somewhat larger than contaminate container to be subjected to underground disposal. In addition, it is subjected to integration-molding such as cold isotropic press with a plastic film being disposed therearound, to form a molding product at high density. The molding product is released and taken out with the plastic film being disposed thereon. Releasability from an elastic mold is improved by the presence of the plastic film. In addition, if it is stored or transported while having the plastic film being disposed thereon, swelling of the buffer material due to water absorption or moisture absorption can be suppressed. (T.M.)

  20. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  1. Mechanical Properties Distribution within Polypropylene Injection Molded Samples: Effect of Mold Temperature under Uneven Thermal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Liparoti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the polymer parts produced by injection molding is strongly affected by the processing conditions. Uncontrolled deviations from the proper process parameters could significantly affect both internal structure and final material properties. In this work, to mimic an uneven temperature field, a strong asymmetric heating is applied during the production of injection-molded polypropylene samples. The morphology of the samples is characterized by optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM, whereas the distribution of mechanical modulus at different scales is obtained by Indentation and HarmoniX AFM tests. Results clearly show that the temperature differences between the two mold surfaces significantly affect the morphology distributions of the molded parts. This is due to both the uneven temperature field evolutions and to the asymmetric flow field. The final mechanical property distributions are determined by competition between the local molecular stretch and the local structuring achieved during solidification. The cooling rate changes affect internal structures in terms of relaxation/reorganization levels and give rise to an asymmetric distribution of mechanical properties.

  2. Halloysite reinforced epoxy composites with improved mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Muhammad Jawwad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs reinforced epoxy composites with improved mechanical properties were prepared. The prepared HNTs reinforced epoxy composites demonstrated improved mechanical properties especially the fracture toughness and flexural strength. The flexural modulus of nanocomposite with 6% mHNTs loading was 11.8% higher than that of neat epoxy resin. In addition, the nanocomposites showed improved dimensional stability. The prepared halloysite reinforced epoxy composites were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. The improved properties are attributed to the unique characteristics of HNTs, uniform dispersion of reinforcement and interfacial coupling.

  3. Surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Dharmalingam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fly ash, an inorganic alumino silicate has been used as filler in epoxy matrix, but it reduces the mechanical properties due to its poor dispersion and interfacial bonding with the epoxy matrix. To improve its interfacial bonding with epoxy matrix, surface treatment of fly ash was done using surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate and silane coupling agent glycidoxy propyl trimethoxy silane. An attempt is also made to reduce the particle size of fly ash using high pressure pulverizer. To improve fly ash dispersion in epoxy matrix, the epoxy was modified by mixing with amine containing liquid silicone rubber (ACS. The effect of surface treated fly ash with varying filler loadings from 10 to 40% weight on the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties of modified epoxy composites was investigated. The surface treated fly ash was characterized by particle size analyzer and FTIR spectra. Morphological studies of surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites indicate good dispersion of fillers in the modified epoxy matrix and improves its mechanical properties. Impact strength of the surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites show more improvement than unmodified composites.

  4. Mechanical Reinforcement of Epoxy Composites with Carbon Fibers and HDPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, R.; Chang, Q.; Huang, X.; Li, J.

    2018-01-01

    Silanized carbon fibers (CFs) and a high-density polyethylene with amino terminal groups (HDPE) were introduced into epoxy resins to fabricate high-performance composites. A. mechanical characterization of the composites was performed to investigate the effect of CFs in cured epoxy/HDPE systems. The composites revealed a noticeable improvement in the tensile strength, elongation at break, flexural strength, and impact strength in comparison with those of neat epoxy and cured epoxy/HDPE systems. SEM micrographs showed that the toughening effect could be explained by yield deformations, phase separation, and microcracking.

  5. Design of carbon nanofiber embedded conducting epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantayat, Subhra; Sarkar, Niladri; Rout, Dibyaranjan; Swain, Sarat K.

    2017-01-01

    Acid treated carbon nanofiber (t-CNF) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up method with various wt % of t-CNF loadings. Pristine or unmodified carbon nano fibers (u-CNFs) were made compatible with epoxy matrix by means of mixed acid treatment. Fabricated nanocomposites were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites were measured as a function of t-CNF content. Effect of acid treated CNFs on to the mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites was justified by comparing the mechanical properties of epoxy/t-CNF and epoxy/u-CNF nanocomposites with same loading level. The electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy resin with a threshold at 1 wt % of t-CNF. Substantial improvement in thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the synthesized epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites may be suitable for fabricating electronic devices. - Highlights: • Epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites are characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM, AFM and TEM. • Electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy with a threshold at 1 wt% of t-CNF. • Tensile strength is enhanced by 40% due to dispersion of t-CNF. • Synthesized nanocomposites are suitable for fabricating electronic devises.

  6. Understanding the thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of epoxy nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarathi, R.; Sahu, R.K.; Rajeshkumar, P.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the electrical, mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy nanocomposite materials were studied. The electrical insulation characteristics were analyzed through short time breakdown voltage test, accelerated electrical ageing test, and by tracking test. The breakdown voltage increases with increase in nano-clay content up to 5 wt%, under AC and DC voltages. The volume resistivity, permittivity and tan(δ) of the epoxy nanocomposites were measured. The Weibull studies indicate that addition of nanoclay upto 5 wt% enhances the characteristic life of epoxy nanocomposite insulation material. The tracking test results indicate that the tracking time is high with epoxy nanocomposites as compared to pure epoxy. Ageing studies were carried out to understand the surface characteristic variation through contact angle measurement. The hydrophobicity of the insulating material was analysed through contact angle measurement. The diffusion coefficients of the material with different percentage of clay in epoxy nanocomposites were calculated. The exfoliation characteristics in epoxy nanocomposites were analyzed through wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) studies. The thermal behaviour of the epoxy nanocomposites was analyzed by carrying out thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) studies. Heat deflection temperature of the material was measured to understand the stability of the material for intermittent temperature variation. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results indicated that storage modulus of the material increases with small amount of clay in epoxy resin. The activation energy of the material was calculated from the DMA results

  7. Design of carbon nanofiber embedded conducting epoxy resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantayat, Subhra [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India); School of Applied Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar 751024, Odisha (India); Sarkar, Niladri [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India); Rout, Dibyaranjan [School of Applied Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar 751024, Odisha (India); Swain, Sarat K., E-mail: swainsk2@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India)

    2017-01-15

    Acid treated carbon nanofiber (t-CNF) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up method with various wt % of t-CNF loadings. Pristine or unmodified carbon nano fibers (u-CNFs) were made compatible with epoxy matrix by means of mixed acid treatment. Fabricated nanocomposites were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites were measured as a function of t-CNF content. Effect of acid treated CNFs on to the mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites was justified by comparing the mechanical properties of epoxy/t-CNF and epoxy/u-CNF nanocomposites with same loading level. The electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy resin with a threshold at 1 wt % of t-CNF. Substantial improvement in thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the synthesized epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites may be suitable for fabricating electronic devices. - Highlights: • Epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites are characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM, AFM and TEM. • Electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy with a threshold at 1 wt% of t-CNF. • Tensile strength is enhanced by 40% due to dispersion of t-CNF. • Synthesized nanocomposites are suitable for fabricating electronic devises.

  8. Effect of the hardener to epoxy monomer ratio on the water absorption behavior of the DGEBA/TETA epoxy system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrton Alef Castanheira Pereira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The water absorption behavior of the DGEBA/TETA epoxy system was evaluated as a function of the epoxy monomer to amine hardener ratio. Weight gain versus immersion time curves were obtained and the experimental points were fitted using Fickian and Non-Fickian diffusion models. The results obtained showed that for all epoxy monomer to hardener ratios analyzed water diffusion followed non-Fickian behavior. It was possible to correlate the water absorption behavior to the macromolecular structure developed when the epoxy/ hardener ratio was varied. All epoxy/hardener ratios present a two-phase macromolecular structure, composed of regions with high crosslink density and regions with lower crosslinking. Epoxy rich systems have a more open macromolecular structure with a lower fraction of the dense phase than the amine rich systems, which present a more compact two-phase structure.

  9. Measurement of lead compound in stack gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Y; Hori, M; Tanikawa, N

    1979-01-01

    The concentration and particle-size distribution of lead compounds in the exhaust gas from various stationary sources are examined. The stationary sources concern lead production from battery scraps, lead smelting of cable mold, steel production from iron scraps, plastic combustion furnace, and a heavy oil boiler. A lead concentration of 0.2-100 mg/cu m in exhaust gas is detected. Furthermore, exhaust gas lead compounds are affected by the raw materials used.

  10. Comparison of structural health assessment capabilities in epoxy – carbon black and epoxy – carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    F. Inam; B. R. Bhat; N. Luhyna; T. Vo

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for comparing structural health of different types of brittle epoxy nanocomposites filled with carbon nanostructured fillers is presented. Epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon black (CB) and epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite bars were prepared by calendering and thermal curing. Nanocomposite bars were subjected to Vickers diamond indentation to produce sub-surface damage. Electrical conductivities were analysed by 4-point method to estimate the structural damage caused by...

  11. Crystal structure of (1R,2S,4R,7R,8S,9R-3,3-dichloro-8,9-epoxy-4,8,12,12-tetramethyltricyclo[5.5.0.02,4]dodecane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Benzalim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C16H24Cl2O, is built up from two fused six- and seven-membered rings which bear a dichlorocyclopropane group and an epoxy group, respectively. In the molecule, the six-membered ring adopts an envelope configuration with the C atom linking the epoxy ring at the flap, while the seven-membered ring adopts a boat–sofa conformation.

  12. Production of Liquid Metal Spheres by Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed G. Mohammed

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates a molding technique for producing spheres composed of eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn with diameters ranging from hundreds of microns to a couple millimeters. The technique starts by spreading EGaIn across an elastomeric sheet featuring cylindrical reservoirs defined by replica molding. The metal flows into these features during spreading. The spontaneous formation of a thin oxide layer on the liquid metal keeps the metal flush inside these reservoirs. Subsequent exposure to acid removes the oxide and causes the metal to bead up into a sphere with a size dictated by the volume of the reservoirs. This technique allows for the production and patterning of droplets with a wide range of volumes, from tens of nanoliters up to a few microliters. EGaIn spheres can be embedded or encased subsequently in polymer matrices using this technique. These spheres may be useful as solder bumps, electrodes, thermal contacts or components in microfluidic devices (valves, switches, pumps. The ease of parallel-processing and the ability to control the location of the droplets during their formation distinguishes this technique.

  13. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  14. Injection molding of high precision optics for LED applications made of liquid silicone rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopmann, Christian; Röbig, Malte [Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV), RWTH Aachen University, Pontstraße 49, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-03-09

    Light Emitting Diodes (LED) conquer the growing global market of lighting technologies. Due to their advantages, they are increasingly used in consumer products, in lighting applications in the home and in the mobility sector as well as in industrial applications. Particularly, with regard to the increasing use of high-power LED (HP-LED) the materials in the surrounding area of the light emitting semiconductor chip are of utmost importance. While the materials behind the semiconductor chip are optimized for maximum heat dissipation, the materials currently used for the encapsulation of the semiconductor chip (primary optics) and the secondary optics encounter their limits due to the high temperatures. In addition certain amounts of blue UV radiation degrade the currently used materials such as epoxy resins or polyurethanes for primary optics. In the context of an ongoing joint research project with various partners from the industry, an innovative manufacturing method for high precision optics for LED applications made of liquid silicone rubber (LSR) is analyzed at the Institut of Plastics Processing (IKV), Aachen. The aim of this project is to utilize the material-specific advantages of high transparent LSR, especially the excellent high temperature resistance and the great freedom in design. Therefore, a high integrated injection molding process is developed. For the production of combined LED primary and secondary optics a LED board is placed in an injection mold and overmolded with LSR. Due to the integrated process and the reduction of subcomponents like the secondary optics the economics of the production process can be improved significantly. Furthermore combined LED optics offer an improved effectiveness, because there are no losses of the light power at the transition of the primary and secondary optics.

  15. Atomistic Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2016-05-01

    The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for epoxy/single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanocomposites. An epoxy network of DGEBA-DDS was built using the `dendrimer' growth approach, and conductivity was computed by taking into account long-range Coulombic forces via a k-space approach. Thermal conductivity was calculated in the direction perpendicular to, and along the SWNT axis for functionalized and pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. The thermal conductivity of the long, pristine SWNT/epoxy system is equivalent to that of an isolated SWNT along its axis, but there was a 27% reduction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. The functionalized, long SWNT/epoxy system had a very large increase in thermal conductivity along the nanotube axis (~700%), as well as the directions perpendicular to the nanotube (64%). The discontinuous nanotubes displayed an increased thermal conductivity along the SWNT axis compared to neat epoxy (103-115% for the pristine SWNT/epoxy, and 91-103% for functionalized SWNT/epoxy system). The functionalized system also showed a 42% improvement perpendicular to the nanotube, while the pristine SWNT/epoxy system had no improvement over epoxy. The thermal conductivity tensor is averaged over all possible orientations to see the effects of randomly orientated nanotubes, and allow for experimental comparison. Excellent agreement is seen for the discontinuous, pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. These simulations demonstrate there exists a threshold of the SWNT length where the best improvement for a composite system with randomly oriented nanotubes would transition from pristine SWNTs to functionalized SWNTs.

  16. Organo-modified bentonites as new flame retardant fillers in epoxy resin nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Tiziana; D'Angelo, Emanuele; Mazzocchetti, Laura; Saraga, Federico; Sambri, Letizia; Franchini, Mauro Comes; Giorgini, Loris

    2016-05-01

    The present work deals with two organophilic bentonites, based on nitrogen-containing compounds: these organoclays were synthesized via an ion exchange process starting from pristine bentonite with 6-(4-butylphenyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (BFTDA) and 11-amino-N-(pyridine-2yl)undecanamide (APUA) and then used for the production of epoxy-based flame retardant nanocomposites. The amount of organic modifier in the organoclays Bento-BFTDA and Bento-APUA was determined with a TGA analysis and is around 0.4mmol/g for both samples. The effect of the organoclays on a commercial epoxy resin nanocomposite's thermo-mechanical and flammability properties was investigated. Composites containing 3wt% and 5wt% of the nanofillers were prepared by solventless addition of each organoclay to the epoxy resin, followed by further addition of the hardener component. For the sake of comparison a similar nanocomposite with the plain unmodified bentonite was produced in similar condition. The nanocomposites's thermo-mechanical properties of all the produced samples were measured and they resulted slightly improved or practically unaffected. On the contrary, when the flame behaviour was assessed in the cone-calorimeter, an encouraging decrease of 17% in the peak heat released rate (pHRR) was obtained at 3wt% loading level with Bento-APUA. This is a promising result, assessing that the APUA modified organoclay might act as flame retardant.

  17. The aba mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is impaired in epoxy-carotenoid biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rock, C.D.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-09-01

    The three mutant alleles of the ABA locus of Arabidopsis thaliana result in plants that are deficient in the plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA). The authors have used {sup 18}O{sub 2} to label ABA in water-stressed leaves of mutant and wild-type Arabidopsis. Analysis by selected ion monitoring and tandem mass spectrometry of ({sup 18}O)ABA and its catabolites, phaseic acid and ABA-glucose ester ({beta}-D-glucopyranosyl abscisate), indicates that the aba genotypes are impaired in ABA biosynthesis and have a small ABA precursor pool of compounds that contain oxygens on the rings, presumably oxygenated carotenoids (xanthophylls). Quantitation of the carotenoids form mutant and wild-type leaves establishes that the aba alleles cause a deficiency of the epoxy-carotenoids violaxanthin and neoxanthin and an accumulation of their biosynthetic precursor, zeaxanthin. These results provide evidence that ABA is synthesized by oxidative cleavage of epoxy-carotenoids (the indirect pathway). Furthermore the carotenoid mutant they describe undergoes normal greening. Thus the aba alleles provide an opportunity to study the physiological roles of epoxy-carotenoids in photosynthesis in a higher plants.

  18. Injection molded polymer optics in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beich, William S.

    2005-08-01

    Precision polymer optics, manufactured by injection molding techniques, has been a key enabling technology for several decades now. The technology, which can be thought of as a subset of the wider field of precision optics manufacturing, was pioneered in the United States by companies such as Eastman Kodak, US Precision Lens, and Polaroid. In addition to suppliers in the U.S. there are several companies worldwide that design and manufacture precision polymer optics, for example Philips High Tech Plastics in Europe and Fujinon in Japan. Designers who are considering using polymer optics need a fundamental understanding of exactly how the optics are created. This paper will survey the technology and processes that are employed in the successful implementation of a polymer optic solution from a manufacturer's perspective. Special emphasis will be paid to the unique relationship between the molds and the optics that they produce. We will discuss the key elements of production: molding resins, molds and molding equipment, and metrology. Finally we will offer a case study to illustrate just how the optics designer carries a design concept through to production. The underlying theme throughout the discussion of polymer optics is the need for the design team to work closely with an experienced polymer optics manufacturer with a solid track record of success in molded optics. As will be seen shortly, the complex interaction between thermoplastics, molds, and molding machines dictates the need for working closely with a supplier who has the critical knowledge needed to manage all aspects of the program.

  19. METHOD FOR EVALUATING MOLD GROWTH ON CEILING TILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A method to extract mold spores from porous ceiling tiles was developed using a masticator blender. Ceiling tiles were inoculated and analyzed using four species of mold. Statistical analysis comparing results obtained by masticator extraction and the swab method was performed. T...

  20. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for High Volume Composite Part Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, Chad E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kunc, Vlastimil [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lokitz, Bradley S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Springfield, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    ORNL worked with TruDesign, LLC to develop viable coating solutions to enable the use of large scale 3D printing for both low-temperature and high-temperature composite molds. This project resulted in two commercial products and successfully demonstrated the use of printed molds for autoclave processing for the first time.

  1. Production application of injection-molded diffractive elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter P.; Chao, Yvonne Y.; Hines, Kevin P.

    1995-12-01

    We demonstrate that transmission kinoforms for visible light applications can be injection molded in acrylic in production volumes. A camera is described that employs molded Fresnel lenses to change the convergence of a projection ranging system. Kinoform surfaces are used in the projection system to achromatize the Fresnel lenses.

  2. Injection molded polymeric hard X-ray lenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stöhr, Frederik; Simons, Hugh; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen

    2015-01-01

    of the etching profile and were removed after DRIE. By electroplating, an inverse nickel sample was obtained, which was used as a mold insert in a commercial polymer injection molding machine. A prototype lens made of polyethylene with a focal length of 350 mm was tested using synchrotron radiation at photon...

  3. Taxonomic re-evaluation of black koji molds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S.B.; Yamada, O.; Samson, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Black koji molds including its albino mutant, the white koji mold, have been widely used for making the distilled spirit shochu in Northeast Asia because they produce citric acid which prevents undesirable contamination from bacteria. Since Inui reported Aspergillus luchuensis from black koji in

  4. Azole-based antimycotic agents inhibit mold on unseasoned pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol. A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2005-01-01

    Inhibiting the growth of mold fungi on cellulose-based building materials may be achievable through the use of azole-based antimycotics. Azoles were variably effective against mold fungi that are frequently found on wood and wood products. Unseasoned southern yellow pine specimens that were dip-treated with varying concentrations of eight azoles were evaluated for...

  5. Multi-height structures in injection molded polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis Korsgaard; Taboryski, Rafael J.

    2015-01-01

    of different geometries, and electroforming a nickel mold from a polymer foil. The injection-molded samples are characterized by contact angle hysteresis obtained by the tilting method. We find that the receding contact angle depends on the surface coverage of the random surface structure, while the advancing...

  6. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a

  7. Injection Molding Parameters Calculations by Using Visual Basic (VB) Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony, B. Jain A. R.; Karthikeyen, S.; Alex, B. Jeslin A. R.; Hasan, Z. Jahid Ali

    2018-03-01

    Now a day’s manufacturing industry plays a vital role in production sectors. To fabricate a component lot of design calculation has to be done. There is a chance of human errors occurs during design calculations. The aim of this project is to create a special module using visual basic (VB) programming to calculate injection molding parameters to avoid human errors. To create an injection mold for a spur gear component the following parameters have to be calculated such as Cooling Capacity, Cooling Channel Diameter, and Cooling Channel Length, Runner Length and Runner Diameter, Gate Diameter and Gate Pressure. To calculate the above injection molding parameters a separate module has been created using Visual Basic (VB) Programming to reduce the human errors. The outcome of the module dimensions is the injection molding components such as mold cavity and core design, ejector plate design.

  8. A poly(dimethylsiloxane)-coated flexible mold for nanoimprint lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Nae Yoon; Kim, Youn Sang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce an anti-adhesion poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-coated flexible mold and its applications for room-temperature imprint lithography. The flexible mold is fabricated using an ultraviolet-curable prepolymer on a flexible substrate, and its surface is passivated with a thin layer of PDMS to impart an anti-adhesion property. The highly flexible mold enables conformal contact with a substrate on which a low-viscosity polymer resist is spin-cast in a thin layer. Large-area imprinting is then realized at room temperature under significantly reduced pressure. The mold was durable even after repetitive imprinting of over 200 times. Also, we show a double imprinting on the substrate with a PDMS-coated replica polymeric mold having 500 nm line patterns. This enables the formation of matrix patterns with varying feature heights in less than 7 min

  9. Mold Flora of Traditional Cheeses Produced in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Yalman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In our country, there are many cheese types that are produced traditionally. Cheeses which produced from cows, sheep and goat milk that matured with spontaneous growth of molds present in livestock skins, pots and similar environments are among them. They are produced traditionally in Mediterrian, Central and Eastern Anatolia regions. Molds that grow spontaneously in cheeses could create public health risk because of their secondary metabolites. Penicillium spp. are the most isolated mold from these cheeses and Penicillium roqueforti is determined as the dominant species. Furthermore, Aspergillus, Alternaria, Mucor, Geotrichum, Cladosporium species have been isolated. It is very important to control the ripening conditions and starter strain selection since some strains were reported as mycotoxin producers. In this review, it has been tried to give general information about traditional production of mold-ripened cheese in Turkey and the mold flora found in traditional cheeses. In addition, public health risk of these cheeses is reported.

  10. Injection molding of bushes made of tribological PEEK composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyetheretherketone (PEEK composites have been extensively studied because of the excellent tribological behavior among plastics. However, laboratory specimens and tests are generally discussed, whereas application studies on industrial components are infrequent. In this paper, an injection molded bush made of tribological PEEK was analyzed to correlate wear behavior and molded material structure. Bushes were tested under unlubricated sliding conditions by means of a short wear test. Surface analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and optical microscopy were used to evaluate the distribution of the different composite fillers (polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, graphite particles and carbon microfibers and their effect on the final bush behavior. A significant lack of homogeneity was observed in the molded bush and black bands appeared on the shaft surface after testing due to the sliding. The bush geometry and the injection molding process should be optimized to allow the best tribological behavior of the molded material under working conditions.

  11. Index change of chalcogenide materials from precision glass molding processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, J.; Walsh, K.; Lindberg, G.; Benson, R.; Gibson, D.; Bayya, S.; Sanghera, J.; Stover, E.

    2015-05-01

    With the increase in demand for infrared optics for thermal applications and the use of glass molding of chalcogenide materials to support these higher volume optical designs, an investigation of changes to the optical properties of these materials is required. Typical precision glass molding requires specific thermal conditions for proper lens molding of any type of optical glass. With these conditions a change (reduction) of optical index occurs after molding of all oxide glass types and it is presumed that a similar behavior will happen with chalcogenide based materials. We will discuss the effects of a typical molding thermal cycle for use with commercially and newly developed chalcogenide materials and show results of index variation from nominally established material data.

  12. Inactivation of dust mites, dust mite allergen, and mold from carpet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kee-Hean; Lewis, Roger D; Dixit, Anupma; MacDonald, Maureen; Yang, Mingan; Qian, Zhengmin

    2014-01-01

    Carpet is known to be a reservoir for biological contaminants, such as dust mites, dust mite allergen, and mold, if it is not kept clean. The accumulation of these contaminants in carpet might trigger allergies or asthma symptoms in both children and adults. The purpose of this study is to compare methods for removal of dust mites, dust mite allergens, and mold from carpet. Carpets were artificially worn to simulate 1 to 2 years of wear in a four-person household. The worn carpets were inoculated together with a common indoor mold (Cladosporium species) and house dust mites and incubated for 6 weeks to allow time for dust mite growth on the carpet. The carpets were randomly assigned to one of the four treatment groups. Available treatment regimens for controlling carpet contaminants were evaluated through a literature review and experimentation. Four moderately low-hazard, nondestructive methods were selected as treatments: vacuuming, steam-vapor, Neem oil (a natural tree extract), and benzalkonium chloride (a quaternary ammonium compound). Steam vapor treatment demonstrated the greatest dust mite population reduction (p 0.05) for both physical and chemical methods. The steam-vapor treatment effectively killed dust mites and denatured dust mite allergen in the laboratory environment.

  13. Local mechanical properties of LFT injection molded parts: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplentere, F.; Soete, K.; Bonte, H.; Debrabandere, E.

    2014-05-01

    In predictive engineering for polymer processes, the proper prediction of material microstructure from known processing conditions and constituent material properties is a critical step forward properly predicting bulk properties in the finished composite. Operating within the context of long-fiber thermoplastics (LFT, length Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight 2014 software has been used. In this software, a fiber breakage algorithm for the polymer flow inside the mold is available. Using well known micro mechanic formulas allow to combine the local fiber length with the local orientation into local mechanical properties. Different experiments were performed using a commercially available glass fiber filled compound to compare the measured data with the numerical simulation results. In this investigation, tensile tests and 3 point bending tests are considered. To characterize the fiber length distribution of the polymer melt entering the mold (necessary for the numerical simulations), air shots were performed. For those air shots, similar homogenization conditions were used as during the injection molding tests. The fiber length distribution is characterized using automated optical method on samples for which the matrix material is burned away. Using the appropriate settings for the different experiments, good predictions of the local mechanical properties are obtained.

  14. A self-crosslinking thermosetting monomer with both epoxy and anhydride groups derived from Tung oil fatty acids: Synthesis and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    A self-crosslinking compound with epoxy groups and anhydride groups (GEMA) has been successfully synthesized from Tung oil fatty acid by reacting with maleic anhydride via the Diels-Alder reaction. GEMA has very good storage stability and can be cured with trace amounts of tertiary amine. This advan...

  15. Realtime 3D stress measurement in curing epoxy packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Jacob; Hyldgård, A.; Birkelund, Karen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to characterize stress in microsystem packaging. A circular p-type piezoresistor is implemented on a (001) silicon chip. We use the circular stress sensor to determine the packaging induced stress in a polystyrene tube filled with epoxy. The epoxy curing process...

  16. Flexural Properties of Activated Carbon Filled Epoxy Nano composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, H.P.S.A.; Khalil, H.P.S.A.; Alothman, O.Y.; Paridah, M.T.; Zainudin, E.S.

    2014-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) filled epoxy nano composites obtained by mixing the desired amount of nano AC viz., bamboo stem, oil palm empty fruit bunch, and coconut shell from agricultural biomass with the epoxy resin. Flexural properties of activated carbons filled epoxy nano composites with 1 %, and 5 % filler loading were measured. In terms of flexural strength and modulus, a significant increment was observed with addition of 1 % vol and 5 % vol nano-activated carbon as compared to neat epoxy. The effect of activated carbon treated by two chemical agents (potassium hydroxide and phosphoric acid) on the flexural properties of epoxy nano composites were also investigated. Flexural strength of activated carbon-bamboo stem, activated carbon-oil palm, and activated carbon-coconut shell reinforced epoxy nano composites showed almost same value in case of 5 % potassium hydroxide activated carbon. Flexural strength of potassium hydroxide activated carbon-based epoxy nano composites was higher than phosphoric acid activated carbon. The flexural toughness of both the potassium hydroxide and phosphoric acid activated carbon reinforced composites range between 0.79 - 0.92 J. It attributed that developed activated carbon filled epoxy nano composites can be used in different applications. (author)

  17. Epoxy modified bitumen : Chemical hardening and its interpretation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolidis, P.; Pipintakos, G.; van de Ven, M.F.C.; Liu, X.; Erkens, Sandra; Scarpas, Athanasios

    2018-01-01

    Epoxy modified bitumen (EMB) is a promising technology for long lasting paving materials ensuring higher resistance to rutting, oxygen- and moisture-induced damage. In this paper, an analysis of the chemical reactions that take place during the chemical hardening process (curing) of epoxy modified

  18. Environmental Degradation and Durability of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman P. Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This experimental investigation reports on the durability of epoxy-clay nanocomposites upon exposure to multiple environments. Nanocomposites are fabricated by mixing the clay particles using various combinations of mechanical mixing, high-shear dispersion, and ultrasonication. Clay morphology is characterized using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Specimens of both neat epoxy and the epoxy-clay nanocomposite are subjected to two environmental conditions: combined UV radiation and condensation on 3-hour repeat cycle and constant temperature-humidity, for a total exposure duration of 4770 hours. The presence of nanoscale clay inhibits moisture uptake, as demonstrated by exposure to constant temperature-humidity. Nonetheless, both materials lose mass under exposure to combined UV radiation and condensation due to the erosion of epoxy by a synergistic process. Surprisingly, the epoxy-clay specimens exhibit greater mass loss, as compared to neat epoxy. Mechanical testing shows that either environment does not significant affect the flexure modulus of either material. On the other hand, both materials undergo degradation in flexural strength when exposed to either environment. However, the epoxy-clay nanocomposite retains 37% more flexure strength than the neat epoxy after 4072 hours of exposure.

  19. Design and analysis of MEMS MWCNT / epoxy strain sensor using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gaurav Sapra

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... In this paper, highly sensitive MEMS-based multi- walled (MWCNT)/epoxy strain sensor has been designed using ... This paper also discusses the process flow for fabricating MWCNT/epoxy thin film ... stone bridge, i.e., connected to the gold metal pad of the sensor. The change in resistance with respect to.

  20. Wettability of nano-epoxies to UHMWPE fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neema, S; Salehi-Khojin, A; Zhamu, A; Zhong, W H; Jana, S; Gan, Y X

    2006-07-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers have a unique combination of outstanding mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. However, as reinforcements for manufacturing high performance composite materials, UHMWPE fibers have poor wettability with most polymers. As a result, the interfacial bonding strength between the fibers and polymer matrices is very low. Recently, developing so-called nano-matrices containing reactive graphitic nanofibers (r-GNFs) has been proposed to promote the wetting of such matrices to certain types of fiber reinforcements. In this work, the wettability of UHMWPE fibers with different epoxy matrices including a nano-epoxy, and a pure epoxy was investigated. Systematic experimental work was conducted to determine the viscosity of the epoxies, the contact angle between the epoxies and the fibers. Also obtained are the surface energy of the fibers and the epoxies. The experimental results show that the wettability of the UHMWPE fibers with the nano-epoxy is much better than that of the UHMWPE fibers with the pure epoxy.

  1. Mechanical properties of graphene oxide (GO/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivan Ismael Abdullah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphene oxide (GO on composites based on epoxy resin were analyzed. Different contents of GO (1.5–6 vol.% were added to epoxy resin. The GO/epoxy composite was prepared using the casting method and was prepared under room temperature. Mechanical tests’ results such as tensile test, impact test and hardness test show enhancements of the mechanical properties of the GO/epoxy composite. The experimental results clearly show an improvement in the Young’s modulus, tensile strength and hardness. The impact strength was seen to decrease, pointing to brittleness increase of the GO/epoxy composite. A microstructure analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis was also performed, which showed how GO impeded the propagation of cracks in the composite. From the SEM images we observed the interface between the GO and the epoxy composite. As can be seen from this research, the GO/epoxy composites can be used for a large number of applications. The results of this research are a strong evidence for GO/epoxy composites being a potential candidate for use in a variety of industrial applications, especially for automobile parts, aircraft components, and electronic parts such as supercapacitors, transistors, etc.

  2. Chemical changes and tensile and electrical properties of epoxy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The properties of epoxy rsesin can be improved by the use of nanofiller such as carbon black (CB), The nanocomposite was synthesized by dispersion via sonication and shear mixing. The morphology, surface chemistry and the structure of CB and the epoxy/CB nanocomposites were investigated using XPS, FTIR, FESEM, ...

  3. Environmental Degradation and Durability of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.P.; Zunjarrao, S.C.; Pandey, G.; Khait, M.; Korach, C.S.

    2010-01-01

    This experimental investigation reports on the durability of epoxy-clay nanocomposites upon exposure to multiple environments. Nanocomposites are fabricated by mixing the clay particles using various combinations of mechanical mixing, high-shear dispersion, and ultrasonication. Clay morphology is characterized using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Specimens of both neat epoxy and the epoxy-clay nanocomposite are subjected to two environmental conditions: combined UV radiation and condensation on 3-hour repeat cycle and constant temperature-humidity, for a total exposure duration of 4770 hours. The presence of nanoscale clay inhibits moisture uptake, as demonstrated by exposure to constant temperature-humidity. Nonetheless, both materials lose mass under exposure to combined UV radiation and condensation due to the erosion of epoxy by a synergistic process. Surprisingly, the epoxy-clay specimens exhibit greater mass loss, as compared to neat epoxy. Mechanical testing shows that either environment does not significant affect the flexure modulus of either material. On the other hand, both materials undergo degradation in flexural strength when exposed to either environment. However, the epoxy-clay nanocomposite retains 37% more flexure strength than the neat epoxy after 4072 hours of exposure.

  4. Predicting and preventing mold spoilage of food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2013-03-01

    This article is a review of how to quantify mold spoilage and consequently shelf life of a food product. Mold spoilage results from having a product contaminated with fungal spores that germinate and form a visible mycelium before the end of the shelf life. The spoilage can be then expressed as the combination of the probability of having a product contaminated and the probability of mold growth (germination and proliferation) up to a visible mycelium before the end of the shelf life. For products packed before being distributed to the retailers, the probability of having a product contaminated is a function of factors strictly linked to the factory design, process, and environment. The in-factory fungal contamination of a product might be controlled by good manufacturing hygiene practices and reduced by particular processing practices such as an adequate air-renewal system. To determine the probability of mold growth, both germination and mycelium proliferation can be mathematically described by primary models. When mold contamination on the product is scarce, the spores are spread on the product and more than a few spores are unlikely to be found at the same spot. In such a case, models applicable for a single spore should be used. Secondary models can be used to describe the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on either the germination or proliferation of molds. Several polynomial models and gamma-type models quantifying the effect of water activity and temperature on mold growth are available. To a lesser extent, the effect of pH, ethanol, heat treatment, addition of preservatives, and modified atmospheres on mold growth also have been quantified. However, mold species variability has not yet been properly addressed, and only a few secondary models have been validated for food products. Once the probability of having mold spoilage is calculated for various shelf lives and product formulations, the model can be implemented as part of a risk management

  5. Public health and economic impact of dampness and mold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mudarri, David; Fisk, William J.

    2007-06-01

    The public health risk and economic impact of dampness and mold exposures was assessed using current asthma as a health endpoint. Individual risk of current asthma from exposure to dampness and mold in homes from Fisk et al. (2007), and asthma risks calculated from additional studies that reported the prevalence of dampness and mold in homes were used to estimate the proportion of U.S. current asthma cases that are attributable to dampness and mold exposure at 21% (95% confidence internal 12-29%). An examination of the literature covering dampness and mold in schools, offices, and institutional buildings, which is summarized in the appendix, suggests that risks from exposure in these buildings are similar to risks from exposures in homes. Of the 21.8 million people reported to have asthma in the U.S., approximately 4.6 (2.7-6.3) million cases are estimated to be attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home. Estimates of the national cost of asthma from two prior studies were updated to 2004 and used to estimate the economic impact of dampness and mold exposures. By applying the attributable fraction to the updated national annual cost of asthma, the national annual cost of asthma that is attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home is estimated to be $3.5 billion ($2.1-4.8 billion). Analysis indicates that exposure to dampness and mold in buildings poses significant public health and economic risks in the U.S. These findings are compatible with public policies and programs that help control moisture and mold in buildings.

  6. ''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehlke, R. D.; Cookson, John M.; Shouwei Hao; Prasad Krishna; Bilkey, Kevin T.

    2001-01-01

    This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive

  7. Experimental Study of Fiber Length and Orientation in Injection Molded Natural Fiber/Starch Acetate Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltola, Heidi; Madsen, Bo; Joffe, Roberts

    2011-01-01

    Composite compounds based on triethyl citrate plasticized starch acetate and hemp and flax fibers were prepared by melt processing. Plasticizer contents from 20 to 35 wt% and fiber contents of 10 and 40 wt% were used. The compounded composites were injection molded to tensile test specimens...... was noticed. A reduction of fiber length along the increasing fiber content and the decreasing plasticizer content was also detected. This reduction originated from the increasing shear forces during compounding, which again depended on the increased viscosity of the material. Hemp fibers were shown to remain...... longer and fibrillate more than flax fibers, leading to higher aspect ratio. Thus, the reinforcement efficiency of hemp fibers by the processing was improved, in contrast with flax fibers. In addition, the analysis of fiber dispersion and orientation showed a good dispersion of fibers in the matrix...

  8. Novel thermal curing of cycloaliphatic resins by thiol-epoxy click process with several multifunctional thiols

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman, Dailyn; Mateu, Blai; Fernández Francos, Xavier; Ramis Juan, Xavier; Serra Albet, Àngels

    2017-01-01

    Novel thermosets were prepared by the base-catalysed reaction between a cycloaliphatic resin (ECC) and various thiol crosslinkers. 4-(N,N-Dimethylaminopyridine) (DMAP) was used as base catalyst for the thiol–epoxy reaction. A commercial tetrathiol (PETMP) and three different thiols synthesized by us, 6SH-SQ, 3SH-EU and 3SH-ISO, were tested. 6SH-SQ and 3SH-EU were prepared from vinyl or allyl compounds from renewable resources such as squalene and eugenol, respectively. Thiol 3SH-ISO was prepa...

  9. Mold heating and cooling microprocessor conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D. P.

    1995-07-01

    Conversion of the microprocessors and software for the Mold Heating and Cooling (MHAC) pump package control systems was initiated to allow required system enhancements and provide data communications capabilities with the Plastics Information and Control System (PICS). The existing microprocessor-based control systems for the pump packages use an Intel 8088-based microprocessor board with a maximum of 64 Kbytes of program memory. The requirements for the system conversion were developed, and hardware has been selected to allow maximum reuse of existing hardware and software while providing the required additional capabilities and capacity. The new hardware will incorporate an Intel 80286-based microprocessor board with an 80287 math coprocessor, the system includes additional memory, I/O, and RS232 communication ports.

  10. Ozone reaction on slime mold. [Physarum polycephalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoh, F.

    1972-01-01

    To determine the effect of ozone, the motive force responsible for protoplasmic streaming in the slime mold, Physarum polycephalum was measured by the Double chamber method which was developed by Kamiya. The effects of ozone on the motive force were investigated by comparison of the Dynamoplasmogram of controls with that of ozone exposure. In the case of high concentration exposure, thickening of plasmagel, inversion of the period of flow and reduction of the extreme point were observed. Succinoxidase of exposed homogenates showed stronger activity than that of controls. It is certain that the Pasteur reaction takes place when plasmodium is kept under high ozone exposure condition. It appears that ozone inhibited a part of the process of glycolysis. 32 references, 8 figures.

  11. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites. Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Jin [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Costa, Franco [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lambert, Gregory [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Baird, Donald G. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Sharma, Bhisham A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kijewski, Seth A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Sangid, Michael D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Toyota Research Inst. North America, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wollan, Eric J. [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States); Roland, Dale [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States); Mori, Steven [Magna Exteriors and Interiors Corporation, Aurora, ON (Canada); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This project aimed to integrate, optimize, and validate the fiber orientation and length distribution models previously developed and implemented in the Autodesk® Simulation Moldflow® Insight (ASMI) software package for injection-molded long-carbon-fiber (LCF) thermoplastic composite structures. The project was organized into two phases. Phase 1 demonstrated the ability of the advanced ASMI package to predict fiber orientation and length distributions in LCF/polypropylene (PP) and LCF/polyamide-6, 6 (PA66) plaques within 15% of experimental results. Phase 2 validated the advanced ASMI package by predicting fiber orientation and length distributions within 15% of experimental results for a complex three-dimensional (3D) Toyota automotive part injection-molded from LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 materials. Work under Phase 2 also included estimate of weight savings and cost impacts for a vehicle system using ASMI and structural analyses of the complex part. The present report summarizes the completion of Phases 1 and 2 work activities and accomplishments achieved by the team comprising Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Purdue University (Purdue); Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Autodesk, Inc. (Autodesk); PlastiComp, Inc. (PlastiComp); Toyota Research Institute North America (Toyota); Magna Exteriors and Interiors Corp. (Magna); and University of Illinois. Figure 1 illustrates the technical approach adopted in this project that progressed from compounding LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 materials, to process model improvement and implementation, to molding and modeling LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 plaques. The lessons learned from the plaque study and the successful validation of improved process models for fiber orientation and length distributions for these plaques enabled the project to go to Phase 2 to mold, model, and optimize the 3D complex part.

  12. Electrical Tracking Formation on Silane Epoxy Resin under Various Contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NFN Rochmadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Contamination at the surface of the insulator becomes a serious problem in power system operation, especially for the tropical area. Humidity and rainfall play an important role in wetness by the water at the surface of the insulator, which result in the presence of contaminant and leakage current flowing at the surface of the insulator. This leakage current will generate heat which occurs at the surface of an insulator, so that dry band area will be formed. This ultimately leads to flashover. This paper presents the influence of contaminants to leakage current and formation of electrical tracking at the surface of epoxy resin compound wit silicon rubber. The test was based on Inclined-Planed Tracking method with NH4Cl as contaminants. The industrial and coastal contaminants are used to explain the effect of contaminant at surface tracking process. The flow rate of contaminant was 0.3 ml/min. The 3.5 kV AC high voltage 50 Hz was applied to the top electrodes. It is found that industrial contamination resulting in the smallest surface leakage current is 327.6 mA. Also it is found that coastal contaminant (1420 mS/cm showed the severest damage at surface of test sample. Therefore, special treatment of the sample are needed under these conditions so that the material performance can be improved, especially against the electrical tracking.

  13. Epoxy Crosslinked Silica Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    Science.gov (United States)

    fabrizio, Eve; Ilhan, Faysal; Meador, Mary Ann; Johnston, Chris; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    NASA is interested in the development of strong lightweight materials for the dual role of thermal insulator and structural component for space vehicles; freeing more weight for useful payloads. Aerogels are very-low density materials (0.010 to 0.5 g/cc) that, due to high porosity (meso- and microporosity), can be, depending on the chemical nature of the network, ideal thermal insulators (thermal conductivity approx. 15 mW/mK). However, aerogels are extremely fragile. For practical application of aerogels, one must increase strength without compromising the physical properties attributed to low density. This has been achieved by templated growth of an epoxy polymer layer that crosslinks the "pearl necklace" network of nanoparticles: the framework of a typical silica aerogel. The requirement for conformal accumulation of the epoxy crosslinker is reaction both with the surface of silica and with itself. After cross-linking, the strength of a typical aerogel monolith increases by a factor of 200, in the expense of only a 2-fold increase in density. Strength is increased further by coupling residual unreacted epoxides with diamine.

  14. Comparison of structural health assessment capabilities in epoxy – carbon black and epoxy – carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Inam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for comparing structural health of different types of brittle epoxy nanocomposites filled with carbon nanostructured fillers is presented. Epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon black (CB and epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon nanotube (CNT nanocomposite bars were prepared by calendering and thermal curing. Nanocomposite bars were subjected to Vickers diamond indentation to produce sub-surface damage. Electrical conductivities were analysed by 4-point method to estimate the structural damage caused by indentation. For comprehensive comparison, fracture toughness and percolation threshold were analysed as well. Because of the systematically induced indentation damage, a sharp decrease of 89% was observed in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CNT nanocomposite as compared to 25% in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CB nanocomposite. CNTs impart superior damage sensing capability in brittle nanocomposite structures, in comparison to CB, due to their high aspect ratio (fibrous nature and high electrical conductivity.

  15. Higher-order-structure formation in liquid crystal epoxy thermosets investigated by synchrotron radiation-wide-angle X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Rina; Okuhara, Kenta; Nakamura, Akihiro; Hayakawa, Teruaki; Uehara, Yasushi; Motoya, Tsukasa; Nobutoki, Hideharu

    2016-01-01

    We report the investigation of the mesophase transformations of a liquid crystalline molecule with terminal epoxy groups from the initial stages of curing with a diamine compound. The ordered arrangement of molecules within the smectic layers in the thermoset formed at the end of the curing process was characterized by synchrotron radiation-wide-angle X-ray diffraction (SR-WAXD). Data from this experiment helps us understand the phase transitions from the nematic to smectic phases of curing liquid crystalline epoxies. (author)

  16. Controlled retting of hemp fibres: Effect of hydrothermal pre-treatmen tand enzymatic retting on the mechanical properties of unidirectiona lhemp/epoxy composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ming; Silva, Diogo Alexandre Santos; Fernando, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the use of hydrothermal pre-treatment and enzymatic retting to remove non-cellulosic compounds and thus improve the mechanical properties of hemp fibre/epoxy composites. Hydrothermal pre-treatment at 100 kPa and 121 °C combined with enzymatic retting...... produced fibres with the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 780 MPa. Compared to untreated fibres, this combined treatment exhibited a positive effect on the mechanical properties of hemp fibre/epoxy composites, resulting in high quality composites with low porosity factor (αpf) of 0.08.Traditional...

  17. Effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact and interlaminar fracture properties of textile graphite/epoxy laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suresh K.; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact damage resistance, impact damage tolerance, and mode I and mode II fracture toughness of textile graphite/epoxy laminates. Uniweave resin-transfer-molded 48 ply graphite/epoxy (AS4/3501-6) laminates were stitched with Kevlar and glass yarns of different linear densities and stitch spacings. Delaminations were implanted during processing to simulate impact damage. Sublaminate buckling tests were performed to determine the effects of stitching on the compressive strength. The results showed outstanding improvements of up to 400 percent in the compression strength over the unstitched laminates. In impact and static indentation tests the onset of damage occurred at the same level, but the extent of damage was less in stitched laminates. Mode I fracture toughness of 24 ply Uniweave unidirectional (AS4/3501-6) stitched laminates was measured by conducting double-cantilever-beam tests. The critical strain energy release rate (G(sub Ic)) was found to be up to 30 times higher than the unstitched laminates. Mode II fracture toughness of the Uniweave laminates was measured by performing end-notched-flexure tests. Two new methods to compute the apparent G(sub IIc) are presented. The apparent G(sub IIc) was found to be at least 5-15 times higher for the stitched laminates.

  18. Manufacture of mold of polymeric composite water pipe reinforced charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfikar; Misdawati; Idris, M.; Nasution, F. K.; Harahap, U. N.; Simanjuntak, R. K.; Jufrizal; Pranoto, S.

    2018-03-01

    In general, household wastewater pipelines currently use thermoplastic pipes of Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC). This material is known to be not high heat resistant, contains hazardous chemicals (toxins), relatively inhospitable, and relatively more expensive. Therefore, researchers make innovations utilizing natural materials in the form of wood charcoal as the basic material of making the water pipe. Making this pipe requires a simple mold design that can be worked in the scale of household and intermediate industries. This research aims to produce water pipe mold with simple design, easy to do, and making time relatively short. Some considerations for molding materials are weight of mold, ease of raw material, strong, sturdy, and able to cast. Pipe molds are grouped into 4 (four) main parts, including: outer diameter pipe molding, pipe inside diameter, pipe holder, and pipe alignment control. Some materials have been tested as raw materials for outer diameter of pipes, such as wood, iron / steel, cement, and thermoset. The best results are obtained on thermoset material, where the process of disassembling is easier and the resulting mold weight is relatively lighter. For the inside diameter of the pipe is used stainless steel, because in addition to be resistant to chemical processes that occur, in this part of the mold must hold the press load due to shrinkage of raw materials of the pipe during the process of hardening (polymerization). Therefore, it needs high pressure resistant material and does not blend with the raw material of the pipe. The base of the mold is made of stainless steel material because it must be resistant to corrosion due to chemical processes. As for the adjustment of the pipe is made of ST 37 carbon steel, because its function is only as a regulator of the alignment of the pipe structure.

  19. Characterization, optical properties and laser ablation behavior of epoxy resin coatings reinforced with high reflectivity ceramic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenzhi; Kong, Jing; Wu, Taotao; Gao, Lihong; Ma, Zhuang; Liu, Yanbo; Wang, Fuchi; Wei, Chenghua; Wang, Lijun

    2018-04-01

    Thermal damage induced by high power energy, especially high power laser, significantly affects the lifetime and performance of equipment. High-reflectance coating/film has attracted considerable attention due to its good performance in the damage protection. Preparing a high-reflectance coating with high reaction endothermal enthalpy will effectively consume a large amount of incident energy and in turn protect the substrate from thermal damage. In this study, a low temperature process was used to prepare coatings onto substrate with complex shape and avoid thermal effect during molding. An advanced high reflection ceramic powder, La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ , was added in the epoxy adhesive matrix to improve the reflectivity of coating. The optical properties and laser ablation behaviors of coatings with different ceramic additive ratio of La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ and modified epoxy-La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ with ammonium polyphosphate coatings were investigated, respectively. We found that the reflectivity of coatings is extremely high due to mixed high-reflection La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ particles, up to 96% at 1070 nm, which can significantly improve the laser resistance. In addition, the ammonium polyphosphate modifies the residual carbon structure of epoxy resin from discontinuous fine particles structure to continuous and porous structure, which greatly enhances the thermal-insulation property of coating. Furthermore, the laser ablation threshold is improved obviously, which is from 800 W cm‑2 to 1000 W cm‑2.

  20. Two component micro injection molding for MID fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2009-01-01

    Molded Interconnect Devices (MIDs) are plastic substrates with electrical infrastructure. The fabrication of MIDs is usually based on injection molding and different process chains may be identified from this starting point. The use of MIDs has been driven primarily by the automotive sector......, but recently the medical sector seems more and more interested. In particular the possibility of miniaturization of 3D components with electrical infrastructure is attractive. The paper describes possible manufacturing routes and challenges of miniaturized MIDs based on two component micro injection molding...

  1. Neuroinhibitory meroterpenoid compounds from Cordia oncocalyx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Taynara S; Silva, Ana Karine O; Quintela, Amanda L; Francisco das Chagas Pinto, L; Canuto, Kirley M; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Fonseca, Maria Júlia S; Luna-Costa, Angélica Maria; Paz, Iury A; Nascimento, Nilberto Robson F; Silveira, Edilberto R; Pessoa, Otilia Deusdênia L

    2017-11-01

    Five new meroterpenoid compounds designed as rel-10β,11β-epoxy-2,11-dimethoxy-8α-hydroxy-8aβ-methyl-5α,6,7,8,8a,9,10,10aβ-octahydro-1,4-anthracendione (1), rel-10β,11β-epoxy-8α,5-dihydroxy-2-methoxy-8aβ-methyl-5,6,7,8,8a,9,10,10aβ-octahydro -1.4-anthracendione (2), rel-1,4,8α-trihydroxy-5-furanyl-2-methoxy-8aβ-methyl-6,7,8, 8a,9,10-hexahydro-10-anthracenone (3), rel-10α,11α-epoxy-8α,11β-dihydroxy-8aβ-methyl-5β,6,7,8,8a,9,10,10aβ-octahydro-1,4-anthracenediol (4) and rel-1,4,8α-trihydroxy-5-carboxyethyl-2-methoxy-8aβ-methyl-6,7,8,8a,9,10-hexahydro-10-anthra-cenone (5), besides seven (6-12) known compounds were isolated from the heartwood and sapwood ethanol extracts of Cordia oncocalyx. Moreover, the main isolated compounds were screened using the electrically driven mice vas deferens bioassay, which has a rich pharmacological receptors diversity. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The failure mode of natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshkour, R A; Ariffin, A K; Zulkifli, R; Sulong, A B; Azhari, C H

    2012-01-01

    In this study the quasi static compression test over natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes has been carried out, the natural silk epoxy composite tubes consist of 24 layer of woven natural silk as reinforcement and thermoset epoxy resin as matrix which both of them i e natural silk and epoxy have excellent mechanical properties More over the natural silk have better moisture resistance in comparison with other natural reinforcements, the length of tubes are 50, 80 and 120 mm The natural silk epoxy composite tubes are associated with an external trigger which includes 4 steel pieces welded on downside flat plate fixture The hand lay up fabrication method has been used to make the natural silk epoxy composite tubes Instron universal testing machine with 250 KN load capacity has been employed to accomplish this investigation The failure modes of natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes has been investigated by representative photographs which has been taken by a high resolution camera(12 2 Mp) during the quasi static compression test, from the photographs is observed the failure modes is progressive local buckling

  3. Enhancement of mechanical properties of epoxy/graphene nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanuddin, N. I. C.; Zaman, I.; Rozlan, S. A. M.; Karim, M. A. A.; Manshoor, B.; Khalid, A.; Chan, S. W.; Meng, Q.

    2017-10-01

    Graphene is a novel class of nanofillers possessing outstanding characteristics including most compatible with most polymers, high absolute strength, high aspect ratio and cost effectiveness. In this study, graphene was used to reinforce epoxy as a matrix, to enhance its mechanical properties. Two types of epoxy composite were developed which are epoxy/graphene nanocomposite and epoxy/modified graphene nanocomposite. The fabrication of graphene was going through thermal expansion and sonication process. Chemical modification was only done for modified graphene where 4,4’-Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) is used. The mechanical properties of both nanocomposite, such as Young’s modulus and maximum stress were investigated. Three weight percentage were used for this study which are 0.5 wt%, 1.0 wt% and 1.5 wt%. At 0.5 wt%, modified and unmodified shows the highest value compared to neat epoxy, where the value were 8 GPa, 6 GPa and 0.675 GPa, respectively. For maximum stress, neat epoxy showed the best result compared to both nanocomposite due to the changes of material properties when adding the filler into the matrix. Therefore, both nanocomposite increase the mechanical properties of the epoxy, however modification surface of graphene gives better improvement.

  4. Predicting the mechanical behaviour of Kevlar/epoxy and carbon/epoxy filament-wound tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazeneuve, C.; Joguet, P.; Maile, J. C.; Oytana, C.

    1992-11-01

    The axial, hoop and shear moduli and failure conditions of carbon/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy filament-wound tubes have been determined through respective applications of internal pressure, tension and torsion. The introduction in the laminated plate theory of a gradual reduction in individual moduli makes it possible to overcome the limitations of the theory and enables accurate predictions to be made of the linear and non-linear stress/strain curves of 90 deg +/- 0/90 deg tubes. The existence of a dominant layer in the failure of the multilayered tubes has been shown experimentally. When associated with a failure criterion applied to the dominant layer, the new model permits the prediction of tube failure. Agreement between calculated and experimental data is better than 5 percent.

  5. Indoor visible mold and mold odor are associated with new-onset childhood wheeze in a dose-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, Caroline; Crane, Julian; Pierse, Nevil; Barnes, Phillipa; Kang, Janice; Wickens, Kristin; Douwes, Jeroen; Stanley, Thorsten; Täubel, Martin; Hyvärinen, Anne; Howden-Chapman, Philippa

    2018-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that indoor dampness and mold are associated with the development of asthma. The underlying mechanisms remain unknown. New Zealand has high rates of both asthma and indoor mold and is ideally placed to investigate this. We conducted an incident case-control study involving 150 children with new-onset wheeze, aged between 1 and 7 years, each matched to two control children with no history of wheezing. Each participant's home was assessed for moisture damage, condensation, and mold growth by researchers, an independent building assessor and parents. Repeated measures of temperature and humidity were made, and electrostatic dust cloths were used to collect airborne microbes. Cloths were analyzed using qPCR. Children were skin prick tested for aeroallergens to establish atopy. Strong positive associations were found between observations of visible mold and new-onset wheezing in children (adjusted odds ratios ranged between 1.30 and 3.56; P ≤ .05). Visible mold and mold odor were consistently associated with new-onset wheezing in a dose-dependent manner. Measurements of qPCR microbial levels, temperature, and humidity were not associated with new-onset wheezing. The association between mold and new-onset wheeze was not modified by atopic status, suggesting a non-allergic association. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Rapid and Low-cost Prototyping of Medical Devices Using 3D Printed Molds for Liquid Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Philip; Heller, J. Alex; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Ottoson, Paige E.; Liu, Jonathan A.; Rand, Larry; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Biologically inert elastomers such as silicone are favorable materials for medical device fabrication, but forming and curing these elastomers using traditional liquid injection molding processes can be an expensive process due to tooling and equipment costs. As a result, it has traditionally been impractical to use liquid injection molding for low-cost, rapid prototyping applications. We have devised a method for rapid and low-cost production of liquid elastomer injection molded devices that utilizes fused deposition modeling 3D printers for mold design and a modified desiccator as an injection system. Low costs and rapid turnaround time in this technique lower the barrier to iteratively designing and prototyping complex elastomer devices. Furthermore, CAD models developed in this process can be later adapted for metal mold tooling design, enabling an easy transition to a traditional injection molding process. We have used this technique to manufacture intravaginal probes involving complex geometries, as well as overmolding over metal parts, using tools commonly available within an academic research laboratory. However, this technique can be easily adapted to create liquid injection molded devices for many other applications. PMID:24998993

  7. Relation between interlaminar fracture toughness and pressure condition in autoclave molding process of GFRP composite laminates; GFRP sekisoban no autoclave seikei ni okeru atsuryoku joken to sokan hakai jinseichi tono kankei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J. [Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Motogi, S.; Fukuda, T. [Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-06-15

    Relation between fracture toughness and pressure condition in autoclave molding of GF composite laminates is investigated. Glass/epoxy prepregs are molded under different curing pressures, and UD laminates of [O{sub 8}]T and [O{sub 16}]T are fabricated. The results of the double cantilever beam (DCB) test show that the curing pressure has certain influences on the interlaminar fracture toughness via the change in morphology of matrix resin and fibers between laminae, and via the change in interfacial strength of fiber and matrix. It is also found that the fiber/matrix interfacial strength increases as the curing pressure increases by SEM photographs of the fracture surface in GF UD laminates. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Thermomechanical Behavior of High Performance Epoxy/Organoclay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Soares Cavalcanti Leal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites of epoxy resin containing bentonite clay were fabricated to evaluate the thermomechanical behavior during heating. The epoxy resin system studied was prepared using bifunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA, crosslinking agent diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS, and diethylenetriamine (DETA. The purified bentonite organoclay (APOC was used in all experiments. The formation of nanocomposite was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Specimens of the fabricated nanocomposites were characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. According to the DMA results a significant increase in glass transition temperature and storage modulus was evidenced when 1 phr of clay is added to epoxy resin.

  9. Hansen solubility parameters for a carbon fiber/epoxy composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Launay, Helene; Hansen, Charles M.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the physical affinity between an epoxy matrix and oxidized, unsized carbon fibers has been evaluated using Hansen solubility (cohesion) parameters (HSP). A strong physical compatibility has been shown, since their respective HSP are close. The use of a glassy carbon substrate...... as a model for unsized carbon fiber has been demonstrated as appropriate for the study of interactions between the materials in composite carbon fiber-epoxy systems. The HSP of glassy carbon are similar to those of carbon fibers and epoxy matrix. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  10. Plant Oil-Derived Epoxy Polymers toward Sustainable Biobased Thermosets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongkai; Yuan, Liang; Ganewatta, Mitra S; Lamm, Meghan E; Rahman, Md Anisur; Wang, Jifu; Liu, Shengquan; Tang, Chuanbing

    2017-06-01

    Epoxy polymers (EPs) derived from soybean oil with varied chemical structures are synthesized. These polymers are then cured with anhydrides to yield soybean-oil-derived epoxy thermosets. The curing kinetic, thermal, and mechanical properties are well characterized. Due to the high epoxide functionality per epoxy polymer chain, these thermosets exhibit tensile strength over an order of magnitude higher than a control formulation with epoxidized soybean oil. More importantly, thermosetting materials ranging from soft elastomers to tough thermosets can be obtained simply by using different EPs and/or by controlling feed ratios of EPs to anhydrides. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Measurements of print-through in graphite fiber epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Jeunnette, Timothy T.; Anzic, Judith M.

    1989-01-01

    High-reflectance accurate-contour mirrors are needed for solar dynamic space power systems. Graphite fiber epoxy composites are attractive candidates for such applications owing to their high modulus, near-zero coefficient of thermal expansion, and low mass. However, mirrors prepared from graphite fiber epoxy composite substrates often exhibit print-through, a distortion of the surface, which causes a loss in solar specular reflectance. Efforts to develop mirror substrates without print-through distortion require a means of quantifying print-through. Methods have been developed to quantify the degree of print-through in graphite fiber epoxy composite specimens using surface profilometry.

  12. Generalized morphea/eosinophilic fasciitis overlap after epoxy exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren H. Chan, MS

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Generalized morphea is associated with epoxy resin vapors and is characterized by the development of lesions shortly after exposure. Morphea presenting along with eosinophilic fasciitis (EF, or morphea/EF overlap, is rare and an indicator of poor prognosis and resistance to treatment. Here we present a case of generalized morphea/EF overlap linked to epoxy exposure. Our patient received multiple therapies—ultraviolet A1 phototherapy, prednisone, methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, and rituximab—none of which led to a significant response. The refractory nature of this disease warrants vigilance in its association with epoxy exposure.

  13. Use of headspace SPME-GC-MS for the analysis of the volatiles produced by indoor molds grown on different substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, Fien; Adams, An; Delmulle, Barbara; De Saeger, Sarah; Moretti, Antonio; Van Peteghem, Carlos; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2008-10-01

    An automated headspace solid phase microextraction method followed by GC-MS analysis was used to evaluate and compare the in vitro production of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) on malt extract agar, plasterboard and wallpaper. Five fungal strains were isolated from the walls of water-damaged houses and identified. In addition, four other common molds were studied. In general, MVOC production was the highest on malt extract agar. On this synthetic medium, molds typically produced 2-methylpropanol, 2-methylbutanol and 3-methylbutanol. On wallpaper, mainly 2-ethylhexanol, methyl 2-ethylhexanoate and compounds of the C8-complex such as 1-octene-3-ol, 3-octanone, 3-octanol and 1,3-octadiene were detected. The detection of 2-ethylhexanol and methyl 2-ethylhexanoate indicates an enhanced degradation of the substrate by most fungi. For growth on plasterboard, no typical metabolites were detected. Despite these metabolite differences on malt extract agar, wallpaper and plasterboard, some molds also produced specific compounds independently of the used substrate, such as trichodiene from Fusarium sporotrichioides and aristolochene from Penicillium roqueforti. Therefore, these metabolites can be used as markers for the identification and maybe also mycotoxin production of these molds. All five investigated Penicillium spp. in this study were able to produce two specific diterpenes, which were not produced by the other species studied. These two compounds, which remain unidentified until now, therefore seem specific for Penicillium spp. and are potentially interesting for the monitoring of this fungal genus. Further experiments will be performed with other Penicillium spp. to study the possibility that these two compounds are specific for this group of molds.

  14. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Natalia Carolina Camargos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  15. A new instrument for statistical process control of thermoset molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, D.R.; Lee, H.L.; Shepard, D.D.; Sheppard, N.F.

    1991-01-01

    The recent development of a rugged ceramic mold mounted dielectric sensor and high speed dielectric instrumentation now enables monitoring and statistical process control of production molding over thousands of runs. In this work special instrumentation and software (ICAM-1000) was utilized that automatically extracts critical point during the molding process including flow point, viscosity minimum gel inflection, and reaction endpoint. In addition, other sensors were incorporated to measure temperature and pressure. The critical point as well as temperature and pressure were then recorded during normal production and then plotted in the form of statistical process control (SPC) charts. Experiments have been carried out in RIM, SMC, and RTM type molding operations. The influence of temperature, pressure chemistry, and other variables has been investigated. In this paper examples of both RIM and SMC are discussed

  16. Evaluation of stability for monolayer injection molding tools coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cech, Jiri; Taboryski, Rafael J.

    2012-01-01

    We tested and characterized molecular coating of Aluminium and Nickel prototype molds and mold inserts for polymer replication via injection molding (IM). X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data, sessile drop contact angles with multiple fluids, surface energy and roughness data have been...... collected and used to predict coating lifetimes. Samples have been characterized immediately after coating, after 500+ IM cycles to test durability and after 7 months to test temporal stability. Sessile drop contact angle was measured for multiple fluids, namely water, di-iodomethane and benzylacohol....... Detectable coating presence was indicated by an increased angle on all post IM samples. To conclude, we present mold coating evaluation method, which is well suited for ultrathin, controlable, covalently bonded coating, that is reasonably durable, affordable, scalable to production, detectable on surface...

  17. Microinjection molding of microsystem components: new aspects in improving performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Can; Yin, Xiao-Hong; Cheng, Guang-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Microinjection molding (µIM) is considered to be one of the most flexible, reliable and cost effective manufacturing routes to form plastic micro-components for microsystems. The molding machine, mold tool fabrication, material selection and process controlling in this specific field have been greatly developed over the past decades. This review aims to present the new trends towards improving micro-component performance by reviewing the latest developments in this area and by considering potential directions. The key concerns in product and mold designing, essential factors in simulation, and micro-morphology and resultant properties are evaluated and discussed. In addition, the applications, variant processes and outlook for µIM are presented. Throughout this review, decisive considerations in seeking improved performance for microsystem components are highlighted. (topical review)

  18. Method and mold for casting thin metal objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2014-04-29

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  19. Demonstration of pharmaceutical tablet coating process by injection molding technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Vibha; Brancazio, David; Harinath, Eranda; Martinez, Alexander R; Desai, Parind M; Jensen, Keith D; Chun, Jung-Hoon; Braatz, Richard D; Myerson, Allan S; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2018-01-15

    We demonstrate the coating of tablets using an injection molding (IM) process that has advantage of being solvent free and can provide precision coat features. The selected core tablets comprising 10% w/w griseofulvin were prepared by an integrated hot melt extrusion-injection molding (HME-IM) process. Coating trials were conducted on a vertical injection mold machine. Polyethylene glycol and polyethylene oxide based hot melt extruded coat compositions were used. Tablet coating process feasibility was successfully demonstrated using different coating mold designs (with both overlapping and non-overlapping coatings at the weld) and coat thicknesses of 150 and 300 μm. The resultant coated tablets had acceptable appearance, seal at the weld, and immediate drug release profile (with an acceptable lag time). Since IM is a continuous process, this study opens opportunities to develop HME-IM continuous processes for transforming powder to coated tablets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josh A. Salmond

    2009-08-07

    The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

  1. Cork is used to make tooling patterns and molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, F. J.

    1965-01-01

    Sheet and waste cork are cemented together to provide a tooling pattern or mold. The cork form withstands moderately high temperatures under vacuum or pressure with minimum expansion, shrinkage, or distortion.

  2. Catalyzed Synthesis and Characterization of a Novel Lignin-Based Curing Agent for the Curing of High-Performance Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Nikafshar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, lignin, an aromatic compound from the forestry industry, was used as a renewable material to synthesize a new aromatic amine curing agent for epoxy resin. Firstly, lignin was separated from black liquor and hydroxyl groups were converted to tosyl groups as leaving groups. Then, primary amination was conducted using an ammonia solution at high pressure and temperature, in the presence of a nano-alumina-based catalyst. The structure of the nanocatalyst was confirmed by FT-IR, ICP, SEM, and XPS analyses. According to the FT-IR spectra, a demethylation reaction, the substitution of hydroxyl groups with tosyl groups, and then an amination reaction were successfully performed on lignin, which was further confirmed by the 13C NMR and CHNS analyses. The active hydrogen equivalent of aminated lignin was determined and three samples with 9.9 wt %, 12.9 wt %, and 15.9 wt % of aminated lignin, as curing agents, were prepared for curing the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA. The thermal characteristics of the curing process of these epoxy samples were determined by DSC and TGA analyses. Moreover, the mechanical performance of the cured epoxy systems, e.g., the tensile strength and Izod impact strength, were measured, showing that in the presence of 12.9 wt % aminated lignin, the mechanical properties of the aminated lignin-epoxy system exhibited the best performance, which was competitive, compared to the epoxy systems cured by commercial aromatic curing agents.

  3. Degradation of epoxy coatings under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djouani, F.; Zahra, Y.; Fayolle, B.; Kuntz, M.; Verdu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Epoxy networks based on Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and cured with Jeffamine® (POPA) or polyamidoamine (PAA) were gamma irradiated at 25 °C in air. Dose rates of 50, 200 or 2000 Gy h −1 for doses up 100 kGy were used. Structural changes were monitored by IR spectrophotometry, DSC and sol–gel analysis. Both networks display some common features: for I≥200 Gy h −1 , reaction products grow proportionally to time and the rate is a decreasing function of dose rate. The simplest explanation is that peroxy radicals are the main precursors of these products (in the dose rate domain under study), through a unimolecular rearrangement of which an hypothetical mechanism is proposed. DGEBA–POPA are more reactive then DGEBA–PAA networks (according to IR criteria), that can be attributed to the high reactivity of tertiary CH bands in polyoxypropylene segments. The oxidation of these sites leads to methyl ketones. A simple kinetic model in which methyl ketones result from rearrangements of tertiary peroxyls and from tertiary alkoxyls was proposed. It leads to an expression of the radiochemical yield of methyl ketones (G(MK)) of the form G(MK)=a+bI −1/2 where a and b are parameters depending of elementary rate constants. Experimental G(MK) values are reasonably well fitted by this equation. In DGEBA–PAA networks, a wide variety of oxidation products, among which amides predominate, can be observed. In these networks, chain scissions predominate over crosslinking, whereas a slight predominance of crosslinking was observed, at least for the lowest dose rate, in DGEBA–POPA. - Highlights: ► The effects of irradiation at three distinct dose rates have been studied on two epoxy networks. ► DGEBA–polyamidoamine networks appear more stable than DGEBA–polyoxypropylene diamine ones. ► A simple kinetic model involving methyl ketones is proposed.

  4. Cellulose whisker/epoxy resin nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liming; Weder, Christoph

    2010-04-01

    New nanocomposites composed of cellulose nanofibers or "whiskers" and an epoxy resin were prepared. Cellulose whiskers with aspect ratios of approximately 10 and approximately 84 were isolated from cotton and sea animals called tunicates, respectively. Suspensions of these whiskers in dimethylformamide were combined with an oligomeric difunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A with an epoxide equivalent weight of 185-192 and a diethyl toluenediamine-based curing agent. Thin films were produced by casting these mixtures and subsequent curing. The whisker content was systematically varied between 4 and 24% v/v. Electron microscopy studies suggest that the whiskers are evenly dispersed within the epoxy matrix. Dynamic mechanical thermoanalysis revealed that the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the materials was not significantly influenced by the incorporation of the cellulose filler. Between room temperature and 150 degrees C, i.e., below T(g), the tensile storage moduli (E') of the nanocomposites increased modestly, for example from 1.6 GPa for the neat polymer to 4.9 and 3.6 GPa for nanocomposites comprising 16% v/v tunicate or cotton whiskers. The relative reinforcement was more significant at 185 degrees C (i.e., above T(g)), where E' was increased from approximately 16 MPa (neat polymer) to approximately 1.6 GPa (tunicate) or approximately 215 MPa (cotton). The mechanical properties of the new materials are well-described by the percolation model and are the result of the formation of a percolating whisker network in which stress transfer is facilitated by strong interactions between the whiskers.

  5. Toughening of Epoxy Adhesives by Combined Interaction of Carbon Nanotubes and Silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Barra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The extensive use of adhesives in many structural applications in the transport industry and particularly in the aeronautic field is due to numerous advantages of bonded joints. However, still many researchers are working to enhance the mechanical properties and rheological performance of adhesives by using nanoadditives. In this study the effect of the addition of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS compounds, either Glycidyl Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (GPOSS or DodecaPhenyl Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (DPHPOSS to Tetraglycidyl Methylene Dianiline (TGMDA epoxy formulation, was investigated. The formulations contain neither a tougher matrix such as elastomers nor other additives typically used to provide a closer match in the coefficient of thermal expansion in order to discriminate only the effect of the addition of the above-mentioned components. Bonded aluminium single lap joints were made using both untreated and Chromic Acid Anodisation (CAA-treated aluminium alloy T2024 adherends. The effects of the different chemical functionalities of POSS compounds, as well as the synergistic effect between the MWCNT and POSS combination on adhesion strength, were evaluated by viscosity measurement, tensile tests, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA, single lap joint shear strength tests, and morphological investigation. The best performance in the Lap Shear Strength (LSS of the manufactured joints has been found for treated adherends bonded with epoxy adhesive containing MWCNTs and GPOSS. Carbon nanotubes have been found to play a very effective bridging function across the fracture surface of the bonded joints.

  6. CAE for Injection Molding — Past, Present and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo K.

    2004-06-01

    It is well known that injection molding is the most effective process for mass-producing discrete plastic parts of complex shape to the highest precision at the lowest cost. However, due to the complex property of polymeric materials undergoing a transient non-isothermal process, it is equally well recognized that the quality of final products is often difficult to be assured. This is particularly true when a new mold or material is encountered. As a result, injection molding has often been viewed as an art than a science. During the past few decades, numerical simulation of injection molding process based on analytic models has become feasible for practical use as computers became faster and cheaper continually. A research effort was initiated at the Cornell Injection Molding Program (CIMP) in 1974 under a grant from the National Science Foundation. Over a quarter of the century, CIMP has established some scientific bases ranging from materials characterization, flow analysis, to prediction of part quality. Use of such CAE tools has become common place today in industry. Present effort has been primarily aimed at refinements of many aspects of the process. Computational efficiency and user-interface have been main thrusts by commercial software developers. Extension to 3-dimensional flow analysis for certain parts has drawn some attention. Research activities are continuing on molding of fiber-filled materials and reactive polymers. Expanded molding processes such as gas-assisted, co-injection, micro-molding and many others are continually being investigated. In the future, improvements in simulation accuracy and efficiency will continue. This will include in-depth studies on materials characterization. Intelligent on-line process control may draw more attention in order to achieve higher degree of automation. As Internet technology continues to evolve, Web-based CAE tools for design, production, remote process monitoring and control can come to path. The CAE

  7. Nonlinear core deflection in injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poungthong, P.; Giacomin, A. J.; Saengow, C.; Kolitawong, C.; Liao, H.-C.; Tseng, S.-C.

    2018-05-01

    Injection molding of thin slender parts is often complicated by core deflection. This deflection is caused by molten plastics race tracking through the slit between the core and the rigid cavity wall. The pressure of this liquid exerts a lateral force of the slender core causing the core to bend, and this bending is governed by a nonlinear fifth order ordinary differential equation for the deflection that is not directly in the position along the core. Here we subject this differential equation to 6 sets of boundary conditions, corresponding to 6 commercial core constraints. For each such set of boundary conditions, we develop an explicit approximate analytical solution, including both a linear term and a nonlinear term. By comparison with finite difference solutions, we find our new analytical solutions to be accurate. We then use these solutions to derive explicit analytical approximations for maximum deflections and for the core position of these maximum deflections. Our experiments on the base-gated free-tip boundary condition agree closely with our new explicit approximate analytical solution.

  8. Mold-filling experiments for validation of modeling encapsulation. Part 1, "wine glass" mold.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Altobelli, Stephen A. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM); Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2005-06-01

    The C6 project 'Encapsulation Processes' has been designed to obtain experimental measurements for discovery of phenomena critical to improving these processes, as well as data required in the verification and validation plan (Rao et al. 2001) for model validation of flow in progressively complex geometries. We have observed and recorded the flow of clear, Newtonian liquids and opaque, rheologically complex suspensions in two mold geometries. The first geometry is a simple wineglass geometry in a cylinder and is reported here in Part 1. The results in a more realistic encapsulation geometry are reported in Part 2.

  9. Effect of fatigue testing on the properties of Glass-Epoxy composites using the acoustic tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menail Younès

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the experimental results of the influence of mechanical fatigue on composite material. The plates of Glass fiber with SR 1500 epoxy resin with SD 2505 composite were realized by vacuum molding. Experimental tests were carried out on a standard hydraulic machine INSTRON 8516. The machine is interfaced with a dedicated computer for controlling and data acquisition. The fatigue tests were performed using sinusoidal type of waveform at a displacement control with frequency of 10 Hz. The evolution of Young’s modulus and strain based on fatigue gives us an idea about the resistance of the material. Degradation of mechanical properties was observed, and the results have showed that the Young’s modulus of plates undergo only minor changes. In fact, the residual stiffness and residual strength decrease when the cycle number of fatigue increase (100 to 50000 cycles, indicating that the studied composites have experienced some forms of mechanical damage.The mechanical tests were backed by Acoustic Emission Monitoring (AEM during the load cycle, in order to understand the nature of the failure process in the composites such as fiber breakage, matrix crazing, matrix debonding and delamination etc.

  10. Effect of Coconut Fillers on Hybrid Coconut Kevlar Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Jani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This project focuses on the conversion of naturally available coconut fibers and shells into a useful composite. In addition to it, some mechanical properties of the resultant composite is determined and also the effect of coconut shell fillers on the composite is also investigated. The few portion of the composite is incorporated with synthetic Kevlar fiber, thus the coconut fiber is hybridized to enhance the mechanical properties of coconut. In this work two types of composite is fabricate, kevelar coconut fibre (kc composite and kevelarcoco nut fibre coconut shell filler (kccsf composite. Coconut fibers have low weight and considerable properties among the natural fibers, while coconut fillers have a good ductile and impact property. The natural fibers and fillers are treated with Na-OH to make it free of organic impurities. Epoxy resin is used as the polymer matrix. Two composite are produced one with fillers and the other without the fillers using compression molding method. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and water absorption tests are done with ASTM standard. It is observed that that the addition of filler materials improves the adhesiveness of the fibers leading to the increase in the above mentioned properties. The density of the composite is also low hence the strength to weight ratio is very high. The water absorption test also showed that the resultant composite had a small adhesion to water and absorption of water.

  11. Prediction of Mold Spoilage for Soy/Polyethylene Composite Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmay Naphade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mold spoilage was determined over 109 days on soy/PE fibers held under controlled temperatures (T ranging from 10°C to 40°C and water activities (aw from 0.11 to 0.98. Water activities were created in sealed containers using saturated salt solutions and placed in temperature-controlled incubators. Soy/PE fibers that were held at 0.823 aw or higher exhibited mold growth at all temperatures. As postulated, increased water activity (greater than 0.89 and temperature (higher than 25°C accelerated mold growth on soy/PE fibers. A slower mold growth was observed on soy/PE fibers that were held at 0.87 aw and 10°C. A Weibull model was employed to fit the observed logarithmic values of T, aw, and an interaction term log⁡T×log⁡aw and was chosen as the final model as it gave the best fit to the raw mold growth data. These growth models predict the expected mold-free storage period of soy/PE fibers when exposed to various environmental temperatures and humidities.

  12. Analysis of form deviation in non-isothermal glass molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreilkamp, H.; Grunwald, T.; Dambon, O.; Klocke, F.

    2018-02-01

    Especially in the market of sensors, LED lighting and medical technologies, there is a growing demand for precise yet low-cost glass optics. This demand poses a major challenge for glass manufacturers who are confronted with the challenge arising from the trend towards ever-higher levels of precision combined with immense pressure on market prices. Since current manufacturing technologies especially grinding and polishing as well as Precision Glass Molding (PGM) are not able to achieve the desired production costs, glass manufacturers are looking for alternative technologies. Non-isothermal Glass Molding (NGM) has been shown to have a big potential for low-cost mass manufacturing of complex glass optics. However, the biggest drawback of this technology at the moment is the limited accuracy of the manufactured glass optics. This research is addressing the specific challenges of non-isothermal glass molding with respect to form deviation of molded glass optics. Based on empirical models, the influencing factors on form deviation in particular form accuracy, waviness and surface roughness will be discussed. A comparison with traditional isothermal glass molding processes (PGM) will point out the specific challenges of non-isothermal process conditions. Furthermore, the underlying physical principle leading to the formation of form deviations will be analyzed in detail with the help of numerical simulation. In this way, this research contributes to a better understanding of form deviations in non-isothermal glass molding and is an important step towards new applications demanding precise yet low-cost glass optics.

  13. Classification of buildings mold threat using electronic nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagód, Grzegorz; Suchorab, Zbigniew; Guz, Łukasz; Sobczuk, Henryk

    2017-07-01

    Mold is considered to be one of the most important features of Sick Building Syndrome and is an important problem in current building industry. In many cases it is caused by the rising moisture of building envelopes surface and exaggerated humidity of indoor air. Concerning historical buildings it is mostly caused by outdated raising techniques among that is absence of horizontal isolation against moisture and hygroscopic materials applied for construction. Recent buildings also suffer problem of mold risk which is caused in many cases by hermetization leading to improper performance of gravitational ventilation systems that make suitable conditions for mold development. Basing on our research there is proposed a method of buildings mold threat classification using electronic nose, based on a gas sensors array which consists of MOS sensors (metal oxide semiconductor). Used device is frequently applied for air quality assessment in environmental engineering branches. Presented results show the interpretation of e-nose readouts of indoor air sampled in rooms threatened with mold development in comparison with clean reference rooms and synthetic air. Obtained multivariate data were processed, visualized and classified using a PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and ANN (Artificial Neural Network) methods. Described investigation confirmed that electronic nose - gas sensors array supported with data processing enables to classify air samples taken from different rooms affected with mold.

  14. Impact of phenolic compounds and related enzymes in Sorghum varieties for resistance and susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stresses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicko, M.H.; Gruppen, H.; Barro, C.; Traore, A.S.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Contents of phenolic compounds and related enzymes before and after sorghum grain germination were compared between varieties either resistant or susceptible to biotic (sooty stripe, sorghum midge, leaf anthracnose, striga, and grain molds) and abiotic (lodging, drought resistance, and photoperiod

  15. Behavior of Epoxy-Coated Textured Reinforcing Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Cracking in bridge decks is a common but difficult problem to control. Both research and experience show that the use of epoxy-coated reinforcement, which is mandated by most state departments of transportation (DOTs) for bridge decks, increases c...

  16. Behaviour of Epoxy Silica Nanocomposites Under Static and Creep Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Dan Mihai; Picu, Radu Catalin; Sandu, Marin; Apostol, Dragos Alexandru; Sandu, Adriana; Baciu, Florin

    2017-12-01

    Specific manufacturing technologies were applied for the fabrication of epoxy-based nanocomposites with silica nanoparticles. For dispersing the fillers in the epoxy resin special equipment such as a shear mixer and a high energy sonicator with temperature control were used. Both functionalized and unfunctionalized silica nanoparticles were added in three epoxy resins. The considered filling fraction was in most cases 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 wt%.. The obtained nanocomposites were subjected to monotonic uniaxial and creep loading at room temperature. The static mechanical properties were not significantly improved regardless the filler percentage and type of epoxy resin. Under creep loading, by increasing the stress level, the nanocomposite with 0.1 wt% silica creeps less than all other materials. Also the creep rate is reduced by adding silica nanofillers.

  17. Magnetism in graphene oxide induced by epoxy groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dongwook, E-mail: dongwookleedl324@gmail.com [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Division of Physics and Applied Physics, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Seo, Jiwon, E-mail: jiwonseo@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Physics and IPAP, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Zhu, Xi; Su, Haibin [Division of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Cole, Jacqueline M. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    We have engineered magnetism in graphene oxide. Our approach transforms graphene into a magnetic insulator while maintaining graphene's structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra reveal that graphene oxide has various chemical groups (including epoxy, ketone, hydroxyl, and C-O groups) on its surface. Destroying the epoxy group with heat treatment or chemical treatment diminishes magnetism in the material. Local density approximation calculation results well reproduce the magnetic moments obtained from experiments, and these results indicate that the unpaired spin induced by the presence of epoxy groups is the origin of the magnetism. The calculation results also explain the magnetic properties, which are generated by the interaction between separated magnetic regions and domains. Our results demonstrate tunable magnetism in graphene oxide based on controlling the epoxy group with heat or chemical treatment.

  18. Epoxy blanket protects milled part during explosive forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Epoxy blanket protects chemically milled or machined sections of large, complex structural parts during explosive forming. The blanket uniformly covers all exposed surfaces and fills any voids to support and protect the entire part.

  19. Evolution of Surface Texture and Cracks During Injection Molding of Fiber-Reinforced, Additively-Manufactured, Injection Molding Inserts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Mischkot, Michael; Pedersen, David Bue

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the lifetime and surfacedeterioration of additively-manufactured, injection-moulding inserts. The inserts were produced using digital light processing and were reinforcedwith oriented short carbon fibers. Theinserts were used during injection molding oflow-density polyethy......This paper investigates the lifetime and surfacedeterioration of additively-manufactured, injection-moulding inserts. The inserts were produced using digital light processing and were reinforcedwith oriented short carbon fibers. Theinserts were used during injection molding oflow......-density polyethylene until their failure. The molded products were used to analyse the development of the surface roughness and wear. By enhancing the lifetime of injection-molding inserts,this work contributes to the establishment of additively manufactured inserts in pilot production....

  20. Exit Presentation: Infrared Thermography on Graphite/Epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Kayla

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on the internship project that was accomplished during the summer of 2010. The objectives of the project were to: (1) Simulate Flash Thermography on Graphite/Epoxy Flat Bottom hole Specimen and thin void specimens, (2) Obtain Flash Thermography data on Graphite/Epoxy flat bottom hole specimens, (3) Compare experimental results with simulation results, Compare Flat Bottom Hole Simulation with Thin Void Simulation to create a graph to determine size of IR Thermography detected defects

  1. Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-01-01

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  2. Characteristics and infl uence factors of mold fi lling process in permanent mold with a slot gating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Changjun

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide fi lms and entrapped gas. In this study, the slot gating system is employed to improve mold fi lling behavior and therefore, to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. An equipment as well as operation procedures for real-time X-ray radiography of molten aluminum fl owing into permanent molds have been developed. Graphite molds transparent to X-rays are utilized which make it possible to observe the fl ow pattern through a number of vertically oriented gating systems. The investigation discovers that there are many infl uencing factors on the mold fi lling process. This paper focuses its research on some of the factors, such as the dimensions of the vertical riser and slot thickness, as well as roughness of the coating layer. The results indicate that molten metal can smoothly fi ll into casting cavity with a proper slot gating system. A bigger vertical riser, proper slot thickness and rougher coating can provide not only a better mold fi lling pattern, but also hot melt into the top of the cavity. A proper temperature gradient is obtainable, higher at the bottom and lower at the top of the casting cavity, which is in favor of feeding during casting solidifi cation.

  3. In-situ Crystallization of Highly Volatile Commercial Mold Flux Using an Isolated Observation System in the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Yong; Ryu, Jae Wook; Sohn, Il

    2014-08-01

    The in situ crystallization behavior of highly volatile commercial mold fluxes for medium carbon steels was investigated using the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) equipped with an optimized isolated observation system. The highly volatile compounds of the mold flux were suppressed during heating allowing direct observation in the CLSM. Cooling rates of 25, 50, 100, 400, and 800 K/min were incorporated and continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams of 4 different commercial mold fluxes for medium carbon steels were developed. Identification of the crystalline phase was conducted with XRD and SEM-EDS analysis. A cuspidine crystalline was observed in all samples at various cooling rates. With higher basicity, CaF2, and NaF, the crystallization of the fluxes was enhanced according to the CCT diagram. As the slag structure becomes depolymerized, the diffusion rate of the cathodic ions seems to increase.

  4. Epoxy encapsulant as serendipitous dosimeters during radiological/nuclear events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkyoumb, J.H. [Carderock Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, 9500 MacArthur Blvd., West Bethesda, MD 20817-5700 (United States)], E-mail: jhbarky@earthlink.net; Mathur, V.K. [Carderock Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, 9500 MacArthur Blvd., West Bethesda, MD 20817-5700 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    The radiation response of a smart chip (embedded integrated circuit) module has been reported earlier using the technique of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). It was found that a smart chip module could be used to evaluate the personnel exposure in the accident dosimetry range. Through subsequent experiments, the radiation sensitivity of the chip module was traced to the epoxy encapsulant provided to protect the chip from the environment and physical damage and that the radiation sensitivity of the epoxy is due to the silica used as the 'filler' for controlling the thixotropic properties of the epoxy used for 'glob top' or 'dam-and-fill' encapsulation. It is desirable to retain the ability to use the smart chip as an accident dosimeter without requiring a modification of standard manufacturing process for which an infrastructure already exists to avoid additional costs. For this reason, we have investigated commercially available filled and unfilled epoxies both as received from the manufacturer and compared their response with epoxies to which commercial fillers are added. In this work we investigate the OSL response of various epoxies commonly used for potting of electronic circuits with and without various filler materials for their potential to be used as a casualty dosimeter in the exposure range of 0.5-10 Gy.

  5. Optical emission behavior and radiation resistance of epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, Shunichi; Udagawa, Akira; Hagiwara, Miyuki

    1987-11-01

    To make clear a mechanism of radiation resistance of epoxy resin systems, a role of energy trapping site induced in bisphenol A type epoxy resins cured with 4 kinds of aromatic amines (Φ N ) was studied in comparison with the case of aliphatic amine curing system through a measurement of optical emission. In the system of the epoxy resin cured with DETA, the optical emission from an excited state of bisphenol A unit of epoxy resin and a charge transfer complex was observed. On the other hand, the optical emission from Φ N was observed in the aromatic amine curing system. Their excitation spectrum consists of peaks of absorption spectrum of BA and those of Φ N , showing that the excited state of Φ N is formed through the excitation of both BA and Φ N . Therefore, the excited energy of BA transfers to the excited state of Φ N . Emission intensity of Φ N band was 20 ∼ 100 times as large as that of BA. These results indicate that the radiation energy is effectively released as an optical emission from excited state of Φ N in the epoxy resin when cured with aromatic amine. It can be concluded from the above results that aromatic amine hardeners contribute to enhancement of the radiation resistance of epoxy resin by acting as an energy transfer agent. (author)

  6. Performance of epoxy-nanocomposite under corrosive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite materials consisting of polymeric matrix materials and natural or synthetic layered minerals like clay are currently an expanding field of study because these new materials often exhibit a wide range of improved properties over their unmodified starting polymers. Epoxy/organoclay nanocomposites have been prepared by intercalating epoxy into the organoclay via direct mixing process. The clay exfoliation was monitored by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Water diffusion and sulfuric acid corrosion resistance of epoxy-based nanocomposites were evaluated. Diffusion was studied through epoxy samples containing up to 6 phr (parts per hundred resin of an organically treated montmorillonite. The diffusion of the environmental solution was measured by noting the increase in weight of the samples as a function of immersion time in these solutions at 80°C. The effect of the degree of exfoliation of the organoclay on water barrier and corrosion resistance was specifically studied. The data have been compared to those obtained from the neat epoxy resin to evaluate the diffusion properties of the nanocomposites. The flexural strength of the epoxy/organoclay nanocomposites samples made was examined to compare their mechanical performance under corrosive conditions as a function of immersion time and temperature. It was found, that the organoclay was mainly intercalated with some exfoliation and that addition of the organoclay yields better flexural strength retention under immersion into sulfuric acid.

  7. Effects of Nanofillers on the Thermo-Mechanical Properties and Chemical Resistivity of Epoxy Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchudan, Raji; Pandurangan, Arumugam; Joo, Jin

    2015-06-01

    MWCNTs was synthesized using Ni-Cr/MgO by CVD method and were purified. The purified MWCNT was used as a filler material for the fabrication of epoxy nanocomposites. The epoxy nanocomposites with different amount (wt% = 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0) of nanofillers (CB, SiO2 and MWCNTs) were prepared by casting method. The effects of nanofillers on the properties of neat epoxy matrix were well studied. The thermal properties of nanocomposites were studied using DSC, TGA and flame retardant, and also the mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength, compressive strength, impact strength, determination of hardness and chemical resistance were studied extensively. Based on the experiment's results, 2 wt% MWCNTs loading in epoxy resin showed the highest improvement in tensile strength, as compared to neat epoxy and to other epoxy systems (CB/epoxy, SiO2/epoxy). Improvements in tensile strength, glass transition temperature and decomposition temperature were observed by the addition of MWCNTs. The mechanical properties of the epoxy nanocomposites were improved due to the interfacial bonding between the MWCNTs and epoxy resin. Strain hardening behavior was higher for MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites compared with CB/epoxy and SiO2/epoxy nanocomposites. The investigation of thermal and mechanical properties reveals that the incorporation of MWCNTs into the epoxy nanocomposites increases its thermal stability to a great extent. Discrete increase of glass transition temperature of nanocomposites is linearly dependent on MWCNTs content. Due to strong interfacial bonding between MWCNTs and epoxy resin, the chemical resistivity of MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites is superior to neat epoxy and other epoxy systems.

  8. Injection molding of ceramic filled polypropylene: The effect of thermal conductivity and cooling rate on crystallinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suplicz, A.; Szabo, F.; Kovacs, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • BN, talc and TiO 2 in 30 vol% were compounded with polypropylene matrix. • According to the DSC measurements, the fillers are good nucleating agents. • The thermal conductivity of the fillers influences the cooling rate of the melt. • The higher the cooling rate is, the lower the crystallinity in the polymer matrix. - Abstract: Three different nano- and micro-sized ceramic powders (boron-nitride (BN), talc and titanium-dioxide (TiO 2 )) in 30 vol% have been compounded with a polypropylene (PP) matrix. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the particles are dispersed smoothly in the matrix and larger aggregates cannot be discovered. The cooling gradients and the cooling rate in the injection-molded samples were estimated with numerical simulations and finite element analysis software. It was proved with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements that the cooling rate has significant influence on the crystallinity of the compounds. At a low cooling rate BN works as a nucleating agent so the crystallinity of the compound is higher than that of unfilled PP. On the other hand, at a high cooling rate, the crystallinity of the compound is lower than that of unfilled PP because of its higher thermal conductivity. The higher the thermal conductivity is, the higher the real cooling rate in the material, which influences the crystallization kinetics significantly

  9. Fatigue life extension of epoxy materials using ultrafast epoxy-SbF5 healing system introduced by manual infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Ye

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is devoted to the verification of the capability of epoxy-SbF5 system as a healing chemistry for rapidly retarding and/or arresting fatigue cracks in epoxy materials at room temperature. Owing to the very fast curing speed of epoxy catalyzed by SbF5, epoxy monomer and the hardener (ethanol solution of SbF5–ethanol complex are successively infiltrated into the fracture plane under cyclic loading during the tension-tension fatigue test. As a result, the mechanisms including hydrodynamic pressure crack tip shielding, polymeric wedge and adhesive bonding of the healing agent are revealed. It is found that the healing agent forms solidified wedge at the crack tip within 20 s after start of polymerization of the epoxy monomer, so that the highest healing effect is offered at the moment. The epoxy-SbF5 system proves to be effective in rapidly obstructing fatigue crack propagation (despite that its cured version has lower fracture toughness than the matrix, and satisfies the requirement of constructing fast self-healing polymeric materials.

  10. Design and Analysis of Drive Shaft using Kevlar/Epoxy and Glass/Epoxy as a Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, P.; Gobinath, R.; Kumar, L. Ajith; Jenish, D. Xavier

    2017-05-01

    In automobile industry drive shaft is one of the most important components to transmit power form the engine to rear wheel through the differential gear. Generally steel drive shaft is used in automobile industry, nowadays they are more interested to replace steel drive shaft with that of composite drive shaft. The overall objective of this paper is to analyze the composite drive shaft using to find out the best replacement for conventional steel drive shaft. The uses of advanced composite materials such as Kevlar, Graphite, Carbon and Glass with proper resins ware resulted in remarkable achievements in automobile industry because of its greater specific strength and specific modulus, improved fatigue and corrosion resistances and reduction in energy requirements due to reduction in weight as compared to steel shaft. This paper is to presents, the modeling and analysis of drive shaft using Kevlar/Epoxy and Glass/Epoxy as a composite material and to find best replacement for conventional steel drive shafts with an Kevlar/epoxy or Glass/Epoxy resin composite drive shaft. Modeling is done using CATIA software and Analysis is carried out by using ANSYS 10.0 software for easy understanding. The composite drive shaft reduces the weight by 81.67 % for Kevlar/Epoxy and 72.66% for Glass/Epoxy when compared with conventional steel drive shaft.

  11. Two new compounds from the flowers of Rhododendron molle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Nong; Bao, Guan-Hu; Wang, Li-Quan; Qin, Guo-Wei

    2013-09-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the flowers of Rhododendron molle. Compounds were isolated by repeated chromatography over silica gel and Sephadex LH-20. Structures were elucidated based on spectral techniques, mainly 1D- and 2D-NMR and mass spectrometric analyses. Two compounds (1 and 2) were isolated. Compounds 1 and 2 were identified as two new compounds: 2α, 10α-epoxy-3β, 5β, 6β, 14β, 16α-hexahydroxy-grayanane and benzyl 2, 6-dihydroxybenzoate-6-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-β-D-glucopyranoside, respectively. Copyright © 2013 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental design applied optimization of a state in epoxy clay dispersion; Planejamento de experimentos aplicado a otimizacao do estado de dispersao de argilas em epoxi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, Juliana D' Avila; Bertholdi, Jonas; Folgueras, Marilena Valadares; Pezin, Sergio Henrique; Coelho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira, E-mail: julianadpaz@yahoo.com.b [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents some analysis showed that the exfoliation / intercalation of a montmorillonite clay in epoxy resin such as viscosity, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG). Increasing the viscosity of epoxy resin diglycidyl ether bisphenol A with the addition of clay associated with the sonification system at the time of dispersion is a good indication of exfoliation. The X-ray diffraction already cured composite shows a decrease of crystallinity of clay and EDS microanalysis of SEM, non-uniform dispersion of clay in epoxy resin. Thermal analysis TG composite clay / epoxy shows an increase in thermal stability relative to pure epoxy. (author)

  13. Selective etching of injection molded zirconia-toughened alumina: Towards osseointegrated and antibacterial ceramic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamant, Quentin; Caravaca, Carlos; Meille, Sylvain; Gremillard, Laurent; Chevalier, Jérôme; Biotteau-Deheuvels, Katia; Kuntz, Meinhard; Chandrawati, Rona; Herrmann, Inge K; Spicer, Christopher D; Stevens, Molly M; Anglada, Marc

    2016-12-01

    Due to their outstanding mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility, zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) ceramics have become the gold standard in orthopedics for the fabrication of ceramic bearing components over the last decade. However, ZTA is bioinert, which hampers its implantation in direct contact with bone. Furthermore, periprosthetic joint infections are now the leading cause of failure for joint arthroplasty prostheses. To address both issues, an improved surface design is required: a controlled micro- and nano-roughness can promote osseointegration and limit bacterial adhesion whereas surface porosity allows loading and delivery of antibacterial compounds. In this work, we developed an integrated strategy aiming to provide both osseointegrative and antibacterial properties to ZTA surfaces. The micro-topography was controlled by injection molding. Meanwhile a novel process involving the selective dissolution of zirconia (selective etching) was used to produce nano-roughness and interconnected nanoporosity. Potential utilization of the porosity for loading and delivery of antibiotic molecules was demonstrated, and the impact of selective etching on mechanical properties and hydrothermal stability was shown to be limited. The combination of injection molding and selective etching thus appears promising for fabricating a new generation of ZTA components implantable in direct contact with bone. Zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) is the current gold standard for the fabrication of orthopedic ceramic components. In the present work, we propose an innovative strategy to provide both osseointegrative and antibacterial properties to ZTA surfaces: we demonstrate that injection molding allows a flexible design of surface micro-topography and can be combined with selective etching, a novel process that induces nano-roughness and surface interconnected porosity without the need for coating, avoiding reliability issues. These surface modifications have the

  14. Computer Texture Mapping for Laser Texturing of Injection Mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongquan Zhou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser texturing is a relatively new multiprocess technique that has been used for machining 3D curved surfaces; it is more flexible and efficient to create decorative texture on 3D curved surfaces of injection molds so as to improve the surface quality and achieve cosmetic surface of molded plastic parts. In this paper, a novel method of laser texturing 3D curved surface based on 3-axis galvanometer scanning unit has been presented to prevent the texturing of injection mold surface from much distortion which is often caused by traditional texturing processes. The novel method has been based on the computer texture mapping technology which has been developed and presented. The developed texture mapping algorithm includes surface triangulation, notations, distortion measurement, control, and numerical method. An interface of computer texture mapping has been built to implement the algorithm of texture mapping approach to controlled distortion rate of 3D texture math model from 2D original texture applied to curvature surface. Through a case study of laser texturing of a high curvature surface of injection mold of a mice top case, it shows that the novel method of laser texturing meets the quality standard of laser texturing of injection mold.

  15. Graphite epoxy composite degradation by space radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, M.; Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M.; Bennion, J.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation environment in space is a critical consideration for successful operation in space. All manned space missions with a duration of more than a few days are subjected to elevated ionizing radiation exposures, which are a threat to both personnel and structures in space. The increasing demands for high-performance materials as structural components in the aerospace, aircraft, and defense industries have led to the development of materials such as graphite fiber-reinforced, epoxy resin matrix composites (Gr/Ep). These materials provide important advantages over conventional structural materials, such as ultrahigh specific strength, enhanced specific moduli, and better fatigue resistance. The fact that most advanced composite materials under cyclic fatigue loading evidence little or no observable crack growth prior to rapid fracture suggests that for fail-safe considerations of parts subject to catastrophic failure, a detailed evaluation of radiation damage from very energetic particle is crucial. The Gr/Ep components are believed to suffer severe degradation in space due to highly penetrating secondary radiation, mainly from neutrons and protons. Investigation into the performance and stability of Gr/Ep materials are planned

  16. Shape memory polymers from benzoxazine-modified epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimdusit, Sarawut; Lohwerathama, Montha; Dueramae, Isala; Hemvichian, Kasinee; Kasemsiri, Pornnapa

    2013-01-01

    Novel shape memory polymers (SMPs) were prepared from benzoxazine-modified epoxy resin. Specimens consisting of aromatic epoxy (E), aliphatic epoxy (N), Jeffamine D230 (D) and BA-a benzoxazine monomer (B) were evaluated. The mole ratio of D/B was used as a mixed curing agent for an epoxy system with a fixed E/N. The effects of BA-a content on the thermal, mechanical and shape memory properties of epoxy-based shape memory polymers (SMPs) were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), flexural test and shape recovery test. The results revealed that the obtained SMPs exhibited a higher flexural strength and flexural modulus than those of the unmodified epoxy-based SMP at room temperature and at 20 ° C above glass transition temperature (T g ). The presence of 1 mol BA-a as a curing agent provided the specimen with the highest T g , i.e. about 72 ° C higher than that of epoxy-based SMP cured by Jeffamine D230. All SMP samples needed only a few minutes to fully recover to their original shape. The samples exhibited high shape fixity (98–99%) and shape recovery ratio (90–100%). In addition, the recovery stress values increased with increasing BA-a mole ratio from 20 to 38 kPa, when BA-a up to 1 mol ratio was added. All of the SMP samples exhibited only minimum change in their flexural strength at the end of a 100 recovery cycles test. (paper)

  17. Viscoelastic properties of graphene-based epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Rosolia, Salvatore; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the viscoelastic properties of an epoxy resin filled with graphene-based nanoparticles have been investigated in the liquid state, before curing, by means of a rotational rheometer equipped with a parallel plate geometry. Exfoliated graphite was prepared using traditional acid intercalation followed by a sudden treatment at high temperature (900°C). The percentage of exfoliated graphite was found to be 56%. The epoxy matrix was prepared by mixing a tetrafunctional precursor with a reactive diluent which produces a significant decrease in the viscosity of the epoxy precursor so that the dispersion step of nanofillers in the matrix can easily occur. The hardener agent, the 4,4-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), was added at a stoichiometric concentration with respect to all the epoxy rings. The inclusion of the partially exfoliated graphite (pEG) in the formulated epoxy mixture significantly modifies the rheological behaviour of the mixture itself. The epoxy mixture, indeed, shows a Newtonian behaviour while, at 3 wt % pEG content, the complex viscosity of the nanocomposite clearly shows a shear thinning behaviour with η* values much higher at the lower frequencies. The increase in complex viscosity with the increasing of the partially exfoliated graphite content was mostly caused by a dramatic increase in the storage modulus. All the graphene-based epoxy mixtures were cured by a two-stage curing cycles: a first isothermal stage was carried out at the lower temperature of 125°C for 1 hour while the second isothermal stage was performed at the higher temperature of 200°C for 3 hours. The mechanical properties of the cured nanocomposites show high values in the storage modulus and glass transition temperature.

  18. Molding 4.0 - The Economics of an Injection Molding As-a-Service Business Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charalambis, Alessandro; Tonetti, Marco Alessandro; Tosello, Guido

    involved contributes to a hazy definition of the phenomenon. In this work, Industry 4.0 is analyzed by analyzing into its influence on the plastics industry, with a focus on the injection molding technology. A new business model for the plastic industry is proposed, which fosters closer cooperation......During the last few years, the term Industry 4.0 or The Fourth Industrial Revolution, made its appearance and spread across industries. While it is accepted that the term broadly refers to a set of recent innovations with potential to disrupt value and process chains, the heterogeneity of actors...... the paradigm of Industry 4.0 is able to disrupt the industry by decreasing machine downtime and offering remarkable improvements in machine up-time. The present research aims to highlighting some of the opportunities for the plastic industry enabled by the implementation of an Internet of Things architecture....

  19. Initial verification of an induction heating set-up for injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menotti, Stefano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2013-01-01

    Molding of thin and long parts by injection molding leads to special requirements for the mold in order to ensure proper filling and acceptable cycle time. This paper investigates the applicability of embedded induction heating for the improvement of the filling of thin long parts. The object...... selected for the investigation is a thin spiral. For the complete molding of the component, elevated mold temperatures are required. For this propose a new injection molding set-up was developed, which allows rapid heating of the cavity wall by an induction heating system. The temperature was measured...

  20. Development of the computer-aided process planning (CAPP system for polymer injection molds manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tepić

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Beginning of production and selling of polymer products largely depends on mold manufacturing. The costs of mold manufacturing have significant share in the final price of a product. The best way to improve and rationalize polymer injection molds production process is by doing mold design automation and manufacturing process planning automation. This paper reviews development of a dedicated process planning system for manufacturing of the mold for injection molding, which integrates computer-aided design (CAD, computer-aided process planning (CAPP and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM technologies.

  1. Physical, structural and thermomechanical properties of oil palm nano filler/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, N., E-mail: naheedchem@gmail.com [Laboratory of Biocomposite Technology, Institute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Products(INTROP), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Paridah, M.T. [Laboratory of Biocomposite Technology, Institute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Products(INTROP), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Abdan, K. [Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang Selangor (Malaysia); Ibrahim, N.A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-12-01

    The present research study deals with the fabrication of kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites by the incorporation of oil palm nano filler, montmorillonite (MMT) and organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) at 3% loading, through hand lay-up technique. Effect of adding different nano fillers on the physical (density), structural [X-ray diffraction (XRD)] and thermomechanical analysis (TMA) of kenaf/epoxy composites were carried out. Density results revealed that the incorporation of nano filler in the kenaf/epoxy composites increases the density which in turn increases the hardness of the hybrid nanocomposites. XRD analysis confirmed the presence of nano fillers in the structure of their respective fabricated hybrid nanocomposites. All hybrid nanocomposites displayed lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) with respect to kenaf/epoxy composites. Overall results predicted that the properties improvement in nano OPEFB/kenaf/epoxy was quite comparable to MMT/kenaf/epoxy but relatively lesser to OMMT/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites and higher with respect to kenaf/epoxy composites. The improvement ascribed due to improved interfacial bonding or cross linking between kenaf fibers and epoxy matrix by addition of nano filler. - Highlights: • Nano OPEFB/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up. • Effect of nano OPEFB on density & structure of kenaf/epoxy were investigated. • Thermal expansion coefficients of kenaf/epoxy and hybrid nanocomposites evaluated. • Comparative studies were made with MMT and OMMT kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites.

  2. Physical, structural and thermomechanical properties of oil palm nano filler/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saba, N.; Paridah, M.T.; Abdan, K.; Ibrahim, N.A.

    2016-01-01

    The present research study deals with the fabrication of kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites by the incorporation of oil palm nano filler, montmorillonite (MMT) and organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) at 3% loading, through hand lay-up technique. Effect of adding different nano fillers on the physical (density), structural [X-ray diffraction (XRD)] and thermomechanical analysis (TMA) of kenaf/epoxy composites were carried out. Density results revealed that the incorporation of nano filler in the kenaf/epoxy composites increases the density which in turn increases the hardness of the hybrid nanocomposites. XRD analysis confirmed the presence of nano fillers in the structure of their respective fabricated hybrid nanocomposites. All hybrid nanocomposites displayed lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) with respect to kenaf/epoxy composites. Overall results predicted that the properties improvement in nano OPEFB/kenaf/epoxy was quite comparable to MMT/kenaf/epoxy but relatively lesser to OMMT/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites and higher with respect to kenaf/epoxy composites. The improvement ascribed due to improved interfacial bonding or cross linking between kenaf fibers and epoxy matrix by addition of nano filler. - Highlights: • Nano OPEFB/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up. • Effect of nano OPEFB on density & structure of kenaf/epoxy were investigated. • Thermal expansion coefficients of kenaf/epoxy and hybrid nanocomposites evaluated. • Comparative studies were made with MMT and OMMT kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites.

  3. Study on the flow of molten polymers in a mold an investigation on mold printability; Kobunshi yoyutai no kanagatanai bisho ryudo. Kanagata tenshasei no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Ito, S. [Ube Industries Ltd. Yamaguchi (Japan)] Usui, H. [Kobe Univ. (Japan)] Saeki, T. [Yamaguchi Univ. (Japan)

    1998-09-15

    A visualization experiment was carried out using a small metal mold with rectangular grooves as a mold printable model to observe the micro-flow of molten polymer in a metal mold. The glitter, which is an index of printability, was correlated with blow velocity and space area. Since it is highly correlated with space area, it can be thought that filling up well the fine grooves of mold heighten the glitter and printability as well. The effect of such factors as mold temperature, polymer melt temperature, air blow pressure and air blow velocity on the mold printability was investigated. For high density polyethylene and polypropylene, the glitter depended the most on the mold temperature. The higher the temperature, the higher the glitter. It was also found that the increase in blow pressure was effective. For high density polyethylene, the effect of blow velocity and polymer melt temperature was also recognized. 3 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Casting metal microstructures from a flexible and reusable mold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, Andrew H; King, William P

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes casting-based microfabrication of metal microstructures and nanostructures. The metal was cast into flexible silicone molds which were themselves cast from microfabricated silicon templates. Microcasting is demonstrated in two metal alloys of melting temperature 70 °C or 138 °C. Many structures were successfully cast into the metal with excellent replication fidelity, including ridges with periodicity 400 nm and holes or pillars with diameter in the range 10–100 µm and aspect ratio up to 2:1. The flexibility of the silicone mold permits casting of curved surfaces, which we demonstrate by fabricating a cylindrical metal roller of diameter 8 mm covered with microstructures. The metal microstructures can be in turn used as a reusable molding tool

  5. Customized mold radiotherapy with prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Tadahide; Tsuchiya, Yoshiyuki; Hayasaka, Junichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Kusama, Mikio; Takahashi, Satoru; Nakazawa, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Eight patients (6 males, 2 females; median age, 78 years; age range, 31-94 years) were treated by mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers between October 2006 and March 2013. The primary sites were the tongue in 3 cases, hard palate and buccal mucosa in 2 cases each, and oral floor in 1 case. The type of treatment consisted of radical radiotherapy and palliative radiotherapy in 2 cases each, and preoperative radiotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy, additional radiotherapy after external beam radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy in 1 case each. Patients received 40-50 Gy in 8-10 fractions with mold radiotherapy. Two patients who received radical radiotherapy showed no signs of recurrence or metastasis. The present therapy contributed to patients' palliative, postoperative, and preoperative therapy. Mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic appliance was performed safely and was a useful treatment for several types of oral cancer. (author)

  6. Influence of melt mixer on injection molding of thermoset elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochman, Arif; Zahra, Keith

    2016-10-01

    One of the drawbacks in injection molding is that the plasticizing screw is short such that polymers having high concentrations of additives, such as thermoset elastomers, might not mix homogeneously within the short period of time during the plasticizing stage. In this study, various melt mixers inside the nozzle chamber, together forming a mixing nozzle, were developed. Three different materials were investigated, namely nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR), ethylene propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) and fluorocarbon (FKM). The use of these melt mixers resulted in better homogeneity and properties of the molded parts despite a curing time reduction of 10 s. This was due to the increase in mixing and shearing introduced a higher rate of crosslinking formation in the molded parts.

  7. Long fiber polymer composite property calculation in injection molding simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Han, Sejin

    2013-05-01

    Long fiber filled polymer composite materials have attracted a great attention and usage in recent years. However, the injection and compression molded long fiber composite materials possess complex microstructures that include spatial variations in fiber orientation and length. This paper presents the recent implemented anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model for predicting fiber orientation distribution[1] and a newly developed fiber breakage model[2] for predicting fiber length distribution in injection and compression molding simulation, and Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka model[3,4] with fiber-matrix de-bonding model[5] have been implemented to calculate the long fiber composite property distribution with predicted fiber orientation and fiber length distributions. A validation study on fiber orientation, fiber breakage and mechanical property distributions are given with injection molding process simulation.

  8. Fabricating microfluidic valve master molds in SU-8 photoresist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Aaron J.; Cosmanescu, Alin; Sluka, James; Glazier, James A.; Stupack, Dwayne; Amarie, Dragos

    2014-05-01

    Multilayer soft lithography has become a powerful tool in analytical chemistry, biochemistry, material and life sciences, and medical research. Complex fluidic micro-circuits require reliable components that integrate easily into microchips. We introduce two novel approaches to master mold fabrication for constructing in-line micro-valves using SU-8. Our fabrication techniques enable robust and versatile integration of many lab-on-a-chip functions including filters, mixers, pumps, stream focusing and cell-culture chambers, with in-line valves. SU-8 created more robust valve master molds than the conventional positive photoresists used in multilayer soft lithography, but maintained the advantages of biocompatibility and rapid prototyping. As an example, we used valve master molds made of SU-8 to fabricate PDMS chips capable of precisely controlling beads or cells in solution.

  9. Injection molding of coarse 316L stainless steel powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, M.A.; Abdullah, N.S.; Subuki, I; Ali, E.A.G.E.; Ismail, F.; Hassan, N.

    2007-01-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) process using 316L stainless steel powder of 45 μm was investigated. The binder system consists of a major fraction of palm stearins and minor fraction of polyethylene with a powder loading of 65 vol. %. The rheological behaviour of the feedstock was determined using Capillary Rheometer. The feedstock then injected using vertical injection molding machine into the tensile test bar. Then molded parts were de bound and sintered in vacuum at temperature of 1360 degree Celsius. The results show that the viscosity of the feedstock decreased with the temperature increased. The best sintered density achieved was about 7.5 g/cm 3 with the tensile strength of more than 460 MPa. The properties of the sintered specimens could be increased with the increasing of sintering temperature. (author)

  10. Process and part filling control in micro injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Schoth, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The influence of process parameters on μ-injection molding (μIM) and on μ-injection molded parts has been investigated using Design of Experiments. A mold with a sensor applied at injection location was used to monitor actual injection pressure and to determine the cavity filling time. Flow markers...... position was measured on the polymer μ-parts to evaluate filling behavior of the polymer melt flowing through μ-features. Experimental results obtained under different processing conditions were evaluated to correlate the process parameter levels influence on the selected responses. Results showed...... that the injection speed in one of the most influencing process parameters on the μIM process and on the μ-parts filling....

  11. Fabricating microfluidic valve master molds in SU-8 photoresist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dy, Aaron J; Cosmanescu, Alin; Sluka, James; Glazier, James A; Amarie, Dragos; Stupack, Dwayne

    2014-01-01

    Multilayer soft lithography has become a powerful tool in analytical chemistry, biochemistry, material and life sciences, and medical research. Complex fluidic micro-circuits require reliable components that integrate easily into microchips. We introduce two novel approaches to master mold fabrication for constructing in-line micro-valves using SU-8. Our fabrication techniques enable robust and versatile integration of many lab-on-a-chip functions including filters, mixers, pumps, stream focusing and cell-culture chambers, with in-line valves. SU-8 created more robust valve master molds than the conventional positive photoresists used in multilayer soft lithography, but maintained the advantages of biocompatibility and rapid prototyping. As an example, we used valve master molds made of SU-8 to fabricate PDMS chips capable of precisely controlling beads or cells in solution. (technical note)

  12. Treatment principles for the management of mold infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Lewis, Russell E

    2014-11-06

    Survival rates among immunocompromised patients with invasive mold infections have markedly improved over the last decade with earlier diagnosis and new antifungal treatment options. Yet, increasing antifungal resistance, breakthrough infections with intrinsically resistant fungi, and potentially life-threatening adverse effects and drug interactions are becoming more problematic, especially with prolonged therapy. Evidence-based recommendations for treating invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis provide excellent guidance on the initial workup and treatment of these molds, but they cannot address all of the key management issues. Herein, we discuss 10 general treatment principles in the management of invasive mold disease in immunocompromised patients and discuss how these principles can be integrated to develop an effective, individualized treatment plan. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  13. Permanent Mold Casting of JIS-AC4C Aluminum Alloy Using a Low-Temperature Mold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Hiroshi; Nikawa, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Permanent mold casting using mold temperatures below 200 deg. C was conducted to obtain a high-strength, thin-walled casting. Al-7.36 mass% Si -0.18 Cu- 0.27Mg-0.34Fe alloy JIS-AC4C was cast using a bottom pouring cast plan. The product had a rectangular tube shape (70 mm W x 68 mm D x 180 mm H) with wall thicknesses of 1, 3 and 5 mm. The effect of heat insulation at the melt path was compared when using a sand runner insert and when using a steel runner insert as well as a powder mold release agent. Fine microstructures were observed in the casting. The smaller the thickness, the higher the hardness with smaller secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS). However, the hardness and the SDAS were unaffected by the mold temperature. It was proposed that the avoidance of the formation of primary α dendrite at the melt path generates a higher strength casting with adequate mold filling.

  14. Use of the smart tongue to monitor mold growth and discriminate between four mold species grown in liquid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Guangying, E-mail: zhaogy-user@163.com [Food Safety Key Lab of Zhejiang Province, Department of Food Quality and Safety, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310035 (China); Lin Xiaona; Dou Wenchao; Tian Shiyi; Deng Shaoping; Shi Jinqin [Food Safety Key Lab of Zhejiang Province, Department of Food Quality and Safety, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310035 (China)

    2011-04-01

    A novel voltammetric electronic tongue, smart tongue, was employed to monitor the growth of mold and to differentiate between four types of mold grown in liquid medium. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to extract the relevant information obtained by the smart tongue. Reference growth curves were based on measurements of dry weight and pH. The growth detected by the smart tongue was basically consistent with that observed by the measurement of dry weight and pH. The optimal combinations of electrodes and frequencies for monitoring growth were as follows: for Aspergillus, both the Pt and Au electrodes at 1 Hz, 10 Hz and 100 Hz; for Penicillium, the Pt and W electrodes at 100 Hz; for Mucor, the Pt, Pd and W electrodes at the three frequency segments; for Rhizopus, the Pd, Ti and Ag electrodes at the three frequency segments. The Ag electrode at 10 Hz or 100 Hz frequency could differentiate well between the four types of mold for culturing 6 h in the liquid media. Therefore, the smart tongue has a promising future as a modern rapid analytical technology for the real time detection of the growth of mold and for the classification model of mold.

  15. Use of the smart tongue to monitor mold growth and discriminate between four mold species grown in liquid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Guangying; Lin Xiaona; Dou Wenchao; Tian Shiyi; Deng Shaoping; Shi Jinqin

    2011-01-01

    A novel voltammetric electronic tongue, smart tongue, was employed to monitor the growth of mold and to differentiate between four types of mold grown in liquid medium. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to extract the relevant information obtained by the smart tongue. Reference growth curves were based on measurements of dry weight and pH. The growth detected by the smart tongue was basically consistent with that observed by the measurement of dry weight and pH. The optimal combinations of electrodes and frequencies for monitoring growth were as follows: for Aspergillus, both the Pt and Au electrodes at 1 Hz, 10 Hz and 100 Hz; for Penicillium, the Pt and W electrodes at 100 Hz; for Mucor, the Pt, Pd and W electrodes at the three frequency segments; for Rhizopus, the Pd, Ti and Ag electrodes at the three frequency segments. The Ag electrode at 10 Hz or 100 Hz frequency could differentiate well between the four types of mold for culturing 6 h in the liquid media. Therefore, the smart tongue has a promising future as a modern rapid analytical technology for the real time detection of the growth of mold and for the classification model of mold.

  16. Toughening Mechanisms in Silica-Filled Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Binay S.

    Epoxies are widely used as underfill resins throughout the microelectronics industry to mechanically couple and protect various components of flip-chip assemblies. Generally rigid materials largely surround underfill resins. Improving the mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resins to better match those of their rigid counterparts can help extend the service lifetime of flip-chip assemblies. Recently, researchers have demonstrated that silica nanoparticles are effective toughening agents for lightly-crosslinked epoxies. Improvements in the fracture toughness of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites have primarily been attributed to two toughening mechanisms: particle debonding with subsequent void growth and matrix shear banding. Various attempts have been made to model the contribution of these toughening mechanisms to the overall fracture energy observed in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. However, disparities still exist between experimental and modeled fracture energy results. In this dissertation, the thermal, rheological and mechanical behavior of eight different types of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites was investigated. Each nanocomposite consisted of up to 10 vol% of silica nanoparticles with particle sizes ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm, with a variety of surface treatments and particle structures. Fractographical analysis was conducted with new experimental approaches in order to accurately identify morphological evidence for each proposed toughening mechanism. Overall, three major insights into the fracture behavior of real world silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites were established. First, microcracking was observed as an essential toughening mechanism in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. Microcracking was observed on the surface and subsurface of fractured samples in each type of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposite. The additional toughening contribution of microcracking to overall fracture energy yielded excellent agreement between experimental

  17. Microcapsules Filled with a Palm Oil-Based Alkyd as Healing Agent for Epoxy Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurshafiza Shahabudin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the approaches to prolong the service lifespan of polymeric material is the development of self-healing ability by means of embedded microcapsules containing a healing agent. In this work, poly(melamine-urea-formaldehyde (PMUF microcapsules containing a palm oil-based alkyd were produced by polymerization of melamine resin, urea and formaldehyde that encapsulated droplets of the suspended alkyd particles. A series of spherical and free-flowing microcapsules were obtained. The chemical properties of core and shell materials were characterized by Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis showed a glass transition around −15 °C due to the alkyd, and a melting temperature at around 200 °C due to the shell. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA results showed that the core and shell thermally degraded within the temperature range of 200–600 °C. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM examination of the ruptured microcapsule showed smooth inner and rough outer surfaces of the shell. Flexural strength and microhardness (Vickers of the cured epoxy compound were not affected with the incorporation of 1%–3% of the microcapsules. The viability of the healing reactions was demonstrated by blending small amounts of alkyd with epoxy and hardener at different ratios. The blends could readily cure to non-sticky hard solids at room temperature and the reactions could be verified by ATR-FTIR.

  18. Thermomechanical characterization of thiol-epoxy shape memory thermosets for mechanical actuators design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Alberto; Fernández-Francos, Xavier; De la Flor, Silvia

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, shape-memory "thiol-epoxy" polymers are synthesized and characterized as potential thermomechanical actuators. Their thermomechanical properties are investigated through dynamo mechanical and tensile analyses and related to their network structural properties by using "thiol" and "epoxy" compounds of different functionality and structure. Their mechanical properties (resistance at break, elongation limits and strain energy) are related to their shape-memory response under free-recovery conditions and partially-constrained conditions, thus, establishing the connection between network relaxation (free-recovery) with the work output capabilities (partially-constrained). Results show high mechanical performance, achieving high elongation at break values (up to 100%) and stress at break values (up to 50 MPa). The shape-memory experiments reveal strong dependence of the programming conditions and network structure on the recovery efficiency at free-conditions, whereas under partially-constrained conditions, the controlling factors are the mechanical limits at high temperature. Moreover, some recommendations to achieve the maximum work output efficiency for a given operational design of a thermomechanical actuator are deduced.

  19. Improved anti-stiction coating of SU-8 molds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Jacob Moresco; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2010-01-01

    of the epoxy groups by oxygen plasma or sulfuric acid improves the deposition of FDTS. The deposition of FDTS on acid-activated and untreated SU-8 gave an identical well performing anti-stiction coating, as opposed to oxygen plasma activated surface which resulted in a poor FDTS coverage. In this paper...

  20. CT use for nasopharingeal molds realization in endocavitary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J. Torrecilla; Crispin, V.; Chust, M.; Guinot, J.; Arribas, L.; Mengual, J.; Carrasco, P.; Miragall, E.; Hernandez, A.; Guardino, C.; Carrascosa, M.; Cardenal, R.; Casana, M.; Prats, C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: We present the following procedure for the making of individual molds with dental silicone for endocavitary brachytherapy of nasopharingeal cancer aided by CT scan. Procedure: Head immobilization during the realization of nasopharynx CT. Planification of treatment using these CT images, to determine the optimum position of radioactive sources. Printing on paper CT images with the nasopharynx contoured walls and the radioactive sources position. Realization of the mold in plastiline with the aid of the cuts of printer paper cut out with the nasopharynx form. Obtaining of the negative of the mold of plastiline by means of the use of alginate. Placement of two number 20 rectal rigid catheters with metal malleable bars inside them, in order to give them an adequate form in relation to the previous carried out planning. Filling in of alginato negative, where rectal catheters were placed, with Provil MCD Bayer Dental, a silicone based material for precision impression. We recommend to crossing the catheters' end with a number 2 silk thread to secure the catheter. An end of the silk thread is left outside the mold in order to help the extraction at the end of application. We advise to carry out a neuroleptic anaesthesia for its insertion, for the purpose of achieving a soft palate suitable relaxation. It makes the insertion easier. Repeat CT with the mold and phantoms in position to know a definitive dose distribution calculation. Conclusion: This method avoids the necessity of general anaesthesia in the realization of individual molds of nasopharyx for endocavitary brachytherapy and it improves the implant dosimetry

  1. Infant origins of childhood asthma associated with specific molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reponen, Tiina; Lockey, James; Bernstein, David I; Vesper, Stephen J; Levin, Linda; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Zheng, Shu; Ryan, Patrick; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Villareal, Manuel; Lemasters, Grace

    2012-09-01

    The specific cause or causes of asthma development must be identified to prevent this disease. Our hypothesis was that specific mold exposures are associated with childhood asthma development. Infants were identified from birth certificates. Dust samples were collected from 289 homes when the infants were 8 months of age. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of 36 molds that comprise the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) and endotoxin, house dust mite, cat, dog, and cockroach allergens. Children were evaluated at age 7 years for asthma based on reported symptoms and objective measures of lung function. Host, environmental exposure, and home characteristics evaluated included a history of parental asthma, race, sex, upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms, season of birth, family income, cigarette smoke exposure, air conditioning, use of a dehumidifier, presence of carpeting, age of home, and visible mold at age 1 year and child's positive skin prick test response to aeroallergens and molds at age 7 years. Asthma was diagnosed in 24% of the children at age 7 years. A statistically significant increase in asthma risk at age 7 years was associated with high ERMI values in the child's home in infancy (adjusted relative risk for a 10-unit increase in ERMI value, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.5-2.2). The summation of levels of 3 mold species, Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus unguis, and Penicillium variabile, was significantly associated with asthma (adjusted relative risk, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.8-2.7). In this birth cohort study exposure during infancy to 3 mold species common to water-damaged buildings was associated with childhood asthma at age 7 years. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Applying dynamic mold temperature control to cosmetic package design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao Shih-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the fashion trend and the market needs, this study developed the eco-cushion compact. Through the product design and the advanced process technology, many issues have improved, for instance, the inconvenience of transportation, the lack of multiuse capability, the increase of costs, and the low yield rate. The eco-cushion compact developed in this study was high quality, low cost, and meets the requirements of the eco market. The study aimed at developing a reusable container. Dynamic mold temperature control was introduced in the injection modeling process. The innovation in the product was its multi-functional formula invention, eco-product design, one-piece powder case design, and multifunctional design in the big powder case, mold flow and development of dynamic mold temperature control. Finally, through 3D drawing and modeling, and computer assistance for mold flow and verification to develop and produce models. During the manufacturing process, in order to solve the problems of tightness and warping, development and manufacture of dynamic mold temperature control were introduced. This decreased the injection cycle and residual stress, and deformation of the products has reduced to less than 0.2 mm, and the air tightness increased. In addition, air leakage was less than 2% and the injection cycle decreased to at least 10%. The results of the study can be extended and applied on the future design on cosmetic package and an alternative can be proposed to solve the problems of air tightness and warping. In this study, dynamic mold temperature control is considered as a design with high price-performance ratio, which can be adopted on industrial application for practical benefit and improvement.

  3. High-performance fiber/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.; Toland, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Activities described include: (1) determining the applicability of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber to composite pressure vessels; (2) defining the fatigue performance of thin-titanium-lined, high-strength graphite/epoxy pressure vessel; (3) selecting epoxy resin systems suitable for filament winding; (4) studying the fatigue life potential of Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels; and (5) developing polymer liners for composite pressure vessels. Kevlar 49/epoxy and graphite fiber/epoxy pressure vessels, 10.2 cm in diameter, some with aluminum liners and some with alternation layers of rubber and polymer were fabricated. To determine liner performance, vessels were subjected to gas permeation tests, fatigue cycling, and burst tests, measuring composite performance, fatigue life, and leak rates. Both the metal and the rubber/polymer liner performed well. Proportionately larger pressure vessels (20.3 and 38 cm in diameter) were made and subjected to the same tests. In these larger vessels, line leakage problems with both liners developed the causes of the leaks were identified and some solutions to such liner problems are recommended.

  4. Liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite material for dental application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yun-Yuan; Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Su, Wei-Fang; Chen, Min-Huey

    2015-01-01

    Novel liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposites, which exhibit reduced polymerization shrinkage and effectively bond to tooth structures, can be applied in esthetic dentistry, including core and post systems, direct and indirect restorations, and dental brackets. The purposes of this study were to investigate the properties of liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposites including biocompatibility, microhardness, and frictional forces of bracket-like blocks with different filler contents for further clinical applications. In this study, we evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials that exhibited various filler contents, by assessing their cell activity performance using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and their microhardness with or without thermocycling. We also evaluated the frictional force between bracket-like duplicates and commercially available esthetic bracket systems using Instron 5566. The liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials showed good biocompatibility. The materials having high filler content demonstrated greater microhardness compared with commercially available bracket materials, before and after the thermocycling treatment. Thus, manufacturing processes are important to reduce frictional force experienced by orthodontic brackets. The microhardness of the bracket-like blocks made by our new material is superior to the commercially available brackets, even after thermocycling. Our results indicate that the evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials are of an appropriate quality for application in dental core and post systems and in various restorations. By applying technology to refine manufacturing processes, these new materials could also be used to fabricate esthetic brackets for orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of TiO2-epoxy nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Amit; Islam, Muhammad S.

    2008-01-01

    A systematic study has been conducted to investigate the matrix properties by introducing nanosize TiO 2 (5-40 nm, 0.5-2% by weight) fillers into an epoxy resin. Ultrasonic mixing process, via sonic cavitations, was employed to disperse the particles into the resin system. The thermal, mechanical, morphology and the viscoelastic properties of the nanocomposite and the neat resin were measured with TGA, DMA, TEM and Instron. The nano-particles are dispersed evenly throughout the entire volume of the resin. The nanofiller infusion improves the thermal, mechanical and viscoelastic properties of the epoxy resin. The nanocomposite shows increase in storage modulus, glass transition temperature, tensile modulus, flexural modulus and short beam shear strength from neat epoxy resin. The mechanical performance and thermal stability of the epoxy nanocomposites are depending on with the dispersion state of the TiO 2 in the epoxy matrix and are correlated with loading (0.0015-0.006% by volume). In addition, the nanocomposite shows enhanced flexural strength. Several reasons to explain these effects in terms of reinforcing mechanisms were discussed

  6. Flexural properties of treated and untreated kenaf/epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, B.F.; Shalwan, A.; Chin, C.W.; Ming, K.C.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Untreated kenaf fibre/epoxy composites. Treated kenaf fibre/epoxy composites. Highlights: ► Treatment of kenaf fibres with 6% NaOH has improved the flexural properties of epoxy composites. ► Interfacial adhesion of the natural fibres is controlled by the microstructure of the fibres. ► Kenaf fibres have a potential to replace glass fibres for flexural applications. -- Abstract: In the current work, flexural properties of unidirectional long kenaf fibre reinforced epoxy (KFRE) composites are studied. The kenaf fibres were prepared into two types as untreated and treated (with 6% NaOH). The failure mechanism and damage features of the materials were categorized with the surface observation by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results revealed that reinforcement of epoxy with treated kenaf fibres increased the flexural strength of the composite by about 36%, while, untreated fibres introduced 20% improvement. This was mainly due to the high improvement of the chemical treatment (NaOH) on the interfacial adhesion of the fibres and the porosity of the composites which prevented the debonding, detachments or pull out of fibres. For untreated KFRE, the fracture mechanisms were debonding, tearing, detachments and pull out of fibres. The developed composite exhibited superior properties compared to the previous composites based on natural and synthetic fibres.

  7. Void-free epoxy castings for cryogenic insulators and seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    The design of the Westinghouse Magnet for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Large Coil Program (LCP) incorporates a main lead bushing which transmits heat-leak loads by conduction to the supercritical helium stream. The bushing, which consists of epoxy resin cast about a copper conductor, must be electrically insulated, vacuum tight and be capable of withstanding the stresses encountered in cryognic service. The seal design of the bushing is especially important; leakage from either the helium system or the external environment into the vacuum will cause the magnet to quench. Additionally, the epoxy-resin casting must resist mechanical loads caused by the weight of leads attached to the bushing and thermal stresses transmitted to the epoxy via the conductor. The epoxy resin is cast about the conductor in such a way as to provide the required vacuum tight seal. The technique by which this is accomplished is reviewed. Equally important is the elimination of voids in the epoxy which will act as stress-concentrating discontinuities during cooling to or warming from 4K. The types of voids that could be expected and their causes are described. The paper reviews techniques employed to eliminate voids within the cast-resin portion of the bushing

  8. Feasibility of using Big Area Additive Manufacturing to Directly Manufacture Boat Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Brian K. [ORNL; Chesser, Phillip C. [ORNL; Lind, Randall F. [ORNL; Sallas, Matthew R. [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J. [ORNL

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this project was to explore the feasibility of using Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) to directly manufacture a boat mold without the need for coatings. All prior tooling projects with BAAM required the use to thick coatings to overcome the surface finish limitations of the BAAM process. While the BAAM process significantly lowers the cost of building the mold, the high cost element rapidly became the coatings (cost of the material, labor on coating, and finishing). As an example, the time and cost to manufacture the molds for the Wind Turbine project with TPI Composites Inc. and the molds for the submarine project with Carderock Naval Warfare Systems was a fraction of the time and cost of the coatings. For this project, a catamaran boat hull mold was designed, manufactured, and assembled with an additional 0.15” thickness of material on all mold surfaces. After printing, the mold was immediately machined and assembled. Alliance MG, LLC (AMG), the industry partner of this project, experimented with mold release agents on the carbon-fiber reinforced acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (CF ABS) to verify that the material can be directly used as a mold (rather than needing a coating). In addition, for large molds (such as the wind turbine mold with TPI Composites Inc.), the mold only provided the target surface. A steel subframe had to be manufactured to provide structural integrity. If successful, this will significantly reduce the time and cost necessary for manufacturing large resin infusion molds using the BAAM process.

  9. Injection molding tools with micro/nano-meter pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for embedded a micrometer and/or nanometer pattern into an injection molding tool. In a first main aspect, a micro/nanometer structured imprinting device is applied in, or on, an active surface so as to transfer the micro/nanometer patterned structure...... to the tool while the imprinting device is, at least partly, within a cavity of the injection molding tool. In a second main aspect, a base plate with a micro/nanometer structured pattern positioned on an upper part is positioned on the active surface within the tool, the lower part of the base plate facing...

  10. The study and fabrication of DLC micropattern on roll mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young Woo; Lee, Tae Dong; Park, Yeong Min; Cho, Hyun; Kim, Jin Kon; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2015-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating is becoming a promising protective coating layers due to its superior properties. In this study, instead of protective coating, DLC film was applied as the only component for micropattern then etched with lithography and lift-off process selectively. Furthermore, DLC film has been fabricated on aluminum roll mold. Then UV curing resin was applied to form the pattern on the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. The dimension and formation of the DLC micropattern on roll mold were analyzed. Moreover, the Raman spectroscopic of nitrogen-doped DLC film was analyzed.

  11. Tribologic analysis and technical innovation for rotary molding press

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Wei; Bai Yumeng; Dai Xingjian

    2012-01-01

    The rotary molding press R53C-Y is the key facility in the compression molding working procedure of the nu clear fuel pellets. Its main compression assembly called the upper compression roller frame has been worn seriously during the production. At first, the mechanical model of the upper compression roller assembly was established for analysis and calculation physical strength. Then the wear causations of the upper compression roller frame were analyzed, and the existent problems of central lubrication system were discussed. Finally, Oil-air central lubrication system was designed considering the characteristic of nuclear fuel pellets production. (authors)

  12. Characterization of epoxy hybrid composites filled with cellulose fibers and nano-SiC

    KAUST Repository

    Alamri, H.; Low, I. M.

    2012-01-01

    Three different approaches have been applied and investigated to enhance the thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy resin. Epoxy system reinforced with either recycled cellulose fibers (RCF) or nanosilicon carbide (n-SiC) particles as well

  13. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Standard Cement Materials, Epoxy Coating 4553

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Standard Cement Materials, Inc. Standard Epoxy Coating 4553™ (SEC 4553) epoxy coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Ma...

  14. Evaluation of Carbon Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels Fabricated Using Ionic Liquid Epoxies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In terms of "Innovation" this is a unique epoxy with unique properties, and NASA co-holds the patent. This epoxy is being exclusively formulated for cryogenic use....

  15. Mechanical properties of uniaxial natural fabric Grewia tilifolia reinforced epoxy based composites: Effects of chemical treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jayaramudu, J

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chemical treatment on the mechanical, morphological, and chemical resistance properties of uniaxial natural fabrics, Grewia tilifolia/epoxy composites, were studied. In order to enhance the interfacial bonding between the epoxy matrix...

  16. E-Beam-Cured Layered-Silicate and Spherical Silica Epoxy Nanocomposites (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Chenggang; Anderson, David P

    2007-01-01

    .... The nanofillers can be two dimensional (layered-silicate) and zero dimensional (spherical silica). Both the spherical silica epoxy nanocomposite and the layered-silicate epoxy nanocomposite can be cured to a high degree of curing...

  17. Effect of Boron and Phosphate compounds on Thermal and Fire Properties of wood/HDPE composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgay Akbulut; Nadir Ayrilmis; Turker Dundar; Ali Durmus; Robert H. White; Murat Teker

    2011-01-01

    Melting and non-isothermal crystallization behaviors, oxidative induction time, and fire performance of the injection-molded wood flour-high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites (WPCs) incorporated with different levels (4, 8, or 12 wt %) of boron compounds [borax/boric acid (BX/BA) (0.5:0.5 wt %), zinc borate (ZB)] and phosphorus compounds [mono- and di-ammonium...

  18. Effect of Binder and Mold parameters on Collapsibility and Surface Finish of Gray Cast Iron No-bake Sand Molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasulu Reddy, K.; Venkata Reddy, Vajrala; Mandava, Ravi Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Chemically bonded no-bake molds and cores have good mechanical properties and produce dimensionally accurate castings compared to green sand molds. Poor collapsibility property of CO2 hardened sodium silicate bonded sand mold and phenolic urethane no-bake (PUN) binder system, made the reclamation of the sands more important. In the present work fine silica sand is mixed with phenolic urethane no-bake binder and the sand sets in a very short time within few minutes. In this paper it is focused on optimizing the process parameters of PUN binder based sand castings for better collapsibility and surface finish of gray cast iron using Taguchi design. The findings were successfully verified through experiments.

  19. Epoxy – the hub for the most versatile polymer with exceptional combination of superlative features

    OpenAIRE

    Inam, Fawad

    2014-01-01

    Epoxy resins and epoxy based materials have experienced significant advancement since their beginning in 1936, when Dr. Castan of Switzerland and Dr. Greenlee of USA succeeded in synthesizing the very first bisphenol-A-based epoxy resins. Whether it is the new carbon fiber composite of Boeing’s Dreamliner or the thin set terrazzo flooring, epoxy has always been the ideal choice because of its superlative properties and unique chemical composition. Belonging to thermoset family, it is certainl...

  20. Study of the Effect of Mold Corner Shape on the Initial Solidification Behavior of Molten Steel Using Mold Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Peisheng; Wang, Wanlin; Long, Xukai; Zhang, Kaixuan; Gao, Erzhuo; Qin, Rongshan

    2018-02-01

    The chamfered mold with a typical corner shape (angle between the chamfered face and hot face is 45 deg) was applied to the mold simulator study in this paper, and the results were compared with the previous results from a well-developed right-angle mold simulator system. The results suggested that the designed chamfered structure would increase the thermal resistance and weaken the two-dimensional heat transfer around the mold corner, causing the homogeneity of the mold surface temperatures and heat fluxes. In addition, the chamfered structure can decrease the fluctuation of the steel level and the liquid slag flow around the meniscus at mold corner. The cooling intensities at different longitudinal sections of shell are close to each other due to the similar time-average solidification factors, which are 2.392 mm/s1/2 (section A-A: chamfered center), 2.372 mm/s1/2 (section B-B: 135 deg corner), and 2.380 mm/s1/2 (section D-D: face), respectively. For the same oscillation mark (OM), the heights of OM roots at different positions (profile L1 (face), profile L2 (135 deg corner), and profile L3 (chamfered center)) are very close to each other. The average value of height difference (HD) between two OMs roots for L1 and L2 is 0.22 mm, and for L2 and L3 is 0.38 mm. Finally, with the help of metallographic examination, the shapes of different hooks were also discussed.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of rubbery epoxy/organoclay hectorite nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research investigates the morphology, the mechanical, and the viscoelastic properties of rubbery epoxy/clay nanocomposites synthesized by in situ polymerisation of a prepolymer diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A crosslinked with an aliphatic diamine based on a polyoxypropylene backbone. The inorganic phase was hectorite, exchanged with octadecylammonium ions in order to give organophilic properties to the phyllosilicate. An ultrasonicator was used to disperse the silicate clay layer into epoxy-amine matrix. The morphology of epoxy-hectorite nanocomposites examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM showed that mixed delamination or intercalation or microdispersion could occur depending on type of organoclay. Moreover, the mechanical and viscoelastic properties were found to be improved with only the treated hectorite.

  2. Epoxy-silicate nanocomposites: Cure monitoring and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Farzana; Chen, Jihua; Hojjati, Mehdi

    2007-01-01

    Epoxy-clay nanocomposites were prepared with organically modified layered clay with varying clay contents (1-8 wt.%). Neat resin and nanocomposite were characterized using different techniques. At first, the effect of nanoclay concentration on the cure behaviour was investigated using an on-line dielectric cure monitoring technique. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to verify the dielectric measurement results. Furthermore, mechanical and thermal properties were studied using tensile test and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), respectively. Experimental results showed that properties of the epoxy were changed evidently because of the nanoclay loading. The tensile modulus of the nanocomposites increased by 47%, however, no improvement in tensile strength and glass transition temperature (T g ) was observed. Fracture surface of the tensile samples were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The nanocomposites structures were characterized with Wide Angle X-Ray Diffraction (WAXD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), which revealed the intercalated morphology of clay layers in the epoxy resin systems

  3. Physical and chemical durability of cement impregnated epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryantoro

    1997-01-01

    Immobilization of simulation radioactive waste contains Cs and Sr with cement impregnated epoxy resin has been done. Low level liquid waste in 30% weight mixed cement homogeneously and then set in its curing time about 28 days. Waste from was impregnated with epoxy resin (Bisphenol-A-diglycidylether) and use Triethylenteramin as catalyst. the sample of cement impregnated epoxy resin 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm in diameter and length was tested by Paul Weber. The compressive strength was obtained of 4.08 kN.cm - 2. The sochxlet apparatus was run on flow rate of 300 ml/hour at 100 o C and during 24 hours. The leaching rate of Cs was round on 5.5 x 10 - 4 g.cm - 2.d - 1 and Sr was 6.1 x 10 - 4 g.cm - 2.d - 1 (author)

  4. Interfacial Strength and Physical Properties of Functionalized Graphene - Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Heimann, Paula; Scheiman, Daniel; Adamson, Douglas H.; Aksay, Iihan A.; Prud'homme, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    The toughness and coefficient of thermal expansion of a series of functionalized graphene sheet - epoxy nanocomposites are investigated. Functionalized graphene sheets are produced by splitting graphite oxide into single graphene sheets through a rapid thermal expansion process. These graphene sheets contain approx. 10% oxygen due to the presence of hydroxide, epoxide, and carboxyl functional groups which assist in chemical bond formation with the epoxy matrix. Intrinsic surface functionality is used to graft alkyl amine chains on the graphene sheets, and the addition of excess hardener insures covalent bonding between the epoxide matrix and graphene sheets. Considerable improvement in the epoxy dimensional stability is obtained. An increase in nanocomposite toughness is observed in some cases.

  5. Thermal conductive epoxy enhanced by nanodiamond-coated carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Jiang, Guohua

    2017-11-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) particles were coated on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical reactions. Reliable bonding was formed by the combination of acyl chloride on NDs and amine group on CNTs. ND coated CNTs (CNT-ND) were dispersed into epoxy to fabricate thermal conductive resins. The results show that the surface energy of CNTs is decreased by the coated NDs, which is contributed to the excellent dispersion of CNT-NDs in the epoxy matrix. The heat-transfer channels were built by the venous CNTs cooperating with the coated NDs, which not only plays an effective role of heat conduction for CNTs and NDs, but also avoids the electrical leakage by the protection of NDs surrounding outside of CNTs. Electrical and thermal conductance measurements demonstrate that the influence of the CNT-ND incorporation on the electrical conductance is minor, however, the thermal conductivity is improved significantly for the epoxy filled with CNT-ND.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Characterization and analysis of epoxy/clay nanotubes composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sene, Tarcisio S.; Kock, Thyago; Coelho, Luiz A.F.; Becker, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    An DGEBA epoxy matrix was used aiming to achieve a nanocomposite material, through the dispersion of (CNT) via mechanical stirring followed by sonication. In this work the following characterization were performed: mechanical characterization, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of CNT and modified clays promoted the increase of modulus of the epoxy matrix, and a synergistic effect between CNT and both clays could be presumed. SEM images of the fracture surface show the difference between the fracture surface area and the presence of clusters among the samples, allowing a correlation with the modulus of elasticity. X-ray diffractograms from 2Θ = 5 deg showed no peaks for modified clay samples, however it is possible to affirm that modified clay platelets are forming a less organized structure compared to the structure of the clay as natural in epoxy. (author)

  7. DEGRADATION OF MAGNET EPOXY AT NSLS X-RAY RING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU,J.P.; ZHONG,Z.; HAAS,E.; HULBERT,S.; HUBBARD,R.

    2004-05-24

    Epoxy resin degradation was analyzed for NSLS X-ring magnets after two decades of 2.58-2.8 GeV continuous electron-beam operation, based on results obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeters irradiated along the NSLS ring and epoxy samples irradiated at the beamline target location. A Monte Carlo-based particle transport code, MCNP, was utilized to verify the dose from synchrotron radiation distributed along the axial- and transverse-direction in a ring model, which simulates the geometry of a ring quadrupole magnet and its central vacuum chamber downstream of the bending-magnet photon ports. The actual life expectancy of thoroughly vacuum baked-and-cured epoxy resin was estimated from radiation tests on similar polymeric materials using a radiation source developed for electrical insulation and mechanical structure studies.

  8. The reflectivity, wettability and scratch durability of microsurface features molded in the injection molding process using a dynamic tool tempering system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Sascha; Burr, August; Kübler, Michael; Deckert, Matthias; Bleesen, Christoph

    2011-02-01

    In this paper the replication qualities of periodically and randomly arranged micro-features molded in the injection molding process and their effects on surface properties are studied. The features are molded in PC, PMMA and PP at different mold wall temperatures in order to point out the necessity and profitability of a variotherm mold wall temperature control system. A one-dimensional heat conduction model is proposed to predict the cycle times of the variotherm injection molding processes. With regard to these processes, the molding results are compared to the molded surface feature heights using an atomic force microscope. In addition, the effects of the molded surface features on macroscopic surfaces are characterized in terms of light reflection using a spectrometer and in terms of water wettability by measuring the static contact angle. Furthermore, due to the sensitivity of the surface features on the molded parts, their durability is compared in a scratch test with a diamond tip. This leads to successful implementation in applications in which the optical appearance, in terms of gloss and reflection, and the water repellence, in terms of drag flow and adhesion, are of importance.

  9. The reflectivity, wettability and scratch durability of microsurface features molded in the injection molding process using a dynamic tool tempering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, Sascha; Burr, August; Kübler, Michael; Deckert, Matthias; Bleesen, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the replication qualities of periodically and randomly arranged micro-features molded in the injection molding process and their effects on surface properties are studied. The features are molded in PC, PMMA and PP at different mold wall temperatures in order to point out the necessity and profitability of a variotherm mold wall temperature control system. A one-dimensional heat conduction model is proposed to predict the cycle times of the variotherm injection molding processes. With regard to these processes, the molding results are compared to the molded surface feature heights using an atomic force microscope. In addition, the effects of the molded surface features on macroscopic surfaces are characterized in terms of light reflection using a spectrometer and in terms of water wettability by measuring the static contact angle. Furthermore, due to the sensitivity of the surface features on the molded parts, their durability is compared in a scratch test with a diamond tip. This leads to successful implementation in applications in which the optical appearance, in terms of gloss and reflection, and the water repellence, in terms of drag flow and adhesion, are of importance.

  10. Thermoset Blends of an Epoxy Resin and Polydicyclopentadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, Brian J.; Le, Kim Mai; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Robertson, Megan L.

    2016-12-13

    The mechanical properties of two chemically distinct and complementary thermoset polymers were manipulated through development of thermoset blends. The thermoset blend system was composed of an anhydride-cured diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA)-based epoxy resin, contributing high tensile strength and modulus, and polydicyclopentadiene (PDCPD), which has a higher toughness and impact strength as compared to other thermoset polymers. Ultra-small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis explored the morphology of concurrently cured thermoset blends, revealing a macroscopically phase separated system with a surface fractal structure across blended systems of varying composition. The epoxy resin rich and PDCPD rich phases exhibited distinct glass transitions (Tg’s): the Tg observed at higher temperature was associated with the epoxy resin rich phase and was largely unaffected by the presence of PDCPD, whereas the PDCPD rich phase Tg systematically decreased with increasing epoxy resin content due to inhibition of dicyclopentadiene ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The mechanical properties of these phase-separated blends were in reasonable agreement with predictions by the rule of mixtures for the blend tensile strength, modulus, and fracture toughness. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the tensile and fracture specimen fracture surfaces showed an increase in energy dissipation mechanisms, such as crazing, shear banding, and surface roughness, as the fraction of the more ductile component, PDPCD, increased. These results present a facile method to tune the mechanical properties of a toughened thermoset network, in which the high modulus and tensile strength of the epoxy resin can be largely retained at high epoxy resin content in the blend, while increasing the fracture toughness.

  11. Los cambios de temperatura en los revestimientos epoxi II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Cánovas, M.

    1970-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is the second part of a previous paper published by the author in no. 189 of this magazine. It describes the tests carried out to check the theoretical results published in the earlier article. The tests have consisted in submitting concrete slabs covered with a layer of epoxi mortar to certain thermal conditions, to check the behaviour of the covering in the face of thermal changes. In all the tests, described in detail in the article, the epoxi layer has behaved extremely well, and no bonding failure has been observed, nor failures in the concrete base or in the epoxi layer.Este artículo es la segunda parte de un trabajo publicado por el autor en el número 189 de esta revista, y en él se realiza una descripción de los ensayos prácticos llevados a cabo para complementar el estudio teórico publicado en aquella primera parte. Los ensayos han consistido en someter a placas de hormigón revestidas de una Kipa de mor tero epoxi a determinadas condiciones térmicas, con el fin de poder comprobar el comportamiento del revestimiento frente a los cambios de temperatura. En todos los ensayos realizados y que, con detalle, están descritos en este artículo, el comportamiento de los revestimientos de mortero epoxi ha sido excelente, no habiéndose notado ningún fallo de adherencia, ni roturas en la base de hormigón, ni en la capa de mortero epoxi.

  12. Education and Public Outreach for NASA's EPOXI Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Lucy-Ann A.; Crow, C. A.; Behne, J.; Brown, R. N.; Counley, J.; Livengood, T. A.; Ristvey, J. D.; Warner, E. M.

    2009-09-01

    NASA's EPOXI mission is reusing the Deep Impact (DI) flyby spacecraft to study comets and extra-solar planets around other stars. During the Extrasolar Planetary Observations and Characterization (EPOCh) phase of the mission extrasolar planets transiting their parent stars were observed to gain further knowledge and understanding of planetary systems. Observations of Earth also allowed for characterization of Earth as an extrasolar planet. A movie of a lunar transit of the Earth created from EPOCh images and links to existing planet finding activities from other NASA missions are available on the EPOXI website. The Deep Impact Extended Investigation (DIXI) continues the Deep Impact theme of investigating comet properties and formation by observing comet Hartley 2 in November 2010. The EPOXI Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program is both creating new materials and updating and modifying existing Deep Impact materials based on DI mission results. Comparing Comets is a new educational activity under development that will guide students in conducting analyses of comet surface features similar to those the DIXI scientists will perform after observing comet Hartley 2. A new story designed to stimulate student creativity was developed in alignment with national educational standards. EPOXI E/PO also funded Family Science Night (FSN), a program bringing together students, families, and educators for an evening at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. FSN events include time for families to explore the museum, a presentation by a space scientist, and an astronomy themed IMAX film. Nine events were held during the 2008-2009 school year with a total attendance of 3,145 (attendance since inception reached 44,732). Half of attendance is reserved for schools with high percentages of underrepresented minorities. EPOXI additionally offers a bi-monthly newsletter to keep the public, teachers, and space enthusiasts updated on current mission activities. For more

  13. Energy absorption and failure response of silk/epoxy composite square tubes: Experimental

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshkovr, Simin Ataollahi; Taher, Siavash Talebi; A. Eshkoor, Rahim

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on natural silk/epoxy composite square tubes energy absorption and failure response. The tested specimens were featured by a material combination of different lengths and same numbers of natural silk/epoxy composite layers in form of reinforced woven fabric in thermosetting epoxy...

  14. Preparations and applications in UV curing coatings of epoxy acrylates containing carboxyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yu Min

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces preparations of epoxy acrylates containing carboxyl through the reactions of epoxy acrylates with butanedioic anhydride, pentanedioic anhydride, cis-butenedioic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, tetrabromophthalic anhydride and -tetrahydrophthalic anhydride. These epoxy acrylates containing carboxyl have been applied to UV-curing coatings and their effects on properties of UV-curing coatings have been studied

  15. Mechanical properties of the weld line defect in micro injection molding for various nano filled polypropylene composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Lei; Ziegmann, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    is increased to 30%, the E modulus and tensile strength of micro weld line were increased again compared with the low loading level. → Finally, an empirical prediction equation for micro injection molded weld line strength of nano PP composites was proposed for higher nano filler loading fraction than 10 wt%. - Abstract: The nano filled functional polymer materials have been widely processed with micro injection molding technology for micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication. As the unfavorable defect in micro injection molding parts, weld line brings reduced mechanical and physical properties, especially for nano filled composites. In this study, polypropylene (PP) was compounded respectively with carbon nano fibers (CNFs) and TiO 2 nano particles at various weight fractions (10, 20, 30, 35 wt%) through co-screws internal mixing. The morphological, thermal and rheological properties of nano composites were characterized by wider angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD), different scanning calorimeter (DSC) and high pressure capillary rheometer. Additionally, under the constant setting of injection molding process parameters in injection molding machine, micro tensile samples with weld lines for each nano filled PP composite were produced. The tensile tests were served as the characterizing method for weld line mechanical properties. The results show that when the CNFs is filled higher than 10 wt%, the tensile strength of samples with weld lines made of nano composites become lower than neat PP. While the raising CNFs content contributes to the improved E modulus of micro injection molded weld lines. Additionally, with the increasing fraction of CNFs in PP, the weld line area's elongation percent is decreased. Whereas for case of TiO 2 , the 10 wt% is the threshold for micro injection molded weld line tensile strength turning from decrease trend to increase. The same as CNFs, elongation of micro weld line samples were in general lower than neat PP as well, due to

  16. Study on the performance of MoS2 modified PTFE composites by molding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiqiang; Hou, Genliang; Bi, Song; Li, Ping; Li, Penghui

    2017-10-01

    MoS2 filled PTFE composites were prepared by cold pressing and sintering molding. The compressive and creep properties of composite materials were analyzed by controlling the size of molded composites during molding. The results show that the composites have the best compressive and creep resistance when the molding pressure is 55 MPa in the MoS2 composites with 15% mass fraction, which is a practical reference for the preparation of MoS2-modified PTFE composites.

  17. Manufacturability evaluation for molded parts using fictitious physical models, and its application in topology optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Yuki; Yamada, Takayuki; Izui, Kazuhiro; Nishiwaki, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Manufacturing methods using molds, such as casting and injection molding, are widely used in industries. A basic requirement when using such manufacturing methods is that design engineers must design products so that they incorporate certain geometrical features that allow the mold parts to be removed from the created solid object. In the present study, we propose a manufacturability evaluation method especially adapted for the use of molds. To evaluate the manufacturability, we introduce fic...

  18. Comparison Of Simulation Results When Using Two Different Methods For Mold Creation In Moldflow Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushikbhai C. Parmar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Simulation gives different results when using different methods for the same simulation. Autodesk Moldflow Simulation software provide two different facilities for creating mold for the simulation of injection molding process. Mold can be created inside the Moldflow or it can be imported as CAD file. The aim of this paper is to study the difference in the simulation results like mold temperature part temperature deflection in different direction time for the simulation and coolant temperature for this two different methods.

  19. Effect of pretreatments on electrodeposited epoxy coatings for electronic industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sironmani Palraj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Waterborne epoxy coatings were prepared on aluminium (Al surfaces by cathodic electro-deposition on the pretreated surface of pickling, phosphating, chromating and anodizing. The electro-deposition experiments were done at two different voltages, 15 V and 25 V at room temperature in 10% epoxy coating formulations. Corrosion and thermal behavior of these coatings were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA. The coating exhibits better corrosion resistance in anodized Al surface than the other. But, TGA studies show that the thermal stability is higher in anodized and chromated Al surfaces. The surface morphology of these coatings were analyzed by SEM and AFM studies.

  20. Interlaminar fracture in woven carbon/epoxy laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo N.B. Reis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experimental study developed to characterize the mode I and mode II fracture toughness of carbon/epoxy woven composites, using DCB and ENF tests, respectively. The laminates were manufactured using an epoxy resin and twelve woven balanced bi-directional layers of carbon fibres, all of them with the same orientation (0/90º. Significant instantaneous delaminations were observed particularly for the DCB specimen, which were responsible for an oscillatory behaviour of GI versus crack length. The maximum values obtained for GIC and GIIC were 281 and 1800 J/m2, respectively.

  1. Thermal contraction effects in epoxy resin composites at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.; Morgan, J.T.

    1979-10-01

    Because of their electrical and thermal insulation characteristics, high strength fibreglass/epoxy composites are widely used in the construction of bubble chamber and other cryogenic equipment. Thermal contraction effects on cooling to operating temperature present problems which need to be taken into account at the design stage. This paper gives results of thermal contraction tests carried out on fibreglass/epoxy composites including the somewhat anomalous results obtained with rings and tubes. Also considered are some of the problems associated with the use of these materials at temperatures in the region of 20K. (author)

  2. Radiochemical ageing of epoxy coating for nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, D.P.R.; Fraisse, F.; Fayolle, B.; Kuntz, M.; Verdu, J.

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of an epoxy-amine network exposed to gamma irradiation in oxygen atmosphere has been studied by using a variety of analytical methods, including infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and sol-gel analysis. Results show that the oxidation of epoxy systems grows with the irradiation dose. Hydroperoxides, which are species resulting from oxidation, were identified and quantified by DSC. As indicated by the sol-gel analysis, the mechanism of degradation of chain scission seems to be predominant over crosslinking. The modifications induced by irradiation reflect in a greater capacity of water absorption.

  3. Epoxy composites based on inexpensive tire waste filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmetli, Gulnare; Gungor, Ahmet; Kocaman, Suheyla

    2014-05-01

    Tire waste (TW) was recycled as raw material for the preparation of DGEBA-type epoxy composite materials. The effects of filler amount and epoxy type on the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the composites with NPEL were generally higher than composites with NPEF. The appropriate mass level for TW in both type composites was found to be 20 wt%. The equilibrium water sorption of NPEL/TW and NPEF/TW composites for 14-day immersion was determined as 0.10 % and 0.21 %, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for characterization of the composites.

  4. Aging results for PRD 49 III/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kevlar 49/epoxy composite is growing in use as a structural material because of its high strength-to-weight ratio. Currently, it is used for the Trident rocket motor case and for various pressure vessels on the Space Shuttle. In 1979, the initial results for aging of filament-wound cylindrical pressure vessels which were manufactured with preproduction Kevlar 49 (Hamstad, 1979) were published. This preproduction fiber was called PRD 49 III. This report updates the continuing study to 10-year data and also presents 7.5-year data for spherical pressure vessels wound with production Kevlar 49. For completeness, this report will again describe the specimens of the original study with PRD 49 as well as specimens for the new study with Kevlar 49.

  5. Monomers for thermosetting and toughening epoxy resins. [glycidyl amine derivatives, propargyl-containing amines, and mutagenic testing of aromatic diamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Eight glycidyl amines were prepared by alkylating the parent amine with epichlorohydrin to form chlorohydrin, followed by cyclization with aqueous NaOH. Three of these compounds contained propargyl groups with postcuring studies. A procedure for quantitatively estimating the epoxy content of these glycidyl amines was employed for purity determination. Two diamond carbonates and several model propargly compounds were prepared. The synthesis of three new diamines, two which contain propargyloxy groups, and another with a sec-butyl group is in progress. These materials are at the dinitro stage ready for the final hydrogenation step. Four aromatic diamines were synthesized for mutagenic testing purposes. One of these compounds rapidly decomposes on exposure to air.

  6. Imprinted and injection-molded nano-structured optical surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik

    2013-01-01

    . In this paper, nanostructured polymer surfaces suitable for up-scalable polymer replication methods, such as imprinting/embossing and injection-molding, are discussed. The limiting case of injection-moulding compatible designs is investigated. Anti-reflective polymer surfaces are realized by replication...

  7. Mechanical performance of injection molded polypropylene : characterization and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, van T.B.; Govaert, L.E.; Peters, G.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that predictions of local mechanical properties in a product can be made from the orientation only using an anisotropic viscoplastic model. Due to processing-induced crystalline orientations, the mechanical properties of injection-molded polymer products are anisotropic and exhibit

  8. 47 CFR 76.805 - Access to molding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... that there is sufficient space to permit the installation of the additional wiring without interfering... permit the installation of the new wiring without interfering with the ability of an existing MVPD to... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.805 Access to molding. (a) An MVPD shall be permitted...

  9. Precision glass molding: Toward an optimal fabrication of optical lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangchi; Liu, Weidong

    2017-03-01

    It is costly and time consuming to use machining processes, such as grinding, polishing and lapping, to produce optical glass lenses with complex features. Precision glass molding (PGM) has thus been developed to realize an efficient manufacture of such optical components in a single step. However, PGM faces various technical challenges. For example, a PGM process must be carried out within the super-cooled region of optical glass above its glass transition temperature, in which the material has an unstable non-equilibrium structure. Within a narrow window of allowable temperature variation, the glass viscosity can change from 105 to 1012 Pas due to the kinetic fragility of the super-cooled liquid. This makes a PGM process sensitive to its molding temperature. In addition, because of the structural relaxation in this temperature window, the atomic structure that governs the material properties is strongly dependent on time and thermal history. Such complexity often leads to residual stresses and shape distortion in a lens molded, causing unexpected changes in density and refractive index. This review will discuss some of the central issues in PGM processes and provide a method based on a manufacturing chain consideration from mold material selection, property and deformation characterization of optical glass to process optimization. The realization of such optimization is a necessary step for the Industry 4.0 of PGM.

  10. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has been identified by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) and industry to be one of the promising processes being developed today which can break the cost barrier of implementing composite primary structures into a commercial aircraft production environment. The RTM process developments and scale-up plans Douglas Aircrart will be conducting under the NASA ACT contract are discussed.

  11. Packing parameters effect on injection molding of polypropylene nanostructured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo; Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    having a diameter of 500 nm was employed. The tool insert surface was produced using chemical-based-batch techniques such aluminum anodization and nickel electroplating. During the injection molding process, polypropylene (PP) was employed as material and packing phase parameters (packing time, packing...

  12. influence of molding water content on shear strength characteristic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    INFLUENCE OF MOLDING WATER CONTENT ON SHEAR STRENGTH OF COMPACTED CEMENT KILN DUST, K. J. Osinub. K. J. Osinub. K. J. Osinubi, et al. Nigerian Journal of Technology,. Vol. 34, No. 2, April 2015 267 pavements or as waste containment materials. Therefore, recent studies have been geared towards.

  13. Stability of FDTS monolayer coating on aluminum injection molding tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cech, Jiri; Taboryski, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We present novel and highly useful results on FDTS monolayer coating of aluminum. ► The coating is particularly applicable for coating of prototyping injection molding tools, which often are made of Al. ► We have demonstrated that the coating prevails in injection molding conditions and that the coating will prevent wear of the tools. - Abstract: We have characterized perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS) molecular coating of aluminum molds for polymer replication via injection molding (IM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data, sessile drop contact angles with multiple fluids, surface energies and roughness data have been collected. Samples have been characterized immediately after coating, after more than 500 IM cycles to test durability, and after 7 months to test temporal stability. The coating was deposited in an affordable process, involving near room temperature gas phase reactions. XPS shows detectable fluorine presence on both freshly coated samples as well as on post-IM samples with estimated 30 at.% on freshly coated and 28 at.% on post-IM samples with more than 500 IM cycles with polystyrene (PS) and ABS polymer.

  14. Smart plastic functionalization by nanoimprint and injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zalkovskij, Maksim; Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Smistrup, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a route for making smart functionalized plastic parts by injection molding with sub-micrometer surface structures. The method is based on combining planar processes well known and established within silicon micro and sub-micro fabrication with proven high resolution...

  15. Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control is the Key to Mold Control When water leaks or spills occur indoors - act quickly . If wet ... version of this image . Renters: Report all plumbing leaks and ... In cases where persistent water problems are not addressed, you may want to ...

  16. Parylene C coating for high-performance replica molding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyries, Kevin A; Hansen, Carl L

    2011-12-07

    This paper presents an improvement to the soft lithography fabrication process that uses chemical vapor deposition of poly(chloro-p-xylylene) (parylene C) to protect microfabricated masters and to improve the release of polymer devices following replica molding. Chemical vapor deposition creates nanometre thick conformal coatings of parylene C on silicon wafers having arrays of 30 μm high SU8 pillars with densities ranging from 278 to 10,040 features per mm(2) and aspect ratios (height : width) from 1 : 1 to 6 : 1. A single coating of parylene C was sufficient to permanently promote poly(dimethyl)siloxane (PDMS) mold release and to protect masters for an indefinite number of molding cycles. We also show that the improved release properties of parylene treated masters allow for fabrication with hard polymers, such as poly(urethane), that would otherwise not be compatible with SU8 on silicon masters. Parylene C provides a robust and high performance mold release coating for soft lithography microfabrication that extends the life of microfabricated masters and improves the achievable density and aspect ratio of replicated features.

  17. Photodegradation of UHMWPE Compounded with Annatto and Beetroot Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Rangel de Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We observed the anti-UV action of beetroot extract in an ultra-high molecular weight (UHMWPE matrix. The beetroot extract and the one prepared from annatto seed also acted efficiently as pigment to the same polymeric matrix. Neat UHMWPE and UHMWPE compounded with annatto and beet extract were compression molded and tensile specimens were obtained from the molded plates and submitted to UV radiation for up to 42 days. Tensile tests were performed and it was observed that the beet extract had a stabilizing action in the polymer compared to neat polymer and the one with annatto extract. Complementary analyses showed good homogenization of the extracts through the polymer matrix indicating the possibility of use as pigment, although the annatto extract appeared to be very unstable under irradiation. Spectroscopic characterization helped to explain the stability of the extracts before and after molding.

  18. Enhanced thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy composites by mixing thermotropic liquid crystalline epoxy grafted graphene oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Qi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO sheets were chemically grafted with thermotropic liquid crystalline epoxy (TLCP. Then we fabricated composites using TLCP-g-GO as reinforcing filler. The mechanical properties and thermal properties of composites were systematically investigated. It is found that the thermal and mechanical properties of the composites are enhanced effectively by the addition of fillers. For instance, the composites containing 1.0 wt% of TLCP-g-GO present impact strength of 51.43 kJ/m2, the tensile strength of composites increase from 55.43 to 80.85 MPa, the flexural modulus of the composites increase by more than 48%. Furthermore, the incorporation of fillers is effective to improve the glass transition temperature and thermal stability of the composites. Therefore, the presence of the TLCP-g-GO in the epoxy matrix could make epoxy not only stronger but also tougher.

  19. Modeling of ultrasonic wave propagation in composite materials obtained by the resin transfer molding process; Modelisation de la propagation ultrasonore dans les materiaux composites obtenus par le procede de fabrication RTM (Resin Transfer Molding)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonne, S.

    2003-11-01

    The Resin Transfer Molding process for manufacturing composite materials is used to produce parts of complex shape. During the ultrasonic examination of such parts, attenuation is measured to characterize possible porosity content (a potential defect in this material). However, strong variation of attenuation is observed including on sound plates. The present study aims at explaining this by developing a model for ultrasonic propagation and attenuation in such parts which complex microstructure exhibits a multiple-scale aspect. An original model has been developed to predict attenuation at the elementary scale of an unidirectional layer of carbon fibers in an epoxy matrix. It couples multiple scattering by fibers and viscoelastic losses phenomena. It has been experimentally validated and applies to arbitrary two-phase fiber reinforced composites whatever the fiber volume fraction. At the upper scale of a ply made of several elementary layers of various orientations, the anisotropic behavior of ultrasonic waves and their attenuation are obtained by a homogenization procedure. An actual plate is made of several plies separated by pure resin layers. Plies and layers thicknesses are highly variable. A statistical study has been conducted to evaluate the influence of these geometrical variations on the ultrasonic transmission predicted by a model derived from Thomson-Haskell formalism. Ultrasonic attenuation variability practically observed is quantitatively reproduced and explained as resulting from the geometrical irregularity of the microstructure. (author)

  20. 40 CFR Appendix - Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC Manufacturing Operations Where the Standards Are..., Table 5 Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC... casting—CR/HS 3,4 A vent system that moves heated air through the mold 27 lb/ton. 8. Centrifugal casting...

  1. A rapid colorimetric assay for mold spore germination using XTT tetrazolium salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2011-01-01

    Current laboratory test methods to measure efficacy of new mold inhibitors are time consuming, some require specialized test equipment and ratings are subjective. Rapid, simple quantitative assays to measure the efficacy of mold inhibitors are needed. A quantitative, colorimetric microassay was developed using XTT tetrazolium salt to metabolically assess mold spore...

  2. Applications of polyamide/cellulose fiber/wollastonite composites for microcellular injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman Winata; Lih-Sheng Turng; Daniel F. Caulfield; Tom Kuster; Rick Spindler; Rod Jacobson

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a cellulose-fiber-reinforced Polyamide-6 (PA-6) composite, a hybrid composite (PA-6/cellulose/Wollastonite), and the neat PA-6 resin were injection molded into ASTM test–bar samples with conventional and microcellular injection molding. The impact and tensile strengths of molded samples were measured and the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images were...

  3. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Properties of Injection Molding Tool Materials Used in Induction Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrier, Patrick; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the heating phase of an induction heated injection molding tool precisely, the temperature-dependent magnetic properties, B–H curves, and the hysteresis loss are necessary for the molding tool materials. Hence, injection molding tool steels, core materials among other materials have...

  4. 75 FR 55340 - Recovery Fact Sheet 9580.100, Mold Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ...] Recovery Fact Sheet 9580.100, Mold Remediation AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION... accepting comments on Recovery Fact Sheet RP9580.100, Mold Remediation. DATES: Comments must be received by... 20472-3100. II. Background The Recovery Fact Sheet RP9580.100, Mold Remediation, identifies the expenses...

  5. Dimensional accuracy of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene injection molded parts produced in a pilot produc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mischkot, Michael; Davoudinejad, Ali; Charalambis, Alessandro

    of a geometry including micro-features have been injection-molded in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) with a single 20x20x2.5 mm^3 injection molding insert manufactured in a photopolymer composite material. This research investigates the dimensional accuracy of the injection molded parts as a function...

  6. Differential allergy induction by molds found in water-damaged homes**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molds are ubiquitous in the environment and exposures to molds contribute to various human diseases including allergic lung diseases. The Institute of Medicine reports (NAS, 2004) and World Health Organization guidelines (WHO, 2009) concluded that the role of molds in asthma indu...

  7. Molding Properties of Inconel 718 Feedstocks Used in Low-Pressure Powder Injection Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Fareh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of binders and temperature on the rheological properties of feedstocks used in low-pressure powder injection molding was investigated. Experiments were conducted on different feedstock formulations obtained by mixing Inconel 718 powder with wax-based binder systems. The shear rate sensitivity index and the activation energy were used to study the degree of dependence of shear rate and temperature on the viscosity of the feedstocks. The injection performance of feedstocks was then evaluated using an analytical moldability model. The results indicated that the viscosity profiles of feedstocks depend significantly on the binder constituents, and the secondary binder constituents play an important role in the rheological behavior (pseudoplastic or near-Newtonian exhibited by the feedstock formulations. Viscosity values as low as 0.06 to 2.9 Pa·s were measured at high shear rates and high temperatures. The results indicate that a feedstock containing a surfactant agent exhibits the best moldability characteristics.

  8. Structural and electrical properties of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube/epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantayat, S.; Rout, D.; Swain, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotube on the structure and electrical properties of composites was investigated. Samples based on epoxy resin with different weight percentage of MWCNTs were prepared and characterized. The interaction between MWCNT & epoxy resin was noticed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structure of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (f-MWCNT) reinforced epoxy composite was studied by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The dispersion of f-MWCNT in epoxy resin was evidenced by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Electrical properties of epoxy/f-MWCNT nanocomposites were measured & the result indicated that the conductivity increased with increasing concentration of f-MWCNTs.

  9. Experimental design applied optimization of a state in epoxy clay dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, Juliana D'Avila; Bertholdi, Jonas; Folgueras, Marilena Valadares; Pezin, Sergio Henrique; Coelho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents some analysis showed that the exfoliation / intercalation of a montmorillonite clay in epoxy resin such as viscosity, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG). Increasing the viscosity of epoxy resin diglycidyl ether bisphenol A with the addition of clay associated with the sonification system at the time of dispersion is a good indication of exfoliation. The X-ray diffraction already cured composite shows a decrease of crystallinity of clay and EDS microanalysis of SEM, non-uniform dispersion of clay in epoxy resin. Thermal analysis TG composite clay / epoxy shows an increase in thermal stability relative to pure epoxy. (author)

  10. Investigation of low glass transition temperature on COTS PEM's reliability for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, M.; Agarwal, S.; Peters, D.; Cooper, M. S.

    2003-01-01

    Plastic Encapsulated Microelectronics (PEM) reliability is affected by many factors. Glass transition temperature (Tg) is one such factor. In this presentation issues relating to PEM reliability and the effect of low glass transition temperature epoxy mold compounds are presented.

  11. Novel epoxy activated hydrogels for solving lactose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnashar, Magdy M M; Hassan, Mohamed E

    2014-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance" is a medical problem for almost 70% of the world population. Milk and dairy products contain 5-10% w/v lactose. Hydrolysis of lactose by immobilized lactase is an industrial solution. In this work, we succeeded to increase the lactase loading capacity to more than 3-fold to 36.3 U/g gel using epoxy activated hydrogels compared to 11 U/g gel using aldehyde activated carrageenan. The hydrogel's mode of interaction was proven by FTIR, DSC, and TGA. The high activity of the epoxy group was regarded to its ability to attach to the enzyme's -SH, -NH, and -OH groups, whereas the aldehyde group could only bind to the enzyme's -NH2 group. The optimum conditions for immobilization such as epoxy chain length and enzyme concentration have been studied. Furthermore, the optimum enzyme conditions were also deliberated and showed better stability for the immobilized enzyme and the Michaelis constants, K m and V max, were doubled. Results revealed also that both free and immobilized enzymes reached their maximum rate of lactose conversion after 2 h, albeit, the aldehyde activated hydrogel could only reach 63% of the free enzyme. In brief, the epoxy activated hydrogels are more efficient in immobilizing more enzymes than the aldehyde activated hydrogel.

  12. Crosslinking of epoxy-polysiloxane system by reactive blending

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gonzales, M.; Kadlec, Petr; Štěpánek, Petr; Strachota, Adam; Matějka, Libor

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 16 (2004), s. 5533-5541 ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050008 Keywords : reactive blending * siloxane network * epoxy network Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.433, year: 2004

  13. Epoxy-crosslinked sulfonated poly (phenylene) copolymer proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Michael; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Norman, Kirsten; Hickner, Michael A.

    2010-10-19

    An epoxy-crosslinked sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer composition used as proton exchange membranes, methods of making the same, and their use as proton exchange membranes (PEM) in hydrogen fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cell, in electrode casting solutions and electrodes, and in sulfur dioxide electrolyzers. These improved membranes are tougher, have higher temperature capability, and lower SO.sub.2 crossover rates.

  14. The study of epoxy polyamide and polyvinyl resins as corrosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The corrosion resistance of two commonly used protective coatings (epoxy polyamide and polyvinyl resins) in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria has been assessed. The coatings on low carbon steel were subjected to varying conditions of pH, temperature and exposure time and the corrosion rates calculated. At a pH of 2, 3, 4, ...

  15. The catalystic asymmetric synthesis of optically active epoxy ketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, Bertha Gerda

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis the use of catalytic asymmetric synthesis to prepare optically active epoxy ketones is described. This means that the auxiliary chirality, necessary to obtain an optically active product, is added in a catalytic quantity . In principle this is a very efficient way to make opticlly

  16. Piezoelectric and mechanical properties of structured PZT-epoxy composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, N.K.; Ende, D.A. van den; Lafont, U.; Zwaag, S. van der; Groen, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Structured lead zirconium titanate (PZT)-epoxy composites are prepared by dielectrophoresis. The piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites as a function of PZT volume fraction are investigated and compared with the corresponding unstructured composites. The effect of poling voltage

  17. Novel Epoxy Activated Hydrogels for Solving Lactose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy M. M. Elnashar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available “Lactose intolerance” is a medical problem for almost 70% of the world population. Milk and dairy products contain 5–10% w/v lactose. Hydrolysis of lactose by immobilized lactase is an industrial solution. In this work, we succeeded to increase the lactase loading capacity to more than 3-fold to 36.3 U/g gel using epoxy activated hydrogels compared to 11 U/g gel using aldehyde activated carrageenan. The hydrogel’s mode of interaction was proven by FTIR, DSC, and TGA. The high activity of the epoxy group was regarded to its ability to attach to the enzyme’s –SH, –NH, and –OH groups, whereas the aldehyde group could only bind to the enzyme’s –NH2 group. The optimum conditions for immobilization such as epoxy chain length and enzyme concentration have been studied. Furthermore, the optimum enzyme conditions were also deliberated and showed better stability for the immobilized enzyme and the Michaelis constants, Km and Vmax, were doubled. Results revealed also that both free and immobilized enzymes reached their maximum rate of lactose conversion after 2 h, albeit, the aldehyde activated hydrogel could only reach 63% of the free enzyme. In brief, the epoxy activated hydrogels are more efficient in immobilizing more enzymes than the aldehyde activated hydrogel.

  18. Study on Concrete Containing Recycled Aggregates Immersed in Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Suraya Hani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, engineers have sought a more sustainable method to dispose of concrete construction and demolition waste. One solution is to crush this waste concrete into a usable gradation for new concrete mixes. This not only reduces the amount of waste entering landfills but also alleviates the burden on existing sources of quality natural concrete aggregates. There are too many kinds of waste but here constructions waste will be the priority target that should be solved. It could be managed by several ways such as recycling and reusing the concrete components, and the best choice of these components is the aggregate, because of the ease process of recycle it. In addition, recycled aggregates and normal aggregates were immersed in epoxy resin and put in concrete mixtures with 0%, 5%, 10% and 20% which affected the concrete mixtures properties. The strength of the concrete for both normal and recycled aggregates has increased after immersed the aggregates in epoxy resin. The percentage of water absorption and the coefficient of water permeability decreased with the increasing of the normal and the recycled aggregates immersed in epoxy resin. Generally the tests which have been conducted to the concrete mixtures have a significant results after using the epoxy resin with both normal and recycled aggregates.

  19. Evaluation of epoxy for use on NuSTAR optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, H.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Doll, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer (SMEX) mission which employs two focusing optics. The optics are composed of stacks of thin mirror shells and spacers. Epoxy is used to bond the mirror shells to the spacers and is a crucial component in determining...

  20. Functionalizing CNTs for Making Epoxy/CNT Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Rajagopal, Ramasubramaniam

    2009-01-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with linear molecular side chains of polyphenylene ether (PPE) has been shown to be effective in solubilizing the CNTs in the solvent components of solutions that are cast to make epoxy/CNT composite films. (In the absence of solubilization, the CNTs tend to clump together instead of becoming dispersed in solution as needed to impart, to the films, the desired CNT properties of electrical conductivity and mechanical strength.) Because the PPE functionalizes the CNTs in a noncovalent manner, the functionalization does not damage the CNTs. The functionalization can also be exploited to improve the interactions between CNTs and epoxy matrices to enhance the properties of the resulting composite films. In addition to the CNTs, solvent, epoxy resin, epoxy hardener, and PPE, a properly formulated solution also includes a small amount of polycarbonate, which serves to fill voids that, if allowed to remain, would degrade the performance of the film. To form the film, the solution is drop-cast or spin-cast, then the solvent is allowed to evaporate.